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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 12 FEBRUARY 2022

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nqprn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htr)
France's place in the world

This week the French president Emmanuel Macron travelled thousands of kilometres across Europe in a diplomatic effort to avert an escalation of the war in Ukraine. He met Presidents Putin and Zelensky in Moscow and Kyiv, as well as German and Polish leaders in Berlin. Diplomats say Mr Macron has made himself a key interlocutor between the EU and the US on one side and Russia on the other. The crisis in Ukraine has galvanised France's alliance with the United States which was at a low point just months ago when Paris lost a lucrative Australian submarine contract to Washington and London. But at home - where the president is facing re-election, there’s scepticism over France’s close alliance with America. So what are President Macron's foreign policy goals? As the EU’s only nuclear-armed state, what role should France play in representing Europe’s broader interests on the world stage? And will Mr Macron’s diplomatic achievements improve his chances of winning a second term in April?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nqths)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlnrjw3fp1)
World leaders discuss protecting the oceans

The summit has seen international commitments to protect the ocean and reverse its declining health - we get details from Louise Guillot, a sustainability reporter for Politico. Also in the programme, Argentina's government and the International Monetary Fund have been renegotiating the terms of a 2018 loan issued to the country. The package had been vaunted for its commitment to protecting the most vulnerable in society, but as the BBC's Ed Butler reports, the reality has been painfully different. Plus, ahead of this weekend's Super Bowl between the LA Rams and Cincinnati Bengals the BBC's Michelle Fleury reports on the rising number of cryptocurrency adverts expected on TV. And with the event returning to Los Angeles for the first time in almost 30 years, we examine the likely economic impact on the city with Matt Dangelantonio of LA's KPCC radio. (Picture of a wave via Getty Images).


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8f5s5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f4h)
Hijab row: Should India’s colleges have a dress code?

An escalating row over the hijab, a headscarf worn by Muslim women, has highlighted India’s sharpening religious divide in recent weeks. After a government-run college barred six Muslim girls from attending classes for wearing the hijab, a debate over uniform dress code erupted across the country. The girls say the hijab is an essential part of their religious identity, which is protected by the Constitution.

Protests both in favour of and against the Muslim girls’ demands have been organised in several parts of India. Some have turned violent. An Indian court has now asked students to abstain from wearing religious clothing in educational institutions till final orders are issued, but the larger issue remains.

Is it restrictive to ask students to stick to a uniform dress code at college level? Should they be forced to choose between education and religious practices? Will it have a wider impact on the education of girl students in the country? How feasible is it to impose such rules in a nation known for its diverse cultural identity?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss whether India’s colleges should have a dress code.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Afreen Fatima, student activist; Sabika Abbas Naqvi, community and advocacy manager, Fearless Collective; Professor Geeta Bhatt, University of Delhi; Priyanka Chaturvedi, MP, spokesperson - Shiv Sena; Kavita Krishnan, secretary, All India Progressive Women's Association


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nqy7x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrstk75)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8f9j9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lcs)
Langer's exit: What next for Australian cricket?

Alison Mitchell, Jim Maxwell and Charu Sharma discuss the resignation of Australia Men’s Head Coach Justin Langer. They look at his legacy and the power play between himself and his players.

Plus this week they are joined by John Buchanan, the former Australia coach from 1999 to 2007 who lead the side to multiple World Cup and Ashes wins. He also coached Justin Langer during this time and shares his experiences of him as a player and who his front-runners are for the vacancy.

England have chosen to drop both Stuart Broad and James Anderson from their tour to the West Indies and with the team also looking for a new head coach we ask whether we are entering a new era for English cricket?

Photo: Justin Langer Head Coach of Australia watches on during an Australian Ashes squad nets session at Blundstone Arena on January 12, 2022 in Hobart, Australia. (Photo by Steve Bell/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nr201)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g8)
No guns on the Ferris wheel

Afghanistan's Taliban Cabinet recently issued a statement that their fighters should not carry weapons while visiting amusement parks. It follows videos circulating online of fighters enjoying bumper car rides, as well as shooting for toys at the rifle range. BBC Afghan's Khalil Noori lived in Kabul until August last year when he was evacuated with his family. He shares his memories of days out in amusement parks, and the background to this story.

An icy bike ride on Lake Baikal
BBC Russian's Oleg Boldyrev took the opportunity of a far flung deployment to visit a frozen Lake Baikal, naturally with his bike. A place of ice stalactites, upended jagged ice shards, and strange, sci-fi sounding ice symphonies as the ice expands and contracts.

Turkish inflation
BBC Arabic's Shahdi Alkashif lives in Istanbul, and has been reporting on the dramatic rise in the cost of living. And it's not just a professional assignment - with a large family to provide for it's a story that's close to home.

The president ploughing a field for new year
Vietnamese President Nguyen Xuan Phuc dressed as a farmer and ploughed a rice field with a buffalo during the Lunar New Year celebrations. It’s a ceremony formerly performed by Vietnamese kings, and the photos on social media received a mixed reaction, as Giang Nguyen of BBC Vietnamese explains.

India's most renowned female activist
Sudha Barawaj is an activist and trade unionist, who spent 30 years fighting for the rights of the tribal people in the mineral-rich state of Chhattisgarh. She was arrested in 2018 and then spent three years in jail. Soutik Biswas of BBC Delhi tells us what an eye opening experience this was for her.

(Photo: Taliban fighter with gun sits on fun ride in Afghan amusement park, November 2021. Credit: Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzw)
The 1972 mass killings in Burundi

In late April 1972, Hutu rebels launched an insurgency in the south of Burundi with the aim of overthrowing the Tutsi led government. They brutally murdered government officials and civilians, targeting mostly Tutsi. Estimates from the time suggest at least a thousand people were killed. The army quickly contained the insurgency but then began reprisals against Hutu civilians. Hutu elites in particular were targeted – those with education or with government jobs. The killing lasted for more than 3 months. Human Rights Watch estimates as many as 200,000 were killed. Rob Walker speaks to Jeanine Ntihirageza who was an 11-year-old schoolgirl at the time and whose father went missing at the start of the reprisals.

(Photo: National Commission for Truth and Reconciliation officials inspect remains of people at a mass grave existing from 1972 in Mwaro, Burundi. Credit: Renovat Ndabashinze/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nr5r5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nr9h9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrstxgk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8fnrp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwj)
Regrets

Looking back over a long life can provide cause for regret. Incidents from decades past, seemingly forgotten, can suddenly provoke deep sadness. Richard in Malaysia is troubled by the way he acted as a young man. Writer and therapist Dr Shefali offers him guidance on accepting his flaws and living more in the present moment.

Presented by the BBC’s Sana Safi.

Produced by Ruth Edwards and Charlie Taylor


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dpl)
Nato’s role in the Ukraine crisis

Russia and some Nato member states, including the US, are at odds over the Ukraine crisis. Ros Atkins examines the dynamics at play between Russia and Nato. (Photo: Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nrf7f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytnqvd2thj)
Ukraine tensions: US says Russia invasion could begin any day

The US has warned that Russia could invade Ukraine "at any time" and American citizens should leave immediately. The White House said an invasion could start with aerial bombing that would make departures difficult and endanger civilians. Moscow has repeatedly denied any plans to invade Ukraine despite massing more than 100,000 troops near the border.

Also in the programme: Large numbers of people are continuing to occupy a vital Canada-US border crossing, hours after an injunction to end the blockade took effect. And we hear about why there are protests and counter-protests in the southern Indian state of Karnataka over Muslim students wearing the hijab.

Julian Worricker has two guests to discuss these and the day's other stories. Joanna Chiu is a Canadian author and senior journalist for the Toronto Star. Carlos Lopes is a professor at the Mandela School of Public Governance at the University of Cape Town and former UN Under-Secretary General.

(Photo: National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan responds to questions at the White House. Credit: EPA/Shawn Thew/Pool)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nrjzk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytnqvd2y7n)
Ukraine tensions: US says Russia invasion could begin any day

The US has warned that Russia could invade Ukraine "at any time" and American citizens should leave immediately. The White House said an invasion could start with aerial bombing that would make departures difficult and endanger civilians. Moscow has repeatedly denied any plans to invade Ukraine despite massing more than 100,000 troops near the border.

Also in the programme: Protests continue in the Canadian province of Ontario despite an injunction that has come into force. And we hear the latest from day eight of the Winter Olympics in Beijing.

Julian Worricker has two guests to discuss these and the day's other stories. Joanna Chiu is a Canadian author and senior journalist for the Toronto Star. Carlos Lopes is a professor at the Mandela School of Public Governance at the University of Cape Town and former UN Under-Secretary General.

(Photo: US President Joe Biden walks to board Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House. Credit: EPA/Shawn Thew/Pool)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nrnqp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytnqvd31zs)
Ukraine tensions: US says Russia invasion could begin any day

The US has warned that Russia could invade Ukraine "at any time" and American citizens should leave immediately. The White House said an invasion could start with aerial bombing that would make departures difficult and endanger civilians. Moscow has repeatedly denied any plans to invade Ukraine despite massing more than 100,000 troops near the border.

Also in the programme: Large numbers of people are continuing to occupy a vital Canada-US border crossing, hours after an injunction to end the blockade took effect. And researchers from Cambridge University say our musical tastes are determined by our personalities.

Julian Worricker has two guests to discuss these and the day's other stories. Joanna Chiu is a Canadian author and senior journalist for the Toronto Star. Carlos Lopes is a professor at the Mandela School of Public Governance at the University of Cape Town and former UN Under-Secretary General.

(Photo: National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan responds to questions at the White House. Credit: EPA/Shawn Thew/Pool)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8g102)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9t)
The miscarriage that changed my life

It is estimated that one in four pregnancies will end in a miscarriage. But despite being a common occurrence, this topic is still shrouded in secrecy, stigma and shame. Kim Chakanetsa meets two women who are using their first-hand experience to help other people heal.

Wanjiru Kihusa is a maternal health advocate from Kenya who lost two of her three children through miscarriage. She’s the founder of Still A Mum, a charity offering support to parents who have lost their babies. She also trains health care workers, religious leaders and managers to better support grieving parents.

Paula Ávila-Guillen is a human rights lawyer from Colombia and the Executive Director at the Women’s Equality Center, a non-profit based in New York. Since 2014, Paula has been working in El Salvador, a country where a strict abortion ban led to 181 women being imprisoned after having obstetric emergencies – including in cases where they said they had suffered miscarriages or stillbirths. In 2019, Paula had a miscarriage herself – an experience that brought her even closer to the women she works with.

Produced by Alice Gioia

(Image: (L) Paula Ávila-Guillen, credit Pablo Salgado. (R) Wanjiru Kihusa, courtesy Wanjiru Kihusa)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nrsgt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d71)
Coronavirus: Protesting truckers

For the past fortnight, the world has watched Canadian truckers block roads to protest against Covid restrictions. A rule that required any truckers entering Canada from the US to be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 or face a 14-day quarantine triggered the demonstations. The protests then grew to include different people who are angry at other Covid restrictions and also at Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government.

Host Karnie Sharp hears perspectives on the protest in Ottawa, and brings together two residents on what it’s like to live and work in the capital, amid the trucks and the wailing horns.

We also consider the removing of other restrictions, specifically the rule during the pandemic to work solely from home. We bring together people living in South Africa, Nigeria and the United States to hear their stories on what it’s been like to spend almost two years doing your job from home. They share the unexpected pleasures and also why they are nervous about remembering how to behave in an office with colleagues once more.

(Photo: Trucks block downtown streets as truckers and their supporters continue to protest against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine mandates, in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, February 10, 2022. Credit: Patrick Doyle/Reuters)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8g4r6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Music Planet (w3ct3hgj)
Colombia - Vallenato

Episode 1: Colombia - Vallenato

Journalist Betto Arcos reports from Valledupar, home to vallenato, a folk style popularised in the 1990s by Carlos Vives and celebrated in the city's annual Vallenato Legend Festival. The singers are accompanied by accordion and percussion in music that ranges from the slow, swaying rhythms of paseo and son to the more upbeat merengue and the frenetic grooves of puya. Vallenato as a genre goes back around 200 years and its songs are mini-epics, filled with local characters and poetry. Gabriel García Márquez once described his novel One Hundred Years of Solitude as a “400-page vallenato”. Betto Arcos tells the story of this vibrant music and drops in on a local parranda gathering – a type of jam session – in Valleupar during the festival.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2r)
Making coverage of Africa Cup of Nations possible

The 2022 Africa Cup of Nations football tournament has drawn to another nail biting close. One of the BBC World Service’s most complex sporting events to report on, we talk to the man who made the radio coverage possible. Plus our ongoing debate about the use of background music in programmes is given an unusual key change!

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nrx6y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0qft3v7b7l)
Sportshour at The Super Bowl: L.A

All the excitement and colour from LA ahead of the most watched annual sporting event anywhere in the world. We look at what the Super Bowl means to America through the eyes of three former NFL players. One who only got to the game once he retired, one who lost on the day but won a bigger prize and one who ended up a champion but paid an incredibly high price for his success. And all three have gone on to have a great impact off the field.

Former San Francisco 49er George Visger tells us about the horrific cost of winning his Super Bowl ring. During the course of his career he suffered many concussions and now years later and after several brain surgeries, he has been left fighting not only for his memory but for his medical bills to be paid. He lost his house, his business and his family, but despite all of that and his severe medical condition George is a leading campaigner and advocate for the protection of athletes in sport.

Jeff Rohrer never made it to the Super Bowl as a player, but as one of TV’s most regarded advert commercial directors he has had almost as much impact on Super Bowls as any of those who won a ring! He’s behind some of the most iconic Super Bowl adverts of all time. Jeff also happens to be the first NFL player, past or present, to enter into a same sex marriage. He tells us about his life and how he hopes he is inspiring a new generation of players and change the reasons why so few men feel comfortable being out in professional sport. You can see Jeff and husband Josh on social media @joshuaandjeffrey

Garry Gilliam tasted defeat to Tom Brady’s Patriots in 2015 and gave up the game in his twenties. Having grown up in poverty Garry was sent away for schooling at the famous Milton Hershey school, just a few miles from where he was born in Pennsylvania. The experience of the school’s “whole child” approach led him to dedicate his life to creating and empowering under represented communities. He explains his practical and achievable urban regeneration plans, aimed at lifting people out of poverty.

A view of SoFi Stadium as workers prepare for Super Bowl LVI on February 01, 2022 in Inglewood, California. (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ns0z2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsvmyb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8gd7g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct3jsp)
Season 3 with Celeste Ntuli and Anuvab Pal

Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini are back with Season 3 of Comedians vs The News!

This week they’re joined by South African comedian Celeste Ntuli and India’s hilarious Anuvab Pal.

They’re taking a look at the troublesome truckers causing havoc in Canada, wondering if the great Indian wedding could go virtual and asking: Just how many husbands should women have in South Africa?

Join #Comediansvsthenews for the funniest take on the headlines you’ve heard this week.

Audio for this episode was updated on 11 February.


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ns4q6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct3gkr)
World Wide Waves '22: The sounds of community radio

For World Radio Day 2022, we tune in to radio stations around the world that connect communities, spark conversations, keep traditions alive and give a voice to their listeners. From Aboriginal Koori Radio in Australia to a community station in India run by rural women from the lowest Dalit caste, the airwaves carry intimate wisdom, vital knowledge, beats and tunes that keep reminding us who we are.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ns8gb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhx87ry)
UK and US urge their citizens to leave Ukraine

Russia could invade Ukraine "at any time" and American citizens should leave immediately, the US has warned. The statement has prompted countries around the world to issue fresh warnings to nationals in Ukraine.

Also on the programme: Our Africa correspondent become the first journalist to reach the remote disputed Chagos archipelago in the Indian ocean - we'll hear from him.

And a senior virologist warns that many countries are lifting Covid restrictions too quickly

(Photo: Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy attends special tactical training exercises held by police, the National Guard and security services. CREDIT: REUTERS/Irakli Gedenidze)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nsd6g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tql1800y8)
Live Sporting Action

Lee James presents live Premier League commentary of Frank Lampard's first league game in charge of Everton at Goodison Park, as they take on Leeds United.

We’ll also bring you updates on Saturday’s other games, as well as discussing the day's action at the Winter Olympics, and the second weekend of the Six Nations.

Plus, we'll be looking ahead to Super Bowl LVI between the LA Rams and the Cincinnati Bengals.

Photo: Richarlison of Everton is closed down by Pascal Struijk, Luke Ayling, Mateusz Klich and Stuart Dallas of Leeds United. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nsw5z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrswh57)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8h7gc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9j)
Morten Andersen: The NFL Hall of Fame kicker

Morten Andersen arrived in the US at the age of 17 knowing nothing about American football. He went on to become a record-breaking NFL kicker and was later inducted into the Hall of Fame. Alex Last speaks to Morten about his remarkable career and hears why the kicker is one of the most under-appreciated skill positions in American football.

Photo: Kicker Morten Andersen of the New Orleans Saints kicks on a hold by Tommy Barnhardt, Oct 1991 (George Gojkovich/Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nszy3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfs)
Young Syria

World Questions offers a rare chance to hear a new Syrian generation debate its future.
The programme is presented by the BBC’s chief international correspondent, Lyse Doucet, and features a panel and questioners of young Syrians from within the country – and those living abroad.
Up for debate: economic sanctions, education, civil war, foreign intervention, the plight of refugees and how best to achieve a lasting peace.

The panel includes:
Karim Khwanda: Businessman and analyst
Masa Akbik: TV Presenter, Syrian Satellite Channel
Ismail Alabdullah: Volunteer with the Syria Civil Defence
Omar Alshogre: Human rights activist

Producer: Helen Towner
Studio Engineers: Darren Wardrobe, Kate Barker and Bob Nettles

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Syrian child walking down a street past rubble from destroyed buildings in Douma, Credit: Hamza Al-Ajweh/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nt3p7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv8)
Actor and producer Jessica Chastain

Oscar-nominated Jessica Chastain talks about playing Christian televangelist Tammy Faye Bakker in her latest film, The Eyes of Tammy Faye.

One of Barack Obama’s favourite writers, Honorée Fannone Jeffers, discusses America’s hidden history and her book, The Love Songs of W.E.B. Du Bois.

Pulp Fiction actor Uma Thurman talks about her role in new streaming series, Suspicion.

The celebrated Icelandic pianist Víkingur Ólafsson reflects on his life in music.

Australian screen writers Arka Das and Bina Bhattacharya talk about their new movie, Here Out West.

Georgian filmmaker Salomé Jashi tells Nikki about her new documentary Taming the Garden. And Salomé and the writer and journalist, Kohinoor Sahota, discuss their cultural highlights of the past week.

Plus there’s music from the award-winning Cape Verdean singer Mayra Andrade.

Presenter: Nikki Bedi
Producer: Paul Waters

(Photo: Jessica Chastain. Credit: Tiziana Fabi AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nt7fc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhx96qz)
Western countries urge their citizens to leave Ukraine

More than a dozen countries have urged their citizens to leave Ukraine amid warnings from Western nations that an invasion by Russia could be imminent. The US, UK and Germany are among those who told their nationals to leave.

Also on the programme: Canadian police are clearing a blockade of the main US border crossing by truckers angered by Covid mandates; and thousands of Afghan refugee camp residents in Abu Dhabi have gathered in public to protest over their continuing stay at a camp since fleeing Kabul after the Taliban took power in Afghanistan.

(Service members ride atop of an armoured personnel carrier during tactical exercises, which are conducted by the Ukrainian National Guard, Armed Forces, special operations units and simulate a crisis situation in an urban settlement, in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, Ukraine 4 February 2022. Credit: Reuters/Gleb Garanich)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ntc5h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx42166nqg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sx49nbqc3)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8hqfw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pty)
Atelier for exiles

Just a few streets from the Louvre in central Paris, the Atelier des Artistes en Exil (the Agency of Artists in Exile) is a large studio space and cultural centre which has become a thriving hub for 400+ refugee professional artists.

We join them for an “open doors” evening where visual artists, photographers, musicians and dancers are sharing their work with the public.
Graffiti artist and sculptor Ahlam Jarban is our guide. Originally from Yemen, Ahlam now lives in France and has been a member of the Atelier since 2018. She shares a vibrant studio space with four other artists who have all fled their country - including Richie, a painter from Myanmar who arrived in June. Since coming to Paris, Richie’s art has become much more political.

We also hear from Iranian artist Maral Balouri, Kurdish artist Bager Kaya, Afghan photographers Fatima Hossaini and Roya Heydari, and atelier director Judith Depaule

The Atelier provides practical support to refugee artists applying for asylum in France, in addition to professional development and project support. But bringing together exiled artists from 45 different countries has also created a strong sense of community and sharing of artistic ideas. It’s a place for preserving traditional culture but also developing new collaborations. The night ends with a joyful live concert outside in the courtyard.

Presenter: Ahlam Jarban

(Photo: Daouda Nganga. Credit: Fadi Idrees)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ntgxm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd6)
Kryptonite to my ears with Joel Culpepper, Mysie, Anaiis, and TYSON

Joel Culpepper, Mysie, Anaiis, and TYSON discuss navigating your own voice, knowing who you are, and the importance of not thinking about the mainstream or making music you hate.

Joel Culpepper grew up in South London, where he was introduced to gospel music at church from a young age. He’s renowned for being one of the best and most consistent singers coming out of the UK, and has earned fans including Stevie Wonder, Paloma Faith, former Music Life guests Tom Misch and Kojey Radical.

Mysie is a London-based artist with Ugandan roots. Her intimate brand of indie soul won her the 2020 Ivor Novello Rising Star Award. Drawing on influences from soul and hip-hop to contemporary R&B, she says her latest work is “about my relationship with love itself and wearing my heart on my sleeve”.

TYSON grew up between London, Stockholm, Spain and New York. She’s from a musical dynasty which includes her mother Neneh Cherry, grandfather trumpeter Don Cherry, and sister Mabel.

Anaiis is a French-Senegalese singer who spent time living in Dublin, Dakar, Brazil and the US, before finally settling in London, . Her music combines traditional Senegalese percussion and multi-linguistic vocals, with lyrics that explore her journey of self-discovery in life and art.



SUNDAY 13 FEBRUARY 2022

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ntlnr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d71)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8hyy4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ntqdw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1ywj)
Inside Wuhan's coronavirus lab

The Wuhan Institute of Virology has been at the centre of a controversy surrounding the origins of the virus which caused the Covid-19 pandemic. The work of the lab's previously obscure division looking at bat coronaviruses has been the subject of massive speculation and misinformation campaigns. Journalist and former biomedical scientist Jane Qui has gained unique access to the lab. She has interviewed the staff there extensively and tells us what she found on her visits.

And Tyler Starr from the Fred Hutchinson Institute in Seattle, has looked at a range of bat coronaviruses from around the world, looking to see whether they might have the capability to jump to humans in the future. He found many more than previously thought that either have or are potentially just a few mutations away from developing this ability.

Nuclear fusion researchers at the 40-year-old Joint European Torus facility near Oxford in the Uk for just the 3rd time in its long history, put fully-fledged nuclear fuel, a mixture of hydrogen isotopes, into the device, and got nuclear energy out – 59 megajoules. They used a tiny amount of fuel to make this in comparison with coal or gas.

A survey of Arctic waters under ice near the North pole has revealed a colony of giant sponges, feeding on fossilised worms. Deep-Sea Ecologists Autun Purser at the Alfred-Wegener-Institut and Teresa Maria Morganti from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology tells us about the discovery.

And, Climate change and biodiversity loss are two of the biggest threats humanity has ever faced - and tackling them is going to take a whole lot of collaboration and putting others before ourselves. But are humans cut out for this level of cooperation? Or are we fundamentally too self-interested to work together for the common good?

Listener Divyesh is not very hopeful about all this, so he’s asked CrowdScience if humans have a “selfish gene” that dooms us to failure when trying to meet these challenges. He's worried that humans are destined by our evolution to consume ever more natural resources and destroy the environment in the process.

But while it's true that humans often act in our own interest, we also show high levels of cooperation and care. Could tapping into these beneficial behaviours help us solve our global problems? Marnie Chesterton goes on the hunt for the best ways to harness human nature for the good of planet Earth - from making sure the green choice is always the cheaper and easier option, to encouraging and nurturing our better, altruistic and collaborative sides.

We visit a rural mountain community in Spain to see the centuries-old system they have for sharing common resources; while in the city, we meet activists figuring out how to live a more community-spirited and sustainable urban life. And we speak to experts in evolution, ecology and psychology to find out what helps nudge us into greener habits.

(Image: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ntv50)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsxg48)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8j6fd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwl)
Black women and breast cancer

Breast cancer makes up a third of all cancer diagnoses for black women and for those with the most common type of cancer, ER-positive (estrogen or oestrogen positive) cancers, black women are 42% more likely to die of the disease than white women. The reasons for these disparities are complex and include socio-economic factors and racism. There is also a historical absence of samples from black women in research databases and lack of inclusion in clinical trials. Researchers at Stanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute at La Jolla, California in the US have discovered significant differences at the molecular level which could explain some of the disparities. In research published in the journal, Therapeutic Advances in Medical Oncology, Dr Svasti Haricharan and her team found significant differences in black women in the all-important DNA damage repair genes, the proteins which form our body’s first line of defence against damage to our DNA. Dr Haricharan tells Marnie Chesterton that these findings have real-world implications for the treatments black women should be offered and when.

GP Dr Ann Robinson joins Marnie to discuss a new study which suggests people with high blood pressure who take paracetamol on prescription, could be increasing their risk of heart attacks and strokes. University of Edinburgh researchers published in the journal, Circulation, trial results which suggest that although taking the painkiller for headaches and fever is safe, doctors should think twice about the risks and benefits to patients taking it over many months. The trial tracked volunteers, two-thirds of whom were taking drugs for high blood pressure, or hypertension. Paracetamol, the results showed, increased blood pressure, which is one of the most important risk factors for heart attacks and strokes.

Group B Streptococcus is an infection which causes almost 100,000 new-born deaths, at least 46,000 stillbirths, and significant long-term disability for babies around the world. The bacterium is harmless for most pregnant women who carry it but it can be extremely serious when it passes to babies during pregnancy, childbirth or in the early weeks of life. James Gallagher reports on the merits of testing for Group B Strep and talks to Dr Kate Walker, Professor of Obstetrics at the University of Nottingham in the UK about a large, randomised controlled trial she is leading which will provide much-needed evidence about how best to protect babies from this dangerous infection.

And Dr Ann Robinson shares with Marnie new research which focuses on the best ways to avoid and treat gout and how playing games on your mobile could help you to quit smoking.

Presenter: Marnie Chesterton
Producers: Paula McGrath and Fiona Hill

(Picture: A senior woman looking through a window. Photo credit: FG Trade/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ntyx4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct3gkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nv2n8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw5)
Optimism and betrayal in Ukraine

Sarah Rainsford finds echoes of Russian life, language and hospitality in Eastern Ukraine, but how close do local people feel to their Russian neighbours?

Life for the herding communities in northern Kenya is increasingly challenging, with droughts becoming longer and more frequent. Samuel Derbyshire has spent ten years living and working in this parched and barren region, he believes the flexibility and responsiveness of the Turkana people can help others navigate the uncertainties of our changing world.

The Winter Olympics are well underway, with medals won and lost. Competitive spirit and top level performance have triumphed despite the pandemic, but one thing which has been missing is the sports fans, except that is for a select few. Stephen McDonell was one of the lucky ones.

Known as the city of flowers, Sanremo is a picturesque town in northwestern Italy. For Italians, it's most famous for the annual song festival which came to an end last weekend. Dany Mitzman has been enjoying the glitz and sparkle of this showcase for singer songwriters young and old.




(Image: Russian troops in fire training in the Yaroslavl region, Russia. Credit: EPA/Russian Defence Ministry Press Service handout)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8jfxn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pty)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nv6dd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsxtcn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8jkns)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct3gk3)
No satisfaction

Sex is everywhere – in popular music and TV programmes, in toothpaste adverts and on social media. Yet in real life, regular sex no longer seems to be such a big priority for people in their 20s. Research in countries including Britain, the United States and Japan has shown that young people are having less sex than previous generations.

Twenty-one-year-old student Anoushka Mutanda-Dougherty talks to people her own age to find out why. She meets Kohsuke from Japan, who has high expectations of his ideal girlfriend because of the airbrushed images he sees on Instagram, but feels shy about approaching girls because he doesn’t have much money or a stellar career.

Mercedes and Esme, both from the UK, are wrestling with new understandings of relationships which make emotional attachment frightening; while Penelope and Darren use labels like demi sexual or homo romantic asexual to explain why they only want sex in very specific circumstances. And, Tory, a Christian from the US, who went from a strict no-sex-before-marriage upbringing straight to hook-up culture – meeting partners online for sex.

Expert comment is provided by Prof Kaye Wellings, who has conducted one of the largest research projects in the world on sexual behaviour, and Anjula Mutanda, a relationship psychologist.

(Photo: A couple in bed peeking over a blanket. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nvb4j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytnqvd5qdm)
Ukraine tension: Biden warns Putin of 'swift and severe costs'

President Joe Biden has told the Russian leader Vladimir Putin that the US and its allies would impose 'swift and severe costs' if Russia invaded Ukraine. It comes after an hour of talks between the leaders aimed at defusing the situation at the Ukrainian border. The Kremlin said that Washington had failed to consider Russia's main security concerns including a veto on Ukraine ever joining Nato.

Also in the programme: Police in Canada say they have begun removing protesters occupying a bridge at the busiest border crossing with the United States. And we hear about Super Bowl 56, which will take place later today in Los Angeles.

Julian Worricker has two guests to discuss these and the other stories of the day. Martina Stevis-Gridneff is the Brussels bureau chief for The New York Times and Tom McTague is a London-based staff writer at The Atlantic, and co-author of Betting The House: The Inside Story of the 2017 Election.

(Photo: President Joe Biden speaks on the phone with Russia"s President Vladimir Putin. Credit: The White House/Handout via Reuters)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nvfwn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytnqvd5v4r)
Ukraine tension: Biden warns Putin of 'swift and severe costs'

US President Joe Biden has reiterated to Russian leader Vladimir Putin during a phone call that there will be ‘swift and severe costs’ if Russia invaded Ukraine. It comes after an hour of talks between the leaders aimed at defusing the situation at the Ukrainian border. Australia is the latest country to advise its citizens to leave Ukraine amid warnings that an invasion could be imminent.

Also in the programme: Campaigning has begun for the Hungarian elections which will take place in early April. And we hear about the newest adaptation of one of Agatha Christie’s most celebrated works, Death on the Nile.

Julian Worricker has two guests to discuss these and the other stories of the day. Martina Stevis-Gridneff is the Brussels bureau chief for The New York Times and Tom McTague is a London-based staff writer at The Atlantic, and co-author of Betting The House: The Inside Story of the 2017 Election.

(Photo: President Joe Biden speaks on the phone with Russia"s President Vladimir Putin. Credit: The White House/Handout via Reuters)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nvkms)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytnqvd5yww)
Ukraine tension: Biden warns Putin of 'swift and severe costs'

President Joe Biden has told the Russian leader Vladimir Putin that the US and its allies would impose 'swift and severe costs' if Russia invaded Ukraine. It comes after an hour of talks between the leaders aimed at defusing the situation at the Ukrainian border. The Kremlin said that Washington had failed to consider Russia's main security concerns including a veto on Ukraine ever joining Nato.

Also on the programme: We hear from the annual Munich security conference that is happening next week. And we are joined by the directors of the Oscar nominated documentary feature, Writing with Fire.

Julian Worricker has two guests to discuss these and the other stories of the day. Martina Stevis-Gridneff is the Brussels bureau chief for The New York Times and Tom McTague is a London-based staff writer at The Atlantic, and co-author of Betting The House: The Inside Story of the 2017 Election.

(Photo: President Joe Biden speaks on the phone with Russia"s President Vladimir Putin. Credit: The White House/Handout via Reuters)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8jxx5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgz)
The constipation taboo

It’s estimated that as many as 1 in 7 adults are suffering from constipation at any one time. And yet, talking about the problem is taboo.

Ruth Alexander is joined by two experts who want us to be more open about the condition. They say our reluctance to talk about constipation is having an impact on our well-being and creating a costly burden on health services.

Find out why a balanced and varied diet will help many people avoid the problem, but not all; and why prunes – a famous remedy – can actually make it worse.

Plus, a historian traces how we came to be so reticent about our toilet habits; and how constipation may have had a decisive role at numerous turning points in history.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoochain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Closed airplane toilet door. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Contributors:

Anton Emmanuel, University College Hospital London and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery

Louise Foxcroft, medical historian and author

Miguel Toribio-Mateas, School of Applied Sciences at London South Bank University.


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nvpcx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8k1n9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky7)
Modern birth: The man who had a baby

A few years ago, Freddy McConnell decided to have a baby. A decision that is a big deal for most, but that is even more complicated for Freddy, because he is trans. Freddy started his transition in 2012. Back then having a baby wasn’t on his mind. But after realising that – biologically – it was still a possibility, Freddy decided to get pregnant.

Emily Webb first spoke to Freddy in 2019, and since then he has had a second child.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Saskia Edwards

(Photo: Freddy McConnell standing on a beach. He is pregnant. Credit: Mark Bushnell)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nvt41)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Women Building Peace (w3ct3fld)
Colombia

An ex-Farc fighter talks about her struggle to integrate into Colombian society after she laid down arms five years ago. Leading women peace builders discuss whether the historic 2016 peace accord delivered on its promises to help women and communities across the country.

A co-production by BBC and Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security

Presenter: Suzanne Kianpour
Produced by Philip Reevell for BBC World Service

(Photo: A woman holds a flag reading "Peace" during the funeral of Heine Collazos and Esneider Collazos, two of the six men massacred by alleged members of an armed group. Credit: Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8k5df)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct3hh6)
The transgender pastor

June Joplin was born outwardly a boy, but at the age of 11, at a Christian summer camp, two things became very clear to her: that she was supposed to be a pastor, and that she was supposed to be a girl.

Becoming a pastor was the easy bit. June studied to become a Baptist minister in Richmond, Virginia, married and started a family. Yet the sense that she was really a woman never left her – and by her own admission, the struggles with her gender identity led to a depression which at times made her difficult to live with.

Eventually, by now living in Canada, she decided to come out as a transgender woman to her congregation and face the consequences.

In conversation with Mike Wooldridge, June Joplin tells her story and reflects on the cost of doing what she felt was the right thing.

Presenter: Mike Wooldridge.
Producer: Rosie Dawson
A CTVC production for BBC World Service

(Photo: June Joplin)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nvxw5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsyjvf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8k94k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct3fnh)
It’s a Bird’s World

It’s a Bird’s World: Climate change

Our relationship with birds has developed in ways we could have never have imagined, and today they are invaluable in alerting us to our greatest environmental challenge: climate change. As scientists have discovered, there are winners and losers. From seabirds on the Isle of May in Scotland to emperor penguins in Antarctica, climate change can have direct and indirect effects on birds; on their habitat, food supply, reproduction and migration. For some species, like the emperor penguins, time is running out, and their fate and that of the environment is in our hands.

(Photo: Emperor penguins in the Antarctic. Credit: Stephanie Jenouvrier)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nw1m9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nw5cf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhxc4p1)
Ukraine hopes for diplomacy to prevail amid invasion fears

While the danger from a Russian invasion is very real, Ukraine's ambassador says he hopes diplomacy will prevail.

Also on the programme: Hungarians are gearing up for one of the most important elections in Europe this year, as Viktor Orban faces a united opposition; and is Switzerland about to become the first country in the world to ban animal testing?

(Photo:Ukrainian police and National Guard servicemen take part in an exercises near the Kalanchak village of Skadovsk district of Kherson area, South Ukraine, 12 February 2022. EPA/OLEG PETRASYUK)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nw93k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmh)
Sofya Kovalevskaya: The eventful life of a maths pioneer

If you were a woman in the mid-19th century, some universities might let you attend public lectures on science, but very few would enrol women as regular students. The number of women allowed to sit exams and get academic degrees was vanishingly small. In mathematics it was almost unheard of.
But the Russian mathematician Sofya Kovalevskaya changed all that. She was one of the first women in modern Europe both to gain a doctorate in mathematics and become a tenured professor. She was also the first woman to be part of the editorial committee of a leading mathematics journal and the publicity around her achievements helped pave the way for women to play a greater role in university life. Above all, she was an outstanding mathematician with at least one theorem bearing her name still used to this day.

So how did Kovalevskaya do it? How much was talent? How much luck and opportunity? And how much just sheer force of character?

To guide us through Sofya Kovalevskaya’s eventful life - and her equations – Bridget Kendall is joined by three experts:
Ann Hibner Koblitz, professor emerita at Arizona State University and the author of A Convergence of Lives: Sofya Kovalevskaya - Scientist, Writer, Revolutionary;
June Barrow-Green, professor of the history of mathematics at the Open University in the UK and chair of the International Commission on the History of Mathematics;
and Elena Arsenyeva, associate professor at St. Petersburg State University in Russia and the coordinator of the Leonhard Euler International Mathematical Institute.

(Photo: Sofya Kovalevskaya Credit: Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dlb)
Testosterone and sport

In early December 2021 a member of Penn University Women’s Swim Team caused a stir. Lia Thomas not only won three events but she had the fastest time in elite college swimming in the country in two out of three races. This achievement reignited a debate as Lia Thomas is a transgender woman; we examine the rules around testosterone and trans women’s participation in elite sport.

(Lia Thomas swims the 200 yard Freestyle for the University of Pennsylvania on January 22, 2022. Credit: Joseph Prezioso/ Getty Images.)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nwdvp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nwjlt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tql1835bm)
Live Sporting Action

Delyth Lloyd presents Premier League commentary of Leicester City against West Ham, plus we’ll have reaction to Liverpool’s trip to Burnley, Tottenham against Wolves and Newcastle United against Aston Villa.

We’ll be live in LA as we build up to Super Bowl LVI between the Los Angeles Rams and the Cincinnati Bengals and we’ll have reaction from the Six Nations match between Italy and England.

Photo: Kelechi Iheanacho of Leicester City in action with Issa Diop of West Ham United. (Credit: Leicester City FC via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nwwv6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrszhtg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8l83l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct3jsp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nx0lb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dj2)
Should energy giants do more to help customers?

On this edition of Business Weekly, we’re looking at BP’s latest results. The energy giant made a profit of $12.8bn last year - thanks mainly to surging oil and gas prices. This comes after a loss in 2020. We hear why some are calling for a ‘windfall tax’ - a one-off charge that would then be channelled to help struggling consumers battling price rises. We hear the response from BP plus Connor Schwartz at Friends of the Earth and Tom Wilson from the Financial Times. Staying with rising bills, Tamasin Ford investigates the cost of living in different parts of the world. She hears how increases in everyday essentials impact people in different ways. Also on the programme we enter the world of fashion and hear how some apps are trying to increase the sustainability of the industry by encouraging us to buy or rent second-hand. We get a tour of the technology from the BBC’s Justin Rowlatt and his daughter, Zola. Turkey is a country with soaring inflation. The currency has lost some 50% of its value in a year. Although this means day-to-day life in the country is hard, it does make it an attractive destination for tourists, who will find their money goes further. Also the BBC’s Victoria Craig talks to visitors to Istanbul about how they’re getting more value for money and visits traders in the Grand Bazaar. Finally Sasha Twining meets ‘Buddy’, a robot pet dog, designed for those living with dementia. She speaks to the Chief Executive of Ageless Innovation, Ted Fischer, and hears how the interactive dogs and cats can respond to their human owners and could help those who feel lonely or isolated. Business Weekly is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Gas burner with flame, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nx4bg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhxd3n2)
German Chancellor warns of serious threat to peace in Europe

Germany has become the latest Western nation to publicly warn that a Russian invasion of Ukraine may be imminent. The chancellor Olaf Scholz, who's due in Kyiv on Monday, said there was a serious threat to peace in Europe. We speak to the German Social Democrats Spokesperson on Foreign Affairs, Nils Schmid.

Also in the programme: Canadian protesters angry at Covid restrictions have been cleared from an important border crossing with the United States almost a week after they began their blockade; and a Nigerian rights group has asked the High Court to force the government to publish an agreement with Twitter that led to the restoration of the social media company's services last month following a six-month ban.

(Photo: German Chancellor Olaf Scholz holds a press conference with the leaders of the three Baltic states ahead of consultations on the Ukraine crisis, at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany, 10 February 2022. Credit: EPA/ Christophe Gateau)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nx82l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx42169kmk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sx49nfm86)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8lmbz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nxctq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 Women Building Peace (w3ct3fld)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8lr33)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Music Planet (w3ct3hgj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dlb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]



MONDAY 14 FEBRUARY 2022

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz1bv0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kqq3d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct3hh6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz1gl4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlp3t5f2rd)
Airlines begin to withdraw from Ukraine

The effects of unrest in Ukraine are now being felt in the aviation industry, as several airlines have cancelled or reduced their flights to the country. Some are avoiding flying through the area at all. We hear from Alex Macheras an airline analyst. Swiss voters have backed a ban on tobacco advertising anywhere young people might see it. Imogen Foulkes tells us why it has taken the Swiss so long to clamp down on tobacco advertising. Plus, we hear about the huge amount of money advertisers will pay to get their brand on TV during Super Bowl 56.

Image: A woman checks the departures board for the flight to Kyiv before boarding. Credit: JACK GUEZ / AFP / Getty Images


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kqtvj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct1m92)
A new space age?

In 2021, Captain James Kirk, aka William Shatner, popped into space for real for a couple of minutes, transported by space company Blue Origin's tourist rocket New Shepard. Elon Musk's Space X ferried more astronauts and supplies between Earth and the International Space Station, using its revolutionary reusable launchers and Dragon spacecraft. On Mars, the latest Nasa robot rover landed and released an autonomous helicopter - the first aircraft to fly on another planet.

This year promises even more. Most significantly Nasa plans to launch the first mission of its Artemis programme. This will be an unmanned flight of its new deep space vehicle Orion to the Moon, propelled off the Earth by its new giant rocket, the Space Launch System. Artemis is the American space agency's project to return astronauts to the lunar surface and later establish moon bases. China also has a similar ambition.

Are we at the beginning of a new space age and if so, how have we got here? When will we see boots on the Moon again? Could we even see the first people on Mars by the end of this decade?

Dr Kevin Fong convenes a panel of astronautical minds to discuss the next decade or two of space exploration. He is joined by Dr Mike Barratt, one of Nasa's most senior astronauts and a medical doctor, based at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas; Dr Anita Sengupta, research associate professor in Astronautical Engineering at the University of Southern California; Oliver Morton, briefings editor at The Economist and the author of Mapping Mars and The Moon.

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

Picture: Artist concept of the SLS Block 1 configuration, Credit: NASA/MSFC


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz1lb8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13469j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kqyln)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2drv)
Is our obsession with GDP killing the climate?

For nearly a century, governments around the world have measured the health of their economies by a single metric: GDP, or Gross Domestic Product. It measures a country’s economic growth, and over the years has become a shorthand for national progress; a rising GDP is generally understood to mean more people in work, more companies in business, living standards on the rise.
Yet, as experts have argued for decades, there is a lot that GDP leaves out. While it measures the value of all goods and services produced and consumed in an economy, it doesn’t account for nature, wellbeing, or planetary health. To GDP, a 100-year-old carbon capturing tree is worthless until its chopped down and sold as timber. Cleaning up after disasters, such as extreme weather events, improve GDP due to the increase in spending - even as people and planet suffer the consequences.
In an age of climate breakdown, many economists are arguing that our obsession with GDP is damaging the planet. So is it time to ditch GDP as a measure of progress and come up with a new metric that puts sustainability at its core?
Presenters Jordan Dunbar and Tanya Beckett are joined by the economists:

Professor Kate Raworth, Senior Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute
Professor Tim Jackson, Director of Centre for Understanding Sustainable Prosperity
Professor Jayati Ghosh, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Dr Celestin Monga, visiting professor of public policy at Harvard University


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz1q2d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Women Building Peace (w3ct3fld)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kr2bs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Music Planet (w3ct3hgj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz1ttj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw134fss)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kr62x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9v)
How to find the perfect wedding dress

Of the many different items of clothing a woman will wear throughout her life, there is perhaps none loaded with so much significance as her wedding dress, and finding the perfect one can be an enormous source of stress. Kim Chakanetsa meets two wedding designers who help women dial down that pressure by helping bring their bridal visions to life.

Yasmine Yeya is the founder of Masion Yeya, a couture atelier in Dubai. She was raised in Egypt by a family of French descent and her heritage is reflected in her elegant and unique style, which is a blend of European and Middle Eastern influences.

Nneka Alexander is the founder of Brides by Nona. What started out as a dress making favour for her twin sister has turned into a sought-after bridal business with its signature gowns of intricate detail and bead work. She’s originally from Nigeria and she’s based in Atlanta, in the United States.

Produced by Alice Gioia

(Image: wedding dresses, courtesy of Maison Yeya and Brides by Nona.)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz1ykn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldh0ld)
Kyiv requests an urgent meeting with Moscow within 48 hours

Newsday will be heading to Ukraine shortly where with tensions escalating, Ukraine's Ambassador to the UK says the country might be prepared to make concessions with Russia.

A court in the Southern Indian state of Karnataka will make a ruling on whether Muslim girls can wear the hijab in school.

A former Goldman Sachs banker goes on trial in New York today for a multi billion dollars fraud in Malaysia.

And Dr Dre and Snoop Dogg and a host of LA pop stars are happy as the LA Rams have won the Superbowl.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz229s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldh4bj)
Nations continue to pull staff from embassies in Ukraine due to threat of invasion

The US says Russia could invade Ukraine at any time and might also create a surprise excuse for an attack... Moscow denies any plans and accuses the West of hysteria.

The German Chancellor Olaf Scholz, will visit Kyiv today and Moscow on Tuesday. He's called for Russia to de-escalate and warned of sanctions if Moscow did invade.

Canadian police have cleared protesters off the Ambassador bridge in Ontario - allowing for important trade between the US and Canada to continue.

Also, a look at the release of an Amnesty International report - which condemns pharmaceutical companies for the way they've handled the distribution of the Covid 19 vaccines.

And Cuba will debate changing the country’s "family code" which could see same-sex marriage legalised in a referendum later this year.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz261x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldh82n)
Russia has denied any plans to invade Ukraine despite the build-up of some 100,000 soldiers

Ukraine asks for talks with Russia and accuses the country of ignoring its requests to explain its troop build up. In the meantime diplomatic efforts to ease tension between the two countries also continue with a visit to Ukraine by the German Chancellor.

We also have a special report from our correspondent from Mariupol in the eastern Ukraine.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport has confirmed it will allow the 15 year old Russian ice skater Kamila Valieva to continue to compete at the Winter Olympics.

And university staff in the UK start 10 days of industrial action today in a dispute over pay.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz29t1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n72)
Kiril Petkov: Is Bulgaria ready to stand up to Russia?

Vladimir Putin knows how to probe for weakness in the West. With his troops building up on the Ukrainian border, Russia’s president is testing the unity of NATO. In particular, he is putting pressure on Europe’s eastern flank. How will nations once in the Soviet orbit respond? Stephen Sackur speaks to Kiril Petkov, Prime Minister of Bulgaria, which Moscow says must not host a NATO military presence. This is a big test for a new prime minister in the EU’s poorest country. Is Bulgaria ready to stand up to Russia?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2krp2f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j62)
Ending disability exclusion

The UN describes people living with disabilities as the world’s largest minority group. A billion of us live with some sort of disability and are up to twice as likely to be unemployed than non-disabled people. For Caroline Casey, the founder and creator of the Valuable 500, this was a challenge. She calls herself a troublemaker and as such she has persuaded the CEO's of more than 500 of the world's biggest companies to personally sign a declaration to end disability exclusion in the workplace. Tamasin Ford meets Caroline and hears her story and what motivates her. We also hear from disabled Ugandan worker Naome Akwee, Sam Latif from London and executives from some of the Valuable 500 including Santen, a Japanese pharmaceutical company and Ernst and Young.
Produced by Tom Kavanagh and Clare Williamson.
(Image: Caroline Casey; Credit:The Valuable 500)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x25)
The first LGBT film in war-torn Yugoslavia

How the ground-breaking film "Marble Ass" was made amid the conflict in the former Yugoslavia. Petra Zivic talks to acclaimed Serbian director Zelimir Zilnik about his film which played a role in the struggle for greater recognition and rights for the LGBT community in the war-torn country.

Photo: The Serbian trans star Merlinka with Nenad Rackovic as Johnny in the Serbian film "Marble Ass" in 1994 (Credit: Zelimir Zilnik)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz2fk5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2krstk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prr)
Are we too selfish to save the planet?

Climate change and biodiversity loss are two of the biggest threats humanity has ever faced - and tackling them is going to take a whole lot of collaboration and putting others before ourselves. But are humans cut out for this level of cooperation? Or are we fundamentally too self-interested to work together for the common good?


Listener Divyesh is not very hopeful about all this, so he’s asked CrowdScience if humans have a “selfish gene” that dooms us to failure when trying to meet these challenges. He's worried that humans are destined by our evolution to consume ever more natural resources and destroy the environment in the process.


But while it's true that humans often act in our own interest, we also show high levels of cooperation and care. Could tapping into these beneficial behaviours help us solve our global problems? Marnie Chesterton goes on the hunt for the best ways to harness human nature for the good of planet Earth - from making sure the green choice is always the cheaper and easier option, to encouraging and nurturing our better, altruistic and collaborative sides.


We visit a rural mountain community in Spain to see the centuries-old system they have for sharing common resources; while in the city, we meet activists figuring out how to live a more community-spirited and sustainable urban life. And we speak to experts in evolution, ecology and psychology to find out what helps nudge us into greener habits.


Presenter: Marnie Chesterton. Produced by Cathy Edwards for BBC World Service.


Image Credit: Getty Images


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz2k99)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pty)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2krxkp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dlb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz2p1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13590p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2ks19t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz2ssk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jvd)
The dramatic journey of Jamaica’s first Olympic bobsleigh

The comedy film classic Cool Runnings, about a Jamaican bobsleigh team's surprising efforts to get to the Winter Olympics, was inspired by a real story.

Dudley Stokes was an officer in the Jamaican army and hadn't really heard of the sport until his superiors gave a presentation to try and recruit volunteers to take part in the country's first Olympic bobsleigh team. Some of his colleagues were put off by the danger involved as they watched a film of a bobsleigh hurtling down an icy track, but Dudley wasn't. He got on to the team as a driver and became the captain. Dudley tells Anu Anand about the difficult journey to the 1988 Winter Olympics, with only a few months training, and how he coped with a dramatic crash at the Games as the world watched.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Anu Anand
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

Photo: The Jamaican four man bobsleigh team in action at the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympic Games.
Credit: David Yarrow/Getty Images


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz2xjp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw135jhy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2ks8t2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz318t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5lss6l0lf)
Ukraine crisis: Should Germany put more economic pressure on Russia?

The German chancellor, Olaf Scholz, is meeting the Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy in Kyiv in the latest diplomatic effort to defuse tension in the region.

But with no reduction in Russian troops along the borders with Ukraine - despite weeks of high-level shuttle diplomacy - are we just days away from the most serious conflict in Europe in decades?

Also in the programme: the 15-year-old Russian ice skater Kamila Valieva is cleared to compete at the Beijing Olympics, despite failing a drugs test before the Games; the flag of Mauritius is raised over the Chagos Islands in a challenge to British sovereignty; and why the reopening of Cuba's first LGBTQ-friendly hotel doesn't impress the island's activists.

(Photo shows German Chancellor Olaf Scholz meeting with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky in Kyiv. Credit: Ukrainian Presidential Press Service via REUTERS)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz350y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n72)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2ksj9b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y48fj2xnd4s)
Ukraine tensions heighten

Amid warnings from the West that time really is running out, the G7 group of nations has reiterated that it is ready to impose sanctions on Russia if it sends troops over the border; we hear from Oleg Chernyak who is based in Ukraine's second city, close to the Russian border. Plenty of companies talk about net zero campaign organisation Share Action, says many are failing to fulfil pledges, with a large number of the world's biggest banks continuing to fund oil and gas expansion programmes; we hear from Kevin Anderson, a leading British Climate Scientist. The Indian government has decided to ban more than fifty Chinese mobile apps, saying they pose a threat to the country's security; we get the details from Amit Bhandari, a senior fellow for energy investment and connectivity at Gateway House. One billion of the world's population have some form of disability - the BBC's Tamasin Ford has been speaking to some of the people working to end disability exclusion. An energy firm in Britain has apologised after mistakenly sending out compensation cheques worth several trillion dollars to some people hit by power cuts during a storm last year. So how common is this - we ask Olga Kolokolova, senior finance lecturer in finance at the Manchester Business School. (Picture of the Ukrainian flag via Getty Images).


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz38s2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxy09p2k8qj)
Ukraine: How are people feeling in Kyiv?

Western leaders continue to warn of an imminent Russian invasion of Ukraine, despite Russia repeatedly saying it has no such plans to invade. The fears of an invasion stem from the presence of nearly 130 thousand Russian troops which are positioned within reach of Ukraine's borders. So how do the people in the Ukrainian capital Kyiv feel about the rising tensions? And are they preparing for an invasion? We'll speak to people in the city to find out.

Also, Hong Kong is currently seeing record numbers of daily Covid infections. This comes as the Hong Kong authorities continue to pursue their 'zero Covid' strategy, imposing strict restrictions and lockdowns. We'll have a conversation with three people there to hear how the restrictions are affecting their lives and how they feel about them.

And every day we're joined by one of our regular coronavirus experts to answer your questions about the virus. Today our guest is Dr Eleanor Murray, assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health.

(Photo: People take part in the Unity March, which is a procession to demonstrate Ukrainians" patriotic spirit amid growing tensions with Russia, in Kyiv, Ukraine February 12, 2022. Credit: REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz3dj6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxy09p2kdgn)
Coronavirus conversations: Hong Kong restrictions

Hong Kong is currently seeing record numbers of daily Covid infections. This comes as the Hong Kong authorities continue to pursue their 'zero Covid' strategy, imposing strict restrictions and lockdowns. We'll have a conversation with three people there to hear how the restrictions are affecting their lives and how they feel about them.

Western leaders continue to warn of an imminent Russian invasion of Ukraine, despite Russia repeatedly saying it has no such plans to invade. The fears of an invasion stem from the presence of nearly 130 thousand Russian troops which are positioned within reach of Ukraine's borders. So how do the people in the Ukrainian capital Kyiv feel about the rising tensions? And are they preparing for an invasion? We'll speak to people in the city to find out.

And every day we're joined by one of our regular coronavirus experts to answer your questions about the virus. Today our guest is Professor Manfred Green - a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel.

(Photo: A woman wearing a face mask and a face shield line up among people at a makeshift testing site for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Hong Kong. February 11, 2022. Credit: REUTERS/Joyce Zhou)
11/02/2022 Reuters


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz3j8b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jvd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz3n0g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw1367zq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kt08v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nt8xy6htt)
2022/02/14 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz3rrl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kt40z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1m93)
Deep sea exploration

UCL oceanographer Helen Czerski explores life in the ocean depths with a panel of deep sea biologists. They take us to deep ocean coral gardens on sea mounts, to extraordinary hydrothermal vent ecosystems teeming with weird lifeforms fed by chemosynthetic microbes, to the remarkable biodiversity in the muds of the vast abyssal plains.

Helen's guests are Adrian Glover of the Natural History Museum in London, Kerry Howell of Plymouth University and Alex Rogers, scientific director of REV Ocean.

They discuss the dramatic revelations made by deep ocean explorers in just the last forty years, and the profound connections that the deep sea floor has with life at the Earth's surface. They also consider the threats to the ecosystems down there from seabed mining and climate change.

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

Picture: Black smoker hydrothermal vents, Credit: Science Photo Library


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz3whq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5lss6lvtb)
Russia could invade Ukraine 'at any moment' claims UK Foreign Minister

We hear from a former Ukrainian Prime Minister and we get the view from Moscow and Washington

Also on the programme: as the Russian skater at the centre of doping allegations is cleared to compete on Tuesday, we hear from a former teenage olympian whose medal was wrongly stripped; and the flag of Mauritius is raised over the British-administered Chagos Islands.

(Photo: Members of the Ukrainian State Border Guard Service near the border with Belarus and Poland Credit: REUTERS/Gleb Garanich)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz407v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx4f9hj9st)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sxhkyncfg)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2ktcj7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrv6n1ngvs)
Ukraine tensions heighten

Amid warnings from the West that time really is running out, the G7 group of nations has reiterated that it is ready to impose sanctions on Russia if it sends troops over the border; we hear from Anders Aslund, senior fellow at the Stockholm Free World Forum and an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University. The Indian government has decided to ban more than fifty Chinese mobile apps, saying they pose a threat to the country's security; we get the details from Amit Bhandari, a senior fellow for energy investment and connectivity at Gateway House. One billion of the world's population have some form of disability - the BBC's Tamasin Ford has been speaking to some of the people working to end disability exclusion. (Picture of the Ukrainian flag via Getty Images).


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz43zz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n72)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kth8c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



TUESDAY 15 FEBRUARY 2022

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz47r3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z87)
The Ukraine crisis: an eyewitness history

Former presidents and protestors recount two key moments in the history of the Ukraine crisis - from the historic meeting that ended the USSR to the dramatic anti-government protests in Ukraine in 2013-14. And the BBC's Lucy Ash explains how Russian-Ukrainian relations have evolved.
Also in the programme, an eyewitness account of the forgotten mass killings in Burundi in 1972, plus the inventors of Google Maps and how Manolo Blahnik became a legend in the world of shoes.

Photo: Kyiv, Ukraine - December 9th 2013. Anti-government protesters stand guard at one of the barricades defending Maidan Square against police. Credit: Etienne De Malglaive/Getty Images


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz4ch7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqv32w1qsy)
US considers offering Ukraine $1 billion in sovereign loan guarantees

Amid warnings from the West that time really is running out, the G7 group of nations has reiterated that it is ready to impose sanctions on Russia if it sends troops over the border; we hear from Anders Aslund, senior fellow at the Stockholm Free World Forum and an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University. Greed is considered one of the seven deadly sins, and of all of those sins it is one of the few that people will rarely admit to. But where would western capitalism be without it? The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson has been taking a look at whether it is a good thing. Plus, authorities in New Zealand have been trying to disperse anti-vaccine protesters from outside the country's parliament and hit upon a plan to play Barry Manilow's greatest hits on a loop. The protestors were tougher than they thought, so they upped the anti and started playing Baby Shark (Doo Doo Doo) and when that failed belted out James Blunt's 2005 hit, You're Beautiful. It seems even under this barrage of sound, protesters have not been moved, with hundreds still remaining outside parliament. We discuss which records you just can't stand.

Throughout the programme Jamie Robertson is joined by Jasper Kim in Seoul and Takara Small from Toronto.

Picture: Ukrainians take part in a military training for residents. Credit: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz4h7c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13736m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2ktvhr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct3hgn)
Dark patterns

Trying to cancel some online accounts can be a maze of searches and false hopes, multiple clicks through a puzzle of seemingly unrelated destinations.

This is what has become known as a 'dark pattern'; complex web design that makes it hard for you to do something the website does not want you to do, and employs behavioural psychology to make you do things it does want you to do. It is just one of the techniques used to make us click, buy or subscribe.

Journalist and broadcaster Darryl Morris digs into the methods being used to grip your attention, and examines the persuasive power that is being harnessed. What impact is it having on your free will, and is there anything that can be done to resist it?

He hears from user experience expert Harry Brignall, who first blew the whistle on these practices, and Stockholm-based web designer Kat Zou, who exposes the intense pressure design teams are under to deliver company growth – and how some designers feel as trapped as the customers.

Dark patterns play a key role in getting users to share more data than they may otherwise choose to. Darryl meets Professor David Carrol, who famously took legal action against Cambridge Analytica. He describes the impact losing your data can have on your life, from your job, to where you live and how you are treated.

Finn Mystrad, who took one of the world’s biggest companies to task in his role on the Norwegian Consumer Council, explains how hard it is for governments to legislate against dark pattern web design.

And Darryl meets New Yorker Carla Sosenko, who tells him how online retail and dark patterns fed a shopping addiction that chipped away at her life.

(Photo: Abstract images on the theme of computers, Internet and high technology. Credit: Getty Images)

A Made in Manchester production for BBC World Service.


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz4lzh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jvd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz4qqm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw137bpw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kv300)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tfb)
Green Planet

We join wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson and go behind the scenes of Green Planet, a new, hugely ambitious BBC natural history television series which offers a plant’s eye view to our understanding of the world. We discover how Chris embraces the challenges of this series, the creative decisions he makes, and how he uses the latest technologies to capture the sounds produced by plants, as well as the sound world inside and around them.

Image: Chris Watson makes a field recording (Credit: Chris Watson/BBC)


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz4vgr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldkxhh)
New intelligence from the US points towards an attack on Ukraine

Newsday will look at how likely diplomacy is to succeed in Ukraine, as Russian troops maintain their positions at their borders.

The Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau invokes an emergency law for the first time in fifty years, to target people protesting against vaccine mandates.

And why are some articles about the disputed region of Kashmir disappearing from the internet in India?

Plus we look at the increasingly important role that women are playing in the protests in Sudan.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz4z6w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldl17m)
Djokovic: I was never against vaccination

World number one tennis champion Novak Djokovic speaks to the BBC on his opposition to having a Covid vaccine.

He says he's prepared to miss the French Open and Wimbledon. Newsday will bring you that exclusive interview.

And President Trudeau of Canada is ready to use emergency powers to try and end the demonstrations there.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz52z0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldl4zr)
Tennis star is willing to miss future tournaments

World tennis number one Novak Djokovic speaks to the BBC for the first time since the Australian open.

And he says he's prepared to miss the French Open and Wimbledon if the situation remains the same.

Also on Tuesday the German Chancellor, Olaf Scholz, is heading to Moscow and is due to meet President Putin. Newsday will look at what he might bring to the diplomatic table.

And why are potentially toxic levels of drugs in rivers around the world - we'll look at who's responsible and if it can be fixed.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz56q4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm6)
Training police to patrol each other

How do you get officers to step in to prevent other officers from harming the public?

“Loyalty isn't saying: ‘Well, you've done something wrong, I'm going to protect you.’ Loyalty is me saying: ‘You're about to do something wrong, and I'm going to stop you.’”

New Orleans Police Department says this is the basis of a radical training programme devised to reduce incidents of police brutality.

We first reported on the training system back in October 2020, five months after the killing of George Floyd.

Since then, the idea has spread, and the system is now being taught right across the United States and beyond.

Daniel Gordon catches up with the project to hear what progress is being made.

Picture credit: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kvkzj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jh3)
Romance scamming: A global industry

Many of us will have noticed 'friend' or 'follow' requests on our social media from strangers with profiles which don’t quite ring true. They mainly use cloned pictures, often taken from accounts of those in the US military. Zoe Kleinman investigates the global industry of romance scamming, which can have tragic consequences. Zoe hears from Lisa Forte, a cyber security expert from Red Goat Security, Professor Alan Woodward from Surrey University, and she goes into the tragic story of Renee Holland, as investigated by Jack Nicas of the New York Times. With thanks to the New York Times for their material.

This is a repeat of a programme first broadcast on 26 August 2020

Producer: Sarah Treanor.

(Photo: Mobile phone display. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6p)
"Don't ask, don't tell" in the US Armed Forces

LGBT servicemen and women in the US armed forces had to keep their sexuality secret until the 'Don't ask, don't tell' policy was repealed in 2011. Lieutenant Colonel Heather Mack served under the policy for most of her military career. She spoke to Rachael Gillman about her experiences. This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Lieutenant Colonel Heather Mack (l) with her wife Ashley (r) and their two children. (Courtesy of Heather Mack)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz5bg8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct3hgn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kvpqn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct1m93)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz5g6d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz5kyj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw1385xs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kvy6x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tfb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz5ppn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxn)
A descendant of chiefs: My long journey home

Today, Jesse Thistle is a celebrated professor of Indigenous history in Canada. But as a child, he was a high school drop-out, raised by his disciplinarian white paternal grandparents and cut off from his mother and his Métis Cree roots. It set him on a self-destructive path to drug addiction, homelessness and prison. In jail and in his 30s, Jesse learned to read. After he was released, he would reach the pinnacle of academic success – finding his identity, his calling and along the way, his long-lost mother. Jesse’s memoir is called From the Ashes.

Anu was speaking to Jesse in 2020. He's recently got in touch to let us know that he and his wife Lucie now have a daughter, baby Rose.

Presenter: Anu Anand
Producer: Sophie Eastaugh and Maryam Maruf

(Photo: Jesse Thistle. Credit: Lucie Thistle)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz5tfs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw138ff1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kw5q5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct1m93)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz5y5x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5lss6nxhj)
Putin says NATO not addressing his basic concerns

The Russian president says he's prepared to continue discussions on Ukraine, but the head of NATO says there's no evidence Russia is withdrawing any of its troops.

Also on the programme world number one tennis player Novak Djokovic on not getting vaccinated, and the Tongan Prime Minister talks about the impact of the recent earthquake and tsunami

(Picture: President Putin and German Chancellor Scholz hold talks. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz61y1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kwf6f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bwv8qt6br)
NATO cautiously optimistic over Ukraine

The Russian Ministry of Defence has announced that some of the units deployed near the border with Ukraine have completed their tasks and are heading back to their bases. But some are sceptical that the threat has diminished. We hear from the BBC's Olga Ivshina. And earlier this month, after years of delay, a deal was signed by the French energy giant Total Energies giving the green light to a controversial pipeline running from Uganda to Tanzania. The project's backers say it will usher in economic development across the region, but activists question the environmental impact of the project, as the BBC's Joshua Thorpe has been finding out. A new study has found that a quarter of the world's rivers contain potentially toxic levels of pharmaceutical drugs and it's been concluded that the pharmaceutical products found in them are a threat to human health and aquatic life. We get details from Dr Veronica Edmonds Brown, an Aquatic Ecologist at The University of Hertfordshire. And Belgium has announced that under new proposed laws, workers will soon be able to choose a four day week. So will other countries follow their lead and does a four day week actually mean that employees work fewer hours? We speak to Joe Ryle, the campaign director of the four day week campaign


(Picture of Russia./Ukraine flags with cracks. Picture credit: Getty Images)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz65p5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxy09p2n5mm)
Djokovic speaks to the BBC

The world number one men’s tennis player Novak Djokovic says he'd rather miss out on tennis trophies than be forced to get a Covid vaccine. Speaking exclusively to the BBC, he said he should not be associated with the anti-vax movement, but supported an individual's right to choose. We hear the key moments of that interview and find out what people around the world think of what he said. We also speak to the BBC journalist who asked the questions, Amol Rajan.

We ask our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Isaac Bogoch, how he might try to persuade Novak Djokovic to take a Covid jab.

Also, Russia says it’s withdrawing some troops from near Ukraine’s border, but the NATO military alliance says it’s yet to see evidence of any reduction in Russian forces there. Our correspondent in Moscow tells us the latest.

And after the murders of five journalists in Mexico so far this year, we’re featuring the work of a Mexican reporter on every edition this week. We hear from an investigative reporter in Ciudad Juarez, on the border with the US state of Texas.

(Picture: Novak Djokovic playing at Wimbledon in 2018)
(Credit: John Walton/PA Wire)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz69f9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxy09p2n9cr)
Prince Andrew settles civil sex assault case

A document submitted to a US court on Tuesday says Prince Andrew and Virginia Giuffre have reached an out-of-court settlement. She alleges he sexually assaulted her on three occasions when she was 17, allegations he has repeatedly denied. We hear from our Home and Legal Correspondent.

Also, the world number one men’s tennis player Novak Djokovic says he'd rather miss out on tennis trophies than be forced to get a Covid vaccine. Speaking exclusively to the BBC, he said he should not be associated with the anti-vax movement, but supported an individual's right to choose. We hear the key moments of that interview and find out what people around the world think of what he said. We also speak to the BBC journalist who asked the questions, Amol Rajan.

And Russia says it’s withdrawing some troops from near Ukraine’s border, but the NATO military alliance says it’s yet to see evidence of any reduction in Russian forces there. Our correspondent in Moscow tells us the latest.

(Picture: Prince Andrew in 2019
Credit: EPA/Richard Wainwright)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz6f5f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz6jxk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw1394wt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kwx5y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nt8xy9dqx)
2022/02/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz6nnp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct3hgn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kx0y2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ltd)
India to launch digital rupee

India has announced a digital budget with plans to create its own cryptocurrency – the digital rupee. It also plans a 30% digital asset tax. Bhaskar Chakravorti, Dean at the Fletcher School at Tufts University explains the implications.

Mars landing on Earth
Long-time Digital Planet listener Gowri Abhiram has visited the landing site of NASA’s Perseverance Rover in India. The trip was part of Chris Riley’s project comparing the landing sites of Mars to their corresponding locations on Earth, which we reported on last year. We hear about her journey a year after the successful Martian landing.

Robot-assisted navigation – the augmented white cane
As we've heard before on Digital Planet, tech can be a real game-changer for blind and visually impaired people in helping them to live their lives independently.. However, even now in 2022, one of the most common mobility aids - the white cane - is pretty much as low tech as it gets! But is that too about to get the tech treatment? Our reporter, Fern Lulham tells us more.


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Angelica Mari.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz and Rami Tzabar

(Image: Indian Currency virtual world with connection network. Credit: Global data information and technology exchange. stock photo)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz6sdt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5lss6prqf)
Prince Andrew settles civil sex assault case with Virginia Giuffre

Britain's Prince Andrew has reached a settlement with Virginia Giuffre after she accused him of sexually assaulting her on three occasions when she was 17. Prince Andrew has constantly denied the allegations. While a court case was due to take place, the pair have reached a financial settlement of an undisclosed amount.

Also on the programme: Vladimir Putin says NATO has so far failed to address what he called 'basic concerns' about Russian security, but says he is prepared to continue diplomatic discussions on Ukraine; and tennis world number one Novak Djokovic breaks his silence after the Australian Open deportation saga.

(Photo: Prince Andrew, Virginia Roberts and Ghislaine Maxwell in 2001. Credit: VIRGINIA ROBERTS)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz6x4y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx4f9hm6px)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sxhkyr8bk)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kx8fb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycsnncnfp65)
Ukraine hit by cyber attacks

The Ukrainian government has said its websites and banks have been hit by cyber attacks. Two state-owned banks, PrivatBank and Oschadbank, had been targeted by “massive” denial of service attacks and other failures which interrupted banking services. We hear from Reuven Aronashvili, Co-Founder of cybersecurity firm CYE. Earlier this month, after years of delay, a deal was signed by the French energy giant Total Energies giving the green light to a controversial pipeline running from Uganda to Tanzania. The project's backers say it will usher in economic development across the region, but activists question the environmental impact of the project, as the BBC's Joshua Thorpe has been finding out. A new study has found that a quarter of the world's rivers contain potentially toxic levels of pharmaceutical drugs and it's been concluded that the pharmaceutical products found in them are a threat to human health and aquatic life. We get details from Dr Veronica Edmonds Brown, an Aquatic Ecologist at The University of Hertfordshire.

(Picture of Russia./Ukraine flags with cracks. Picture credit: Getty Images)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz70x2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 Amol Rajan Interviews Novak Djokovic (w3ct40sl)
Amol Rajan interviews Novak Djokovic

He’s one of the greatest tennis players of all time – and has just become one of the most controversial too. In an exclusive interview, Novak Djokovic talks to BBC Media Editor Amol Rajan. The Serbian star was the centre of an international storm when the Canberra government refused to allow him to compete in the Australian Open – and eventually deported him because they said, he could “incite anti-vax sentiment”. Speaking at his tennis centre in Belgrade, Djokovic breaks his silence to give his side of the story.

Producers: Cara Swift, Elizabeth Needham-Bennett and Vivien Jones
Sound: Kate Barker and John Scott
Production Coordinator: Brenda Brown
Editor: Hugh Levinson


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kxd5g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tfb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 16 FEBRUARY 2022

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz74n6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz78db)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqv32w4mq1)
Ukraine hit by cyber attacks

The Ukrainian government has said its websites and banks have been hit by cyber attacks. Two state-owned banks, PrivatBank and Oschadbank, had been targeted by “massive” denial of service attacks and other failures which interrupted banking services. We hear from General Keith Alexander, the former director of the US National Security Agency and founding commander of United States Cyber Command. Earlier this month, after years of delay, a deal was signed by the French energy giant Total Energies giving the green light to a controversial pipeline running from Uganda to Tanzania. The project's backers say it will usher in economic development across the region, but activists question the environmental impact of the project, as the BBC's Joshua Thorpe has been finding out. A new study has found that a quarter of the world's rivers contain potentially toxic levels of pharmaceutical drugs and it's been concluded that the pharmaceutical products found in them are a threat to human health and aquatic life. We get details from Dr Veronica Edmonds Brown, an Aquatic Ecologist at The University of Hertfordshire.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Sushma Ramachandran, journalist and columnist at The Tribune in Delhi, and Andres Franzetti, Chief Executive Officer at The Risk Cooperative from Washington.

Picture: PrivatBank logo is displayed on a mobile phone screen. Credit: Beata Zawrzel/NurPhoto via Getty Images


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz7d4g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13b03q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kxrdv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct3fnj)
It’s a Bird’s World

It's a Bird's World: Toxic substances

How the deaths of vultures and sparrowhawks have alerted the world to serious environmental problems. Like the canaries which were used to detect toxic gases in coal mines, birds play a vital role in alerting us to substances which can damage a healthy environment. The price they pay to alert us can be losing their lives.

Presenter: Mya-Rose Craig
Producer: Sarah Blunt

(Photo: White-rumped vultures, slender-billed vultures and Himalayan griffons feed on a dead cattle. Credit IUCN/Sarowar Alam)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz7hwl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz7mmq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13b7lz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kxzx3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302z)
QAnon: The plot to break reality.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz7rcv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldntdl)
US President says Russian attack on Ukraine remains a possibility

US President Joe Biden has said that a Russian attack on Ukraine "remains very much a possibility", and the human cost would be "immense". During a televised address, Biden announced that Russia has now amassed around 150,000 troops on the border with Ukraine. Russia's Defence Minister Sergey Shoygu has said some forces have withdrawn, but Biden claims this has not been verified. We hear what Russia's finance minister makes of the situation.


For the first time ever, a gun company in the US has been ordered to pay compensation to the victims of the Sandy Hook massacre. We hear from a mother whose 6 year old son was killed that day.

And we go to Ethiopia where a state of emergency has been lifted.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz7w3z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldny4q)
Ukraine crisis: Human cost of Russia attack would be immense says President Biden

US President Joe Biden has said a Russian invasion of Ukraine remains a distinct possibility, despite Russia’s claims that some of its troops along the Ukraine boarder are being pulled back. The US claims that Russia has now amassed over 150,000 Russian troops along it’s boarder with Ukraine. Defence ministers from the western NATO alliance are meeting to discuss the crisis.

British royal Prince Andrew has reached an out of court settlement over sexual abuse claims in the US. Virginia Giuffre sued the Duke of York, claiming he sexually assaulted her on three occasions when she was 17 - accusations Prince Andrew has repeatedly denied. A statement from their lawyers said the duke would pay an undisclosed sum to Ms. Giuffre and make a substantial donation to her charity in support of victims' rights.

And we get the latest from Hungary, where after 12 years in power Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban is asking for eight more. However, his right-wing Fidesz government is facing a strong challenge from an alliance of six opposition parties. Elections are to be held on the 3rd of April.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz7zw3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldp1wv)
NATO members get ready to discuss Ukraine

US President Joe Biden said a Russian attack on Ukraine is still very much a possibility and the human cost would be immense. These words come this morning as NATO members get ready to meet this morning to discuss the situation in the region. Russian President Vladimir Putin said on Tuesday that Russia did not want war.

We go to Ethiopia, where several provinces have been affected by a civil war for 15 months. A new report by Amnesty international says there is mounting evidence of atrocities committed by Tigrayan rebels in the Amhara region, neighbouring Tigray.

And in Sports, we'll bring you all the latest news from the slopes at the Winter Olympics in Beijing.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz83m7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncl)
Yuri Vitrenko: Russia, Ukraine and Europe's energy

Russia and Ukraine have powerful ties of geography, history and energy. And when it comes to the geopolitics of the current crisis energy is a key factor. Ukraine has long profited from being the middle-man for Russian gas exports into Europe. Moscow is in the business of changing that reality. Stephen Sackur speaks to Yuri Vitrenko, CEO of Naftogaz, Ukraine's biggest energy company. As Kiev and Moscow face off, where does the economic leverage lie?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kygwm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jpw)
Sickening in America

Have US pharmaceutical companies created a web of disinformation to boost their profits?

That's the accusation of John Abramson, an academic at Harvard Medical School. In an extended interview with the BBC's Ed Butler, he discusses the thesis of his new book, Sickening: How Big Pharma Broke American Health Care and How We Can Repair It.

According to Abramson, scandals such as the opioid addiction epidemic caused by drugs like Oxycontin, or the shockingly high cost of insulin in America, have a common cause - the ability of big pharma companies to gull American doctors into overprescribing their premium products.

(Picture: Pills spilling out of a prescription bottle; Credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8y)
The Berlin Patient

In the 1990s, doctors in Berlin began a cutting-edge treatment programme that led to a patient being cured of HIV/AIDS. The so-called "Berlin patient" was Timothy Ray Brown: he was suffering from leukemia as well as HIV/AIDS, and was given a bone marrow transplant from a donor with a rare genetic mutation which killed off the HIV virus. Timothy Ray Brown was a campaigner for AIDS research until his death, from leukemia, in 2020. Ashley Byrne speaks to his partner, Tim Hoeffgen.

PHOTO: Timothy Ray Brown in 2012 (Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz87cc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct3fnj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kylmr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ltd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz8c3h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct3gkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz8gvm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13c2tw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kyv40)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz8llr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzx)
Attacked and accused of lying – my long fight for the truth

Donna Palomba's life changed in September 1993, when she was sexually assaulted in her family home in Connecticut. A month after the attack, Donna was called to the local police station and accused of making the assault up by the officer in charge of her case. It was a devastating blow but Donna was determined to clear her name and get justice. It would take years and several court cases before her attacker was arrested and his identity sent shockwaves through Donna’s family and community. As a result of her experience Donna founded Jane Doe No More, a non-profit organisation called Jane Doe No More which empowers survivors of sexual crimes to find their voice, advance their healing and educate others.

A warning that what Donna describes is shocking and at times distressing.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Anu Anand
Producer: Tom Harding Assinder

(Photo: Donna Palomba. Credit: Christine Petit)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz8qbw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13cbb4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kz2m8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ltd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz8v30)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5lss6rtdm)
Uncertainty over Russian 'de-escalation' near Ukraine

The head of NATO says Russia is still massing troops close to the border with Ukraine despite claims from Moscow that some units have been pulling back.

President Voldymyr Zelensky tells the BBC "we don’t see any withdrawal yet" of Russian troops from Ukraine's borders. It comes after Russia said it was pulling back more troops - this time from the Crimean peninsula.

Also in the programme: the UK's Prince Andrew settles his sexual assault lawsuit in the US, reportedly for millions of dollars -- but who'll pay the bill? And how intimate pictures of women are being shared on the social media app Telegram to shame and blackmail them:

(Photo shows Russian troops withdrawing from their military exercise near the border with Ukraine. Credit: Reuters)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz8yv4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kzb3j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4d40cmy1ws)
Hungary and Poland lose EU funding fight

The European Union's highest court has ruled that the EU can reduce funding for member states found to have flouted democratic values. Judges at the European Court of Justice dismissed a challenge by Poland and Hungary, which argued that what's known as the conditionality mechanism has no legal basis. We hear from German Green MEP Daniel Freund. Two of the world's biggest lager makers, Carlsberg and Heineken, have warned that inflation in the manufacturing process is driving up brewers' costs and will make a pint more expensive. And there's also supply chain issues and staff shortages. So how worried should beer drinkers be? We hear from journalist Melissa Cole, author of The Ultimate Book of Craft Beer. Have US pharmaceutical companies created a web of disinformation to boost their profits? That's the accusation of Dr John Abramson, a family physician and faculty member at Harvard Medical School as laid out in his new book about Big Pharma, 'Sickening' - Dr Abramson explains further. And in France, a long list of covid rules are being dropped – and clubs can reopen right away. We hear from Parisian DJ, Francois X. (Picture of a judges' gavel on a flag of the European Union. Picture credit: Getty images).


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz92l8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxy09p2r2jq)
Russia-Ukraine crisis: 'We don't see any withdrawal yet'

There's little evidence to substantiate Russian claims that it's begun withdrawing its troops from the border with Ukraine. As diplomatic efforts to de-escalate continue, we hear messages from people across Ukraine describing the mood where they are. And, our reporter from the BBC's disinformation unit explains how the Russian media is portraying the crisis.

We talk through the latest stories on the pandemic with one of our regular experts, Dr Maria Sundaram from Marshfield Clinic in Wisconsin.

We speak to our colleague about her investigation that has found hundreds of nude pictures being shared on social media app Telegram without consent.

This week we are connecting with journalists in Mexico to find out what it is like to work in one of the most dangerous countries for reporters. We hear from an audio visual journalist who divides her time between Mexico City and Ciudad Juarez.

(Photo: A member of the Ukrainian State Border Guard Service is seen at the Senkivka checkpoint near the border with Belarus and Russia in the Chernihiv region, Ukraine February 16, 2022. Credit: Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz96bd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxy09p2r68v)
Nato chief: Russian aggression is 'new normal'

Nato secretary general Jens Stoltenberg says Russia testing the principles of Europe's security had become "the new normal" in Europe. We hear from our correspondents monitoring the developments and play messages from people across Ukraine describing the mood where they are.

We also go to Moscow to hear how the crisis is being portrayed by the Russian media.

We speak to our colleague about her investigation that has found hundreds of nude pictures being shared on social media app Telegram without consent.

This week we are connecting with journalists in Mexico to find out what it is like to work in one of the most dangerous countries for reporters. We hear from an audio visual journalist who divides her time between Mexico City and Ciudad Juarez.

(Photo: NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg speaks during a NATO Defence Ministers meeting in Brussels, Belgium, February 16, 2022. Credit: Johanna Geron/Reuters)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz9b2j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz9ftn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13d1sx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kzt31)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nt8xyd9n0)
2022/02/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz9kks)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct3fnj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2kzxv5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwm)
Pig organs for transplant patients

People die waiting for replacement hearts, lungs and kidneys. Could genetically modified pigs be the solution to a worldwide shortage of organ donors?

We meet the teams that have had impressive recent successes transplanting pig organs into people. We’ll explore the huge leaps of genetic engineering that are making 'xenotransplantation' possible and ask if it’s even ethical to try.

In the studio with Marnie Chesterton, Dr Graham Easton guides us through the science of getting pig organs to work in human bodies.

We also hear from transplant surgeon Dr Devagourou Velayoudam and Professor Nadey Hakim, on how these breakthroughs might benefit India and Nigeria, and other countries which don’t have the same medical and research resources of the US.

Presenter: Marnie Chesterton
Producer: Ilan Goodman

(Picture: Two pigs on a farm. Photo credit: Charity Burggraaf/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz9p9x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5lss6snmj)
NATO pledges solidarity to Ukraine

We hear from Luxembourg's Defence Minister, François Bausch, who was at the Brussels NATO meeting and spoke of the new European 'normal'. We get the view from a Ukrainian MP with the president's ruling coalition with more about those cyber attacks that hit two banks and the country's defence ministry.

Also on the programme: a stark warning about the humanitarian situation in Afghanistan and a Danish scientist tells us why her country was right to do away with Covid restrictions, despite a big rise in cases there.

(Photo: Meeting of NATO Ministers of Defence in Brussels Credit: EPA/STEPHANIE LECOCQ)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz9t21)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx4f9hq3m0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sxhkyv57n)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l05bf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172yct2cqyw79x)
Beer prices set to rise

Two of the world's biggest lager makers, Carlsberg and Heineken, have warned that inflation in the manufacturing process is driving up brewers' costs and will make a pint more expensive. And there's also supply chain issues and staff shortages. So how worried should beer drinkers be? We hear from Bart Watson Chief Economist for the Brewers Association. Have US pharmaceutical companies created a web of disinformation to boost their profits? That's the accusation of Dr John Abramson, a family physician and faculty member at Harvard Medical School as laid out in his new book about Big Pharma, 'Sickening' - Dr Abramson explains further. And in France, a long list of covid rules are being dropped – and clubs can reopen right away. We hear from Parisian DJ, Francois X.

Picture: A couple raises their pints of beer. Credit: Dinendra Haria/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bz9xt5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l092k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 17 FEBRUARY 2022

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzb1k9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct3gkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzb59f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqv32w7jm4)
Twitter takes action to curb trolling and hate

Twitter has announced what it is doing to try and tackle the problem of trolling and hate. It will expand the 'Safety Mode Feature' which allows users to temporarily block accounts which send harmful or abusive tweets. We speak to Imran Ahmed, CEO of the Centre for Countering Digital Hate. Two of the world's biggest lager makers, Carlsberg and Heineken, have warned that inflation in the manufacturing process is driving up brewers' costs and will make a pint more expensive. So how worried should beer drinkers be? We hear from Bart Watson Chief Economist for the Brewers Association. Have US pharmaceutical companies created a web of disinformation to boost their profits? That's the accusation of Dr John Abramson, a family physician and faculty member at Harvard Medical School as laid out in his new book about Big Pharma, 'Sickening' - Dr Abramson explains further. And in France, a long list of covid rules are being dropped – and clubs can reopen right away. We hear from Parisian DJ, Francois X.

Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Yoko Ishikura in Tokyo and Steven Bertoni from New York.

Picture: Twitter logo seen displayed on a smartphone. Credit: Mateusz Slodkowski/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzb91k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13dx0t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l0n9y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gyp)
Italy’s hidden sins

With the seat of the Catholic Church on its doorstep and the highest number of priests of any country, Italy is a bastion of global Catholicism. And yet, unlike many other countries, it has failed to confront the scourge of clerical sex abuse. It keeps no official statistics on the issue and the number of convictions remains shockingly low. Survivors of abuse have fallen foul of a combination of cover-ups, complicity and legal failings in their search for justice. After a report in France last year found that there had been some 3,200 paedophile priests there since the 1950s, pressure is growing on Italy for a similar reckoning. For Assignment, Mark Lowen has set out to ask how and why abuse has been hidden in Italy, speaking to survivors, confronting those accused and meeting officials working to uncover the dark secrets that the Italian authorities have been unwilling to investigate.

Reporter: Mark Lowen
Producer: Julian Miglierini in Rome and Michael Gallagher in London

(Angel statue, Rome. Credit: iStock/Getty Images Plus)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzbdsp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzbjjt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13f4j2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l0wt6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rh0)
The online food fighters

Social media is full of fake news about food.

Fad diets, cure-all superfoods, demonised ingredients, made-up health scares – you’re never more than a few clicks away from unreliable nutritional information.

In this episode, Ruth Alexander meets two people trying to take on those who peddle the food myths. What is it like getting into an online food fight; can an individual ever hope to change people’s minds; and why would anyone even try?

(Picture: Hand holding cream pie on man's face. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Producer: Sarah Stolarz

Contributors:

Dr Joshua Wolrich, NHS doctor, nutritionist and author

Erin aka Food Science Babe, chemical engineer and food scientist


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzbn8y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldrq9p)
US warns Russia added more troops to Ukraine boarder

The US has warned that Russia has added more troops to its forces near the Ukraine Border. The warning comes after NATO's secretary general Jen Stoltenberg said that there was no sign that Russian forces are de-escalating near Ukraine despite Russian claims they are doing so. The Western military alliance, NATO, accuses Moscow of planning an incursion, with troops encircling the country, despite the Kremlin saying it was not interested in crossing the border.

The Top U.S. infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci says it is time for the United States to start going back towards normality. We get a reaction to his words.

And we take a look at Halal Speed Dating, a face-to-face matchmaking event where applicants that are shortlisted will introduce themselves to each other, specifically created for Muslims.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzbs12)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldrv1t)
Nato and US say Russia still building troops along Ukraine boarder

Moscow says it's pulling troops back from its western border with Ukraine, following recent war manoeuvres in the region, but according to western powers and Nato, there's a distinct lack of evidence on the ground.

France has said that conditions are no longer in place to continue the fight against Islamist militants in Mali. President Emmanuel Macron has asked to reorganise French troops in the Sahel region. French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said the country would continue to fight against terrorism in neighbouring countries. France had already cut the number of troops in Mali.

The average time spent by asylum seekers in Australia in detention centres is said to be around 700 days, claims a new report on the issue. We ask what authorities doing about it.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzbws6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldrysy)
Ukraine crisis: Russian claim of troop withdrawal false, says US

Russia's claim that it is moving troops away from the border with Ukraine is "false", according to a senior US official, who added that 7,000 extra troops have arrived in recent days. The official also said that Russia could launch "a false pretext" to invade Ukraine "at any moment". Moscow says it is moving troops away from the Ukrainian border after the completion of military exercises, but western officials say they have seen no evidence to support the claim.We'll hear the views of a Ukranian politician.

Also we get the latest on landslides and flooding in the Brazilian city of Petropolis. Over 90 people have been killed and many more made homeless.

And we'll look into why the catholic church in Italy is failing to tackle clerical sex abuse in the country, and what authorities are doing about it.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzc0jb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z3b)
What will end the war in Yemen?

One of the world's largest humanitarian crises plagues the people of Yemen who have endured nearly eight years of civil conflict in the country. Over half the population struggles to access food, poverty is rife, and cholera is spreading. Meanwhile, three separate forces compete for control of Yemen. Backed by powerful foreign players, is there anything that can bring these warring factions to the table to find a peaceful resolution?

Tanya Beckett takes a closer look at what stands in the way of peace in Yemen.

Producer: Christopher Blake


(Armed Yemeni supporters of the Iran-backed Houthi movement rally in the capital Sanaa 27/01/2022. Credit Mohammed Huwais /Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l1csq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jbl)
Japan’s closed borders

Two years on from the start of the pandemic and most visitors are still banned from Japan. We take a look at why the world’s third largest economy has one of the strictest border controls in the world. How is it affecting people? And how is it affecting the economy? Tamasin Ford goes on a virtual tour of Tokyo’s foodie hotspots with Yukari Sakamoto, writer, chef and the author of a book called Food Sake Tokyo. Yukari explains how a lack of tourists has impacted her business, and how travel bans have stopped her from seeing family and friends. We also hear from a student stuck in the UK, and from Seijiro Takeshita. Professor of Management and Information at the University of Shizuoka Japan about the concerns from some big business over continued isolation.

(Image: Women cross a street at night, in Tokyo on November 3, 2021. Credit: Charly Triballeaue / AFP/ Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4f)
Bollywood's pioneering lesbian drama

The Bollywood film "Fire" was the first in Indian history to depict a lesbian relationship. Released in 1998, the movie sparked a row over censorship and then a wider debate about LGBT rights in a country where homosexuality was then illegal. In 2015, Lucy Burns met Bollywood superstar, Shabana Azmi, who played a lesbian in "Fire".

PHOTO: Shabana Azmi (AFP)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzc48g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l1hjv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzc80l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmj)
Joseph Heller's Catch-22: A novel of twisted logic and absurd bureaucracy

"That’s some Catch, that Catch 22". It’s a novel that gave rise to a new term in the English language and gave voice to American soldiers serving in Vietnam in the 1960s. Since its publication in 1961, Catch-22, Joseph Heller’s best-selling novel, has not only come to symbolise the cynical self-serving aspect of war run as a business, but also the way an ordinary person can be trapped and controlled by bureaucracy and social rules, in whatever area of life. It’s a novel that’s sold tens of millions of copies, and it continues to engage new readers. So, what is the secret of its success? Bridget Kendall is joined by the American novelist and friend of Joseph Heller, Christopher Buckley; Dr Beci Carver, lecturer in 20th century literature at Exeter University, whose forthcoming book is Modernism’s Whims; and Tracy Daugherty, author of Just One Catch: A Biography of Joseph Heller, and Emeritus Professor at Oregon State University in the US. With the contribution of Patricia Chapman Meder, the author of The True Story of Catch-22, whose father was the inspiration for Colonel Cathcart, Heller’s commander who kept increasing the number of flight missions.

Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service.

(Photo: An early edition of Joseph Heller’s novel Catch 22. Credit: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9k)
Dan Jansen - from tragedy to triumph

In February 1988, the American speedskater, Dan Jansen was told on the day of his Winter Olympic final that his sister had died of cancer. Stricken by grief, he then fell during his race. It took Dan Jansen another six years - and five more races - before he finally won gold and completed one of the most emotional laps-of-honour in Olympic history. He spoke to Simon Watts in 2014.

PHOTO: Dan Jansen (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzccrq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13fzqz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l1r13)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rh0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzchhv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k4f)
The forgotten story of a pioneering Olympic Champion

American sprinter Wyomia Tyus grew up on a dairy farm in Georgia, in the racially segregated South. When she was 14, tragedy struck her family - their house burned to the ground, and her father died shortly after. Bereft, Wyomia started running to get over her grief. She was soon spotted by the coach of the first - and only - college athletics training programme for black women in the US, and became the first person to win back to back gold medals in the 100m sprint in two consecutive Olympic Games in 1964 and 1968. Yet despite these historic achievements it is only now that she is getting recognition. She tells Anu Anand how it feels to finally get her moment in the spotlight.  
 
Another woman breaking barriers – both literal and symbolic - mountaineer Rosemary was part of the first African-American team to climb America’s highest mountain when she was 19. Now she’s inspiring young black children to do the same. She spoke to Outlook’s Rhianna Dillon in 2019.  

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Anu Anand

(Photo: Medal winners of the women's 100 metres in the 1964 Olympic Games, with Wyomia Tyus in first place. Credit: Bettmann via Getty Images)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzcm7z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13g777)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l1zjc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzcr03)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5lss6vq9q)
France and partners pull out of Mali

France and its European and Canadian partners are ending their decade-long campaign against jihadists in the West African state of Mali - saying the ruling military junta in Mali is making it impossible to continue. We hear from an MP in President Macron's party.

Also in the programme: a major study describes systematic and widespread use of extreme violence by the Dutch military during Indonesia's struggle for independence in the 1940s; and why we need a global library of the sounds of the sea.

(Photo: French President Emmanuel Macron (2-R) flanked by Ghana's President Nana Afuko Addo (R), Senegal's President Macky Sall (2-L), and European Council President Charles Michel (L), holds a joint press conference on France's engagement in the Sahel region, at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, 17 February 2022 / Credit: EPA / Ian Langsdon / Pool)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzcvr7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l270m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49np5tz1j0)
Britain to close down golden visa scheme

Wealthy individuals who invest at least £2m in the UK are offered residency through the golden visa scheme. But that's set to end as the UK government aims to deter Vladimir Putin's allies from benefitting from the UK economy. We get more details from Jack Freeland, an immigration solicitor with the law firm Shepherd and Wedderburn and Ben Cowdock, Investigations Lead at Transparency International UK. And the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong reported last year that 44% of their members were contemplating pulling out - we hear why from Tara Joseph, President of AmCham. Plus, two years on from the start of the pandemic, most visitors are still banned from Japan, but how is it affecting the people there and the national economy? The BBC's Tamasin Ford reports. (Picture of a gold private jet, picture via Getty).


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzczhc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxy09p2tzft)
French troops to leave Mali

France and its allies say they are going to withdraw their military forces from Mali, where they've been fighting a jihadi insurgency for nearly a decade. We hear reaction from the region and our BBC Africa collegue answers audience questions about the impact of the withdrawal.

We look at the evidence of a supposed Russian troops withdrawal as some intelligence suggests that instead of a withdrawal, 7,000 extra troops have arrived at Ukraine’s border. We speak to an expert about how journalists are analysing satellite images and other available “Open Source” information about Russian troop movements.

We also get your latest questions answered on the coronavirus pandemic with one of our regular experts, Dr Emma Hodcroft from the University of Bern.

(Photo: French President Emmanuel Macron and Senegal"s President Macky Sall in a joint press conference at the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, 17 February 2022. Credit; EPA/IAN LANGSDON / POOL/EPA)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzd37h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxy09p2v35y)
Deadly landslides in Brazil

We speak to our correspondent in Brazil about the deadly landslides and floods that struck the city of Petrópolis, in the mountains of Rio de Janeiro. We also hear from a teacher who has been helping people left homeless by the disaster.

We look at the evidence of a supposed Russian troops withdrawal as some intelligence suggests that instead of a withdrawal, 7,000 extra troops have arrived at Ukraine’s border. We speak to an expert about how journalists are analysing satellite images and other available “Open Source” information about Russian troop movements.

We hear about a BBC investigation that has uncovered an apparent culture of denial and complicity around sexual abuse in the Catholic Church in Italy.

We get your latest questions answered on the coronavirus pandemic with one of our regular experts, Dr Helen Wimalarathna from the University of Buckingham.

(Photo: People work at the site of a mudslide at Morro da Oficina after pouring rains in Petropolis, Brazil February 17, 2022. Credit: Ricardo Moraes/Reuters)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzd6zm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzdbqr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13gyq0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l2q04)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nt8xyh6k3)
2022/02/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzdggw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l2tr8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l51)
Bone repair from Covid-19 vaccine technology

Messenger RNA-based vaccines have been used successfully to kick start the antibody production needed to fight Covid-19. Now the technology has been successfully used to encourage the growth of new bones to heal severe fractures. The technique seems to work far better than the current alternatives says Maastricht University’s Elizabeth Rosado Balmayor.

Ivory smuggling continues to be a lucrative business for international criminal gangs, however, DNA techniques to trace where ivory seized by law enforcement authorities originates are now so accurate that individual animals can be pinpointed to within a few hundred miles. This says Samuel Wasser at the University of Washington, can be used as evidence against those ivory trafficking gangs.

And we look at development in attempts to detect and weigh neutrinos, elusive subatomic particles essential to our understanding of the makeup of the universe. Physicist Diana Parno from Carnegie Mellon University takes us through the latest findings.

Philologists have borrowed a statistical method from ecology to try and work out how much medieval romantic literature has been lost. The results seem to depend on which languages were involved, and like ecological systems, whether they were shared in isolated communities says Oxford University’s Katarzyna Kapitan

(Photo: A doctor points to a x-ray of a woman's hand broken small metacarpal bone. Credit: Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzdl70)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5lss6wkjm)
US: Russia ‘seeking excuse’ to invade Ukraine

The US secretary of state Anthony Blinken has urged Russia to formally announce that it will not invade Ukraine, as fears mount that it's preparing to create a pretext for war. Russia says that's an outrageous charge – we peer through the fog of mutual accusations.

Also on the programme: As France pulls its troops out of Mali - is it an opportunity for Russian mercenaries? And how a culture of complicity and denial is hiding the true scale of sexual abuse by Catholic priests in Italy.

(Image: U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken speaks during a meeting of the U.N. Security Council on the situation between Russia and Ukraine in New York City on 17 February 2022. Credit: Reuters/Allegri)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzdpz4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx4f9ht0j3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sxhkyy24r)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l327j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs7y0c8tsq)
Elon Musk says US is trying to "chill" his free speech

Tesla boss Elon Musk has accused US regulators of targeting him for "unrelenting investigation" because of his criticism of the government. In a court filing, the billionaire says the Securities and Exchange Commission has engaged in "outsized efforts" to monitor the firm that "seem calculated to chill his exercise" of free speech. We hear from our North America Correspondent Michelle Fleurry on the matter.

The Indonesian President Joko Widodo called on global unity to revive the global economy hit hard by the Covid pandemic. He was speaking at the start of the G20 meeting of finance ministers in Bali. One of the challenges those ministers will have to deal with is the amount of debt facing the world's poorest countries. According to figures from the International Monetary Fund almost 60 percent of low income countries - most of them in Africa - are at risk of struggling to pay back their debts. We asked Marcello Estevao from the World Bank what could be done.

Concerns over the security situation in Ukraine have once again impacted the markets - which remain volatile. We spoke to independent financial consultant Carey Leahy for our Market Report.

Hong Kong has changed a great deal over the past ten years. The political leadership is in lockstep with the Communist Party leadership in Beijing - they've made the Legislative Council far more compliant - and they've implemented a National Security Law. If that's the case, Hong Kong's value as an in-between space - halfway between China Proper and the global marketplace - doesn't really exist any more. The American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong reported last year that 44 percent of their members were contemplating pulling out. Tara Joseph is the President of AmCham and she spoke to our Fergus Nicholl.

Lastly, two years on from the start of the pandemic, most visitors are still banned from Japan. The world’s third largest economy has one of the strictest border controls in the world - but how is it affecting the people there and the national economy? Tamsin Ford of the BBC's Business Daily has been on a virtual tour of Tokyo’s foodie hotspots with Yukari Sakamoto - chef and author of a book called Food Sake Tokyo. She explored what impact has the lack of tourists had on Yukari's business.

(photo credit: getty)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzdtq8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l35zn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rh0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 18 FEBRUARY 2022

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzdygd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzf26j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqv32wbfj7)
Elon Musk says US is trying to 'chill' his free speech

Tesla boss Elon Musk has accused US regulators of targeting him for "unrelenting investigation" because of his criticism of the government. In a court filing, the billionaire says the Securities and Exchange Commission has engaged in "outsized efforts" to monitor the firm that "seem calculated to chill his exercise" of free speech. We speak to Michelle Fleurry in New York.

The Indonesian President Joko Widodo called on global unity to revive the global economy hit hard by the Covid pandemic. He was speaking at the start of the G20 meeting of finance ministers in Bali. One of the challenges those ministers will have to deal with is the amount of debt facing the world's poorest countries. According to figures from the International Monetary Fund almost 60 percent of low income countries - most of them in Africa - are at risk of struggling to pay back their debts. We asked Marcello Estevao from the World Bank what could be done.

Two years on from the start of the pandemic, most visitors are still banned from Japan. The world’s third largest economy has one of the strictest border controls in the world - but how is it affecting the people there and the national economy? Tamsin Ford of the BBC's Business Daily has been on a virtual tour of Tokyo’s foodie hotspots with Yukari Sakamoto - chef and author of a book called Food Sake Tokyo. She explored what impact has the lack of tourists had on Yukari's business.

Hong Kong has changed a great deal over the past ten years. The political leadership is in lockstep with the Communist Party leadership in Beijing - they've made the Legislative Council far more compliant - and they've implemented a National Security Law. If that's the case, Hong Kong's value as an in-between space - halfway between China proper and the global marketplace - doesn't really exist anymore. The American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong reported last year that 44 percent of their members were contemplating pulling out. We hear from Tara Joseph, the President of AmCham.

Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Andy Uhler from Marketplace in Austin Texas, and Rebecca Choong Wilkins from Bloomberg in Hong Kong.

Picture: US entrepreneur and business magnate Elon Musk. Credit: PATRICK PLEUL/POOL/AFP via Getty Images


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzf5yn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13hsxx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l3k71)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1v0d)
India's Sunil Chhetri and building St Louis

India's record goal scorer Sunil Chhetri talks about Lionel Messi, North Korean adventures and his love of tigers. We are also joined by the former goalkeeper Lutz Pfannenstiel who is now building a new MLS team in St Louis.

Picture on website: Sunil Chhetri comes close to scoring in a match between India and the United Arab Emirates (Yifan Ding/Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzf9ps)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzfffx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13j1f5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l3sq9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct3hh7)
Muslim and lesbian

From an early age, Fatima Daas knew that she was different. Raised in a strict Algerian Muslim family in the poor suburbs of Paris, she struggled to reconcile the feelings she was developing with her devotion to her faith. Her upbringing dictated that she would have to choose between Islam and her sexuality. At high school, she tried and failed to start teenage romances with boys. Confused and isolated, one day she even took out her frustrations on a fellow student whom she resented for being able to be openly gay.

Mike Wooldridge travels to the suburbs of Paris to meet Fatima and some of those who accompanied her on her difficult journey. He hears about the pressures she came under, and her fears of disappointing both her family and her community.

As she grew up, Fatima says, she coped “by speaking to God…as if He was a counsellor,” sharing with Him her innermost secrets. And for many years, she says, she was convinced she was the only lesbian who was also a Muslim.

Now in her mid-20s, Fatima tells Mike how she eventually reconciled her inner conflicts and made her choice. She has recently published a frank semi-autobiographical novel about her experiences, which has caused a stir in France. “I’m not going to reform a religion that’s existed for such a long time,” Fatima says, adding: “But I have never doubted God.”

(Image: Fatima Daas. Credit: Mike Lanchin)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzfk61)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldvm6s)
Ukraine: US warns war is a very real threat

The US warns war is a very real threat as a major security conference starts in Munich. The US claims that Russia has added over 700 troops along the boarder with Ukraine. We hear from the mayor of Kyiv, Vitaliy Klitschko.

A judge in New York rules that former President Trump must give evidence under oath to a state investigation into alleged fraud at his family business.

And we'll be taking a look at how communities in Ghana are coping a month after a huge explosion killed 13 people. The blast which police say happened when a truck carrying mining explosives collided with a motorcycle, killed 13 people.Over a thousand people are still living in camps provided by the government and say they’re desperate for help to rebuild their lives.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzfny5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldvqyx)
US president says Russia is plotting to justify an attack on Ukraine

There have been more accusations from the United States regarding Russia. The latest came from the Secretary of State Anthony Blinken, who said the United States believes Russia is preparing to invade Ukraine in the next few days, despite Russian claims that its troops were pulling back after military drills. It comes as the Munich Security Conference gets underway today with Ukraine high on the agenda.

The World Health Organisation says that more than a quarter of women around the world have experienced intimate partner violence. We hear from the author of the report.

And we hear from Afghan women who refuse to be silenced by the Taliban.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzfsp9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv34gldvvq1)
World leaders meet in Munich to discuss Ukraine.

As world leaders meet in Munich, Germany, to discuss the situation between Russia and Ukraine, there have been accusations by Russian backed rebels in the east who say government forces have been shelling in the area.

Also, a fire has broken out on a ferry carrying nearly 300 passengers from Greece to Italy. The Italian-flagged Euroferry Olympia was headed to the port of Brindisi from the Greek city of Igoumenitsa when the fire broke out on Friday morning, it is normally a busy passenger route between the two countries.

And we'll hear more about how a forensic marking liquid, that's traditionally used to deter crimes of theft and burglary, is being used to bring the perpetrators of domestic violence to justice.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzfxff)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2k)
Jamie Raskin, Democrat Congressman, House Committe to Investigative January 6th Attack

Early last year American democracy came under attack from within. Supporters of defeated President Donald Trump stormed the US Capitol and provoked deadly violence. Stephen Sackur speaks to the Democrat Congressman Jamie Raskin, a key player in the subsequent impeachment of Trump and the Congressional investigation into the 6 January assault. All this, as Congressman Raskin has faced up to personal tragedy - what happens when the pillars of personal and political life come crashing down all at once.


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l48pt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j1k)
Debt relief: Who should foot the bill?

There’s a credit crunch facing dozens of the world's poorest countries: billions of dollars are now owed and some countries simply won't manage the repayments. So who should foot the bill? We speak with Sri Lankan businessman, Indika Merenchige, who imports vehicles in to Sri Lanka – but it’s not business as usual when your government has defaulted with one of the world’s most influential creditors: China.

Meanwhile, the percentage some African countries are now paying just to service loan repayments has become alarmingly high. Jan Friederich is an African specialist at the Ratings Agency Fitch and speaks with us from Hong Kong. Plus, saying there’s no crisis on the horizon is Sonja Gibbs, the managing director and head of global policy initiatives at the Institute of International Finance, a trade group for the global financial industry. And it is when middle income countries like Turkey default on debt that really worries banks, says Harvard economist Ken Rogoff. Finally, Tim Jones represents the Jubilee Campaign, a non-profit organisation campaigning for global debt relief, thinks there might be a plan for widespread debt relief:

(Photo: A man holds banknotes of the Turkish lira. Credit: Berkcan Zengi/Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzx)
The world's first civil union

In 1989, Denmark became the first country to celebrate same-sex civil unions. In 2014, Farhana Haider spoke to Ivan Larsen and Ove Carlsen, who were one of the first couples to sign on the dotted line


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzg15k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj9)
The return of Trump?

Donald Trump is banned on Twitter and Facebook. Can he make a social media comeback? James Clayton and Jasmin Dyer discuss Trump's plans for his own social media platform 'Truth Social', and hear from Jason Miller, a former Trump adviser and founder of the GETTR platform. Plus we hear how US authorities tracked down billions of stolen Bitcoin, and the growing trend of celebrities advertising cryptocurrency to the masses.

(Photo: Donald Trump at a recent rally, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l4dfy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l51)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzg4xp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hts)
Why is China supporting Russia on Nato?

This month President Putin of Russia was the star guest at the opening of the Winter Olympics in Beijing. But his trip to China was not just about showing support for the host country. He and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping issued an unexpectedly long statement pledging friendship with 'no limits' and no 'forbidden areas of co-operation'. Beijing and Moscow have maintained a stable relationship since the 2000s, a far cry from the bitter days of the Sino-Soviet split during the Cold War.

China has increased its gas imports from Russia and Russia has in turn allowed more Belt and Road investments in its territory. The two conduct joint military exercises, co-operate in exploring Arctic sea routes, and support each other on the world stage. Now, breaking with its previous ambiguity, China has expressed support for Russia's concerns over the potential future expansion of Nato, giving Moscow a significant boost in its border standoff with Ukraine. Russia meanwhile backs China's claims over Taiwan. Even though no formal alliance has been announced, experts see the new Sino-Russia pact as a clear challenge to the United States.

So how important is the agreement between Russia and China and what are the countries' longer term goals? Does Russia risk being dominated by China, which is soon to become the biggest economy in the world? And how will the evolving relationship between the two powers impact the future of the democracy-based world order envisioned by President Biden? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.

Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzg8nt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13jwn2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l4my6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1v0d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzgddy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g9)
A tale of two Olympians

As the Winter Olympics draw to a close, we take a closer look at two stars who have dominated the headlines. Zhijie Shao of BBC Chinese describes how China’s ‘frog princess’ Eileen Gu has captured the heart of the nation, and Elizaveta Fokht of BBC Russian charts the ups and downs of 15-year-old figure skater Kamila Valieva.

Icon, rebel and feminist: a tribute to Forugh Farokhzad
It’s 55 years this week since the death of Iranian poet Forugh Farokhzad, but her popularity has never faded and she still inspires young and old. Maryam Zohdi of BBC Persian, who is herself a poet, has made a BBC radio documentary to introduce Forugh to non-Farsi speakers.

Goodbye Turkey, hello Türkiye
Why is Turkey trying to change its internationally recognised name to Türkiye? BBC Monitoring’s Ilgin Karlidag takes us into the history and geopolitics behind the move.

The brothers separated for 75 years
A story of two brothers – one in Pakistan and one in India – has gone viral in both countries. Sadiq and Habib Khan were separated 75 years ago during the Partition of India. Thanks to a Pakistani campaigner, they recently met face to face. The BBC’s Ali Kazmi, who’s based in Lahore, worked with BBC Punjabi colleagues in India to tell the brothers’ story.

(Photo: Composite image with Ailing Eileen Gu of Team China (L) and Russian Kamila Valieva. Credit: VCG via Getty Images (L), Jean Catuffe/Getty Images)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzgj52)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13k44b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l4wfg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l51)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzgmx6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5lss6ym6t)
World leaders meet in Munich for security talks

World leaders are meeting in Munich today for a security conference, but Russia won't attend for​ the first time since 1999. Russia now has up to 190,000 troops stationed near the Ukraine ​border, according to US officials. They say it is the "most significant military mobilisation" in Europe since World War Two. Moscow continues to deny planning an invasion of Ukraine and accuses the West of stoking "hysteria".

Also in the programme: Malawi has declared a wild polio outbreak, the first in Africa for five years. And we hear a report from Afghanistan about the lives of women under the Taliban.

(Photo: Munich Security Conference chairman Wolfgang Ischinger speaks during the conference. Credit: Reuters/Andreas Gebert)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzgrnb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l53xq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y476c010147)
Africa closer to making and distributing Covid-19 vaccines

The World Health Organization has announced that six African countries will be given the revolutionary mRNA technology to set up their own vaccine production centres - helping the continent acquire self-reliance against the Covid pandemic. But there are still a lot of questions to answer; we hear from Anna Marriott, Health Policy Manager at Oxfam, part of the People's Vaccine Alliance. EU and African heads of state have been meeting in Brussels and when it comes to trade, there is a lot of anger about what African leaders describe as a one-sided economic relationship. So what were the highlights of this week's meeting? Barbara Moens is Senior Trade Correspondent for Politico in Brussels. And Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, hosted a virtual summit with the Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi, Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed al-Nahyan, to sign strategic economic and trade agreements aimed at boosting trade between India and the UAE. We hear from the BBC's Archana Shukla in Mumbai. Plus, Rwanda's Ambassador to China, James Kimonyo has occasionally turned salesman to deliver Rwandan coffee and chilli products to Chinese customers. He's been speaking to Stanley Kwenda of the Focus on Africa programme. And now that most of the world is flying again, will the aviation industry be able to meet global emission targets? We hear from Asia Business Reporter, Nick Marsh. (Picture of a Covid 19 vaccine via Getty Images)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzgwdg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxy09p2xwbx)
Russia Ukraine crisis: Your questions answered

As fears continue to grow that Moscow is planning to invade Ukraine, we’ll have our BBC Russian colleague and our correspondent in Kyiv explain and answer audience questions about the crisis. You can send in a question via WhatsApp on +447730 751925.

The way that Russian figure skating star, Kamila Valieva, was treated by her coach when she failed to win a medal, has prompted an outcry and debate on skaters’ wellbeing. We’ll speak to a former figure skater and a sport journalist in Russia about methods and training regimes of skating clubs.

We continue to feature the work of journalists in Mexico to hear what it is like to work in one of the most dangerous countries for journalists. Today a journalist in Culiacan, Sinaloa describes the everyday challenges and dangers he faces.

The WHO has announced that six African countries will be given the MRNA technology to set up their own vaccine production centres in the continent. We'll discuss the significance of the news with our regular expert, Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University.

(Photo: A service member of the Ukrainian Naval Infantry Corps (Marine Corps) drives a tank during drills at a training ground in an unknown location in Ukraine, in this handout picture released February 18, 2022. Credit: Press Service of the Ukrainian Naval Forces/Handout via REUTERS).


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzh04l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxy09p2y031)
Reporting in Mexico

All of this week on OS we've been hearing from journalists in Mexico, about their lives and their work. Reporters there face deadly violence - five have been killed since the start of 2022. Today we're hearing from a journalist whose newspaper focuses on organised crime and drugs in Sinaloa state.

Russia continues to deny planning an invasion of Ukraine and accuses the West of stoking hysteria but US officials say Russia now has up to 190,000 troops built-up around Ukraine. We speak to our correspondent in Kyiv and to our colleague from BBC Russian about today's developments.

The way that Russian figure skating star, Kamila Valieva, was treated by her coach when she failed to win a medal, has prompted an outcry and debate on skaters’ wellbeing. We’ll speak to a former figure skater and a sport journalist in Russia about methods and training regimes of skating clubs.

(Photo: Journalists, friends, and relatives of the journalist Heber Lopez demand justice for his murder that occurred on 10 February 2022 and to demand security in the face of the wave of murders of other journalists, in Salina Cruz, Oaxaca state, Mexico, 17 February 2022. Credit: Luis Villalobos/EPA


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzh3wq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzh7mv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyw13kvm3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l5lx7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nt8xyl3g6)
2022/02/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzhccz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l5qnc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prs)
How do you navigate in space?

How good are you at finding your way from A to B? Humans throughout history have used all sorts of tools to get us to our destination – from a trusty map and compass to the instant directions on a smartphone. But CrowdScience listener Pam from Florida wants to know what happens when we leave the surface of the Earth and try to navigate our way around space. Is there a North and South we can use to orientate ourselves? Which way is left if your nearest landmark is a million light years away? And if you can’t tell which way is up, how do spacecraft know where they’re going?

Presenter Anand Jagatia speaks to experts in an attempt to find his way through the tricky problem of intergalactic space navigation.

Contributors:
Ethan Siegal, journalist and astrophysicist
Michelle Baker, ESA
Coryn Bailer-Jones, Max Planck Institute for Astronomy
Presented by Anand Jagatia
Produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzhh43)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5lss6zgfq)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzhlw7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx4f9hwxf6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sxhkz0z1v)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l5z4m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrfh8rpf8j)
First broadcast 18/02/2022 22:32 GMT

The latest business and finance news from around the world, on the BBC.


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk17bzhqmc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkvp2l62wr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1v0d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Amol Rajan Interviews Novak Djokovic 23:06 TUE (w3ct40sl)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gyp)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gyp)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gyp)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172xzkv9t8f5s5)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkv9t8f9j9)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkv9t8fnrp)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkv9t8g102)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkv9t8g4r6)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkv9t8gd7g)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkv9t8h7gc)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172xzkv9t8hqfw)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172xzkv9t8hyy4)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkv9t8j6fd)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkv9t8jfxn)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkv9t8jkns)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkv9t8jxx5)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkv9t8k1n9)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzkv9t8k5df)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkv9t8k94k)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkvp2kxd5g)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkvp2kxrdv)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkvp2l0n9y)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkvp2l3k71)

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BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172xzk0w2nqprn)

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BBC News 05:00 MON (w172xzk17bz1ykn)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172xzk17bz229s)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172xzk17bz261x)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172xzk17bz29t1)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172xzk17bz2fk5)

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BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzk17bz2p1f)

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BBC News 14:00 MON (w172xzk17bz318t)

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BBC News 16:00 MON (w172xzk17bz38s2)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzk17bz3dj6)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172xzk17bz3j8b)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172xzk17bz3n0g)

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BBC News 21:00 MON (w172xzk17bz3whq)

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BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz4qqm)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz4vgr)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz4z6w)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz52z0)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz56q4)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz5bg8)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz5g6d)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz5kyj)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz5ppn)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz5tfs)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz5y5x)

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BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz65p5)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz69f9)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz6f5f)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz6jxk)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz6nnp)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz6sdt)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz6x4y)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzk17bz70x2)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172xzk17bz74n6)

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BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzk17bz7mmq)

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BBC News 06:00 WED (w172xzk17bz7w3z)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172xzk17bz7zw3)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzk17bz83m7)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzk17bz87cc)

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BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzk17bz8gvm)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzk17bz8llr)

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BBC News 14:00 WED (w172xzk17bz8v30)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172xzk17bz8yv4)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172xzk17bz92l8)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172xzk17bz96bd)

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BBC News 20:00 WED (w172xzk17bz9kks)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzk17bz9p9x)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzk17bz9t21)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzk17bz9xt5)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172xzk17bzb1k9)

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BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzk17bzb91k)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzk17bzbdsp)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzk17bzbjjt)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzk17bzbn8y)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzk17bzbs12)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzk17bzbws6)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzk17bzc0jb)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzk17bzc48g)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzk17bzc80l)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzk17bzccrq)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzk17bzchhv)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzk17bzcm7z)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzk17bzcr03)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzk17bzcvr7)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzk17bzczhc)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzk17bzd37h)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzk17bzd6zm)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzk17bzdbqr)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172xzk17bzdggw)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172xzk17bzdl70)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172xzk17bzdpz4)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzk17bzdtq8)

BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzdygd)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzf26j)

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BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzf9ps)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzfffx)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzfk61)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzfny5)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzfsp9)

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BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzg15k)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzg4xp)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzg8nt)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzgddy)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzgj52)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzgmx6)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzgrnb)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzgwdg)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzh04l)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzh3wq)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzh7mv)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzhccz)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzhh43)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzhlw7)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzk17bzhqmc)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d71)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 SUN (w3ct2d71)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxy09p2k8qj)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxy09p2kdgn)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxy09p2n5mm)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172xxy09p2n9cr)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172xxy09p2r2jq)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172xxy09p2r68v)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172xxy09p2tzft)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxy09p2v35y)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172xxy09p2xwbx)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxy09p2y031)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j62)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jh3)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jpw)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1jbl)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j1k)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqv32w1qsy)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqv32w4mq1)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqv32w7jm4)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqv32wbfj7)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dj2)

Comedians Vs. The News 11:32 SAT (w3ct3jsp)

Comedians Vs. The News 19:32 SUN (w3ct3jsp)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1prr)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1prr)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1prs)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1ltd)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1ltd)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1ltd)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct1m92)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct1m93)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct1m93)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct1m93)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mw5)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mw5)

From Our Own Correspondent 00:06 MON (w3ct1mw5)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n72)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n72)

HARDtalk 23:06 MON (w3ct1n72)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1ncl)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1ncl)

HARDtalk 23:06 WED (w3ct1ncl)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n2k)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n2k)

HARDtalk 23:06 FRI (w3ct1n2k)

Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nwl)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nwm)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nwm)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nwm)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct3hh6)

Heart and Soul 00:32 MON (w3ct3hh6)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct3hh7)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tfb)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tfb)

In the Studio 23:32 TUE (w3ct1tfb)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dlb)

More or Less 23:50 SUN (w3ct2dlb)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dlb)

Music Life 23:06 SAT (w3ct1hd6)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hd6)

Music Planet 09:32 SAT (w3ct3hgj)

Music Planet 23:32 SUN (w3ct3hgj)

Music Planet 03:32 MON (w3ct3hgj)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv34gldh0ld)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv34gldh4bj)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172xv34gldh82n)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172xv34gldkxhh)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172xv34gldl17m)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172xv34gldl4zr)

Newsday 05:06 WED (w172xv34gldntdl)

Newsday 06:06 WED (w172xv34gldny4q)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172xv34gldp1wv)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172xv34gldrq9p)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172xv34gldrv1t)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172xv34gldrysy)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172xv34gldvm6s)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172xv34gldvqyx)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172xv34gldvvq1)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172xv5lfhx87ry)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172xv5lfhx96qz)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172xv5lfhxc4p1)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172xv5lfhxd3n2)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172xv5lss6l0lf)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172xv5lss6lvtb)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172xv5lss6nxhj)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172xv5lss6prqf)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172xv5lss6rtdm)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172xv5lss6snmj)

Newshour 14:06 THU (w172xv5lss6vq9q)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172xv5lss6wkjm)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172xv5lss6ym6t)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172xv5lss6zgfq)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1ky7)

Outlook 22:32 SUN (w3ct1ky7)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jvd)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct1jvd)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3ct1jvd)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3ct1jxn)

Outlook 18:06 TUE (w3ct1jxn)

Outlook 03:06 WED (w3ct1jxn)

Outlook 12:06 WED (w3ct1jzx)

Outlook 18:06 WED (w3ct1jzx)

Outlook 03:06 THU (w3ct1jzx)

Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k4f)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3ct1k4f)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k4f)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l2r)

Over to You 00:50 SUN (w3ct1l2r)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l2r)

People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pm6)

People Fixing The World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pm6)

Ros Atkins on ... 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dpl)

Science In Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l51)

Science In Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l51)

Science In Action 13:32 FRI (w3ct1l51)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nt8xy6htt)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172y0nt8xy9dqx)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172y0nt8xyd9n0)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172y0nt8xyh6k3)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172y0nt8xyl3g6)

Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct1l9j)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3ct1l9k)

Sporting Witness 00:50 FRI (w3ct1l9k)

Sports News 22:20 SAT (w172y0sx49nbqc3)

Sports News 22:20 SUN (w172y0sx49nfm86)

Sports News 22:20 MON (w172y0sxhkyncfg)

Sports News 22:20 TUE (w172y0sxhkyr8bk)

Sports News 22:20 WED (w172y0sxhkyv57n)

Sports News 22:20 THU (w172y0sxhkyy24r)

Sports News 22:20 FRI (w172y0sxhkz0z1v)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0qft3v7b7l)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tql1800y8)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0tql1835bm)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lcs)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1nj9)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3ct1nj9)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rv8)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3ct1rv8)

The Arts Hour 00:06 WED (w3ct1rv8)

The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2drv)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2drv)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2drv)

The Coming Storm 04:32 WED (w3ct302z)

The Coming Storm 11:32 WED (w3ct302z)

The Coming Storm 23:32 WED (w3ct302z)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct3fnh)

The Compass 02:32 WED (w3ct3fnj)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct3fnj)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct3fnj)

The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p9t)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p9v)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p9v)

The Conversation 23:32 MON (w3ct1p9v)

The Cultural Frontline 22:32 SAT (w3ct1pty)

The Cultural Frontline 04:32 SUN (w3ct1pty)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1pty)

The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct3gkr)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct3gkr)

The Documentary 05:32 SUN (w3ct3gk3)

The Documentary 02:32 TUE (w3ct3hgn)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct3hgn)

The Documentary 20:06 TUE (w3ct3hgn)

The Documentary 10:06 WED (w3ct3gkr)

The Documentary 00:06 THU (w3ct3gkr)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20g8)

The Fifth Floor 12:06 FRI (w3ct20g9)

The Fifth Floor 18:06 FRI (w3ct20g9)

The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rgz)

The Food Chain 04:32 THU (w3ct1rh0)

The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3ct1rh0)

The Food Chain 23:32 THU (w3ct1rh0)

The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rmh)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3ct1rmj)

The Forum 00:06 FRI (w3ct1rmj)

The History Hour 00:06 TUE (w3ct1z87)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z3b)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct1z3b)

The Inquiry 23:06 THU (w3ct1z3b)

The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172xyxyhrstk75)

The Newsroom 05:06 SAT (w172xyxyhrstxgk)

The Newsroom 11:06 SAT (w172xyxyhrsvmyb)

The Newsroom 18:06 SAT (w172xyxyhrswh57)

The Newsroom 22:06 SAT (w172xyx42166nqg)

The Newsroom 02:06 SUN (w172xyxyhrsxg48)

The Newsroom 05:06 SUN (w172xyxyhrsxtcn)

The Newsroom 11:06 SUN (w172xyxyhrsyjvf)

The Newsroom 19:06 SUN (w172xyxyhrszhtg)

The Newsroom 22:06 SUN (w172xyx42169kmk)

The Newsroom 02:06 MON (w172xyxyw13469j)

The Newsroom 04:06 MON (w172xyxyw134fss)

The Newsroom 11:06 MON (w172xyxyw13590p)

The Newsroom 13:06 MON (w172xyxyw135jhy)

The Newsroom 19:06 MON (w172xyxyw1367zq)

The Newsroom 22:06 MON (w172xyx4f9hj9st)

The Newsroom 02:06 TUE (w172xyxyw13736m)

The Newsroom 04:06 TUE (w172xyxyw137bpw)

The Newsroom 11:06 TUE (w172xyxyw1385xs)

The Newsroom 13:06 TUE (w172xyxyw138ff1)

The Newsroom 19:06 TUE (w172xyxyw1394wt)

The Newsroom 22:06 TUE (w172xyx4f9hm6px)

The Newsroom 02:06 WED (w172xyxyw13b03q)

The Newsroom 04:06 WED (w172xyxyw13b7lz)

The Newsroom 11:06 WED (w172xyxyw13c2tw)

The Newsroom 13:06 WED (w172xyxyw13cbb4)

The Newsroom 19:06 WED (w172xyxyw13d1sx)

The Newsroom 22:06 WED (w172xyx4f9hq3m0)

The Newsroom 02:06 THU (w172xyxyw13dx0t)

The Newsroom 04:06 THU (w172xyxyw13f4j2)

The Newsroom 11:06 THU (w172xyxyw13fzqz)

The Newsroom 13:06 THU (w172xyxyw13g777)

The Newsroom 19:06 THU (w172xyxyw13gyq0)

The Newsroom 22:06 THU (w172xyx4f9ht0j3)

The Newsroom 02:06 FRI (w172xyxyw13hsxx)

The Newsroom 04:06 FRI (w172xyxyw13j1f5)

The Newsroom 11:06 FRI (w172xyxyw13jwn2)

The Newsroom 13:06 FRI (w172xyxyw13k44b)

The Newsroom 19:06 FRI (w172xyxyw13kvm3)

The Newsroom 22:06 FRI (w172xyx4f9hwxf6)

The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3ct1htr)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1htr)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3ct1hts)

The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3ct1ywj)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172xytnqvd2thj)

Weekend 07:06 SAT (w172xytnqvd2y7n)

Weekend 08:06 SAT (w172xytnqvd31zs)

Weekend 06:06 SUN (w172xytnqvd5qdm)

Weekend 07:06 SUN (w172xytnqvd5v4r)

Weekend 08:06 SUN (w172xytnqvd5yww)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wzw)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3ct1x25)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct1x25)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3ct1x25)

Witness History 03:50 TUE (w3ct1x25)

Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3ct1x6p)

Witness History 12:50 TUE (w3ct1x6p)

Witness History 18:50 TUE (w3ct1x6p)

Witness History 03:50 WED (w3ct1x6p)

Witness History 08:50 WED (w3ct1x8y)

Witness History 12:50 WED (w3ct1x8y)

Witness History 18:50 WED (w3ct1x8y)

Witness History 03:50 THU (w3ct1x8y)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3ct1x4f)

Witness History 12:50 THU (w3ct1x4f)

Witness History 18:50 THU (w3ct1x4f)

Witness History 03:50 FRI (w3ct1x4f)

Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3ct1wzx)

Witness History 12:50 FRI (w3ct1wzx)

Witness History 18:50 FRI (w3ct1wzx)

Women Building Peace 10:06 SUN (w3ct3fld)

Women Building Peace 23:06 SUN (w3ct3fld)

Women Building Peace 03:06 MON (w3ct3fld)

WorklifeIndia 01:32 SAT (w3ct2f4h)

World Business Report 01:06 SAT (w172xzlnrjw3fp1)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzlp3t5f2rd)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y48fj2xnd4s)

World Business Report 22:32 MON (w172ycrv6n1ngvs)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172y4bwv8qt6br)

World Business Report 22:32 TUE (w172ycsnncnfp65)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172y4d40cmy1ws)

World Business Report 22:32 WED (w172yct2cqyw79x)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172y49np5tz1j0)

World Business Report 22:32 THU (w172ycs7y0c8tsq)

World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172y476c010147)

World Business Report 22:32 FRI (w172ycrfh8rpf8j)

World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1v0d)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1v0d)

World Football 23:32 FRI (w3ct1v0d)

World Questions 19:06 SAT (w3ct1wfs)

World Questions 12:06 SUN (w3ct1wfs)

World of Wisdom 05:32 SAT (w3ct2zwj)

World of Wisdom 18:32 SAT (w3ct2zwj)

World of Wisdom 00:32 SUN (w3ct2zwj)

World of Wisdom 10:32 MON (w3ct2zwj)