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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 23 APRIL 2022

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172ykq07676vht)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct33nr)
Sweden’s hardening stance on immigration

Sweden has experienced days of violent protests against a far-right group. Danish-Swedish politician Rasmus Paludan’s anti-Islam party Hard Line says it will burn copies of the Quran as part of a tour of cities with large immigrant populations. Sweden has traditionally welcomed refugees, taking in Jews during WW2, Iranians fleeing the revolution, and a large number of people from the former Yugoslavia. But is that approach changing? Per capita Sweden accepted more refugees from the war in Syria than any other EU country. But after the arrival of more than 160,000 refugees in 2015 alone, government policy began to evolve – seeing the introduction of border checks, a reduction in access to permanent residency, and more stringent rules around family reunions. Voters increasingly complain that core government services like health and education are struggling to cope and many migrants still find it hard to secure jobs. The far-right party Sweden Democrats has seen a surge in support and is now the third most popular party nationally. So is Sweden changing?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.
Producers: Ellen Otzen and Paul Schuster.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172ykq07676z7y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172yk17jbzfl9z)
Carlos Ghosn: Ex-Nissan boss says he wants a trial

Former Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn, who fled Japan whilst awaiting trial, says he’d be willing to go to court in Lebanon on financial wrongdoing charges. Speaking to the BBC’s international business correspondent Theo Leggett, Mr. Ghosn said he had not profited from financial impropriety. Plus, ahead of the second round of France’s presidential election on Sunday, the BBC’s Paris correspondent Hugh Schofield tells us how the two candidates wound up their campaigns, and what their economic priorities are. Chris Low from FHN Financial tells us how stock markets in the US have been affected by the Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell suggesting that half percentage-point interest rate increases could be on the horizon. We hear from a resident of Shanghai in China, who describes the impact of the city’s stringent Covid-19 lockdown. And Kristin Schwab of World Business Report partner programme Marketplace reports on how current high inflation rates are hitting women harder than men.

(Photo: Carlos Ghosn in Beirut in January 2020; Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtxbjb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct3jc7)
How is India exploring the metaverse?

Often referred to as the next big thing in the digital space, the metaverse has caught the fancy of big tech firms around the world. The belief is that soon we will all be hanging out in different digital worlds to work, play, attend concerts, watch movies, or catch up with a friend over coffee.

The concept is now also finding firm ground in India, where many companies have begun exploring the space. Some have launched retail stores inside a metaverse shopping mall, while some have opened up office complexes. Some have even organised weddings.

But does it all sound much like a souped-up version of virtual reality? Does India have the right technology and bandwidth to develop the metaverse, or is it just a fad that is likely to pass after some time?

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Rajesh Dhuddu, VP and practice leader - Blockchain, Tech Mahindra; Manish Maheshwari, founder and CEO, Invact Metaversity; Sai Srinivas, CEO and co-founder, Mobile Premier League


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172ykq07677302)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll6fmg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtxg8g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct370f)
Root: Wisden and his rollercoaster year

Alison Mitchell, Jim Maxwell and Charu Sharma are joined by Lawrence Booth, the editor of arguably the most famous sports book in the world. The 159th edition of the Wisden Almanack has just been released and Lawrence shares which cricketer has been named the leading cricketer of the year and women’s cricketer of 2021.

Plus with the ever changing set up in English men's cricket we debate who should be the next captain and the next coach of the national side and which one should take priority.

And we discuss the Indian Premier League as the competition reaches the halfway stage. The last five winner have been either the Chennai Super Kings or the Mumbai Indians, yet this season Chennai and Mumbai sit bottom of the table with only one win from 12 matches between them. Conversely the new teams Lucknow Super Giants and Gujarat Titans are top of the table with 9 wins out of 12. We debate why this could be the case.

Photo: England captain Joe Root waits for the toss ahead of day one of the 3rd Test match between the West Indies and England at National Cricket Stadium on March 24, 2022 in Grenada, Grenada. (Photo by Gareth Copley/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172ykq076776r6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct37z1)
Why women vote for Modi

Narendra Modi’s BJP party won four out of five Indian states in recent elections, with polls reporting that more women than men voted for them. Geeta Panday of BBC News Delhi explains BJP’s appeal to women, from Prime Minister Modi’s strongman image, to the party's development schemes to improve women’s lives.

Space Kebab
A kebab shop owner in Adana, known in Turkey as the capital of kebabs, attempted to deliver the world's first kebab into outer space. Özge Ozdemir from BBC Turkish tells us more about the not entirely serious space mission.

Rio Alligators
From bus stations to door mats, alligators have been seen in Rio de Janeiro's most urban areas. Disorganised urban expansion, pollution and human feeding appear to have caused the population boom. Brazilian Ricardo Senra grew up in Rio, and made a video about Rio's wild inhabitants.

Shanghai's Covid lockdown
Shanghai has been in lockdown for a month. What began as a 5 day intervention is still in place as omicron defies the measures, and government’s zero-Covid policy shows no sign of changing. BBC Chinese journalist Benny Lu has been finding out what life is like under arguably the world’s strictest lockdown.

Omani dishdashas
How would you feel if your government made laws about what you could wear? That’s what’s happened in the Gulf state of Oman, with laws relating to the traditional robe the dishdasha and how it can and can’t be worn, as BBC Arabic's Nisrine Hatoum reports.

(Photo: Indian Prime Minister Modi visits Allahabad, India in 2021. Credit: Ritesh Shukla/Getty Images)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct3bw9)
The battle for Kinder Scout

It's 90 years since hundreds of walkers organised a mass trespass on a mountain in the English Peak District called Kinder Scout. It was a major step in the fight by workers in the northern industrial city of Manchester for access to the surrounding countryside, much of which was in private hands. In 2012, Simon Watts brought together the memories of survivors of the Trespass as recorded in the BBC archives.

PHOTO: The countryside around Kinder Scout (Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172ykq07677bhb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct33nr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172ykq07677g7g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll6svv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtxthv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct3bqp)
Ghana's free speech crackdown

A number of Ghanaian journalists and influencers have been arrested in recent years – with several recent high-profile cases. Critics say freedom of speech is under serious threat.

It wasn’t always this way. In 2018, Ghana was ranked the top country in Africa for press freedom by Reporters Without Borders.

But in recent years it has dropped down the table and since the start of 2022 a handful of prominent journalists and social media influencers have been detained.

We speak to those who say they are paying a price for the words they posted or broadcast, including radio presenter Bobie Ansah who faces a charge of “publication of false news and offensive conduct”.

So what’s behind the crackdown, and is freedom of speech under attack?

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Producer: Favour Nunoo
Photo: Oliver Barker-Vormawor, an activist recently arrested in Ghana, arrives at Ashaiman District Court on 28 February.
Photo credit: Favour Nunoo/BBC


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct3k4h)
Understanding India through data

How do you go about understanding a country with a population as diverse as it is vast?

Data journalist Rukmini S is the author of Whole Numbers and Half Truths: What Data Can and Cannot Tell Us About Modern India.

Tim Harford spoke to her about the power and pitfalls of using statistics to make sense of modern India, from basic questions like average income to the huge challenges of keeping track of Covid.


Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Nathan Gower
Sound Engineer: Rod Farquhar

(Slum dwellers in Cuffe Parade across from the elite's ultra-rich apartments, Mumbai. Credit: Viviane Moos/ Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172ykq07677kzl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172ykwbz6ftxbt)
Ukraine deputy PM: The UN must help Mariupol evacuation

Ukrainian's deputy prime minister has appealed to the United Nations to help evacuation efforts out of Mariupol, which has been under siege for two months.

Also on the programme, British MPs approved a House of Commons committee investigation into whether Prime Minister Boris Johnson misled parliament over lockdown-breaking parties. And, an overpass will stretch over ten traffic lanes in California, allowing wildlife to cross safely.

Joining Julian Worricker are Catherine Nicholson, European Affairs Editor for the France 24 TV network, and Remi Adekoya, a Polish-Nigerian writer and politics lecturer at the University of York.

(Photo: Ukraine"s Deputy PM Vereshchuk speaks during an interview with Reuters in Kyiv, 11/04/2022. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172ykq07677pqq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172ykwbz6fv12y)
Ukraine deputy PM: the UN must help Mariupol evacuation

Ukrainian's deputy prime minister has appealed to the United Nations to help evacuation efforts out of Mariupol, which has been under siege for two months..

In Sri Lanka about 22 million people faces a severe economic crisis, amid sharply rising inflation, fuel shortages, electricity outages, and a severe lack of medical supplies. And, the rivals in the French presidential election campaign made a last push for votes ahead of the run-off vote.

Joining Julian Worricker are Catherine Nicholson, European Affairs Editor for the France 24 TV network, and Remi Adekoya, a Polish-Nigerian writer and politics lecturer at the University of York.

(Photo: A man walks near damaged buildings in Mariupol 22/04/2022 Reuters)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172ykq07677tgv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172ykwbz6fv4v2)
Ukraine deputy PM: the UN must help Mariupol evacuation

Ukrainian's deputy prime minister has appealed to the United Nations to help evacuation efforts out of Mariupol, which has been under siege for two months.

Sometimes a song won't get out of your head. What happens if you can't identify the 'earworm'? We hear about who spent five years searching for a sticky tune.

Joining Julian Worricker are Catherine Nicholson, European Affairs Editor for the France 24 TV network, and Remi Adekoya, a Polish-Nigerian writer and politics lecturer at the University of York.

(Photo: A view shows the city of Mariupol 22/04/2022 Reuters)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxty5r7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct37lp)
Women watching birds

Beatriz de la Pava talks to birdwatchers from Zimbabwe and Uruguay about their passion for birdlife.

Zimbabwean ornithologist Merlyn Nomsa Nkomo was on her way to secure a work placement to study wild dogs as part of her degree when she went birdwatching for the first time. It changed her life and she went to work in a vulture rehabilitation centre instead. She's now studying for a PhD in conservation biology in the Fitzpatrick Institute of African Ornithology at the University of Cape Town. She writes and blogs about her passion for raptors and is keen to bring more black women into the world of birdwatching.

Florencia Ocampo started bird watching in Uruguay as a teenager after coming across baby falcons in a street market. While teaching herself falconry from books she became fascinated by the birdlife around her. Motivated by conservation issues she started birding and became a biologist. As well as doing ornithological research she now runs her own tour guide company, Birding With Me.

(IMAGE: (L) Florencia Ocampo, courtesy of Florencia Ocampo. (R) Merlyn Nomsa Nkomo, credit Linda Nordling.)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172ykq07677y6z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll78vc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxty9hc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Hidden Sport (w3ct41d2)
Dambe boxing

Kim Tserkezie faces up to her lifelong dislike of combat sports by exploring Dambe boxing, a Nigerian sport with a history that is said to go back as far as the 10th Century.

Kim speaks with promoters and fighters from the African Warriors Fighting Championship, as well as their family members, to find out why Dambe boxing is so important to the Hausa community and whether it can one day become one of the world’s global combat sports.

Producer: Joe Aldridge

An IMG/Scattered Pictures production for BBC World Service

(Photo: A young Dambe boxer covers himself with water after a fight. Credit: Stefan Heunis/AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct35s1)
Helping listeners connect the strands of history

Who Killed My Grandfather is the story of the assassination of a leading Yemini politician in Beirut in 1974. The documentary’s presenter Mai Noman answers your questions about her journey to uncover the truth behind the killing of her grandfather Mohamed Noman almost 50 years ago. And listeners tell us how it has helped them connect the strands of history.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172ykq076781z3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172yg8g0mddppz)
"Without ping pong I’d be dead, or in jail for life"

Professional table tennis player Wally Green opens up about he went from being a 13-year-old caught up in Brooklyn Gangs to a table tennis pro on a trip to North Korea for ping pong diplomacy.

Big wave surfer Sebastian Steudtner tells us how he was brought in by Jurgen Klopp to help Liverpool’s players deal with stress ahead of their last Premier League title win, and explains how he’s trying to use surfing to help children impacted by the war in Ukraine.

World Record rower Victoria Evans joins us to explain why she set herself the challenge of rowing across the Atlantic Ocean having never set foot in a boat before.

Sporting Witness tells the story of Pakistani squash player, Jahangir Khan, who went undefeated for five years during the 1980s.

Plus we’re at the Crucible to hear about the pigeon at the Snooker World Championship and at Wembley for heavyweight boxing as Tyson Fury looks to defend his world title against Dillian Whyte.

Photo: Wally Green watches a game of Table Tennis. Credit: Paul Conrad/Getty Images for SPiN Seattle


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172ykq076785q7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll7jbm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtyjzm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct37r8)
New global art at the Venice Biennale

The Venice Biennale was created in 1895 as an international art exhibition and after a year’s delay due to Covid, it’s just re-opened. Artists from across the globe have descended on the enchanting Italian city of canals and churches. There are over 1400 works on display, as well as the Pavilions from 80 countries, which will become part of the landscape of Venice over the next seven months.

Finnish performance artist Pilvi Takala has impersonated a wellness consultant, a trainee at a global accountancy firm and even Snow White for her documentary style videos. For her Venice Biennale commission, Close Watch, Pilvi worked undercover for several months as a guard at one of Finland’s largest shopping malls and she explained the thinking behind her project to Lucy Ash.

There are 5 countries participating for the first time at the Venice art Biennale - Cameroon, Namibia, Oman, Uganda and Nepal and one of the artists who’s representing Cameroon is photographer Angèle Etoundi Essamba. Angèle tells Anu Anand how she challenges the stereotypes of African women in her work and why it’s important for Cameroonian artists to be part of this Biennale.

In the Patagonian region which covers Chile and Argentina are peatlands, a specific type of wetland that’s shaped one of the most remote landscapes in the world. Architect Alfredo Thiermann and filmmaker Dominga Sotomayor are two of the artists who’ve been collaborating on the Chilean Pavilion and working with the descendants of the Selk’nam people, the ancient indigenous group that inhabited that land many years ago. Their immersive video and sound installation “Turba Tol Hol-Hol Tol,” reflects the relationship between this ancestral culture and the landscapes that surrounds it, as they told reporter Constanza Hola.

Like Cameroon, Nepal also has its first ever pavilion this year and the artist representing that country is Tsherin Sherpa. The title of the Pavilion is Tales of Muted Spirits – Dispersed Threads – Twisted Shangri-La, created to help dispel misconceptions about the country and to give Nepali artists and the entire country, a new voice in the world. Paul Waters went to meet Tsherin to hear more about his own work as well as the Nepali art scene.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

Photo: Dominga Sotomayor and Alfredo Thiermann finalising their immersive instillation. Credit: Dominga Sotomayor and Alfredo Thiermann)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172ykq076789gc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct41d1)
Ingenious II

Dr Kat Arney takes a deep dive into our genetic make-up and tells the story of four pieces of human DNA: the fat gene, the Huntington gene, the CCR5 gene associated with HIV resistance, and PAX6, the eyeball gene.

People have never been so well informed about their DNA, with tens of millions of home genetic testing kits sold. But behind each of your 20,000 genes is a fascinating story - one that’s being added to every day, as genetics remains on the cutting edge of innovation.

Combining history, archive, anthropology, comedy - and of course, lots of lovely science - we finally give these crucial substances the attention they deserve.

Presenter: Kat Arney
Producer: Beth Sagar-Fenton

(Photo: People reaching for cookies. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172ykq07678f6h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172yfbxbd0bz4s)
Russia appears to threaten Moldova

Senior Russian commander Major General Rustam Minnekayev was quoted in state media as saying that Moscow seeks "control over the south of Ukraine", which he claimed would give Moscow access to the Russian-backed separatist region of Transnistria in Moldova. We hear reaction from a former Moldovan MP and ambassador to the US.

Russia has yet again promised to allow civilians trapped in Mariupol to leave - we hear live from Ukraine with the latest.

And why far right French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen attracts more young voters than ever before.

(Image: Russian tanks / Credit: Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172ykq07678jym)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172ygjnfxf96zd)
Live Sporting Action

Lee James presents live Premier League commentary of Manchester City against Watford at the Etihad Stadium and we’ll also bring you updates on Saturday’s other four Premier League games, as well as discussing the day’s action from across the top European leagues.

We'll also look ahead to the world heavyweight title fight between Tyson Fury and Dillian Whyte at Wembley Stadium.

Photo: Joao Cancelo of Manchester City passes the ball whilst under pressure from Cucho Hernandez of Watford. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172ykq076790y4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll8ckj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtzd6j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct3bqp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct36fc)
Jahangir Khan: The king of squash

In the 1980s, Pakistani squash player Jahangir Khan became a legend in his sport by going undefeated for five years. But, as Shumaila Jaffery discovers, to become unbeatable, Khan had to overcome childhood illness and family tragedy. This programme was first broadcast in 2015.

(Photo: Jahingar Khan in action. Credit: Steve Line/SquashPics)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172ykq076794p8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct4179)
Ukrainian journalists

Reporting from a war zone is always challenging and accurate information can be hard to establish, but it’s estimated that thousands have been killed since the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Among them are journalists – more than 20 - from different parts of the world.

In this edition, we hear from those who are trying to tell the story of this war as it happens in the place they call home.

We bring together three Ukrainian journalists: Andriy Kulykov from a national public radio station Hromadske Radio; Romeo Kokriatski, editor of the online site New Voice Ukraine and host of the podcast Ukraine Without Hype; and Angelina Karyakina, news editor for public broadcaster Suspilne. They share the impact on their lives and their jobs with host Ben James.

These experiences include the pros and cons of social media and discussions in the newsroom over what to report on both sides. They also explain why - despite the risks - remaining in the country is so important to get direct accounts of the war and how regional knowledge adds to the accuracy of their work.

(Photo: Journalists work near damaged buildings hit in a military strike, amid Russia"s invasion of Ukraine, in Shevchenkivskyi district in Kyiv, Ukraine March 23, 2022. Credit: Serhii Nuzhnenko/Reuters)


SAT 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtzhyn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct3jc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172ykq076798fd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct38zz)
Actor Meera Syal

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi talks to actor and writer Meera Syal about her role in the new Apple TV+ series, Roar.

We hear from Oscar-winning actor Jared Leto who stars as, and in, Morbius - the third film in Sony’s Spiderman Universe.

Finnish director Juho Kuosmanen tells us about his film Compartment No 6.

We hear about The Handmaid’s Tale opera from director Annilese Miskimmon.

The action epic The Northman is now in movie theatres - director Robert Eggers tells us how he made it.

From the world of Indian cinema, actor Jr NTR talks about RRR - which stands for Rise, Roar, Revolt. And we have music from Kurdish singer songwriter Olcay Bayir. Plus we hear from critic Anil Sinanan.

Producer: Paul Waters

(Photo: Meera Syal in Roar. Credit: AppleTV+)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172ykq07679d5j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172yfbxbd0cy3t)
New attacks on Odesa

At least eight people have been killed in a Russian missile strike on a residential block of flats in the Black Sea port of Odesa, Ukraine's third biggest city. We speak to a local member of parliament.

Also on the programme, would a change in leadership following tomorrow's French elections affect the country's presence in Africa's Sahel region? And we take a look at the ‘age of the strongman’ with author Gideon Rachman.


(Photo: Members of the emergency team work near a residential building damaged by a missile strike in Odesa today; Credit: REUTERS/Igor Tkachenko)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172ykq07679hxn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct30jq)
Song separation anxiety with Noon Garden, Go Kurosawa, Yukimi Nagano and Serra Petale

Noon Garden, Go Kurosawa, Yukimi Nagano and Serra Petale discuss why they’re happiest when they’re hitting things, seeing every song you make as if it’s your first, the importance of renewal to stay fresh, why you can’t be emotionally detached from your music, and the evolution of the demo to release day.

Charles Prest, a.k.a. Noon Garden, is a British-Nigerian-Jamaican musician and founding member of the international psych band Flamingods, who have been creating funky psychedelic music inspired largely by the disco, funk and psychedelia that came out of the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia in the ‘70s.

Go Kurosawa is a Japanese drummer and vocalist from psychedelic band Kikagaku Moyo. Their sound is full of influences from Krautrock to classical Indian music, and they enjoy singing in an imaginary language.

Swedish singer and songwriter Yukimi Nagano is the voice of electronic band Little Dragon. Serra Petale is a drummer and guitarist from international instrumental quartet Los Bitchos, whose love of both garage rock and Colombian cumbia is weaved through their fun and groovy sound.

They’ll be discussing why they’re happiest when they’re hitting things, seeing every song you make as if it’s your first, the importance of renewal to stay fresh, why you can’t be emotionally detached from your music, and the evolution of the demo to release day.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172ykq07679mns)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrwrs3y0mqc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh0kg6yqq2)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtzzy5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct37r8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 today]



SUNDAY 24 APRIL 2022

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172ykq07679rdx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct4179)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxv03p9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Trending (w3ct3bqp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 More or Less (w3ct3k4h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172ykq07679w51)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct39z0)
Climate techno-fix would worsen global malaria burden

As a series of UN climate reports have warned recently, drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions – a halving over the next decade – are needed if we are to keep global warming down to manageable levels. No sign of that happening.

An emergency measure to buy time that’s sometimes discussed is solar geoengineering – creating an atmospheric sunscreen that reduces incoming solar heat. Sulphate compounds in volcanic gases or in industrial fumes attract water vapour to make a fine haze and have that effect. The difference would be starting a deliberate programme of injecting sulphate particles into the stratosphere.

There are a host of arguments against it, including a revulsion against adding another pollutant to the atmosphere to offset the one, carbon dioxide, that’s giving us problems in the first place. Another objection, outlined this week, is that it could set back the global fight against malaria - a major killer in its own right. University of Cape Town ecologist Chris Trisos tells Roland Pease what his team’s modelling study revealed.

Yale University neurologist Kevin Sheth talks to us about a revolution in medical scanning – small-scale MRI machines that can be wheeled to the patient’s bedside.

According to palaeontologist Maria McNamara, an amazingly preserved pterosaur fossil from Brazil proves that some of these flying reptiles did have feathers similar to those of birds (and some dinosaurs), and that the feathers were of different colours, possibly for mating display.

Primatologist Adrian Barnett has discovered that spider monkeys in one part of the Brazilian Amazon seek out fruit, full of live maggots to eat. Why?

The ancient Maya flourished in modern day Mexico and Central America for millennia. They built incredible cities and they had sophisticated knowledge of astronomy, architecture and the natural world. But although Maya culture continues to exist today, around 900 AD, many of their great settlements collapsed, and today they lie in ruins.

CrowdScience listener Michael wants to know - how did the Maya sustain their populations successfully for so long? And what happened 1000 years ago that led them to abandon their cities?

To find out, Melanie Brown travels to the forests of Western Belize. She visits the archaeological site of Xunantunich to learn about what life would have been like for the Maya living in what was once a prosperous city. She hears about the importance of water to the Maya way of life in this region, and their ingenious methods for capturing and storing rainfall.

She meets archaeologists using lasers and drones to map Maya settlements that have lain hidden by jungle for centuries. And she discovers what material from the bottom of lakes can tell us about how the Maya faced a changing climate, which may have had huge consequences for their society.

(Photo: Illustration of a mosquito biting
Credit: SCIEPRO/Science Photo Library/Getty Images)

Presenters: Roland Pease and Melanie Brown
Producers: Andrew Luck-Baker and Anand Jagatia


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172ykq07679zx5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll9bjk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxv0c5k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct32w7)
Are we kinder to people like us?

Using the results of the Kindness Test, which 60,000 people took part in, Claudia Hammond asks whether we are kinder to people who we think are like us? And what happens once we move beyond family and friends to acquaintances and strangers. What can the evidence tell us about who it is that we choose to be kind to and why?

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767b3n9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct41d1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767b7df)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct3277)
The shifting shores of Bangladesh

Pascale Harter introduces dispatches from writers and reporters in Bangladesh, Morocco, Iraq and Latvia.

Rivers and the sea have long battered waterfront villages in Bangladesh, but their troubles are now intensified by climate change. Many people have already had to rebuild their lives several times over, as farmland is eroded and their homes crumble. Qasa Alom went to meet some of the people who’ve had to restart in new places, and meets locals working on a solution to provide a permanent sanctuary.

Morocco was once home to a thriving Jewish community, who began an exodus from the country in the 1950s, as relations worsened between the Arab world and Israel. The community has now dwindled, but the links between Morocco and Israel are still there – and growing closer, with diplomatic relations and direct flights now restored. This has encouraged some locals in Essaouira to reach out to Israelis, and Jews elsewhere, who have family ties to the historic port city. Elizabeth Gowing found herself wondering whether tensions of the recent past can really be replaced by fonder memories of longer shared history.

The government of Iraq is building more prisons to cope with huge over-crowding - the system straining at what's thought to be three times its official capacity. Conditions inside are often filthy and unhealthy, but better buildings will not address the deep-rooted issues affecting the country's justice system. Shelly Kittleson has seen the Iraqi justice system at work, and tells the story of one recently-released prisoner.

Like many nations – but particularly those which were once part of the Soviet Union – Latvia is walking a tightrope as it tries to judge the best way to deal with Vladimir Putin’s Russia. In Riga, Beth Timmins recently explored Latvian memories and opinions of the Soviet era – and public feeling about today’s relations with the giant next door.

Producer: Polly Hope
Production Co-Ordinator: Gemma Ashman


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxv0lnt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct37r8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767bc4k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll9pry)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxv0qdy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct41ct)
Saving our species

Australia is famous for its unique wildlife and landscapes. But Australia also has the highest mammal extinction rate in the world, and there are big declines in frogs, reptiles, and birds caused by introduced predators and land clearing. Some species are hanging on in small numbers on private land.
Could paying farmers and indigenous landowners to return parts of their properties to nature or turn them into carbon farms help solve Australia’s biodiversity crisis?

ABC producer Belinda Sommer takes you to the wide plains and sub-tropical forests of Australia to meet the farmers who are combining commerce and conservation.


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767bgwp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172ykwbz6fxt7x)
French vote as Macron aims to beat far-right Le Pen

People in France are voting shortly for a new president in the second and final round of the election. They're choosing between the pro-European incumbent, Emmanuel Macron, and the far-right leader, Marine Le Pen, who's promised to challenge the authority of the European Union.

Also in the programme: The way Russian state TV has been telling the story of the war in Ukraine and how that story has subtly changed over two months; and we hear about a production of 'The Cherry Orchard', the Chekhov classic, in Philadelphia, a production influenced by the war.

Joining Julian Worricker are Nataliya Vasilyeva, Russia correspondent for the Telegraph. she joins now from Istanbul, and Georgina Wright, Senior Fellow and Director of Europe Program for Institute Montaigne, a Paris based think tank.

(Photo: Emmanuel Macron. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767blmt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172ykwbz6fxy01)
Ukraine war: Zelensky to ask US for material support

As Russia's war on Ukraine enters its third month, the US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Defence Secretary Lloyd Austin are due in Kyiv today, the first top US officials to visit since the invasion. Their trip's been announced by President Volodymyr Zelensky though not confirmed by Washington. Mr Zelensky said he expected them to come with material support.

Journalist Stanislav Aseyev on how war in Eastern Ukraine and imprisonment by Russian backed separatists have transformed him.

Polls have opened in France's presidential election runoff, with voters facing a choice between Emmanuel Macron and his far-right rival, Marine Le Pen.

Joining Julian Worricker are Nataliya Vasilyeva, Russia correspondent for the Telegraph. she joins now from Istanbul, and Georgina Wright, Senior Fellow and Director of Europe Program for Institute Montaigne, a Paris based think tank.

(Photo: President Zelensky. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767bqcy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172ykwbz6fy1r5)
French go to polls as Emmanuel Macron faces Marine Le Pen for presidency

People in France are voting shortly for a new president in the second and final round of the election. They're choosing between the pro-European incumbent, Emmanuel Macron, and the far-right leader, Marine Le Pen, who's promised to challenge the authority of the European Union.

As Russia's war on Ukraine enters its third month, the US Secretaries of State and Defense are due in the country today, Sunday.

Joining Julian Worricker are Nataliya Vasilyeva, Russia correspondent for the Telegraph. she joins now from Istanbul, and Georgina Wright, Senior Fellow and Director of Europe Program for Institute Montaigne, a Paris based think tank.

(Photo: French voters in the US were among the first to vote in the second round run-off. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxv12nb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct38mp)
How to date a carnivore

Can the love of eating meat ever get in the way of a relationship?

You may have heard the phrase ‘the way to someone’s heart is through their stomach’, but what happens if the foods they eat are wildly different from yours?

Tamasin Ford explores what it’s like to date a carnivore. Not just someone who eats meat, but someone who loves meat. Someone who has been brought up to eat meat in every meal.

We speak to two couples whose diets can sometimes be the source of their most heated arguments to find out how they navigate meal times and social events. Can tolerance win out over frustration?

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email: thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Steak on a plate. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Producer: Sarah Stolarz

Contributors:

Barbara Friend

Molly Savard

Charlie Pears-Wallace

Joe Deeney


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767bv42)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmllb5rg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxv16dg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct41d9)
Saving the songs of the Sahara

Fadimata Walet Oumar learned how to sing and dance in northern Mali under the light of the desert moon. Her people, the Tuaregs, traditionally lived as nomads on the fringes of the Sahara but successive wars, droughts and famines have fundamentally changed their lives. However her love of music never waned. As a teenager, Fadimata was given the nickname Disco after winning dance battles on the streets of Timbuktu. In 1995 she created a band called Tartit with other women who had been forced to flee into refugee camps due to conflict. It was the first woman-led group in the burgeoning desert music scene and received global acclaim. In 2012, Tuareg culture was put into peril when Islamist militants took over northern Mali and banned music. Fadimata had to flee her homeland for the third time in her life but vowed to return. A longer version of this episode was first broadcast in June 2021.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Kevin Ponniah

(Photo: Fadimata Walet Oumar performs in 2012 Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767byw6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct3hh3)
Deeply Human Series 2

Hate

Why do we hate one another - and how can we stop?

How and when does conflict metastasize into hatred? Dessa picks apart the science of hostility, with help from a criminologist who identifies the tipping point between prejudice and hate, and an Israeli psychologist who's studied one of the longest conflicts in the world today.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxv1b4l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct4233)
Emancipation, assimilation and Jewish identity

For 500 years the Jews of Europe were kept apart, legally segregated in ghettos. Then at the dawn of the 19th Century Jews were emancipated and overnight what it meant to be a Jew in the world changed. Michael Goldfarb looks at how this historic event changed Jewish identity and the world in which Jews lived.

In interviews with prominent members of his community in three different countries - a Rabbi, a musician and educator, and an organiser for eastern Europe’s rebuilding Jewish communities, he explores the rapid changes of identity in a group of people who lived an essentially unchanged existence for more than half a millennium.

Emancipation changed the practice of Judaism and brought new ideas to the arts. It created controversy within the Jewish community about how far one should assimilate, and hatred outside the Jewish community among those who did not want Jews to assimilate at all. This reaction would create an ideology - anti-Semitism, which would ultimately lead to the near annihilation of Europe’s Jews.

(Photo: Anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto rebellion. Creddit: Bernard Bisson/Sygma/Getty Images)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767c2mb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmllbf7q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxv1fwq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct41cy)
Slick: The Story of Oil, Shell and Nigeria

Slick: 3. Black creeks

BBC West Africa correspondent Mayeni Jones travels to the creeks of the Niger Delta to investigate the impact that oil pollution continues to have on communities and their environment. What she finds is alarming. And she speaks to Shell to ask them who is to blame for the ongoing environmental damage.

Presenter: Mayeni Jones.
Producer: Josephine Casserly
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Photo: Landscape destroyed by oil pollution. Image courtesy of Fyneface Dumnamene)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767c6cg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct39st)
Why did Sri Lanka’s organic farming dream fail?

In 2021 the president of Sri Lanka announced a total ban on chemical fertilizer and pesticides. The country’s farms were going to go fully organic.

Health concerns were given as a reason, but in the background was the pandemic, loss of tourism and a lack of natural fertilizer available in the country.

Sri Lanka is now in the worse economic crisis they have seen in decades and the government has reversed its ban on chemical fertilizer.

This week on The Inquiry we explore why Sri Lanka’s organic farming dream failed.

Presented by Charmain Cozier
Produced by Louise Clarke-Rowbotham
Researched by Christopher Blake

(Woman picking tea on plantation in Sri Lanka. Credit: Getty images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxv1kmv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3ct303f)
Myanmar: fighting the might of the junta

Myanmar is now in a state of civil war. What started in February 2021 as a mass protest movement against the military coup is now a nationwide armed uprising. The junta is under attack across the country from a network of civilian militias called the People’s Defence Forces who say they’re fighting to create a democratic Myanmar. The BBC gained rare access to the jungle training camps where young protests are being turned into soldiers. We follow a single mother and a student who have sacrificed everything to join the fight. They're up against a well-trained military that’s willing to use brutal tactics to stay in power. As the death toll mounts and the world looks away, can they restore democracy?

Reporter, Rebecca Henschke.
Produced with Kelvin Brown, Ko Ko Aung and Banyar Kong Janoi.

(Image: 20 year-old Myo left home to join the resistance. Credit: BBC/Chit Aye)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767cb3l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172yfbxbd0fw1w)
US officials visit Ukraine

As Ukraine's President Zelensky prepares to meet the US Secretaries of State and Defense in Kyiv, we ask what he wants and needs now from the US.

We hear from locked-down Shanghai as daily deaths from COVID-19 reach a new high of 39. And we're live from Paris as French voters choose their next President, in a tight race between the incumbent Emanuel Macron and the far right challenger Marine Le Pen.

(Image: Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky answers questions from journalists during an underground press conference in Kyiv, Ukraine, 23 April 2022 / Credit: EPA / Sergey Dolzhenko)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767cfvq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct38s6)
Mirror Mirror on the wall: The history of the looking glass

For the Ancient Egyptians they were seen as receptacles for the soul, for the Aztecs they were used to tell the future and for the early Christians, they were an aid for reaching self-knowledge. And mirrors’ key role in the reflection of light led to the development of high-powered telescopes to explore the universe. No human invention has been so closely tied with our sense of self and the world around us. And yet mirrors also have a capacity to deceive us – so how much attention should we give them in our lives, and are we overly obsessed with our image in the mirror?

Joining Rajan Datar to find out more about the history of mirrors is Dr Elizabeth Baquedano, a specialist in the indigenous cultures of Mesoamerica and Senior Honorary Lecturer at the Institute of Archaeology, University College, London. Dr Franziska Kolt, a post-doctoral research fellow in the history of science at the University of York in England, who’s written Alice Through the Wonderglass: the Surprising Histories of a children's classic. And Mark Pendergrast, the author of Mirror Mirror: a history of the human love affair with reflection. With the contribution of Professor Serpil Bagci from Hacettepe university in Ankara in Turkey.

Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service.

(Photo: Mirror reflecting blue sky in digital landscape. Credit: Artur Debat via Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 Over to You (w3ct35s1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767cklv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct30jq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767cpbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172ygjnfxfdccr)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld Sunday will have live commentary of the Merseyside Derby between Liverpool and Everton at Anfield. Delyth Lloyd will be alongside former Liverpool defender Jose Enrique and former Everton defender Sylvain Distin.

We’ll also have the latest from the other Premier League and Women’s Super League fixtures as well as the Women’s Champions League semi-final between Lyon and Paris Saint-Germain.

We’ll also keep up to date on the Emilia Romagna Formula 1 Grand Prix and the NBA playoffs.

Photo: A general view of the Merseyside Derby at Anfield Stadium during an FA Cup Third Round match between Liverpool and Everton. (Credit: AMA/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767d1lc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 Newshour (p051zl5n)
French President wins second term

Emmanuel Macron would become the first French president in twenty years to be re-elected, but turn-out was at a historic low and the country is divided with his far-right challenger, Marine Le Pen, receiving 42 percent of the votes. In this special programme we hear reaction to the vote from both camps and ask what the result means for France, for Europe and for the wider world.

(Photo: President Macron celebrating his victory; Credit: EPA/GUILLAUME HORCAJUELO)


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767d5bh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Newshour (p051zl5n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 today]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767d92m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (p051zl5n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 today]


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767ddtr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Deeply Human (w3ct3hh3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxv2s34)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Hidden Sport (w3ct41d2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 Over to You (w3ct35s1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767djkw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrwrs3y3jmg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh0kg71mm5)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxv2wv8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct41d9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 25 APRIL 2022

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767dnb0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct3277)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxv30ld)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Comedians vs. the News (w3ct3jt7)
Brodi Snook and Carol Zoccoli

Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini are joined by Brazilian comedian Carol Zoccoli and Australian Brodi Snook to take on the global headlines.

They’ll be hearing how Bolsonaro has announced the end of Covid in Brazil and about the introduction of IVF for Australia’s koalas.

Join #Comediansvsthenews for the funniest take on the headlines you’ve heard this week.


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjjmb9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwhyyp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv1646zlp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct4290)
Wild Inside: The Burmese Python

Ben Garrod and Jess French delve deep inside the predatory Burmese Python to examine its extraordinary body plan that enables it to catch, constrict and consume huge prey whole.

Producer Adrian Washbourne


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjjr2f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwj2pt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv16473bt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct3khs)
What does 'net zero' really mean?

When talking about climate change, the term net zero has become popular with politicians over the last few years.

More than 130 countries have now pledged to go net zero to help slow global warming.

Reaching net zero means reducing the amount of emissions as much as possible and removing any that remain from the atmosphere.

We hear from communities in South Africa, where the government plans to reach net zero by 2050. But the country is heavily tied to coal and faces several challenges around employment and energy security.

And while politicians make their net zero announcements, the United Nations projects that emissions will continue to rise even with the current pledges politicians have announced.

What does net zero mean and could it help climate change?
Presenters Jordan Dunbar and Kate Lamble are joined by:

Dr Mahmoud Mohieldin, UN climate change high-level champion for Egypt
Lola Vallejo, climate programme director at the IDDRI
Dr Benny Peiser, director of the Global Warming Policy Forum

Reporter: Zinhle Kanyane
Researcher: Natasha Fernandes
Producer: Darin Graham
Series producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Nicola Addyman
Sound engineer: Tom Brignell
Production coordinators: Siobhan Reed and Sophie Hill


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjjvtk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct3hh3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164772y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Hidden Sport (w3ct41d2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct35s1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjjzkp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwjb62)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv1647bv2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct37lq)
Magic in the mind

It’s scientifically impossible to read minds, so how do some magicians seem to do it? Beatriz de la Pava delves into the world of mentalism with two renowned women mentalists who regularly amaze and mystify audiences around the world.

Ava Do is a magician, mentalist and deceptionist from Vietnam who moved to the United States at thirteen years old. Growing up navigating two different cultural identities, she became fascinated with the subjects of perception and social psychology. After studying Psychobiology at UCLA and working as a crisis counsellor, Ava has spent the last decade turning her academic background and real-world experience with human behavior into a unique style of entertainment.

Kruti Parekh from India began her professional career as a magician at an early age. As a child, Kruti performed on national television, and at the age of eleven she received the FIE Foundation National Award. She has been hailed the “youngest female mentalist in Asia”. Currently, she works as a motivational speaker for corporate events and impresses audiences with her skills as a mentalist.

Produced by Emily Naylor.

(Image: (L), Kruti Parekh, courtesy Kruti Parekh. (R), Ava Do, courtesy Ava Do.)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjk39t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghkqz7)
French election: Macron defeats Le Pen

We’ll get the latest from France as Emmanuel Macron secures five more years as President.

We’ll also hear from Ukraine as the US confirms that its secretary of state, Antony Blinken, has held talks with President Volodymyr Zelensky in Kyiv.

And we’ll head to Shanghai where China continues to tighten restrictions, insisting on its zero Covid policy.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjk71y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghkvqc)
French election: World leaders congratulate Macron

France's Emmanuel Macron has comfortably beaten his far-right opponent to be re-elected as president for five more years. But the country is deeply divided. We’ll find out why.

We'll get the latest from Ukraine after US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Defence Secretary Lloyd Austin travelled to Kyiv for talks on Sunday.

And we'll head to the Democratic Republic of Congo where there's been a new Ebola outbreak.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjkbt2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghkzgh)
French election: Emmanuel Macron vows to be ‘president for all’

We’ll get the latest from France where Emmanuel Macron has won five more years as President.

We’ll find out what the US is offering Ukraine after the US Secretary of State, Antony Blinken, and the Secretary of Defence, Lloyd Austin, met with the Ukrainian president, Volodymyr Zelensky, in Kyiv.

And we’ll get the latest from the Chinese capital, Beijing, where there’s panic buying following fears of another lockdown.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjkgk6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32l7)
Robin Hanbury-Tenison: Have his efforts to protect indigenous people made a difference?

Stephen Sackur speaks to one of the world’s great modern-day explorers, Robin Hanbury-Tenison. He committed himself to the protection of indigenous people and their lands. Have his efforts made a difference?

(Photo: Robin Hanbury-Tenison in the Hardtalk studio)


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv1647ttl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct30x1)
Wealth from waste: can urban mining save the planet?

Ivana Davidovic investigates urban mining - the process of reclaiming raw materials from spent products, buildings and waste. She looks at what new technologies are helping us to recycle waste and the benefits that could bring.

In Antwerp, Belgium, she visits Umicore, once a traditional smelting company, which now specialises in extracting precious metals from electronics - and then puts them into new products, like catalysts or car battery components.

On the other side of the world - in Sydney, Australia - professor and inventor Veena Sahajwalla explains her innovative way to produce so-called "green steel."

Jessika Richter, a researcher from Lundt University in Sweden, tells us why the booming electric vehicles industry will increasingly have to find raw materials for batteries outside of conventional mining. Heather Clancy, the editor of the US-based Green Biz magazine, says US carmakers are now investing in urban mining.

Pascal Leroy, the director-general of the WEEE Forum, discusses how re-using waste can help the rest of the world become less dependent on rare earth materials which come from Russia, China and Ukraine.

PHOTO: Aerial view waste management facility with cityscape background/Getty Images


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct3byl)
Algeria’s Milk Bar Bomber

Zohra Drif was 21 years old when she planted a bomb that exploded at a busy ice-cream parlour in Algiers. The Algerian student targeted the venue in 1956 during her country’s war of independence with France, because she knew it would be frequented by European settlers. Dozens of civilians were maimed by the blast, which marked the start of a new phase of urban conflict known as the Battle of Algiers. Nick Holland hears from Zohra Drif about what happened that day, and from Danielle Chich, who was enjoying a cold treat at the café when the bomb went off.

PHOTO: Zohra Drif after her arrest in 1957 (AFP/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjkl9b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwjxxq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv1647ykq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct3j6q)
Why did the ancient Maya abandon their cities?

The ancient Maya flourished in modern day Mexico and Central America for millennia. They built incredible cities and they had sophisticated knowledge of astronomy, architecture and the natural world. But although Maya culture continues to exist today, around 900 AD, many of their great settlements collapsed, and today they lie in ruins.

CrowdScience listener Michael wants to know - how did the Maya sustain their populations successfully for so long? And what happened 1000 years ago that led them to abandon their cities?

To find out, presenter Melanie Brown travels to the forests of Western Belize. She visits the archaeological site of Xunantunich to learn about what life would have been like for the Maya living in what was once a prosperous city. She hears about the importance of water to the Maya way of life in this region, and their ingenious methods for capturing and storing rainfall.

She meets archaeologists using lasers and drones to map Maya settlements that have lain hidden by jungle for centuries. And she discovers what material from the bottom of lakes can tell us about how the Maya faced a changing climate, which may have had huge consequences for their society.

This episode is being released on Earth Day 2022. As we face an uncertain future of our own amid a climate crisis, are there any lessons we can learn from the Maya about how to live sustainably on this planet?

Presented by Melanie Brown and produced by Anand Jagatia

Featuring:
Elias Cambranes, Maya expert and tour guide
Prof Lisa Lucero, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Prof Tim Murtha, University of Florida
Dr Eben Broadbent, University of Florida
Prof Mark Brenner, University of Florida

Photo: Ancient ruins of the Mayas deep in the forest of Belize
Credit: Simon Dannhauer/Getty Images


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjkq1g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct37r8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164829v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct3bqp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct3k4h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjktsl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwk5dz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164861z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct37lq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjkyjq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct34n3)
The dancing prodigy who became Prince’s greatest muse

In 1990, Mayte Garcia was an aspiring dancer. Her mother sent a video of her belly dancing to the musician Prince in the hope he might hire her. Not only would Prince – who was then one of the most famous performers in the world – eventually hire her as his primary stage dancer, but Mayte would end up becoming his muse, inspiring hit songs and albums. The relationship was not without controversy. Mayte was a teenager when they first met while Prince was in his early 30s. They married when she was 22 and their happiness would be tested by heartbreaking tragedy.

If you've been affected by any of the issues in this episode, you can get help and support at Befrienders Worldwide or through BBC Action Line.

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Mayte Garcia on stage with Prince in 1995. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct3byl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjl28v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwkdx7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv1648fk7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct3j6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjl60z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172yfbxpn9nqz8)
France: Macron's second term challenges

Emmanuel Macron is the first French President in 20 years to win re-election. With record numbers of votes for his far right rival and a high level of abstentions, what kind of challenges could he face in his second five year term?

Also in this programme: The US Defence Secretary Lloyd Austin promises hundreds of millions of dollars more in military aid for Ukraine; and reports that Twitter is poised to accept billionaire Elon Musk's offer to buy the company.

(Photo: French President Emmanuel Macron delivers a speech after winning the second round of the French presidential election. Credit: EPA/Christophe Petit Tesson)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjl9s3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32l7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv1648p1h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172yk4jnjpk66l)
Fears grow over China Covid lockdowns

Chinese stock markets closed sharply down amid concerns Beijing may soon go into lockdown. With reports of panic buying at supermarkets in the city, we hear from student Keegan Elmer in Beijing, and get wider context from Jonathan Cheng, China bureau chief of the Wall Street Journal. Also in the programme, there are reports that Tesla entrepreneur Elon Musk may be close to securing a purchase of the social media site Twitter. The BBC's Samira Hussain brings us up to speed from New York. As Emmanuel Macron secures a second term as president of France, the BBC's Rob Young examines how he will approach tackling the country's economic challenges. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan reflects on the economic importance of optimism, following a visit to the far reaches of Nepal.

Today's edition is presented by Faarea Masud, and produced by Joshua Thorpe, George Thomas and Gabriele Shaw.

(Picture: A Covid test is administered in Beijing. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjlfj7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172yg1hgyw0tw9)
Macron wins French presidential election

France’s Emmanuel Macron has beaten his far-right opponent in Sunday’s presidential elections. We bring together a group of voters in the southern city of Nice to discuss and explain the issues and policies that determined the vote.

Our guests – an editor of a local paper, an owner of a fashion boutique, an engineer, a student and a video editor – will gather in a local café to share experiences of the rise in cost of living, and to discuss why the French public is so divided on issues like immigration and economy.

We also look at the challenges that lie ahead for the centrist president, Mr Macron, and what his re-re-election will mean for France’s role in Europe and for the war in Ukraine.

Away from France, we report on the visit by the US secretary of state and the Defence Secretary in the Ukrainian capital Kyiv, and get the latest on the offensive by Russian forces.

(Photo: Macron wins French presidential election. Credit: EPA/Christophe Petit Tesson)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjlk8c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172yg1hgyw0ymf)
Macron wins French presidential election

France’s Emmanuel Macron has beaten his far-right opponent in Sunday’s presidential elections. We bring together a group of voters in the southern city of Nice to discuss and explain the issues and policies that determined the vote.

Our guests – an editor of a local paper, an owner of a fashion boutique, an engineer, a student and a video editor – will gather in a local café to share experiences of the rise in cost of living, and to discuss why the French public is so divided on issues like immigration and economy.

We also look at the challenges that lie ahead for the centrist president, Mr Macron, and what his re-re-election will mean for France’s role in Europe and for the war in Ukraine.

Away from France, we report the latest on Russia’s offensive in Ukraine, and we hear from Nigeria where a mass burial will be taking place for the victims of the illegal oil refinery fire. At least 130 people have lost their lives.

(Photo: Macron wins French presidential election. Credit: EPA/Christophe Petit Tesson)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjlp0h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct34n3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct3byl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjlsrm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwl4d0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv1649510)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172ygfd189w9qj)
2022/04/25 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjlxhr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct3khs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv16498s4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct4291)
Wild Inside: The Ocean Sunfish

Ben Garrod and Jess French get under the skin of Mola mola the world's largest bony fish to unravel this bizarrely shaped predator's ability to swim to a huge range of depths.

Producer Adrian Washbourne


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjm17w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172yfbxpn9pl65)
Business-as-usual at start of Macron's second term

Emmanuel Macron is the first French president in 20 years to win re-election, but it came amid a high number of abstentions, a lack of enthusiasm for his candidacy, and a record number of votes for the far-right.

Yet he has done something no other French president has achieved before: winning re-election while still being in charge of his own government. We'll hear from voters in Paris about what they want to see the centrist achieve.

Also in the programme: the board of Twitter has agreed to a $44bn takeover offer from the billionaire Elon Musk; a Turkish court sentences the activist and philanthropist Osman Kavala to life in prison; and we'll hear from the Ukrainian soldiers on the front line of Russia's offensive in the east.

(Photo shows Emmanuel Macron waving to supporters. Credit: Christophe Petit Tesson/European Pressphoto Agency)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjm500)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32l7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv1649j8d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct37lq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjm8r4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrws4d7b8sq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh0xqj8csf)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv1649n0j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172yk5c3898glx)
Elon Musk to buy Twitter

Twitter’s board has accepted Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s $44bn offer to buy the social media giant. Dan Primack, Business Editor at Axios, says that those on both the right and the left who have reacted strongly to the prospect of a Musk-led takeover may be getting ahead of themselves. Peter Jankowskis, Vice President of Research and Analytics at Arbor Financial Services, tells us how markets in the US have reacted to the potential buyout, as well as fears of further lockdown measures being implemented in China. We hear from residents of Beijing, who tell us they’re not overly concerned by the prospect of a strict lockdown being imposed, and describe the mood in the city. In Ukraine, much attention has focused on the city of Mariupol in recent days, where hundreds of people are sheltering from a Russian bombardment in bunkers underneath the Azovstal steelworks. We speak to Yuriy Ryzhenkov, CEO of the company which runs the steelworks, Metinvest. And a joint investigation by The Bureau of Investigative Journalism and the LA Times has revealed that consultants working for cigarette giant Reynolds American Tobacco bankrolled black activists, in an effort to lobby against the prohibition of menthol cigarettes, which are disproportionately popular among African Americans.

(Photo: Elon Musk's $44bn offer has been accepted by Twitter's board; Credit: Getty Images)



TUESDAY 26 APRIL 2022

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjmdh8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct39l1)
Women's rights in Iraq

Max Pearson investigates what life is like for women in Iraq following the US invasion in 2003. Plus, first-person accounts of the start of Europe's Erasmus student exchange scheme, the rebellion by Kurds in Iran following the 1979 revolution, and the battle in the UK for the right to walk in the countryside.

PHOTO: Women queuing to vote in the Iraqi city of Basra in 2005 (Getty Images)


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjmj7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172ydpb2k5njm9)
Elon Musk to buy Twitter

Twitter’s board has accepted Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s $44bn offer to buy the social media giant. Dan Primack, Business Editor at Axios, says that those on both the right and the left who have reacted strongly to the prospect of a Musk-led takeover may be getting ahead of themselves. Stock markets around the world have been shaken by fears of further lockdown measures being implemented in China. We hear from residents of Beijing, who tell us they’re not overly concerned by the prospect of a strict lockdown being imposed, and describe the mood in the city. Plus, a joint investigation by The Bureau of Investigative Journalism and the LA Times has revealed that consultants working for cigarette giant Reynolds American Tobacco bankrolled black activists, in an effort to lobby against the prohibition of menthol cigarettes, which are disproportionately popular among African Americans. In Ukraine, much attention has focused on the city of Mariupol in recent days, where hundreds of people are sheltering from a Russian bombardment in bunkers underneath the Azovstal steelworks. We speak to Yuriy Ryzhenkov, CEO of the company which runs the steelworks, Metinvest. Plus, developing economies which rely heavily on tourism have been particularly affected by the global wave of Covid-19 lockdowns which paralysed foreign travel. With voyagers now venturing out again, our correspondent Peter Morgan was reminded of the economic value of optimism during a journey to Nepal.

Throughout the programme we're joined live by Peter Landers of the Wall Street Journal in Tokyo, and Forbes deputy editor Diane Brady in New York.

(Photo: Elon Musk’s $44bn offer was accepted by Twitter’s board; Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjmmzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwlzlx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164b07x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct41cv)
Shifting Cultures: From paddock to plate

On Queensland’s Western Downs the Penfold family, Dan, Karen and their four daughters run 40,000 hectares of beef cattle. The farm has been in the family for four generations and with no sons, it is now the girls who will take over the family business and stay on the land. But they plan to do it differently, embracing the shifting cultures of 21st Century agricultural life; caring for the environment, international trade and sustainability. And the challenges are huge - drought, intense rain and volatile beef markets. But this family are determined to continue feeding the world well into the 21st Century.

A BBC World Service and ABC co-production.

(Photo: Youngest daughter Matilda ready to muster at the feedlot. Credit: Penfold family)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjmrqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct34n3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct3byl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjmwgs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwm735)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164b7r5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct3jhs)
Colm Tóibín: A life of writing

Irish author Colm Tóibín is among the world’s most celebrated contemporary writers. His works includes novels such as Nora Webster and The Blackwater Lightship, but also journalism, criticism, drama and more. His book Brooklyn was adapted into an Oscar-nominated film starring Saoirse Ronan, and his writing has been translated into over thirty languages.

Colm has explored the experiences of other novelists and creative thinkers in his writing. His recent title, The Magician, traced the life of German writer Thomas Mann, and his book The Master, an international literary sensation, told the story of the novelist Henry James.

Alongside the release of his debut collection of poems, Vinegar Hill, Colm gives fellow Irish writer Helen Cullen an insight into how he works, taking her through his writing process, how he gathers his ideas and his approach to refining his work.

They explore the differences and similarities in techniques of writing prose and poetry, and how influence can be drawn from outside the literary world. Helen discovers what it is like to immerse oneself in the creative of mind of figures such as Henry James, and how it shaped Colm as a writer.

Presenter: Helen Cullen
Readings: Matthew Durkan
Producer: Sam Peach
Executive Producer: Rebecca Armstrong for the BBC World Service


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjn06x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghnmwb)
The UN Secretary General visits Russia

Our top story today: as the bombs continue to fall in Ukraine, Russia's foreign minister warns that there is a risk that Western actions could lead to a Third World War.

All this as the UN Secretary General is due to meet Russia's President Vladimir Putin today - Newsday will get a Ukrainian reaction.

Also: the billionaire Elon Musk is poised to buy Twitter - we'll find out what it means for the social media giant.

And we'll talk to a leading scientist who is taking acts of civil disobedience to get the world to wake up to the dangers of climate change.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjn3z1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghnrmg)
UN head in Moscow for talks with President Putin

The secretary general of the United Nations will meet Vladimir Putin in Moscow today, after Moscow accused NATO of engaging in a proxy war with Russia.

Newsday has a special report from the front-lines of the war in Ukraine's Donbas region.

The head of Twitter has admitted that the future of the business is uncertain after the world's richest man, Elon Musk, reached a deal to buy it.

And could so-called "novel foods" provide an alternative source of protein that will help save the planet? That could mean cultured meat, algae and fungus all on the menu for this edition of Newsday.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjn7q5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghnwcl)
UN head meets Vladimir Putin in Moscow today

The head of the United Nations, Antonio Guterres, will hold talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin today about the war in Ukraine. But with no end in sight to the fighting, there are concerns that there is not much the UN can do.

Newsday will also take you to the the last Ukrainian village just before a three-way border crossing between Ukraine, Russia and Belarus. Once the site of festivals that were held celebrating friendship between the three countries, it’s now a war front-line.

And could so-called "novel foods" provide an alternative source of protein that will help save the planet? That could mean cultured meat, algae and fungus all on the menu for this edition of Newsday.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjncg9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct3j27)
Work: Access for all

La Casa de Carlota isn’t like most workplaces. The design studio, based in Barcelona, Spain, employs creatives who have intellectual disabilities, autism and schizophrenia.

Working together with non-disabled colleagues, they produce striking graphics for campaigns and packaging, as well as original works of art. This isn’t a government-backed scheme to help out a disadvantaged group, but a winning formula that is helping the studio forge a unique brand.

In this programme we look at two companies who have realised there is strength in neurodiversity and hear from Natalie Duo from the charity Mencap. The vast majority of people with learning disabilities are unemployed, so how can other businesses can follow suit?

Presenter: Myra Anubi
Reporter: William Kremer
Executive producer: Tom Colls
Editor: Penny Murphy

Image: Casa de Carlota


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164bqqp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct3162)
The cost of China’s zero-Covid policy

Millions of people have been locked down in China for weeks, as the country battles a surge in Omicron cases, with a zero-Covid policy.

We follow one young woman’s journey across the country as she tries to reach her home in central China amid layers of bureaucracy and travel restrictions.

We hear how the lockdown is causing some major disruptions to the Chinese economy from Julian Evans-Pritchard, a China Analyst at Capital Economics.

Businessman Kent Kedl, who works at a Shanghai based risk consultancy firm, tells us what business – and life – has been like in lockdown.

And US-based epidemiologist Eric Feigl-Ding explains the advantages and disadvantages of China's Covid policies.

Presenter/Producer: Vivienne Nunis
Picture: Reuters (person sits behind barrier)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct3c33)
The War in Algeria: A French soldier's experience

In the late 1950s a young Frenchman, who now goes by the name Ted Morgan, was conscripted to fight for France against Algeria's independence fighters. He served as an intelligence officer during the Battle of Algiers, and over sixty years later he is still haunted by what he saw, and did. This included involvement in the systematic torture by the French of members of Algeria's National Liberation Front or FLN. Ted Morgan spoke to Roger Hardy in 2010.

(Photo: French soldiers in the Casbah of Algiers in 1960. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjnh6f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwmttt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164bvgt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct4291)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjnlyk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct38zz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjnqpp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwn2b2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164c2z2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct3jhs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjnvft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct352n)
The champion boxer without a country to fight for

Bilal Fawaz was just 14 when he was trafficked to the UK from Nigeria. Without stability or family support he survived domestic slavery and went on to become an English boxing champion. He was even tipped to fight for Britain at the 2012 Olympics, but a long legal battle to establish his nationality - a country to fight for - derailed his rise to the top.

While husband and wife Timofey Yuriev and Melissa Kho were walking their dog in New York state, they came across two other dogs that had fallen through the ice into a freezing lake. Luckily Timofey's Siberian grandfather and nuclear physicist mother had given him the skills necessary for this rescue. This interview was first broadcast in May 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Bilal Fawaz. Credit: Tom Jenkins/Getty Images)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct3c33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjnz5y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwn9tb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164cbgb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct4291)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjp2y2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172yfbxpn9rmwc)
UN Secretary General in Moscow for talks on humanitarian crisis

The UN Secretary General has called for immediate humanitarian assistance for civilians caught up in the war in Ukraine. Antonio Guterres is in Moscow to speak with Russia’s foreign minister, Sergei Lavrov.

Also in the programme: Malcolm Nance is a former US Navy sailor and TV pundit who decided to join Ukraine’s International Legion. He explains why he made this decision, and what is he is seeing on the ground in Ukraine.

(Photo: UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres visits Moscow. April 26, 2022. Credit: Maxim Shipenkov/Pool via REUTERS)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjp6p6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct3j27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164ckyl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172yk7tfg3d9tv)
How will Elon Musk change Twitter?

As Twitter's board agrees a sale to Elon Musk, we ask how the social network might change. Bruce Daisley was vice-president of Twitter for Europe, the Middle East and Africa, and brings us his perspective on the proposed deal. Also in the programme, the bank HSBC has just unveiled earnings that did not meet investor expectations. Frances Coppola is an independent banking analyst, and tells us what is putting pressure on the firm's profits. The BBC's Ivana Davidovic investigates urban mining, which is the process of reclaiming raw materials from spent products, buildings and waste. Plus, the world's largest horticultural show, Floriade, is under way in the Netherlands. Frank Cornelissen is chief commercial officer for the event, and tells us more.

Today's edition is presented by Martin Webber, and produced by Nisha Patel, Joshua Thorpe and Gabriele Shaw.

(Picture: Elon Musk's Twitter account on a smartphone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjpbfb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172yg1hgyw3qsd)
Ukraine: UN chief in Moscow

We bring the latest on the war in Ukraine and hear about the talks in Moscow between the UN Secretary General António Guterres and Russia's president and foreign minister.

The BBC's Anna Foster is in the western city of Lviv speaking to Ukrainians about how the two months of war have changed their lives.

We talk about Elon Musk’s deal to buy Twitter and explain how he has become the richest man in the world.

We hear from Twitter users around the world about their experiences of using the social media site and how they think the change of ownership may affect the day-to-day user experience.

(Photo: Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov (R) and UN Secretary-General António Guterres (L) leave at the end of their press conference following their meeting in Moscow, Russia, 26 April 2022. Credit: MAXIM/EPA)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjpg5g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172yg1hgyw3vjj)
Ukraine: UN chief in Moscow

We bring the latest on the war in Ukraine and hear about the talks in Moscow between the UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres and Russia's president and foreign minister.

The BBC's Anna Foster is in the western city of Lviv and has spoken to Ukrainians about how the two months of war have changed their lives.

We talk about Elon Musk’s deal to buy Twitter and explain how he has become the richest man in the world. We also hear from Twitter users around the world about their experiences of using the social media site and how they think the change of ownership may affect the day-to-day user experience.

The South African president has promised more help to rebuild communities devastated by the recent floods. We get more from our correspondent.

(Photo: Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov (R) and UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres (L) leave at the end of their press conference following their meeting in Moscow, Russia, 26 April 2022. Credit: MAXIM/EPA)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjpkxl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct352n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct3c33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjppnq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwp193)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164d1y3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172ygfd189z6mm)
2022/04/26 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjptdv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct41cv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164d5p7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct31y7)
Can we predict Twitter’s future?

What’s in store for twitter, now that Elon Musk’s offer has been accepted by the Twitter board? Bill and Gareth discuss.

Is video chat tech still listening when you’re muted?
Video conferencing technology might still be listening to your voice even when you are on mute. A new study shows that a number of video meeting apps were recording audio even when the user had switched off their microphone. The researchers analysed the code behind the apps and found that all of the apps in the test were gathering raw audio when they were on mute – and that one of them was sending that information over the internet at the same rate, whether the user was muted or not. They even identified what someone was doing 82% of the time e.g cooking, typing. Professor Kassem Fawaz, one of the authors of the study, explains more.

World first – swarming molecular robots working together
Scientists from Hokkaido University in Japan have for the first time shown that molecular robots are five times more effective at transporting cargo when working as a swarm compared to working alone. Inspired by insects, like ants, honey bees and even fish and birds, they have created microscopic molecular robots that use microtubules propelled by proteins and DNA. Dr Mousumi Akter explains how they work together so successfully and the possible applications which include intensive drug delivery to a specific location or collection of micro-contaminants in the environment.

How to encourage more women into game design
Many women enjoy playing video games – but why are so few of them involved in designing them? Our gaming correspondent Leigh Milner has been meeting those at the top of the business, who are doing something to widen access to its creative side.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Photo: Woman having a video meeting on her laptop. Credit: Witthaya Prasongsin/Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjpy4z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172yfbxpn9sh38)
UN chief highlights Ukraine concerns in Moscow visit

Today was the day the United Nations took its grievances about Russia's invasion of Ukraine directly to the Russian president.

The UN Secretary-General, António Guterres, told Vladimir Putin that his invasion fully contradicted the constitution of the UN charter, but insisted he was visiting Moscow as a "messenger of peace".

Also in the programme: An interview with a Russian member of parliament; we hear from the wife of an opposition activist jailed for speaking out about the war; and we discuss the future of Twitter - under Elon Musk.

(Photo shows Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres. Credit: Maxim Shipenkov/Reuters)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjq1x3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct3j27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164df5h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct3jhs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjq5n7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrws4d7f5pt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh0xqjc8pj)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164djxm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172yk8mw5q3l75)
Gazprom to halt gas supplies to Poland

Russian company Gazprom says it will halt gas supplies to Poland and Bulgaria from Wednesday morning. Poland currently depends on Russian imports for around half of its gas. The country’s deputy foreign minister Marcin Pzydacz tells us his government was already been prepared for this move. Plus, the World Bank’s latest commodities report makes sobering reading, suggesting that high food and fuel prices could blight the global economy for years to come. We hear from its author, World Bank Senior Economist Peter Nagle. We take a look at what's been happening in the US markets with Joe Saluzzi from Themis Trading, after a difficult day for tech stocks. With Elon Musk poised to take over at Twitter, the European Union’s Commissioner for the Internal Market Thierry Breton tells us that the firm will be welcome to operate in the EU under new management, providing it adheres to the bloc’s rules. As Delta Air Lines reveals that cabin crew will be paid for boarding as well as flight time in a landmark announcement, the president of the Association of Flight Attendant Sara Nelson says unionisation efforts by airline staff forced the company’s hand. And the BBC’s North America Business Correspondent Samira Hussain reports from Michigan on Ford’s iconic F-150 pickup getting a fully electric makeover.

(Photo: Gazprom says it will halt gas supplies to Poland and Bulgaria; Credit: Getty Images)



WEDNESDAY 27 APRIL 2022

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjq9dc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct38zz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjqf4h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172ydpb2k5rfjd)
Gazprom to halt gas supplies to Poland

Russian company Gazprom says it will halt gas supplies to Poland and Bulgaria from Wednesday morning. Poland currently depends on Russian imports for around half of its gas. The country’s deputy foreign minister Marcin Pzydacz tells us his government was already been prepared for this move. Plus, the World Bank’s latest commodities report makes sobering reading, suggesting that high food and fuel prices could blight the global economy for years to come. We hear from its author, World Bank Senior Economist Peter Nagle. With Elon Musk poised to take over at Twitter, the European Union’s Commissioner for the Internal Market Thierry Breton tells us that the firm will be welcome to operate in the EU under new management, providing it adheres to the bloc’s rules. As Delta Air Lines reveals that cabin crew will be paid for boarding as well as flight time in a landmark announcement, the president of the Association of Flight Attendant Sara Nelson says unionisation efforts by airline staff forced the company’s hand. And the BBC's Ivana Davidovic investigates urban mining, the process of reclaiming raw materials from spent products, buildings and waste.
Throughout the programme we’re joined live by Zyma Islam, a journalist with The Daily Star newspaper in Bangladesh and by Tony Nash, chief economist at AI firm Complete Intelligence, based in Houston, Texas.

(Photo: Gazprom says it will halt gas supplies to Poland and Bulgaria; Credit: Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjqjwm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwpwj0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164dx50)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct41cz)
Slick: The Story of Oil, Shell and Nigeria

Slick: 4. The oil thieves

The newest player in the Niger Delta is not a multinational company, it is Nigeria’s enormous illegal oil industry. Oil thieves cut the pipelines, siphoning off oil, which they refine in the bush and sell on the black market.

BBC West Africa correspondent Mayeni Jones meets an oil thief king pin, as well as an exuberant local politician, taking on this illegal business and treks deep into the forests of the Niger Delta to visit an underground refinery.

And we catch up with Victoria Bera. For decades, she has been in a prolonged legal battle against Shell in courthouses around the world. Will she finally get the justice she seeks?

Presenter: Mayeni Jones
Producer: Josephine Casserly
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Photo: Illegal oil refinery in Emuoha, Niger Delta. Credit: Fyneface Dumnamene)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjqnmr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct352n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct3c33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjqscw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwq408)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164f4n8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Documentary (w3ct41tx)
Soul Music

Lean on Me by Bill Withers

An enduring classic which delivers a message of support and friendship. Never more so than in 2020 when it has been the musical backdrop to the Covid crisis in the UK, and at Black Lives Matter protests in the US.

Andy Greene, a senior writer at Rolling Stone magazine, tells the remarkable life-story of Bill Withers.

Composer, Neil Brand, explains how the simplicity of this track is what enables it to pack such a strong emotional punch.

Sara Morrell is a nurse whose version of Lean On Me, recorded quickly at home as a way of cheering-up colleagues, caught the attention of some big names in the music industry.

Sharmila Bousa organised a community flash-mob to show support to her local shops in Westbury-on-Trym, South West England which had suffered a spate of armed-robberies.

Arianna Evans has become a voice of the Black Lives Matter protests. She recalls a powerful moment at one of the Washington DC rallies where local singer, Kenny Sway, sang Lean On Me creating a memorable and much-needed moment of joy and unity.

(Photo: Bill Withers, 1973)


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjqx40)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghrjsf)
Ukraine War: What did the UN Secretary General's visit to Moscow achieve?

Russia is stopping its supply of gas to Poland and Bulgaria - another consequence of the Ukraine war - as the Secretary General of the United Nations ends his visit to Moscow to secure humanitarian cooperation over attempts to evacuate civilians from besieged cities.

The UN children's agency UNICEF says 10 million children are facing severe drought in the Horn of Africa - we'll speak live to the organisation's executive director.

And we'll head to Singapore to hear about the controversial execution of a man convicted of drug smuggling.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjr0w4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghrnjk)
Ukraine peace talks: President Putin meets UN chief in Moscow

Russia's President Vladimir Putin says a diplomatic solution is possible after his invasion of Ukraine, as Poland and Bulgaria say Russia has told them that their gas supply will be halted from today - we'll find out what it means for the two countries.

From Nobel prize winner to a prisoner facing years behind bars - a court in Myanmar sentences Aung San Suu Kyi to five years in prison for corruption.

Football: we'll have more on the way from that incredible European Champions League semi-final, Manchester City 4 Real Madrid 3!!


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjr4m8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghrs8p)
Russia cuts off gas supplies to Poland and Bulgaria

Russia suspends natural gas supplies to Poland and Bulgaria - they say they prepared for such a situation despite a heavy reliance on Russian gas.

We hear about conditions in Mariupol from those who have managed to escape the city after weeks of living under siege - and speak to the former prime minister of Finland for his analysis of the Ukraine crisis.

And the difficulties faced by the Biden administration in the US in its bid to end a Trump-era immigration programme that requires asylum seekers to await approval in Mexico.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjr8cd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32qr)
Slava Vakarchuk: A rock star on the frontline

Stephen Sackur speaks to Slava Vakarchuk, a Ukrainian rock star who has exchanged stadium gigs for a military uniform and morale-boosting visits to the frontline. As Ukraine fights for its survival in the face of Russia’s aggression, what role can this cultural icon play?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164fmms)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct31bl)
False banana: A new superfood?

As the spectre of food insecurity grows and climate change threatens lives and livelihoods, could enset play a part in assuaging hunger? Elizabeth Hotson delves into the many and varied properties of a crop consumed mainly in parts of Ethiopia and she asks how it might be possible to widen the appeal of a plant which takes months to turn into an something edible.

Dr Wendewek Abebe from Hawassa university in southern Ethiopia is a leading researcher of enset and he explains why it’s known as the ‘tree against hunger.’ Dr Abebe also takes us on a trip to meet a farmer who cultivates the crop and considers it a superfood. Back in the UK, Dr James Borrell, a research fellow at Kew Gardens in London explains why cultivating - and ultimately consuming enset - takes a lot of time, energy and local knowledge. And Berhanu Tesfaye, owner of Zeret Kitchen, an Ethiopian restaurant in London, shares a rare meal of kocho - bread made from enset.

(Photo: Enset crop in Southern Ethiopia. Credit: Getty Images)

Presenter/producer: Elizabeth Hotson


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct3c5c)
Algeria: The Massacre in Paris

During their country's War of Independence, Algerian fighters from the FLN also targeted the French mainland, killing police officers in Paris and other cities. In October 1961, French police turned against Algerian demonstrators in the capital who'd been called out onto the streets by the FLN. Dozens were shot, others drowned in the River Seine. For decades, the killings were not officially acknowledged. In 2011, Jannat Jalil heard from one man whose sister died that day.

Photo: Algerian demonstrators under arrest after a rally in Paris in October1961 (AFP/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjrd3j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwqqqx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164frcx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct31y7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjrhvn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct41d1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjrmls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwqz75)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164fzw5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct41tx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjrrbx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct3y87)
'A little bit Indiana Jones'

Archaeologist Harald Meller believes we underestimate the intelligence and culture of prehistoric people. Fascinated by the ancient world since childhood, he's now based at the Museum of Prehistory in Halle, Germany. In 2001, a chance visit to a colleague in Berlin resulted in him hearing about a unique ancient artefact that had come to light: a spellbindingly beautiful metal disc illustrated with depictions of the stars and the sun.

Looking at photos of the disc, Harald knew immediately that it was important - and that it could change everything we thought we knew about astronomy in the prehistoric era. There was just one snag: it was in the hands of the wrong people. Today on Outlook, he tells Mobeen Azhar about how he became the front man in a daring police operation to recover what would become known as the Nebra Sky Disc from the black market.

Also in today's programme: Italian photographer Letizia Battaglia, who died last week, was the first woman to document the so-called Mafia wars in Sicily. She spoke to Outlook in 2017.

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar

(Photo: The Nebra Sky Disk. Credit: Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Image)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct3c5c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjrw31)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwr6qf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164g7cf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct31y7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjrzv5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172yfbxpn9vjsg)
Russia stops gas deliveries to Bulgaria and Poland

Bulgaria receives more than 90% of its gas from Russia - we hear from the Bulgarian energy minister.

Also on the programme, in the Philippines election, the Marcoses think all is forgiven as the family bids for highest office once more; and the wildlife conservationists saving the snow leopard from extinction in India.

(Photo: Protest in Riga to demand a faster abandonment of Russia's energy resources Credit: EPA/TOMS KALNINS)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjs3l9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32qr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164ggvp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172yk9g9x9vtlj)
DJI halts drone sales to Russia and Ukraine

Chinese drone maker DJI halted sales to Russia and Ukraine to avoid their use in the war. Matt Williams is a former military pilot, and expert on drone operations, and discusses the thinking behind the move from the world's biggest drone firm. Also in the programme, the BBC's Samira Hussain reports from Dearborn, Michigan, on the prospects for the new electric Ford F-150 pickup truck. A Danish robotics company has teamed up with General Electric with the aim of producing towers for wind turbines using a 3D printer. We find out more from Henrik Lund-Nielsen, founder and general manager of Cobod International. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson asks whether the false banana, or enset, could help tackle the problem of food insecurity in developing countries.

Today's edition is presented by Faarea Masud, and produced by George Thomas and Elizabeth Hotson.

(Picture: A DJI drone in flight. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjs7bf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172yg1hgyw6mph)
Russia halts gas supply to Poland and Bulgaria

We explain what's happening with Russian gas supplies after energy giant Gazprom halted exports to Poland and Bulgaria. We also assess how this might impact global energy supplies.

Inside Ukraine, Russia's ground invasion is slowly making progress; we'll get the latest from our correspondents and regional experts reporting on today's developments.

In other news, our health team tell us what's behind the mysterious hepatitis outbreak in children. The cases have been reported across Europe, parts of the US and one case in Asia.

And our BBC Urdu and BBC Chinese have details and analysis on the suicide attack that killed three Chinese citizens in the Pakistani city of Karachi.

(Photo: A sign, which reads: "Warsaw", is pictured at the Gaz-System gas distribution station in Gustorzyn, central Poland. Credit: Reuters/Wojciech Kardas/Agencja Gazeta)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjsc2k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172yg1hgyw6rfm)
Families fleeing Ukraine: Starting afresh

Approximately 5.3 million people have left Ukraine since the war started, many for neighbouring countries. We speak to families with teenage children about what the move has been like for them and how they are settling in.

We explain what's happening with Russian gas supplies after energy giant Gazprom halted exports to Poland and Bulgaria. We also assess how this might impact global energy supplies.

In other news, our health team tell us what's behind the mysterious hepatitis outbreak in children. The cases have been reported across Europe, parts of the US and one case in Asia.

And British DJ Tim Westwood is facing multiple allegations of sexual misconduct by women who say he abused his position in the music industry to exploit them. We speak to our reporter who heard detailed accounts from seven women as part of a joint investigation by the BBC and the Guardian newspaper.

(Photo: A child kneels on a bench while leaning on the handle of a suitcase as refugees from Ukraine cross the Ukrainian-Slovakian border following Russia"s invasion of Ukraine. Credit: Reuters/Lukasz Glowala)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjsgtp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct3y87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct3c5c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjslkt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwry66)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164gyv6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172ygfd18b23jq)
2022/04/27 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjsq9y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct41cz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164h2lb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct32w8)
New Covid Research

Update on the latest global research into Covid-19 and Claudia talks to the authors of a new study charting brain development over the human life span. Could this be a useful tool to understanding how the brain varies over populations and over time and what are the ethical questions involved?

Plus if you carry excess weight, what difference does it make to your health if those extra kgs are round your waist or hips?

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Neurologists working with CT brain scan images in a laboratory. Photo credit: Gorodenkoff/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjsv22)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172yfbxpn9wd0c)
Ukraine: Mariupol defenders make new appeal

A Ukrainian marines commander -- holed up inside a steel works in the besieged port city of Mariupol -- has made another impassioned appeal for rescue, warning "people here will simply die". Serhiy Volynsky says about six hundred soldiers are badly injured and hundreds of civilians are trapped at the works.

The European Union has said it won't give in to Russian blackmail after Moscow cut supplies of gas to Poland and Bulgaria.

A groundbreaking case involving the legal rights of US waterways.

How metals and minerals illegally mined in the Democratic Republic of Congo are bypassing a scheme designed to stop them entering the formal economy.

(Photo: Commander Serhiy Volynsky in Mariupol)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjsyt6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32qr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164hb2l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct41tx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjt2kb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrws4d7j2lx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh0xqjg5lm)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164hftq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172ykb8rmxl2zv)
China lockdowns hit global shipping

With global supply chains still reeling in the wake of Covid-19 and the Ukraine war, recent lockdowns in China have compounded the situation. Backlogs have become common place on the USA’s west coast, but how has trade there recovered? We get the latest from Josh Brazil of supply chain specialists project44. Plus, as Facebook parent company Meta reports better-than-expected profit figures and an increase in the number of users, we get the latest on the firm’s quarterly figures from our North America Business Correspondent Michelle Fleury in New York. After Chinese company DJI, the world's largest drone manufacturer, said it’s suspending sales to Russia and Ukraine, we discuss the reasons behind the decision with David Hambling, author of Swarm Troopers: How small drones will conquer the world. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson asks whether the false banana, or enset, could help tackle the problem of food insecurity in developing countries. And we speak to Matteo Pietrobelli from Oceanix, a company working on a project to hopefully create what’s been called the world’s first floating city. Busan in South Korea has unveiled plans to extend out to sea, using floating, interconnected platforms, in a move that it’s hoped could help to mitigate both rising sea levels and human population numbers.

(Photo: Yangshan deepwater port In Shanghai; Credit: Getty Images)



THURSDAY 28 APRIL 2022

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjt69g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct41d1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjtb1l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172ydpb2k5vbfh)
China lockdowns hit global shipping

With global supply chains still reeling in the wake of Covid-19 and the Ukraine war, recent lockdowns in China have compounded the situation. Backlogs have become common place on the USA’s west coast, but how has trade there recovered? We get the latest from Josh Brazil of supply chain specialists project44. Plus, the BBC’s North America Business Correspondent Samira Hussain reports from Michigan on Ford’s iconic F-150 pickup getting a fully electric makeover. After Chinese company DJI, the world's largest drone manufacturer, said it’s suspending sales to Russia and Ukraine, we discuss the reasons behind the decision with David Hambling, author of Swarm Troopers: How small drones will conquer the world. We speak to Matteo Pietrobelli from Oceanix, a company working on a project to hopefully create what’s been called the world’s first floating city. Busan in South Korea has unveiled plans to extend out to sea, using floating, interconnected platforms, in a move that it’s hoped could help to mitigate both rising sea levels and human population numbers. And the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson asks whether the false banana, or enset, could help tackle the problem of food insecurity in developing countries.

Throughout the programme we’re joined live by Rachel Puppazoni, a journalist covering business and the economy for ABC News in Perth, Australia, and by Alison van Diggelen, the host at freshdialogues.com in Silicon Valley.

(Photo: Yangshan deepwater port In Shanghai; Credit: Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjtfsq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwssf3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164ht23)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct303g)
The accordion wars of Lesotho

A form of oral poetry accompanied on the accordion is the basis of a wildly popular form of music in Lesotho, southern Africa. But jealousy between Famo artists has triggered warfare that’s killing hundreds. Some of the genre’s best-known stars became gang bosses, and their rivalry has helped make rural, stunningly beautiful Lesotho the murder capital of Africa, with the sixth highest homicide rate in the world. Musicians, their relatives, producers and DJs have all been gunned down. Whole communities live in fear, and are now demanding action from politicians and police who are accused of protecting the Famo gangsters. Tim Whewell tells the story of a style of music that developed among Basotho migrant workers in the tough world of South African mines. He meets some of Famo's greatest artists - now disgusted by the violence - and talks to the families of victims of a cycle of revenge that the authorities appear unable to end.

Presented and produced by Tim Whewell

(Image: Famo group leader Ntei Tsehlana was shot at a Democratic Congress (DC) party concert and later died from his injuries. Credit: BBC/Tim Whewell)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjtkjv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct3y87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct3c5c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjtp8z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwt0xc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164j1kc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct38mq)
The cost of 'getting ripped'

The man with carefully sculpted six-pack is everywhere: in Hollywood action films, on magazine front covers, in your social media feed, on dating apps. And so are the online ads telling you how to get the look. But what does it really take to get a washboard stomach? This week, Ruth Alexander hears from three men about the reality of getting ‘ripped’ and how much of it is down to what you eat. They reveal how deeply the experience can affect your relationship with food, your loved ones and yourself

(Picture: Male torso ripped in half. Credit: Getty/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email: thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Sarah Stolarz

Contributors:

Graham Isador, writer

Florian Gaffet, massage therapist

Matthew Todd, author ‘Straight Jacket: Overcoming Society’s Legacy of Gay Shame’


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjtt13)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghvfpj)
UK Foreign Minister says allies should send Ukraine warplanes

Our top story today: the UK Foreign Minister says Russia must be pushed out of the whole of Ukraine - and the west should send warplanes to help the Ukrainians fight Russia's invasion. Will the UK's western allies agree? Newsday will speak to former senior US military officer.

We'll also hear from Ukrainian civilians who say they were forcibly moved to Russia during this conflict.

Also, an Australian minister accuses China of interfering in the upcoming elections - we'll go live to Australia to find out more.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjtxs7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghvkfn)
The UN receives backlash from visiting Kyiv after Moscow

The United Nations Secretary General has arrived in the Ukrainian capital for a meeting with President Zelensky. It follows a similar trip to Moscow which was heavily criticised by the Ukrainian government. So what kind of reception will he get? Newsday will go live to Kyiv to get a sense of the mood in the city this morning.

Also today: We have a report looking at China's national security law for Hong Kong which has resulted in many pro democracy activists languishing in jail awaiting their trials but refused bail.

With the Russian energy giant Gazprom halting gas exports to Poland and Bulgaria - how worried should we be about the gas supply crisis?

And we head to Pakistan to look at why Chinese nationals in the country are being targeted by separatist groups.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjv1jc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghvp5s)
Guterres to visit Kyiv to discuss humanitarian aid and evacuations

Coming up: The United Nations Secretary General has arrived in the Ukrainian capital for a meeting with President Zelensky. It follows a similar trip to Moscow which was heavily criticised by the Ukrainian government. So what kind of reception will he get? We'll go live to Kyiv to find out.

Also a report by our correspondent in Ukraine who has been speaking to people who say they were forcibly relocated to Russia.

Newsday will go to Sri Lanka where trade unions have called for strikes to force the government out of office.

And how effectively has China been dealing these past few weeks with the new Covid crisis? Newsday will speak to an expert who monitors and knows the health system there.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjv58h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct39sv)
Can Europe give up Russian gas?

Since the invasion of Ukraine, European countries have sought alternatives to Russian gas. There are different options. Piped gas from countries such as Algeria and Libya, or liquid natural gas from the US or Qatar. Stepping up the drive towards renewable energy. More controversially, investing in nuclear power or continuing to mine or import coal. How quickly can a solution be found and what are the financial and environmental costs?

With Tanya Beckett. Producer Bob Howard


(Steam from the cooling towers of German energy giant RWE power AG in Neurath, Germany April 2022. Photo: Ying Tang/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164jjjw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct311k)
The power of the brooch

We look into why sales of brooches have soared, and why they can be such a powerful accessory. Governor of the bank of Russia Elvia Nabiullina says the brooches she wears contain clues to understanding policy decisions, and the late Madeleine Albright, former USA Secretary of State, used to wear them as a diplomatic tool.

Brooches are currently gaining popularity among consumers and fashion brands are taking note, as Dolce & Gabbana’s Carlos Palacios and British Vogue’s Carol Woolton tell us.

Paul Paradis, an art historian from L’ECOLE School of Jewellery Arts in Paris, takes us through the history of brooches, and jewellery historian Vivienne Becker tells us what it was like to work with Madeleine Albright, and help pen her novel Read My Pins.

And we speak to Cindy Chao, one of the world’s most famous brooch makers, who became the first Asian female to get her work inducted into the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

Presenter: Vivienne Nunis
Producer: Izzy Greenfield

(Photo: Lady Gaga at the inauguration of Joe Biden as the 46th President of the United States. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct3c0v)
The Algerians who fought for France

More than 200,000 Algerians fought for France during the war of independence, becoming known as Harkis. After Algeria's independence in 1962, the Harkis were treated badly by both the Algerians and the French. The FLN regarded the Harkis as traitors; while the French washed their hands of them after losing the war. Brahim Sadouni was one of the Harkis. He spoke to Louise Hidalgo in 2010 about how he was rejected by his own father.

PHOTO: Harki forces in 1959 (Jean-Louis SWINERS/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjv90m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwtmn0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164jn90)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct32w8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjvdrr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct38s7)
Emperor Nero: Bad boy of Ancient Rome

Nero fiddled while Rome burned, didn’t he? At least, that’s what the history books tell us. Nero’s image as a depraved tyrant has been handed down to us by three biased sources, written after the emperor’s suicide in 68AD. These sources have informed interpretations of Nero’s legacy ever since, so much so that his involvement in the Great Fire of Rome has become a meme.

Recent scholarship has sought to rehabilitate Nero to a certain extent, to try to understand him in the context of his time. He was indeed a man who succeeded in shocking the Roman elite, but also someone who could strike a chord with the public and was well thought of outside the centre of political intrigue.

Rajan Datar attempts to separate fact from fiction, with guests Dr Ginna Closs, Associate Professor of Classics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in the US and author of While Rome Burned: Fire, Leadership, and Urban Disaster in the Roman Cultural Imagination which was published in 2020; and Dr Evan Jewell, Assistant Professor of History at Rutgers University, Camden. He’s writing a book entitled Youth and Power: Acting Your Age in the Roman Empire; and Dr Shushma Malik, Senior Lecturer in Classics at the University of Roehampton. She’s the author of The Nero-Antichrist: Founding and Fashioning a Paradigm.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for BBC World Service.

(Photo: Nero and the burning of Rome, July 18-27, 64 A.D. Coloured woodcut by Conti. Credit: Fototeca Gilardi/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct36fd)
Janet Guthrie: The first woman at the Indianapolis 500

In 1977, Janet Guthrie became the first woman to qualify for the Indianapolis 500 - the biggest race in American motorsport. Guthrie, a former aerospace engineer, had faced opposition and scepticism from male drivers and some sections of the press. In 2017 she talked to Rachael Gillman.

(Photo: Janet Guthrie after qualifying for the Indianapolis 500 in 1977. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjvjhw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwtw48)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164jws8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct38mq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjvn80)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct34vw)
The teenager pilot who flew around the world

Three stories of teenagers achieving big things.

Growing up in Cambodia, Richard Yim's childhood was overshadowed by a fear of landmines. Like countless other children, he was cautioned from playing outside, and when he was eight years old, his aunt was killed in a landmine explosion. When Richard was still a teenager he decided to invent a robot to help clear Cambodia of its hidden bombs. Richard spoke to Neal Razzell in 2019.

Brothers Abdoulaye and Ibrahima Barry speak Fulfulde, a language spoken by millions across Africa. The language never had its own script, so when the brothers were just children, they created one. Today, the script is supported by Microsoft. This interview was first broadcast in 2017.

Earlier this year, Zara Rutherford became the youngest woman to fly around the world, at the age of just 19. Her adventure took her over the forests of Siberia and the rainforests of Colombia, and she successfully bought her tiny plane back in just 155 days.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar

(Photo: Zara Rutherford. Credit: Beatrice De Smet)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct3c0v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjvs04)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwv3mj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164k48j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct32w8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjvwr8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172yfbxpn9yfpk)
UN chief visits mass graves in Bucha

The secretary general of the United Nations, Antonio Guterres, has called on Russia to cooperate with the International Criminal Court in its investigations into alleged war crimes carried out by Russian forces in Ukraine.

Also on the programme, protesters calling for the government of Sri Lanka to step down as the country faces the worst crisis since independence. And, scientists say that a tooth from a 205 million-year old sea creature may change our understanding of the earth's earliest predators.

(Photo: UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres visits Ukraine 28/04/2022 Reuters)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjw0hd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct39sv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164kcrs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172yk65jzx6hsg)
US economy contracts unexpectedly

Economic activity in the US contracted unexpectedly in the first three months of 2022. The Harvard economist Professor Ken Rogoff tells us whether it signals a possible recession. Also in the programme, a mass strike in Sri Lanka has forced the closure of many schools, shops and services. The BBC's Ranga Sirilal tells us why people in the country have withdrawn their labour. The United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres has been visiting Ukraine today. We catch up with Ukrainian businessman Oleg Chernyak, of CHI Software, to hear how he and his staff are doing, now that they have moved from Kharkiv in the east, to the relative safety of Lviv in the west. Plus, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis explores why sales of brooches have been soaring, and why they can be such a powerful accessory.

Today's edition is presented by Will Bain, and produced by Faarea Masud, Ivana Davidovic and George Thomas.

(Picture: A US vehicle production line. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjw47j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172yg1hgyw9jll)
Who buys Russian gas?

Russia is threatening to cut off countries which refuse to pay for gas in roubles, as a response to sanctions over its invasion of Ukraine. Poland and Bulgaria both had their supplies halted. Now some large European companies are suggesting they will pay in roubles. We'll explain who buys Russian gas and whether there are any realistic alternatives.

We'll hear a conversation between mums of small children who have fled their homes in Ukraine as a result of the war. One remains in her own country, two others are now in different European nations. They share their experiences.

And we'll explain the new law targeting kidnapping in Nigeria, which features tough penalties for kidnappers, but also people who decide to hand over ransom money to free their loved ones.

Picture: Flames on a gas cooker near Bonn in Germany (Reuters / Wolfgang Rattay)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjw7zn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172yg1hgyw9nbq)
Indonesia bans palm oil exports

Soaring palm oil prices have led to street protests because it's such an important product to Indonesians. We'll explain why the cost has gone up and whether the export ban will solve the problem. We'll also explain the consequences for food prices around the world.

We'll hear a conversation between mums of small children who have fled their homes in Ukraine as a result of the war. One remains in her own country, two others are now in different European nations. They share their experiences.

We'll explain the new law targeting kidnapping in Nigeria, which features tough penalties for kidnappers, but also people who decide to hand over ransom money to free their loved ones.

Picture: A worker on a palm oil plantation in Deli Serdang, North Sumatra, Indonesia (EPA / Dedi Sinuhaji)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjwcqs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct34vw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct3c0v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjwhgx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwvv39)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164kvr9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172ygfd18b50ft)
2022/04/28 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjwm71)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct303g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164kzhf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science In Action (w3ct368w)
The Indian subcontinent’s record-breaking heatwave

Deadly heat has been building over the Indian sub-continent for weeks and this week reached crisis levels. India experienced its hottest March on record and temperatures over 40 degrees Celsius (and in some places approaching 50 degrees) are making it almost impossible for 1.4 billion people to work. It’s damaging crops and it’s just what climate scientists have been warning about. Roland Pease talks to Vimal Mishra of the Indian Institute of Technology in Gandhinagar about the impact and causes of the unprecedented heatwave.

What could be behind the incidence of hepatitis in young children around the world in recent months? Ordinarily, liver disease in childhood is extremely rare. Could a virus normally associated with colds be responsible or is the Covid virus involved? Roland Pease talks to virologist William Irving of Nottingham University.

Also in the programme: how climate change is increasing the likelihood of animal viruses jumping the species barrier to humans with global change modeller Colin Carlson of Georgetown University, and myths about the personalities of dog breeds are exploded with new research by Elinor Karlsson of the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

(Photo: Woman cooling herself in India heatwave
Credit: Debajyoti Chakraborty/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjwqz5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172yfbxpn9z8xg)
Rockets hit Kyiv as UN Secretary-General visits

Rockets strike the Ukrainian capital during an official visit to the city by the UN Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres.

Also in the programme: a study suggests climate change will increase the risk of pandemics, by accelerating the exchange of viruses between species; and we hear from a Ukrainian Red Cross volunteer captured by Russian soldiers and taken to Belarus, and then Russia.

(Photo: UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres and Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskiy shake hands at a joint news conference, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, in Kyiv, Ukraine 28 April 2022. Credit: Reuters/Valentyn Ogirenko)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjwvq9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct39sv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164l6zp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct38mq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjwzgf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrws4d7lzj0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh0xqjk2hq)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164lbqt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172yk6zzqhxs5s)
US economy contracts unexpectedly

Economic activity in the US contracted unexpectedly in the first three months of 2022. The Harvard economist Professor Ken Rogoff tells us whether it signals a possible recession. Also in the programme, a mass strike in Sri Lanka has forced the closure of many schools, shops and services. The BBC's Ranga Sirilal tells us why people in the country have withdrawn their labour. The United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres has been visiting Ukraine today. We catch up with Ukrainian businessman Oleg Chernyak, of CHI Software, to hear how he and his staff are doing, now that they have moved from Kharkiv in the east, to the relative safety of Lviv in the west. Plus, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis explores why sales of brooches have been soaring, and why they can be such a powerful accessory.

(Picture: A US vehicle production line. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 29 APRIL 2022

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjx36k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct38s7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct36fd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjx6yp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172ydpb2k5y7bl)
Amazon shares fall sharply

Amazon has announced its first loss since 2015 due to slowing sales and rising costs; we hear more from James Clayton, the BBC's North America tech reporter. Economic activity in the US contracted unexpectedly in the first three months of 2022. The Harvard economist Professor Ken Rogoff tells us whether it signals a possible recession. Indonesia is the world's biggest producer of palm oil and it's a staple of cooking there but prices there have soared and that has led to street protests so the government has reacted by banning exports of palm oil so there's plenty for the domestic market. We hear from the BBC's Asia Editor, Rebecca Henscke. Also in the programme, a mass strike in Sri Lanka has forced the closure of many schools, shops and services. The BBC's Archana Shukla reports from Colombo. Millions of people in India are experiencing a brutal heatwave that is throwing lives and livelihoods out of gear; the India Meteorological Department says some states are recording 120 year highs. We hear more from Dr Vidhya Venugopal, Professor of Occupational and Environmental Health at the Sri Ramachandra Institute of Higher Education and Research in Chennai. Plus, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis explores why sales of brooches have been soaring, and why they can be such a powerful accessory. (Picture description: Amazon logo on phone; Picture credit: Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjxbpt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwwpb6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164lpz6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct3hpy)
Seattle Sounders and Toulouse FC

Former Seattle Sounder Steve Zakuani reflects on the first leg of the CONCACAF Champions League final. And Toulouse's Australian international Denis Genreau discusses his team's promotion.

Picture on website: Cristian Roldan of the Seattle Sounders lies on the pitch after their CONCACAF Champions League final match against Pumas (ALFREDO ESTRELLA / AFP)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjxgfy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct34vw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct3c0v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjxl62)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwwxtg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164lygg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct4234)
Not even water?

It is the number one question asked to anyone who is fasting for Ramadan, which began at the beginning of April. But what is Ramadan? Why Fast? And how do young Muslims manage Ramadan in their respective lives and work?

Former teacher turned journalist Mehreen Baig goes in search of the answers by speaking to Muslims from different cultural backgrounds. She explores all aspects of fasting like abstaining from food, sex, music and of course…water. Basically everything you wanted to know about but either didn’t ask or just weren't aware of.

(Photo: Iftar water for Ramadan fast opening. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjxpy6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghyblm)
The Ukrainian President denounces Russian attack during UN visit

The UN Secretary General has been visiting the Ukrainian capital Kyiv - two days after he travelled to Moscow. As the conflict in Ukraine rages on, we will hear from Antonio Guterres on his week of diplomacy - and what can be done to stop the fighting.

We'll tell you about another significant visit too - Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is travelling to Saudi Arabia, for the first time since the murder of the Saudi dissident Jamal Khashoggi in Istanbul. So what's behind the trip?

And we head to Kenya as the country prepares for the funeral of the former president Mwai Kibaki.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjxtpb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghygbr)
Ukraine: UN Secretary-General near missile hit in Kyiv

Ukraine's president has said a missile attack on Kyiv on the day of a visit by the UN chief shows the scorn Russia holds for international institutions.

So is the UN still relevant and can it play any significant role in ending the war? We'll hear from a former official about that.

Also a former general in the Afghan army has threatened to launch an insurgency against the Taliban after the end of Ramadan.

And scandal in the Caribbean as the Premier of the British Virgin Islands has been arrested for alleged drug smuggling and money laundering in the US.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjxyfg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172yf8gcghyl2w)
UN shocked by Moscow's attack on Kyiv during visit

Ukraine's president has said a missile attack on Kyiv on the day of a visit by the UN chief, António Guterres, shows the scorn Russia holds for international institutions. We speak to a military analyst in Kyiv.

Concerns in Europe over the Russian supply of gas - what happens if they turn off the tap? Newsday speaks to the government of North Macedonia about Russian gas.

We also report on China's zero Covid strategy. And 30 years on from the LA Riots over the acquittal of police officers who battered a black man - we hear from a photojournalist who was there.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjy25l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32fq)
Frances O'Grady: How can workers defend their interests?

As rising inflation eats into wages, and machine learning and the gig economy transform the world of work, how do workers defend their interests? Stephen Sackur speaks to Frances O’Grady, General Secretary of the UK’s Trades Union Congress.


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164mffz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct30rj)
Disney's Florida fallout

We look into the decision by Florida's governor Ron DeSantis to dissolve Disney's special status in the state. It follows Disney's criticism of a new law restricting discussion of LGBTQ issues in schools. What will the row mean for the company, and what questions does it raise for other companies navigating the so-called 'culture wars'?

We hear from Disney historian Richard Foglesong, and a former vice president of operations at Disney World, Lee Cockerell. The New York Post columnist Karol Markowicz and Christina Huguet, an analyst at political risk consultancy Eurasia Group, give their perspectives on whether companies should take a stand on the issues of the day.

Presenter: Rahul Tandon
Producer: James Graham
Photo: A Disney employee protests against the company's initial silence on a controversial new law restricting discussion of LGBTQ issues in schools. (Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct3bwb)
Algeria's rebel footballers

During Algeria's War of Independence, a group of Algerian players secretly left their clubs in France to form their own national team. Some had already been selected to play for France in the upcoming World Cup Finals in 1958. In 2014, Saint Etienne striker, Rashid Mekhloufi, spoke to Mike Lanchin about the day that changed his footballing life.

Photo: The 1958 Algerian revolutionary team, reunited 30 years later. Rashid Mekhloufi is second from the right, front row


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjy5xq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwxjk3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164mk63)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science In Action (w3ct368w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjy9nv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct33ns)
The future of Twitter

The Chief Executive of the social media company, Twitter, has acknowledged the company's future is uncertain after the board accepted a takeover offer from Elon Musk, the world's richest man. Mr Musk describes himself as a "free speech absolutist" and he says he will relax content restrictions on the platform - used by many celebrities, politicians, journalists and commentators. Some people have expressed their fears of a Musk takeover, which they say, will lead to an entirely ungoverned space - allowing propaganda, conspiracy theories and abuse to flourish. Others say they relish the prospect of the end of what they see censorship by a politically-correct West Coast tech elite. So what difference will Mr Musk's vision make to the Twitter user-experience? Will advertisers pay to be on a platform with more provocative content? And how much will change be constrained by the variety of rules governing digital media, around the world? Ritula Shah and a panel of guests discuss the future of Twitter.


Producers: Alba Morgade and Ellen Otzen


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjyfdz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwxs1c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164mspc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct3hpy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjyk53)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct37z2)
One country, two refugee experiences

Denmark has some of the toughest immigration rules in Europe but the government has welcomed thousands of Ukrainian refugees since the Russian invasion. Hanan Razek of BBC Arabic has been to Denmark to investigate what looks like a mismatch between the treatment of Syrian refugees, who've been there since 2015, and the policy towards Ukrainians.

The tree that becomes a spring
A mulberry tree in Montenegro has become famous for the spring that gushes out of its trunk at the end of winter, when the snow melts and streams are full. Katarina Stevanovic has made a video of the tree for BBC Serbian, and tells us about this strange phenomenon.

Nigeria's traditional dye pits
Dye pits in Nigeria’s Kano state have been producing beautiful indigo-dyed fabrics for more than six centuries. But insurgency in the region and changing modern tastes mean the dye pits are facing an uncertain future. BBC Africa’s Salihu Adamu visited and met some of the dyers.

KwaZulu-Natal: after the floods
More than four hundred people died and thousands were left homeless earlier this month when floods devastated South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal province. The BBC’s Pumza Fihlani describes the aftermath and its impact on local people.

An encounter with the most venomous snakes of Bangladesh
Bangladesh’s first venom research centre has opened in Chittagong. Venom is extracted from captive snakes to produce anti-venom, which will be used to treat the thousands bitten every year. A nervous Shahnewaj Rocky of BBC Bangla returned to his hometown to see inside the centre.

(Photo: Demonstrators, friends and relatives protest against the deportation of Syrian families in Copenhagen on November 13, 2021. Credit: Thibault Savary/ AFP)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct3bwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjynx7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwy0jm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164n15m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science In Action (w3ct368w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjysnc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172yfbxpnb1bln)
Estonia PM: Russia should be pushed back from Ukraine

Estonia's prime minister tells Newshour Russia should be expelled from Ukraine and "pushed back to Russia".

Also in the programme: The Afghan former general who says he's leading an insurgency against the Taliban; the premier of a British overseas territory arrested in the US on drugs charges; the displaced orphans of Ukraine; and bringing Japanese Animation to the British stage.

(Photo: Estonian PM, Kaja Kallas. Credit: EPA)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjyxdh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32fq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164n8nw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172yk2ws2hk5zd)
Italy's economy contracts

In the first three months of 2022, Italy's economy contracted by 0.2%. Italian journalist Giada Zampano talks us through the latest data. Also in the programme, Chinese technology stocks have surged, on speculation that a government crackdown on the tech sector may soon start to ease. Jonathan Cheng is China bureau chief at the Wall Street Journal, and explains the background. US law enforcement officers have arrested Andrew Fahie, the premier of the British Virgin Islands, in Florida, on charges relating to drugs trafficking and money laundering. We find out more from Daniel Bruce, chief executive of Transparency International UK. Plus, the BBC's Rahul Tandon explores the removal of Disney's special status in Florida, following the company's criticism of the state's new law restricting discussion of LGBTQ issues in schools.

Today's edition is presented by Faarea Masud, and produced by Joshua Thorpe, Ivana Davidovic and George Thomas.

(Picture: A Fiat plant in Naples, Italy. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjz14m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172yg1hgywdfhp)
Transnistria and the Ukraine conflict

Fears are growing that Moldova and Transnistria could be drawn into the Ukraine conflict. The country’s deputy prime minister has said that Moldova is facing “a very dangerous new moment”. He warned that unnamed forces were seeking to stoke tensions following a series of explosions in the Russian-controlled territory of Transnistria this week. We hear a conversation with people from the region.

We continue to bring you the latest lines on the war in Ukraine. The country’s leader, President Zelensky accuses Russia of trying to humiliate the United Nations by launching a missile attack on the capital Kyiv, while UN Secretary-General António Guterres was there for talks. The Ukrainian government says an operation is planned to evacuate civilians from a huge steel plant in Mariupol, the last area of the city holding out against Russia's besieging forces.

Also, a former Afghan general has told the BBC that he and many other former soldiers and politicians are preparing to launch military operations against the Taliban. Lieutenant General Sami Sadat said eight months of increasingly harsh Taliban rule had led them to believe that it was the only solution. We hear from our correspondent.

And more than forty Palestinians have been injured in Jerusalem's Al-Aqsa mosque compound during the latest round of early morning clashes with Israeli police. We speak to our reporter in Jerusalem about the recent rise in violence.

(Photo: The toppled Pridnestrovian radio centre antennas following explosions near Maiac, Grigoriopol, in Moldova's Transdniestria region. Credit: Transdniestrian Interior Ministry via Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjz4wr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172yg1hgywdk7t)
Gay men can donate blood in Canada

Canadian health officials have removed a ban on blood donations from gay men, one that has long been condemned as homophobic. The old rule prevented donations from men who have had sex with other men within three months of giving blood. The UK lifted its own ban last year. France, Greece, Israel, Hungary, Denmark and Brazil have also lifted restrictions. We hear from gay men who have recently donated blood.

We continue to bring you the latest lines on the war in Ukraine. The country’s leader, President Zelensky accuses Russia of trying to humiliate the United Nations by launching a missile attack on the capital Kyiv, while UN Secretary-General António Guterres was there for talks. The Ukrainian government says an operation is planned to evacuate civilians from a huge steel plant in Mariupol, the last area of the city holding out against Russia.

Also, fears are growing that Moldova and Transnistria could be drawn into the Ukraine conflict. The country’s deputy prime minister has said that Moldova is facing “a very dangerous new moment”. He warned that unnamed forces were seeking to stoke tensions following a series of explosions in the Russian-controlled territory of Transnistria this week. We hear a conversation with people from the region.

And, a former Afghan general has told the BBC that he and many other former soldiers and politicians are preparing to launch military operations against the Taliban. Lieutenant General Sami Sadat said eight months of increasingly harsh Taliban rule had led them to believe that it was the only solution. We hear from our correspondent.

(Photo: A man donating blood. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjz8mw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct37z2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct3bwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjzdd0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mzvwyr0d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164nrnd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172ygfd18b7xbx)
2022/04/29 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjzj44)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct374z)
Twitter: The Elon Musk takeover

On the programme this week, Brooke Erin Duffy of Cornell University returns to give her assessment of Twitter's new owner. The MEP Arba Kokalari explains the new tougher approach Europe is taking to regulating tech. And wine drinkers see if they can tell the difference between a real sommelier and an AI one.


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164nwdj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct3j6r)
How do you balance on a bicycle?

How do we stay up when we ride a bicycle? Lots of us can do it without even thinking about it, but probably very few of us can say exactly HOW we do it. Well, CrowdScience listener Arif and his children Maryam and Mohammed from India want to understand what’s going on in our heads when go for a cycle, and how we learn to do it in the first place.

Presenter Marnie Chesterton is on the case, tracking down a neuroscientist studying how our brains and bodies work together to keep us balanced whether we’re walking or trying to ride a bicycle. She learns about the quirks of bicycle engineering from researchers in the Netherlands who are part of a lab entirely devoted to answering this question. In the process falling off of some unusual bicycles and uncovering the surprising truth that physics might not yet have a proper answer. And we peer deeper into our brains to find out why some memories last longer than others, whether some people can learn quicker than others and the best way to learn a new skill.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Produced by Emily Bird for the BBC World Service.

Featuring:
Kathleen Cullen, Johns Hopkins University, USA
Jason Moore, University of Technology Delft, The Netherlands
Lara Boyd, University of British Columbia, Canada
Rado Dukalski, University of Technology Delft, The Netherlands
Josie and Freesia, Pedal Power


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjzmw8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172yfbxpnb25tk)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjzrmd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32fq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164p3ws)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct3hpy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172ykq0lgjzwcj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrws4d7pwf3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh0xqjmzdt)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqv164p7mx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172yk3q6t38gcq)
Italy's economy contracts

In the first three months of 2022, Italy's economy contracted by 0.2%. Italian journalist Giada Zampano talks us through the latest data. Also in the programme, Chinese technology stocks have surged, on speculation that a government crackdown on the tech sector may soon start to ease. Jonathan Cheng is China bureau chief at the Wall Street Journal, and explains the background. US law enforcement officers have arrested Andrew Fahie, the premier of the British Virgin Islands, in Florida, on charges relating to drugs trafficking and money laundering. We find out more from Daniel Bruce, chief executive of Transparency International UK. Plus, the BBC's Rahul Tandon explores the removal of Disney's special status in Florida, following the company's criticism of the state's new law restricting discussion of LGBTQ issues in schools.

(Picture: A Fiat plant in Naples, Italy. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3ct303f)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct303g)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct303g)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172ykqtnxtxbjb)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172ykqtnxtxg8g)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172ykqtnxtxthv)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172ykqtnxty5r7)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172ykqtnxty9hc)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172ykqtnxtyjzm)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172ykqtnxtzd6j)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SAT (w172ykqtnxtzhyn)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172ykqtnxtzzy5)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172ykqtnxv03p9)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172ykqtnxv0c5k)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172ykqtnxv0lnt)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172ykqtnxv0qdy)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172ykqtnxv12nb)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172ykqtnxv16dg)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172ykqtnxv1b4l)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172ykqtnxv1fwq)

BBC News Summary 12:30 SUN (w172ykqtnxv1kmv)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172ykqtnxv2s34)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172ykqtnxv2wv8)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172ykqtnxv30ld)

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BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172ykqv164b7r5)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172ykqv164bqqp)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172ykqv164c2z2)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172ykqv164cbgb)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172ykqv164ckyl)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172ykqv164d1y3)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172ykqv164d5p7)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172ykqv164df5h)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172ykqv164djxm)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172ykqv164dx50)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172ykqv164f4n8)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172ykqv164fmms)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172ykqv164frcx)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172ykqv164fzw5)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172ykqv164g7cf)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172ykqv164ggvp)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172ykqv164gyv6)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172ykqv164h2lb)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172ykqv164hb2l)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172ykqv164hftq)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172ykqv164ht23)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172ykqv164j1kc)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172ykqv164jjjw)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172ykqv164jn90)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172ykqv164jws8)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172ykqv164kvr9)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172ykqv164kzhf)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172ykqv164l6zp)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172ykqv164lbqt)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172ykqv164lpz6)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172ykqv164lygg)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172ykqv164mffz)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172ykqv164mk63)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172ykqv164mspc)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172ykqv164n15m)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172ykqv164nrnd)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172ykqv164nwdj)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172ykqv164p3ws)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172ykqv164p7mx)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172ykq07676vht)

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BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172ykq076785q7)

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BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172ykq07679rdx)

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BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172ykq0767c2mb)

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BBC News 23:00 MON (w172ykq0lgjm8r4)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172ykq0lgjmdh8)

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BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172ykq0lgjq5n7)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172ykq0lgjq9dc)

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BBC News 00:00 THU (w172ykq0lgjt69g)

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BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172ykq0lgjx36k)

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BBC OS Conversations 19:06 SAT (w3ct4179)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 SUN (w3ct4179)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172yg1hgyw0tw9)

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BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172yg1hgywdk7t)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct30x1)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct3162)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct31bl)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct311k)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct30rj)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172ydpb2k5njm9)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172ydpb2k5rfjd)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172ydpb2k5vbfh)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172ydpb2k5y7bl)

Comedians vs. the News 00:32 MON (w3ct3jt7)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct3j6q)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct3j6q)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct3j6r)

Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct3hh3)

Deeply Human 22:06 SUN (w3ct3hh3)

Deeply Human 03:06 MON (w3ct3hh3)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct31y7)

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Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct4290)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct4291)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct4291)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct4291)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct3277)

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HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct32l7)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct32l7)

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Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct32w7)

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Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct4233)

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Hidden Sport 09:32 SAT (w3ct41d2)

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In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct3jhs)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct3jhs)

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More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct3k4h)

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More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct3k4h)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct30jq)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172yf8gcghkqz7)

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Newshour 19:06 SUN (p051zl5n)

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Newshour 14:06 MON (w172yfbxpn9nqz8)

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Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3ct41d9)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct34n3)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct34n3)

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Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3ct352n)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct34vw)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct35s1)

Over to You 14:50 SUN (w3ct35s1)

Over to You 22:50 SUN (w3ct35s1)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct35s1)

People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct3j27)

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Science In Action 20:32 THU (w3ct368w)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172ygfd189w9qj)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172yg8g0mddppz)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172ygjnfxf96zd)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172ygjnfxfdccr)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct370f)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3ct374z)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct38zz)

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The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct3khs)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct41cy)

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The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct37lp)

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The Cultural Frontline 11:32 SAT (w3ct37r8)

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The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct41d1)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct38mp)

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The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct38s6)

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The History Hour 00:06 TUE (w3ct39l1)

The Inquiry 12:06 SUN (w3ct39st)

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The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3ct33nr)

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The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3ct39z0)

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Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172ykwbz6ftxbt)

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Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct3bw9)

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Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct3byl)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3ct3byl)

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WorklifeIndia 01:32 SAT (w3ct3jc7)

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World Business Report 01:06 SAT (w172yk17jbzfl9z)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172yk4jnjpk66l)

World Business Report 23:32 MON (w172yk5c3898glx)

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World Business Report 23:32 TUE (w172yk8mw5q3l75)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct3hpy)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct3hpy)

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