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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 05 FEBRUARY 2022

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbyk4t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htq)
China’s zero-Covid conundrum

As the Beijing Winter Olympics get underway in China this week the host city has reported its highest number of new Covid-19 cases in more than a year. The authorities have put in place a strict 'closed loop bubble’, isolating more than 60,000 athletes, officials and service providers from the rest of the country. China's firm approach to quashing transmission of the virus has been in place ever since the first outbreak in Wuhan. Detection of the virus typically prompts mass testing and can even result in entire cities being placed into snap lockdowns. Only essential travellers are allowed to enter the country and even then only after weeks of strict quarantine. Only a few thousand Chinese citizens are said to have died of Covid-19, a fraction of the number of lives lost in many other nations. But a recent report from the IMF has warned of an economic slowdown in China, blamed in part on the country’s zero-Covid policy. The approach has been welcomed by most citizens, but could public attitudes change if more of the country is forced to stay at home in order to combat outbreaks? Can China follow in the footsteps of other countries that have transitioned towards 'living with the virus'? And will the country have to wait for the next generation of vaccines before opening up?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Paul Schuster and Junaid Ahmed.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbynwy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlnd8kb926)
US jobs report exceeds expectations

The United States economy created 467,000 new jobs in January, despite a surge in coronavirus cases caused by the Omicron variant. The BBC's Michelle Fleurry brings us the details, and Chris Low of FHN Financial analyses the impact on Wall Street. Also in the programme, Iceland has announced plans to end whaling from 2024 as demand dwindles. Matt Collis, International Fund for Animal Welfare says the move by the government is a positive one. Plus, the BBC's Russell Newlove reports on the booming market for electric bikes.

Presenter : Joshua Thorpe
Producer: Nisha Patel

(Picture: Craftsmanship. Picture: Getty.)


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyn15b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f4g)
How can India tackle the jobs crisis?

India’s unemployment rate was at almost 8% last month, a recent study has reported, significantly higher than that seen in the last many years. The situation is so bad that two Indian states saw violent protests last week, with some job seekers setting railway carriages on fire. There is also a huge mismatch in available jobs and people with the right skills for them.

The government has announced plans to create millions of new jobs by promoting local manufacturing and big spending on infrastructure. But the gap in demand and supply is huge.

Can India create enough jobs to meet the needs of its hundreds of millions of poorly employed people, especially the youth? In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss ways to tackle India’s jobs crisis.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Mahesh Vyas, MD and CEO, CMIE; Pawan Goyal, chief business officer, Naukri.com; Mehar Sindhu Batra, career coach, influencer; Prafull Billore, founder, MBA Chai Wala


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbysn2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hh1dmb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyn4xg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lcr)
Unmukt Chand: Breaking the BBL barrier

On this week’s BBC Stumped with Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Jim Maxwell. We speak to the Unmukt Chand, the cricketer once touted as the next Virat Kohli, about leaving his homeland in search of better opportunities and becoming the first Indian man to play in the Big Bash League in Australia. BCCI rules state any Indian player, contracted or non-contracted is not allowed to play any franchise cricket outside of India.
Chand won the Under 19’s World Cup with India in 2012, but now ten years on is living in the USA and recently made his debut for the Melbourne Renegades.

Plus the fallout continues from England’s 4-0 thrashing by Australia in the Men’s Ashes. We discuss the news that Ashley Giles is leaving his role as England's managing director of men's cricket.

We also debate whether there should be more Test matches in the women’s game following the thrilling draw between England and Australia.

JANUARY 19: Unmukt Chand of the Renegades bats during the Men's Big Bash League match between the Sydney Thunder and the Melbourne Renegades at Melbourne Cricket Ground, on January 19, 2022, in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Jonathan Di Maggio/Cricket Australia via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbyxd6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g7)
Teenage mums back at school in Tanzania

Pregnant students in Tanzania are no longer forced to drop out of school, after a ban endorsed by former President John Magufuli was overturned. Girls who had to drop out in previous years have also started to return to the classroom. Aboubakar Famau of BBC Swahili has been to meet a young mother who has returned to school and hopes to become a lawyer.

Taiwan's burgeoning porn industry
Over recent years the production and sale of 'soft porn' movies in Taiwan has boomed. Japan had always led the industry in the region, but now Taiwan is creating its own rising stars, some of whom are popping up in mainstream programming. Benny Lu is a journalist with BBC Chinese in Hong Kong, and he spoke to people involved in the industry about this cultural shift around porn.

‘Save me from an arranged marriage’
A 29-year-old Londoner has received hundreds of messages from women around the world after launching a billboard campaign to find a wife. Muhammad Malik put up billboards in three cities, with the slogan 'Save me from an arranged marriage'. The BBC’s South Asia diaspora reporter Gaggan Sabherwal has met Malik and tells us about his campaign.

Why Venezuelans are 'killing tigers'
Venezuelans are killing tigers like never before. It’s not an animal rights issue – but a uniquely Venezuelan phrase that means doing an extra job to make ends meet. The phrase originated in the 1920s, but has come back in force in the 2020s as the economic crisis has worsened. BBC Mundo’s Daniel Pardo has returned to the capital Caracas after five years away, and noticed the phenomenon.

My Home town: Luanda, Kenya
We go to Luanda, Kenya with Beverly Ochieng for some homemade smoked fish soup with her grandmother.

(Photo: Teenage mother in a Tanzanian school. Credit: BBC)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzv)
The Death of King George VI

On February 6th 1952, King George VI died after a long illness. Britain came to a standstill to mourn the monarch who had led the nation through World War II, and the present Queen acceded to the throne. Simon Watts brings together BBC recordings from 70 years ago. This programme was first broadcast in 2012.

PHOTO: The coffin of King George VI passing through central London (Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbz14b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbz4wg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hh1rvq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjynj4v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwh)
The passion for life

The pandemic has caused many people to reassess their lives...but self-reflection is a journey that can bring challenges. Annie, from Australia, feels she has gained wisdom and a deeper insight into life but it has led to her living almost on 'auto-pilot', without the passion she had before. She speaks to Sufi teacher and interfaith minister Imam Jamal Rahman. He suggests ways we might connect with life more deeply.

Presented by the BBC's Sana Safi.

Produced by Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards.


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dpk)
Joe Rogan, Spotify and Covid

The musicians Neil Young and Joni Mitchell have asked Spotify to remove their music from the platform. They have criticised the music streaming service for publishing a podcast that spreads Covid misinformation. It’s sparked a debate about freedom of speech and corporate responsibility. Ros Atkins has been looking into the controversy.

(Photo: Commentator Joe Rogan during the UFC Fight Night event at Prudential Center on April 18, 2015 in Newark, New Jersey. Credit: Getty Images/Alex Trautwig)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbz8ml)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytncl29nwp)
Former US Vice President Mike Pence rebukes Donald Trump

Former US Vice President Mike Pence has dismissed claims by Donald Trump that he could have stopped Joe Biden becoming president last year.

Also in the programme: Is the UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson following a Trump script? And we ask if the Taliban is starting to keep its promise to let women back into education in Afghanistan.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss the stories of the day, our two guests: Eunice Goes is a Portuguese-born professor of Politics at Richmond University in the UK. Vladislav Zubok is a Russian-born professor of international history at the London School of Economics.

(Photo: Former US Vice President Mike Pence officiates at a joint session of the House and Senate to confirm votes cast in November's election. Saul Loeb/Pool via REUTERS/File Photo)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbzdcq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytncl29smt)
Former US Vice President: "President Trump is wrong"

The former US Vice President Mike Pence has dismissed claims by Donald Trump that he could have stopped Joe Biden becoming President last year.

Also today: Will athletes be tempted to protest about human rights at the Beijing Winter Olympics? And with Russian troops poised on the border - we hear from the Ukrainians caught in a conflict that's been dragging on for years.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss the stories of the day, our two guests: Eunice Goes is a Portuguese-born professor of politics at Richmond University in the UK. Vladislav Zubok is a Russian-born professor of international history at the London School of Economics.

(Photo: US former Vice President Mike Pence. Credit: Reuters/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbzj3v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytncl29xcy)
Nato boss calls for unity after Russia-China joint statement

Nato's secretary general, Jens Stoltenberg, has said the alliance needs to stand together after Russia and China signed a joint statement on Friday promising closer cooperation. President Xi Jinping has joined his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, in calling for an end to Nato expansion.

Also today: Does the West need to rethink its approach to Eastern Europe? And we'll hear from the director of the Kosovo war film in the running for an Oscar this year.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss the stories of the day, our two guests: Eunice Goes is a Portuguese-born professor of politics at Richmond University in the UK. Vladislav Zubok is a Russian-born professor of international history at London School of Economics.

(Photo: Nato Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg during a joint press conference at the end of a meeting at the Nato headquarters in Brussels, January 2022. Credit: EPA/Stephanie Lecocq)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjynwd7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9s)
Rock on! The art of dry stone walling

Dry stone walling is an ancient craft that goes back thousands of years and remains an important means of enclosing fields in rural areas of Europe, and of constructing terraces for agriculture in more mountainous regions. But it’s a craft, along with other countryside skills, that’s practiced by fewer people these days. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women from the US and Italy about their passion for building beautiful walls.

Serena Cattaneo is from Genoa Northern Italy where the walls helped establish terraces for olive and vine groves in the mountains. She started dry stone walling five years ago and now, as well as working restoring walls, she also teaches the skill at workshops. She’s passionate about the trade and keen to develop a women’s network as she’s yet to meet another female waller in Italy.

Whitney Brown was 26 years old when she met a dry stone waller at a festival in Washington, within weeks she was out on the hill with him in Wales wielding a hammer and learning everything she could about the craft. She’s since taken her skills back to the United States where she teaches others, but returns as often as she can to work in the UK.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

(Image: (L) Serena Cattaneo, credit Serena Cattaneo. (R) Whitney Brown, courtesy Whitney Brown. Background: wall in Sori, credit Serena Cattaneo.)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbzmvz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d70)
The Winter Olympics

The Winter Games are officially underway as Beijing becomes the first city to host both the summer and winter Olympics. Host Karnie Sharp brings us a conversation between two competitors, who are from countries that don’t traditionally send large teams to snow sports.

Manon Ouaiss is the only woman on the three person Lebanon team while Ornella Oettl Reyes is the sole member, and flag bearer, for Peru. Both are alpine skiers and both are aware of the importance of sending a positive message to those who are cheering them on from the countries they represent.

These Games are impacted by the Covid pandemic and by politics. Several countries have declared diplomatic boycotts over China’s alleged human rights abuses. One protest concerns the treatment of the Muslim Uyghur population. While China denies any human rights violations, we hear from three Uyghur exiles and activists living in Germany, Australia and Switzerland. They discuss their objection to these Games.

(Photo: Manon Ouaiss Credit: Manon Ouaiss)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyp04c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386h)
Pick of the World: The all-female Indonesian metal band

Listeners to the BBC World Service not only love what they hear, they love to engage with it; it's a two way relationship that has created a special bond.

Each week, Anna Doble celebrates the amazing radio the World Service produces, with clips chosen by its listeners, and explores the reaction on social media.

She also speaks to some of those listeners around the world, to find out what it was about the issue that captured them.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2q)
Making the documentary Music that Survived the Nazis

Your reactions to the moving documentary Music that Survived the Nazis - its presenter and producer join us to explain how the programme was made.
Plus, with the Winter Olympics underway in China, one listener worries about the freedom of the foreign press to report the bigger picture.

Presenter: Rajan Datar.
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbzrm3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0qffvjg5mr)
Sportshour at the 2022 Winter Olympic Games in Beijing

We join our correspondent Alex Capstick live in Beijing with the Winter Olympics well underway. We also hear from Olympic skiing Gold medallists Lindsey Vonn and Picabo Street about their friendship and the new documentary Vonn has co-directed about Street’s life. Vonn discusses her first meeting with her idol as a 9 year old child, while Street opens up on the difficult issues in her personal life that are explored in the film.

United States men’s Ice Hockey coach – David Quinn – discusses the challenges of putting a team together without National Hockey League players and Simon Gleave from the data company Gracenote tells us who he expects to do well in Beijing.

Sporting Witness has a Winter Olympics theme as we hear from Vonetta Flowers. At the 2002 games in Salt Lake City, she became the first black athlete to win a Winter Olympic Gold medal, as she and Jill Bakken topped the podium in the two-woman Bobsleigh event.

Iceland midfielder Dagny Brynjarsdottir opens up on combining motherhood and a career as a professional footballer. She welcomes the recent introduction of maternity pay for players in the WSL but argues there should be more support for players going forward. Brynjarsdottir also explains how she became a West Ham United fan as a child and tells us about her dream move to the club last year.

And - Katie Higgins tells us about becoming part of the first ever women’s camel racing team in the United Arab Emirates. The 29-year-old art teacher made history in the country when she competed in its first licensed female camel championship race at Al Marmoom Racetrack.


The National Stadium, also known as the Bird's Nest, the venue for the opening and closing ceremonies of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics, is illuminated at night on February 2, 2022 in Beijing, China. Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics will open on February 4. (Photo by Yi Haifei/China News Service via Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbzwc7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hh2hbh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyp7mm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f4g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc003c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9x)
Isabel Allende: Eva Luna

In the second in our season celebrating The Exuberance of Youth in this centenary year of the BBC, Harriett Gilbert talks to world-famous Chilean writer Isabel Allende about her extraordinary novel, Eva Luna.

Eva Luna is the story of an orphan who beguiles the world with her remarkable visions, triumphing over the worst of adversities and bringing light, as her name would suggest, to a dark place.

As Eva comes of age and tells her tale, Isabel Allende conjures up a whole complex, unidentified, South American nation— filled with a cast of unforgettable characters, rich, poor, simple, sophisticated, oppressors and oppressed. Against this turbulent background, love, politics and tragedy all play their part in Eva’s life and help shape her into the unforgettable revolutionary and storyteller she becomes.

A novel that celebrates the power of imagination to create a better world.

(Picture: Isabel Allende. Photo credit: Lori Barra.)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc03vh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27lh353)
African Union meets after series of military coups

The chair of the African Union Commission, Moussa Faki Mahamat, has opened a summit in Ethiopia with a call for greater cooperation to tackle political instability, following several recent military coups.

Also in the programme: In Morocco the attempt to rescue a five year old boy who's been trapped down a deep well for several days has captivated the country and the wider Arab world; and Philosophy Professor, Olufemi Taiwo, argues that reparations for what he calls "global racial empire" are closely linked to climate justice and should focus less on the past and present and more on remaking the world.

(Photo: Heads of states and delegates pose for the group photo during the 35th ordinary session of the Assembly of the African Union at the African Union Commission headquarters in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on 5 February 2022. Credit: Reuters/Tiksa Negeri)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc07lm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tq6ry6wbf)
Live Sporting Action

Lee James will be based at the Etihad Stadium ahead of Manchester City’s FA Cup fourth round tie against Fulham with the former Fulham, Chelsea and Australia goalkeeper Mark Schwarzer among his guests.

Live commentary comes from Selhurst Park as Premier League side Crystal Palace take on fourth tier Hartlepool United.

We’ll also bring you updates on Saturday’s other games, as well as discussing the opening day of action at the Winter Olympics, the start of the Six Nations, and looking ahead to the final of the Africa Cup of Nations.

Photo: A fan of Kidderminster Harriers holds up a tin foil FA Cup Trophy. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc0ql4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hh3bkd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyq2vj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9h)
Vonetta Flowers: The first black Winter Olympic champion

Vonetta Flowers became the first black athlete to win a Winter Olympic gold, when her US pair won the two-woman Bobsleigh event in 2002. Flowers started her career as a sprinter and long-jumper, but switched to bobsledding after failing to make the American summer Olympic team. She was a natural for the brake-woman role and formed a successful team with driver, Jill Bakken. Vonetta Flowers speaks to Iain Mackness. The programme is a Made-In-Manchester production.

(Photo: Vonetta Flowers celebrating her Olympic victory in 2002. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc0vb8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z86)
Kazakhstan's new capital

How Kazakhstan's strongman president, Nursultan Nazarbayev, created a new capital, which would eventually be named after him; transformation in the UEA - the first Emirati female teacher in the 1960s; the murder of American journalist, Daniel Pearl; from 70 years ago, the passing of Britain’s King George VI; and a once-in-a-lifetime transit of Venus.

Picture: Kazakhstan's capital, Astana, since renamed Nur-Sultan (credit: Shutterstock)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc0z2d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv7)
Director Pedro Almodóvar

Nikki Bedi is joined by comedians Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini to discuss their cultural highlights of the week and the new series of Comedians vs The News on the BBC World Service.

Double Oscar winning Spanish director Pedro Almodóvar on why he’s reflecting on a painful chapter of Spanish history in his film Parallel Mothers.

Comedian Ricky Gervais on being drawn to life’s losers and the final series of After Life.

Director Adam McKay on his comet crisis comedy Don’t Look Up.

Actor Ciaran Hinds tells us about revisiting his childhood in Kenneth Branagh’s latest film Belfast.

Swedish Lebanese video games creator Josef Fares talks to Nikki about his award-winning game It Takes Two.

British author Deborah Levy on losing her voice as a child and finding it through writing.

And there’s music from South African saxophonist Khaya Mahlangu.

(Photo: Pedro Almodóvar. Credit: Rich Polk/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc12tj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27lj244)
Surge in targeted killings of Mexican journalists

Four journalists were killed in Mexico in January, the most violent month for the profession in a decade. The surge in attacks against media workers has left vast swaths of the country in an information blackout.

Also in the programme: Rescue workers have emerged from a tunnel carrying a five-year-old boy who fell on a 32 metre well on Tuesday; and as western governments and NATO line up against Russia, President Putin has been strengthening ties with China.

(Photo: Members of the press protest to reject violence against their colleagues.Credit: EPA).


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc16kn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3prwfj3m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sws1bkkr8)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyqkv1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptx)
Art and China's Winter Olympics

Painter and installation artist, Qu Lei Lei, co-founded the Stars movement in China in 1979, when a group of artists grabbed national attention by displaying their work in public outside official channels and marching under the slogans of political democracy and artistic freedom. Decades later, Qu Lei Lei is still creating art that is making waves internationally. His recent work highlights the use of misinformation for political purposes, and how vulnerable the lives of ordinary people are to being “knocked over” by politics, pandemic, and environmental or financial disaster. Our reporter Paul Waters interviewed him in the home he shares with co-artist Caroline Deane.

And as China hosts the Winter Olympics, artists are marking the sporting contest in their own way. Inside the China Winter Sport Art Festival in Beijing, dozens of artists have been customizing snowboards. We hear from one of them, abstract painter Shuang Wu. And also from China’s controversial “pandaman”, artist Zhao Bandi, whose signature panda sculptures are on show in the festival courtyard.

Plus: What lies ahead for China – and the rest of the world – after the Olympics? China’s science fiction authors are coming up with scenarios based on new technology, artificial intelligence, Covid, climate change and the other uncertainties of life. And they're also looking to new parts of the world for inspiration too. We hear from two award-winning sci fi writers. Chen Qiufan is the author of a series of short stories called AI 2041, 10 Visions of Our Future. And Xia Jia’s first English language collection, A Summer Beyond Your Reach, was published a few months ago.

We also hear from Chinese electronic dance music star, Corsak, on how he tailors his music depending on whether it’s for a domestic or an international audience.

Presenter: Chi Chi Izundu
Producer: Paul Waters

(Photo: Qu Lei Lei in front of his painting Mastering Our Fate. Credit: Paul Waters)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc1b9s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd5)
Making your music sound 'human', with Heba Kadry, Sarah Davachi, Marta Salogni and Faten Kanaan

Heba Kadry, Sarah Davachi, Marta Salogni and Faten Kanaan discuss why limitations can push creativity, how instruments can be an extension of the body, and why sounding “human” is better than pure perfection.

Egyptian-born, Brooklyn-based mastering and mixing engineer Heba Kadry has worked with the likes of Beach House, serpentwithfeet, the Mars Volta, Yaeji and former Music Life guest Mykki Blanco. She also collaborated with Bjork on the iconic Utopia album, and worked on a number of film soundtracks, including the Oscar-nominated biopic Jackie.

Grammy-nominated engineer, producer and mixer Marta Salogni started out as a live sound engineer in her home town of Brescia, Italy, before moving to London in 2010. She has since worked at some of the city’s most renowned studios with artists including Bjork, M.I.A, fka Twigs and Frank Ocean. She was nominated for a Grammy in 2019 for her involvement in Bon Iver’s i,i album.

Inspired by cinematic forms and folklore traditions, Brooklyn-based composer and producer Faten Kanaan builds cyclical patterns in her music that she uses to tell stories. Having immersed herself in New York’s electronic scene during the late 2000s, her most recent release, the spellbinding A Mythology Of Circles, is inspired by classical mythology and medieval music.

Canadian-born, LA-based composer and performer Sarah Davachi “builds temples out of tone”, and is best known for her minimalist electroacoustic sound. She has held residencies around the world and collaborated with artists such as William Basinski, Ariel Kalma and the London Contemporary Orchestra.



SUNDAY 06 FEBRUARY 2022

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc1g1x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d70)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyqtb9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc1kt1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1ywh)
Identifying a more infectious HIV variant

We’re 40 years into the AIDS pandemic, and even with massive public health campaigns, still, 1 ½ million become infected with HIV each year; about half that number die of its ravages. And a study just out shows that this well-understood virus can still take on more worrying forms as a new variant has been uncovered. Although the total number of cases involved is small, and the new variant is as treatable as earlier strains, the finding underlines that viruses can become more infectious and more virulent.

Back in October 2020, before we had effective vaccines, 36 plucky volunteers agreed to be deliberately infected with SARS-CoV-2 in order to better understand the infection process and outcomes in what’s known as a human “challenge” trial. Dr. Chris Chiu from Imperial College reveals what they’ve learned now the results of the study are in. We’ll hear about a new plastic that’s stronger than steel and as many gardeners have long suspected, – spring-flowering has over many years been occurring earlier and earlier, at least according to a new UK study. We discuss the implications for the ecosystem.

Imagine spending six months of every year living in total shade. That’s what life is like for residents of the Norwegian town of Rjukan, set so low in a valley that they see no direct sunshine at all from October to March. Marnie Chesterton heads there to hear about an ingenious solution: giant mirrors that beam rays down into the town square, where locals gather to feel the reflected heat. The man behind the project was motivated by a need for winter sun – but how much difference does it really make to our health and happiness? That’s the question posed by this week’s Crowdscience listener Michael, who has noticed living in the rainy Australian city of Melbourne is taking its toll. Many pensioners claim sunshine relieves achiness as well as conditions like arthritis but one of the biggest scientific studies found temperature actually has no impact on reported pain levels, while factors like air pressure and humidity may play a role. When it comes to our mood, it seems that spending time outside is more important than feeling the heat and the optimum temperature for wellbeing is around cool 19 degrees centigrade, while excessive warm weather has been linked to an increase in violence and crime.



(Image: 3d illustration of HIV virus. Credit: Artem Egorov via Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc1pk5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hh49jf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyr1tk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwk)
Bringing death back into life

The pandemic has caused many people to die alone in hospital intensive care units - whilst others have died at home without the support and pain relief they needed. The Lancet Commission on the Value of Death is calling for a radical change in how we approach death. Co-author Dr Libby Sallnow explains what makes a good death, and palliative care consultant Dr M R Rajagopal shares how communities have transformed palliative care in Kerala, India.

Mixed messaging around Covid vaccines for pregnant women have resulted in a low uptake, leaving mothers and babies at risk of infection and serious complications. Dr Sarah Stock, an Honorary Consultant and Subspecialist in Maternal and Fetal Medicine at the University of Edinburgh, reassures us that vaccines are safe in pregnancy.

Following the Spotify misinformation row, Marnie Chesterton asks how should streaming platforms respond to false claims about Covid-19? Professor Matt Fox from Boston University says they have a responsibility to tackle misinformation but warns that censorship may do more harm than good. Also, how a new scan is revealing hidden lung damage in long Covid, and should our chocolate treats come with picture warnings of clogged arteries?

Presenter: Marnie Chesterton
Producer: Paula McGrath and Samara Linton

(Picture: A senior woman being comforted by a doctor in a hospice. Photo credit: Pornpak Khunatorn/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc1t99)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc1y1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw4)
Myanmar: One year under military rule

Myanmar this week marked one year since its democratically-elected government was overthrown by a coup. The generals who took over have promised to restore democracy, “once the emergency is over.” However, protestors calling for democracy have been arrested and beaten, while the army stands accused of murdering more than a thousand civilians, in its efforts to quash opposition to military rule. Jonathan Head has spoken to some of those still resisting the junta.

Yalda Hakim was six months old, when her family fled Afghanistan. Going back there recently, she found dramatic changes since her last visit. Under Taliban rule, there have been widespread reports of Taliban soldiers carrying out summary executions. When Yalda spoke to women determined to maintain their role in the workplace and wider society, she found their efforts were proving dangerous, and potentially fatal.

It started with a young woman going to the police to complain that she had been gang raped and resulted in a court case, with her in the dock. The case dates back to 2019, when the British student said she had been raped by up to twelve Israelis at a hotel room in Cyprus. She then retracted the allegation, and found herself convicted for making it up. That sentence has now been overturned, by a panel of judges in the Cypriot capital, Nicosia. Anna Holligan watched the hearing, and says it focused attention on the way cases of rape and sexual assault are treated in Cyprus.

The volcanic eruption and tsunami which struck the Pacific Islands of Tonga caused catastrophic damage, killing at least three people, destroying homes and covering many communities in a thick layer of ash. The violent eruption also cut the Kingdom's only undersea communications cable, isolating people from contact with the outside world, so for Tongans living abroad it’s been a time of huge concern, as they wait for news from their family and friends. As the BBC’s Simon Atkinson found out, a small community broadcaster in Australia has become a hub for information, solace and support.

(Image: A group of women hold torches as they protest against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar July 14, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Stringer/File Photo)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyr99t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc21sk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hh4nrt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyrf1y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct3flh)
Pakistan's long game

Owen Bennett-Jones examines how the government in Tehran outwitted the United States in Iraq, which resulted in Tehran having more influence in Baghdad than Washington.

He also examines how Islamabad pulled off much the same trick in relation to Afghanistan. But whilst Iran was under US sanctions, Pakistan secured its objectives in Afghanistan whilst simultaneously receiving billions of dollars worth of US aid. As one retired Pakistan intelligence chief bragged – the US was helping secure its own defeat.

Owen highlights the occasions on which Pakistan (despite many denials) acknowledged that it did have a relationship with the Afghan Taliban. He looks at the nature of that relationship and explains how Pakistan felt it had little choice. Islamabad always realised that Western forces would leave Afghanistan and that it had to prepare for the situation after the withdrawal.

He speaks to Pakistani and US critics of Pakistan’s policy and asks whether the Pakistani strategy will backfire. It may now be enjoying a degree of control in Afghanistan, but how great is the threat from an emboldened Pakistani Taliban which wants power in Pakistan itself. And most of all how come the most powerful country on earth was outwitted by two regional powers, first Iran and then Pakistan.

(Photo: A man holds a national flag of Pakistan as he walks along a street in Islamabad. Credit: Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc25jp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytncl2dkss)
Cyclone Batsirai: Second storm in weeks hits Madagascar

We speak to Madagascar's Environment Minister Vahinala Raharinirina about Cyclone Batsirai, with 35-thousand people thought to be displaced.

Also in the programme: a sad end to the story of a 5-year-old boy who fell down a well in Morocco; and the death of Lata Mangeshkar, one of India's most beloved singers.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and the day's other stories are two guests. Catherine Barnard is a professor of European Union law and employment law at Cambridge University. Seyi Rhodes is a television reporter and investigative journalist.

(Photo: Evacuation shelters are now providing for those displaced by Cyclone Batsirai and Storm Ana. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc298t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytncl2dpjx)
Tragic end for boy trapped in Moroccan well

A five-year-old Moroccan boy who was trapped in a well for four days has died, despite painstaking efforts to rescue him.


Also in the programme: Warnings from the US that a Russian invasion of Ukraine could cause tens of thousands of civilian deaths; and as tensions with the West rise, Moscow looks to China.

Paul Henley has two guests to discuss these and the day's other stories. Catherine Barnard is professor of EU law at Cambridge University. Seyi Rhodes is an investigative journalist.

(Photo: Rayan's parents leaving the scene after their son's body is taken away by ambulance. Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc2f0y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytncl2dt91)
The European Parliament hosts Afghan women

The European Parliament says countries won't engage with the Taliban unless women's rights are ensured.

Also in this programme: The death of one of India's most famous and prolific singers: Lata Mangeshkar has died at the age of ninety-two. The Prime Minister, Narendra Modi says he is anguished beyond words.

And how to make a drama out of a political crisis.

Paul Henley's guests today: Catherine Barnard, professor of EU law at Cambridge University -- and reporter and investigative journalist, Seyi Rhodes.

(Photo: A displaced Afghan woman holds her child as she waits with other women to receive aid supply outside an UNCHR distribution centre on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan October 28, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Zohra Bensemra/File Photo)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyrs9b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgy)
The sisters who can 'taste' words

Imagine being able to ‘taste’ every word that comes out of your mouth. Everything you or someone else says provoking something in your brain to kick your taste buds into action. It sounds incredulous, but for a tiny proportion of the world’s population, that is their reality. It’s a neurological phenomenon called synaesthesia, where two or more senses merge.

Tamasin Ford meets two sisters from Glasgow, Scotland, who have had the condition for as long as they can remember. They share what it’s like to live with this explosion of taste at every waking moment.

But how and why does it happen? We try to unpick the science behind it and take a look at what synaesthesia could tell us about how we experience taste and flavour.

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Keyboard letters in a soup bowl. Credit:Getty/BBC)

Contributors:

Julie McDowall and Jennifer McCready
Guy Leschziner, author and Professor of neurology and sleep medicine at King's College London.


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc2js2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyrx1g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky6)
The Cuban aristocrat with a revolutionary secret

In the 1950s, Cuba was run by a military dictator called Fulgencio Batista, and a wealthy elite controlled the country's resources. On the surface, Natalia Bolivar was a member of this elite. She was a rich socialite from an aristocratic family. She spent her days engrossed in the art world, studying in Havana and New York.

But she had a secret. She'd joined an underground group called the Revolutionary Directorate, made up of students who'd become urban guerillas. As the struggle against Batista intensified, Natalia took up arms, and used her high class contacts to help her cause. But when her secret was revealed, even her aristocratic roots couldn't save her from arrest and torture. First broadcast in 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jane Chambers
Producer: Harry Graham

(Photo: Natalia Bolivar. Credit: Natalia Bolivar)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc2nj6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Women Building Peace (w3ct3flc)
Ethiopia

Women working to help communities caught up in Ethiopia’s brutal war talk about the immense challenges they face on the ground, and we hear the story of "Tsega", who was brutally attacked after she was forced to flee from her home.

A co-production by BBC and Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security.

Presenter: Suzanne Kianpour
Produced by Philip Reevell for BBC World Service.

Image: An Ethiopian woman who fled fighting in the Tigray region carries her child near the Setit river on the Sudan-Ethiopia border (Credit: Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjys0sl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct3hh9)
From Hong Kong to the UK

BBC Hong Kong reporter Danny Vincent hears from Christian migrants who have fled the territory for a new life in the UK. Many of the people Danny hears from are speaking about their experiences for the first time. A large number of Christians have made the difficult decision to leave Hong Kong after the introduction of a controversial national security law, which critics say is eroding freedoms in Hong Kong. Danny also meets their friends and family who have been left behind, the Christians still worshipping in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong was a British colony for 156 years until it was returned to Chinese control on 1 July, 1997. China formed the special administrative region of Hong Kong, which had maintained governance and economic systems separate from those of China's communist regime.

Around 600 UK churches of different denominations have signed up to be “Hong Kong Ready”, welcoming Christians from Hong Kong into their church communities. One in 10 of new arrivals is estimated to be Christian.

(Photo: Jimmy Lai. Credit: Danny Vincent)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc2s8b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hh5d7l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjys4jq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct3033)
Why We Play

Why We Play: Old age

Many of today’s old people grew up in an era when life was hard, retirement short, and opportunities for play limited. But as we live longer, we need to seek out playful activities, for both physical and mental health.

We visit a bridge club for older people, where many members started to learn the game after they retired, to keep their brains sharp and give them social opportunities. We visit a care home in Scotland where the management frequently organise play sessions, such as pretend weddings, and where disco bingo is a regular event. And in Jerusalem, we meet two older men, one Arab, one Jewish, who come together over a shared love of backgammon. But will the old people of tomorrow want to move beyond these traditional games, and if so, what will the play of the future look like?


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc2x0g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z38)
Do we have enough lithium to power the future?

Can we meet the soaring demand for lithium, a vital metal for electric cars and green energy? Mining is concentrated in a limited number of countries such as Australia and Chile. And with China dominating the manufacture of electric car batteries and already accounting for the importation of a high proportion of raw lithium, it may be difficult for Western countries to secure their own supplies.

With Tanya Beckett. Producer Bob Howard


(A worker checks lithium car batteries at the Xinwangda factory in Nanjing,China on March 12, 2021. AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjys88v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxl)
Dangerous liaisons in Sinaloa

The Mexican state of Sinaloa is synonymous with drug trafficking. With the profits from organised crime a driver of the local economy, the tentacles of ‘narco cultura’ extend deep into people’s lives – especially those of women. In the city of Culiacan, plastic surgeons service demand for the exaggerated feminine silhouette favoured by the men with guns and hard cash. Often women’s surgery will be paid for by a ‘sponsor’ or ‘godfather.’ Meanwhile, a group of women trackers spend their weekends digging in isolated parts of the state, looking for the remains of loved ones who disappear in Sinaloa’s endless cycle of drug-fuelled violence.

Producer / presenter: Linda Pressly
Producer in Mexico: Ulises Escamilla
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Photo: Lawyer Maria Teresa Guerra advocates for women in Sinaloa. Credit: BBC/Ulises Escamilla)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc30rl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27ll026)
Cyclone Batsirai: Madagascar hospitals and schools destroyed

Madagascar's environment minister says Cyclone Batsirai -- which is making its way across the island -- has displaced tens of thousands of people and destroyed many buildings

Batsirai is the second major storm to hit the island in less than two weeks. Gusts have hit speeds of 235km/h and high waves battered coastal areas.

Also in the programme: Large crowds have gathered in Mumbai for the funeral of one of India's greatest ever singing stars, Lata Mangeshkar, who has died at the age of 92; and we'll speak to the first woman to referee an Africa Cup of Nations football match.

(Photo shows locals removing mud from a damaged road following a landslide, as Cyclone Batsirai hits Madagascar, in Haute Matsiatra region, Madagascar Credit: Alkis Konstantinidis/Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc34hq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmg)
Machu Picchu: Secrets of a forgotten city

The ancient Inca town Machu Picchu is now the most visited tourist attraction in Peru – and yet it lay nearly forgotten for over three centuries until American and Peruvian explorers drew the world's attention to it in the 1910s. And despite a century of excavations at the site, there are still many unanswered questions about Machu Picchu: why was it built in the first place, who were the immigrants that made up a large proportion of the town’s population, and why was it abandoned so quickly.

To find out more about Machu Picchu, Bridget Kendall is joined by leading archaeologists of the Inca civilisation Lucy Salazar and Michael Malpass, the celebrated mountaineer and explorer Johan Reinhard and by writer Mark Adams who retraced the steps of the 1911 expedition led by Hiram Bingham that put Machu Picchu back on the map.

(Photo: Machu Picchu, Peru. Credit: Eitan Abramovich/Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl9)
Placebo: Can you fool your brain?

Have you given up on your New Year’s resolution yet? Every year many of us make the promise to become better, shinier, more accomplished versions of ourselves by the same time next year. It’s often easier said than done but to an extent it really is the thought that counts. David Robson, author of ‘The Expectation Effect’ says the power of our expectations can cause real physiological effects but Mike Hall, co-director of ‘The Skeptic’ magazine isn’t convinced.


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc387v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 Sportsworld (w172y0tq6ryb0c5)
Live Sporting Action

Sunday Sportsworld has commentary this week from the fourth round of the FA Cup in England. Having already beaten Arsenal, find out if Nottingham Forest can cause another upset when they take on holders Leicester City.

We’ll also be live in Yaoundé ahead of the final of the Africa Cup of Nations. Plus, with seven gold medals to be won on Sunday, we’ll have the latest from the Winter Olympics in Beijing.


Photo: FA Cup patches on an Oldham shirt during the FA Cup match between Ipswich Town and Oldham Athletic. (Credit: NurPhoto via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc3r7c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hh6c6m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyt3hr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct3hh9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc3vzh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dj1)
Spotlight on Spotify over Joe Rogan controversy

On this edition of Business Weekly, we’re looking at Spotify’s latest results, and hearing how it has had to react to controversy surrounding its star podcaster, Joe Rogan. We hear from music industry writer Eamonn Ford, who tells us how the service is expanding more into spoken word, and how it will now have to editorially manage the content it acquires. The Winter Olympics has now officially started, and we hear how some people would like sponsors to be more politically active, when choosing where to place their money. The mining giant Rio Tinto has pledged to take on board all the recommendations from a damning report that said racism, sexual harassment and bullying were rife at its sites. We hear from ABC’s Peter Ryan how this could be the ‘Me Too’ moment for the mining industry. Also on the programme, we hear how Wordle’s creator has decided to sell his five-letter game to the New York Times, and if the puzzle’s fans will be happy to turn to the newspaper’s website instead. The BBC’s Mike Johnson delves into the world of up-and-coming African music and hears how major record labels are opening their wallets and taking notice of the genre. And a billion year old rock is up for sale at a London auction house. Known as the Enigma, the rare black diamond is thought to be the largest cut diamond on earth and could have extra terrestrial origins. We hear from Nikita Benani, a jewellery specialist at Sotheby’s. Business Weekly is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Joe Rogan podcast on Spotify,Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc3zqm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27llz17)
Unicef condemns detention of children in Syrian prison

The United Nations children’s agency has condemned the continuing detention of children in a Syrian prison attacked by fighters from the Islamic State group last month. Unicef has just visited the jail and says the conditions facing children there are 'precarious'.

Also in the programme: Senegal beat Egypt on penalties to win the Africa Cup of Nations for the first time; and we hear from the AU Special Envoy on Youth.

(Photo: US soldiers along with Syria Democratic Forces (SDF) take part in a mop-up operation in Hasaka, northeastern Syria on 29 January 2022. The US-backed Syria Democratic Forces (SDF) announced that they had retaken full control of Ghwayran prison in the city of Hasaka and re-arrested dozens of jihadists holed up in the prison and in nearby houses, after a major jailbreak attempt from the so-called Islamic State group (IS or ISIS) militants. Credit: EPA/Stringer)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc43gr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3prwjf0q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sws1bngnc)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjytgr4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htc476w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 Women Building Peace (w3ct3flc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjytlh8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]



MONDAY 07 FEBRUARY 2022

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n8675)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t7ykhk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct3hh9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n89z9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlnrjvmy4k)
Germany's Ukraine dilemma

Germany's new Chancellor Olaf Scholz is travelling to the United States for his first face to face meeting with President Biden. He is under pressure from both domestic rivals & international allies in his response so far to the crisis involving Ukraine, with accusations that Germany is putting its energy needs ahead of protecting Ukraine from an invasion. Presenter Will Bain speaks to Kristine Berzina from the German Marshall Fund think tank in Washington. Also we catch up with regular economic commentator Michael Hughes as inflation concerns continue to reverberate around the world. And Russell Padmore reports on the Chinese defence and aerospace industry, asking why more Chinese developed technology isn't being snapped up by keen buyers elsewhere.

(Image: Scholz speaking to Joe Biden in December, Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t7yp7p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct1m91)
African science, African future

Professor Tom Kariuki has spent his career battling for science in Africa, both as a leading immunologist and as the former director of the Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa. Now, as the world comes to grips with the coronavirus pandemic and a global movement for social justice, could this prove an opportunity for the transformation of African science?

Tom talks to leading scientists in Africa about the successes they have achieved as well as the profound challenges they face, from the complexities of international funding to keeping the lights on. He asks who African science belongs to and benefits, and what needs to happen if its future is to be prosperous.

(Photo: A team of scientists in a lab. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n8fqf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsc1pp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t7yszt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2drt)
Can we believe companies’ promises on climate?

Ahead of COP 26, a rush of businesses declared their commitment to “net zero” emissions targets. But concerns were raised about how credible these targets were. Critics pointed out that many companies’ plans did not require them to change behaviour any time soon, or be held accountable for realising them - and that some of their promises just weren’t good enough. In this edition of The Climate Question, Kate Lamble and Jordan Dunbar ask how much can we believe in companies’ promises on climate?


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n8kgk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Women Building Peace (w3ct3flc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t7yxqy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n8p6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsc95y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t7z1h2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9t)
The miscarriage that changed my life

It is estimated that one in four pregnancies will end in a miscarriage. But despite being a common occurrence, this topic is still shrouded in secrecy, stigma and shame. Kim Chakanetsa meets two women who are using their first-hand experience to help other people heal.

Wanjiru Kihusa is a maternal health advocate from Kenya who lost two of her three children through miscarriage. She’s the founder of Still A Mum, a charity offering support to parents who have lost their babies. She also trains health care workers, religious leaders and managers to better support grieving parents.

Paula Ávila-Guillen is a human rights lawyer from Colombia and the Executive Director at the Women’s Equality Center, a non-profit based in New York. Since 2014, Paula has been working in El Salvador, a country where a strict abortion ban led to 181 women being imprisoned after having obstetric emergencies – including in cases where they said they had suffered miscarriages or stillbirths. In 2019, Paula had a miscarriage herself – an experience that brought her even closer to the women she works with.

Produced by Alice Gioia

(Image: (L) Paula Ávila-Guillen, credit Pablo Salgado. (R) Wanjiru Kihusa, courtesy Wanjiru Kihusa)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n8syt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv343b2pvzk)
Senegal win African Cup of Nations

Senegal have won the African Cup of Nations. The final was decided on penalties after a goalless match against Egypt. Senegal striker Sadio Mane scored the winning penalty and secured his nation's first ever triumph at the final. We'll have all the latest reaction.

The mayor of Canada's capital Ottawa has declared a state of emergency in response to more than a week of protests by truck drivers and their supporters over Covid restrictions. Mayor Jim Watson described the city as being "completely out of control", with demonstrators outnumbering police. Many Ottawa residents have objected to the ongoing demonstrations. We hear from a former national security analyst for the Canadian government.

And we'll hear from the President of Malawi as he discusses the Ethiopian civil war, the threat from climate change and tackling corruption in his country.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n8xpy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv343b2pzqp)
French President Emmanuel Macron heads to Moscow

A day of intensified diplomatic efforts is under way to reduce the risk of conflict in Ukraine, with President Macron of France heading to Moscow. Mr Macron says he believes a deal is possible to avoid war between both countries, this comes as the number of Russian troops on Ukraine's eastern border is now said to have reached 130,000.

A UN report has revealed that North Korea has been using cyber crime to generate hundreds of millions of dollars for its weapons programmes. We'll hear from one of the journalists who first broke the story.

Senegal has been celebrating its national football team's triumph over Egypt at the final of the Africa Cup of Nations.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n91g2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv343b2q3gt)
French president off to Moscow on a day of intensified diplomatic efforts

The diplomatic activity around Ukraine steps up a gear today with French President Macron travelling to Moscow - but what does he bring to the table? We hear from our Moscow correspondent.

Morocco is a nation in mourning after the five-year-old boy, Rayan, dies after becoming trapped in a well. Rescuers freed him on Saturday evening but later announced he was dead. The bid to free the boy had gripped the country.

And we hear the story of a paralysed man who despite a serious accident, has regained the ability to walk again using an electrical implant.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n9566)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n71)
Marine Le Pen: France's future president?

Stephen Sackur speaks to the longtime leader of France's far right, Marine Le Pen. She's hoping to win the French presidency for her party, National Rally, in elections this spring. But the far right is now divided, and rivals accuse her of going soft in the defence of French civilisation. Have her efforts to detoxify her party’s image backfired?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t7zjgl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j61)
Cost of living crisis

Prices around the world are rising at their fastest level for years. Rising energy prices and a surge in demand after the pandemic lockdown have pushed up the prices of many of the goods that we rely on and our wages are not keeping pace. Tamasin Ford looks at the factors behind the rises and hears why it is often the poorest in our society who are impacted the most. Tamasin talks to Davide Angeletti who owns Ovenbird Coffee in Glasgow; he's looking at how he can cut his costs whilst he struggles to pay his bills; Tehiya Ben Zur is a mother living in one of the world's most expensive cities, Tel Aviv and Claudia Keller, the CEO of Second Harvest Food Bank in Orange County in California. And to explain how inflation is measured and why price rises are felt differently across society, economist Xavier Jaravel of the London School of Economics breaks down the data.
(Image: A shopper at a supermarket in London, Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x24)
The demise of the Soviet Union

In December 1991 the leaders of three Soviet Republics - Russia, Ukraine and Belarus - signed a treaty dissolving the USSR. They did so without asking the other republics, and against the wishes of the USSR's overall President Mikhail Gorbachev. By the end of the year, Gorbachev had resigned and the Soviet Union was no more. In 2016, Dina Newman spoke to the former President of Ukraine, Leonid Kravchuk, and former President of Belarus, Stanislav Shushkevich, who signed that historic document alongside Boris Yeltsin.

PHOTO: The breakaway leaders signing the treaty the dissolved the Soviet Union (Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n98yb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t7zn6q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prq)
Is the ‘sunshine cure’ a real thing?

Imagine spending six months of every year living in total shade. That’s what life is like for residents of the Norwegian town of Rjukan, set so low in a valley that they see no direct sunshine at all from October to March. Marnie Chesterton heads there to hear about an ingenious solution: giant mirrors that beam rays down into the town square, where locals gather to feel the reflected heat. The man behind the project was motivated by a need for winter sun – but how much difference does it really make to our health and happiness? That’s the question posed by this week’s Crowdscience listener Michael, who has noticed living in the rainy Australian city of Melbourne is taking its toll. Many pensioners claim sunshine relieves achiness as well as conditions like arthritis but one of the biggest scientific studies found temperature actually has no impact on reported pain levels, while factors like air pressure and humidity may play a role. When it comes to our mood, it seems that spending time outside is more important than feeling the heat and the optimum temperature for wellbeing is around cool 19 degrees centigrade, while excessive warm weather has been linked to an increase in violence and crime.


Contributors:
Dr Anna Beukenhorst, University of Manchester
Professor Oscar Ybarra, University of Illinois
Professor Solomon Hsiang, University of California, Berkeley
Martin Andersen, artist


(Image: Man with smoke coming out of ears. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n9dpg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t7zryv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n9jfl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsd4dv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t7zwpz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n9n5q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jvc)
The first African in Greenland

As a 16-year-old boy in Togo, Tété-Michel Kpomassie knew he had to escape. It was the late 1950s, and his father had ordered him to train as a priest in a snake cult. But Tété-Michel was terrified of snakes after a close encounter up a coconut tree that had nearly cost him his life. One day, he came across a book about Greenland. He read that there were no reptiles, only ice, and he was intrigued by the Inuit people. So he set out on an odyssey to reach this mysterious country, full of images of icebergs and sledding and hunting. It took him eight years to travel through Africa and Europe, all the while doing clerical odd-jobs, before final reaching the south of Greenland in the mid-60s. He was the first African they had ever seen, and was offered a warm welcome. For 18 months, he learnt the culture and way of life; dog-sledding, seal-fishing and acclimatising to the cold. Then, he returned to Togo as a different man - he shared his story and built a bridge between Africa and Greenland. Now 80, he speaks to Jo Fidgen about his extraordinary adventure and his hopes to return this year to buy a house and spend the last part of his life there.

Michel The Giant: An African in Greenland is by Tété-Michel Kpomassie.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Katy Takatsuki

(Photo: Tété-Michel Kpomassie in the 60s. Credit: Tété-Michel Kpomassie)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x24)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n9rxv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsdcx3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t80467)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2n9wnz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhwsvzl)
Macron goes to Moscow to defuse tensions over Ukraine

Intensive diplomatic efforts are continuing to calm tensions between Western powers and Russia over Ukraine. The French president, Emmanuel Macron, will hold talks in Moscow with President Putin.

Also in the programme: EU leaders criticised for loose vaccine talk; and are global companies overstating their green credentials?

(Picture: French President Emmanuel Macron gestures at the Informal Meeting of Ministers for Home Affairs in Tourcoing, France. Credit: REUTERS)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nb0f3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n71)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t80cph)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y48f4tlw7jy)
Large companies 'fail' on net zero targets

The New Climate Institute argues a host of big firms are not meeting climate commitments. Thomas Day was lead author of the institute's report, and discusses its findings. Also in the programme, prices for goods and services are rising sharply all over the world. The BBC's Tamasin Ford explores some of the factors behind the rises, and hears why it is often the poorest in society who are impacted the most. Following the death of Indian singer Lata Mangeshkar, schools and offices in her home city of Mumbai were shut today, along with banks and financial markets. The BBC's Archana Shukla reports from Mumbai. Plus, when it first streamed in China, the film Fight Club had its ending censored, but following an outcry the original has now been restored. We get reaction from entertainment journalist Caroline Frost.

Today's edition is presented by Sasha Twining, and produced by Nisha Patel, George Thomas and Gabriele Shaw.

(Picture: A protester holds up a "climate can't wait" sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nb457)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzydrs43p)
Russia-Ukraine crisis: Macron in Moscow

We explain today’s diplomatic efforts to prevent Russia from invading Ukraine. The French president Emmanuel Macron is having talks in Moscow with Vladimir Putin and later Germany’s new chancellor Olaf Scholz will meet President Biden in Washington.

It’s a public holiday in Senegal after their footballers beat Egypt to win the Africa Cup of Nations. We hear from fans celebrating the title.

We continue our conversations on the Beijing Winter Olympics and bring together three athletes from Ghana, Timor Leste and Puerto Rico who are competing at the Games.

One of our regular coronavirus health experts, Dr Eleanor Murray from the Boston University School of Public Health. answers listener’s coronavirus questions. You can send in a question via WhatsApp on +447730 751925


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nb7xc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzydrs7vt)
Winter Olympics: Ghana, Timor Leste and Puerto Rico

We continue our conversations on the Beijing Winter Olympics and bring together three athletes from Ghana, Timor Leste and Puerto Rico - the countries that traditionally don't send large teams to winter games.

The city of Ottawa in Canada has declared a state of emergency in response to truckers’ protests against Covid restrictions. We hear from those taking part in protests and from people who are angry about the ongoing disruption.

We explain today’s diplomatic efforts to prevent Russia from invading Ukraine. The French president Emmanuel Macron is having talks in Moscow with Vladimir Putin and later Germany’s new chancellor Olaf Scholz will meet President Biden in Washington.

It’s a public holiday in Senegal after their footballers beat Egypt to win the Africa Cup of Nations. We hear from fans celebrating the title.

We answer your questions about Covid-19 with the help of Professor Manfred Green from the University of Haifa, Israel.

(Photo: Ghanain alpine skier Carlos Maeder Credit: Carlos Maeder)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nbcnh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jvc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x24)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nbhdm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsf3cw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t80vp0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nsxnmfc6z)
2022/02/07 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nbm4r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t80zf4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1m92)
A new space age?

In 2021, Captain James Kirk, aka William Shatner, popped into space for real for a couple of minutes, transported by space company Blue Origin's tourist rocket New Shepard. Elon Musk's Space X ferried more astronauts and supplies between Earth and the International Space Station, using its revolutionary reusable launchers and Dragon spacecraft. On Mars, the latest Nasa robot rover landed and released an autonomous helicopter - the first aircraft to fly on another planet.

This year promises even more. Most significantly Nasa plans to launch the first mission of its Artemis programme. This will be an unmanned flight of its new deep space vehicle Orion to the Moon, propelled off the Earth by its new giant rocket, the Space Launch System. Artemis is the American space agency's project to return astronauts to the lunar surface and later establish moon bases. China also has a similar ambition.

Are we at the beginning of a new space age and if so, how have we got here? When will we see boots on the Moon again? Could we even see the first people on Mars by the end of this decade?

Dr Kevin Fong convenes a panel of astronautical minds to discuss the next decade or two of space exploration. He is joined by Dr Mike Barratt, one of Nasa's most senior astronauts and a medical doctor, based at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas; Dr Anita Sengupta, research associate professor in Astronautical Engineering at the University of Southern California; Oliver Morton, briefings editor at The Economist and the author of Mapping Mars and The Moon.

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

Picture: Artist concept of the SLS Block 1 configuration, Credit: NASA/MSFC


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nbqww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhwtq6h)
President Macron of France has met with President Putin in Moscow

Diplomatic efforts to reduce the risk of conflict in Ukraine intensify. Meanwhile the German Chancellor, Olaf Scholz, has flown to Washington speak to Joe Biden.

Also on the programme, Israel's government says it will set up a commission of inquiry to examine allegations that the police used the Pegasus spyware to hack the phones of Israeli public figures without authorisation. And we hear about new spinal implant, developed in Switzerland, which has allowed a man who was completely paralysed to walk again.

(Picture: President Putin and President Macron in Moscow. Credit: Reuters)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nbvn0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx4215r55z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sx49mw6tm)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t816xd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrtvcqwb7y)
Large companies 'fail' on net zero targets

The New Climate Institute argues a host of big firms are not meeting climate commitments. Thomas Day was lead author of the institute's report, and discusses its findings. Also in the programme, prices for goods and services are rising sharply all over the world. The BBC's Tamasin Ford explores some of the factors behind the rises, and hears why it is often the poorest in society who are impacted the most. Following the death of Indian singer Lata Mangeshkar, schools and offices in her home city of Mumbai were shut today, along with banks and financial markets. The BBC's Archana Shukla reports from Mumbai. Plus, when it first streamed in China, the film Fight Club had its ending censored, but following an outcry the original has now been restored. We get reaction from entertainment journalist Caroline Frost.

(Picture: A protester holds up a "climate can't wait" sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nbzd4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n71)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t81bnj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



TUESDAY 08 FEBRUARY 2022

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nc348)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z86)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nc6wd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqtqtk8l63)
Scholz meets Biden in Washington

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz makes his first visit to the US since taking office in December. He and Joe Biden held a press conference where the US President declared his confidence in German as a dependable ally amid concerns Scholz had been slow to react to events in Ukraine. We speak to Thorsten Benner of the Global Public Policy Institute in Berlin. Around the world people and businesses are feeling the pinch as the cost of living goes up - the BBC's Tamasin Ford looks at what's causing price rises. A new report criticises some of the biggest companies in the world for lacking integrity in their green claims and climate promises - we hear from the the report's co-author Thomas Day of the New Climate Institute. The BBC's Jessica Murphy reports from the so-called freedom convoy in Ottowa in Canada, and the Chinese authorities reinstate the original ending to the movie Fight Club, after inventing their own ending two weeks ago. Throughout the programme we're joined by Stefanie Yuen Thio - Joint Managing Partner at TSMP Law in Singapore and Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland in the US.

Photo: German Chancellor Olaf Scholz answers questions at a press conference in Washington, DC Credit: EPA


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ncbmj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsfyls)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t81pwx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct3gk3)
No satisfaction

Sex is everywhere – in popular music and TV programmes, in toothpaste adverts and on social media. Yet in real life, regular sex no longer seems to be such a big priority for people in their 20s. Research in countries including Britain, the United States and Japan has shown that young people are having less sex than previous generations.

Twenty-one-year-old student Anoushka Mutanda-Dougherty talks to people her own age to find out why. She meets Kohsuke from Japan, who has high expectations of his ideal girlfriend because of the airbrushed images he sees on Instagram, but feels shy about approaching girls because he doesn’t have much money or a stellar career.

Mercedes and Esme, both from the UK, are wrestling with new understandings of relationships which make emotional attachment frightening; while Penelope and Darren use labels like demi sexual or homo romantic asexual to explain why they only want sex in very specific circumstances. And, Tory, a Christian from the US, who went from a strict no-sex-before-marriage upbringing straight to hook-up culture – meeting partners online for sex.

Expert comment is provided by Prof Kaye Wellings, who has conducted one of the largest research projects in the world on sexual behaviour, and Anjula Mutanda, a relationship psychologist.

(Photo: A couple in bed peeking over a blanket. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ncgcn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jvc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x24)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ncl3s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsg631)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t81yd5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf9)
Elizabeth McGovern: Becoming Ava Gardner

The Emmy and Oscar-nominated actor Elizabeth McGovern is about to star as the glamorous Hollywood legend Ava Gardner in a new play that she’s written about her life.

Elizabeth is known all around the world for her portrayal of Cora Crawley, the Countess of Grantham, in the British drama series Downton Abbey. In this, her first play, she aims to capture the complexities of Ava’s life and the relationship with her biographer on stage at the Riverside Studios in London.

Join Anna Bailey as she follows Elizabeth in rehearsals with her fellow creatives, exploring the action, set, sound and costumes.

Presented and produced by Anna Bailey
Executive produced by Rebecca Armstrong for the BBC World Service


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ncpvx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv343b2srwn)
Germany and US unite on Ukraine crisis

With Russian troops still amassed on its western border with Ukraine, efforts to prevent a possible war breaking out have stepped up a notch. US President Joe Biden has vowed to shut down a key Russian gas pipeline to Germany if Moscow invades Ukraine. We hear about the German perspective on the crisis.

And the campaign for the Philippines presidential elections is underway with Bongbong Marcos, the son of the notorious former leader Ferdinand Marcos, emerging as a leading candidate.

And we'll hear why several candidates in France could fail to make the ballot for the upcoming presidential elections.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nctm1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv343b2swms)
French President Macron in diplomatic talks over Ukraine

With diplomatic efforts underway to resolve the crisis over Ukraine, we find out exactly how French President Emmanuel Macron is playing a part to keep the peace between both countries. From Moscow, he will travel to Kiev today to meet Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky - and then on to Berlin to catch up talks with his German and Polish counterparts. There’s an estimated 130,000 Russian troops now surrounding Ukraine on its border, with Western countries concerned about a possible invasion by Russian forces.

A Nepalese government report leaked to the BBC has accused China of encroaching into the country's territory, restricting grazing and religious activities on the their side of the border. China denies there's a problem. We’ll dig into the details of the report.

And we'll hear about a number of cases of historic sexual abuse carried out by the Catholic Church in Spain, following an investigation carried out by daily Spanish newspaper El Pais.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ncyc5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv343b2t0cx)
French President tries to resolve Ukraine crisis

More diplomatic globe trotting today in an effort to save off war in Ukraine: US President Joe Biden has vowed to shut down a key Russian gas pipeline to Germany if Moscow invades. The Nord-Stream pipeline crosses German territory so the announcement made after talks with German Chancellor Olaf Scholz in Washington, is a significant one. Newsday gets the German perspective on how this is playing out.

And dynastic politics in full swing the Philippines, where the son of notorous dictaror Ferdinand Marcos is making his own bid for power. Can BongBong Marcos succeed in his quest for the presidency?

And we’ll hear more about a BBC report looking into claims of institutional racism within healthcare in the US and Britain. Why are black women more likely to experience a miscarriage than white women?


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nd239)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm5)
The house that fights malaria

Malaria kills more than half a million people per year. We meet the innovators who are using buildings, lights, genes and vaccines to fight the mosquito-borne disease.

In Ghana, a young woman has turned her school project into a business, selling lights that electrocute mosquitos and help kids study.

In Tanzania, researchers have designed a house with porous walls that diffuse human breath and keep the people inside hidden from mosquitos.

In London, scientists are using genetic engineering to reduce female mosquito fertility, aiming one day to make a dent in the wild population.

And in Kenya and Malawi, a new malaria vaccine is being tested, offering hope to millions of people.

Presenter: Jo Mathys
Reporter: Rumella Dasgupta

Image: A Star Home (Credit: Star Homes Project)


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t82fcp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jh2)
Making second-hand sexy

Can apps like Depop and By Rotation, which are giving new life to old clothes, help reduce the fashion industry's enormous environmental footprint?

Justin Rowlatt heads to the London offices of both these online platforms. Depop's Justine Porterie explains how their clothing resale app helped Gen Z take back control of their wardrobes and fall in love with second-hand clothes. Meanwhile Eshita Kabra-Davies, founder of By Rotation, retells how she came up with the concept of a high fashion rental app after seeing all the discarded garments piling up in her hometown in Rajasthan.

These apps have grown enormously during the last two years of lockdowns, attracting millions of users, particularly teenagers. But Sarah Kent, editor at the Business of Fashion website, questions whether they can really make a dent in the sheer volume of clothes produced and disposed of every year.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Someone photographing a sweater for sale online; Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6n)
The invention of Google Maps

In 2005, a revolutionary online mapping service called Google Maps went live for the first time. It introduced searchable, scrollable, interactive maps to a wider public, but required so much computing power that Google's servers nearly collapsed under the strain. Lars Rasmussen, one of the inventors of Google Maps, talks to Ashley Byrne. The programme is a Made-in-Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Google Maps being used on a mobile phone (Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nd5vf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct3gk3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t82k3t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct1m92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nd9lk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ndfbp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsh19y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t82sm2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ndk2t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxm)
The refugee pilot who helped Afghans flee the Taliban

Afghan-American pilot Zak Khogyani was just nine years old when he fled his home in Afghanistan. Being forced to leave his family and belongings behind was not easy, but he eventually managed to settle in the United States, which he now considers home. So last year, when Zak heard about Afghans fleeing the Taliban's takeover, he knew better than most the hardships they were facing. He felt compelled to lend a helping hand, and over three evacuation flights, Zak chaperoned 1,002 people hoping to find safety in the United States. They told him their stories and their fears, looking at him as an inspiration for the life that awaited them upon landing.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Gaia Caramazza

(Photo: Zak Khogyani at work. Credit: Zak Khogyani)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ndnty)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsh8t6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8313b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct1m92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ndsl2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhwwrwp)
Macron says "concrete solutions" exist to Ukraine crisis

President Macron of France -- on a visit to Ukraine -- says there can be a concrete solution to the crisis in relations with Russia. We hear from Ukrainian MP Ivanna Klympush-Tsintsadze.

Also in the programme: Zemmour's quest for 500 votes; and collusion in Northern Ireland.

(Picture: French President Macron in Kiev. Credit: EPA/Thibault Camus)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ndxb6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t838ll)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bwh0f11qx)
EU aims to boost chip manufacture

Seeking to counter a microchip shortage, the EU unveiled a plan to boost manufacturing. Some $49bn in subsidies are proposed to try and ensure 20% of the world's microchips are produced in Europe by 2030. Jan-Peter Kleinhans from technology think tank SNV in Berlin assesses whether that is a realistic target. Also in the programme, the oil giant BP has posted $12.8bn in profits for the past year, its highest level for eight years. It has led to calls for a windfall tax on oil companies in the United Kingdom, as we hear from Tom Wilson, senior energy correspondent at the Financial Times. The BBC's Justin Rowlatt reports on new technologies that might help mitigate the environmental impact of so-called 'fast fashion', which are clothes that often end up in landfill. Plus, we explore the potential for robot cats and dogs, designed to interact with their owners, including mimicking their heartbeats and breathing, with Ted Fischer, co-founder of Ageless Innovation which is behind the devices.

Today's edition is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Sarah Hawkins, George Thomas and Gabriele Shaw.

(Picture: Microchips on a silicon wafer. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nf12b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzydrw10s)
Living with Ottawa's truck protest

As Canadian truckers opposed to vaccine mandate and their supporters continue to protest in downtown Ottawa, we speak to people who live and work in the area. What is it like to have a demonstrating trucker parked outside your home?

We'll explain why schools and universities in the Indian state of Karnataka are closed because of a row over whether female Muslim students should be allowed to wear a hijab in class.

We'll talk through some of the trending stories at the Beijing Winter Olympics, including why China's gold medallist Eileen Gu could be the face of the games and the disqualification of five female ski jumpers from their mixed team competition because their suits were said to break the rules.

Picture: Trucks sit parked on Wellington Street near the Parliament Buildings as truckers and their supporters take part in a convoy to protest coronavirus vaccine mandates for cross-border truck drivers in Ottawa, Canada (Reuters / Patrick Doyle)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nf4tg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzydrw4rx)
2022/02/08 17:06 GMT

BBC OS gives a vibrant account of the day’s events with explanation and reaction from those involved.


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nf8kl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nfd9q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsj08z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t83rl3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nsxnmj842)
2022/02/08 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nfj1v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct3gk3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t83wb7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ltc)
Tonga internet satellite kit deployed

Télécoms Sans Frontières has sent satellite kits to Tonga to improve connectivity on the islands following the volcanic eruption. Before the pandemic TSF would have immediately deployed to Tonga after it went dark, but strict quarantine rules limit what they can do. As their engineers can’t go out, they’ve had to adapt the equipment they send so that it can be set up on the island. Their kit is now out of quarantine and should be deployed imminently and will eventually bring internet connectivity to the smaller islands where people are still completely cut off. TSF Regional Manager Sebastien Latouille also tells us in the podcast about their latest deployment to Madagascar following Cyclone Batsirai.

Could NFT protect our health data?
If you think NFT’s (non-fungible tokens) are just the new way to buy art then think again as they could be the way to secure our medical data. Once our medical information is digitised into an electronic health record we have no control over what is done with it. Writing in the journal Science, Prof Kristin Konstick-Quenet, suggests that NFTs could provide a way to secure ownership over the management of digital information using blockchain technology. However, will the companies who currently monetise our medical records be willing to give up access to it? Legislation will be necessary if we are to have any control over our own health data.

Enhanced Audio Description
Reporter Fern Lulham begins her first in a series of reports into the latest disability tech looking at audio descriptions of films and TV shows. There's plenty of evidence to show that despite the draw of social media and endless other activities, watching telly or going to the cinema remain extremely popular. In the UK for example, figures tell us that even before the pandemic, people spent an average of just over three hours a day watching TV, And since the mid -80s, visits to the cinema had risen quite dramatically to well over 150 million a year before Covid19 restrictions kicked in. But how accessible are these media if you're blind or visually impaired?

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.

Studio Manager: Bob Nettles
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Aftermath of volcanic eruption and Tsunami in Tonga. Credit: Malau Media/via Reuters)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nfmsz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhwxm3l)
Ukraine crisis: Macron says Putin pledges no new Ukraine escalation

Following his talks with the Russian and Ukrainian presidents, the French leader said their willingness to resolve the separatist conflict in eastern Ukraine by implementing the stalled Minsk accords was the only way to ease the current crisis.

Also on the programme: Over 900,000 deaths and counting, why is the US Covid death rate so much higher than in other rich countries? And the retired Pope Benedict admits to "errors in the handling of child abuse cases" before he became Pontiff, when he was the Archbishop of Munich.

(Picture: President Zelensky of Ukraine and Macron of France. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nfrk3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx4215v232)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sx49mz3qq)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t843th)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycsn93bnjlb)
EU aims to boost chip manufacture

Seeking to counter a microchip shortage, the EU unveiled a plan to boost manufacturing. Some $49bn in subsidies are proposed to try and ensure 20% of the world's microchips are produced in Europe by 2030. Jan-Peter Kleinhans from technology think tank SNV in Berlin assesses whether that is a realistic target. Also in the programme, the oil giant BP has posted $12.8bn in profits for the past year, its highest level for eight years. It has led to calls for a windfall tax on oil companies in the United Kingdom, as we hear from Tom Wilson, senior energy correspondent at the Financial Times. The BBC's Justin Rowlatt reports on new technologies that might help mitigate the environmental impact of so-called 'fast fashion', which are clothes that often end up in landfill. Plus, we explore the potential for robot cats and dogs, designed to interact with their owners, including mimicking their heartbeats and breathing, with Ted Fischer, co-founder of Ageless Innovation which is behind the devices.

(Picture: Microchips on a silicon wafer. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nfw97)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t847km)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 09 FEBRUARY 2022

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ng01c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ng3sh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqtqtkch36)
Massive profits prompts windfall tax debate

There are calls for a windfall tax on some of the world's biggest energy companies after they posted huge profits at the same time as consumers' bills face massive increases. We speak to Professor Arun Advani of Warwick University about the economical and moral implications of one-off taxes. In the US the Justice Department has seized $3.6bn in Bitcoin from an online theft which occurred six years when the digital tokens were worth just $71m. The BBC's Michelle Fleury in New York takes us through what happened. The EU announces tens of billions of dollars in subsidies to mitigate supply chain problems in the manufacture and roll out of microchips; Peleton navigates a bumpy road and are robots set to be the pets of the future? Throughout the programme we're joined by Ann Dwyer, editor of Crain's Chicago Business and by James Mayger of Bloomberg in Beijing.

Photo: A gas hob Credit: PA


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ng7jm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsjvhw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t84lt0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct3fnh)
It’s a Bird’s World

It’s a Bird’s World: Climate change

Our relationship with birds has developed in ways we could have never have imagined, and today they are invaluable in alerting us to our greatest environmental challenge: climate change. As scientists have discovered, there are winners and losers. From seabirds on the Isle of May in Scotland to emperor penguins in Antarctica, climate change can have direct and indirect effects on birds; on their habitat, food supply, reproduction and migration. For some species, like the emperor penguins, time is running out, and their fate and that of the environment is in our hands.

(Photo: Emperor penguins in the Antarctic. Credit: Stephanie Jenouvrier)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ngc8r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ngh0w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsk304)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t84v98)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302y)
QAnon: The plot to break reality.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ngls0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv343b2wnsr)
Gynaecologist alleged to have assaulted over 200 women at UCLA

One of America's most famous universities - University of California, Los Angeles - has agreed to pay almost a quarter of a billion dollars to settle a lawsuit following allegations that a doctor sexually abused hundreds of women.

With Russian troops massing in Belarus, NATO countries that share a border with the Russian ally - such as Lithuania - are becoming nervous. Newsday will hear from their Prime Minister Ingrida Šimonytė.

To Canada, where truckers demanding an end to Coronavirus restrictions have caused chaos by blockading a major trade route into the United States.

That's the pandemic hitting trade, but we'll also look at how its impacting children. Researchers are concerned about the anxiety lockdowns placed on children's mental health.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ngqj4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv343b2wsjw)
Sexual assault survivors settle case against UCLA

Our top story today: The University of California in Los Angeles has settled a sexual assault suit with a payout of almost a quarter of a billion dollars.

European leaders say they'll continue talking to Russia about the tension surrounding Ukraine, we'll hear from another nervous neighbour - Lithuania which is wary of Russia's attempts to extend its influence westward. Newsday will speak to the president's chief adviser on foreign policy.

And we'll head to Beijing, where our correspondent has been given the rare opportunity - in this pandemic-affected winter Olympics - to see the games as a spectator.

Also Newsday will hear about the US justice department's biggest ever seizure - more than 3.6 billion dollars worth of cryptocurrency - and the husband and wife team that have been arrested.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ngv88)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv343b2wx90)
University of California to payout sexual abuse survivors

Another University in the United States pays out an eight figure sum to settle claims by women who say they were sexually assaulted by a campus gynaecologist.

The threat of war still hangs over Ukraine. But the Russian Ambassador to the European Union tells the BBC that there is still time for a political settlement...

That's the official line from Moscow, but what about the unofficial message? We have a look at the issue of misinformation.

And Newsday will be telling you who won what at the Brit Awards.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2ngz0d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nck)
George Takei, Actor

Stephen Sackur talks to George Takei, forever famous as Lieutenant Sulu in Star Trek. Interned as a child in the United States for being of Japanese origin, he now campaigns for gay and immigrant rights. Do the values of Star Trek still resonate?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t85b8s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jpv)
Is greed good?

Greed is considered one of the seven deadly sins; but is the accumulation - and retention - of wealth always a bad thing? With economic inequality growing, Elizabeth Hotson asks John Paul Rollert, from the Chicago Booth school of management, why greed has historically invited criticism. We also hear from Paul Piff, Associate Professor of Psychological Science at the University of California, Irvine, who tells us about an experiment in acquisitiveness, played out during a game of Monopoly. Plus serial entrepreneur and self-made multi millionaire, Richard Skellett, tells us why he supports a wealth tax.

Presented by Elizabeth Hotson
Produced by Sarah Treanor

(Picture of dollar bills, picture via Getty Images).


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8x)
Shoe designer Manolo Blahnik

How a young designer from the Canary Islands became one of the most famous shoe-makers in the world. Manolo Blahnik was studying art and set design in Paris when in 1969 he was introduced to the editor of American Vogue, who said he should concentrate on shoes. He got his first break in fashion three years later, and so began a 50 year career that has seen his name become synonymous with what have been described as the sexiest shoes in the world. In 2012, Louise Hidalgo spoke to Manolo Blahnik about his life and work.

Picture: Manolo Blahnik at the opening of a new boutique in Dublin (credit: PA)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nh2rj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct3fnh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t85g0x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ltc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nh6hn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nhb7s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsky71)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t85pj5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nhfzx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzw)
Gaming with Tourette’s: Sweet Anita’s success story

This programme contains offensive language. Sweet Anita has Tourette’s syndrome, a neurological condition which causes her to make involuntary sounds and movements. Her specific type of Tourette’s is called coprolalia, which means she sometimes says offensive or inappropriate things. Before her diagnosis, she didn't know why she was different to everyone else. She was bullied at school and making friends was difficult. Lonely and confused, she was told by a doctor her tics were ‘attention seeking’. But today, with a medical diagnosis and a new-found confidence, Anita is a successful streamer on the gaming platform Twitch, with an avid fanbase and a growing community online.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: May Cameron

(Photo: Sweet Anita. Credit: Sweet Anita)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nhkr1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsl5q9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t85y0f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ltc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nhph5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhwznss)
Ukraine crisis: Russia to begin military exercises in Belarus

(Photo: A handout photo made available by the Belarusian Defence Ministry's press service shows tanks of the Belarus Armed Forces during a military exercise at the Brestsky training ground near Brest, Belarus, 03 February 2022. The joint military exercises of the armed forces of Russia and Belarus "Allied Resolve - 2022" will be held from February 10 to 20. EPA/BELARUSIAN DEFENCE MINISTRY PRESS SERVICE)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nht79)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nck)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t865hp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4d3n3b4x8y)
Dutch central bank 'deeply regrets' slavery links

The Dutch central bank said it "deeply regrets" its founders' role in the slave trade. Dr Joris van den Tol conducted an independent review into the issue, and discusses the review's findings. Also in the programme, Japanese car giant Toyota says it will make 500,000 fewer vehicles this year than previously planned, as a result of a shortage of semiconductors for its cars. David Leggett is automotive editor at Global Data, and explains the implications. As the cost of living rises rapidly in America, so has the use of gifting platforms such as the BuyNothing project. It is one of a number of schemes that help people give away things they no longer need, as the BBC's Michelle Fleury reports. Plus, the Indian industrialist Gautam Adani has become Asia's richest person, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. The BBC's Archana Shukla tells us how Mr Adani made his money.

Today's edition is presented by Rahul Tandon, and produced by Sarah Hawkins, George Thomas and Gabriele Shaw.

(Picture: The Dutch central bank building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nhxzf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzydryxxw)
India: Karnataka shuts schools over hijab row

The Indian state of Karnataka has shut high schools and colleges for three days after a row over the wearing of hijabs in classrooms. The debate started when six college students staged a protest after they were banned from wearing the hijab in the classroom. The protests spread to other schools and colleges in the state and there's been counter protests. We'll speak to our correspondent to find out more and hear from women in the state.

Also, many people are approaching their two year anniversary of working from home because of the coronavirus pandemic. For some, they have not been into the office for this entire time. We want to look at what this experience has been like. We'll speak to people in Nigeria, South Africa and the USA to hear their experiences.

And, every day on the show we're joined by one of our regular health experts to answer questions about Covid-19 from around the world. Today our guest is Dr Maria Sundaram - infectious disease epidemiologist at Marshfield Clinic Research Institute in Wisconsin.

(Photo: Protests in New Delhi against the hijab ban in Karnataka state. February 9, 2022. Credit: Reuters/Anushree Fadnavis)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nj1qk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzydrz1p0)
Coronavirus: Working from home for two years

Many people are approaching their two year anniversary of working from home because of the coronavirus pandemic. For some, they have not been into the office for this entire time. We want to look at what this experience has been like. We'll speak to people in Nigeria, South Africa and the USA to hear their experiences.

Also, diplomatic efforts to ease tensions between the West and Russia over Ukraine continue. This week President Macron of France has held talks with Russian and Ukrainian leaders, the German Chancellor has met the American President, and today the British Foreign Secretary is flying to Moscow. We'll speak to our Europe Editor Katya Adler about everything that's been happening.

And, every day on the show we're joined by one of our regular health experts to answer questions about Covid-19 from around the world. Today our guest is Dr Maria Sundaram - infectious disease epidemiologist at Marshfield Clinic Research Institute in Wisconsin.

(Photo: A woman working from home during the Covid lockdown. 02/07/2020. Credit: Getty Creative)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nj5gp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nj96t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrslx62)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t86nh6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nsxnmm515)
2022/02/09 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2njdyy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct3fnh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t86s7b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwl)
Black women and breast cancer

Breast cancer makes up a third of all cancer diagnoses for black women and for those with the most common type of cancer, ER-positive (estrogen or oestrogen positive) cancers, black women are 42% more likely to die of the disease than white women. The reasons for these disparities are complex and include socio-economic factors and racism. There is also a historical absence of samples from black women in research databases and lack of inclusion in clinical trials. Researchers at Stanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute at La Jolla, California in the US have discovered significant differences at the molecular level which could explain some of the disparities. In research published in the journal, Therapeutic Advances in Medical Oncology, Dr Svasti Haricharan and her team found significant differences in black women in the all-important DNA damage repair genes, the proteins which form our body’s first line of defence against damage to our DNA. Dr Haricharan tells Marnie Chesterton that these findings have real-world implications for the treatments black women should be offered and when.

GP Dr Ann Robinson joins Marnie to discuss a new study which suggests people with high blood pressure who take paracetamol on prescription, could be increasing their risk of heart attacks and strokes. University of Edinburgh researchers published in the journal, Circulation, trial results which suggest that although taking the painkiller for headaches and fever is safe, doctors should think twice about the risks and benefits to patients taking it over many months. The trial tracked volunteers, two-thirds of whom were taking drugs for high blood pressure, or hypertension. Paracetamol, the results showed, increased blood pressure, which is one of the most important risk factors for heart attacks and strokes.

Group B Streptococcus is an infection which causes almost 100,000 new-born deaths, at least 46,000 stillbirths, and significant long-term disability for babies around the world. The bacterium is harmless for most pregnant women who carry it but it can be extremely serious when it passes to babies during pregnancy, childbirth or in the early weeks of life. James Gallagher reports on the merits of testing for Group B Strep and talks to Dr Kate Walker, Professor of Obstetrics at the University of Nottingham in the UK about a large, randomised controlled trial she is leading which will provide much-needed evidence about how best to protect babies from this dangerous infection.

And Dr Ann Robinson shares with Marnie new research which focuses on the best ways to avoid and treat gout and how playing games on your mobile could help you to quit smoking.

Presenter: Marnie Chesterton
Producers: Paula McGrath and Fiona Hill

(Picture: A senior woman looking through a window. Photo credit: FG Trade/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2njjq2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhx0j0p)
Major breakthrough on nuclear fusion energy

European scientists say they have made a major breakthrough in their quest to develop practical nuclear fusion - the energy process that powers the stars. If it’s successfully recreated on Earth it holds out the potential of unlimited supplies of low-carbon energy.

Also on the programme: A prominent Ugandan author, charged with insulting the President ,has fled the country in fear of his life; and world leaders are under pressure to come up with an agreement to protect the world's oceans.

(Picture: The JET reactor. Credit: UKAEA)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2njng6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx4215xz05)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sx49n20mt)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t870ql)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172yct20gn32q2)
Blinken arrives in Australia to meet foreign ministers

The US Secretary of State Antony Blinken will meet leaders of the "Quad" grouping, a US-led bloc which includes Australia, Japan and India, to shore up Indo-Pacific partnerships in the face of China's growing power. We get analysis from Cleo Paskal, Associate Fellow at Chatham House.
The Dutch central bank said it "deeply regrets" its founders' role in the slave trade. We get reaction from Linda Nooitmeer, chair of the National Institute for the History and Legacy of Dutch Slavery.
As the cost of living rises rapidly in America, so has the use of gifting platforms such as the BuyNothing project. It is one of a number of schemes that help people give away things they no longer need, as the BBC's Michelle Fleury reports.
Plus, the Indian industrialist Gautam Adani has become Asia's richest person, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. The BBC's Archana Shukla tells us how Mr Adani made his money.

(Picture: Antony Blinken arriving in Melbourne. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2njs6b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nck)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t874gq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 10 FEBRUARY 2022

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2njwyg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nk0pl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqtqtkgd09)
Blinken arrives in Australia to meet foreign ministers

The US Secretary of State Antony Blinken will meet leaders of the "Quad" grouping, a US-led bloc which includes Australia, Japan and India, to shore up Indo-Pacific partnerships in the face of China's growing power. We get analysis from Cleo Paskal, Associate Fellow at Chatham House.
The Dutch central bank has said it "deeply regrets" its founders' role in the slave trade. We get reaction from Linda Nooitmeer, chair of the National Institute for the History and Legacy of Dutch Slavery.
Also in the programme, we look at what's happening on the US-Canada border where the ongoing vaccine protests first started. Truck drivers have blocked the most important commercial crossing, Ambassador Bridge. We get the latest from Nate Tabak who's been covering the story.
As the cost of living rises rapidly in America, so has the use of gifting platforms such as the BuyNothing project. It is one of a number of schemes that help people give away things they no longer need, as the BBC's Michelle Fleury reports.
And as the US postal service comes under fire for spending billions of dollars on a new fleet, we ask journalist Michael Sainato what the public thinks.

Fergus Nicoll is joined throughout the programme by financial professional Jessica Khine in Malaysia and Dante Disparte, head of global policy for financial services firm Circle, who's in Washington DC.

(Picture: Antony Blinken arriving in Melbourne. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nk4fq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsmrdz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t87hq3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gyn)
Ukraine’s frontline bakery revisited

Lucy Ash catches up with a warzone bakery comforting people in an east Ukrainian town. She visited in 2017 to tell the story of a small enterprise that was bringing hope to a trapped community living near the frontline. The town of Marinka is in the buffer zone – the ‘grey zone’ - that separates Ukraine from the Dontesk region – now claimed and occupied by Russian backed separatists. For the town’s inhabitants the low-intensity conflict had become an unavoidable part of daily life. But there was one bright spot amidst the gloom – a bakery. It was Ukraine’s first frontline workplace-generating enterprise, and a haven from the politics, propaganda, and violence that had been tearing the town apart. But now, more than four years on, with Russian troops now massing along Ukraine’s eastern border, the threat of all out conflict looms. The bakery’s owner Oleg Tkachenko tells Lucy Ash he hopes there will not be an all out conflict. He fears an invasion could destroy everything that he and his community have built up over the past five years.

(Image: Workers in the bakery in Marinka. Credit: Frederick Paxton)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nk85v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nkcxz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsmzx7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t87r6c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgz)
The constipation taboo

It’s estimated that as many as 1 in 7 adults are suffering from constipation at any one time. And yet, talking about the problem is taboo.

Ruth Alexander is joined by two experts who want us to be more open about the condition. They say our reluctance to talk about constipation is having an impact on our well-being and creating a costly burden on health services.

Find out why a balanced and varied diet will help many people avoid the problem, but not all; and why prunes – a famous remedy – can actually make it worse.

Plus, a historian traces how we came to be so reticent about our toilet habits; and how constipation may have had a decisive role at numerous turning points in history.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoochain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Closed airplane toilet door. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Contributors:

Anton Emmanuel, University College Hospital London and the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery

Louise Foxcroft, medical historian and author

Miguel Toribio-Mateas, School of Applied Sciences at London South Bank University.


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nkhp3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv343b2zkpv)
Ugandan author critical of President Museveni has fled country

Ugandan author Kakwenza Rukirabashaija, who has accused the authorities of torturing him while he was in detention, has fled the country - we'll hear from the man himself.

Why elections in India's most populous state are particularly important for Prime Minister Narendra Modi, we speak to our correspondent there.

Football against the war - we go to Ukraine and look at whether diplomacy with a ball is holding off further escalation.

Also in the first half hour - how Tinder and other dating apps are used to gather intelligence- that's what the Australian authorities are claiming.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nkmf7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv343b2zpfz)
Geopolitics: military drills begin in Belarus

Ten days of military drills are to begin in Belarus where Vladimir Putin has sent thirty thousand Russian troops and armaments... Newsday gets a reaction from Estonia.

In Afghanistan, a BBC investigation finds that a number of women who participated in protests demanding women’s rights are still missing.

Plus a new study reveals paint could be the largest source of micro plastic leakage in the world’s oceans.

And in business - what do results just published show us about the hail riding company Uber?


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nkr5c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv343b2zt63)
War games to start in the Baltics as both Nato and Russian troops increase

Russia and Belarus are starting 10 days of joint military drills today as concerns rise over the buildup of Russian forces on the Ukrainian border. Newsday will get the view of their concerned Baltic neighbours.

Are protests against Covid rules taking place in Canada spreading to other continents? We head to New Zealand where police have clashed with anti-vaccine protesters.

As increasing inflation around the world brings hardship to consumers, we look at what France is offering its low income families and why it is not enough.

And is democracy on the decline and authoritarianism rising?


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nkvxh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z39)
Why have military coups returned to West Africa?

Elected governments have been overthrown by military coups in Burkina Faso, Mali and Guinea. Each has some popular support as people grow frustrated with their political elites. But will military lead governments perform better than civilians ones in these West African countries and will the soldiers lead a transition back to elections or cling on to power?

With Charmaine Cozier.
Producer Bob Howard



(video screen grab of the military junta in Burkina Faso confirming the coup on state television RTB 24 Jan 2022. Credit: Getty images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8875w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jbk)
Rent-a-Robot

The use of robots in North American workplaces has increased by 40% since the start of the pandemic and the small to medium sized businesses, which never automated before, are getting in on the act. The robotics industry has responded to the global increased demand by creating more and more customisable robots, which can be leased or hired.
Ivana Davidovic explores what effect this has had - and could have in the future - on the labour markets, innovation, but also on social inequality.
Ivana hears from a small restaurant owner from California who wouldn't be without her server robot Rosie any more, after months of being unable to fill vacancies.
Joe Campbell from the Danish company Universal Robots and Tim Warrington from the British company Bots explain how they are taking advantage of the post-pandemic "great resignation" and which industries are next in line for a robotics boom.
Karen Eggleston from Stanford University explains her research into the consequences of the use of robots in over 800 nursing homes in Japan and Daron Acemoglu from MIT discusses whether robots in workplaces will liberate their human colleagues or simply entrench inequality.

Presented and produced by Ivana Davidovic

(Photo: Robot waitress serving dessert and coffee on a tray in a cafe. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4d)
Ukraine's 'Maidan Revolution'

Throughout the winter of 2013/14 protesters built barricades and camped out in the centre of Kyiv demanding change. The focus was the Maidan, Kyiv's central Square of Independence. The demonstrators wanted the government of Viktor Yanukovych to move politically towards the EU and away from Russia, but when he refused to sign an agreement with the EU tensions spilled over. In February government forces, and snipers, shot dead 103 protesters and injured many others. Shortly afterwards President Yanukovych fled Ukraine and went to Russia. Elvira Bulat was a businesswoman from Crimea when the protests began. She tells Rebecca Kesby why she packed up her business, to spend that snowy winter in the barricades of the Maidan, and why she still believes Ukraine belongs in Europe.

Photo: Kyiv, Ukraine - December 9th 2013. Anti-government protesters stand guard at one of the barricades defending Maidan Square against police. Credit: Etienne De Malglaive/Getty Images.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nkznm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t88by0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nl3dr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmh)
Sofya Kovalevskaya: The eventful life of a maths pioneer

If you were a woman in the mid-19th century, some universities might let you attend public lectures on science, but very few would enrol women as regular students. The number of women allowed to sit exams and get academic degrees was vanishingly small. In mathematics it was almost unheard of.
But the Russian mathematician Sofya Kovalevskaya changed all that. She was one of the first women in modern Europe both to gain a doctorate in mathematics and become a tenured professor. She was also the first woman to be part of the editorial committee of a leading mathematics journal and the publicity around her achievements helped pave the way for women to play a greater role in university life. Above all, she was an outstanding mathematician with at least one theorem bearing her name still used to this day.

So how did Kovalevskaya do it? How much was talent? How much luck and opportunity? And how much just sheer force of character?

To guide us through Sofya Kovalevskaya’s eventful life - and her equations – Bridget Kendall is joined by three experts:
Ann Hibner Koblitz, professor emerita at Arizona State University and the author of A Convergence of Lives: Sofya Kovalevskaya - Scientist, Writer, Revolutionary;
June Barrow-Green, professor of the history of mathematics at the Open University in the UK and chair of the International Commission on the History of Mathematics;
and Elena Arsenyeva, associate professor at St. Petersburg State University in Russia and the coordinator of the Leonhard Euler International Mathematical Institute.

(Photo: Sofya Kovalevskaya Credit: Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9j)
Morten Andersen: The NFL Hall of Fame kicker

Morten Andersen arrived in the US at the age of 17 knowing nothing about American football. He went on to become a record-breaking NFL kicker and was later inducted into the Hall of Fame. Alex Last speaks to Morten about his remarkable career and hears why the kicker is one of the most under-appreciated skill positions in American football.

Photo: Kicker Morten Andersen of the New Orleans Saints kicks on a hold by Tommy Barnhardt, Oct 1991 (George Gojkovich/Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nl74w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsnv44)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t88lf8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nlbx0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k4d)
The artist who started out drawing war as a child refugee

Petrit Halilaj was born in Kosovo in 1986 and grew up in the small town of Runik. He always loved drawing and had a rare talent for it. When war broke out in Kosovo and Serbian troops moved into their hometown, Petrit and his family had to flee, eventually finding sanctuary in a refugee camp in Albania. It was there, in 1999, that Petrit met the Italian psychologist Giacomo 'Angelo' Poli who encouraged the children to communicate the traumas they had experienced, through drawing. Using only felt tip pens, Petrit's drawings ended up being beamed all over the world. They even caught the attention of the then UN Secretary General Kofi Annan who asked to meet Petrit during a visit to the camp. Many years on, Petrit is now a highly acclaimed artist. He recently exhibited work based on some of the drawings from the refugee camp, at Tate St Ives in Cornwall in the South West of England. The show is called Very volcanic over this green feather.

The Winter Olympics of 1984 were hosted by Sarajevo in what was then Yugoslavia. A centrepiece of the Games was a state of the art luge, bob-sledding and skeleton track on the icy slopes of Mount Trebević. But just a few years after those Olympics, Yugoslavia broke up and Sarajevo became a war zone. The Olympic track was used as a trench and damaged by guns and explosives and was left in ruins... that was until a Sarajevo man called Senad Omanovic resolved to try to restore it to its former glory. Senad spoke to Outlook in December 2016.

Larry Ridge has always been fascinated by carousels - those enchanting merry-go-rounds you often find in fairgrounds where you sit on a carved figure - usually a horse - and watch the world go by. Larry specialises in carving these figures, in fact he runs the only full-time school in America that teaches people how to do it. For Outlook, Kathy Karlo stopped by to see him in Chattanooga in Tennessee.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen

(Photo: Petrit Halilaj and Dr Giacomo Poli, 1999. Credit: Giacomo Poli)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nlgn4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsp2md)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t88txj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nlld8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhx2kpw)
Russia begins military exercises in Belarus

With Russian forces conducting major military manoeuvres in Belarus and the Black Sea, Britain's prime minister, Boris Johnson, has said the crisis over Ukraine is probably at its most dangerous moment. We hear the views of a Russian military analyst.

Also in the programme: the Canadian truck protests now clogging the US car industry; and Snoop Dogg announces that he's buying Death Row Records.

(Photo: A satellite image shows a troop housing area and a vehicle park in Rechitsa, Belarus, 4 February 2022. Credit: Maxar Technologies/Handout via Reuters)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nlq4d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t892ds)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49n9xj5wx5)
Snoop Dogg acquires Death Row Records

US rapper Snoop Dogg has acquired Death Row Records, the label that launched his career. We find out more from MK Asante of Morgan State University, who wrote the book It's Bigger Than Hip Hop. Also in the programme, the Swiss banking giant Credit Suisse has reported a loss of $2.2bn for the final quarter of last year. Owen Walker is European banking correspondent at the Financial Times, and explains the background to the company's woes. The International Court of Justice in the Hague has ordered Uganda to pay the Democratic Republic of the Congo more than $300m in compensation for invading and occupying the mineral-rich Ituri province between 1998 and 2003. But as the BBC's Robert Misigaro explains, it's not clear whether the compensation will be forthcoming. Plus, the BBC's Ivana Davidovic reports on why the use of robots has risen by 40% in North American workplaces since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

Today's edition is presented by Rahul Tandon, and produced by Sarah Hawkins, George Thomas and Gabriele Shaw.

(Picture: Snoop Dogg. Picture credit: Reuters.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nltwj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzyds1ttz)
Ukraine crisis: Talks with Russia continue

With Russian forces conducting major military manoeuvres in Belarus and the Black Sea, the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, is visiting Brussels and Warsaw in support of NATO allies. Britain’s foreign secretary is also holding talks in the Kremlin with her Russian counterpart. We look at the diplomatic efforts to de-escalate tensions between Russia and its neighbour Ukraine.

Also, our reporter in India tells us about schools banning the hijab, or headscarf, in the southern state of Karnataka. The ban has sparked ongoing protests and clashes between Muslims and Hindus.

And we hear two people talk about why they decided to deliberately catch Covid-19. We examine the beliefs and justifications behind their decisions, with our regular health experts.

Picture: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki shake hands during a joint press conference
(EPA/LESZEK SZYMANSKI)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nlymn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzyds1yl3)
Coronavirus: People who deliberately get it

We hear two people talk about why they decided to deliberately catch Covid-19. We examine the beliefs and justifications behind their decisions, with our regular expert guests.

Also, In Canada, police are negotiating with anti-vaccine protesters who have occupied a bridge in Ottawa which has important travel routes to the US city of Detroit. In France, a similar protest is planned place against Covid restrictions there. We hear voices from both places.

And with Russian forces conducting major military manoeuvres in Belarus and the Black Sea, the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, is visiting Brussels and Warsaw in support of NATO allies. Britain’s foreign secretary is also holding talks in the Kremlin with her Russian counterpart. We look at the diplomatic efforts to de-escalate tensions between Russia and its neighbour Ukraine.

Picture: Adult hand with protective glove holding a positive rapid test for Covid-19
(GETTY CREATIVE/MASSIMILIANO FINZI)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nm2cs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nm63x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrspt35)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t89kd9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nsxnmq1y8)
2022/02/10 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nm9w1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t89p4f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l50)
Inside Wuhan's coronavirus lab

The Wuhan Institute of Virology has been at the centre of a controversy surrounding the origins of the virus which caused the Covid-19 pandemic. The work of the lab's previously obscure division looking at bat coronaviruses has been the subject of massive speculation and misinformation campaigns. Journalist and former biomedical scientist Jane Qui has gained unique access to the lab. She has interviewed the staff there extensively and tells us what she found on her visits.

And Tyler Starr from the Fred Hutchinson Institute in Seattle, has looked at a range of bat coronaviruses from around the world, looking to see whether they might have the capability to jump to humans in the future. He found many more than previously thought that either have or are potentially just a few mutations away from developing this ability.

Nuclear fusion researchers at the 40-year-old Joint European Torus facility near Oxford in the Uk for just the 3rd time in its long history, put fully-fledged nuclear fuel, a mixture of hydrogen isotopes, into the device, and got nuclear energy out – 59 megajoules. They used a tiny amount of fuel to make this in comparison with coal or gas.

A survey of Arctic waters under ice near the North pole has revealed a colony of giant sponges, feeding on fossilised worms. Deep-Sea Ecologists Autun Purser at the Alfred-Wegener-Institut and Teresa Maria Morganti from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology tells us about the discovery.

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle

(Image: Getty Images)


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nmfm5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhx3dxs)
Ukraine tension: New Russian military manoeuvres

Western leaders are warning of new, alarming new military escalation as Russian troops have been involved in live-fire drills in Belarus. We have an interview with UK Foreign Secretary Liz Truss who was in Moscow to speak with her Russian counterpart Sergey Lavrov.

Also on the programme: Canadian trucker protests have forced car plant shutdowns and a new major border crossing has been blocked; and the first woman to head the London Metropolitan Police, Dame Cressida Dick, has resigned in the aftermath of a recent report that found serious evidence of police misconduct.

(Photo: Russian navy ships passed through the Bosphorus from the Mediterranean into the Black Sea. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nmkc9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx42160vx8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sx49n4xjx)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t89xmp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs7kr1hp5w)
US inflation at 7.5%

With inflation rising faster than expected, we hear from the BBC's North America Business correspondent Michelle Fleury and economist Cary Leahey. Plus, blockades across some of the busiest border crossings between Canada and the United States are disrupting supply chains of America's biggest car companies. We hear from Peter Campbell, Global Motor Industry Correspondent at the Financial Times. And Tesla is being sued for alleged racial discrimination and harassment by a California regulator which claims the electric carmaker operates "a racially segregated workplace". Dana Hull automotive and technology reporter for Bloomberg tells us about the allegations. The International Court of Justice in the Hague has ordered Uganda to pay the Democratic Republic of the Congo more than $300m in compensation for invading and occupying the mineral-rich Ituri province between 1998 and 2003. But as the BBC's Robert Misigaro explains, it's not clear whether the compensation will be forthcoming. Plus, the BBC's Ivana Davidovic reports on why the use of robots has risen by 40% in North American workplaces since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. (Picture of dollar bills, picture via Getty Images).


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nmp3f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8b1ct)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 11 FEBRUARY 2022

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nmsvk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nmxlp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqtqtkk8xd)
US inflation hits 7.5%

With inflation rising faster than expected, we hear from the BBC's North America Business correspondent Michelle Fleury and economist Cary Leahey. Plus, blockades across some of the busiest border crossings between Canada and the United States are disrupting supply chains of America's biggest car companies. We hear from Peter Campbell, Global Motor Industry Correspondent at the Financial Times. And Tesla is being sued for alleged racial discrimination and harassment by a California regulator which claims the electric carmaker operates "a racially segregated workplace". Dana Hull automotive and technology reporter for Bloomberg tells us about the allegations. Plus, the BBC's Ivana Davidovic reports on why the use of robots has risen by 40% in North American workplaces since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. And we're joined throughout the programme by Alaezi Akpuru entrepreneur and Creative Director at Virgioli Fashion in Lagos, Nigeria and Alexander Kaufman senior reporter at HuffPost, based in New York.

(Picture of dollar bills, picture via Getty Images).


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nn1bt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsqnb2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8bdm6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1v0c)
Afghanistan reunited

Afghan footballer Fati talks about her escape from the Taliban and her return to football. Exiled Afghanistan players have reunited in Australia and are back training together for the first time since the Taliban took control of the country last year.

Picture on website: Afganistan Flag beside the soccer balls laid out on a football pitch ( Maryam Majd ATPImages/Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nn52y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nn8v2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsqwtb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8bn3g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct3hh6)
The transgender pastor

June Joplin was born outwardly a boy – but at the age of 11, at a Christian summer camp, two things became very clear to her - that she was supposed to be a pastor, and that she was supposed to be a girl.

Becoming a pastor was the easy bit. June studied to become a Baptist minister in Richmond, Virginia, married and started a family. Yet the sense that she was really a woman never left her – and by her own admission, the struggles with her gender identity led to a depression which at times made her difficult to live with.

Eventually, by now living in Canada, she decided to come out as a transgender woman to her congregation and face the consequences.

In conversation with Mike Wooldridge, June Joplin tells her story and reflects on the cost of doing what she felt was the right thing.

Presenter: Mike Wooldridge.
Producer: Rosie Dawson
A CTVC production for BBC World Service

(Photo: June Joplin)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nndl6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv343b32gly)
US President Biden asks US citizens to leave Ukraine immediately

US President Joe Biden has called on all American citizens remaining in the Ukraine to leave the country immediately, citing increased threats of Russian military action.

Authorities in Canada have decided to use federal powers to end the blockade by truck drivers. We'll speak to a member of the legal team representing the truckers.

Also in the programme, we'll hear more about the Anti-Discrimination Bill being proposed but hotly debated in Australia. We'll hear from an Australian MP who talks about the bill invoking concerns of discrimination and safety.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nnjbb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv343b32lc2)
President Biden warns all US citizens to leave Ukraine

US President Joe Biden has called on all American citizens remaining in the Ukraine to leave the country immediately, following concerns that Russia troops could invade the country. Biden said he would not send US troops to rescue Americans if Moscow invades Ukraine.

Tensions are high in the Indian state of Karnataka as Muslim students are stopped from wearing the hijab. We'll hear from a woman who became the face of resistance for young Indian Muslim women amid the escalating rows.

Also, we'll hear more about the 16 year old Siberian student who has been sentenced to five years in prison after he strategised how to blow up Moscow's Federal Security Services (FSB) building, whilst playing the popular online game Minecraft.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nnn2g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv343b32q36)
President Biden issues stark warning to all US citizens living in Ukraine.

For several weeks now more than 100,000 Russian troops have been deployed to the border with Ukraine. The countries Western allies have expressed strong concerns that Russia shall invade the country. US President Joe Biden has issued a warning to all US citizens saying they must leave Ukraine immediately.

Also in the programme, US authorities ask Canada to use federal powers to end the blockade caused by truck drivers protesting the Covid vaccine mandate.
A member of the legal team representing the protesters tells us why they feel so strongly.

And star gazers say they may have found the first habitable planet near a dying sun, we'll hear from an astrophysicist who lead the study.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nnrtl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2j)
Michael McCaul: Is Biden up to facing off with Putin?

Republican Congressman Michael McCaul accuses President Biden of failing to stand up to the challenge of Vladimir Putin in Ukraine. After four years of Donald Trump, are Republicans credible when they condemn Biden for foreign policy failure?

(Photo: Congressman Michael McCaul appears on Hardtalk via videolink)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8c42z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j1j)
Argentina’s latest IMF crisis

Argentina’s government and the International Monetary Fund have been renegotiating the terms of a 2018 loan issued to the country – the largest in IMF history. The Fund’s own internal analysis of that deal was scathing. The 2018 package had been vaunted for its commitment to protecting the most vulnerable in society. Yet people in Argentina, and particularly those on the lowest incomes, are currently enduring a cost of living crisis, with inflation running at above 50% in 2021, and wages struggling to keep pace with increased housing, food and energy costs. Amy Booth is a journalist in Argentina, and says many people have lost hope in the midst of the country’s seemingly interminable economic crisis. Daniel Munevar, who works on debt justice at the European Network on Debt and Development, says the IMF broke its own rules in order to issue the 2018 loan. Carolina Millán is Bloomberg’s bureau chief in Buenos Aires, and tells us that the Fund’s decades-long association with austerity and misery in Argentina loom large over any potential new deal between the two parties. Former IMF executive director and Argentine diplomat Héctor Torres says he’s sceptical that a prospective 22nd loan from the lender to the country will end differently to previous failures. Argentina isn’t the only country struggling with debt, either. Former IMF chief economist Ken Rogoff says that more than half of the world’s poorest nations are currently in debt distress or default.

Presented by Ed Butler, produced by Tom Kavanagh.

(Photo: Left-wing protesters in Buenos Aires carry a banner reading, “break with the IMF, don’t pay the debt”; Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzw)
The 1972 mass killings in Burundi

In late April 1972, Hutu rebels launched an insurgency in the south of Burundi with the aim of overthrowing the Tutsi led government. They brutally murdered government officials and civilians, targeting mostly Tutsi. Estimates from the time suggest at least a thousand people were killed. The army quickly contained the insurgency but then began reprisals against Hutu civilians. Hutu elites in particular were targeted – those with education or with government jobs. The killing lasted for more than 3 months. Human Rights Watch estimates as many as 200,000 were killed. Rob Walker speaks to Jeanine Ntihirageza who was an 11-year-old schoolgirl at the time and whose father went missing at the start of the reprisals.

(Photo: National Commission for Truth and Reconciliation officials inspect remains of people at a mass grave existing from 1972 in Mwaro, Burundi. Credit: Renovat Ndabashinze/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nnwkq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj8)
A major chip deal collapses

Chip maker Arm won't be bought by Nvidia after all. Jane Wakefield speaks to the new Arm CEO Rene Haas about the future for the UK firm. Plus the BBC's James Clayton in Silicon Valley tells us about the sexual content evading the moderators on children's gaming platform Roblox, and the challenges of policing the nascent metaverse. And Pete Snyder from the privacy-focused web browser Brave discusses the prospect of an internet without cookies.

(Photo: Arm logo, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8c7v3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l50)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2np09v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htr)
France's place in the world

This week the French president Emmanuel Macron travelled thousands of kilometres across Europe in a diplomatic effort to avert an escalation of the war in Ukraine. He met Presidents Putin and Zelensky in Moscow and Kyiv, as well as German and Polish leaders in Berlin. Diplomats say Mr Macron has made himself a key interlocutor between the EU and the US on one side and Russia on the other. The crisis in Ukraine has galvanised France's alliance with the United States which was at a low point just months ago when Paris lost a lucrative Australian submarine contract to Washington and London. But at home - where the president is facing re-election, there’s scepticism over France’s close alliance with America. So what are President Macron's foreign policy goals? As the EU’s only nuclear-armed state, what role should France play in representing Europe’s broader interests on the world stage? And will Mr Macron’s diplomatic achievements improve his chances of winning a second term in April?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2np41z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsrr17)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8chbc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1v0c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2np7t3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g8)
No guns on the Ferris wheel

Afghanistan's Taliban Cabinet recently issued a statement that their fighters should not carry weapons while visiting amusement parks. It follows videos circulating online of fighters enjoying bumper car rides, as well as shooting for toys at the rifle range. BBC Afghan's Khalil Noori lived in Kabul until August last year when he was evacuated with his family. He shares his memories of days out in amusement parks, and the background to this story.

An icy bike ride on Lake Baikal
BBC Russian's Oleg Boldyrev took the opportunity of a far flung deployment to visit a frozen Lake Baikal, naturally with his bike. A place of ice stalactites, upended jagged ice shards, and strange, sci-fi sounding ice symphonies as the ice expands and contracts.

Turkish inflation
BBC Arabic's Shahdi Alkashif lives in Istanbul, and has been reporting on the dramatic rise in the cost of living. And it's not just a professional assignment - with a large family to provide for it's a story that's close to home.

The president ploughing a field for new year
Vietnamese President Nguyen Xuan Phuc dressed as a farmer and ploughed a rice field with a buffalo during the Lunar New Year celebrations. It’s a ceremony formerly performed by Vietnamese kings, and the photos on social media received a mixed reaction, as Giang Nguyen of BBC Vietnamese explains.

India's most renowned female activist
Sudha Barawaj is an activist and trade unionist, who spent 30 years fighting for the rights of the tribal people in the mineral-rich state of Chhattisgarh. She was arrested in 2018 and then spent three years in jail. Soutik Biswas of BBC Delhi tells us what an eye opening experience this was for her.

(Photo: Taliban fighter with gun sits on fun ride in Afghan amusement park, November 2021. Credit: Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2npck7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrsrzjh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8cqtm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l50)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nph9c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhx5glz)
Russia defends skater despite failed drug test

A Kremlin spokesman says 15-year-old figure skater Kamila Valieva has Russia's absolute support, even though she tested positive for a banned heart medication in December.

Also today: US secretary of state Anthony Blinken says a Russian invasion of Ukraine could begin at any time. Does diplomacy work? We hear from a former UK ambassador; and how the Canadian truck blockades over Covid restrictions are inspiring copy-cat protests in France.

(Photo: Kamila Valieva of the Russian Olympic Committee during training at the Beijing Winter Olympics. Credit: Reuters/Evgenia Novozhenina)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2npm1h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8cz9w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y475zqq6wjd)
Fastest UK economic growth since WW2

The UK economy grew 7.5% in 2021, despite a fall in December due to Omicron restrictions. We get analysis of the latest data from Ruth Gregory, senior UK economist at Capital Economics in London. Also in the programme, Argentina's government and the International Monetary Fund have been renegotiating the terms of a 2018 loan issued to the country. The package had been vaunted for its commitment to protecting the most vulnerable in society, but as the BBC's Ed Butler reports, the reality has been painfully different. Religious police in Nigeria have destroyed nearly four million bottles of beer in a crackdown on alcohol in the northern city of Kano. The BBC's Nkechi Ogbonna explains the background. Plus, ahead of this weekend's Super Bowl between the LA Rams and Cincinnati Bengals the BBC's Michelle Fleury reports on the rising number of cryptocurrency adverts expected on TV. And with the event returning to Los Angeles for the first time in almost 30 years, we examine the likely economic impact on the city with Matt Dangelantonio of LA's KPCC radio.

Today's edition is presented by Will Bain, and produced by Sara Parry, Sarah Hawkins and Gabriele Shaw.

(Picture: Crowds of Christmas shoppers in Birmingham. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2npqsm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzyds4qr2)
Covid-19: Anti-restrictions protests

As Canadian truckers continue their protest against Covid restrictions, we look at protests taking place or being planned in New Zealand and France - inspired by the “Freedom Convoy” in Canada.

Our Environment Correspondent explains the findings of Brazil’s new deforestation report and brings the latest on the summit in France focussing on the protection of the oceans.

We speak to our Africa health reporter about the visit by the WHO head in South Africa, and one of our regular experts, Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University, helps us understand today’s other Covid stories.

Ros Atkins looks at Nato’s role in the Ukraine crisis and examines the dynamics at play between Russia and Nato


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2npvjr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzyds4vh6)
Russian figure skater

Russia has defended the participation of the teenage figure skater Kamila Valieva at the winter Olympics despite a failed drug test. Our BBC Russian reporter explains what is known about the skater's positive test for a banned heart medication.

We hear from Canada where truckers continue their protest against Covid restrictions and look at what they might have common with the ones being planned or taking place in France, New Zealand and Austria.

One of our regular coronavirus health experts, Marc Mendelson, Professor of Infectious Diseases and Head of the Division of Infectious Diseases & HIV Medicine at Groote Schuur Hospital, University of Cape Town, answers listener’s coronavirus questions. You can send in a question via WhatsApp on +447730 751925

Ros Atkins looks at Nato’s role in the Ukraine crisis and examines the dynamics at play between Russia and Nato.

(Phone: 2022 Beijing Olympics - Figure Skating - Training - Training Rink Capital Indoor Stadium, Beijing, China - February 11, 2022. Kamila Valieva of the Russian Olympic Committee during training Credit: Evgenia Novozhenina/Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2npz8w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nq310)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxyhrssq08)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8dg9d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nsxnmsyvc)
2022/02/11 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nq6s4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8dl1j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prr)
Are we too selfish to save the planet?

Climate change and biodiversity loss are two of the biggest threats humanity has ever faced - and tackling them is going to take a whole lot of collaboration and putting others before ourselves. But are humans cut out for this level of cooperation? Or are we fundamentally too self-interested to work together for the common good?


Listener Divyesh is not very hopeful about all this, so he’s asked CrowdScience if humans have a “selfish gene” that dooms us to failure when trying to meet these challenges. He's worried that humans are destined by our evolution to consume ever more natural resources and destroy the environment in the process.


But while it's true that humans often act in our own interest, we also show high levels of cooperation and care. Could tapping into these beneficial behaviours help us solve our global problems? Marnie Chesterton goes on the hunt for the best ways to harness human nature for the good of planet Earth - from making sure the green choice is always the cheaper and easier option, to encouraging and nurturing our better, altruistic and collaborative sides.


We visit a rural mountain community in Spain to see the centuries-old system they have for sharing common resources; while in the city, we meet activists figuring out how to live a more community-spirited and sustainable urban life. And we speak to experts in evolution, ecology and psychology to find out what helps nudge us into greener habits.


Presenter: Marnie Chesterton. Produced by Cathy Edwards for BBC World Service.


Image Credit: Getty Images


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nqbj8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5lfhx69tw)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nqg8d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx42163rtc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sx49n7tg0)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8dtjs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrf40fx8np)
Fastest UK economic growth since WW2

The UK economy grew 7.5% in 2021, despite a fall in December due to Omicron restrictions. We get analysis of the latest data from Ruth Gregory, senior UK economist at Capital Economics in London. Also in the programme, Argentina's government and the International Monetary Fund have been renegotiating the terms of a 2018 loan issued to the country. The package had been vaunted for its commitment to protecting the most vulnerable in society, but as the BBC's Ed Butler reports, the reality has been painfully different. Religious police in Nigeria have destroyed nearly four million bottles of beer in a crackdown on alcohol in the northern city of Kano. The BBC's Nkechi Ogbonna explains the background. Plus, ahead of this weekend's Super Bowl between the LA Rams and Cincinnati Bengals the BBC's Michelle Fleury reports on the rising number of cryptocurrency adverts expected on TV. And with the event returning to Los Angeles for the first time in almost 30 years, we examine the likely economic impact on the city with Matt Dangelantonio of LA's KPCC radio.

(Picture: Crowds of Christmas shoppers in Birmingham. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0w2nql0j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkv9t8dy8x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1v0c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3ct1gxl)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gyn)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gyn)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gyn)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172xzktyjyn15b)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzktyjyn4xg)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzktyjynj4v)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzktyjynwd7)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzktyjyp7mm)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzktyjyq2vj)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172xzktyjyqkv1)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172xzktyjyqtb9)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzktyjyr1tk)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzktyjyr99t)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzktyjyrf1y)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzktyjyrs9b)

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BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzktyjys0sl)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzktyjyt3hr)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzktyjytgr4)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzktyjytlh8)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172xzkv9t7ykhk)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkv9t87hq3)

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BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkv9t8875w)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkv9t8bdm6)

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BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172xzk0htbyk4t)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j61)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1ltc)

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World of Wisdom 05:32 SAT (w3ct2zwh)

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