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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 29 JANUARY 2022

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k15djz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htp)
Why Putin has his sights on Ukraine

Growing fears of a Russian invasion of Ukraine have prompted the US and UK to pull the families of staff at their embassies in Kyiv out of the country. Moscow’s forces have been amassing on Ukraine’s border for months prompting fears of a major escalation in a war that’s been underway since Russia’s annexation of the Crimean Peninsula in 2014. Vladimir Putin says the Russian and Ukrainian populations are 'one people' and has blamed Nato’s expansion east for rising tensions. Joe Biden has warned Russia that an invasion of Ukraine would result in severe consequences for the Kremlin. So how likely is full-scale war? What is President Putin's strategy? And what is the likely end-game?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k15j93)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzln107k4gc)
US inflation at a 40 year high

As US inflation in the US hits record highs, we get analysis from Chris Low at FHN Financial. There's a dispute in Spain over the cultivation of strawberries in Andalucia which are taking water from the Donana National Park, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. We find out more from Javier Martin Arroyo, who is a writer for the Spanish newspaper El Pais. Plus, as climate change progresses, the demand for energy hungry air conditioning increases, which in turn exacerbates the problem. The BBC's Ed Butler reports on the potential for more energy efficient cooling systems. (Picture: US bank notes. Picture credit: Getty Images).


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mvwkh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f4f)
What’s prompting online misogyny?

India’s online space has seen an alarming rise in misogyny and harassment of women during the pandemic. In a recent incident, more than 100 prominent Muslim women were put up for sale in a mock online auction. Critics say cyber bullying and trolling of Muslim women in particular has worsened in recent years in India’s polarised climate.

So, what are the right doors to knock on, if facing online hate? Do women, particularly those who are vocal and influential in India’s patriarchal society, know their basic cyber rights? How does it impact their mental wellbeing? And what’s causing this environment of online hate to spread wider?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss what’s prompting online misogyny and the ways to deal with it.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Sayema Rahman, radio presenter; Sadaf Vidha, founder, Guftagu Therapy; Dr Pavan Duggal, cyber law expert, advocate


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k15n17)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs75880h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mw09m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lcq)
The Women's Ashes and cricket's highest catch

On this week’s Stumped with Alison Mitchell, Jim Maxwell & Charu Sharma, we take a look at the state of play in the Women’s Ashes so far, debate the maiden use of DRS in the competition and ask if the format works.

As the ICC name their cricketing achievements of the year, we celebrate Pakistan cricket after they picked up four awards.

We are joined by a Guinness World Record holder who has successfully achieved the highest catch of a cricket ball ever. Plus after an autograph book was found in Somerset containing signatures from the ‘golden age’ of cricket, we share our autograph stories.

Photo: Rachael Haynes of Australia is congratulated by Meg Lanning after reaching her half century during day one of the Women's Ashes Test match. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k15rsc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g6)
Myanmar coup: One year on

It's a year since Myanmar's military removed the democratically elected government from power. We share key moments in Myanmar's journey towards democracy from The Fifth Floor archive, with BBC Burmese editor Soe Win Than, former editor Tin Htar Swe and presenter Yee Yee Aung. And we hear how the service is marking the anniversary, with stories about the opposition-run 'zoom government' outside Myanmar, the past year of military leadership, and how citizens will be marking the day.

Driving on the frozen sea
Around this time of year Estonia opens up its ice roads on the frozen Baltic sea. People can drive their cars and visit some of the islands off the coast, and in 2019, two intrepid reporters from BBC Russian - Ivan Chesnokov and Yury Baranyuk - couldn’t resist driving the ice road for themselves.

Reporting from the Democratic Republic of Congo
The risks of rebel activity, capsizing boats and an active volcano – some of the challenges BBC Africa’s health correspondent Rhoda Odhiambo faced on a recent trip to eastern DRC to report on child malnutrition and a vaccination campaign.

Brazil's pioneering female football referee
Lea Campos was one of the first women in the world to become a qualified football referee. But in her home country, Brazil, she was barred from working after being told women were too emotional to referee in men’s football games. Fernando Duarte of BBC Minute tells us how she fought back.

Celebrating Vietnamese Tet
Vietnam's lunar new year celebration of Tet is the time families come together to see out the old year and welcome the new. BBC Vietnamese journalist Tran Vo is spending her first ever Tet away from home in Bangkok, and put together a report on how Bangkok's Vietnamese community celebrates with the traditional Banh Chung rice cake, to remind her of home.

(Photo: Protestors after the military coup in Myanmar, February 2021. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzt)
The Good Friday Agreement

In 1998, the political parties in Northern Ireland reached a peace agreement that ended decades of war. But the Good Friday Agreement, as it became known, was only reached after days of frantic last-minute negotiations. In 2012, Louise Hidalgo spoke to Paul Murphy, the junior minister for Northern Ireland at the time.

PHOTO:Irish Prime Minister Bertie Ahern (L) and British Prime Minister Tony Blair (R) pose with the mediator of the agreement, Senator George Mitchell. (AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k15wjh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1608m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs758m7w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mwck0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwg)
Judging ourselves harshly

Can we learn to let go of negative thoughts that are bringing us down? Sometimes it can feel as if nothing in life is going the way it should and we judge ourselves for not doing better. Judy is from Thailand and lives in Japan. Her sister has to look after their elderly mother in Thailand alone and Judy is unhappy with herself for not having built a ‘successful’ career in Japan. She speaks to writer and teacher Gary Zukav. He suggests that, even though it sometimes doesn't feel like it, there might be a way to move beyond the control of these negative and damaging feelings.

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producer: Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dpj)
The rising cost of living

The cost of food and fuel has risen globally. The pandemic has played some part in it but there are other reasons too. Ros Atkins examines what’s behind the rise in the price of goods and services.

(Photo Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1640r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytn09rjj8v)
Ukraine crisis: Don't create panic, Zelensky tells West

Russian President Vladimir Putin has said he does not intend to invade Ukraine. Meanwhile the US says war seems imminent, and it is sending additional reinforcements while British troops have been training Ukrainian forces.

Also in the programme, police in Guatemala say they’ve broken up a ring of smugglers known as ‘coyotes.’

To discuss this and more, Julian Worricker is joined by Olivia Cheung, research fellow and expert on China at London University’s School of Oriental and African Studies, and James Rodgers, British author and reader in international journalism at City University in London.

(Picture: President Zelensky of Ukraine Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k167rw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytn09rjn0z)
Russia's troop build-up outside Ukraine is the biggest since Cold War says US military chief

General Mark Milley has said that a Russian invasion of Ukraine would be "horrific" and would lead to a significant number of casualties. Meanwhile the country’s president calls on the West to avoid creating ‘panic’ by suggesting Russia is poised to attack.

Also in the programme, Disney’s latest remake of Snow White has prompted Game of Thrones actor Peter Dinklage – who has a common form of dwarfism known as achondroplasia - to question the stereotypes that that film might reinforce.

To discuss this and more, Julian Worricker is joined by Olivia Cheung, research fellow and expert on China at London University’s School of Oriental and African Studies, and James Rodgers, British author and reader in international journalism at City University in London.

(Picture: General Mark Millay Credit: Reuters)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k16cj0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytn09rjrs3)
Ukrainian troops prepare for possible Russian invasion

Top US military personnel warn a conflict in the region could be "horrific." We have a special report from Western Ukraine where British troops have been training local forces.

Also in the programme - how canned pork meat attained global fame. We’ll hear about the history of Spam.

To discuss this and more, Julian Worricker is joined by Olivia Cheung, research fellow and expert on China at London University’s School of Oriental and African Studies, and James Rodgers, British author and reader in international journalism at City University in London.

(Picture: Ukrainian soldier with an anti tank gun. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mwqsd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9r)
Saving lives in the mountains

Mountain rescue volunteers are a rare breed: they’re on call 24/7, ready to risk their lives to save hikers and skiers who get stuck on the mountains. Kim Chakanetsa meets two women who lead perilous rescue missions in Canada and in the UK.

Kirsty Pallas is a mountaineering and climbing instructor based in Scotland. In 2014 she joined the Oban Mountain Rescue Team, where she’s a callout manager and a training officer. She’s also the founder of Our Shared Outdoors, an organisation set up to tackle and change the lack of diversity in the outdoors and promote underrepresented groups.

Kayla Brolly is an emergency room nurse and a crew member with North Shore Rescue, the busiest volunteer search and rescue organisation in Canada. She’s been involved in countless rescue operations in the popular hiking and skiing mountains north of Vancouver. In December 2017, whilst taking part in a delicate rescue mission on a steep slope, she suffered a severe head injury.

Produced by Alice Gioia for BBC World Service.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k16h84)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6z)
Women in Ukraine and Russia

There is much international focus on the possibility of a Russian military invasion of its neighbour Ukraine. US President Joe Biden has spoken of “enormous consequences” if that did happen, warning it would “change the world”.

Russia has an estimated 100,000 troops on the border with Ukraine but has said it does not want war.

While world leaders talk, host Ben James guides us through the discussions among six women in the two countries.

In Ukraine, the BBC’s James Reynolds hears from three women in the capital Kyiv about the prospect of war. They include Olena, a volunteer sniper since 2014 and a professional servicewoman for five years, who is once more prepared to fight for her country.

We also hear from three women in the Russian capital Moscow about the atmosphere in the city, the conversations they are having with friends and family and why they believe a war will not happen.

(Photo: Pedestrians walk under boards displaying the flag and coat of arms of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People"s Republic in the rebel-held city of Donetsk, Ukraine January 24, 2022. Credit: REUTERS/Alexander Ermochenko)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mwvjj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386g)
Pick of the World: The singer who 'deliberately' caught Covid - and died

Listeners to the BBC World Service not only love what they hear, they love to engage with it; it's a two way relationship that has created a special bond.

Each week, Anna Doble celebrates the amazing radio the World Service produces, with clips chosen by its listeners, and explores the reaction on social media.

She also speaks to some of those listeners around the world, to find out what it was about the issue that captured them.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2p)
How should the BBC be funded?

Your reactions to the news that future BBC funding is to be up for discussion. How might it affect the World Service? Plus listeners give their fond farewells as we say goodbye to a familiar voice on BBC Outside Source, Nuala McGovern.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k16m08)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0qf2l6p10x)
Ukraine crisis: What's the impact on sport?

On this week's Sportshour with Caroline Barker, we speak to the President of the Ukrainian Paralympic Committee, Valeriy Sushkevych, about the tensions at the Russian border and how this is affecting the countries athletes ahead of the Winter Paralympics in Beijing.

Plus, we’ll hear from Jack Jablonski who was an aspiring ice hockey player, who suffered a terrible spinal injury ending his chances. Despite his injury, he’s now working for a professional ice hockey team in the US.

Photo: A view of Humvees given to the Ukrainian Armed Forces. (Credit: TASS via Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k16qrd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs759bqn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mx30s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k16vhj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct3c7z)
Music that survived the Nazis: Part two

Featuring extraordinarily rare recordings, historian Shirli Gilbert presents this new history of life and music under Nazi tyranny. This episode focuses on music-making in the camps and ghettos of Nazi Europe, including stories of music at Sachsenhausen, Vilna and Auschwitz. This includes a wealth of different styles, from Yiddish Tango and rousing camp anthems, to partisan songs and string quartets. Contributors include Lloica Czackis, Krzysztof Kulisiewicz, Anita Lasker-Wallfisch, Dr Astrid Ley and Bret Werb.

(Photo: Members of the orchestra at the Janowska concentration camp perform while standing in a circle around the conductor, Yacub Mund, in the Appelplatz [roll call area]. Credit: The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum)

Written and presented by Shirli Gilbert, professor of Modern Jewish History at University College London
Producer: Tom Woolfenden
A Loftus Media production for the BBC World Service


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k16z7n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz8pyk8)
Chairman of TPLF sees encouraging signs in peace negotiations

The Chairman of the Tigrayan People’s Liberation Front has told the BBC that there are encouraging signs in the peace negotiations to end the 15-month-old civil war with the federal government. On our programme we hear direct from Debretsion Gebremichael.

Also in the programme: Joni Mitchell removes her songs from Spotify; and a new study into breathlessness and long Covid.

(Photo: A farmer walks past a military tank destroyed recently during fighting between the Ethiopian National Defense Force (ENDF) and the Tigray People's Liberation Front (TPLF) in Damot Kebele of Amhara region, Ethiopia. CREDIT: REUTERS/Kumera Gemechu NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k172zs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tpvhmfqql)
Live Sporting Action

Lee James will again be joined on the Sportsworld panel by the two-time Africa Cup of Nations winner with Cameroon, and a two-time Premier League champion with Arsenal, Lauren; the former Nigeria and Wolves goalkeeper Carl Ikeme; and the South Africa women's captain Janine van Wyk, to look ahead to the first two quarter finals at the Africa Cup of Nations. We’ll also discuss the women’s Australian Open final and look ahead to the men’s final, reflect on the fourth day of the women’s Ashes Test between Australia and England, and preview the start of the Winter Olympics in Beijing, including hearing at length from the likes of USA Hockey head coach David Quinn and Swiss alpine skier Michelle Gisin.

Mohamed Salah (C) of Egypt team during the Africa Cup of Nations Cameron 2021 round of 16 football match between Côte d'Ivoire and Egypt at Stade de Japoma in Douala on January 26, 2022. (Photo by Ayman Aref/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k17kz9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs75b5yk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mxy7p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9g)
India's Luge pioneer

Shiva Keshavan was the first Indian to compete in one of the most dangerous events at the Winter Olympics – the luge. At the 1998 games in Japan, the 16-year-old was the only athlete in the Indian team and had to lead himself out in the opening ceremony in Nagano. Shiva Keshavan took part in a further five Winter Olympics and is credited with boosting awareness of snow sports in India. In 2020, he spoke to Farhana Haider.

(Photo: Shiva Keshavan in action in 2010. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k17pqf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Evidence (w3ct2zql)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

Africa, the pandemic and healthcare independence

In a special edition of The Evidence, Claudia Hammond and her panel of experts focus on Africa, on how the more than fifty countries on the continent, home to 1.3 billion people and the most youthful population in the world, have fared, two years into the pandemic.

African scientists have been key players in the global response, sequencing variants of the virus and sharing this vital information with the world.

But there’s been huge frustration and anger on the continent about the way Africa has, yet again, found itself at the back of the global queue for life-saving tests, treatments and vaccines.

The sense that the global health system isn’t set up to deliver for Africa has prompted what’s been described as unprecedented solidarity, and galvanised calls for increased healthcare independence, self-sufficiency and a new public health order for the continent.

This includes plans to manufacture the vaccines, medicines and tests that Africa needs to increase its health security in Africa for Africa.

In The Evidence, the head of the World Health Organisation in Africa, Dr Matshidiso Moeti, tells Claudia it has been “extremely devastating” to watch history repeating itself (just like the HIV pandemic and the millions of African lives lost because they were unable to access life-saving antiretroviral medication) as international solidarity faltered and Africa struggled to access vital supplies.

The Pasteur Institute in Dakar, Senegal (along with centres in South Africa and Rwanda) has a key role in pan-African plans for increased health sufficiency. Yellow Fever vaccines have long been made here but the plan is that later this year, mRNA vaccines for Covid-19 and eventually for other diseases like Lassa and Rift Valley fevers, will be manufactured at this and other sites.

Institute head Professor Amadou Sall, a virologist and public health specialist says producing vaccines, medicines and tests will reduce the dependency of Africa on the global community and increase health security.

Dr Yodi Alakija, co-chair of the African Union’s Vaccine Delivery Alliance and WHO Special Envoy to the Access to Covid Tools Accelerator, the ACT-Accelerator, says the pandemic has laid bare a failure of global political leadership, where a life in Lagos has been viewed as worth less than a life in London.

The equity gaps in access to the tools needed to fight Covid-19, she says, must be closed, and there are hopes that a high level global conference, “Port to Arms: Africa Responds – Vaccine Equity, Delivery and Manufacturing”, in Abuja, Nigeria, in February, will lead to a renewed commitments to vaccinate the world and end this pandemic.

Produced by: Fiona Hill and Maria Simons
Studio Engineer: Donald McDonald and Tim Heffer

Picture: A medical syringe pointing towards a whole lot of green viruses, Credit: David Malan/Getty Images


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k17tgk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv6)
Director Guillermo del Toro

Nikki Bedi is joined by novelist Nikki May and cineaste Karen Krizanovich to discuss their cultural highlights of the week.

Oscar winning Mexican director Guillermo del Toro on the influence of film noir on his latest film, Nightmare Alley.

Author Hanya Yanagihara on writing and re-writing American history in her novel, To Paradise.

German director Christian Schwochow on reimagining the brink of World War Two in his film, Munich - The Edge of War.

Bafta and Oscar winning actor Tilda Swinton talks about her latest role in Memoria, a supernatural thriller set in Colombia and the first English Language film by Thai film director Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

Anglo-Nigerian novelist Nikki May discusses the inspirations for her debut novel Wahala, about three friends living in London who share the gift of two cultures.

First time Belgian director Laura Wandel reveals her methods for working with children on her film Playground, or Un Monde in its original French, about the lasting influence of schoolyard bullying.

And there’s music from Korean Trio Dongyang Gozupa.

(Photo: Guillermo del Toro. Credit: Amanda Edwards/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k17y6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz8qxj9)
'Bomb cyclone' sweeps across US north-eastern coast

Heavy snow, whipped up by high winds, is sweeping across the Northeast of the US as forecasters warn of historic blizzards.

Also a rare broadcast interview with the Tigrayan rebels' political leader; and we hear of the plight of the pregnant New Zealander, excluded from her country because of Covid restrictions, who has found refuge in Afghanistan.


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k181yt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3bhknchs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0swds0sf4f)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8myf76)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptw)
Girl bands

As we say farewell to Ronnie Spector of '60s original "girl group" the Ronettes, and 25 years on from the Spice Girls’ 90s message of "girl power", we meet all-female bands striking a note for gender equality.

Heavy metal in a hijab, the Indonesian Muslim metal band Voice of Baceprot, rocking out against traditional gender expectations.

The all-girl group from Benin, Star Feminine Band, singing-out joyfully for girls’ right to school, not marriage.

K-Pop superstars (G)I-dle - we talk to the non-Korean members finding friendship and fame in the South Korean music machine.

Plus, Fafa Ruffino explains how her grandmother’s songs about her life inspired her to join African women’s rights "supergroup" Les Amazones d’Afrique.

Presenter: Chi Chi Izundu
Producer: Emma Wallace
Reporters: Frank McWeeny and Laura Bicker

(Photo: Voice of Baceprot. Credit: Bay Ismoyo/AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k185py)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd4)
Stay hydrated with Cakes Da Killa, UNIIQU3, Shaun Ross and Jubilee

Cakes Da Killa, UNIIQU3, Shaun Ross and Jubilee talk about how to tell if the track you’re working on is really hitting the mark, the spaces they’re creative in and what they look like, and their best – and worst – collaborations.

Rashard Bradshaw, better known as the Brooklyn-based rapper Cakes Da Killa, blends ‘90s grit with club beats, dipping into electronic and house genres. His lyrics are witty, unapologetic, and promote Black excellence and LGBTQ+ visibility in the hip-hop world and the wider media.

Shaun Ross is an LA-based singer-songwriter born and raised in New York. After studying dance and posting Voguing videos to YouTube, he caught the attention of a model agent and started his fashion career at the age of 16. He has appeared in videos by Katy Perry and Beyoncé, collaborated with Lizzo, and has teamed up with house music icon Duke Dumont. As a gay Black man with albinism, he has advocated for difference and representation across all avenues of his career, and last year he dropped his highly anticipated debut album SHIFT, inspired by all the music he loves including R&B, disco and pop.

UNIIQU3 is the queen of the Jersey club scene. She brings together influences from house music, hip hop and breakbeat, and has established herself as one of the most in-demand producers.

Jubilee is a DJ and producer from South Florida who says she’s been staying up all night for as long as anyone can remember. She spent her youth raving, soaking up influences including electro, drum and bass and Miami hip-hop.



SUNDAY 30 JANUARY 2022

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k189g2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mynqg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k18f66)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1ywg)
The roots of Long Covid

There are now a number of biological indicators for the potential development of long covid. Immunologist Onur Boyman of Zurich University Hospital and Claire Steves, Clinical Senior Lecturer at King’s College London strives to tell us how pinpointing these factors is now helping in the development of strategies to predict the syndrome and prepare treatment.

The James Webb telescope has reached its final orbit. The years of planning, preparation and rehearsal seem to have paid off. The telescope is now ready to begin its mission of looking back into the early universe. BBC Science correspondent Jonathan Amos has followed the mission.

The widely held view that human development was propelled by our ancestors developing a taste for meat is being questioned by a new analysis of the fossil record. Paleoanthropologist Andrew Barr of George Washington University suggests part of the reason for this assumption is the sampling method, actively looking for evidence to support the hypothesis.

And Michael Boudoin of Lille University has led a team of physicists who have produced the longest-lasting soap bubble ever – they managed to prevent the bubble from popping for well over a year.

Also, How is a small budget pocket radio able to recreate all the atmosphere and sounds of a football match? CrowdScience listener Andy wants to know about the science enabling his radio listening, so presenter CrowdScience Geoff Marsh sets off - microphone in hand - to follow the journey of sound on the radio.

Starting with the microphone, Geoff learns how acoustic energy is converted into electrical signals. Then BBC World Service presenter Gareth takes Geoff to a little-known room in the BBC called the Radio Shack. Gareth demonstrates how these electrical signals are attached to radio waves before being sent over the airwaves and they take a radio kit apart to understand how these waves are received and converted back into sound waves.
Geoff talks to a speech and hearing specialist who, through the use of auditory illusions, shows Geoff that our brains are often filling in the gaps of lower quality audio.

Finally, Geoff visits an acoustic lab at Salford University where he hears a demonstration of ‘object based audio’. This technology could enable us to create our own bespoke mix of dramas and sports, such as heightening the commentary sound or choosing to hear just the crowd, just by using the everyday speakers many have lying around them, such as mobile phones.
(Image credit: Horacio Villalobos/Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k18jyb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs75c4xl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8myx6q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwj)
Gene therapy hope for sickle cell patients

Positive results for a handful of patients on a trial in the United States offers hope for the millions of people around the world living with sickle cell disease. Doctors say the gene-editing therapy literally 'turns back the clock' by reducing the number of red blood cells that are sickle-shaped and increasing the type that a baby has, which can carry more oxygen around the body. Other cheaper, more widely-available medications can work, but we hear how the health of sickle cell patients depends on where they live.

After two years of caring for patients with Covid-19, many healthcare workers are exhausted. This week’s guest, Graham Easton, who is Professor of Communication Skills at Barts and The Royal London Hospital, explains how mistakes can happen when doctors carry out repetitive tasks when they are tired.

Could changing your asthma inhaler be better for you and the planet? We hear from Caroline and her son Sebastian, who found that switching to dry-powder inhalers transformed their lives.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath and Samara Linton

(Picture: Scientist analysing a blood sample in a laboratory. Photo credit: Krisanapong Detraphiphat/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k18npg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct3c7z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k18sfl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw3)
Hunger in Helmand

Pascale Harter introduces insights and analysis from BBC correspondents and journalists around the world.

Since the Taliban takeover last year, Afghanistan is more at peace than it’s been for a long time. It’s an opportunity for tens of thousands of the three million Afghans, who moved again and again as the fighting followed them, to finally head back to their land. But many farmers are finding it a bleak homecoming. Andrew North got a first-hand view when he travelled to Helmand province, which was for years the scene of some of the heaviest fighting between British and US forces and the Taliban.

In Turkey, many people are preoccupied at the moment by matters very close to home, like how they will afford the family food shop. Salaries have been slashed by soaring inflation. But that doesn’t stop some Turks dreaming big about the country’s future and hoping to expand its role in the world. Tim Whewell recently went to Istanbul to hear about one man's vision to extend Turkey’s influence far and wide.

Senegal, in West Africa, has a lively and longstanding culture of democratic elections. For the past twenty years and more it’s kept to a steady schedule of local, regional and national votes, with regular and peaceful transfers of power. The latest regional elections, held last week, saw the ruling party coalition, Benno Bokk Yaakaar, lose the mayors’ offices in two big cities, the capital, Dakar, and Ziguinchor, in the Casamance region in the west of the country. It’s been seen as a sign that the popularity of President Macky Sall’s is falling, and that his government may lose the next national election. But it’s not just the candidates in the headlines who sway the voters. Lucinda Rouse rented a place in the Senegalese capital and found herself living above the home of a community leader with considerable influence.

In October last year, Japan elected Fumio Kishida to be its Prime Minister - and as the new government got itself organised, an old story re-emerged. Mr Kishida planned to move into the official Prime Minister’s residence, in order to be closer to work. There’s nothing structurally wrong with the place, it’s a handsome Art Deco building in good repair, put up in 1929 and it comes with the job. But it had been unoccupied for more than a decade as previous Prime Ministers wouldn’t set foot there. Rupert Wingfield Hayes explains why.

(Image: A man rides his bike along a dirt road in Helmand province, November 2021. Credit: Javed Tanveer/AFP)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mz4pz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k18x5q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs75cj4z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mz8g3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct3c80)
Fighting tobacco in Zambia

In Zambia, smoking is on the rise. One woman wants to change that. BBC global health correspondent Tulip Mazumdar follows the story of Brenda Chitindi in her efforts to get tobacco control on the agenda.

As tobacco production and consumption increase in Zambia, Brenda and others are campaigning for the introduction of a Tobacco Control Bill to the nation's legislature. It is a campaign they have been fighting for over a decade. With a new government elected in 2021, could this be the moment for change?

Tulip speaks to those pressing for the bill as well as hearing the arguments against its introduction. She looks into the culture of tobacco use in Zambia and the role of tobacco companies in society. Widening her focus across the continent, Tulip uncovers the trends in tobacco production and consumption elsewhere in Africa. Countries such as Kenya have introduced stricter tobacco control measures - does this hint at what the future for Zambia might hold?

(Photo: Hand putting out a cigarette in an ashtray. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k190xv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytn09rmf5y)
Portugal prepares to go to the polls

Portugal’s president is appealing to voters to take part in today’s elections, despite the record number of coronavirus cases. Hundreds of thousands of people who are isolating have been asked to wait for the end of the day before casting their ballots.

Also in the programme – thousands of truckers and other protesters converge on Parliament Hill in Canada’s capital city today to voice their opposition to vaccine mandates and other Covid restrictions.

To discuss this and more, Julian Worricker is joined by Elif Shafak, an award-winning Turkish-British author and women’s rights activist, and Professor Sir Andrew Pollard, Director of the Oxford Vaccine Group.

(Picture: Polling booths are assembled for Portugal's snap election Credit: Reuters / Nunes)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k194nz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytn09rmjy2)
Tensions rise in the Ukraine-Russia crisis

The West is hoping the threat of severe economic sanctions will stop Russia from invading Ukraine. Sanctions expert Dr. Maria Shagina with the Finnish Institute of Foreign Affairs, and Nathalie Tocci, director or the Italian Institute of Foreign affairs, will help make sense of what is on the table for Russia.

Also in the programme, you may not have heard of it, but the seventh annual Mabati-Cornell Kiswahili prize for literature was just awarded in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Last year’s winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature, Abdulrazak Gurnah, joins us to explain if this award is helping to raise the profile of writers in African languages.

To discuss this and more, Julian Worricker is joined by Elif Shafak, an award-winning Turkish-British author and women’s rights activist, and professor Sir Andrew Pollard, director of the Oxford Vaccine Group.

(Photo: Ukrainian soldiers. Credit Levin/Reuters)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k198f3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytn09rmnp6)
More military aid to be sent to Ukraine and Baltics

Canada’s Minister of National Defence, Anita Anand, explains how her country will extend its military training mission for Ukraine, and is also pledging military aid options.

Also on the programme, Italy re-elected its 80-year-old president, though he had said repeatedly he wanted to step down. But President Sergio Mattarella was persuaded to stay after MP’s failed to agree on an another candidate after seven rounds of voting. We find out exactly what happened.

To discuss this and more, Julian Worricker is joined by Elif Shafak, an award-winning Turkish-British author and women’s rights activist, and Professor Sir Andrew Pollard, Director of the Oxford Vaccine Group.

(Picture: Ukrainian troops in training. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mzmph)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgx)
Cancer, food and me

Can you imagine suddenly finding that it hurts to eat? Or that when you take a bite of your favourite meal you feel nothing?

In this episode, we’re talking about something that isn’t much talked about: what happens to your relationship with food when you’ve got cancer.

Ruth Alexander is joined by three women who want you to know about a side effect of treatment that they weren’t fully prepared for - the loss of their sense of taste.

They share how what is a relatively minor detail, given a devastating diagnosis, nevertheless had a huge effect on their everyday routine, their interactions with family and friends, their sense of self.

Hear how they learned to cope and how, out of the depths of this distressing experience, came a new appreciation of the everyday.

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Grapefruit with pills coming out of it. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Producer:

Sarah Stolarz


Contributors:

Heather McCollum

Semira Oguntoyinbo

Angharad Underwood


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k19d57)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mzrfm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky5)
Dynamo: Turning illness into magic

Steven Frayne, aka Dynamo, isn't your usual white-gloved magician pulling rabbits out of hats. His tricks have seen him walk on water and stroll down the side of a huge building. He's one of the world's most celebrated magicians but it hasn't been an easy path to success for the British entertainer. His entire life has been hampered by Crohn's disease, a debilitating inflammatory bowel disease. But this adversity has been the source of inspiration for some of his best tricks. This programme was first broadcast in June 2020.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presented and produced by Saskia Edwards.

(Photo: Dynamo. Credit: Courtesy of Clare Britt)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k19hxc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Women Building Peace (w3ct3flb)
Bosnia-Herzegovina

A woman born after her mother was raped during the Bosnian conflict of the 1990s says the struggle for reparation and reconciliation continues 25 years later. Suzanne Kianpour discusses what we can learn from past atrocities to help resolve the current political crisis, with Oscar-nominated Bosnian film director Jasmila Zbanic, and Council of Europe human rights commissioner Dunja Mijatovic.

A co-production by BBC and Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security.

Presenter: Suzanne Kianpour. Produced by Philip Reevell for BBC World Service.

Image: Council of Europe human rights commissioner Dunja Mijatovic (Credit: Council of Europe)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mzw5r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2gj2)
The Uighur poets

Uighur poetry is and has been for centuries a fundamental part of the culture and members of the community write poetry and often recite part poems that have been passed down the generations and learn off by heart. As the community face widespread persecution by the Chinese authorities and at a time of great despair and fear for them, Uighurs speak to us about the ways in which poetry offers ways of support, succour and resistance.

The programme features the voices and works of Uighurs, poets and experts from across the world.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k19mnh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs75d7mr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mzzxw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct3032)
Why We Play

Adulthood and the importance of play

As an adult you have responsibilities, and life settles into routine. Researchers have found that even in the most boring jobs, workers find ways to introduce elements of play to make the time pass, while people with more creative occupations use play to free their imaginations and release creativity. The Situationist art movement of 1950s Paris thought that play was a political act, and that the city could be used as a playground to rebel against the restrictions of capitalism. Their legacy lives on in the immersive “street games”, such as snakes and ladders played in multi storey car parks and city-wide zombie hunts. But this natural tendency to play is also being co-opted by employers, some of whom want to “gamify” boring jobs, to make workers more productive by turning the tasks into a game, or who encourage their employers to play at work to make them more creative. Can workers really be asked to play on demand, and what happens when they play in ways that the employers never expected or wanted?

Presenter: Steffan Powell
Producer: Jolyon Jenkins

(Photo: Performers of The Free Association. Credit: Lidia Crisafulli)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k19rdm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Evidence (w3ct2zql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k19w4r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz8svgc)
Ukraine: Nato chief says Russia to decide between diplomacy or war

Nato's secretary general has said it is up to Russia to decide whether to pursue a diplomatic path offered by Western powers or one of confrontation over Ukraine. Jens Stoltenberg deflected recent suggestions by the Ukrainian president, Volodymyr Zelenksy, that Western allies had over-reacted to the crisis.

Also in the programme: North Korea has tested its most powerful missile for five years. And Portugal are voting in a snap election to choose a new parliament.

(Credit: Jens Stoltenberg earlier this month. Credit: EPA/Stephanie Lecocq)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k19zww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmf)
Pleasure and pain: The philosophy of Jeremy Bentham

How do you approach the decisions you make in life? Do you think about them in terms of the maximum pleasure and minimum pain that any choice would lead to for yourself and others around you? If so, you are beginning to think along similar lines to the influential British philosopher and reformer Jeremy Bentham with his concept of Utilitarianism. This was not Bentham’s only contribution to radical thought. With the prison and judicial systems, with education, women’s suffrage, animal rights and the monarchy, throughout his life he came up with a huge body of work that challenged the status quo and still feels relevant today.

Rajan Datar is joined by three expert guests to guide us through the life and work of this remarkable thinker: professor Philip Schofield from University College London who is both the director of the Bentham Project and the general editor of the Collected Works of Jeremy Bentham; Emmanuelle de Champs who is professor of British history and civilisation at CY Cergy Paris University, and Jeffrey Kaplan who is assistant professor of philosophy at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro.

(Image: Coloured engraving of Jeremy Bentham, early 19th century. Credit: Stock Montage/Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl8)
Fertility rates: Baby boom or bust?

Under lockdown, couples were destined to find themselves closer than ever before, but despite what you would think – this did not result in a higher birth rate. In fact in developed countries across the world the birth rate is falling; we spoke to Professor Marina Adshade about why this is and what this could mean for the future.

(Photo: Newborn baby in a hospital crib. Credit: Getty images)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1b3n0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1b7d4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tpvhmjw3y)
Live Sporting Action

Join Delyth Lloyd on Sportsworld as we have the latest from the Africa Cup of Nations Quarter finals, reaction to the men’s singles final at the Australian Open and look ahead to the Concacaf World Cup Qualifiers.

Plus we have previews of Rugby Union’s Six Nations Championship and the NFL’s Conference Championship games.

Image: Egypt's players celebrate after winning the Africa Cup of Nations Cameron 2021 round of 16 football match between Côte d'Ivoire and Egypt at Stade de Japoma in Douala on January 26, 2022. (Photo by Ayman Aref/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1blmj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs75f6ls)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8n0ywx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2gj2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1bqcn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dj0)
The Formula One technology to make mining greener

On Business Weekly we look at the efforts being made to reduce the carbon footprints of mining companies. One of the largest iron ore producers, Fortescue Metals, is looking to reduce its carbon emissions and has snapped up the technology research arm of the Williams Formula One team to help them do it. Plus, we examine the continuing war on drugs and how the Mexican cartels have been taking advantage of the pandemic restrictions in the United States. Also, we ask if having one or two wealthy owners in the world of football is the best route to a winning strategy. We review the deal that the Australian government struck to buy the licence for the Aboriginal flag – now that the image is free to use, is that the end of the matter? And Bob Dylan is, once again, selling off his assets – this time, his back catalogue is going to Sony Music for an estimated $200m. Business Weekly is presented by Matthew Davies and produced by Philippa Goodrich.

(Image: Williams Formula 1 testing in Abu Dhabi, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1bv3s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz8ttfd)
Rafal Nadal most successful man in tennis history

The Spanish tennis player overcame injury to defy the odds and win his 21st grand slam singles title at the Australian Open. His two closest rivals Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic, now trail just behind him with 20 Grand Slam titles each

Also on the programme Sudan cracks down on peaceful protestors, and why Belgians have the right have to disconnect

(Picture: Rafael Nadal poses with the Norman Brookes Challenge Cup as he celebrates victory in his men’s singles final match against Daniil Medvedev at the 2022 Australian Open. Credit: Andy Cheung/Getty Images)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1byvx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3bhkr8dw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0swds0wb1j)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8n1b49)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1c2m1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 Women Building Peace (w3ct3flb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8n1fwf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]



MONDAY 31 JANUARY 2022

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbh1mb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy5dwq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2gj2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbh5cg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlnd8jvsjq)
Spotify clamps down on Covid-19 misinformation

We start the programme looking into Spotify and The Joe Rogan Experience - it's Spotify's most popular podcast which has come under scrutiny for platforming what critics and artists like Neil Young have called Covid-19 misinformation. Chris Cooke is a music industry expert and the founder of a consultancy called CMU Insights who have been looking into the challenges facing digital media companies like Spotify.

Next Our correspondent in Lisbon, Alison Roberts, joined us live to discuss the final stages of counting in Portugal's general election.

Our US Market report with Economist Michael Hughes had a look at whether things are as rosy as they once were with the US markets.

If you've decided to follow Veganuary and embrace a completely plant-based diet for a month, you now have only a matter of hours left. This year there's been a noticeable boom - not just in people taking part but also in the amount of vegan food that's on sale. Even from fast-food restaurants like McDonalds. But is this just a one-off occasion for people to try to be 'good' for a month, or are tastes gradually shifting away from meat? Tonight's presenter David Harper asked Ramsey Baghdadi, an Associate Analyst at Global Data Plc in London, who studies trends in vegan fast food product.

Lastly, Demand for beauty "tweakments" - small changes to your appearance, as opposed to full-on face changing plastic surgery - is soaring. Hours spent on video conferencing has forced people to constantly scrutinise their appearance, so what exactly are people having done and is it worth the price tag?
Our colleague Elizabeth Hotson also looked into how being an attractive female affects your work prospects and how much this all costs for some people.

(IMAGE CREDIT: GETTY)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy5jmv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct30j2)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The venomous vendetta

Whilst watching a documentary about some poisonous frogs, Curio Janni in Amsterdam, started to wonder what would happen if a frog licked itself or another frog of the same species. She asks Dr Adam Rutherford and Professor Hannah Fry to investigate whether an animal would react badly to a toxin it itself produces? In essence 'can a venomous snake kill itself by biting itself?'

Of course the answer is complicated, but the sleuths know exactly who to ask.

Steve Backshall, award-winning wildlife explorer, best known for his BBC series 'Deadly 60'. Author of 'Venom – Poisonous Creatures in the Natural World'. Steve has been bitten, stung and spat at by a plethora of venomous creatures during his career. He also studied the first known venomous newt - the sharp-ribbed newt - a creature that has sharpened ribs that when it's under attack, it will squeeze its body force those ribs out through its skin, coating them in venom, which is then delivered into the mouth of an attacker.

Professor Nick Casewell, studies venomous snakes and their impact on humans. He works on treatments for snakebites at the Liverpool School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Snakebites have a huge impact on communities in South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa and South America. It's now been reinstated as one of the most serious neglected tropical diseases by the World Health Organisation. Traditional treatments - antivenins - can be expensive, difficult to access and don't always work - Nick is looking into alternative medicines to treat snakebite victims.

Dr. Ronald Jenner is Principle Researcher in the Comparative Venomics group at the Natural History Museum's Life Sciences, Invertebrates Division and co-wrote the book ‘Venom -the secrets of nature's deadliest weapon.’ He explains the evolutionary arms race between venomous predators and their prey and poisonous prey and their predators. He explains how resistance to venom has evolved and how venom has evolved to be more or less powerful over time, answering another Curio - Scott Probert's question on the evolution of venom.

Christie Wilcox wrote 'Venomous – How Earth’s Deadliest Creatures Mastered Biochemistry'. She studied the molecular basis of lionfish venom. Christie describes how venom and immunity to venom works at the molecular level.


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbh93l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgkx2v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy5ncz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2drs)
How committed is China to climate change?

At the UN climate summit in Glasgow last year, China and the United States announced they will work together on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Experts say this is a significant move because China and the United States are the two largest economies and polluters.

China emits the most greenhouse gasses, around 27% of global emissions, but it is walking a narrow path between its energy crisis and its commitment to climate work.

There are reports of plans to build up to 80 new coal power plants.

Without China acting, attempts to keep global temperatures down will not work.

How committed is China to climate change?

Presenters Kate Lamble and Jordan Dunbar are joined by:

Changhua Wu, executive director of the Professional Association for China’s Environment
Todd Stern, former climate envoy, United States
Bernice Lee, research director, Chatham House

Producer: Darin Graham
Reporter: Sophia Yan
Researchers: Tatyana Movshevich and Matilda Welin
Series Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound Engineer: Tom Brignell


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbhdvq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Women Building Peace (w3ct3flb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy5s43)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbhjlv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgl4l3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy5ww7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9s)
Rock on! The art of dry stone walling

Dry stone walling is an ancient craft that goes back thousands of years and remains an important means of enclosing fields in rural areas of Europe, and of constructing terraces for agriculture in more mountainous regions. But it’s a craft, along with other countryside skills, that’s practiced by fewer people these days. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women from the US and Italy about their passion for building beautiful walls.

Serena Cattaneo is from Genoa Northern Italy where the walls helped establish terraces for olive and vine groves in the mountains. She started dry stone walling five years ago and now, as well as working restoring walls, she also teaches the skill at workshops. She’s passionate about the trade and keen to develop a women’s network as she’s yet to meet another female waller in Italy.

Whitney Brown was 26 years old when she met a dry stone waller at a festival in Washington, within weeks she was out on the hill with him in Wales wielding a hammer and learning everything she could about the craft. She’s since taken her skills back to the United States where she teaches others, but returns as often as she can to work in the UK.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

(Image: (L) Serena Cattaneo, credit Serena Cattaneo. (R) Whitney Brown, courtesy Whitney Brown. Background: wall in Sori, credit Serena Cattaneo.)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbhnbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1rxqcq)
Tennis star Rafael Nadal wins Australian Open

Rafael Nadal wins a record 21st Grand Slam men's title after his win in the Australian Open. We hear more about how the tennis star became the greatest of all time.

Chaos in the Canadian capital, Ottawa, as truckers block streets around parliament in a second day of protest against the country's vaccine mandate.

A weather warning for Southern Africa as yet another storm gathers - as the region still deals with the devastation caused by storm Ana last week.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbhs33)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1rxv3v)
Australian Open: Tennis star Rafael Nadal becomes greatest of all time

Rafeal Nadal beats Russia's Daniil Medvedev in a classic Australian Open final. We hear from a fan who has watched Nadal play 67 times, including this most recent final, on what makes him a champion.

Rwanda is re-opening its border with Uganda today after being closed for nearly three years. Rwanda previously said Ugandan-backed rebels opposed to the government of President Paul Kagame, but following this recent diplomatic resolution, will trade between the two countries start excelling again?

And we go to Myanmar, where after a year since the military seized power, a growing number of Burmese people are fleeing the country or taking up arms in what is now an escalating civil war between the army and civilians opposing the military coup.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbhwv7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1rxyvz)
Rafeal Nadal makes historic win at Australian Open

As Rafael Nadal becomes the most successful male tennis player in the history of the sport, we hear from thrilled fans reacting to his win. We also get the thoughts of former Tokyo Olympian tennis player Ellen Perez on this news.

Following the military coup in Burkina Faso, a mission from the West Africa regional block, ECOWAS, and the United Nations are visiting the capital Ouagadougou today. It comes as French officials said on Sunday that sixty militants have been killed in operations involving local and French troops this month.

And we hear from Katie Higgins, an art teacher who moved to Dubai from Ireland and switched her love for horse riding to racing camels. She joins a newly formed all female camel riding team in the United Arab Emirates.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbj0lc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n70)
Isabel Allende: What does South America's future hold?

The decisive victory by Gabriel Boric, the left-wing candidate, in Chile’s recent elections has reset the button on the country’s political path. He defeated the right-wing presidential contender in a result which observers believe may be replicated when other Latin American countries go to the polls this year. Zeinab Badawi speaks to Isabel Allende, the acclaimed Chilean writer whose uncle was Salvador Allende, the left-wing Chilean leader removed in a coup in 1973. Isabel Allende has lived in four Latin American countries and knows the continent well. How does she view current trends in South America?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy6cvr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j60)
African music goes global

This is a big moment for African music on the global stage. African artists are winning international awards and embarking on tours to the US and Europe. And major record companies want a piece of the action. They’ve been busy doing deals to sign African stars with Warner Music buying a controlling stake in a Johannesburg business which bills itself as “the home of African music”. So what’s going on, and what does it all mean for a new generation of African artists? Mike Johnson talks to singers Nomcebo Zikode from South Africa and Mildred Ashong, aka Eazzy, from Ghana, Phiona Okumu, head of African music at the streaming service Spotify, Yoel Kenan, chief executive of music distribution company Africori and Temi Adeniji, MD of Warner Music South Africa.
(Image: Nomcebo Zikode at the Nomcebo Zikode Foundation Launch at the Houghton Hotel on June 09, 2021 in Johannesburg, South Africa, Credit:Getty)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x23)
Kazakhstan's new capital

In the 1990s, newly independent Kazakhstan created a new capital. It was a vast project and the man behind it was Nursultan Nazarbayev - Kazakhstan's strongman president who stayed in power for 30 years. Not surprisingly perhaps this new capital would eventually be named after him.

Picture: Kazakhstan's capital, Astana, now Nur-Sultan (credit: Shutterstock)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbj4bh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy6hlw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prp)
How does my radio work?

How is a small budget pocket radio able to recreate all the atmosphere and sounds of a football match? CrowdScience listener Andy wants to know about the science enabling his radio listening, so presenter CrowdScience Geoff Marsh sets off - microphone in hand - to follow the journey of sound on the radio.

Starting with the microphone, Geoff learns how acoustic energy is converted into electrical signals. Then BBC World Service presenter Gareth takes Geoff to a little-known room in the BBC called the Radio Shack. Gareth demonstrates how these electrical signals are attached to radio waves before being sent over the airwaves and they take a radio kit apart to understand how these waves are received and converted back into sound waves.
Geoff talks to a speech and hearing specialist who, through the use of auditory illusions, shows Geoff that our brains are often filling in the gaps of lower quality audio.

Finally, Geoff visits an acoustic lab at Salford University where he hears a demonstration of ‘object based audio’. This technology could enable us to create our own bespoke mix of dramas and sports, such as heightening the commentary sound or choosing to hear just the crowd, just by using the everyday speakers many have lying around them, such as mobile phones.

Tune in and join us!
Presented by Geoff Marsh
Produced by Melanie Brown

[Image Credit: Getty Images]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbj82m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy6mc0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbjctr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hglzt0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy6r34)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbjhkw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jvb)
My love affair with the instrument that reminds me of home

Syrian musician Maya Youssef is in love with her qanun, a traditional Middle Eastern stringed instrument. Like a family member, it has got her through some difficult times and it consoled Maya as she watched from afar as her homeland was ripped apart by war. Maya's talent at playing the qanun gave her the opportunity to live in the UK and she has taken it on tour playing in refugee centres for new arrivals and at the Royal Albert Hall. Maya tells Mobeen Azhar about her journey with the qanun. Her upcoming album is called Finding Home.

Kenechukwu Ogbuagu's world revolves around board games. He invents them, designs them and makes them with his own hands for his company Nibcard Games. Kenechukwu also hosts the African Boardgame Convention and runs a Games cafe in Abuja. He tells Mobeen what sparked his obsession with games.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

(Photo: Maya Youssef and her qanun. Credit: Igor Studio)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x23)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbjmb0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgm798)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy6zld)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbjr24)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27l0qcr)
Sanctions plan for Russian elite

The US and other Western powers have drawn up a list of members of the Russian elite who will be targeted with sanctions in the event of further aggression towards Ukraine. The Kremlin has called the measures an open attack on Russian business.

Also on the programme: A year on from the coup in Myanmar - civilians are making their own guns to take on the military; and the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has received a report into lockdown parties in Downing Street.

(Photo: Tank crews take part in military exercises held by a brigade of the Ukrainian Armed Forces. Credit: Reuters/Vyacheslav Madiyevsky)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbjvt8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n70)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy772n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y48dsk932y3)
Should Spotify be called a platform or a publisher?

Joe Rogan has pledged to try harder to offer more balanced views on his podcast, after he was criticised by Neil Young and Joni Mitchell for helping to spread Covid misinformation. The Canadian musicians asked to have their music pulled from Spotify as a result. Spotify has since said it is working to add advisory warnings to any podcast discussing Covid-19. But does that mean it is moving from a platform to a publisher, with the different regulations that that would entail?

Also in the programme, voters in Portugal give a clear 'yes' to their Prime Minister after a snap general election - we hear what this means for the country's economy.

Plus - why the time is now for African musicians.

PHOTO: Spotify/Reuters


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbjzkd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzl4fzzhv)
UK government lockdown parties inquiry

In Britain, an official report into parties held during coronavirus lockdowns at the Downing Street office of the prime minister, Boris Johnson, has highlighted a failure of leadership at the heart of government. We explain today’s developments.

Spotify says it’s working to add a special advisory notice to any podcast that includes a discussion about Covid-19 after criticism of its work with Joe Rogan, who has included vaccine-sceptics in his podcast. We’ll explain the story and hear from people who have considered cancelling or have cancelled their Spotify subscriptions over Joe Rogan.

We hear a conversation on how the Ukraine-Russia crisis is affecting family dynamics and hear from one Russian-Ukrainian couple in Kyiv.

One of our regular coronavirus health experts, Dr Eleanor Murray from the Boston University School of Public Health, answers listener’s coronavirus questions. You can send in a question via WhatsApp on +447730 751925

(Credit: Prime Minister Boris Johnson delivers a statement to MPs in the House of Commons on the government lockdown parties inquiry: Sue Gray report. January 31, 2022. Credit: PA)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbk39j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzl4g037z)
Ukraine-Russia tensions

As the political crisis deepens between Russia and Ukraine, we hear how it is affecting family dynamics, and hear from one Russian-Ukrainian couple living in Kyiv.

In Britain, an official report into parties held during coronavirus lockdowns at the Downing Street office of the prime minister, Boris Johnson, has highlighted a failure of leadership at the heart of government. We explain today’s developments. We also hear how the story is viewed in Europe.

Spotify says it’s working to add a special advisory notice to any podcast that includes a discussion about Covid-19 after criticism of its work with Joe Rogan, who has included vaccine-sceptics in his podcast. We explain the story and hear from people who have considered cancelling or have cancelled their Spotify subscriptions over Joe Rogan.

Our regular health expert, Professor Manfred Green, from the University of Haifa, Israel, answers your questions about Covid-19

Photo: A family picture of Alexander, Zarena and their daughter Arina. Credit: Alexander and Zarena.)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbk71n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jvb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x23)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbkbss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgmys1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy7q25)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nskd9n6m4)
2022/01/31 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbkgjx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy7tt9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1m91)
African science, African future

Professor Tom Kariuki has spent his career battling for science in Africa, both as a leading immunologist and as the former director of the Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa. Now, as the world comes to grips with the coronavirus pandemic and a global movement for social justice, could this prove an opportunity for the transformation of African science?

Tom talks to leading scientists in Africa about the successes they have achieved as well as the profound challenges they face, from the complexities of international funding to keeping the lights on. He asks who African science belongs to and benefits, and what needs to happen if its future is to be prosperous.

(Photo: A team of scientists in a lab. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbkl91)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27l1kln)
Failure of leadership over Downing Street lockdown parties

The British prime minister, Boris Johnson, has apologised to parliament and promised changes, after a report by a senior civil servant into parties held at Downing Street during coronavirus lockdowns highlighted a failure of leadership. The report was greeted with anger by many MPs including those in his own Conservative party.

Also in the programme: President Biden has said Russia is threatening the modern international order, and not just Ukraine; how Myanmar looks, a year after the coup; and Beijing's attempt to place the entire Winter Olympics in a Covid-19 free bubble.

(Photo: Boris Johnson. Credit: Reuters)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbkq15)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3prvz0l4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sws1b326s)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy829k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrth3f35n3)
How much will the Joe Rogan scandal hurt Spotify?

Once Rogan started talking to people about Coronavirus he was accused of spreading misinformation, and artists including Neil Young, and Joni Mitchell threatened to remove their music from Spotify. Spotify has promised to post advisory warnings, Joe Rogan has apologised but the damage has been done.
We spoke to Our North American Tech Correspondant James Clayton about the practical implications of this scandal and how worried Spotify should actually be.

Sony has done a deal to buy Bungie for $3.6 billion. Now Bungie is a games developer and it comes soon after a rafte of similar deals. In fact the last year saw over a thousand private placements, mergers, and acquisitions in the games industry. To mention two of the biggest; Take-Two Interactive bought Zynga for $12.7 billion and Microsoft spent a massive 69 billion dollars buying Activision. There have recently been many other such deals, so what is the significance of Bungie, a question we put to our New York Business Correspondent Samira Hussein.

Lastly, we're seeing a big moment for African music on the global stage. African artists are winning international awards and embarking on tours to the US and Europe. It seems major record companies want a piece of the action. They’ve been busy doing deals to sign African stars. Just recently, Warner Music in the US bought a controlling stake in a Johannesburg business which bills itself as “the home of African music”. So what’s going on, and what does it all mean for a new generation of African artists? We hear from Mike Johnson with an extended report.

(IMAGE: GETTY)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbkts9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n70)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy861p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



TUESDAY 01 FEBRUARY 2022

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbkyjf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z85)
Fifty years since Northern Ireland's Bloody Sunday

In one of the most controversial episodes of 'The Troubles' in Northern Ireland, UK soldiers fired on unarmed Catholic protesters, killing 13 in January 1972. We look at why British troops were there, what happened on that day, and how it further polarised Protestant Unionist and Catholic Republican communities. Successive UK governments insisted the soldiers had returned fire in self defence, until a public inquiry reported in 2010 that the soldiers had in fact fired first - and at fleeing, unarmed, protesters. The then Prime Minister, David Cameron, apologised on behalf of the government. We'll speak to former BBC Northern Ireland Editor, Eimear O'Callaghan, who as a teenager kept a diary of life in sectarian Belfast in the 1970s, later published into a book, and who reported for years on the struggle for peace.

Photo: A British soldier grabs hold of a protester by the hair. (Credit: AFP/Getty Images)


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbl28k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqtck7hfl8)
Russian and US envoys clash at the UN Security Council

We start the programme looking at the the angry clashes between Russian and US envoys at the UN Security Council. The US called a meeting to discuss the build up of some 100,000 Russian troops on on its borders with Ukraine. US Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield said the mobilisation was the biggest Europe had seen in decades. Her Russian counterpart accused the US of fomenting hysteria and unacceptable interference in Russia's affairs.
The US and UK have promised further sanctions if Russia invades Ukraine. UK Foreign Secretary Liz Truss said legislation was being prepared which would target a wider range than currently of individuals and businesses close to the Kremlin. A US official said Washington's sanctions meant individuals close to the Kremlin would be cut off from the international financial system.

Next we spoke to our North American Tech Correspondent James Clayton about whether Spotify had to take responsibility for the material it was hosting - and what the implications of and responsibility were.

Over to Africa where just recently, Warner Music in the US bought a controlling stake in a Johannesburg business which bills itself as “the home of African music”. We hear from Mike Johnson in an extended report about what it all means for a new generation of African artists.

Later this week, Beijing will become the first city ever to host both the Summer and Winter Olympics. This year's Games have given the authorities a huge logistical challenge: how to put on one of the world’s biggest sporting events in a country still committed to “zero-covid” at a time when the omicron variant is spreading rapidly in many parts of the world. The answer has been to enforce enormous, strict, separation bubbles - as our China Correspondent Stephen McDonell tells us.

Lastly, Belgian civil servants will no longer need to answer emails or phone calls out of hours after the country became the latest in Europe to offer workers the right to disconnect. The law comes into effect on Tuesday and means that 65,000 federal officials are able to make themselves unavailable at the end of the normal working day unless there are “exceptional” reasons for not doing so.

Throughout the programme we are joined by Diane Brady, the assistant Managing Editor of Forbes and Mehmal Sarfraz – the Co-founder of the online news and lifestyle platform The Current PK.

(IMAGE CREDIT: GETTY)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbl60p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgnszy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy8k92)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct3flh)
Pakistan's long game

Owen Bennett-Jones examines how the government in Tehran outwitted the United States in Iraq, which resulted in Tehran having more influence in Baghdad than Washington.

He also examines how Islamabad pulled off much the same trick in relation to Afghanistan. But whilst Iran was under US sanctions, Pakistan secured its objectives in Afghanistan whilst simultaneously receiving billions of dollars worth of US aid. As one retired Pakistan intelligence chief bragged – the US was helping secure its own defeat.

Owen highlights the occasions on which Pakistan (despite many denials) acknowledged that it did have a relationship with the Afghan Taliban. He looks at the nature of that relationship and explains how Pakistan felt it had little choice. Islamabad always realised that Western forces would leave Afghanistan and that it had to prepare for the situation after the withdrawal.

He speaks to Pakistani and US critics of Pakistan’s policy and asks whether the Pakistani strategy will backfire. It may now be enjoying a degree of control in Afghanistan, but how great is the threat from an emboldened Pakistani Taliban which wants power in Pakistan itself. And most of all how come the most powerful country on earth was outwitted by two regional powers, first Iran and then Pakistan.

(Photo: A man holds a national flag of Pakistan as he walks along a street in Islamabad. Credit: Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbl9rt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jvb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x23)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htblfhy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgp1h6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy8ssb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcl)
Rex, King of Mardi Gras

As the Mardi Gras season draws near, In the Studio looks back to last year’s Mardi Gras and goes behind the scenes with the Krewe of Rex, New Orleans’s oldest parading organisation, to see how the masters of carnival create their mobile sculptures.

New Orleans reporter, Betsy Shepherd follows Rex’s creative team for a year - the length of time it takes to make the ornate floats that are the fixture of Mardi Gras street parades. But the last couple of years have turned out to be anything but typical. She speaks with creative director Henri Schindler and his team of artisans about the history and craft surrounding this most ephemeral of art forms as well as the challenges and delights of building a fantasy world amidst a pandemic.

What did the 2021 Mardi Gras season bring? Join Betsy for a parade of sounds from Mardi Gras’s most ardent practitioners as they work to keep the spirit of carnival alive.

Presented by Betsy Shepherd
Produced by Betsy Shepherd and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Image Courtesy of the Rex Organization


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htblk82)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1s0m8t)
Britain: Report reveals failure of leadership over Downing Street lockdown parties

A report in Britain by senior civil servant Sue Gray has highlighted a failure of leadership for allowing parties to take place at the Prime Minister's residence when the country was under strict lockdown. In long-awaited findings, the senior civil servant says some events "should not have been allowed to take place".

The UN human rights chief has acknowledged that Myanmar is in a state of civil war, a year after the military seized power. The UN official described the situation in Myanmar as catastrophic, and has said the international community has failed to prevent gross violations by the military regime.

Also, we hear more about the asteroid alert system that scans the sky for dangerous extra-terrestrial bodies.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htblp06)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1s0r0y)
British Prime Minister reacts to report outlining a 'failure of leadership'

After weeks of damaging headlines for the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, a long waited report looking into lockdown parties at the British Prime Minister's residence criticises failures of leadership and judgement. We take a look at what this report means for the Prime Minister and his government.

The US and Russia have clashed during the UN Security Council meeting as they discuss Moscow's build-up of troops on its borders with Ukraine. Russia has moved about 100,000 troops to Ukraine's border but denies it is planning an invasion. We hear from a senior Russian representative at the United Nations.

And January was the deadliest month for reporters in Mexico for years, with a fourth murder. Roberto Toledo was shot dead outside the offices of his online publication in the western state of Michoacan.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htblsrb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1s0vs2)
British prime minister apologies over report investigating parties during lockdown

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has apologised after an inquiry into parties held during a strict national lockdown represented a “serious failure” of judgment. In the published report that came out on Monday, civil servant Sue Gray criticised the culture in Downing Street among senior civil servants and staff. However, an updated report will be released after police have investigated allegations of staff breaking Covid lockdown rules.

The UN human rights chief has acknowledged that Myanmar is in a state of civil war, a year after the military seized power. We hear about the once peaceful protesters who have taken up arms.

And we hear about the historical research that uncovered the lost story of Britain's first Black Olympic athlete: Louis Bruce competed in the 1908 London games as a wrestler.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htblxhg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm4)
Using VR to change lives

Virtual Reality is being used by researchers around the world to change people’s lives – helping them confront their own fears and change how they treat other people.

In the UK, a company is using VR to help people with a fear of heights. The automated therapy system puts participants in a virtual multi-story building to help them combat their fear.

A team in Israel is experimenting with using VR to change how people on both sides of the conflict feel about the other.

And in Spain, a virtual reality simulation is being used in prisons. They’re trying to make people convicted of domestic violence aware of what it feels like to be in the position of their victims.

Presenter: Jo Mathys
Producer/Reporter: Serena Tarling

Image: Someone using a VR headset (Getty Images)


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy98rv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jh1)
Pressure mounts on Olympic sponsors

Allegations of human rights' abuses have led to an official boycott by a number of Western governments of the Winter Olympics in Beijing this month. China has responded angrily, accusing them of politicising a sporting bonanza. The International Olympic Committee insists that sport should be above politics. So where does this leave the sponsors on whom the Olympics depend for funding? International marketing expert Allyson Stewart Allen tells us that sponsors are stuck between a rock and hard space, whilst former Olympic skiier Noah Hoffman calls on sponsors to do more to protect athletes, and British politician Rob Hayward is calling for a boycott of Coca Cola products for not taking a stand. Ed Butler presents and the programme producer is Clare Williamson.

(This podcast is an edited version of the original broadcast programme for reasons of accuracy)

(Image: Short Track Speed Skating official training session ahead of the Winter Olympics, Beijing, China, Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6m)
The murder of US journalist Daniel Pearl

In February 2002 a videotape was released by extremists in Pakistan showing the murder of the Wall Street Journal reporter. Daniel Pearl had been investigating the 9/11 attacks. He was kidnapped in Karachi while on his way to interview a radical cleric. In 2015 Farhana Haider spoke to Asra Nomani, Daniel Pearl's friend and colleague.

PHOTO: Daniel Pearl and Asra Nomani in 1995. (Credit: Asra Nomani)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbm17l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct3flh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy9dhz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct1m91)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbm4zq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbm8qv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgpwq3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy9n07)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbmdgz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxl)
The crumbling old house that hid a treasure trove of art

In 2006 Thomas Schultz and his business partner Lawrence Joseph made a business plan. They were looking for a property to buy, do up and sell. Thomas had his eye on a little cottage near his home in Bellport, a small coastal village to the east of New York City. It was old, dilapidated and needed a lot of attention. But when he crawled through the broken garage door he found something entirely unexpected - 7,000 pieces of art, stacked in piles, rolled up canvasses and strewn across the floor. It turned out to be the work of an unknown artist called Arthur Pinajian and a discovery that would change Thomas' life.

Search online to find out more about Arthur Pinajian.

At the end of January, Brazil lost a music icon. Elza Soares has been described as one of the country's greatest singers of all time. Her career spanned six decades and her death produced an outpouring of tributes. To mark the extraordinary life of Brazil's Queen of Samba, we're replaying an interview she gave to Outlook's Harry Graham in May 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar

(Photo: Thomas Schultz in front of an Arthur Pinajian oil painting. Credit: The Estate Collection of Arthur Pinajian)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbmj73)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgq46c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjy9whh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct1m91)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbmmz7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27l3m8v)
Silent strike marks first anniversary of Myanmar military coup

Protests and a silent strike have taken place to mark the first anniversary of the military coup in Myanmar.

Myanmar is seeing increasingly deadly battles between its military and organised groups of armed civilians, with the UN acknowledging the country is now in a state of civil war. We hear from some of those who've taken up arms against the military.

Also in the programme: torrential rains have triggered deadly a landslide in the Ecuadorian capital, Quito; the South African commuters who are steaming mad with the country's crumbling rail network; and why tigers are proving to be survivors.

(Picture shows a near-empty street in downtown Yangon, Myanmar on 1 February 2022. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbmrqc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyb3zr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bw3r37x42)
India ramps up infrastructure spending

Finance minister Nirmala Sitharaman's budget includes plans for new highways and cargo terminals, and aims to kickstart the Indian economy following a wave of Omicron cases. Our correspondent Arunoday Mukharji brings us more details.
An independent report has found systemic racism, sexual harassment and bullying at the Australian mining giant Rio Tinto. We speak to ABC's Peter Ryan in Sydney and ask whether this could be the mining sector's #MeToo moment.
The Winter Olympics start in Beijing on Friday. Many countries are officially boycotting the games over claims of human rights abuses in China, and now allegations are surfacing of athletes being forced to install spyware on their devices. We have an extended report from Ed Butler.
And as the word game Wordle is sold to the New York Times, we look at what's behind its success and what the move could mean for fans of the game.

(Picture: Indian Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbmwgh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzl4g2wdy)
Myanmar: One year after military coup

In Myanmar silent strikes have been staged across the country, in protest at the military coup that took place a year ago. The UN says Myanmar has descended into civil war and has appealed for record sums to help the Burmese people. We hear from people who have stayed at home in protest, as well as getting the latest developments from our colleagues at BBC Burmese.

The Beijing Winter Olympics officially open this week, and we bring you the first in our series of special conversations. Today we look at how China’s human rights record - particularly its treatment of Uyghur Muslims - has prompted a diplomatic boycott by a number of countries. We bring together three Uyghur activists to hear their stories.

And we speak to our correspondent in Ukraine about the diplomatic talks between the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and President Zelensky in the capital Kyiv.

(Photo: People protest against the military dictatorship in Myanmar outside parliament in London, Britain, 01 February 2022. Credit: EPA/ANDY RAIN)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbn06m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzl4g3052)
Beijing Olympics: Why are some boycotting?

The Beijing Winter Olympics officially open this week, and we bring you the first in our series of special conversations. Today we look at how China’s human rights record - particularly its treatment of Uyghur Muslims - has prompted a diplomatic boycott by a number of countries. We bring together three Uyghur activists to hear their stories.

In Myanmar silent strikes have been staged across the country, in protest at the military coup that took place a year ago. The UN says Myanmar has descended into civil war and has appealed for record sums to help the Burmese people. We hear from people who have stayed at home in protest, as well as getting the latest developments from our colleagues at BBC Burmese.

And we speak to our Spanish language service reporter about deadly landslides in Ecuador and another killing of a journalist in Mexico.

(Photo: Tibetans and members of the Belgium Uyghur Association protest in front of the European Union headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, January 4, 2022. Credit: Reuters/Yves Herman)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbn3yr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbn7pw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgqvp4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyblz8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nskd9r3j7)
2022/02/01 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbncg0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct3flh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjybqqd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ltb)
First-ever unassisted robotic surgery

The first-ever robotic surgery without a human surgeon guiding it has been successfully performed at Johns Hopkins University. The Smart Tissues Autonomous Robot (STAR) completed a keyhole procedure called intestinal anastomosis – the sewing together of two sections of soft bowel - on pigs. More than a million of these surgeries are performed each year in the US alone and they need to be carried out very precisely and accurately to avoid potentially fatal complications. Professor Axel Krieger, the mechanical engineer on the team, tells Gareth how this is a major advancement in robotic surgery.

Singapore Surveillance
Singapore often introduces innovative tech to its citizens, but there is a lack of transparency about the way the data is collected and used. As public tech becomes more affordable it is becoming increasingly available. While the hope is it will solve complex social problems there is no transparency over the algorithms used. This means we don’t know the kind of prejudices, privileges, and assumptions being built in. Without intervention, societal prejudices will continue to be perpetuated. Peter Guest from the Rest of World website has been looking into the dangers of public tech in Singapore and beyond. He tells us why tech companies need to be more transparent.

unReal City
Backstage at the Brighton Dome looks more like the technical suite of a TV studio than a theatre, as technicians watch multiple screens showing the audience and actors in different rooms - and showing a variety of feeds from their VR headsets - because this piece of immersive theatre, unReal City, takes place in both physical and virtual reality. Reporter Claire Jordan has been meeting with the Director of dreamthinkspeak and disabled artists from Access All Areas – the two companies behind the production - which explores if it’s easier or better to connect in the flesh or as an avatar and if links are stronger in reality or could the Metaverse allow us to re-invent ourselves.



The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

Photo: The smart tissue autonomous robot performing laparoscopic anastomosis. Credit to Jiawei Ge//Johns Hopkins University


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbnh64)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27l4ghr)
Attempted coup in Guinea-Bissau

The president of Guinea-Bissau has made an appearance on social media in the wake of what seems to have been an attempted coup. He said that many members of the security forces have been killed in what he described as a failed attack on democracy. Umaro Sissoco Embalo appeared in a video on the presidency's Facebook page hours after heavy gunfire erupted near government buildings in the capital, Bissau. Soldiers surrounded the compound where Mr Embalo was chairing a cabinet meeting. We hear from the capital.

Also in the programme: President Putin breaks his silence to says it’s the West that is threatening Russia; and how American women footballers score a victory before the season even starts.

Photo: Armed soldiers move on the main artery of the capital after heavy gunfire in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau Credit: Reuters/Stringer


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbnly8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3prw1xh7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sws1b5z3w)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjybz6n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycsmxv0wczh)
US pharma giants to pay Native Americans $590 million over opioids

America's three biggest pharmaceutical distributors and Johnson & Johnson have been ordered to pay up to $665 million to native American tribal communities devastated by the opioid crisis. More than 400 tribes sued the companies, claiming they were inundated with highly addictive painkillers manufactured by J&J and shipped by the distributors who ignored clear signs of abuse and death. We hear from Lloyd Miller, one of the lead attorneys representing a third of the litigating tribes.

An independent report has found systemic racism, sexual harassment and bullying at the Australian mining giant Rio Tinto. We speak to ABC's Peter Ryan in Sydney and ask whether this could be the mining sector's #MeToo moment.

The Winter Olympics start in Beijing on Friday. Many countries are officially boycotting the games over claims of human rights abuses in China, and now allegations are surfacing of athletes being forced to install spyware on their devices. We have an extended report from Ed Butler.

And as the word game Wordle is sold to the New York Times, we look at what's behind its success and what the move could mean for fans of the game.

PHOTO: Getty Images


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbnqpd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyc2ys)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 02 FEBRUARY 2022

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbnvfj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbnz5n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqtck7lbhc)
US pharma giants to pay Native Americans $590 million over opioids

America's three biggest pharmaceutical distributors and Johnson & Johnson have been ordered to pay up to $665 million to native American tribal communities devastated by the opioid crisis. More than 400 tribes sued the companies, claiming they were inundated with highly addictive painkillers manufactured by J&J and shipped by the distributors who ignored clear signs of abuse and death. We hear from Lloyd Miller, one of the lead attorneys representing a third of the litigating tribes.

Tom Brady, one of the greatest players in the history of the American National Football League or NFL, has confirmed his retirement. As quarterback for The Tampa Bay Buccaneers he won seven Super Bowls in an astonishing career spanning 22 seasons. Thirty years ago the idea of a pro-football quaretrback in his 40s would have been unthinkable. But science has changed all that. We speak with sports writer and ex player Chris Ballard.

The Winter Olympics start in Beijing on Friday. Many countries are officially boycotting the games over claims of human rights abuses in China, and now allegations are surfacing of athletes being forced to install spyware on their devices. We have an extended report from Ed Butler.

It is one year since the coup in Myanmar when the military seized control following a general election which Aung San Suu Kyi's NLD party won by a landslide. The former chief Minsister of Myanmar's Shan State Dr Linn Htut was among those imprisoned immediately after the coup. His son, after some 11 months in hiding, escaped to the UK to work as an artist and peace activist.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the show by Alison Van Diggelen of Fresh Dialogues in California and writer and journalist Madhavan Narayanan in Delhi.

PHOTO: Getty Images


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbp2xs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgrpx1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjycg65)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct3033)
Why We Play

Why We Play: Old age

Many of today’s old people grew up in an era when life was hard, retirement short, and opportunities for play limited. But as we live longer, we need to seek out playful activities, for both physical and mental health.

We visit a bridge club for older people, where many members started to learn the game after they retired, to keep their brains sharp and give them social opportunities. We visit a care home in Scotland where the management frequently organise play sessions, such as pretend weddings, and where disco bingo is a regular event. And in Jerusalem, we meet two older men, one Arab, one Jewish, who come together over a shared love of backgammon. But will the old people of tomorrow want to move beyond these traditional games, and if so, what will the play of the future look like?


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbp6nx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbpbf1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgryd9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjycppf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302x)
QAnon: The plot to break reality.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbpg55)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1s3j5x)
Failed coup in Guinea Bissau

President Umaro Sissoco Embalo says the situation is now under control after shooting broke out close to government buildings; he thanked the military for protecting him and said this was the work of those involved in the drugs trade.

President Putin of Russia has accused the United States of ignoring his country's security concerns and seeking to drag it into war.

And Tonga goes into lockdown after the confirmation of two Covid-19 cases.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbpkx9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1s3my1)
Tonga closes border as Covid-19 virus arrives

Coronavirus arrives in Tonga after last month's devastating earthquake; the island chain closes its borders and imposes a full lockdown.

The president of Guinea Bissau says the situation is under control after an apparent coup attempt.

And Tom Brady - said to be the greatest quarterback of all time - retires from American football after winning seven Superbowls in three different decades.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbppnf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1s3rp5)
Tonga: Covid-19 arrives amid post-eruption aid

Tonga has gone into lockdown after foreign aid delivered after the tsunami brought Covid-19 into the country - we'll go to New Zealand from where the situation is being closely monitored.

The President of Guinea Bissau has thanked the military for protecting him following what's been described as an attempted coup - we consider how the illegal drugs trade is impacting the country.

A three day torch relay for the Beijing Olympics has just got underway.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbptdk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncj)
Bassem Youssef: Do we expect too much from satire?

Stephen Sackur speaks to comedian and writer Bassem Youssef. He made his name and won an audience of tens of millions with a satirical comedy show during Egypt’s popular uprising more than a decade ago. But the revolution quickly morphed into authoritarianism and Youssef fled to the US, taking his gift for comedy with him. Did he, and do we still, expect too much from political satire?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyd5ny)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jpt)
The economic cost of conflict in Ukraine

Sanctions, energy supplies, cyber-attacks - how bad could the economic fallout be if the situation in Ukraine spirals out of control?

How likely would Russia be to simply cut the gas supply off to Europe in the middle of winter for example? Ed Butler asks Jane Collin, editor of the UK-based publication, Energy Intelligence. Meanwhile Matthew Olney, director of threat intelligence at Cisco, discusses another possibility - the disabling of key energy and other infrastructure in America by Russian hackers.

Meanwhile the West has plenty of threats it can make against Moscow, in the form of further economic and financial sanctions - including the option of kicking Russia off the SWIFT international financial payments messaging system. But Maria Shagina, a visiting fellow at the Finnish Institute of International Affairs, says the West will need to look beyond sanctions if it wishes to influence President Putin's thinking

(Picture: Ukrainian soldier with rifle; Credit: Wolfgang Schwan/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8w)
The day the world looked up

In June 2012 one of the solar system’s rarest of astronomical events took place, when it was possible to see the planet Venus fly past the face of the Sun. It appears when the orbits of Earth and Venus momentarily line up, but that happens only four times every 243 years. Astronomers in Australia, London and Hawaii tell Nick Holland what it was like watching the sight, one they will never get to see again because they won’t be alive when it next reappears in the year 2117.

(Image: SDO satellite captures an ultra-high definition image of the transit of Venus. Credit Nasa/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbpy4p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct3033)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyd9f2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ltb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbq1wt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct3c7z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbq5my)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgssm6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjydjxb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbq9d2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzv)
Mafia, a murder cover-up and a sister’s battle for justice

Perween Rahman’s assassination in 2013 was one of the most high profile target killings in Pakistan that year. She ran an influential NGO, the Orangi Pilot Project, and had exposed how the mafia were stealing Karachi’s water supply. She also stood up to local land grabbers. So who was behind her murder? Faced with a botched police investigation, Perween’s sister Aquila began a seemingly impossible campaign for justice.

Aquila and Perween’s story is portrayed in the film Into Dust. More details available on https://www.intodustmovie.com/.

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Perween Rahman. Credit: Courtesy of Aquila Ismail/Orangi Pilot Project)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbqf46)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgt13g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjydsdl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ltb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbqjwb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27l6j5y)
Students return to some Afghan universities

Students have returned to some public universities in Afghanistan for the first time since the Taliban seized power in August last year.

But the Islamist authorities have said male and female students should be segregated and the curriculum based on religious principles.

Also in the programme: how insecurity in west Africa is forcing people from their homes; climate change is causing British plants to flower almost a month earlier; and on the 100th anniversary of Ulysses, why is James Joyce's ground-breaking Modernist novel still relevant today?

(Photo shows Taliban fighters standing guard at the main gate of Laghman University in Mihtarlam, Laghman province on 2 February 2022. Credit: Mohd Rasfan/AFP)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbqnmg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyf0wv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4d38v0crp3)
Regulating future technology

The European Union has outlined a strategy for regulation of new and emerging technology. Competition chief Margrethe Vestager gave details of the proposals, and we find out more from Javier Espinoza of the Financial Times. Also in the programme, the oil producers' cartel OPEC and its allies met today, and agreed only a moderate increase in output, despite calls from some oil consumers to go further in a bid to reduce prices. The BBC's Sameer Hashmi fills us in on the details. 20 years ago, America's National Football League introduced the Rooney Rule, in an attempt to increase the number of black and ethnic minority candidates hired to NFL coaching and executive positions. One black coach, Brian Flores, is now suing the league, alleging teams invited him for head coach job interviews purely to pad out their Rooney Rule statistics. Jeremi Duru is a law professor at the American University in Washington DC, helped draw up the Rooney Rule, and gives us his reaction to the lawsuit. There's a warning from the giant investment bank BNY Mellon that global investment firms are missing out on potentially as much as three trillion dollars' worth of investment because they are not attracting female investors. Anne-Marie McConnon from BNY Mellon discusses their findings. Plus, following the launch of a trial four day working week at some companies in the UK, our regular workplace commentator Pilita Clarke explores the costs and benefits of such a model.

Today's edition is presented by Will Bain, and produced by Nisha Patel, Elizabeth Hotson and Sara Parry.

(Picture: Margarete Vestager. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbqscl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzl4g5sb1)
Some universities reopen for Afghan women

Students have been returning to public universities in Afghanistan for the first time since the Taliban seized power last year but women and men are being strictly segregated. We speak to our correspondent covering the story and hear from the women we've spoken to previously on the programme.

We explain what is known about Tuesday's coup attempt in Guinea-Bissau and speak to our reporter about concerns that military takeovers are again becoming more frequent in the continent.

We also talk through the latest stories on the pandemic with one of our regular experts, Dr Maria Sundaram from Marshfield Clinic in Wisconsin.

And we hear from two athletes who are representing Peru and Lebanon - the countries that are not traditionally associated with winter sports - at the Winter Olympics in Beijing.

(Photo: Afghan students arrive at Kandahar university on the first day of its reopening after holidays in Kandahar, Afghanistan, 02 February 2022. Credit: STRINGER/EPA)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbqx3q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzl4g5x25)
Beijing Olympics: Skiers from Peru and Lebanon

We hear from two athletes who are representing the countries that are not traditionally associated with winter sports at the Winter Olympics in Beijing. They are skiers from Peru and Lebanon who'll be competing in the slalom events.

Students have been returning to some public universities in Afghanistan for the first time since the Taliban seized power last year but women and men are being strictly segregated. We speak to our correspondent covering the story and hear from the women we've spoken to previously on the programme.

We answer your latest questions on the coronavirus pandemic with the help of Dr Pedro Hallal, an epidemiologist in California.
The Washington Football Team says it's changed its name to the Washington Commanders. The franchise scrapped a former name in 2020, as it was deemed offensive to Native Americans. We speak to fans and a journalist covering the story.

(Photo: Manon Ouaiss Credit: Manon Ouaiss)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbr0vv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbr4lz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgtrl7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyfhwc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nskd9v0fb)
2022/02/02 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbr8c3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct3033)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyfmmh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwk)
Bringing death back into life

The pandemic has caused many people to die alone in hospital intensive care units - whilst others have died at home without the support and pain relief they needed. The Lancet Commission on the Value of Death is calling for a radical change in how we approach death. Co-author Dr Libby Sallnow explains what makes a good death, and palliative care consultant Dr M R Rajagopal shares how communities have transformed palliative care in Kerala, India.

Mixed messaging around Covid vaccines for pregnant women have resulted in a low uptake, leaving mothers and babies at risk of infection and serious complications. Dr Sarah Stock, an Honorary Consultant and Subspecialist in Maternal and Fetal Medicine at the University of Edinburgh, reassures us that vaccines are safe in pregnancy.

Following the Spotify misinformation row, Marnie Chesterton asks how should streaming platforms respond to false claims about Covid-19? Professor Matt Fox from Boston University says they have a responsibility to tackle misinformation but warns that censorship may do more harm than good. Also, how a new scan is revealing hidden lung damage in long Covid, and should our chocolate treats come with picture warnings of clogged arteries?

Presenter: Marnie Chesterton
Producer: Paula McGrath and Samara Linton

(Picture: A senior woman being comforted by a doctor in a hospice. Photo credit: Pornpak Khunatorn/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbrd37)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27l7cdv)
US to send more troops to Europe

The US announces 3,000 additional troops will support Nato in eastern Europe. We hear from Evelyn Farkas, former US Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defence, with responsibility for Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia.

Also in the programme: EU policy on nuclear and gas energy; and Iranian metal music.

(Picture: Onboard a U.S. aircraft carrier in times of Ukraine/Russia tensions Credit: Reuters)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbrhvc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3prw4tdb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sws1b8w0z)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyfw3r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172yct1n6b9y37)
Meta shares plunge more than 20%

It's been a bad day for Big Tech. Shares in Facebook's parent company, Meta, dropped 20 percent in after-hours trading, following the release of its Q4 figures for the end of 2021 and its numbers for the whole calendar year.

The European Union has outlined a strategy for regulation of new and emerging technology. Competition chief Margrethe Vestager gave details of the proposals, and we find out more from Javier Espinoza of the Financial Times.

Also in the programme, the oil producers' cartel OPEC and its allies met today, and agreed only a moderate increase in output, despite calls from some oil consumers to go further in a bid to reduce prices.

20 years ago, America's National Football League introduced the Rooney Rule, in an attempt to increase the number of black and ethnic minority candidates hired to NFL coaching and executive positions. One black coach, Brian Flores, is now suing the league, alleging teams invited him for head coach job interviews purely to pad out their Rooney Rule statistics. Jeremi Duru is a law professor at the American University in Washington DC, helped draw up the Rooney Rule, and gives us his reaction to the lawsuit.

There's a warning from the giant investment bank BNY Mellon that global investment firms are missing out on potentially as much as three trillion dollars' worth of investment because they are not attracting female investors. Anne-Marie McConnon from BNY Mellon discusses their findings.

(Picture: Getty Images)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbrmlh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyfzvw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 03 FEBRUARY 2022

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbrrbm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct3c7z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbrw2r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqtck7p7dg)
Meta's stock plunges after profit declines

It's been a bad day for Big Tech. Shares in Facebook's parent company, Meta, dropped 20% in after-hours trading, following the release of its Q4 figures for the end of 2021 and its numbers for the whole calendar year. Meta wasn't the only big loser. Spotify shares were initially down 30% after their earnings release – and the period covered pre-dated the Joe Rogan controversy. After the initial shock, shares recovered some of their losses.

There's a warning from the global investment management firm BNY Mellon IM that some companies are missing out on potentially as much as three trillion dollars' worth of investment because they are not attracting female investors. Anne-Marie McConnon from BNY Mellon discusses their findings.

Also in the programme, we have a report from Wolverhampton - a city in the Black Country in England - so named for the pollution created by the mines, furnaces and factories of the past. It's one of 20 places which the UK government has announced will benefit from the so called Levelling Up money.

And - 20 years ago, America's National Football League introduced the Rooney Rule, in an attempt to increase the number of black and ethnic minority candidates hired to NFL coaching and executive positions. One black coach, Brian Flores, is now suing the league, alleging teams invited him for head coach job interviews purely to pad out their Rooney Rule statistics. Jeremi Duru is a law professor at the American University in Washington DC, helped draw up the Rooney Rule, and gives us his reaction to the lawsuit.

Fergus Nicoll is joined by Sharon Bretkelly in Auckland, New Zealand and Ralph Silva in Toronto.

PHOTO: Getty Images


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbrztw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgvlt4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjygc38)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxl)
Dangerous liaisons in Sinaloa

The Mexican state of Sinaloa is synonymous with drug trafficking. With the profits from organised crime a driver of the local economy, the tentacles of ‘narco cultura’ extend deep into people’s lives – especially those of women. In the city of Culiacan, plastic surgeons service demand for the exaggerated feminine silhouette favoured by the men with guns and hard cash. Often women’s surgery will be paid for by a ‘sponsor’ or ‘godfather.’ Meanwhile, a group of women trackers spend their weekends digging in isolated parts of the state, looking for the remains of loved ones who disappear in Sinaloa’s endless cycle of drug-fuelled violence.

Producer / presenter: Linda Pressly
Producer in Mexico: Ulises Escamilla
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Photo: Lawyer Maria Teresa Guerra advocates for women in Sinaloa. Credit: BBC/Ulises Escamilla)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbs3l0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbs7b4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgvv9d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjygllj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgy)
The sisters who can 'taste' words

Imagine being able to ‘taste’ every word that comes out of your mouth. Everything you or someone else says provoking something in your brain to kick your taste buds into action. It sounds incredulous, but for a tiny proportion of the world’s population, that is their reality. It’s a neurological phenomenon called synaesthesia, where two or more senses merge.

Tamasin Ford meets two sisters from Glasgow, Scotland, who have had the condition for as long as they can remember. They share what it’s like to live with this explosion of taste at every waking moment.

But how and why does it happen? We try to unpick the science behind it and take a look at what synaesthesia could tell us about how we experience taste and flavour.

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Keyboard letters in a soup bowl. Credit:Getty/BBC)

Contributors:

Julie McDowall and Jennifer McCready
Guy Leschziner, author and Professor of neurology and sleep medicine at King's College London.


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbsc28)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1s6f30)
Beijing Winter Olympics hit by Covid

An outbreak of Covid at the Winter Olympics, we'll be heading to Beijing to find out how it may affect the Games.

As tensions between Russia and the West over Ukraine deepen, we'll take a look at one would-be mediator: Turkey's President Erdogan, who visits Kiev today. Is he the man to achieve a breakthrough?

And we'll go to Malawi, to hear about one of the impacts of the recent tropical storm Ana there. A hydro-electric power station has been knocked out. So what sort of effect is this having?


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbsgtd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1s6jv4)
Organisers downplay Covid fears at Winter Olympics

On the Eve of the start of the Winter Olympics in China, President Xi Jinping addressed the nation promising a splendid games but it's under a cloud as there's been an outbreak of Covid.

The US and other NATO allies have sent thousands of troops to the Ukrainian side of the border with Russia to counter any looming threat of attack but those in Kiev say the build-up of troops in Belarus is a worrying development.

And the World Health Organisation has expressed fears of a crisis in cancer care because of the Covid pandemic.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbslkj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1s6nl8)
Winter Olympics 2022: Beijing reports spike in new virus cases

On the eve of the official opening of the Beijing Winter Olympics, the Chinese president, Xi Jinping, has promised a streamlined, splendid and safe Games. But the daily number of new Covid cases associated with the Games has now risen to more than 50, with 34 new infections within the event's "closed-loop" bubble. We'll hear from Olympic hopefuls who are inside it.

More evidence has emerged of a steady build-up of Russian military equipment and deployments around Ukraine. We’ll get the latest from the Ukraine Belarus border.

And we're in Dakar to catch the mood after Senegal's win over Burkina Faso last night.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbsq9n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z38)
Do we have enough lithium to power the future?

Can we meet the soaring demand for lithium, a vital metal for electric cars and green energy? Mining is concentrated in a limited number of countries such as Australia and Chile. And with China dominating the manufacture of electric car batteries and already accounting for the importation of a high proportion of raw lithium, it may be difficult for Western countries to secure their own supplies.

With Tanya Beckett. Producer Bob Howard


(A worker checks lithium car batteries at the Xinwangda factory in Nanjing,China on March 12, 2021. AFP via Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyh2l1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jbj)
Can tourists help boost Turkey's economy?

Drawn by the favourable exchange rate, tourists are flocking to Turkey, but can they compensate for the country's wider economic woes? In 2020, Turkey was hit hard by the pandemic lockdown, soaring inflation, a weakening currency and a current account deficit. Last year, the number of visitors jumped 85.5%. Victoria Craig talks to tourists in Istanbul about how they're getting more value for money and visits traders in the Grand Bazaar. Tour guide Sebnem Altin at tour company Grand Circle Travel has mixed feelings about the future and economist Roger Kelly at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development puts the latest tourism figures in context.
Produced by Stephen Ryan and Gulsah Karadag.

(Image: Istanbul's Grand Bazaar, Credit: Victoria Craig)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4c)
The first Emirati female teacher

In the 1960s, it was extremely rare for women in what is now the United Arab Emirates to go to school. At the time the future country was a collection of Emirates under British protection. The Trucial states, as they were known, were run by Sheikhs. The Sheikdoms were acutely traditional societies. This is the story of a young woman who was among the first to graduate from high school. She went on to become the first teacher there. Nama bint Majid Al Qasimi, has been telling Farhana Haider about her trailblazing experience.

Image: Nama bint Majid Al Qasimi with her students at Fatima Al Zahra School, Sharjah, 1970. Credit: Shaikha Nama bint Majid bin Saqr Al Qasimi


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbsv1s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyh6b5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbsysx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmg)
Machu Picchu: Secrets of a forgotten city

The ancient Inca town Machu Picchu is now the most visited tourist attraction in Peru – and yet it lay nearly forgotten for over three centuries until American and Peruvian explorers drew the world's attention to it in the 1910s. And despite a century of excavations at the site, there are still many unanswered questions about Machu Picchu: why was it built in the first place, who were the immigrants that made up a large proportion of the town’s population, and why was it abandoned so quickly.

To find out more about Machu Picchu, Bridget Kendall is joined by leading archaeologists of the Inca civilisation Lucy Salazar and Michael Malpass, the celebrated mountaineer and explorer Johan Reinhard and by writer Mark Adams who retraced the steps of the 1911 expedition led by Hiram Bingham that put Machu Picchu back on the map.

(Photo: Machu Picchu, Peru. Credit: Eitan Abramovich/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9h)
Vonetta Flowers - the first black Winter Olympic champion

Vonetta Flowers became the first black athlete to win a Winter Olympic gold, when her US pair won the two-woman Bobsleigh event in 2002. Flowers started her career as a sprinter and long-jumper, but switched to bobsledding after failing to make the American summer Olympic team. She was a natural for the brake-woman role and formed a successful team with driver, Jill Bakken. Vonetta Flowers speaks to Iain Mackness. The programme is a Made-In-Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Vonetta Flowers celebrating her Olympic victory in 2002 (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbt2k1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgwpj9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyhftf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbt695)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k4c)
How books helped me bond with my captors

Growing up in rural Colombia, Professor María Antonia Garcés was obsessed by books and reading, and later on this passion would help her get through a really difficult chapter. In 1982 María Antonia was taken hostage by leftist guerrillas, who were looking for a ransom from her wealthy family. She was put in a tiny cell somewhere in the city of Cali for seven months, and needed a way to keep her sanity. María Antonia fell back on her love of reading, and soon books would become more than just a way to pass the time, they bonded her with her captors. The relationships she made this way, would help save her life. She spoke to Outlook's Mobeen Azhar.

Baby Halder is an internationally best-selling author and a literary superstar at home in India. But her road to stardom was a difficult one, full of interruptions and adversity. Her mother left the family when Baby was seven, she was taken out of education, and at the age of 12 she found herself pregnant and in an arranged marriage. Eventually, years later, Baby fled the marriage and became a domestic servant in Delhi, where her employer, an anthropology professor, encouraged her to begin writing, launching her on a glittering writing career. She spoke to Jo Fidgen in 2020.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar

(Photo: Professor María Antonia Garcés. Credit: Professor María Antonia Garcés)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbtb19)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgwy0k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyhp9p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbtfsf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27l9f31)
Can Turkey ease Ukraine/Russia tensions?

The Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, is visiting Kyiv as diplomatic efforts to ease the crisis sparked by the massing of Russian troops on Ukraine's border continue.

Also: shares in Spotify and a number of social media companies have suffered big falls; and the illegal Brazilian gold you may be wearing.

(Picture: Russian TV has shown pictures of tank exercises close to the border with Ukraine Credit: Russian Defence Ministry)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbtkjk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyhxsy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49myn6dr9b)
Meta shares plunge after weak earnings

Shares in Facebook's parent company Meta fell 25% on opening after weak earnings data. Investors were particularly concerned by Facebook's first ever decline in user figures, and we find out more from Isobel Hamilton, senior technology reporter at Insider. Also in the programme, the inflation rate in Turkey has hit an eye-watering 48% year-on-year. The BBC's Victoria Craig reports on whether tourism might help offset some of the country's bigger economic problems. Plus, a billion-year-old black diamond is going up for auction. Nikita Benani is jewellery specialist at Sotheby's and tells us about the diamond, named The Enigma, which is believed to be the largest cut diamond on earth, and may have been formed from a meteor impact.

Today's edition is presented by Will Bain, and produced by George Thomas, Sara Parry and Elizabeth Hotson.

(Picture: A Meta billboard at its headquarters. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbtp8p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzl4g8p74)
US kills Islamic State leader

President Biden has announced that the leader of the Islamic State group Abu Ibrahim al-Hashimi al-Qurayshi, has been killed in an attack by US special forces carried in the Syrian province of Idlib. We find our more about al-Qurayshi, and the significance of his death from our Jihadi specialist at BBC Monitoring.

Turkish President Recep Tayip Erdogan is the latest world leader to visit Kyiv to get involved in diplomacy to try to avert conflict between Russia and Ukraine. We explain what Turkey’s role could be, with allegiances on both sides.

And ahead of tomorrow’s opening ceremony at the Winter Olympics in Beijing, we speak to an athlete, a competition judge and a reporter about their experiences and impressions so far in the Olympic bubble.

(Photo: A damaged house is seen after an alleged counterterrorism operation by US Special forces in the early morning in Atma village in the northern countryside of Idlib, Syria, 03 February 2022. Credit: EPA/YAHYA NEMAH)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbtt0t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzl4g8sz8)
Life inside the Winter Olympics bubble

Ahead of Friday’s opening ceremony at the Winter Olympics in Beijing, we speak to an athlete, a competition judge and a reporter about their experiences and impressions so far in the Olympic bubble.

Facebook’s parent company, Meta, says daily active users of Facebook are slightly down for the first time in the platform’s history and its share price has fallen. We hear from some people who’ve decided to use Facebook a bit less, or not at all, and get our business reporter to explain the big picture.

And we talk about a series of bomb threats to historically black college campuses in the United States and speak to the president of one of the colleges being targeted.

(Photo: Staff in PPE stand next to the Olympic rings in Beijing, China December 30, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Thomas Peter)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbtxry)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbv1j2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgxnhb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyjdsg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nskd9xxbf)
2022/02/03 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbv586)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyjjjl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4z)
Identifying a more infectious HIV variant

We’re 40 years into the AIDS pandemic, and even with massive public health campaigns, still, 1 ½ million become infected with HIV each year; about half that number die of its ravages. And a study just out shows that this well-understood virus can still take on more worrying forms as a new variant has been uncovered. Although the total number of cases involved is small, and the new variant is as treatable as earlier strains, the finding underlines that viruses can become more infectious and more virulent.

Back in October 2020, before we had effective vaccines, 36 plucky volunteers agreed to be deliberately infected with SARS-CoV-2 in order to better understand the infection process and outcomes in what’s known as a human “challenge” trial. Dr. Chris Chiu from Imperial College reveals what they’ve learned now the results of the study are in. We’ll hear about a new plastic that’s stronger than steel and as many gardeners have long suspected, – spring-flowering has over many years been occurring earlier and earlier, at least according to a new UK study. We discuss the implications for the ecosystem.

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producers: Julian Siddle and Rami Tzabar

(Image: 3D illustration of HIV virus. Credit: Artem Egorov/Getty Images)


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbv90b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27lb89y)
Islamic State leader killed in Syria

US President Joe Biden says the leader of the Islamic State group has been killed in a US special forces raid in north-west Syria. Mr Biden said Abu Ibrahim al-Qurayshi detonated a bomb that killed himself and members of his own family "in a final act of desperate cowardice".

Also in the programme: what role can Turkey play in the Ukraine-Russia crisis? And why Rotterdam is dismantling a historic bridge to allow a superyacht built for Amazon founder Jeff Bezos to pass through.

(Photo: A surveillance image shows a compound housing the leader of the Islamic State jihadist group Abu Ibrahim al-Hashemi al-Quraishi. Credit: Department of Defense/Handout via Reuters)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbvdrg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3prw7q9f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sws1bcry2)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyjs0v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs76gqqjl1)
China and Russia to sign over a dozen trade deals

President Vladimir Putin is due to begin a visit to Beijing on Friday - with the Kremlin saying that he'll sign more than a dozen trade deals with his counterpart Xi Jinping. Later in the day, Mr Putin will attend the opening ceremony of the Beijing Winter Olympics - which is being boycotted by the United States, Canada, Australia and the UK. We hear from Chris Weafer is CEO of the investment consultancy Macro-Advisory in Moscow.

Also in the programme, the Governor of the Bank of England has told the BBC that employees negotiating their salary this year should not ask for too big a pay rise - so they can help bring inflation under control. Mr Bailey said he was concerned that rising inflation would become ingrained in the economy.

Plus - the inflation rate in Turkey has hit an eye-watering 48% year-on-year. The BBC's Victoria Craig reports on whether tourism might help offset some of the country's bigger economic problems.

And, a billion-year-old black diamond is going up for auction. Nikita Benani is jewellery specialist at Sotheby's and tells us about the diamond, named The Enigma, which is believed to be the largest cut diamond on earth, and may have been formed from a meteor impact.

(Picture: Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping/AFP)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbvjhl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyjwrz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 04 FEBRUARY 2022

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbvn7q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbvrzv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqtck7s49k)
China and Russia inch closer

President Vladimir Putin is due to begin a visit to Beijing on Friday - with the Kremlin saying that he'll sign more than a dozen trade deals with his counterpart Xi Jinping. Later in the day, Mr Putin will attend the opening ceremony of the Beijing Winter Olympics - which is being boycotted by the United States, Canada, Australia and the UK. We hear from Chris Weafer, the CEO of the investment consultancy Macro-Advisory in Moscow.

Also in the programme, the Governor of the Bank of England has told the BBC that employees negotiating their salary this year should not ask for too big a pay rise - so they can help bring inflation under control. Mr Bailey said he was concerned that rising inflation would become ingrained in the economy.

Plus - the inflation rate in Turkey has hit an eye-watering 48% year-on-year. The BBC's Victoria Craig reports on whether tourism might help offset some of the country's bigger economic problems.

Rotterdam has confirmed it will dismantle a historic bridge to allow a superyacht built for Amazon founder Jeff Bezos to fit through. The record-breaking luxury yacht is being built by Dutch firm Oceanco and was linked to Mr Bezos last year.

And, a billion-year-old black diamond is going up for auction. Nikita Benani is jewellery specialist at Sotheby's and tells us about the diamond, named The Enigma, which is believed to be the largest cut diamond on earth, and may have been formed from a meteor impact.

Fergus Nicoll is joined by Rachel Cartland in Hong Kong and Paddy Hirsch in Los Angeles.

(Picture: Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping/AFP)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbvwqz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgyhq7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyk80c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1v0b)
Africa Cup of Nations: Third time lucky for Senegal?

Mani Djazmi is joined by former Scotland international Pat Nevin and 2002 Africa Cup of Nations winner with Cameroon Patrick Suffo to discuss the week's biggest football stories.

Former Senegal striker Mamadou Diallo joins us to assess The Lions of Teranga's chances in the 2022 Africa Cup of Nations final and we reflect on the impact of South Africa's 1996 AFCON win with the team's captain Neil Tovey.



Photo: Fans during Senegal's 3-1 semi final win against Burkina Faso at the Africa Cup of Nations.
Credit: Haykel Hmima/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbw0h3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbw477)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgyr6h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjykhhm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct3hh9)
From Hong Kong to the UK

BBC Hong Kong reporter Danny Vincent hears from Christian migrants who have fled the territory for a new life in the UK. Many of the people Danny hears from are speaking about their experiences for the first time. A large number of Christians have made the difficult decision to leave Hong Kong after the introduction of a controversial national security law, which critics say is eroding freedoms in Hong Kong. Danny also meets their friends and family who have been left behind, the Christians still worshipping in Hong Kong.

Hong Kong was a British colony for 156 years until it was returned to Chinese control on 1 July, 1997. China formed the special administrative region of Hong Kong, which had maintained governance and economic systems separate from those of China's communist regime.

Around 600 UK churches of different denominations have signed up to be “Hong Kong Ready”, welcoming Christians from Hong Kong into their church communities. One in 10 of new arrivals is estimated to be Christian.

(Photo: Jimmy Lai. Credit: Danny Vincent)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbw7zc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1s9b03)
Islamic State leader killed in Syria, US says

The leader of Islamic State has blown himself up in what US President Joe Biden called an "act of cowardice" during a raid by US special forces in Syria. Abu Ibrahim al-Hashimi al-Qurayshi detonated a bomb that killed himself and his family members, in the rebel-held province of Idlib.

The Chinese leader Xi Jinping is to hold talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin hours before the official opening of the Winter Olympics in Beijing.

And why nasal spray vaccines could be vital in the fight against Covid-19.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbwcqh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1s9fr7)
Beijing Olympics: Xi and Putin unite amid diplomatic boycott

The Chinese president, Xi Jinping, is about to hold talks with his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, hours ahead of the start of the Beijing Winter Olympics. It will be Mr Xi's first face-to-face meeting with a world leader since the start of the pandemic two years ago. The meeting comes amid the ongoing Russia-Ukraine crisis.

South African scientists have made a copy of the Moderna coronavirus vaccine in what's being seen as a breakthrough for poorer countries. We'll speak to the chief scientist in the project.

And the British prime minister, Boris Johnson, is under further pressure following the resignation of four of his most senior aides. They include his chief of staff, head of communications and head of policy.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbwhgm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv33r1s9khc)
Beijing Olympics: Winter Games start amid Covid and boycotts

The presidents of China and Russia - united by tensions with the West - are holding face-to-face talks in Beijing as the Winter Olympics officially open in the Chinese capital, after a build- up dominated by concerns over human rights and the pandemic.

South African scientists have made a copy of the Moderna coronavirus vaccine in what's being seen as a breakthrough for poorer countries.

And the inspirational story of the adventurer who travels the world, in his wheelchair.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbwm6r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2h)
Gabrielius Landsbergis: Tension in Eastern Europe

Russian forces continue to gather close to Ukraine’s eastern and northern borders, and still the world waits to see what Vladimir Putin’s end game is. If the goal is to wring security concessions out of the US and its Nato partners, does he have any chance of success? Stephen Sackur speaks to Gabrielius Landsbergis, who is foreign minister of Lithuania and on the frontline of tensions between Russia and Nato.


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjykzh4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j1h)
Why gin is still fizzing

From its early reputation as mothers’ ruin to its prime spot in upscale cocktail bars, we tell the story of the juniper-infused spirit. And as the gin craze in the US and the UK shows no sign of slowing, we ask where the next global hotspots will be. Dr Angela McShane of Warwick University tells Elizabeth Hotson how and why gin drinking became popular in the UK and Sandie Van Doorne, from Lucas Bols - which claims to be the oldest distillery brand in the world - explains how the Dutch spirit, genever, fits into the story. Sean Harrison of Plymouth Gin explains how the company is taking on the new contenders in the market and we hear from up-and-coming brands; Toby Whittaker from Whittakers Gin and Temi Shogelola of Black Crowned Gin. Plus, we hear from Emily Neill, Chief Operating Officer at the IWSR which provides data and analysis on the beverage alcohol market. And a programme about gin wouldn’t be complete without a cocktail; William Campbell-Rowntree, bar supervisor at Artesian in London’s Langham Hotel, gives his tips for the perfect tipple.

Presenter: Elizabeth Hotson
Producer: Sarah Treanor

*This programme was originally broadcast on July 13, 2021

(Picture of a gin and tonic with garnish; Picture via Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzv)
The Death of King George VI

On February 6th 1952, King George VI died after a long illness. Britain came to a standstill to mourn the monarch who had led the nation through World War II, and the present Queen acceded to the throne. Simon Watts brings together BBC recordings from 70 years ago. This programme was first broadcast in 2012.

PHOTO: The coffin of King George VI passing through central London (Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbwqyw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj7)
Facebook's metaverse gamble

Facebook is losing users, will it's pivot to the metaverse pay off? Chris Fox speaks to Parmy Olson, technology columnist at Bloomberg about Facebook's parent company Meta, and the challenge of developing its own technology for the virtual world. Plus the co-chair of the Facebook Oversight Board Helle Thorning-Schmidt tells us why organisations like hers are helping Meta become more transparent in the way it moderates its platforms. And the BBC's Joe Tidy reports from Kazakhstan on the central Asian country's boom in Bitcoin mining, and the impact it's having on the environment.

(Photo: Meta headquarters in Silicon Valley, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyl378)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbwvq0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htq)
China’s zero-Covid conundrum

As the Beijing Winter Olympics get underway in China this week the host city has reported its highest number of new Covid-19 cases in more than a year. The authorities have put in place a strict 'closed loop bubble’, isolating more than 60,000 athletes, officials and service providers from the rest of the country. China's firm approach to quashing transmission of the virus has been in place ever since the first outbreak in Wuhan. Detection of the virus typically prompts mass testing and can even result in entire cities being placed into snap lockdowns. Only essential travellers are allowed to enter the country and even then only after weeks of strict quarantine. Only a few thousand Chinese citizens are said to have died of Covid-19, a fraction of the number of lives lost in many other nations. But a recent report from the IMF has warned of an economic slowdown in China, blamed in part on the country’s zero-Covid policy. The approach has been welcomed by most citizens, but could public attitudes change if more of the country is forced to stay at home in order to combat outbreaks? Can China follow in the footsteps of other countries that have transitioned towards 'living with the virus'? And will the country have to wait for the next generation of vaccines before opening up?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Paul Schuster and Junaid Ahmed.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbwzg4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgzlfd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjylbqj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1v0b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbx368)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g7)
Teenage mums back at school in Tanzania

Pregnant students in Tanzania are no longer forced to drop out of school, after a ban endorsed by former President John Magufuli was overturned. Girls who had to drop out in previous years have also started to return to the classroom. Aboubakar Famau of BBC Swahili has been to meet a young mother who has returned to school and hopes to become a lawyer.

Taiwan's burgeoning porn industry
Over recent years the production and sale of 'soft porn' movies in Taiwan has boomed. Japan had always led the industry in the region, but now Taiwan is creating its own rising stars, some of whom are popping up in mainstream programming. Benny Lu is a journalist with BBC Chinese in Hong Kong, and he spoke to people involved in the industry about this cultural shift around porn.

‘Save me from an arranged marriage’
A 29-year-old Londoner has received hundreds of messages from women around the world after launching a billboard campaign to find a wife. Muhammad Malik put up billboards in three cities, with the slogan 'Save me from an arranged marriage'. The BBC’s South Asia diaspora reporter Gaggan Sabherwal has met Malik and tells us about his campaign.

Why Venezuelans are 'killing tigers'
Venezuelans are killing tigers like never before. It’s not an animal rights issue – but a uniquely Venezuelan phrase that means doing an extra job to make ends meet. The phrase originated in the 1920s, but has come back in force in the 2020s as the economic crisis has worsened. BBC Mundo’s Daniel Pardo has returned to the capital Caracas after five years away, and noticed the phenomenon.

My Home town: Luanda, Kenya
We go to Luanda, Kenya with Beverly Ochieng for some homemade smoked fish soup with her grandmother.

(Photo: Teenage mother in a Tanzanian school. Credit: BBC)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbx6yd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hgztxn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyll6s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbxbpj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27ldb04)
Winter Olympics opening ceremony in Beijing

The event has been overshadowed by a diplomatic boycott by several nations because of China's alleged human rights abuses in Xinjiang.

President Putin of Russia is one of the few world leaders to attend the ceremony, he has just had a face to face meeting with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping. How strong are the bonds between Russia and China really?

Also on the programme: scientists in South Africa have developed their own version of the Moderna covid vaccine. And how credible are US claims that Russia may make a "propaganda video" showing fake Ukrainian attacks to justify an invasion?

(Picture: Winter Olympics opening ceremony. Credit: Reuters / Peter)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbxgfn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjyltq1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y475mgdfqxk)
Putin and Xi announce bilateral deals

Presidents Putin and Xi of Russia and China met and unveiled a number of bilateral deals. We hear about the burgeoning economic relationship between the two countries from Dmitry Dolgin, chief economist for Russia at ING. President Putin was also able to catch the opening ceremony of the Winter Olympics in Beijing, and the BBC's Stephen McDonell tells us what impact the coronavirus pandemic has had on the scale of the event, compared to Beijing's summer Olympics in 2008. Also in the programme, the US added 467,000 jobs last month, which was far better than most analysts had predicted. The BBC's Michelle Fleury brings us the details. Plus, the BBC's Russell Newlove reports on the booming market for electric bikes.

Today's edition is presented by Will Bain, and produced by George Thomas, Russell Newlove and Gabriele Shaw.

(Picture: Presidents Putin and Xi. Picture credit: Reuters.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbxl5s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzl4gcl47)
Beijing Winter Olympics open

We speak to our reporter in Beijing who's been watching the official opening ceremony of the 2022 Winter Olympics. We also hear messages from the Chinese people about their country hosting the event during the pandemic, and our China media analyst explains the conversations taking place on Chinese social media about the event and about the controversy surrounding the Games over China’s human rights record.

Our Africa correspondent Catherine Byaruhanga joins us live from the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa to answer listeners’ questions about the ongoing conflict between the government and forces from Tigray and Oromia regions. The BBC has not been able to broadcast from the capital for the last eight months and Catherine explains what people have been telling her about the tensions.

We answer your questions on Covid-19 with the help of Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University.

Ros Atkins looks at the controversy surrounding Spotify and its most popular podcast, The Joe Rogan Experience.

(Photo: Artists perform during the Opening Ceremony of the Beijing 2022 Olympic Games at the National Stadium, also known as Bird"s Nest, in Beijing, China, 04 February 2022. Credit: YONHAP SOUTH KOREA OUT/EPA)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbxpxx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxzl4gcpwc)
Ethiopia: Your questions answered

Our Africa correspondent Catherine Byaruhanga is in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa and has been answering audience questions about the ongoing conflict between the government and forces from Tigray and Oromia regions.The BBC has not been able to broadcast from the capital for the last eight months and Catherine explains what people have been telling her about the tensions.

The official opening ceremony of the 2022 Winter Olympics has taken place at Beijing's Bird's Nest stadium. We hear messages from the Chinese people about their country hosting the event impacted by the pandemic and politics. Our China media analyst explains the conversations taking place on Chinese social media about the event and the controversy surrounding the Games over China’s human rights record.

One of our regular coronavirus health experts, Marc Mendelson, at the University of Cape Town, answers listener’s coronavirus questions. You can send in a question via WhatsApp on +447730 751925

(Photo: A general view of the skyline of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia November 3, 2021. Credit: Tiksa Negeri//File P/Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbxtp1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbxyf5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxy4hh0kdf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjym9pk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nskdb0t7j)
2022/02/04 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htby259)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjymffp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prq)
Is the ‘sunshine cure’ a real thing?

Imagine spending six months of every year living in total shade. That’s what life is like for residents of the Norwegian town of Rjukan, set so low in a valley that they see no direct sunshine at all from October to March. Marnie Chesterton heads there to hear about an ingenious solution: giant mirrors that beam rays down into the town square, where locals gather to feel the reflected heat. The man behind the project was motivated by a need for winter sun – but how much difference does it really make to our health and happiness? That’s the question posed by this week’s Crowdscience listener Michael, who has noticed living in the rainy Australian city of Melbourne is taking its toll. Many pensioners claim sunshine relieves achiness as well as conditions like arthritis but one of the biggest scientific studies found temperature actually has no impact on reported pain levels, while factors like air pressure and humidity may play a role. When it comes to our mood, it seems that spending time outside is more important than feeling the heat and the optimum temperature for wellbeing is around cool 19 degrees centigrade, while excessive warm weather has been linked to an increase in violence and crime.


Contributors:
Dr Anna Beukenhorst, University of Manchester
Professor Oscar Ybarra, University of Illinois
Professor Solomon Hsiang, University of California, Berkeley
Martin Andersen, artist


(Image: Man with smoke coming out of ears. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htby5xf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5l27lf571)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htby9nk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3prwbm6j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sws1bgnv5)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjymnxy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrdrr4441v)
Putin and Xi announce bilateral deals

Presidents Putin and Xi of Russia and China met and unveiled a number of bilateral deals. We hear about the burgeoning economic relationship between the two countries from Dmitry Dolgin, chief economist for Russia at ING. President Putin was also able to catch the opening ceremony of the Winter Olympics in Beijing, and the BBC's Stephen McDonell tells us what impact the coronavirus pandemic has had on the scale of the event, compared to Beijing's summer Olympics in 2008. Also in the programme, the US added 467,000 jobs last month, which was far better than most analysts had predicted. The BBC's Michelle Fleury brings us the details. Plus, the BBC's Russell Newlove reports on the booming market for electric bikes.

(Picture: Presidents Putin and Xi. Picture credit: Reuters.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk0htbyfdp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktyjymsp2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1v0b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gxl)

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