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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 16 APRIL 2022

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxfpwz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct33nq)
The appeal of the French far-right

This week the first round of the presidential election in France has shone a spotlight on the tectonic shifts taking place in the nation’s politics. President Emmanuel Macron, who shocked the world five years ago by winning the presidency as an outsider, has firmly established his party as the only centrist force - peeling off support from the traditional left and right. His main challenger, Marine Le Pen of National Rally, has proved the enduring appeal of the far-right by once again receiving the second highest number of votes. They will face each other in a run-off on 24th April. Analysts believe Ms Le Pen would have performed even better had she not faced stiff competition from another far-right figure, former TV personality Eric Zemmour. So what's behind the popularity of right-wing politics in France? Are policies that used to be confined to the more extreme ends of the political spectrum now becoming commonplace? And what might a far-right president mean for France’s place in Europe and the world?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxftn3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172yk1752nnfq4)
Twitter board to fight Musk bid

Twitter’s board has adopted a ‘poison pill’ policy to help prevent a potential hostile takeover, a day after Elon Musk offered to buy the platform. The BBC’s North America tech reporter James Clayton tells us what the strategy is, and how it could prevent the Tesla CEO from acquiring a controlling stake in the social media giant. Plus, despite several international airlines having suspended flights to and from Russia following the invasion of Ukraine, Emirates president Tim Clark tells us why the Dubai-owned carrier has no plans to follow suit. We bring you a special report from the African island nation of Sao Tome and Principe. Once the world’s largest cocoa exporter but now unable to compete with countries on the mainland due to the islands’ relatively small surface area, Sao Tome’s coffee industry is now pursuing a higher-value product in order to remain a key market player. And we tell you about the innovative technique which is already helping thousands of cocoa farmers in Ghana boost their incomes by up to 30%.

(Photo: Elon Musk offered to buy Twitter at $54.20 per share; Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj45xh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct3jc6)
Should the state be policing food choices?

A bizarre controversy over food has grabbed the spotlight in India recently. Calls for a meat ban by right-wing politicians during a Hindu religious festival sparked a fierce debate about unwanted interference in people’s food choices.

Many see this as an assault on secularism - one of the key principles on which independent India was founded. Experts also point out that despite common beliefs about India being a largely vegetarian country, research has shown that only about 20% of Indians are actually vegetarian. Hindus, who make up 80% of the country's population, are major meat-eaters.

While the Hindu nationalist government has reasserted its commitment to secularism, there is rising fear that the call for a meat ban is just another part of the process, which aims to gradually undermine the freedom of choice that minority communities have so far enjoyed. And what about the Constitutional rights to food and livelihood?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss whether the state should be policing people’s food choices.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Zainab Sikander, writer, columnist; Dr Manoshi Bhattacharya, clinical nutritionist, food historian; Rahul Easwar, author, right-wing activist

Image: A view of a meat shop, at INA market on April 6, 2022 in New Delhi, India (Credit: Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxfyd7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7m8b8f90m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj49nm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct370d)
Alyssa Healy special

Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Matt Clinch are joined by Australian superstar Alyssa Healy.

She currently tops the ICC Women's One Day International player rankings and most recently smashed 170 runs in the World Cup final to help Australia win their seventh World Cup title. She tells us all about that final, how she felt playing her shots and how special it was to play after carrying drinks in the 2013 World Cup.

She also tells us about the dominance of Australian cricket, the possibility of a women's Indian Premier League and her family’s influence on her life.

We also hear what comes first in her life; cricket, golf, her dogs or her husband... Australian bowler Mitchell Starc.

Photo: Alyssa Healy of Australia poses with the World Cup trophy in front of fans after Australia won the 2022 ICC Women's Cricket World Cup Final match between Australia and England in Christchurch, New Zealand. (Credit: Getty Images)

Photo:


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxg24c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct37z0)
Celebrity vlogger or traitor?

Wang Jixian is a computer programmer from Beijing who was relocated to Odessa shortly before the Russian invasion. He started sharing videos of war-torn Ukraine and ended up being labelled a traitor by Chinese nationalists. BBC Chinese editor Howard Zhang tells us more.

Economising during Ramadan
With rising food prices across the Arabic-speaking world, many families are having to scale down the Ramadan traditions of special meals and generous hospitality at the end of a day of fasting. Reem Fatthelbab of BBC Arabic has heard from women from Egypt, Lebanon and Tunisia as they shop for the evening meal.

Brazil’s neglected superfoods
Brazil is home to almost a fifth of the world’s plant species, and yet its farmers rely on just a few commercial crops, nearly all originating from outside the country. The BBC’s Joao Fellet tells us about his investigation into the many native plants which could feed people cheaply and sustainably.

The World Cup fortune-teller
When Pooria Jafereh of BBC Persian correctly predicted, live on air, Iran's opponents at the 2022 FIFA World Cup group stage, it went viral. He tells us how he made his predictions, and describes how the story then took on a life of its own.

Pioneering teachers in Papua
An Indonesian couple have made a new life for themselves in a remote village in the province of Papua. Adit and Putri are teachers, and they wanted to provide education in a place which has been without a school for many years. Nicky Widadio of BBC Indonesian has been hearing their story.

(Vlogger Wang Jixian. Credit: Wang Jixian)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct3bw8)
The World Wide Web

The World Wide Web was created in 1989 by a young British computer scientist called Tim Berners-Lee. It's been called one of the greatest inventions of the 20th century and has revolutionised the way we live and interact with each other and the world, and share information and knowledge. Louise Hidalgo talks to fellow computer scientists Ben Segal and Jean Francois Groff who worked at the European scientific research centre, Cern, where Tim Berners-Lee created the World Wide Web, and helped him realise his vision.

Picture: abstract world map with glowing networks (credit: Imaginima/Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxg5wh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct33nq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxg9mm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7m8b8fn80)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj4nx0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct3bqn)
Defecting online: How soldiers are deserting the Burmese army

Myanmar has been engulfed by a civil war which is getting deadlier and more violent as time goes on. Last year the Tatmadaw – the Burmese armed forces – overthrew the civilian-led government, led by Aung Sun Suu Kyi. Now they’re acting with impunity, allegedly committing heinous crimes against those who oppose them.
In the past year many Tatmadaw soldiers – thousands, according to the opposition – have had second thoughts about their military service and are defecting to the other side. Trending has spoken to several of the defectors. They told us how they changed their minds, how they used social media to connect with the rebels and how they’re now using online tools to work against the military leaders they once served.

Presenter: Reha Kansara

Photo: Burmese soldiers line up with guns hoisted
Photo Credit: Getty Images


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct3k4g)
Subitising and simplifying: how to better explain numbers

Have you ever looked at a numerical claim and thought ‘what on earth does that mean?’

Complex numbers are often badly communicated, making it difficult for the public to appreciate what they signify - but dial things down too much and you’re at risk of oversimplifying important issues.

It’s a tightrope walk authors Chip Heath and Karla Starr have explored in their new book ‘Making Numbers Count’. Tim Harford talks to them about how we can improve the way we communicate numbers to the general public.

Producer: Lizzy McNeill

(Image: Child in front of numbers, Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxgfcr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172ykwbly41rqz)
Russia warns US and its allies against arming Ukraine

Russia has warned the United States and its allies against supplying arms to Ukraine saying doing so could lead to "unpredictable consequences."

The head of the World Food Programme says humanitarian organisations are finding it difficult to reach out to those in need of aid in Ukraine cities and towns.

Also in the programme: An update on China's biggest city Shanghai and its fight against rising cases of Covid-19.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other topical issues of the day are Rokhaya Diallo, a French journalist, author, filmmaker and an activist for minority rights and racial and religious equality and Colleen Graffy, a former United States Deputy Assistant Secretary of State and now an associate professor of law at Pepperdine University, Caruso Law School in the US.

(Picture: Members of the Ukrainian military are seen near a tank, amid Russia's invasion in Ukraine, near Kyiv on March 10, 2022. Credit: REUTERS/Anna Kudriavtseva)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxgk3w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172ykwbly41wh3)
Russia warns US and its allies against arming Ukraine

Russia has warned the US and Nato against supplying arms to Ukraine saying doing so could lead to "unpredictable consequences."

The head of the United Nations World Food Programme says he’s not getting a response from Moscow about how to reach people starving to death in besieged Ukrainian areas

Also in the programme: We hear about Somalia's first all female newsroom.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other topical issues of the day are Rokhaya Diallo, a French journalist, author, filmmaker and an activist for minority rights and racial and religious equality and Colleen Graffy, a former United States Deputy Assistant Secretary of State and now an associate professor of law at Pepperdine University, Caruso Law School in the US.

(Picture: Service members of pro-Russian troops drive a tank during Ukraine-Russia conflict on a road outside the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 10, 2022. Credit: REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko.)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxgnw0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172ykwbly42077)
Russia warns US and its allies against arming Ukraine

Russia has warned the US and Nato against supplying arms to Ukraine saying doing so could lead to "unpredictable consequences."

The head of the United Nations World Food Programme says he’s not getting a response from Moscow about how to reach people starving to death in besieged Ukrainian areas.

Also in the programme: Somalia launches its first all-female newsroom.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other topical issues of the day are Rokhaya Diallo, a French journalist, author, filmmaker and an activist for minority rights and racial and religious equality and also Colleen Graffy, a former United States Deputy Assistant Secretary of State and now an associate professor of law at Pepperdine University, Caruso Law School in the US.

(Picture: NATO member country leaders pose for a family photo before a summit to discuss Russia's invasion of Ukraine at the alliance's headquarters in Brussels, Belgium on March 24, 2022. Credit: REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj514d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct37ln)
Women who puzzle

Millions of people around the world love doing puzzles, and since the pandemic they’ve become even more popular. From complex sudoku grids to cryptic clues in crosswords, and recent viral sensations like Wordle, we have long been intrigued by them and make time to pursue them in our daily or weekly routines.

But, for some, puzzles are much more than a pastime. What’s it like to solve sudoku competitively or create crosswords for a living? And can puzzles be a space for feminist expression? Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women to find out.

Tantan Dai from China is one of the world’s fastest sudoku solvers. What was once just an elective taken at school swiftly developed into a professional undertaking. She twice won gold in the under 18 category at the World Sudoku Championship. She’s currently based in the USA, where she’s studying mathematics.

Anna Shechtman from the United States had her first crossword published in the New York Times at the age of 19 and is now a crossword compiler for The New Yorker. She is also a Klarman Fellow at Cornell University and will begin as an assistant professor in the Department of Literatures in English in 2024.

Produced by Emily Naylor and Alice Gioia.

(IMAGE: (L), Anna Shechtman, courtesy of Emily Shechtman. (R), Tantan Dai, courtesy of Tantan Dai)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxgsm4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7m8b8g47j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj54wj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Explanation (w3ct3tq2)
Understanding the long history between Russia and Ukraine

Claire Graham talks to former BBC foreign correspondent Kevin Connolly about what has historically bound Russia and Ukraine together, and what has pulled them apart.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct35s0)
Has the war given disinformation a boost?

We return to the ongoing issue which is worrying many listeners: disinformation. Has the war in Ukraine made tackling it a more urgent priority? How does the BBC’s team differentiate between fact and fiction, and is social media in some way to blame? We ask the BBC’s disinformation editor, Rebecca Skippage, where priorities lie.

Plus, was the right terminology used in the documentary series Black Music in Europe? A listener in Kenya says not.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxgxc8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172yg8fnc2mk34)
Lesia Tsurenko considered quitting tennis following Russian invasion of Ukraine

Lesia Tsurenko discusses the guilt she feels about not being in Ukraine and the impact the conflict has had on her mental health. Tsurenko says she considered ending her playing career before a chat with Alex Dolgopolov made her see she could help Ukrainian’s by continuing to play and earn money to send home. Along with Elina Svitolina, Tsurenko has donated money to buy a tractor for the Army, which she believes will help save lives.

Beau Greaves reflects on becoming the youngest ever World Champion in Darts. The 18-year-old predicted she’d win a World Title when she was just 13 years old and tells us winning the WDF World Championship was for her family members that didn’t live to see her achieve her dream. She also says she’s now hoping to pass her driving test if she can master roundabouts.

The first blind person to lead climb the iconic Old Man of Hoy – Jesse Dufton – tells us how he got into the sport and how his wife helped him adapt his climbing as his eyesight deteriorated. Dufton says his next challenge is the “Prophecy of Drowning”, which is located on a remote Scottish island.

In Sporting Witness, we tell the story of the cricket club which pulled off what is believed to be the first tour of North Korea. We hear from Jon Newton, who is the president of Shanghai cricket club and the man who brought the sports tradition of cucumber sandwiches to a pariah state.

Russell Fuller joins us live from Prague with the latest on the Billie Jean King Cup, Shabnam Younus-Jewell is at the World Snooker Championship for us and John Murray is with us ahead of Manchester City’s FA Cup semi-final against Liverpool at Wembley Stadium.

Image: Lesia Tsurenko hits a shot during second round of the Miami Open on March 25, 2022 at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, FL. (Photo by Aaron Gilbert/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxh13d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7m8b8gcqs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj5dcs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Tech Tent (w3ct374x)
Facial recognition technology and the war in Ukraine

A controversial facial recognition company helps identify the dead in Ukraine. And a look at whether age verification tech can stop children viewing pornography online.


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxh4vj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct41vt)
Who killed my grandfather?

Beirut, 1974. It is the height of the Cold War. A prominent Yemeni politician is shot dead in his car. Some say, had he lived, Yemen would be a different country today. The killer was never caught, the assassination never investigated.

Political assassinations in the Middle East are almost always unsolved, and reliable evidence can be extremely hard to find. The lack of accountability in these cases is often seen as the reason for the pervasiveness of assassinations in the region. In Yemen, power struggles over the last 60 years have left a long list of murdered political figures. One particular case, the unsolved murder of Yemen’s former Foreign Minister in 1974, sent shockwaves across the country, and was covered widely in the region and then in the West. Mohamed Noman was a liberal and progressive politician who was building a different path for Yemen, away from authoritarian rule. His death at the early age of 41 had arguably paved the way for decades of military rule in Yemen.

In this documentary, his granddaughter, Mai Noman, sets off on a mission to investigate who could have been behind his murder, almost 50 years after his death.

Presenter: Mai Noman
Producer: Estelle Doyle


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxh8ln)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172yfbwz3pktjy)
Russia strikes military-industrial facilities in Kyiv

Russia's defence ministry claims the missile strikes targeted a military plant in the capital Kyiv.

Also on the programme: will Elon Musk swallow Twitter's poison pill? And it's 20 years since the hit film about women's football, Bend It Like Beckham.

(Photo: A member of the Ukrainian Territorial Defence Forces attends military drills in Kyiv region of Ukraine Credit: REUTERS/Stringer)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxhdbs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172ygjn2n3j2ck)
Live Sporting Action

Lee James presents FA Cup semi-final commentary of Manchester City against Liverpool live from Wembley Stadium.

We’ll also bring you updates on Saturday’s four Premier League games, as well as the best of the action from across Europe and the first Women’s FA Cup semi-final between West Ham and Manchester City.

(Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxhwb9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7m8b8h6yp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj67lp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct3bqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct36fb)
Cricket in North Korea

In 2008, a group of cricketers went on what is believed to be the first tour of North Korea. The Shanghai Cricket Club arranged at their own expense to play the first - and only - edition of the Pyongyang Cricket Friendship Cup. Although initially baffled by the sport, some of the North Korean players showed a surprising amount of talent. Jo McDermott talks to Jon Newton, the president of Shanghai cricket club - and the man who brought cucumber sandwiches to a pariah state.

PHOTO: Action from the Pyongyang Cricket Friendship Cup (Courtesy of Jon Newton)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxj02f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct4178)
Saving Ukraine's children

The United Nations’ children agency, UNICEF, has said that almost two-thirds of Ukraine’s 7.5 million children have been displaced during the six weeks since Russia’s invasion.

One of Russia’s key targets has been the southern port city of Mariupol. Thousands of civilians are dead, many more have been left trapped and face an horrendous struggle for survival. Pastor Gennady Mokhnenko is a chaplain from Mariupol. He describes what he has seen and heard in the city and his efforts to help children to escape. He is joined in conversation by director of the charity, Partnership for Every Child, Vasylyna Dubaylo. She’s currently in Poland and has been helping foster children find Ukrainian families.

The war has now separated millions of people in Ukraine from loved ones and host Ben James introduces us to Olha and Andrii, a young married couple. Olha took an opportunity to leave with her younger siblings but is now more than five thousand miles away in Canada. Andrii remains in Ukraine wondering if he will be called upon to fight for his country. Neither of them know when or if they will see each other again and they discuss how the war has changed their lives.

Guidance: Contains graphic content.

(Photo: A group of children evacuated from an orphanage in Zaporizhzhia wait to board a bus for their transfer to Poland after fleeing the ongoing Russian invasion at the main train station in Lviv, Ukraine, March 5, 2022. Credit: Kai Pfaffenbach/Reuters)


SAT 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj6cbt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct3jc6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxj3tk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct38zy)
Antoneta Alamat Kusijanović

Nikki Bedi is joined by Croatian director Antoneta Alamat Kusijanović, whose captivating film Murina won the Camera d'Or at Cannes.

Actors Sandra Bullock and Daniel Radcliffe talk about their latest adventure: The Lost City.

Screenwriter and director Aaron Sorkin talks about writer's block.

Jude Law reveals his take on playing Dumbledore.

Vietnamese American poet Ocean Vuong talks about his new collection of poems.

And Estonian musician Maarja Nuut combines traditional songs with cutting edge technology.

Nikki is joined by critic, academic and broadcaster Shahidha Bari.

(Photo: Julija (Gracija Filipovic) (lhs) and Nela (Danica Curcic) (rhs) in Murina. Credit: © Antitalent RTFeatures)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxj7kp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172yfbwz3plshz)
Russia bombs Kyiv for a second consecutive day

Despite an apparent shift in the focus of the conflict in Ukraine to the south and east of the country, Russia has targeted the capital Kyiv for a second successive day and explosions have also been heard in the western city of Lviv.

We hear from a resident of Kyiv, who recounts how the rocket attacks have affected the city.

Also in the programme: we hear how people are trying to rebuild their lives in the ​Ukrainian town of Bucha - where hundreds of people were killed - and the World Food Programme warns the war in Ukraine will have an impact on food supplies in other vulnerable countries in the coming months.

(Photo shows smoke rising over Darnytskyi District of Kyiv, Ukraine on April 16, 2022. Credit: Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxjc9t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct30jp)
'I don't have an identity beyond music', with Planningtorock, Peaches, Hard Feelings and Colin Self

Planningtorock, Peaches, Hard Feelings and Colin Self discuss bullying themselves into releasing music, audio as a weapon against apathy, why there's no shelf life on great music, using music-making process as a tool for self-discovery, and making sounds with their bodies.

Jam Rahuoja Rostron, also known as Planningtorock, is a singer-songwriter, producer, composer and director from Bolton, England now based in Tallin, Estonia. They experiment with electronic sounds, digital instruments, and manipulated vocals and sounds.

Musician, producer and performance artist Peaches has spent the past two decades breaking barriers with her work. From Toronto, Canada, she plays with gender role representation, mixed with hard electronic sounds, and shocking live shows.

American artist, composer and choreographer Colin Self, who’s based in New York and Berlin, works across multiple disciplines and practices, using voices, bodies and computers as musical tools interfaced into software.

Hot Chip’s Joe Goddard and singer Amy Douglas, better known as Hard Feelings, create an immersive experience that weaves together new wave, synthpop, and dance. Their debut album has been described as ‘an opera of sad bangers’.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxjh1y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrwrdvm7h3j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh065x5l37)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj6vbb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct37r7)
What does history sound like?

Indigenous cultures have been suppressed since Europeans first arrived in Mexico. But increasingly, modern Mexicans want some sort of connection with their indigenous past.

At its height, the ancient Mexican city of Teotihuacan had 100,000 citizens and was the largest city in the Western Hemisphere. But the civilisation had no written language, and the sudden disappearance of its population is largely unexplained. Luckily, the civilisation left behind the remains of instruments. Adje Both and Osvaldo Perez are an academic and a potter that are part of a global network of musicians, instrument makers and archaeologists that are piecing these instruments back together and recreating them. In doing so, they can breathe life back into these lost instruments and rediscover the sounds of these ancient cultures.

But for the indigenous cultures of Mexico, who are still oppressed, dispossessed and marginalised, these instruments take on a more significant meaning. Xiuhtezcatl is based in LA, but his father is Mexica - an indigenous group that used to rule the Aztec empire - and the instruments are a visceral link to his ancestors. Using the work of Adje and Osvaldo and matching it with digital manipulation, Xiuhtezcatl goes back in time and tries to discover what history sounds like.

Image: A collection of instruments (Credit: Tolly Robinson)



SUNDAY 17 APRIL 2022

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxjlt2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct4178)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj6z2g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Trending (w3ct3bqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 More or Less (w3ct3k4g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxjqk6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct39yz)
How ‘magic mushroom’ chemical treats depression

Brain scanning experiments reveal how psilocybin works to relieve severe depression. Psilocybin is the psychedelic substance in 'magic mushrooms'. The psychoactive chemical is currently in clinical trials in the UK and US as a potential treatment for depression and other mental illnesses. Professor David Nutt of Imperial College London tells Roland about the research

Also in the show, worrying findings about the increase in premature deaths because of air pollution in growing cities in tropical Africa and Asia. An international group of climatologists has found that the tropical storms which struck Mozambique, Malawi and Madagascar in early 2022 had been made more intense by human-induced climate change. And astronomer David Jewitt used the Hubble telescope to measure the largest known comet in the solar system - it's huge at about 120 kilometres across.

The team at CrowdScience has spent years answering all sorts of listener questions, which must make them pretty smart, right? IN this week’s episode, that assumption is rigorously tested as Marnie Chesterton and the team pit their wits against a multitude of mind-bending puzzles from an old TV game show - all in the name of answering a question from Antonia in Cyprus.

She wants to know: how do we work out how clever someone is? Is IQ the best measure of cleverness? Why do we put such weight on academic performance? And where does emotional intelligence fit into it all?

In the search for answers, presenter Marnie Chesterton and the team are locked in rooms to battle mental, physical, mystery, and skill-based challenges, all against the clock. Unpicking their efforts in the studio are a global team of cleverness researchers: Dr. Stuart Ritchie from Kings College London, Professor Sophie von Stumm from York University, and Dr. Alex Burgoyne, from the Georgia Institute of Technology in the US.

They are challenged to face the toughest questions in their field: Why do men and women tend to perform differently in these tests? Is our smartness in our genes? And what about the Flynn effect – where IQs appear to have risen, decade after decade, around the world.


(Image: Mexican Psilocybe Cubensis. An adult mushroom raining spores. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxjv9b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7m8b8j5xq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj76kq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvn)
The psychology of courage and bravery

The adventurer and ultra-runner Alex Staniforth talks about his survival on Everest following the devastating Nepalese earthquake in 2015. Rachel Manning from Buckingham University considers why we do or don’t intervene in risky situations and in everyday life. And Patrick Tissington from Warwick University draws on the stories behind those awarded the Victoria or George Cross for bravery to suggest some of the best ways to manage our fear in allowing us to be more courageous. The programme is presented by Claudia Hammond and recorded at the Cheltenham Science Festival in June 2021.

Image: Rock climber clinging to a cliff
Credit: gregepperson/Getty Images

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Adrian Washbourne


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxjz1g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct41vt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxk2sl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct3276)
Imran Khan is out

Pascale Harter introduces dispatches from BBC correspondents in Pakistan, Russia, Korea and Belgium.

Pakistan has a new Prime Minister after cricketer-turned-politician Imran Khan was removed from power – not in elections, but by a parliamentary vote of no confidence. It marked the culmination of weeks of political drama in the country, and there could be further twists ahead with Khan vowing to resist. Secunder Kermani looks back at his tenure and what went wrong for the former national hero.

What do Russians really make of their country’s invasion of Ukraine? It is no easy matter to conduct opinion polls in Russia at the best of times - sampling views from St Petersburg to Siberia is a challenge whatever the rules of the game. Right now though, few Russian people feel entirely free to express their opinions anyway. What they do know – all too well – is that expressing dissent view could cost them their liberty; people who have publicly criticised the war have found themselves locked up. Jenny Hill is in Moscow, and has been keeping her ear to the ground.

In South Korea, women’s rights were a critical issue in the recent general election - that is, the issue of rolling them back. The country’s new president elect, the conservative Yoon Suk-yeol, has been labelled an anti-feminist, winning a tight race by targeting the concerns of young male voters, who were said to be anxious about the social progress made by women. Female ambition - and solidarity - will be needed to keep up the fight for equal rights. As she nears the end of her posting to Seoul, Laura Bicker reflects on the stories of fortitude, persistence and bravery she heard from Korean women of all ages.

Life has not been much fun for performers during the various phases of Covid lockdown. Musicians had a particularly hard time of it - certainly the ones used to playing in front of sweaty crowds keen on dancing. So when the Belgian rock band, Demisec, were offered their first gig in a year, they jumped at the chance. Their bassist, BBC cameraman Maarten Lernout, did not mind at all that they were being asked to play in a local prison...

Producer: Polly Hope
Production Co-ordinator: Gemma Ashman

(Image: A Pakistani resident reads a newspaper after Prime Minister Imran Khan, lost the vote of no-confidence in the parliament in Pakistan Credit: EPA/Shahzaib Akber)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj7g1z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct37r7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxk6jq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7m8b8jk53)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj7kt3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct41cs)
Healing with fire on koala country

In the forests surrounding Biamanga, a sacred mountain for the Yuin people of south-eastern Australia, traditional indigenous fire practitioners are preparing to bring fire back into the landscape.

Not the raging fires that threatened to destroy it in the deadly Black Summer bushfires of 2019, but cool fires that will help protect and revitalise the land and help restore habitat for the elusive population of koalas who have survived in this forest against the toughest of odds.

The practice of cultural burning has been revived in recent decades to help heal the land after wildfire, drought and mismanagement. And we will walk back in time to understand how the long fight for Aboriginal land rights, decades of environmental activism and the discovery of koalas came together to save this forest for future generations.

(Photo: Cultural fire practitioner Dan Morgan watches a burn. Credit: Vanessa Milton)

Shifting Cultures is a BBC World Service and ABC co-production.


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxkb8v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172ykwbly44nn2)
Russia urges Ukraine forces in Mariupol to surrender

Russia has urged Ukraine forces defending the besieged and heavily bombarded port of Mariupol to surrender within hours in order to save their lives.

Search and recovery operations are continuing in South Africa's flooded KwaZulu-Natal province.

Also in the programme: Some rare success for Nigeria's military in its drawn-out war against IS militants.

Joining Celia Hatton are Liana Fix, programme director for international affairs at the Körber-Stiftung think tank in Berlin and Matthew Green, global investigations editor at DeSmog, a non-profit news website focused on exposing "climate misconduct by companies and governments.
(Picture: Service members of pro-Russian troops drive a tank during Ukraine-Russia conflict on a road outside the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 10, 2022. Credit: REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko.)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxkg0z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172ykwbly44sd6)
Russia claims near total control of Mariupol

Russia has claimed near total control of the port city of Mariupol save for a few pockets still under the Ukrainian resistance forces.

A new book about the documents and personal notebook recovered from Osama bin Laden's compound in Pakistan after he was killed by US Special Operations forces in 2011.

Also in the programme: We hear from the great-grand daughter of Nikita Khrushchev, the former Soviet Union leader, who says the capture of Mariupol could allow Russia to end the war.

Joining Celia Hatton are Liana Fix, programme director for international affairs at the Körber-Stiftung think tank in Berlin and Matthew Green, global investigations editor at DeSmog, a non-profit news website focused on exposing "climate misconduct by companies and governments.

(Picture: Service members of pro-Russian troops inspect streets during Ukraine-Russia conflict in the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 7, 2022. Credit: REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko.)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxkks3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172ykwbly44x4b)
Russia issues ultimatum to last defenders of Mariupol

Russia has told the remaining forces defending the besieged port city of Mariupol to surrender within hours and be treated within the bounds of international law.

Search and recovery operations are continuing in South Africa's flooded KwaZulu-Natal province.

Also in the programme: Why Finland has been named the happiest country in the world for the fifth time.

Joining Celia Hatton are Liana Fix, programme director for international affairs at the Körber-Stiftung think tank in Berlin and Matthew Green, global investigations editor at DeSmog, a non-profit news website focused on exposing "climate misconduct by companies and governments.

(Picture: Ukrainian tanks move into the city, after Russian President Vladimir Putin authorized a military operation in eastern Ukraine, in Mariupol, February 24, 2022. Credit: REUTERS/Carlos Barria)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj7y1h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct38mn)
Tasting climate change

Wine producers say a warming planet can be detected in the glass.

The owners of long-established vineyards are having to adapt their methods to preserve the taste of their wines, but experts say change is inevitable and already tangible.

Ruth Alexander finds out how climate change is challenging some of the world’s most famous wine regions, while providing opportunities for new producers emerging in the most unlikely places.

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email: thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: woman holding a glass of wine. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Contributors:

Sally Evans, Chateau George 7, Bordeaux, France

Dr Greg Jones, wine climatologist and CEO of Abacela vineyards and winery in Oregon, United States

Bjorn Bergum, Slinde Vineyard, Sognefjord, Norway


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxkpj7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7m8b8k14m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj81sm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct41d8)
The violin maker's salvation

Hans and Nancy Benning met in Germany while studying the art of lutherie, repairing stringed instruments. Their love and work gave Hans the happiness and love he longed for growing up homeless and malnourished in West Germany during World War 2. Now living in California, they have been making and preserving the world’s most priceless violins for four decades.

This episode was first broadcast in March 2020.

Presenter: Clayton Conn
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Picture: Hans Benning in his workshop. Credit: BBC/ Clayton Conn)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxkt8c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct3hh2)
Deeply Human Series 2

Stuff

Why do you have all that stuff?

What drives us to get and keep so much stuff - even objects that we rarely, if ever, use? Psychologists working on cortisol levels found that living in a messy or cluttered home may correlate to higher rates of depression and that conspicuous consumption may be affecting our well-being. When does your stuff start to own you?

Dessa talks with experts about how animal hoarding behaviors compare with our own, and speaks to a money-saving guru who might make you rethink your relationship to things.

Image: Piles of crockery (Credit: Andrew Holt/Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj85jr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct4232)
Ukraine: Faith in a time of war

Easter and Passover are among the most important religious festivals of the year for Christians and Jews. But after the Russian invasion of Ukraine, how will the people of faith still left in the country celebrate? Is it possible to practise your belief when your country is at war?

In Odesa, an Orthodox priest is preparing to deliver an Easter service as best he can, even though half of his congregation has left. In the west of Ukraine, members of the Jewish Ukrainian Social Initiative are organising supplies for those elderly members of the faith left in Kyiv. And Radio Maria, a Christian radio station based in the capital, is still broadcasting to as much of the country as possible, and has seen listening figures soar. But will it be safe enough for them to broadcast mass at Easter?

Julia Paul speaks to people from the Orthodox, Jewish and Catholic faiths in Ukraine, to hear what it is like living, and worshipping, in a war zone.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxky0h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7m8b8k8mw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj898w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct41cx)
Slick: The Story of Oil, Shell and Nigeria

On trial

In the 1990s, as oil spills devastate the environment, Shell becomes persona non grata in Ogoniland. Then, when Ken Saro-Wiwa, Ledum Mittee and other activists leading the charge against Shell, are accused of incitement to murder, they come face to face with the power of Nigeria’s military government.

BBC West Africa correspondent Mayeni Jones investigates a miscarriage of justice which has become an infamous moment in Nigerian history.

Presenter: Mayeni Jones
Producer: Josephine Casserly

(Photo: Ken Sara Wiwa Credit: Tim Lambon/Greenpeace)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxl1rm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct39ss)
Can we create a universal Covid vaccine?

Can scientists develop a vaccine which can combat the coronavirus and all its variants?

There have been three lethal outbreaks caused by coronaviruses this century: SARS in 2002, MERS in 2012 and now SarsCov2. Scientists predict we will eventually encounter SarsCov3.

That’s why the race is on to develop a universal vaccine to combat the coronaviruses and variants we know about, and the ones we have yet to confront. But attempts to create a universal vaccine for viruses such as influenza and HIV have been going on for decades - without success.

Before 2020, proposals to create a vaccine against coronaviruses were not thought important enough to pursue since many just cause the common cold.

Now that we understand their real threat, can scientists succeed in creating a vaccine to fight this large family of viruses?

Produced and presented by Sandra Kanthal


(image: Covid vaccines/Getty creative)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj8f10)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3ct303d)
Russia's unwelcome new exiles

Hundreds of thousands of Russians have fled abroad since its invasion of Ukraine, afraid of growing repression in their country, and increasing international isolation. Most of the new exiles are young, well-educated professionals – writers, teachers, artists, IT workers – who fear they could be arrested and jailed for expressing opposition to the war, and even drafted into the army. Tens of thousands have escaped to Russia’s neighbour Georgia, where some are involved in humanitarian efforts to help the Ukrainian victims of the war.

But Georgia itself, invaded by the Kremlin in 2008, has a tense relationship with Russia. Tim Whewell travels to Tbilisi, Georgia's capital, to meet some of the new exiles, and finds they’re not universally welcome. They’re accused of arrogance, of raising property prices – and possibly providing a pretext for the Kremlin to intervene again in Georgia.

Presented by Tim Whewell
Producer in Georgia: Rayhan Demytrie

Image: Russian exile Katya Lapsha (Credit: Lago Gogilashvili/BBC)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxl5hr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172yfbwz3pnqg1)
Mariupol ignores Russia surrender deadline

There's no sign that the Ukrainian soldiers defending the port city have heeded a Russian demand to surrender as a deadline passed. We hear from Simon Shuster, a reporter who’s currently in Kyiv and has been talking to one of the soldiers still holding out in Mariupol.

Also in the programme: how a Ukrainian celebrity chef is feeding refugees with big bowls of beetroot-based food during the war; and we'll hear about happiness, Finland-style.

(Photo: An Ukrainian flag near a destroyed building in Mariupol. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxl97w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct38s5)
Kwame Nkrumah: Ghana’s Pan-African idealist

Kwame Nkrumah was considered by some as a visionary hero who urged would-be leaders in Africa to embrace the idea of unity for the continent, and led Ghana to independence from British colonial rule in 1957.

But in becoming Ghana’s first prime minister, and then president, he was criticised for his autocratic style of government and the way in which he pursued his Pan-African ideology seemingly at the expense of his own people. In 1966 Nkrumah was removed from power in a coup, and never returned to Ghana.

Bridget Kendall’s guests include Ghanaian journalist-turned-historian, AB Assensoh, who interviewed Nkrumah in exile. Assensoh is emeritus professor of African American and African Diaspora Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington, and Courtesy Emeritus Professor in the History Department of University of Oregon. He’s the author of many books on Nkrumah, including a collaboration with his wife Yvette entitled Kwame Nkrumah’s Political Kingdom and Pan-Africanism Reinterpreted, 1909–1972. Joining them are Kwasi Konadu, Professor in Africana & Latin American Studies at Colgate University in the US. He’s published widely on African history, including The Ghana Reader: History, Culture and Politics; and Matteo Grilli, senior researcher at the University of the Free State in South Africa. He’s the author of Nkrumaism and African Nationalism: Ghana’s Pan-African Foreign Policy in the Age of Decolonization.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service.

(Photo: Kwame Nkrumah addresses the General Assembly of the United Nations in New York, 1960. Credit: Underwood Archives via Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 Over to You (w3ct35s0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxlf00)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct30jp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxljr4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172ygjn2n3m6rx)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld will be live from Wembley for the second FA Cup semi-final between Chelsea and Crystal Palace.

Delyth Lloyd will be joined by former Wales international Mark Bowen and Sportsworld football reporter Maz Farookhi ahead of full match commentary.

We’ll also get the latest from the Premier League, the NBA play-offs and the Monto Carlo Masters event in tennis.

(Photo by Matthew Ashton - AMA/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxlwzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7m8b8l7lx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj987x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct4232)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxm0qn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 The History Hour (w3ct39l0)
War crimes in the former Yugoslavia

With war still raging in Ukraine, Max Pearson looks back at the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia and their echoes today. He hears an account from the former US Secretary of State, the late Madeleine Albright, of why she backed Nato air strikes in 1998 to prevent atrocities by Serbian forces in Kosovo. Three years later, the former Serbian president, Slobodan Milosevic, went on trial at the International Criminal Court on war crimes charges relating initially to Kosovo, but later also to Bosnia and Croatia. Two of Milosevic's defence lawyers remember the hearings, and Max gets analysis from Mary Kaldor, Professor of Global Governance at the London School of Economics and a former member of the Independent International Commission on Kosovo.

In the second part of the History Hour, we hear a powerful personal account of the famine in Greece during World War Two; plus, two stories from Internet history: how the World Wide Web was invented in 1989 and the creation of the Tinder data app in 2012.


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxm4gs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172yfbwz3pppf2)
The battle for Ukraine's 'steel city' deepens

After weeks of street fighting, air strikes and massive destruction, the fierce battle for the Ukrainian port of Mariupol has now become a battle for its steelworks.

We'll hear the latest as Ukraine's remaining troops gather for what Russia wants to be their last stand. Ukraine's prime minister Denys Shmyhal says the port city hasn't fallen because Ukraine's soldiers will fight to the end.

Also in the programme: we'll hear about the similarities between Russia's aggression in Chechnya and in Ukraine, and the violent clashes between Hindus and Muslims in several Indian cities after incitement during religious festivals.

(Photo shows the Illich Steel and Iron Works in city of Mariupol, Ukraine on 15 April 2022. Credit: Alexander Ermochenko/Reuters)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxm86x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Deeply Human (w3ct3hh2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj9mh9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Explanation (w3ct3tq2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 Over to You (w3ct35s0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxmcz1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrwrdvmbd0m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh065x8h0b)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj9r7f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct41d8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 18 APRIL 2022

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172ykpzvxxmhq5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct3276)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqt9nj9vzk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Comedians vs. the News (w3ct3jt6)
Jacinta Ocansey and Luca Cupani

Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini are joined by Nigerian-Ghanaian comedian Jacinta Ocansey and Italy’s hilarious Luca Cupani to take on the global headlines.

They’ll be asking why people in Ghana aren’t happy about a new tax and finding out about the world’s first openly gay head of state.

Join #Comediansvsthenews for the funniest take on the headlines you’ve heard this week.


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766rgqg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkqtbv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtftzv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct428z)
Wild Inside: Jungle royalty - the Jaguar

Wild Inside embarks on something we hardly ever witness – a look inside some of nature’s most wondrous animals. Its a rare chance to delve deep into some enigmatic and very different wild animals – from a reptile, to a mammal to a fish – unravelling the intricate internal complexity inside three of the most amazing animals ever to evolve. What makes the ultimate predator? What are the keys to successful survival in an ever-changing environment? Whilst we’ve gained a lot by observing their behaviour from the outside, to truly understand these animals, we need to look at what’s on the inside too.

Ben Garrod, Professor of Evolutionary Biology and Science Engagement at the University of East Anglia, together with friend and expert veterinary surgeon Dr Jess French, open up and investigate what makes each of these animals unique. During each animal post mortem, they’re joined by experts in comparative anatomy, evolution and behaviour as they put these enigmatic animals under the knife. Along the way they reveal some unique adaptations which give each species a leg (or claw) up in surviving in the big wild world.

The series begins with one of the truly exotic loaners of the cat family – which at just over two metres long, covered with beautiful gold and black rosette markings, is pure jungle royalty - the greatest of the South American big cats - the Jaguar

Part 2: One of the largest predatory reptiles - the Burmese Python whose extraordinary singular body plan has enabled nearly 4000 species of snakes to succeed in inhabiting nearly every part of the planet,

Part 3 : The largest bony fish you might never have heard of – the bizarre looking Oceanic Sunfish which is being spotted increasingly in UK waters

Presenters: Prof Ben Garrod, Dr Jess French
Producer: Adrian Washbourne


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766rlgl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkqy2z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtfyqz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct3khr)
How are young people feeling 6 months from COP?

Hundreds of youth activists travelled to Glasgow, Scotland, to have their voices heard. As we approach the halfway point between COP26 and COP27- to be held in Egypt - we want to know how young people are feeling about progress made.

We speak to Maria Reyes from Mexico, Edwin Namakanga from Uganda and Farzana Faruk Jhumu from Bangladesh, who all attended the conference. Is the world on course to protect nature, curb emissions and generate the necessary finance to help poorer nations adapt?

Helping us answer these questions is Wanjira Mathai, a COP veteran and the Vice President and Regional Director for Africa at the World Resources Institute, and COP26 president Alok Sharma.

With presenters Jordan Dunbar and Mora Morrison.

Producer: Mora Morrison
Researcher: Natasha Fernandes
Series Producers: Ros Jones + Alex Lewis
Studio engineer: Tom Brignell


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766rq6q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct3hh2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtg2h3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Explanation (w3ct3tq2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct35s0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766rtyv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkr5l7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtg677)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct37lp)
Women watching birds

Beatriz de la Pava talks to birdwatchers from Zimbabwe and Uruguay about their passion for birdlife.

Zimbabwean ornithologist Merlyn Nomsa Nkomo was on her way to secure a work placement to study wild dogs as part of her degree when she went birdwatching for the first time. It changed her life and she went to work in a vulture rehabilitation centre instead. She's now studying for a PhD in conservation biology in the Fitzpatrick Institute of African Ornithology at the University of Cape Town. She writes and blogs about her passion for raptors and is keen to bring more black women into the world of birdwatching.

Florencia Ocampo started bird watching in Uruguay as a teenager after coming across baby falcons in a street market. While teaching herself falconry from books she became fascinated by the birdlife around her. Motivated by conservation issues she started birding and became a biologist. As well as doing ornithological research she now runs her own tour guide company, Birding With Me.

(IMAGE: (L) Florencia Ocampo, courtesy of Florencia Ocampo. (R) Merlyn Nomsa Nkomo, credit Linda Nordling.)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766rypz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172yf8g065slcd)
Ukraine’s foreign minister: Mariupol no longer exists

We’ll get the latest from Ukraine where the foreign minister says the port city of Mariupol no longer exists after weeks of incessant Russian attacks.

We’ll also hear from the Philippines where over 160 people are confirmed dead after landslides and floods following Tropical Storm Megi.

And after Brexit, could there now be a Frexit? French right wing Presidential contender Marine LePen sets out her plans for the EU.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766s2g3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172yf8g065sq3j)
Shanghai: China reports three dead in latest Covid outbreak

We’ll get the latest from China's commercial capital, Shanghai, where the authorities have acknowledged for the first time that the current coronavirus outbreak has caused three deaths.

We’ll get a military assessment on what’s happening in the Ukrainian port city of Mariupol after the foreign minister said the city no longer exists after weeks of relentless bombardment by Russian forces.

And we'll discuss growing tensions between Pakistan and its neighbour Afghanistan since the Taliban took over.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766s667)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172yf8g065stvn)
Shanghai Covid fatalities: first deaths acknowledged since March 2020

We’ll get the latest from the Chinese city of Shanghai were authorities have acknowledged for the first time that the current Covid outbreak has caused three deaths. These are the first fatalities to be officially acknowledged in the entire country since March 2020.

We’ll get the latest from Ukraine where the nation’s foreign minister says the port city of Mariupol no longer exists.

And we’ll ask an MP in Israel if the government is on the brink of collapse.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766s9yc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32l6)
Omid Djalili: Can jokes be funny without being mean?

Comedy challenges taste and convention, and it can arouse strong reactions, as we saw at this year’s Oscars when a joke earned Chris Rock a slap in the face from Will Smith. Stephen Sackur speaks to Omid Djalili, who has spent more than 25 years finding laughs in sometimes unlikely places. He was born in London to Iranian parents, and has thrived as a cross-cultural comedic chameleon. Is it possible to be funny without being mean?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtgp6r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct30x0)
The future of job interviews

We’re looking at the future of the job interview in a world forever changed by the pandemic. Elizabeth Hotson asks whether video conferencing software will hasten the demise of the traditional face to face grilling. And we also find out how virtual reality and artificial intelligence can help level the playing field for candidates from disadvantaged backgrounds. Over a long and distinguished career in business, Heather McGregor, Executive Dean of Edinburgh Business School, has been on both sides of the desk - as interviewer and interviewee and she gives her take on how we’ll get jobs in the future. RADA alumna and confidence coach and trainer, Imogen Butler-Cole tells us how to put our best foot forward - over video conferencing. Christophe Mallet, founder and CEO of immersive soft skills simulator, Body Swaps, explains how technology can provide invaluable interview training to inexperienced candidates. Plus, Michael Platt, a marketing professor and neuroscientist at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania explains why the interview could soon be redundant in some industries.

Presenter/producer: Elizabeth Hotson
Image: A man sits at a table with lights pointing in his face; Credit: Getty Images


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct3byk)
Erasmus: Europe's student exchange scheme

Since 1987, million of students have been able to live and study in other countries in Europe thanks to the Erasmus student exchange programme. The scheme was the result of 18 years of campaigning by Italian academic, Sofia Corradi, who saw the benefits of studying abroad herself back in the 1950s. Sofia Corradi, now known as "Mamma Erasmus", talks to Rachel Naylor, along with Lucio Picci, one of the first students to go on the programme.


PHOTO: Erasmus students based in Italy at a celebration in Rome in 2017 (Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766sfph)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkrs9w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtgsyw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct3j6p)
How should we measure cleverness?

The team at CrowdScience have spent years answering all sorts of listener questions, which must make them pretty smart, right? IN this week’s episode, that assumption is rigorously tested as Marnie Chesterton and the team pit their wits against a multitude of mindbending puzzles from an old TV gameshow - all in the name of answering a question from Antonia in Cyprus.

She wants to know: how do we work out how clever someone is? Is IQ the best measure of cleverness? Why do we put such weight on academic performance? And where does emotional intelligence fit into it all?

In the search for answers, presenter Marnie Chesterton and the team are locked in rooms to battle mental, physical, mystery and skill-based challenges, all against the clock. Unpicking their efforts in the studio are a global team of cleverness researchers: Dr Stuart Ritchie from Kings College London, Professor Sophie von Stumm from York University and Dr Alex Burgoyne, from Georgia Institute of Technology in the US.

They are challenged to face the toughest questions in their field: Why do men and women tend to perform differently in these tests? Is our smartness in our genes? And what about the Flynn effect – where IQs appear to have risen, decade after decade, around the world.

Produced by Marnie Chesterton on BBC World Service

[Image: Man doing puzzle. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766skfm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct37r7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtgxq0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct3bqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct3k4g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766sp5r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlks0t4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxth1g4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct37lp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766ssxw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct34n2)
The dark truth behind my songs

Allison Moorer is an Oscar-nominated country music star. But shaping her lyrics and music are the traumatic deaths of both of her parents, in a murder-suicide, when she was just a teenager. Allison speaks to Emily Webb about why she's decided to tell the story decades later, and why sad songs are the best songs.

This interview was first broadcast in December 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Asya Fouks

(Photo: Allison Moorer. Credit: Heidi Ross)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct3byk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766sxp0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlks89d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxth8yd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct3j6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766t1f4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172yfbxbczwlcf)
Russian missiles strike Lviv

Russian forces have bombarded several Ukrainian cities including Lviv in the west. Seven people were killed after four missiles hit three military warehouses and one civilian target on the edge of the city. We'll hear the latest from BBC correspondents across Ukraine.

Also coming up on the programme: the authorities in Shanghai have reported their first official coronavirus deaths since 2020; and how NASA is beaming a message into outer space that will tell alien civilisations how to find us.

(Photo shows one of the sites targeted by Russian missile strike in Lviv, Ukraine. Credit: Reuters / Pavlo Palamarchuk)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766t558)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32l6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxthjfn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172yk4j98cs1lr)
China announces first Covid-19 deaths since 2020

China has announced three deaths from coronavirus, the first in the country since 2020. And there's more bad news; the Financial Times newspaper is reporting that record numbers of citizens have been enquiring about leaving China for good- the FT's China economics reporter, Sun Yu, gives us the details. And we hear more about China's economy from James Mayger, China Economy editor for Bloomberg News in Beijing. And Covid-19 changed many aspects of the way we work and the traditional face-to-face job interview is one of the pandemic's many casualties with virtual interviews have becoming the norm; the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson has been looking at how virtual reality and artificial intelligence are already changing the way companies hire people. Plus, one of the UK's biggest video games festivals, Insomnia, finishes today; festival organiser, Craig Fletcher, brings us the highlights.
(Picture description: Chinese flag, picture credit: Getty Images).


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766t8xd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172yg1h3pk7p8g)
Ukraine: Missile strikes in western city of Lviv

Russian forces have bombarded several Ukrainian cities including Lviv in the west, which had largely escaped unscathed until now. We get the latest developments form the ground. And we hear from our Ukrainian colleague and a regular guest on the programme, Vitalyi Shevchenko, who shares a personal story about how his mother and severely disabled aunt escaped the war with the help of two BBC listeners.

And in Sri Lanka, the economic crisis and shortage of basic supplies has prompted a wave of protests. We speak to our correspondent has been to hospitals where doctors say they are running out of medicines and essential supplies.

Also, in Zanzibar - off the coast of East Africa – the commission for tourism is investigating an allegation of sexual assault in a hotel made by a Nigerian woman. There’s been an uproar on social media with many women sharing their stories and tips about travelling alone. We reflect conversations taking place around the continent.

(Photo: A member of the Ukrainian Territorial Defence Forces in Irpin, Kyiv region, Ukraine April 18, 2022. Credit: Reuters/Zohra Bensemra)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766tdnj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172yg1h3pk7t0l)
Ukraine: Missile strikes in western city of Lviv

Russian forces have bombarded several Ukrainian cities including Lviv in the west, which had largely escaped unscathed until now. We get the latest developments form the ground. And we hear from our Ukrainian colleague and a regular guest on the programme, Vitalyi Shevchenko, who shares a personal story about how his mother and severely disabled aunt escaped the war with the help of two BBC listeners.

And in Sri Lanka, the economic crisis and shortage of basic supplies has prompted a wave of protests. We speak to our correspondent has been to hospitals where doctors say they are running out of medicines and essential supplies.

Also, in Zanzibar - off the coast of East Africa – the commission for tourism is investigating an allegation of sexual assault in a hotel made by a Nigerian woman. There’s been an uproar on social media with many women sharing their stories and tips about travelling alone. We reflect conversations taking place around the continent.

(Photo: Ukrainian rescuers put out a fire of an auto service center after Russian shelling in the western Ukrainian city of Lviv, Ukraine, 18 April 2022. Credit: EPA/MYKOLA TYS)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766tjdn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct34n2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct3byk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766tn4s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkszs5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtj0f5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172ygfcp00353p)
2022/04/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766trwx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct3khr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtj459)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct4290)
Wild Inside: The Burmese Python

Ben Garrod and Jess French delve deep inside the predatory Burmese Python to examine its extraordinary body plan that enables it to catch, constrict and consume huge prey whole.

Producer Adrian Washbourne


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766twn1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172yfbxbczxflb)
Russia bombards cities across Ukraine

Ukraine says Russian bombardment of cities across the country has killed at least nine people. Seven died when multiple missiles hit the western city of Lviv, which had largely escaped attack until now.

Russian state television has shown two British fighters captured in Ukraine asking for Britain's prime minister to help secure their release.

Also, doctors across Sri Lanka say hospitals are running out of medicines and essential supplies as the country's economic crisis worsens.

(Photo: Seven people died when multiple missiles hit the western city of Lviv, which had largely escaped attack until now. Credit: Reuters)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766v0d5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32l6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtjcnk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct37lp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766v449)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrwrs3xk45w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh0kg6h75l)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtjhdp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172yk5bqzzhb02)
Apple staff make bid for first union at a US store

We start the programme with news that workers at Apple's Grand Central Station store in New York have announced a plan to start a union. If the bid is successful it would be the first union at one of the tech giant's US stores and follows moves by both Starbucks and Amazon employees to unionise. We spoke to Anna Kramer, a workplace, tech labour, and tech culture reporter at news site Protocol about where this could go.

Next - China has announced its latest economic growth figures. The National Bureau of Statistics said there was four-point-eight percent growth in the first 3 months of this year. James Meygar is the China Economy editor for Bloomberg News in Beijing and he spoke to our colleague Ed Butler. Also, The Financial Times newspaper is reporting today that record numbers of citizens have been enquiring about leaving China for good. The BBC's Ed Butler asked the FT's China economics reporter, Sun Yu, for more details.

We then move on to discuss what sort of impact the China GDP figures have on the market with Peter Jankovskis of Arbor Financial Services in Illinois.

Then we look into NBA super-team the Golden State Warriors launching a new entertainment division. Jabari Young, a CNBC Sports reporter talks us through why are they doing this and what it means for the sport.

Lastly, The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson looks into how Covid-19 has changed the way we work - and the rise of the virtual interview.

Presenter: Sasha Twining | Producer: Gabriele Shaw

(PICTURE CREDIT: GETTY)



TUESDAY 19 APRIL 2022

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766v7wf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct39l0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Sunday]


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766vcmk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172ydp9q8vwd0g)
Apple staff make bid for first union at a US store

Workers at Apple's Grand Central Station store in New York have announced a plan to start a union. If their bid is successful it would be the first union at one of the tech giant's US stores. Anna Kramer with the news site Protocol explains the process from here. Also in the programme, China has announced its latest economic growth figures. The NBA's Golden State Warriors team is developing its own entertainment division. And the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson looks into how Covid-19 has changed the way we work - and the rise of the virtual interview.

All through the show we'll be joined by Peter Morici in Washington DC and Jessica Khine in Johor, Malaysia.


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766vhcp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlktv02)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtjvn2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct41ct)
Saving our species

Australia is famous for its unique wildlife and landscapes. But Australia also has the highest mammal extinction rate in the world, and there are big declines in frogs, reptiles, and birds caused by introduced predators and land clearing. Some species are hanging on in small numbers on private land.
Could paying farmers and indigenous landowners to return parts of their properties to nature or turn them into carbon farms help solve Australia’s biodiversity crisis?

ABC producer Belinda Sommer takes you to the wide plains and sub-tropical forests of Australia to meet the farmers who are combining commerce and conservation.


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766vm3t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct34n2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct3byk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766vqvy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkv2hb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtk34b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct3jhr)
Siri Hustvedt writing her next novel

Siri Hustvedt is best known for her novels ‘What I loved’ and ‘The Summer Without Men’ which were international bestsellers. She has in fact written seven novels, two books of essays, a book of poetry and several works of non-fiction. Her work has been translated into over thirty languages and she has been nominated for many international literary awards. In 2015 she won the Los Angeles Times Book for Fiction. She is married to fellow writer Paul Auster and lives in New York in America.

Reporter and actor Tara Gadomski is hanging out with Siri as she starts writing her next novel, ‘The Haunted Envelope’. This process involves very early starts along with lovely walks in the park. Siri has also been recording regular dispatch voice recordings from her desk as she works. We discover how being afflicted by migraines and the pandemic all play a part in Siri’s creative process.

Presented by: Tara Gadomski
Produced by: Emma Betteridge for the BBC World Service
Image by: Spencer Ostrander


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766vvm2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172yf8g065wh8h)
Zelensky: Russia has launched offensive in Ukraine’s east

Ukraine's President Volodymir Zelensky says Russia has begun its large scale offensive in the east of the country, in which it will try to conquer the whole of the Donbas region. We'll hear from frontlines.

We'll take a look at how the war is affecting food prices around the world.

And we'll find out why Turkey has launched a new offensive in northern Iraq.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766vzc6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172yf8g065wm0m)
Battle for the Donbas has begun, says Zelensky

Nearly two months after Russia launched its invasion of Ukraine, the government in Kyiv says a long-anticipated offensive against the east of the country has begun. We’ll find out what's at stake.

We’ll head to China where the authorities are accused of downplaying the number of Covid fatalities in Shanghai.

And we’ll report from Sri Lanka where the country is in the middle of an unprecedented economic crisis.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766w33b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172yf8g065wqrr)
We will fight on says Zelensky as Russia renews offensive in east

We’ll get the latest from the frontlines in Ukraine.

We’ll also hear a special report on the fate of children caught up in the war there.

And we’ll be in Belgium to report on the trial of alleged accomplices to the deadly bomb and gun attacks in Paris in 2015.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766w6vg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct3j26)
Sponge cities that fight flooding

Sponge cities use natural features to slow down, soak up and reuse flood water.
Yu Kongjian nearly drowned as a boy when his village flooded, but it inspired him to come up with the sponge city concept. It’s now being rolled out across China. In Singapore too, parks and lakes are being engineered to soak up excess water. They embrace the flood water rather than block it with concrete barriers. It comes as cities around the world are struggling to cope with more extreme weather caused by climate change.

Presenter: Myra Anubi
Reporter: Tessa Wong
Producer: Claire Bates
Image: Zhejiang, China (Turenscape)


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtkl3v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct3161)
Why whales matter

Baleen whales were almost hunted to extinction. Now they face a new threat – global shipping. But despite humans blighting their lives, can they now recover and help revive ocean life?

Justin Rowlatt speaks to two researchers who observe these intelligent, sociable giants up close. Matt Savoca at Stanford University explains the scale of the slaughter inflicted by whalers in the twentieth century, while Ryan Reisinger of Southampton University describes how modern ships continue to harm whales.

By virtue of their sheer enormity, these animals also underpinned entire ocean ecosystems that have since collapsed, as veteran oceanic researcher Victor Smetacek explains. So with their numbers finally recovering, what can we humans do to help? Justin asks Guy Platten, secretary general of the International Chamber of Shipping.

Presenter: Justin Rowlatt
Producer: Laurence Knight
Picture: Aerial view of a whale getting up close to a boat in the Sea of Cortez in the Gulf of California; Credit: Mark Carwardine/Future Publishing/Getty Images


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct3c32)
Women's rights in Basra

In 2006 after the US-led invasion of Iraq, women in the southern city of Basra were persecuted by militant Islamists forcing them to cover up, stay at home, and adopt an ultra-conservative Islamic code of behaviour, banning them from driving or going out alone. Some women were even killed. Mike Lanchin has spoken to one of the Basra women affected. The producer in Baghdad was Mona Mahmoud. The programme is a CTVC production.

PHOTO: Women queuing to vote in Basra in 2005 (Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766wbll)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkvp6z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtkpvz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct4290)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766wgbq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct38zy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766wl2v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkvxq7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtkyc7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct3jhr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766wptz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct352m)
England's secret cowboy town

Laredo is a functioning Wild West town built in southern England, lived in part-time by a dedicated community. At the weekends, residents adopt full period dress, and leave the 21st century behind. It's been around for decades, but recently a devastating fire threatened to destroy Laredo for good.

In the 1960s Tomi Fujiyama made her name singing American country music - a very rare thing for a young Japanese woman to do. She even realised the dream of country singers all over the world when, in 1964, she played alongside Johnny Cash at the famous Grand Ole Opry in Nashville. But instead of her career going from strength to strength, Tomi's success was not recognised in Japan and she ended up giving up music. But many years later she took up her guitar again and set out to realise her dream of playing the Opry one more time.

Presenter: Emily Webb

(Photo: Laredo in Kent, England. Credit: BBC)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct3c32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766wtl3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkw56h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtl5vh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct4290)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766wyb7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172yfbxbczzh8j)
Russia attacks Ukraine’s Eastern front line

Russian forces are attacking along the entire 300-mile front line in the eastern Donbas region in Ukraine. Russian-backed fighters are also attempting to storm an industrial complex in the city of Mariupol where a thousand people are taking refuge. Also on the programme: India has been accused of undercounting its number of coronavirus deaths by an estimated 3.5 million and a new study suggests that excess weight significantly increases women’s risk of developing womb cancer.


(Photo: Russia's military focus is now on the Donbas region. AFP via Getty Images)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766x22c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct3j26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtlfbr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172yk7t25sm570)
IMF cuts global growth forecast

The International Monetary Fund expects global economic growth to slow to 3.6% this year. The forecast shaves almost a percentage point of growth from its forecast from before the war in Ukraine, and we get analysis from Harvard economist Ken Rogoff, who is also a former IMF chief economist. Also in the programme, the government in Argentina is planning to create an aid programme to help the country's poorest people, which will be funded by businesses that have profited from the Ukraine conflict. We get analysis of the move from Hector Torres, who is a former executive director for the IMF in Argentina. The BBC's Theo Leggett reports from France on the country's post-pandemic economic recovery, ahead of this weekend's second round of the presidential election. We look at why some people decide to anglicise their name in order to “fit in” at the workplace with the BBC's Noor Nanji. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare considers how the Ukraine crisis affects the way businesses engage with the political sphere.

Today's edition is presented by Ed Butler, and produced by Joshua Thorpe and Ivana Davidovic.

(Picture: A billboard for the World Bank and IMF Spring meetings. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766x5th)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172yg1h3pkbl5k)
Ukraine: Frontline in the east

We’ll get the latest information from Ukraine, where Ukraine's general staff say Russia has intensified offensive operations across the eastern Donbas region. There are also reports from the besieged southern city of Mariupol that separatist fighters, supported by Russian forces, are trying to storm an industrial complex where the city's last defenders have been holding out alongside hundreds of civilians. We'll speak to our reporters on the ground, as well as hearing the voices and stories of Ukrainians living through the conflict.

Also, we go to Afghanistan where a boys' high school in the capital Kabul has been targeted by two bomb attacks, killing several students. The area where the attack occurred is in a Shia Hazara neighbourhood in the west of the city, which has been frequently targeted by the Islamic State group. We hear from people in the Hazara community.

And we hear a conversation with three Ukrainian journalists to hear what it's like covering a war in your own country.

(Photo: Ukrainian servicemen on an armoured vehicle in eastern Ukraine, 19/04/2022. Photo: Press service of the Ukrainian Ground Forces/Reuters)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766x9km)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172yg1h3pkbpxp)
What's it like being a Ukrainian journalist?

It's been nearly two months since Russia started it's invasion of Ukraine. Since then journalists around the world have been extensively covering the story. But what has it been like for Ukrainian journalists reporting on a war happening in their own country? And what challenges have they faced whilst doing this? We speak to three journalists to hear their experiences.

Also, we go to South Africa where more than 440 people have died as devastating floods swept through the province of KwaZulu-Natal. We get the latest on the rescue efforts.

And Manchester United footballer Cristiano Ronaldo and partner Georgina Rodriguez have announced the death of their baby boy, saying it is the "greatest pain that any parents can feel". The couple were expecting twins. Their baby girl survived, and they said her birth "gives us the strength to live this moment with some hope and happiness". We hear from people who have gone through similar experiences.

(Photo: Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy and Prime Minister Denys Shmygal, Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki and Deputy Prime Minister Jaroslaw Kaczynski, Czech Prime Minister Petr Fiala and Slovenian Prime Minister Janez Jansa attend a joint news briefing in Kyiv, Ukraine March 15, 2022. Credit: Ukrainian Presidential Press Service/Handout via REUTERS)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766xf9r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct352m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct3c32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766xk1w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkwwp8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtlxb8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172ygfcp00620s)
2022/04/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766xnt0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct41ct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtm12d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct31y6)
Audio beats - the new digital drugs?

Could audio files be the new digital drugs? New research shows that binaural beats - illusionary tones created by the brain when the brain hears two different tones in each ear – can change someone’s emotional state. The work, published in Drug and Alcohol Review, shows for the first time that people use binaural beats to relax, fall asleep and even to try to get a psychedelic drug high. BBC’s R&D Audio team have created a binaural beat soundscape especially for Digital Planet and we speak to Dr Alexia Maddox, a tech sociologist, one of the researchers behind the study.

Publishing via What’s App – getting female authors recognised in Zimbabwe
Getting a book deal may seem like an impossible dream for many budding authors, but in Zimbabwe, for many female writers, this is a reality. Linda Mujuru, a senior reporter for Global Press Journal, tells us how most publishers are struggling in Zimbabwe due to the dire economic situation over the last twenty years and why so many authors have turned to social media as their only way of telling their stories. Samantha Rumbidzai Vazhure set up her own publishing house in the UK as she could not get her work printed. She reads one of her poems in Shona, a native Zimbabwean language, and explains how she now looks for fellow female authors online and publishes their work too.


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Angelica Mari.


Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Music in the mind concept. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766xsk4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172yfbxbd00bhf)
Ukraine says holds the line in the east

On the first full day of the Russian offensive to capture the Donbas, Ukrainian forces say they're holding the line in the east of the country against a broad attack, despite intense bombardment in the Luhansk region.

Also in the programme: the British prime minister, Boris Johnson, has given what he called a wholehearted apology to parliament after he was fined for breaking Covid lockdown laws; and a Hazara student in Kabul tells us what life is like now for the predominantly Shia ethnic group on the day that six Hazara pupils were killed in a suspected targeted bomb attack.

(Photo: A Ukrainian serviceman with a dog stands on a position in a zone between Luhansk and Donetsk areas, Ukraine, 18 April 2022, amid increasing Russian troops activity. Credit: EPA/STR)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766xx98)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct3j26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtm8kn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct3jhr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766y11d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrwrs3xn12z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh0kg6l42p)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtmd9s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172yk8mhxdbfmb)
IMF cuts global growth forecast

The International Monetary Fund expects global economic growth to slow to 3.6% this year. The forecast shaves almost a percentage point of growth from its forecast from before the war in Ukraine, and we get analysis from the BBC's economics editor Faisal Islam.
Also in the programme, as the streaming service Netflix announces its quarterly results, we ask entertainment journalist Caroline Frost what challenges the company is facing.
The BBC's Theo Leggett reports from France on the country's post-pandemic economic recovery, ahead of this weekend's second round of the presidential election.
We look at why some people decide to anglicise their name in order to “fit in” in the workplace with the BBC's Noor Nanji.
Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare considers how the Ukraine crisis affects the way businesses engage with the political sphere.

(Picture: Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas, chief economist at the IMF. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 20 APRIL 2022

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766y4sj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct38zy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766y8jn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172ydp9q8vz8xk)
Netflix loses subscribers for the first time in a decade

The company lost 200,000 customers in the first three months of the year. We look at the reasons why with entertainment journalist Caroline Frost, and what challenges the company is facing.
The International Monetary Fund expects global economic growth to slow to 3.6% this year. The forecast shaves almost a percentage point of growth from its forecast from before the war in Ukraine, and we get analysis from the BBC's economics editor Faisal Islam.
The BBC's Theo Leggett reports from France on the country's post-pandemic economic recovery, ahead of this weekend's second round of the presidential election.
Also in the programme, we look at why some people decide to anglicise their name in order to “fit in” in the workplace with the BBC's Noor Nanji.
Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare considers how the Ukraine crisis affects the way businesses engage with the political sphere.

Sasha Twining is joined throughout the programme by James Mayger, Bloomberg’s China economics reporter in Beijing, and by Takara Small, CBC's technology reporter in Toronto.

(Picture: The Netflix sign. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766yd8s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkxqx5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtmrk5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct41cy)
Slick: The Story of Oil, Shell and Nigeria

Black creeks

BBC West Africa correspondent Mayeni Jones travels to the creeks of the Niger Delta to investigate the impact that oil pollution continues to have on communities and their environment. What she finds is alarming. And she speaks to Shell to ask them who is to blame for the ongoing environmental damage.

Presenter: Mayeni Jones.
Producer: Josephine Casserly
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Photo: Landscape destroyed by oil pollution. Image courtesy of Fyneface Dumnamene)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766yj0x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct352m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct3c32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766yms1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkxzdf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtn01f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Documentary (w3ct41tw)
Soul Music

Pavane Pour Une Infante Défunte by Maurice Ravel

Ravel's beautiful Pavane for a Dead Princess touches many people. While it is not actually about a dead princess it does evoke a sense of loss. For Carla van Raay it symbolises the loss of innocence she experienced after sexual abuse as a child, which led her to make some difficult life choices.

Deal Hudson played it to prisoners in Atlanta and was moved by their reaction. At an academy for troubled teenagers in California the Pavane had a similar effect. Genevieve Monneris comes from the town where Ravel was born on the border with Spain. Her film Henri and Pat tells the story of three French airmen who were stationed in York during World War Two. Just days before Henri's plane was shot down the three young men went to a concert of Ravel's music in York. So the piece has a strong emotional meaning for Genevieve whose own father was also stationed with the RAF in York.

Professor Barbara Kelly of the Royal Northern College of Music explains the background to the Pavane's composition and why it appeals to the emotions in such a powerful way. Although it was written at the end of the 19th Century, it became more widely known in the 1920s. That was when a young woman called Lucia Joyce, daughter of James Joyce, danced to it with her avant-garde dance group. The writer Annabel Abbs tells Lucia's tragic story of how her life ended in a mental asylum and how she almost became the imaginary 'dead princess'.

(Photo: Composer Maurice Ravel. Born in Ciboure, 7 March 1875; died in Paris, 28 December 1937)


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766yrj5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172yf8g065zd5l)
Ukrainian forces hold the Russian army in Donbass

Russian and Ukrainian forces clash in the eastern Donbass region and Russia continues its offensive on the vital southern port city of Mariupol - with President Zelensky saying the situation there is desperate.

Ukraine's allies promise more military support to help its forces push back the renewed Russian offensive.

And Hollywood actor Johnny Depp testifies in the defamation trial against ex-wife Amber Heard saying that he never hit her.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766yw89)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172yf8g065zhxq)
Ukraine: US says it will send extra weapons, including artillery to Kyiv

As Russia continues its massive assault in eastern Ukraine, we hear from a Ukrainian whose relative is fighting a desperate defensive action in Mariupol and a doctor who is dealing with a huge number of injured coming from the front lines.

Football: in the English Premier League Liverpool go top as Sadio Mane and Mohammed Salah help Liverpool crush Manchester United.

And a new play here in London looks at the next presidential elections in the United States.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766z00f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172yf8g065zmnv)
Ukraine remains defiant in Mariupol

Russia continues its offensive on the vital southern port city of Mariupol - we hear from the deputy mayor on the desperate situation there.

Meanwhile, Ukraine's western allies have promised to send more weapons to help the country defend itself but is it too little too late?

And here in Britain, Prime Minister Boris Johnson continues to apologise over braking his own lockdown rules - but is the matter now closed?


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766z3rk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32qq)
Kylie Moore-Gilbert: 804 days in an Iranian jail

Iran’s rocky relations with the West have cost a host of individuals their freedom. The Islamic republic has imprisoned citizens from the US, Britain and a number of other countries for spying. The charges may be trumped up, but Tehran’s determination to use western prisoners for political purposes is very real. Stephen Sackur speaks to Australian academic Kylie Moore-Gilbert, who was released from an Iranian jail in 2020 after 804 days behind bars.


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtnh0y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct31bk)
Will satellite internet technology connect the world?

After a volcanic eruption severed Tonga’s communication cable Elon Musk donated 50 Starlink terminals, allowing the government and residents to connect to the network of satellites orbiting above earth. The company have also sent the technology to Ukraine after Russia’s invasion, and we hear from Stepan Veselovskyi of Lviv IT Cluster using it to keep vital services online and Kyiv resident Oleg Kutkov, who bought a dish online before the war and now hopes to use it as a back-up in case conventional communication networks fail. It’s proved extremely useful, but is this the future for bringing internet to remote corners of the globe? We also hear from expert on space law Professor Melissa De Zwart about the race among SpaceX and other companies to put more of these satellites in low earth orbit, and how too many of them could impede dreams of further space exploration.

Presenter: Sam Fenwick
Producer: Hannah Bewley

(Image: Oleg Kutkov with his Starlink dish; Credit: Oleg Kutkov)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct3c5b)
Britain's Soviet spy scandal

In 1971 during the Cold War, the UK expelled 90 Soviet diplomats suspected of spying. They'd been allowed into Britain in an attempt to improve relations, but it was later discovered that they'd been carrying out espionage instead. George Walden was a young diplomat working on the Soviet Desk in the Foreign Office at the time. He spoke to Dina Newman in 2018.

PHOTO: British Foreign Secretary Alec Douglas-Home (left) shakes hands with Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko (right) at Heathrow Airport, 26th October 1970. (credit: Ian Showell/Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766z7hp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkyl42)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtnls2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct31y6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766zc7t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct41vt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766zgzy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkytmb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtnv8b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct41tw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766zlr2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct3y86)
Book by book, restoring an iconic library destroyed by IS

Dr Alaa Hamdon dreamt of rebuilding an iconic university library in Iraq after it was destroyed by IS fighters during their occupation of Mosul. In 2019 he told Emily Webb how the library had housed more than a million books and it was one of the most important libraries in the Middle East. It was a haven for Dr Hamdon when he was a student and then when he became an academic at Mosul University. But the militants left it in ashes, after they burnt hundreds of thousands of books, including ancient texts. Three years after Emily's first conversation with Dr Hamdon we discover if his wish to see its shelves refilled has become a reality. His project to restore the library is called Mosul Book Bridge and it's supported by Book Aid International.

And we head to Italy to meet one of the country's most famous chefs Massimo Bottura who creates unusual combinations, like foie gras ice cream with a balsamic vinegar centre. Outlook's Dany Mitzman discovers the emotional backstory to his culinary career as Massimo takes her around his home town of Modena.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Dr Alaa Hamdon outside the newly opened Mosul University library. Credit: Dr Alaa Hamdon)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct3c5b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766zqh6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkz23l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtp2rl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct31y6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766zv7b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172yfbxbd02d5m)
Ukraine appeals once again for civilians to be extracted from Mariupol

A deadline issued by Russia for Ukrainian forces in Mariupol to surrender has passed with no sign that the defenders have surrendered. We hear from a former resident of Mariupol whose grandmother remains within the besieged city.

Also on the programme, the Solomon Islands in the Pacific has signed a wide-ranging security pact with China. And it's the final French presidential debate tonight ahead of the vote on Sunday. Will Marine Le Pen be able to persuade voters to choose her over incumbent President Macron?

(Picture: A local resident walks past a building destroyed in the southern port city of Mariupol. Credit: Reuters / Ermochenko)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172ykq0766zyzg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32qq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtpb7v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172yk9fyn02nzp)
Netflix suffers rare fall in subscribers

The streaming giant Netflix lost 200,000 subscribers in its first such decline since 2011. We get reaction to the development, which saw the firm's share price decline substantially, from Georg Szalai, who is international business editor at The Hollywood Reporter. Also in the programme, YouTube has terminated the campaign channel of John Lee Ka-chiu, who is expected to become Hong Kong's next chief executive. Tom Grundy, editor in chief of the Hong Kong Free Press, explains how YouTube's parent company Google justified the move. Fake online reviews are to be outlawed under a package of measures proposed by the UK government in a bid to stop people being ripped off. Kate Nicholls is chief executive of UK Hospitality, which represents hotels and restaurants, and gives us the industry's reaction to the news. Plus, the BBC's Adrienne Murray reports from Denmark on how labour shortages following the pandemic have opened the door to greater automation of tasks through the use of robots.

Today's edition is presented by Ed Butler, and produced by Joshua Thorpe, Ivana Davidovic, Elizabeth Hotson and Tom Kavanagh.

(Picture: A remote control and video on demand screen. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172ykq076702ql)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172yg1h3pkfh2n)
No sign of Ukrainian surrender in Mariupol

The deadline issued by Russia for Ukrainian forces in Mariupol to lay down their weapons today has passed - with no sign that the defenders have surrendered. We get the latest from our correspondent. Meanwhile, efforts to try to evacuate civilians from the devastated city continue. We explain what is meant by “humanitarian corridor” and hear from people who have previously fled the city or have relatives there.

We hear reaction to the news that Russian and Belarusian players will not be allowed to compete at Wimbledon tennis tournament this year because of the invasion of Ukraine.

Scientists say that bacteria in urine could help them identify an aggressive form of prostate cancer. We learn about the significance of the discovery.

To mark the anniversary of the Columbine High School school shooting in 1999 in the United States - and the fact that mass shootings continue – a group of American teenagers have written plays about their own experiences of gun violence. We hear their stories.

(Photo: Residents walk along a street damaged during Ukraine-Russia conflict in the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 19, 2022. Credit: Alexander Ermochenko/Reuters)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172ykq076706gq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172yg1h3pkflts)
Russian and Belarusian players banned from Wimbledon

We hear reaction to the news that Russian and Belarusian players will not be allowed to compete at Wimbledon tennis tournament this year because of the invasion of Ukraine.

The deadline issued by Russia for Ukrainian forces in Mariupol to lay down their weapons today has passed - with no sign that the defenders have surrendered. We get the latest from our correspondent. Meanwhile, efforts to try to evacuate civilians from the devastated city continue. We explain what is meant by “humanitarian corridor” and hear from people who have previously fled the city or have relatives there.

To mark the anniversary of the Columbine High School school shooting in 1999 in the United States - and the fact that mass shootings continue – a group of American teenagers have written plays about their own experiences of gun violence. We hear their stories.

And scientists say that bacteria in urine could help them identify an aggressive form of prostate cancer. We learn about the significance of the discovery.

(Photo: Wimbledon logo. Credit: Steven Paston/PA Wire.)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172ykq07670b6v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct3y86)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct3c5b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172ykq07670fyz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmlkzslc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtpt7c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172ygfcp008yxw)
2022/04/20 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172ykq07670kq3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct41cy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtpxzh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct32w7)
Are we kinder to people like us?

Using the results of the Kindness Test, which 60,000 people took part in, Claudia Hammond asks whether we are kinder to people who we think are like us? And what happens once we move beyond family and friends to acquaintances and strangers. What can the evidence tell us about who it is that we choose to be kind to and why?

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172ykq07670pg7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172yfbxbd037dj)
Evacuation of Mariupol fails

Ukraine's deputy prime minister has said an attempt to evacuate several thousand of the remaining civilians trapped in the devastated southern city of Mariupol has not gone to plan. The US ambassador to Kiyv, Kristina Kvien, blames Russia.

Also in the programme: Wimbledon to ban Russian and Belarussian players; and Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen go head-to-head in TV debate.

(Picture: A woman with a sign reading "Save Mariupol" and her hands tied on her back attends a rally against Russia's invasion of Ukraine, in Prague, Czech Republic. Credit: REUTERS/David W Cerny)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172ykq07670t6c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32qq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtq5gr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct41tw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172ykq07670xyh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrwrs3xqy02)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh0kg6p0zs)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtq96w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172ykb8dclsyd0)
Germany to halt Russian oil imports 'as fast as possible'

Germany says it is working hard to reduce its reliance on Russian energy. The BBC's Faisal Islam speaks to the German finance minister Christian Lindner.
As Tesla releases its Q1 earnings, we get analysis from Dan Ives, senior equity analyst at Wedbush Securities, and ask whether the recent factory shutdowns in Shanghai have had an effect on the company's performance.
Fake online reviews are to be outlawed under a package of measures proposed by the UK government in a bid to stop people being ripped off. Kate Nicholls is chief executive of UK Hospitality, which represents hotels and restaurants, and gives us the industry's reaction to the news.
Plus, the BBC's Adrienne Murray reports from Denmark on how labour shortages following the pandemic have opened the door to greater automation of tasks through the use of robots.

(Picture: An oil refinery. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 21 APRIL 2022

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172ykq076711pm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct41vt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172ykq076715fr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172ydp9q8w25tn)
Germany to halt Russian oil imports 'as fast as possible'

Germany says it is working hard to reduce its reliance on Russian energy. The BBC's Faisal Islam speaks to the German finance minister Christian Lindner.
As Tesla releases its Q1 earnings, we get analysis from Dan Ives, senior equity analyst at Wedbush Securities, and ask whether the recent factory shutdowns in Shanghai have had an effect on the company's performance.
Satellite broadband is still in its infancy, but more and more people are using the technology to connect to the internet - not least in war-torn Ukraine, where conventional communication networks are being destroyed by Russian forces. It’s proving extremely useful, but could it also bring the internet to remote corners of the globe in the future? We have a report from Sam Fenwick.
Plus, the BBC's Adrienne Murray reports from Denmark on how labour shortages following the pandemic have opened the door to greater automation of tasks through the use of robots.

Fergus Nicoll is joined throughout the programme by Mehmal Sarfraz, a journalist and co-founder of the Current PK website in Lahore, and Ralph Silva of the Silva Research Network in Toronto.

(Picture: An oil refinery. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767195w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll0mt8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtqng8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct303f)
Myanmar: fighting the might of the junta

Myanmar is now in a state of civil war. What started in February 2021 as a mass protest movement against the military coup is now a nationwide armed uprising. The junta is under attack across the country from a network of civilian militias called the People’s Defence Forces who say they’re fighting to create a democratic Myanmar. The BBC gained rare access to the jungle training camps where young protests are being turned into soldiers. We follow a single mother and a student who have sacrificed everything to join the fight. They're up against a well-trained military that’s willing to use brutal tactics to stay in power. As the death toll mounts and the world looks away, can they restore democracy?

Reporter, Rebecca Henschke.
Produced with Kelvin Brown, Ko Ko Aung and Banyar Kong Janoi.

(Image: 20 year-old Myo left home to join the resistance. Credit: BBC/Chit Aye)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172ykq07671dy0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct3y86)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct3c5b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172ykq07671jp4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll0w9j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtqwyj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct38mp)
How to date a carnivore

Can the love of eating meat ever get in the way of a relationship?

You may have heard the phrase ‘the way to someone’s heart is through their stomach’, but what happens if the foods they eat are wildly different from yours?

Tamasin Ford explores what it’s like to date a carnivore. Not just someone who eats meat, but someone who loves meat. Someone who has been brought up to eat meat in every meal.

We speak to two couples whose diets can sometimes be the source of their most heated arguments to find out how they navigate meal times and social events. Can tolerance win out over frustration?

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email: thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Steak on a plate. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Producer: Sarah Stolarz

Contributors:

Barbara Friend

Molly Savard

Charlie Pears-Wallace

Joe Deeney


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172ykq07671nf8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172yf8g066292p)
Is the besieged Ukrainian city of Mariupol about to fall?

As the Ukrainian leadership asks for unconditional talks on evacuating civilians and soldiers from Mariupol we'll have the latest on the military situation.

We speak to the New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern - she is concerned about an assertive China, and its increasing presence in the Pacific region.

And ahead of Sunday's presidential election vote in France the two remaining candidates, Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen have taken part in a televised debate.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172ykq07671s5d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172yf8g0662dtt)
Russia 'hours away' from taking Mariupol

The conflict in Ukraine again leads the news - in the latest developments a Ukrainian delegation has offered to go to Mariupol to try to negotiate the evacuation of civilians and military personnel.

Also, the growing debate in Germany as to why the country is doing so little to help Ukraine defend itself?

Crucial international aid to Afghanistan dried up following the Taliban takeover of the country; now, as the group harden their policies, it seems like a growing number of the citizens will be driven into poverty and hunger.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172ykq07671wxj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172yf8g0662jky)
Ukraine: Is Mariupol about to fall to the Russians?

We return to Ukraine, with a look at the hopes for an evacuation of soldiers and civilians amid devastating situation in Mariupol, and how the Russian people view the war on their neighbour.

The two remaining candidates in the French presidential election have been trading blows in a televised debate - who won, and will their performances affect the vote on Sunday.

And we meet the all-female fighting unit made up of teenagers, former housewives and business women taking on the junta in Myanmar.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172ykq076720nn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct39st)
Why did Sri Lanka’s organic farming dream fail?

In 2021 the president of Sri Lanka announced a total ban on chemical fertilizer and pesticides. The country’s farms were going to go fully organic.

Health concerns were given as a reason, but in the background was the pandemic, loss of tourism and a lack of natural fertilizer available in the country.

Sri Lanka is now in the worse economic crisis they have seen in decades and the government has reversed its ban on chemical fertilizer.

This week on The Inquiry we explore why Sri Lanka’s organic farming dream failed.

Presented by Charmain Cozier
Produced by Louise Clarke-Rowbotham
Researched by Christopher Blake

(Woman picking tea on plantation in Sri Lanka. Credit: Getty images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtrcy1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct311j)
Fleeing danger

What do you do when your staff are stuck in a conflict zone or dangerous situation? How do you get them out? Who pays for it? How do you persuade them to go back later?

Rahul Tandon speaks to Alex Nichiporchik whose gaming business tinyBuild has evacuated staff from Ukraine and Russia. He hears from Priscilla Dickey who was part of the US government evacuation from Wuhan in 2020.

Dale Buckner from Global Guardian explains the business of evacuation while Ian Umney discusses the rescue of his family from Ukraine.

Plus, Ema Boccagni from ECA International, which helps companies manage global workforces, reflects on the incentives required to attract workers back to some places.

Presenter: Rahul Tandon
Producers: Helen Ledwick and James Graham
Photo: An evacuation flight from Wuhan in February 2020. (Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct3c0t)
Iranian revolution: The Kurdish uprising

The story of a boy caught up in the forgotten war for Kurdish autonomy in Iran in 1979. During the Iranian revolution, Kurdish groups had joined the struggle to end the rule of the Shah. They wanted greater autonomy for Iran's Kurdish minority. But after the revolution, the new Islamic regime rejected that demand. A conflict erupted between government forces and Kurdish Peshmerga fighters, which lasted for years and left thousands dead. Kameel Ahmady is an anthropologist and researcher. At the time he was a boy living in the ethnically-mixed town of Naqadeh in northwest Iran. He tells Alex Last how, as demands for autonomy grew, his town became the scene of bitter ethnic fighting.

Photo: Armed Kurdish villagers after the revolution in Iran, March 1979. (François LOCHON/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172ykq076724ds)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll1h15)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtrhp5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct32w7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767284x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct38s6)
Mirror Mirror on the wall: The history of the looking glass

For the Ancient Egyptians they were seen as receptacles for the soul, for the Aztecs they were used to tell the future and for the early Christians, they were an aid for reaching self-knowledge. And mirrors’ key role in the reflection of light led to the development of high-powered telescopes to explore the universe. No human invention has been so closely tied with our sense of self and the world around us. And yet mirrors also have a capacity to deceive us – so how much attention should we give them in our lives, and are we overly obsessed with our image in the mirror?

Joining Rajan Datar to find out more about the history of mirrors is Dr Elizabeth Baquedano, a specialist in the indigenous cultures of Mesoamerica and Senior Honorary Lecturer at the Institute of Archaeology, University College, London. Dr Franziska Kolt, a post-doctoral research fellow in the history of science at the University of York in England, who’s written Alice Through the Wonderglass: the Surprising Histories of a children's classic. And Mark Pendergrast, the author of Mirror Mirror: a history of the human love affair with reflection. With the contribution of Professor Serpil Bagci from Hacettepe university in Ankara in Turkey.

Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service.

(Photo: Mirror reflecting blue sky in digital landscape. Credit: Artur Debat via Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct36fc)
Jahangir Khan: The king of squash

In the 1980s, Pakistani squash player Jahangir Khan became a legend in his sport by going undefeated for five years. But, as Shumaila Jaffery discovers, to become unbeatable, Khan had to overcome childhood illness and family tragedy. This programme was first broadcast in 2015.

(Photo: Jahingar Khan in action. Credit: Steve Line/SquashPics)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172ykq07672cx1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll1qjf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtrr5f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct38mp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172ykq07672hn5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct34vv)
Surviving apartheid to make maritime history

Captain Knowledge Bengu battled racial discrimination to become the first black African ice pilot. Earlier this year he led the voyage to discover Sir Ernest Shackleton's ship Endurance which sank below the Antarctic ice over 100 years ago.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Captain Knowledge Bengu, Master of the ‘S.A. Agulhas II’, and Ice Pilot for the Endurance22 Expedition, Captain Freddie Ligthelm. Credit: Courtesy of African Marine Solutions (AMSOL))


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct3c0t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172ykq07672md9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll1z0p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtrznp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct32w7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172ykq07672r4f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172yfbxbd0592q)
Russia claims it controls Mariupol

Russia says it controls Mariupol but Vladimir Putin orders his troops not to storm the Azovstal steel plant, where the last group of Ukrainian fighters in Mariupol is holding out

Moscow has promised a tight blockade on the industrial zone, but Ukraine says the battle for the port city is not over.

Also in the programme: We hear from some of the women of Myanmar who have taken up arms against the military junta, and how indigenous Sami art - instead of Nordic artworks - is being showcased at the Venice Biennale for the first time.

(Photo shows damaged buildings, with the Azovstal Iron and Steel Works plant in the background, in the southern port city of Mariupol, Credit: Alexander Ermochenko/Reuters)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172ykq07672vwk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct39st)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxts74y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172yk655qlfc5m)
French presidential candidates face off

Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen have held their only debate ahead of France's election. Voters head to the polls on Sunday to choose their next president, and we get analysis of the candidates' economic plans from Victor Mallet, Paris bureau chief of the Financial Times. Also in the programme, we explore the impact on renewable energy investment of the rising price of fossil fuels, with the environmentalist George Monbiot. The World Bank has warned of a potential global food crisis, as a result of Russia's invasion of Ukraine. We hear more from the World Bank's president, David Malpass. We have a report from the BBC's Rahul Tandon about the private businesses that have stepped in to evacuate their own staff and others away from danger in Ukraine. Plus, to counter a low birth rate, the government of Singapore is abolishing a law which currently prevents healthy single women aged between 21 and 35 from freezing their eggs. We find out more from one Singapore resident, who is just too old to take advantage of the new rules.

Today's edition is presented by Martin Webber, and produced by Benjie Guy, Ivana Davidovic and Frey Lindsay.

(Picture: Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen on a television. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172ykq07672zmp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172yg1h3pkjczr)
Hundreds in Mariupol waiting for evacuation

We follow the developments in Mariupol as Ukrainian officials are making new efforts to get people out of the besieged city. President Putin has said the city has already fallen but ordered his troops not to storm the last remaining bastion of Ukraine’s resistance, the Azovstal steel plant, in the city. We have the latest from BBC Russian and BBC Ukrainian.

We also bring together three young Ukrainians whose university education has been interrupted by the war. They share experiences and explain how their lives have changed since the invasion began.

Israeli police have again clashed with Palestinians at Al Aqsa Mosque compound in Jerusalem. We get more from our reporter in the city.

And in Myanmar, a protest movement against the military coup is now an armed uprising. We speak to our reporter who has gained rare access to the rebel jungle training camps and urban hide outs where young protesters are being turned into soldiers.

(Photo: Evacuees wait before boarding a bus to leave the Mariupol April 20, 2022. Credit: Reuters/Alexander Ermochenko)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172ykq076733ct)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172yg1h3pkjhqw)
Manchester United appoint Erik ten Hag as coach

We hear about Erik ten Hag, the new manager of the English Premier League football club Manchester United.

We follow the developments in Mariupol as Ukrainian officials are making new efforts to get people out of the besieged city. President Putin has said the city has already fallen but ordered his troops not to storm the last remaining bastion of Ukraine’s resistance, the Azovstal steel plant, in the city. We have the latest from BBC Russian and BBC Ukrainian.

We also bring together three young Ukrainians whose university education has been interrupted by the war.

And it’s the third day of Johnny Depp giving evidence in court in the US in his trial against ex-wife Amber Heard. We get details from our reporter following the trial.

(Photo: Erik ten Hag. Credit; Reuters/Wolfgang Rattay)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767373y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct34vv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct3c0t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172ykq07673bw2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll2phg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtsq4g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172ygfcp00cvtz)
2022/04/21 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172ykq07673gm6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct303f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtstwl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science In Action (w3ct368v)
Climate techno-fix would worsen global malaria burden

As a series of UN climate reports have warned recently, drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions – a halving over the next decade – are needed if we are to keep global warming down to manageable levels. No sign of that happening.

An emergency measure to buy time that’s sometimes discussed is solar geoengineering – creating an atmospheric sunscreen that reduces incoming solar heat. Sulphate compounds in volcanic gases or in industrial fumes attract water vapour to make a fine haze and have that effect. The difference would be starting a deliberate programme of injecting sulphate particles into the stratosphere.

There are a host of arguments against it, including a revulsion against adding another pollutant to the atmosphere to offset the one, carbon dioxide, that’s giving us problems in the first place. Another objection, outlined this week, is that it could set back the global fight against malaria - a major killer in its own right. University of Cape Town ecologist Chris Trisos tells Roland Pease what his team’s modelling study revealed.

Yale University neurologist Kevin Sheth talks to us about a revolution in medical scanning – small-scale MRI machines that can be wheeled to the patient’s bedside.

According to palaeontologist Maria McNamara, an amazingly preserved pterosaur fossil from Brazil proves that some of these flying reptiles did have feathers similar to those of birds (and some dinosaurs), and that the feathers were of different colours, possibly for mating display.

Primatologist Adrian Barnett has discovered that spider monkeys in one part of the Brazilian Amazon seek out fruit, full of live maggots to eat. Why?

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

(Photo: Illustration of a mosquito biting
Credit: SCIEPRO/Science Photo Library/Getty Images)


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172ykq07673lcb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172yfbxbd0649m)
Putin orders troops to seal off Mariupol steel works

Russian President Vladimir Putin has ordered his troops to seal off Ukrainian defenders inside the besieged port city of Mariupol. Some Ukrainian forces are still holding out. We'll hear from a commander inside the Azovstal steel plant.

Also today: A series of bomb attacks across Afghanistan have left dozens of people dead; and the women of Myanmar who have taken up arms against the military junta.

(Photo: Smoke rises above a plant of Azovstal Iron and Steel Works in Mariupol, 21/04/2022. Credit: Reuters/Alexander Ermochenko


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172ykq07673q3g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct39st)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtt2cv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct38mp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172ykq07673tvl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrwrs3xttx5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh0kg6rxww)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtt63z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172yk6zmg64mky)
IMF head: Ukraine needs $5-7bn per month

The Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund Kristalina Georgieva says Ukraine needs up to $7 billion per month in the near future, in the wake of Russia’s invasion. The BBC’s Economics Editor Faisal Islam has been speaking to her, and joins us on the line from Washington DC to talk through the big news lines emanating from the IMF/World Bank 2022 Spring Meetings. Plus, a harrowing day for American news giant CNN, which has axed its recently-launched online streaming service CNN+, less than a month after its launch. CNBC media & technology reporter Alex Sherman has been covering the story and tells us why the fledgling platform failed. Also in the programme, we explore the impact on renewable energy investment of the rising price of fossil fuels, with the environmentalist George Monbiot. The World Bank has warned of a potential global food crisis, as a result of Russia's invasion of Ukraine. We have a report from the BBC's Rahul Tandon about the private businesses that have stepped in to evacuate their own staff and others away from danger in Ukraine.

(Photo: IMF head Kristalina Georgieva; Credit: Getty Images)



FRIDAY 22 APRIL 2022

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172ykq07673ylq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct38s6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct36fc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172ykq076742bv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172ydp9q8w52qr)
CNN axes flagship streaming service

CNN has pulled the plug on its flagship online streaming service CNN+, less than a month after it was launched to much fanfare. CNBC media & technology reporter Alex Sherman has been covering the story and tells us why the fledgling platform failed. Like many economies which reap huge benefits from tourism, Thailand has struggled with a sharp drop in visitor numbers during the Covid-19 pandemic. The government is now trying to woo some of those potential visitors again, but rising coronavirus cases are complicating the issue. Ahead of pivotal midterm elections in November, we survey the political landscape in the United States, as President Biden announces a new package of $800 million in military aid for Ukraine. The Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund, Kristalina Georgieva, says Ukraine needs up to $7 billion per month in the near future, in the wake of Russia’s invasion. The BBC’s Economics Editor Faisal Islam has been speaking to her, and joins us from Washington DC to talk through the big news lines emanating from the IMF/World Bank 2022 Spring Meetings. Plus, the BBC’s Victoria Craig has been catching up with some of British food sector businesses to see how they’re coping with the current stage of the pandemic.

Throughout the programme we’re joined live by political reporter Erin Delmore in New York, and Patrick Barta of the Wall Street Journal in Bangkok.

(Photo: A billboard advertising CNN+ in Manhattan; Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767462z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll3jqc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxttkcc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct3hpx)
Shakhtar Donetsk and Bulgaria's Hristov twins

Shakhtar Donetsk CEO Sergei Palkin discusses the challenges faced by the club and the country. Plus we hear from Bulgarian internationals, and twins, Andrea and Petko Hristov.

Picture on website: Shakhtar Donetsk prepare to face Olympiacos FC in an international friendly match, with the proceeds going to raise money for Ukrainian refugees (Milos Bicanski/Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172ykq076749v3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct34vv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct3c0t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172ykq07674fl7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll3s6m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxttsvm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct4233)
Emancipation, assimilation and Jewish identity

For 500 years the Jews of Europe were kept apart, legally segregated in ghettos. Then at the dawn of the 19th Century Jews were emancipated and overnight what it meant to be a Jew in the world changed. Michael Goldfarb looks at how this historic event changed Jewish identity and the world in which Jews lived.

In interviews with prominent members of his community in three different countries - a Rabbi, a musician and educator, and an organiser for eastern Europe’s rebuilding Jewish communities, he explores the rapid changes of identity in a group of people who lived an essentially unchanged existence for more than half a millennium.

Emancipation changed the practice of Judaism and brought new ideas to the arts. It created controversy within the Jewish community about how far one should assimilate, and hatred outside the Jewish community among those who did not want Jews to assimilate at all. This reaction would create an ideology - anti-Semitism, which would ultimately lead to the near annihilation of Europe’s Jews.

(Photo: Anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto rebellion. Creddit: Bernard Bisson/Sygma/Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172ykq07674kbc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172yf8g06655zs)
Mariupol: Around 120,000 civilians blocked from leaving the city

Around 120,000 civilians are blocked from leaving Mariupol, according to the Ukrainian President, Volodymyr Zelenskiy. But on Wednesday a small convoy of buses evacuated some civilians to the north arriving to the relative safety of the city of Zaporizhzhia. Toby Fricker, a spokesperson for Unicef - The United Nations children’s agency, tells us about the efforts to support evacuees.

Following days of violence in Jerusalem the Arab League has called for an end to Jewish prayers at the al Aqsa Mosque compound. At an emergency meeting the organisation accused Israel of restricting Muslim access to the historic site while permitting ultra-nationalist Jews to enter. The violence has spread beyond Jerusalem with a rocket attack launched on Israel from Gaza and Israel responding with air strikes. Omar Shakir, Israel and Palestine Director at Human Rights Watch, says there is risk of further escalation.

It is the last day of campaigning in the second round of the French presidential elections and the last chance for the current President Emmanuel Macron and the far-right leader Marine Le Pen to convince voters before the vote on Sunday. Our Europe editor Katya Adler has been out on the campaign trail with the candidates.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172ykq07674p2h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172yf8g06659qx)
Mariupol still holding out against Russian attack

President Volodomyr Zelensky says that Russian gains in the east of Ukraine will be reversed, and that Mariupol is still holding out against the Russian attack. A small group of 79 evacuees managed to escape from the port city, seeking refuge in Zaporizhzhia to the north The BBC’s Catherine Byaruhanga spoke to some of them.

Dozens of people have been killed or injured in four explosions across Afghanistan on Thursday, local officials say. The first explosion tore through a Shia mosque in the city of Mazar-i-Sharif. At least 31 people were killed, and 87 were wounded. The Islamic State group (IS) admitted carrying out the attack. Abdirahim Saeed, a specialist in jihadist and insurgent activity with BBC Monitoring, reports.

Google's state of the art Equiano subsea cable lands in Nigeria today. The link begins in Portugal and runs some 12,000 km along the coast of West Africa, and will provide a valuable high capacity internet connection. The head of Google Africa, Nitin Gajria, tells us more.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172ykq07674stm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172yf8g0665fh1)
Volodymyr Zelensky: Russia's gains in the east of Ukraine are temporary

Ukrainian officials said Moscow had taken more than 40 villages in the Donbas region on Thursday, but stressed that Mariupol had not yet fallen. President Volodymyr Zelensky has told Russia its recent gains in the east of the country are only temporary and its forces will be forced back across the border. Tanya Kozyreva, reporter based in Zaporizhzhia, to give us the latest.

It is the final day of campaigning in the French presidential election, with the centrist incumbent Emmanuel Macron and his far-right challenger Marine Le Pen making their final appeals to voters. The BBC's James Coomarasamy reports from Dijon in eastern France.

The world’s largest particle accelerator is about to restart after a three-year shutdown during which it has received a major upgrade. Researchers at the Large Hadron Collider on the Swis- French border believe that the new machine will discover particles that are completely new to science. BBC Science correspondent, Pallab Ghosh, gains exclusive access to the detectors deep underground.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172ykq07674xkr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32fp)
Mikhail Khodorkovsky: Making an enemy of Putin

Stephen Sackur speaks to the the former Russian oligarch turned Putin foe, Mikhail Khodorkovsky. He was once the boss of energy company Yukos and Russia’s richest oligarch. After falling out with President Putin, he spent 10 years in prison. Now he wants tougher western sanctions on Moscow and more arms for Ukraine in the war with Russia. If Putin faces defeat in Ukraine, how will he respond?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtv8v4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct30rh)
Sporting Sanctions

How has the world of sport reacted to the invasion of Ukraine - and what does the exclusion of Russian and Belarusian athletes or teams mean for them and for the finances of world sport?

Ashish Sharma speaks to Michael Payne, who was for many years head of the marketing division of the International Olympic Committee.

He also hears from Cheri Bradish, an expert in sports marketing and the Director of the Future of Sport Lab at Ryerson University in Toronto, and Rob Koehler, the Director General of Global Athlete and formerly the World Anti-Doping Agency Director of Education and Deputy Director General.

Plus there's the Ukrainian tennis players Elina Svitolina and Alex Dolgopalov, the Ukrainian high jumper Yaroslava Mahuchikh, and Marius Vizer Jr, General Secretary of the international Teqball federation.


Presenter: Ashish Sharma
Producer: James Wickham

(Image: Ukraine's Yaroslava Mahuchikh in action during the high jump at the 2022 World Athletics Indoor Championships. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct3bw9)
The battle for Kinder Scout

It's 90 years since hundreds of walkers organised a mass trespass on a mountain in the English Peak District called Kinder Scout. It was a major step in the fight by workers in the northern industrial city of Manchester for access to the surrounding countryside, much of which was in private hands. In 2012, Simon Watts brought together the memories of survivors of the Trespass as recorded in the BBC archives.

PHOTO: The countryside around Kinder Scout (Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767519w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll4cy8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtvdl8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science In Action (w3ct368v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172ykq07675520)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct33nr)
Sweden’s hardening stance on immigration

Sweden has experienced days of violent protests against a far-right group. Danish-Swedish politician Rasmus Paludan’s anti-Islam party Hard Line says it will burn copies of the Quran as part of a tour of cities with large immigrant populations. Sweden has traditionally welcomed refugees, taking in Jews during WW2, Iranians fleeing the revolution, and a large number of people from the former Yugoslavia. But is that approach changing? Per capita Sweden accepted more refugees from the war in Syria than any other EU country. But after the arrival of more than 160,000 refugees in 2015 alone, government policy began to evolve – seeing the introduction of border checks, a reduction in access to permanent residency, and more stringent rules around family reunions. Voters increasingly complain that core government services like health and education are struggling to cope and many migrants still find it hard to secure jobs. The far-right party Sweden Democrats has seen a surge in support and is now the third most popular party nationally. So is Sweden changing?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.
Producers: Ellen Otzen and Paul Schuster.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172ykq076758t4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll4mfj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtvn2j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct3hpx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172ykq07675dk8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct37z1)
Why women vote for Modi

Narendra Modi’s BJP party won four out of five Indian states in recent elections, with polls reporting that more women than men voted for them. Geeta Panday of BBC News Delhi explains BJP’s appeal to women, from Prime Minister Modi’s strongman image, to the party's development schemes to improve women’s lives.

Space Kebab
A kebab shop owner in Adana, known in Turkey as the capital of kebabs, attempted to deliver the world's first kebab into outer space. Özge Ozdemir from BBC Turkish tells us more about the not entirely serious space mission.

Rio Alligators
From bus stations to door mats, alligators have been seen in Rio de Janeiro's most urban areas. Disorganised urban expansion, pollution and human feeding appear to have caused the population boom. Brazilian Ricardo Senra grew up in Rio, and made a video about Rio's wild inhabitants.

Shanghai's Covid lockdown
Shanghai has been in lockdown for a month. What began as a 5 day intervention is still in place as omicron defies the measures, and government’s zero-Covid policy shows no sign of changing. BBC Chinese journalist Benny Lu has been finding out what life is like under arguably the world’s strictest lockdown.

Omani dishdashas
How would you feel if your government made laws about what you could wear? That’s what’s happened in the Gulf state of Oman, with laws relating to the traditional robe the dishdasha and how it can and can’t be worn, as BBC Arabic's Nisrine Hatoum reports.

(Photo: Indian Prime Minister Modi visits Allahabad, India in 2021. Credit: Ritesh Shukla/Getty Images)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct3bw9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172ykq07675j9d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll4vxs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtvwks)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science In Action (w3ct368v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172ykq07675n1j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172yfbxbd085zt)
Last day of campaigning before French election run-off

It's the last day of campaigning before the second-round run-off in the French presidential election between the incumbent centrist Emmanuel Macron and his hard-right challenger Marine Le Pen.

We'll hear from Newshour's James Coomarasamy in Dijon in the east of France about how voters across the political spectrum are united around cost-of-living concerns and how this could affect the vote.

Also in the programme: a Russian general says the aim of the offensive is to take control of the whole of southern and eastern Ukraine; how the war is pushing up food prices around the world and what that means for already impoverished South Sudan; and after a three-year upgrade, the world's largest particle accelerator resumes work.

(Photo shows Official campaign posters of 2022 French presidential election candidates are displayed on a billboard in Herbeville. Credit: Benoit Tessier/Reuters)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172ykq07675rsn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32fp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtw421)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172yk2wdt5s1ck)
Shanghai tightens lockdown restrictions

Shanghai residents infected with coronavirus will get door alarms to prevent them leaving. We get a sense of how that and other new restrictions are impacting daily life from one resident of the city. Also in the programme, market traders in Ghana are calling for authorities to implement policies to hold prices stable as inflation bites. We find out more from Dr Agyapomaa Gyeke-Dako, from the University of Ghana Business School in Accra. A year after we first spoke with them, the BBC's Victoria Craig revisits a number of companies that had adapted their business models to deal with the coronavirus pandemic, to find out whether the changes turned out to be permanent. Plus, ahead of World Record Store Day this weekend, which celebrates everything to do with independent music shops, we hear how the market for vinyl records is evolving, from Rupert Morrison, owner of Drift Records in Devon, in southwest England.

Today's edition is presented by Sasha Twining, and produced by Benjie Guy, Ivana Davidovic and Gabriele Shaw.

(Picture: Shanghai residents queue for coronavirus tests. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172ykq07675wjs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172yg1h3pkm8wv)
Russia 'seeks full control' of southern Ukraine

President Zelensky says Russian gains in eastern Ukraine are only temporary but a Russian general has said the offensive in Ukraine is aimed at conquering the whole of the south as well as the eastern region of Donbas. Our correspondents and experts will be explaining today’s developments on the ground. We’ll also hear the background story of some of the people who have just been evacuated from the besieged city of Mariupol.

We’ll hear about the the campaign to “cancel Russia” over the war in Ukraine.

The world’s most powerful particle accelerator has been re-started. We’ll answer listeners’ questions about the upgraded Hadron Collider and explain what the scientists hope it will discover.

It’s the final day of campaigning in the French presidential election ahead of Sunday’s vote. We’ll hear from some of the voters who will have to choose between the incumbent Emmanuel Macron and his far-right challengers Marine Le Pen.

(Photo: Troops formed a convoy in Mariupol flying the flags of Russia and the self-proclaimed People's Republic of Luhansk. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172ykq0767608x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172yg1h3pkmdmz)
Russia 'seeks full control' of southern Ukraine

President Zelensky says Russian gains in eastern Ukraine are only temporary but a Russian general has said the offensive in Ukraine is aimed at conquering the whole of the south as well as the eastern region of Donbas. Our correspondents and experts will be explaining today’s developments on the ground. We also hear the background story of some of the people who have just been evacuated from the besieged city of Mariupol.

We catch up with the latest news about the floods in South Africa. More than 430 people have been killed after the devastating rains which caused mudslides in KwaZulu Natal province.

It’s the final day of campaigning in the French presidential election ahead of Sunday’s vote. We’ll hear from some of the voters who will have to choose between the incumbent Emmanuel Macron and his far-right challengers Marine Le Pen.

(Photo: Service members of pro-Russian troops, including fighters of the Chechen special forces unit, stand in front of the destroyed administration building of Azovstal Iron and Steel Works during Ukraine-Russia conflict in the southern port city of Mariupol, Ukraine April 21, 2022. Credit: Reuters/Chingis Kondarov)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172ykq07676411)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct37z1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct3bw9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172ykq076767s5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172yl7mmll5ldk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtwm1k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172ygfcp00grr2)
2022/04/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172ykq07676cj9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct374y)
A setback for Netflix

Tech Tent speaks to Julian Aquilina, from Enders analysis, on how serious a blow Netflix's loss of subscribers is. James Clayton checks back in with an update on Elon Musk and Twitter. And our technology reporter Shiona McCallum has been speaking to an astronaut.


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtwqsp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct3j6q)
Why did the ancient Maya abandon their cities?

The ancient Maya flourished in modern day Mexico and Central America for millennia. They built incredible cities and they had sophisticated knowledge of astronomy, architecture and the natural world. But although Maya culture continues to exist today, around 900 AD, many of their great settlements collapsed, and today they lie in ruins.

CrowdScience listener Michael wants to know - how did the Maya sustain their populations successfully for so long? And what happened 1000 years ago that led them to abandon their cities?

To find out, presenter Melanie Brown travels to the forests of Western Belize. She visits the archaeological site of Xunantunich to learn about what life would have been like for the Maya living in what was once a prosperous city. She hears about the importance of water to the Maya way of life in this region, and their ingenious methods for capturing and storing rainfall.

She meets archaeologists using lasers and drones to map Maya settlements that have lain hidden by jungle for centuries. And she discovers what material from the bottom of lakes can tell us about how the Maya faced a changing climate, which may have had huge consequences for their society.

This episode is being released on Earth Day 2022. As we face an uncertain future of our own amid a climate crisis, are there any lessons we can learn from the Maya about how to live sustainably on this planet?

Presented by Melanie Brown and produced by Anand Jagatia

Featuring:
Elias Cambranes, Maya expert and tour guide
Prof Lisa Lucero, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Prof Tim Murtha, University of Florida
Dr Eben Broadbent, University of Florida
Prof Mark Brenner, University of Florida

Photo: Ancient ruins of the Mayas deep in the forest of Belize
Credit: Simon Dannhauer/Getty Images


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172ykq07676h8f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172yfbxbd0916q)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172ykq07676m0k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct32fp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtwz8y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct3hpx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172ykq07676qrp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172yrwrs3xxqt8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172ygh0kg6vtsz)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172ykqtnxtx312)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172yk3pvjsh9rw)
Shanghai tightens lockdown restrictions

Shanghai residents infected with coronavirus will get door alarms to prevent them leaving. We get a sense of how that and other new restrictions are impacting daily life from one resident of the city. Also in the programme, market traders in Ghana are calling for authorities to implement policies to hold prices stable as inflation bites. We find out more from Dr Agyapomaa Gyeke-Dako, from the University of Ghana Business School in Accra. A year after we first spoke with them, the BBC's Victoria Craig revisits a number of companies that had adapted their business models to deal with the coronavirus pandemic, to find out whether the changes turned out to be permanent. Plus, ahead of World Record Store Day this weekend, which celebrates everything to do with independent music shops, we hear how the market for vinyl records is evolving, from Rupert Morrison, owner of Drift Records in Devon, in southwest England.

(Picture: Shanghai residents queue for coronavirus tests. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3ct303d)

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Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct303f)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172ykqt9nj45xh)

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BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172ykpzvxxfpwz)

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BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172yg1h3pkbpxp)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172yg1h3pkfh2n)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172yg1h3pkflts)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172yg1h3pkjczr)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172yg1h3pkjhqw)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172yg1h3pkm8wv)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172yg1h3pkmdmz)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct30x0)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct3161)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct31bk)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct311j)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct30rh)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172ydp9q8vwd0g)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172ydp9q8vz8xk)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172ydp9q8w25tn)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172ydp9q8w52qr)

Comedians vs. the News 00:32 MON (w3ct3jt6)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct3j6p)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct3j6p)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct3j6q)

Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct3hh2)

Deeply Human 22:06 SUN (w3ct3hh2)

Deeply Human 03:06 MON (w3ct3hh2)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct31y6)

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Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct31y6)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct428z)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct4290)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct4290)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct4290)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct3276)

From Our Own Correspondent 00:06 MON (w3ct3276)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct32l6)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct32l6)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3ct32l6)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct32qq)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct32qq)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3ct32qq)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct32fp)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct32fp)

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Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nvn)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct32w7)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct32w7)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct32w7)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct4232)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct4232)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct4233)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct3jhr)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct3jhr)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct3jhr)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct3k4g)

More or Less 00:50 SUN (w3ct3k4g)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct3k4g)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct30jp)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172yf8g065slcd)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172yf8g065sq3j)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172yf8g065stvn)

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Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172yf8g06655zs)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172yf8g06659qx)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172yf8g0665fh1)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172yfbwz3pktjy)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172yfbwz3plshz)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172yfbwz3pnqg1)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172yfbwz3pppf2)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172yfbxbczwlcf)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172yfbxbczxflb)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172yfbxbczzh8j)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172yfbxbd00bhf)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172yfbxbd02d5m)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172yfbxbd037dj)

Newshour 14:06 THU (w172yfbxbd0592q)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172yfbxbd0649m)

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Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct41d8)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3ct41d8)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct34n2)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct34n2)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3ct34n2)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3ct352m)

Outlook 18:06 TUE (w3ct352m)

Outlook 03:06 WED (w3ct352m)

Outlook 12:06 WED (w3ct3y86)

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Outlook 03:06 THU (w3ct3y86)

Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct34vv)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3ct34vv)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct34vv)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct35s0)

Over to You 14:50 SUN (w3ct35s0)

Over to You 22:50 SUN (w3ct35s0)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct35s0)

People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct3j26)

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People Fixing The World 22:06 TUE (w3ct3j26)

Science In Action 20:32 THU (w3ct368v)

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Science In Action 13:32 FRI (w3ct368v)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172ygfcp00353p)

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Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct36fb)

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Sporting Witness 00:50 FRI (w3ct36fc)

Sports News 23:20 SAT (w172ygh065x5l37)

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Sports News 23:20 MON (w172ygh0kg6h75l)

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Sports News 23:20 THU (w172ygh0kg6rxww)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172yg8fnc2mk34)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172ygjn2n3j2ck)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172ygjn2n3m6rx)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct370d)

Tech Tent 11:32 SAT (w3ct374x)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3ct374y)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct38zy)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3ct38zy)

The Arts Hour 00:06 WED (w3ct38zy)

The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct3khr)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct41cx)

The Compass 02:32 WED (w3ct41cy)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct41cy)

The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct37ln)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct37lp)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct37lp)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3ct37lp)

The Cultural Frontline 23:32 SAT (w3ct37r7)

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The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct41vt)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct41vt)

The Documentary 05:32 SUN (w3ct41cs)

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The Documentary 11:32 WED (w3ct41tw)

The Documentary 22:32 WED (w3ct41tw)

The Documentary 00:06 THU (w3ct41vt)

The Explanation 09:32 SAT (w3ct3tq2)

The Explanation 22:32 SUN (w3ct3tq2)

The Explanation 03:32 MON (w3ct3tq2)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct37z0)

The Fifth Floor 12:06 FRI (w3ct37z1)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct38mn)

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The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct38s5)

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The Forum 00:06 FRI (w3ct38s6)

The History Hour 20:06 SUN (w3ct39l0)

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The Inquiry 12:06 SUN (w3ct39ss)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct39st)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct39st)

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The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172yl7m8b8f90m)

The Newsroom 05:06 SAT (w172yl7m8b8fn80)

The Newsroom 09:06 SAT (w172yl7m8b8g47j)

The Newsroom 11:06 SAT (w172yl7m8b8gcqs)

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The Newsroom 23:06 SAT (w172yrwrdvm7h3j)

The Newsroom 02:06 SUN (w172yl7m8b8j5xq)

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The Newsroom 01:06 MON (w172yl7mmlkqtbv)

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The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3ct33nq)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct33nq)

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The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3ct39yz)

Trending 05:32 SAT (w3ct3bqn)

Trending 18:32 SAT (w3ct3bqn)

Trending 00:32 SUN (w3ct3bqn)

Trending 10:32 MON (w3ct3bqn)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172ykwbly41rqz)

Weekend 07:06 SAT (w172ykwbly41wh3)

Weekend 08:06 SAT (w172ykwbly42077)

Weekend 06:06 SUN (w172ykwbly44nn2)

Weekend 07:06 SUN (w172ykwbly44sd6)

Weekend 08:06 SUN (w172ykwbly44x4b)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct3bw8)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3ct3byk)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct3byk)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3ct3byk)

Witness History 03:50 TUE (w3ct3byk)

Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3ct3c32)

Witness History 12:50 TUE (w3ct3c32)

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WorklifeIndia 01:32 SAT (w3ct3jc6)

WorklifeIndia 19:32 SAT (w3ct3jc6)

World Business Report 01:06 SAT (w172yk1752nnfq4)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172yk4j98cs1lr)

World Business Report 23:32 MON (w172yk5bqzzhb02)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172yk7t25sm570)

World Business Report 23:32 TUE (w172yk8mhxdbfmb)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172yk9fyn02nzp)

World Business Report 23:32 WED (w172ykb8dclsyd0)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172yk655qlfc5m)

World Business Report 23:32 THU (w172yk6zmg64mky)

World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172yk2wdt5s1ck)

World Business Report 23:32 FRI (w172yk3pvjsh9rw)

World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct3hpx)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct3hpx)

World Football 22:32 FRI (w3ct3hpx)