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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 22 JANUARY 2022

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qd7y4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htn)
The future of the BBC

The British Broadcasting Corporation is the world’s oldest and largest public service broadcaster. But as it prepares to mark its 100th birthday the organisation finds itself at a crossroads. The UK government has begun a review of the BBC’s long term funding structure with an aim of ending its dependency on television licence fees – effectively a tax on British owners of TV sets. The broadcaster's Director General Tim Davie says services and shows will have to be cut as a result of a funding gap arising from the latest licence fee deal. There are other challenges too. Young people are consuming less BBC content than their parents, preferring to rely on an array of different sources for their news and entertainment. So what should be the role of public service broadcasters in a world where information is curated by search engines and consumers gravitate towards streaming giants such as Netflix and Amazon Prime for their entertainment?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qdcp8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlmnqxrzvj)
First broadcast 22/01/2022 01:06 GMT

The latest business and finance news from around the world, on the BBC.


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b2qyn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f4d)
How is digital campaigning shaping India’s elections?

Five states in India are headed to regional ballots in the coming weeks. More than 180 million people are eligible to vote to choose their local leaders for nearly 690 assembly seats. Physical rallies and election roadshows have been banned due to the pandemic, and poll campaigning has shifted online, with hashtags and digital rallies dominating the election battle. Many political parties have even trained their workers as “social media warriors” to spread their message.

But can digital campaigning really be effective in states that have many regions still with little or no access to the internet? Can virtual meetings really replace the impact of seeing your leaders in person? And does misinformation influence voting behaviour?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the way digital campaigning is shaping India’s elections.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Ankit Lal, founder, Politique Advisors; Rajika Kacheria, media joint in-charge, BJP - Gujarat North Zone; Sanjay Kumar, professor - CSDS, political analyst


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qdhfd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvh3dn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b2vps)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lcp)
'King Kohli' - India's Test captain resigns

Virat Kohli has been Test captain of India for seven years but this week announced that he would be resigning his position. Charu Sharma, Jim Maxwell and Nikesh Rughani are joined by the former India Test Cricketer and current National Selector and President of the Indian Cricketers Association Ashok Malhotra. He tells us whether he thinks Kohli 'jumped before he was pushed' and his prediction for who will fill his shoes.

Plus, from one outgoing captain to potentially another. The current England men’s captain Joe Root says he wants to stay on, but we debate whether this really is the best choice after a 4-0 thrashing by Australia in the Men's Ashes.

Photo: India captain Virat Kohli during the post match presentations after winning the Fourth LV= Insurance Test Match between England and India at The Kia Oval on September 06, 2021 in London, England. (Photo by Gareth Copley/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qdm5j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g5)
India's problem with sacred cows

Uttar Pradesh has a problem with cows. Cows are considered sacred by Hindus, and since the BJP state government banned illegal slaughterhouses five years ago, small farmers have had no way of legally disposing of unwanted cows. There are now nearly a million stray cows roaming around farmland, destroying crops, and causing injury and even death, as BBC Hindi's Nitin Srivastava reports.

Brownie, Chile's 'first dog'
Chile's recently elected president, Gabriel Boric, won with the highest number of votes in Chilean history. But equally popular is his dog, Brownie. With his own social media accounts, Brownie has proclaimed himself 'the first dog of the Republic of Chile'. BBC contributor Constanza Hola tells us more about her country's most popular pet.

Avocado rustling in Kenya
Kenya's avocado sector has become so lucrative that organised criminal gangs are targetting growers. Farmers have started to hire vigilantes and even use drones to guard their trees, as Emmanuel Igunza of BBC News in Kenya discovered.

Yoga refusenik Suhail Haleem
Another chance to enjoy BBC India's Suhail Haleem's lack of flexibility when it comes to India's famous export, yoga.

AFCON: 'fouled by the pitch' and other excuses
BBC Africa's Peter Okwoche and BBC Sport's Isaac Fanin share their experiences of covering the Africa Cup of Nations tournament in Cameroon, and taking on Yaoundé’s Greenfield Football Academy Under 10s (and losing!).

Remembering Anita Mui
There’s nostalgia in Hong Kong for singing star Anita Mui, who died in 2003, but who’s remembered by many and celebrated in a new film, Anita. Zhijie Shao has been reporting for BBC Chinese on her enduring fame.

(Photo: A cow resting in Varanasi. Credit: Enzo Tomasiello/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzs)
A Cold War love affair

The East German authorities built the Berlin Wall in 1961 to keep their people in. Thousands had been streaming westwards. But a few people went the other way. Frauke Naumann was one of them. She grew up in West Germany but fell love with her cousin who lived on the other side of the border. So, in 1986, at the age of 22 she left home to join him. Frauke tells Tim Mansel about the joys and the miseries of making a new life in a foreign country under the watchful eye of the secret police.

PHOTO: The Brandenburg Gate in the 1980s with the Berlin Wall passing in front (BBC)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qdqxn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qdvns)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvhgn1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b36y5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwf)
Feeling used

When we feel taken advantage of by people, it can be very hurtful and leave us feeling bitter. Giving a lot to our friends can come with the expectation that the same is offered in return. This is the experience of Jacob, from India. He speaks to Sister Dang Nghiem who suggests that through giving to ourselves and developing self-love, we find we need less appreciation from others.

Presented by the BBC's Sana Safi.

Produced by Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards.


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dph)
China's Zero-Covid Dilemma

As coronavirus restrictions begin to ease around the world, China is sticking with its Zero-Covid policy. But questions have been raised about how sustainable the strategy is, and how much longer China can keep the virus out. Ros Atkins looks at the dilemma this has created for the country and its leadership.

(Photo: Staff members wearing personal protective equipment spray disinfectant outside a shopping mall in Xi'an in north China's Shaanxi province on January 11, 2022. Credit: STR/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qdzdx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytmn1frcp0)
US support arrives in Ukraine

As talks between Russia and the US amount to little more than the promise of continued conversation, military aid has arrived in Kyiv.

Also in the programme, a week after a giant underwater volcano erupted near Tonga, the first aid ships have arrived to the island nation. And, in the UK, the prime minister is accused of blackmail by his own members of parliament.

To discuss this and more, Rebecca Kesby is joined by Peter Neumann, Professor of Security Studies at Kings College London, and Rosamund Urwin, Media Editor of the Sunday Times newspaper.

(Photo: Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov attends a press conference following talks with his US counterpart on soaring tensions over Ukraine, in Geneva, Switzerland, 21 January 2022. EPA/JEAN-CHRISTOPHE BOTT)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qf351)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytmn1frhf4)
US sends weapons to Ukraine

As talks between Russia and the US amount to little more than the promise of continued conversation, military aid has arrived in Kyiv. We’ll go live to Kiev as they prepare for conflict.

Also in the programme, US talks with Russia over the build up of troops on the Ukraine border have so far resulted in he promise for more discussion. And, a historian specialising in the USSR and Cold War examines what Putin is facing at home.

To discuss this and more, Rebecca Kesby is joined by Peter Neumann, Professor of Security Studies at Kings College London, and Rosamund Urwin, Media Editor of the Sunday Times newspaper.

(Photo: U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Swiss President Ignazio Cassis (not pictured) meet in Geneva, Switzerland, January 21, 2022. Alex Brandon/Pool via REUTERS)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qf6x5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytmn1frm58)
Estonia PM on Russia-US talks

Estonia’s Prime Minister discusses her concerns about the talks between Russia and the US, as Russian troops remain on the Ukrainian border and Putin pushes for NATO to leave the Baltics.

Also on the programme, Johann Sebastian Bach’s son attempts to step out from the shadow of his father with a new composition.

To discuss this and more, Rebecca Kesby is joined by Peter Neumann, Professor of Security Studies at Kings College London, and Rosamund Urwin, Media Editor of the Sunday Times newspaper.

(Photo: Estonia's Prime Minister Kaja Kallas attends an European Union Summit at the European Council building in Brussels, Belgium December 16, 2021. Kenzo Tribouillard/Pool via REUTERS)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b3l5k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 Global Questions (w3ct3fm1)
What’s Putin’s Strategy?

As President Putin again threatens Ukraine, the world is asking what’s his wider foreign policy strategy? Can the West stop him in his tracks, and if it can’t, will that show weakness, emboldening not only Putin but also other autocrats like China’s President Xi? In fact, is the West now facing a dangerous, de facto alliance of Russia and China – and if so, how best does it respond to this dual threat to global stability? Global Questions travels to Kyiv where Zeinab Badawi and her panel of politicians and experts will take questions from a local audience to discuss Putin’s Strategy


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qfbn9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6y)
Coronavirus: Family arguments

Health professionals will tell you that Covid-19 vaccines have saved millions of lives across the globe yet some people continue to doubt their safety and refuse to get a jab. These differences of opinion are being played out within families: some refuse to get a jab, while others are vaccinated.

An American in Florida and a French citizen in Ireland share the difficulties they have encountered at home with host James Reynolds, We bring them together to hear how family gatherings can become fraught.

We also hear from three international students in Sri Lanka, Pakistan and India who have been unable to return to their universities in China for two years, due to the country’s zero Covid policy. It means lockdown on a massive scale and few people allowed to cross its borders. Two are medical students and one is a PhD student. They explain the difficulties of remote learning, what they have lost along the way, and the hardships of remaining in limbo constantly waiting to hear when they can return to China to complete their education.

(Photo: A sign reading "Please, prepare your vaccine pass" is seen at the entrance of a restaurant in Nice, France, January 21, 2022. Credit: Eric Gaillard/Reuters)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b3pxp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386f)
Pick of the World: What is the purpose of life?

Listeners to the BBC World Service not only love what they hear, they love to engage with it; it's a two way relationship that has created a special bond.

Each week, Anna Doble celebrates the amazing radio the World Service produces, with clips chosen by its listeners, and explores the reaction on social media.

She also speaks to some of those listeners around the world, to find out what it was about the issue that captured them.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2n)
How less can often be more

More or Less is the a show that explains and sometimes debunks, the numbers and statistics used in political debate, the news and everyday life.
Listeners put their comments to the programme’s host Tim Harford. Plus, evidence of listener power, when a complaint from Mozambique prompted the BBC World Service to install a brand new transmitter!

Producer Howard Shannon
Presenter Rajan Datar


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qfgdf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0qdq9wwwf2)
Dania Akeel and Mashael al-Obaidan make history for Saudi Arabia at the Dakar Rally

Saudi Arabian women competed in the Dakar Rally for the first time in 2022, with Dania Akeel and Mashael al-Obaidan completing the race earlier this month. They join us to reflect on making history and discuss how competing in one of the world’s most gruelling automobile rally races has changed them. They also give their thoughts on whether they see themselves as inspirational figures for women in their country.

Shanwayne Stephens tells us about helping Jamaica qualify a four-man bobsleigh team for a first Winter Olympics in 24 years. Stephens is the team’s pilot and discusses his hopes for the Beijing Games, what he makes of his team being compared to the 1988 team, which inspired the film Cool Runnings and who would play him in the movie if they made a sequel.

Vegan endurance runner Robbie Balenger joins us to discuss pushing his body to its limits while maintaining a plant-based diet, his spiritual connection to running and to reflect on some of the challenges he has completed. Balenger holds the record for most finished laps around Central Park and has previously completed a transcontinental run across America, averaging 43 miles per day across the 75 day run.

And we are live at the Australian Open tennis and at Goodison Park ahead of Everton’s first game since they sacked manager Rafa Benitez.


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qfl4k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvj63t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b3ydy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qfpwp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct3c7y)
Music that survived the Nazis: Part one

There is a common misconception that music under the Nazis was either ‘Degenerate Music’ to be suppressed or propaganda music that was officially sanctioned. Historian Shirli Gilbert shows that there was a wealth of different music-making during this period, including secret sessions by Jewish musicians and others, that managed to evade official scrutiny.

In this first episode, she explores the music of the Jewish Culture League, as well as the work of Lukraphon and Semer, two Jewish record labels active at this time. This includes a huge range of works recorded in Nazi Germany, from orchestral pieces to cabaret songs to religious singing of enormous beauty.
Contributors include Alan Bern, Ben Fisher, Martin Goldsmith, Lily Hirsch, Rainer E. Lotz and Sasha Lurje.

Image credit: Members of the orchestra at the Janowska concentration camp perform while standing in a circle around the conductor, Yacub Mund, in the Appelplatz [roll call area]. Courtesy of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Ze’ev Lewin archive audio courtesy of the Jewish Museum Berlin.

Written and presented by Shirli Gilbert, professor of Modern Jewish History at University College London
Producer: Tom Woolfenden.
A Loftus Media Production for the BBC World Service.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qftmt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpyxsyf)
Ukraine tension: US 'lethal aid' arrives in Kyiv

Artillery shipments from the US have arrived in Ukraine amid tensions over Russia's troop build-up on the border. Intense international diplomatic talks are continuing. We hear from a reporter who is following the events in Kyiv, and we hear from the Estonian Prime Minister whose country shares a border with Russia and is a member of NATO.

Also, we hear why dating apps need to work harder to protect their transgender users, and we connect with followers of the Buddhist monk and international spiritual leader, Thich Nhat Hanh, who has died.

(Photo: The US embassy in Kyiv released photos of Saturday's shipment as it pledged ongoing support for Ukraine. Credit: US embassy Kyiv)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qfycy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tph79nl3r)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld Saturday will have commentary of West Ham’s trip to Old Trafford to face Manchester United. A win for Manchester United would help Ralf Rangnick's side climb closer to the Champions League places. We’ll also have updates of manager-less Everton as they welcome Steven Gerrard’s Aston Villa to Goodison Park.

Joining Delyth Lloyd this Saturday will be the former Arsenal and Cameroon defender Lauren, the former Wolves and Nigeria goalkeeper Carl Ikeme and current Glasgow City and South Africa defender Janine van Wyk. The Sportsworld team will chat about the Premier League and preview the knockout stages of the African Cup of Nations that start on Sunday.

We’ll also have the latest from the Australian Open tennis and the NFL playoffs.

Photo: Jarrod Bowen of West Ham United holds off a challenge from Manchester United's Jadon Sancho.(Credit: Danehouse/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qgfcg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvk1bq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b4smv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9f)
Novak Djokovic: The road to success

Aged thirteen, Novak Djokovic appeared at coach Nikola Pilic's tennis academy near Munich. He would soon become Pilic's star pupil thanks to his incredible self-discipline and natural tennis brain. Twenty grand slams later, the Serbian star is still in touch with Nikola Pilic, and regards him as one of his mentors. Nikola Pilic speaks to Petra Zivic.

PHOTO: Novak Djokovic in 2008, the year he won his first tennis major (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qgk3l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z84)
The rise of Boko Haram

In 2009, Boko Haram, a small Islamist group, launched an insurgency in the north eastern Nigerian city of Maiduguri. The conflict would eventually force hundreds of thousands from their homes, and leave tens of thousands dead. We hear a witness account of how the violence started. Plus, this past week Americans have been observing the Martin Luther King Jr. Day national holiday. The long campaign to have Dr King formally recognized in the US was led by his widow, Coretta Scott King. We hear from her daughter, Dr Bernice King, about the campaign. We dip into the BBC archive to bring you the story of the notorious Stanford Prison Experiment. Also, from the 1980s, a time when many wanted to get out of East Germany and into the West, the young woman who decided to go the other way and set up a new life in the East. And the Dutchman behind the first bike sharing scheme.


Photo: A suspected Boko Haram house in Maiduguri set ablaze by Nigerian security forces, 30th July 2009 (AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qgnvq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv5)
Actor and director Romola Garai

Nikki Bedi is joined by actor-director Romola Garai to talk about her directorial debut Amulet, a gothic horror story, and by the critic and culture writer Bilal Qureshi.

They discuss Denzel Washington in The Tragedy Of Macbeth, Chinese American director Jessica Kingdon’s look at The Chinese Dream in her documentary Ascension, and another documentary Cow which follows the life of its bovine star, Luma; we hear from director Andrea Arnold.

Sean Baker, director of The Florida Project and Tangerine has a new release, Red Rocket, about a failed adult film industry star.

Director Mathew Vaughan, talks about recreating the trenches of World War One for his latest; The King’s Man.

And there’s some climate crisis poetry from the Contains Strong Language Festival.

(Photo: Romola Garai. Credit: Stefania D'Alessandro/Getty)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qgslv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpyyrxg)
Clashes in northern Syria force Kurdish civilians to flee

A battle is continuing for a third day in northern Syria between Islamic State militants and Kurdish forces guarding a prison where thousands of jihadists are held. The clashes began after IS militants staged an attack on the prison in the city of Hasakeh to secure the release of their fellow combatants. We speak to a journalist who was in the town.

Also in the programme: the Roman Catholic Church is beatifying four people, including two priests, who were murdered by right wing death squads during El Salvador's civil war; and we speak to the newly appointed Chilean Environment Minister on balancing prosperity and tackling climate change.

(Photo: Syrian Kurdish civilians are forced to flee their homes by clashed between Kurdish-led SDF forces and Islamic State fighters Credit: EPA/Ahmed Mardinli)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qgxbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2z77w6wy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sw1hq08jl)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b58mc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Global Questions (w3ct3fm1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qh133)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd3)
Musical collage with Mad Professor, Suzanne Ciani, Matthew E. White and Georgia Anne Muldrow

Mad Professor, Suzanne Ciani, Matthew E. White and Georgia Anne Muldrow discuss how listening to music lets you travel through time, packaging their work into album form, and which part of the music-making process they enjoy the most.

Matthew E. White is a singer, songwriter, producer, and arranger from Richmond, Virginia. He blends folk, gospel, AOR, rock, disco, and psychedelic sounds. He’s also worked with the likes of Sharon Van Etten, Bedouine, Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon, and Slow Club.

Suzanne Ciani is a Grammy-nominated composer, musician, and sound designer. In the 1970s, she invented the world famous ‘pop and pour’ sound effect for Coca Cola. In 1980, she was the first woman hired to score a major Hollywood feature when she composed the music for The Incredible Shrinking Woman. She’s also a recipient of the Moog Innovation Award for her work with synthesizers, and is a former host of this very show.

Georgia Anne Muldrow is an influential part of Los Angeles’ hip-hop, jazz, and soul scenes. She’s released more than 20 albums, and has appeared on tracks with Erykah Badu, Blood Orange, and Robert Glasper. Mos Def is a fan, saying “she’s something else… like Roberta Flack, Nina Simone, and Ella Fitzgerald”.

Mad Professor is a legendary dub reggae producer and engineer. Born in Guyana, he was nicknamed Mad Professor due to his fascination with electronics, and when he moved to London he collected mixing and recording equipment to make his first studio in his living room. Since then he’s released hundreds of recordings and worked with artists including Lee “Scratch” Perry, Sly & Robbie, Grace Jones, Massive Attack, and Sade, before setting up the largest Black-owned studio complex in the UK.



SUNDAY 23 JANUARY 2022

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qh4v7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b5j3m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qh8lc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1ywf)
Tonga eruption – how it happened

The effects of the Tonga eruption could be felt around the world, many heard the boom of a sonic shock, and tsunami waves travelled far and wide. Volcanologist Shane Cronin from the University of Auckland in New Zealand is one of only a handful of people to have landed on the tiny islands above the volcano where the eruption took place. Those islands have now sunk beneath the waves but Shane tells us what he found when he went there and how his findings could inform what happens next.

Stephan Grilli from the School of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island joins us from Toulon in France where he felt the effects of the shockwave and Tsunami. He says the force of the shockwave drove those waves worldwide.

The oceans have continued to warm, producing continuous record temperature rises for several years now. That’s the finding of Michael Mann of the University of Pennsylvania and author of The New Climate Wars. He says warming occurred last year despite the presence of global weather patterns which would usually have a cooling effect.

The long-term effects of covid-19 on health are a cause of growing concern even though in many places the virus itself now appears to be taking on a milder form. Yale University neuroscientist Serena Spudich is particularly concerned with covid’s impact on the brain. She says while the SARS- CoV-2 virus might not be found in brain cells themselves there are neurological impacts.

Scientists have been searching for dark matter for decades, and think there’s six times more of it in the universe than the stuff we can actually see, like stars and planets. But they still don’t know what it is. So how can we be sure dark matter really exists? And why does it matter, anyway?

Back in 2018, armed with a boiler suit, hard hat and ear defenders, Marnie Chesterton travelled over a kilometre underground into a hot and sweaty mine to see how scientists are valiantly trying to catch some elusive particles – in the hope of settling things once and for all.

Several years on we return to the problem, tackling a few more CrowdScience listeners’ questions about dark matter, and hearing whether we’re any closer to uncovering its mysteries. We’re joined in our quest by Dr Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, physicist and author of The Disordered Cosmos: A Journey into Dark Matter, Spacetime, and Dreams Deferred.

With Professor Malcolm Fairbairn, Dr Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, Dr Chamkaur Ghag and Professor Katherine Freese.


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qhdbh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvl09r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b5rlw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwh)
Are people with asthma who exercise healthier?

As Omicron spreads across the US, Claudia Hammond is joined by Professor Matt Fox from Boston University to discuss the latest Covid-19 news, including President Biden’s pledge to make high-quality masks available across the country.

Wheezing and feeling breathless is a fact of life for the 262 million people around the world who have asthma. Some worry that exercise will worsen their asthma symptoms. But UK researchers say that evidence shows that all people with asthma can exercise safely – even if that’s just walking across a room. Lung specialist Andrew Wilson says that the risks are low as long as the symptoms are controlled with medication. Health psychologist Leanne Tyson recommends setting small goals and regular rewards to help keep up the habit. Asthma patient Bill Day, who’s in his 50s, says now that his asthma is under control, he can swim two miles a day to keep fit and healthy.

Yellow and green boxes on social media feeds mean that your friends have been sucked into the world of Wordle, the increasingly popular free online word game. Guessing a new five-letter word every day sounds simple, but Catherine Loveday, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Westminster, explains just how much work the brain does to help solve the puzzle.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath and Samara Linton

(Picture: A young jogger using an asthma inhaler on the beach. Photo credit: Westend61/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qhj2m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct3c7y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qhmtr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw2)
Searching for Mexico's drug-war 'disappeared'

Pascale Harter introduces insights and analysis from BBC correspondents and journalists around the world.

It’s a myth that the only people who die at the hands of drugs cartels are somehow mixed up in the business. In Mexico, they don’t just kill rival narcotraffickers - or the police and soldiers sent to fight them. All too often, their vendettas, gun battles and hitmen end the lives of people who had nothing at all to do with the drug trade. In Mexico, government statistics put the number of people currently missing across the country at more than 95,000. The true number could be far, far higher. So there are many families out there searching for clue to the fate of their relatives, often with little help from the state. Will Grant joined a group of relatives combing a remote part of the Sonora desert for clues.

On the sixteenth of January 2022, there was a suicide bombing in the Somali capital, Mogadishu. Attacks like this are so frequent they aren’t always even reported in the local media, let alone by international news outlets. Somalia has been in a state of conflict for more than thirty years now. Yet although this bombing was “small” by Somali standards, it did make the news - including reports on the BBC - because of who was involved. Our Africa Editor, Mary Harper, is a regular visitor to Somalia – and she’s often worked with the man who was targeted.

At the start of 2022, Kazakhstan was convulsed by unprecedented mass disorder and anti-government protests. The security forces cracked down hard – and even called in help from Moscow to reassert control on the streets. The violence has left at least 225 people dead. Thousands of protestors are still in detention. Abdujalil Abdurasulov lived in Kazakhstan for years, and returned to its capital Almaty in the middle of the protests. It was not the same city he remembered.

Germany currently has the largest Syrian refugee population of any country in the European Union, numbering more than 800,000. You might expect it to be a very tight-knit community, with people who’ve survived similarly harsh experiences looking out for each other and helping each other to rebuild their lives. But when Michael Ertl talked to some Syrian refugees living in Berlin, he found things are not nearly so simple.

(Image: A relative searches for human remains in Sonora, Mexico. Credit: BBC)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b6034)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptv)
Emily Ratajkowski and the art of the body

Emily Ratajkowski is an American model, actress, business woman and now writer and artist. She rose to global fame after appearing in Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines music video dancing topless. She says she’s a feminist and at the time said her performance was a form of empowerment. Since then she’s become a mother and written a series of feminist essays exploring body politics. She tells reporter Anna Bailey about her new book, My Body, exploring her relationship with her own body and exploitation in the modelling industry.

Àsìkò is a photographer who grew up in Lagos, Nigeria. He tells how research into his Yoruba heritage revealed violence inflicted on women's bodies in the name of tradition. He's conveyed this in a series of striking photographs of men and women - their bodies adorned with vivid arrangements of flowers which symbolise something much uglier.

Tadeusz Łysiak in Poland is the director of the film, The Dress. It looks at the longing and loneliness of a woman of short stature who is constantly made to feel that she does not fit within society's norms of beauty. The Dress has been shortlisted for a 2022 Academy Award in the Live Action Short Film category.

And from bodies to how we clothe them or even transcend them. Chinese designer, or "identity engineer", Abi Sheng sees the future of fashion as being less about traditional garments and more about designing alternative bodies. She uses Artificial Intelligence to add identity fluidity to what we wear. Her recent work, a gender transformative suit, aims to change the appearance of the person wearing it, creating a fluid gender identity - as she explained to reporter Constanza Hola.

Presenter: Anu Anand
Producer: Paul Waters

(Photo: Emily Ratajkowski. Credit: Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qhrkw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvlck4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b63v8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2z29)
Tale of a tiny fish: Part two

The Yaboi is a tiny silver fish from West Africa, rich in essential nutrients. It used to be known as ‘the people’s fish’, a staple for lunch for Senegal’s children and a vital fishery for the country’s thousands of women Transformatrices who dry, salt and smoke it to preserve it.

In this second programme we consider the work of Senegal’s Transformatrices. Activist Coumba Toure describes how their work is unseen and uncounted and yet they hold a critical position in a key food chain in West Africa. Tranformatrices describe how dwindling fish stocks and increasing prices are leading to a collapse in the artisanal fishing sector. We also follow the work of leader Djaba Diop who is fighting for recognised status and better working conditions for the women. We hear how this network of mobilised, energised women offer hope for the country’s food security.

Presenter: Hazel Healy
Producer: Sarah Cuddon

(Photo: A Transformatrice holds out a tray of Yaboi fish. Credit: Hazel Healy)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qhwb0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytmn1fv8l3)
UK accuses Russia of plans to install new Ukraine leader

The UK’s foreign minister, Liz Truss, has accused the Kremlin of plans to install a pro-Russia leadership in Ukraine. Also on the programme, aid ships arrive in Tonga as the island tries to recover from the devastating volcano that covered the nation in ash and sent tsunamis through communities. And, as British Prime Minister Boris Johnson faces the threat of a no-confidence vote, we look at the man behind the scandals.

To discuss these issues and more, Rebecca Kesby is joined by Cecile Alduy, professor of French literature and culture at Stanford University, and Oliver Bullough a British journalist and former correspondent in Russia.

(Photo: British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss delivers remarks ahead of Australia-United Kingdom Ministerial Consultations (AUKMIN) talks at Admiralty House, in Sydney, Australia, 21 January 2022. Australian and British defence and foreign affairs ministers will come together for the first time since the start of the pandemic. EPA/BIANCA DE MARCHI AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND OUT)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qj024)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytmn1fvdb7)
ISIS and Kurdish forces fighting continues in Syria

After ISIS attacked a prison in Syria, freeing almost a hundred inmates, Kurdish forces and the Islamic State fighters battle for a third day. Also on the programme, Germany has remained surprisingly reticent in their approach to Russian aggression on the Ukraine border, refusing to send assistance to Ukraine and even barring some countries from sending German-made weapons. And, as Silvio Berlusconi drops out, the Italian presidential election gets under way on Monday. Will Mario Draghi succeed in his bid for a promotion?

To discuss these issues and more, Rebecca Kesby is joined by Cecile Alduy, professor of French literature and culture at Stanford University, and Oliver Bullough a British journalist and former correspondent in Russia.

(Photo: Syrian Kurdish people, who just fled their houses due the clashes with Islamic state group fighters (IS), arrive at Syria democratic forces (SDF) checkpoint at Ghweran district in Hasaka, northeastern Syria, 21 January 2022. EPA/AHMED MARDNLI)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qj3t8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytmn1fvj2c)
UK accuses Russia of plans to install new Ukraine leader

The UK’s foreign minister, Liz Truss, has accused the Kremlin of plans to install a pro-Russia leadership in Ukraine. Also on the programme, is Jamie Dornan too handsome, too stylish, for his role in Kenneth Branagh’s depiction of working class Belfast? A former Hollywood casting director examines the virtues and perils of glamour on screen.

To discuss these issues and more, Rebecca Kesby is joined by Cecile Alduy, professor of French literature and culture at Stanford University, and Oliver Bullough a British journalist and former correspondent in Russia.

(Photo:British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss walks out to greet European Commission Vice-President Maros Sefcovic at Chevening House in Sevenoaks, south of London, Britain January 13, 2022. Ben Stansall/Pool via REUTERS)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b6h2n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgw)
How not to feed a dog

How do you feed a dog? The answer may be more fraught than you had imagined.

Should you give them ‘dog food’? Is it a step too far to feed them at the table? And can man’s best friend thrive on a vegetarian diet?

we bring together three dog-loving experts from the UK, India and the USA to analyse what dog feeding reveals about our relationship with animals and even our own relationship with food.

Be prepared to hear some surprises, some empowering advice and maybe some uncomfortable home truths. And even if you don’t have a dog, you may get some ideas that you can apply to your own life.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: dogs licks lips. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Presenter: Ruth Alexander

Producer: Sarah Stolarz

Contributors:

Shirin Merchant, dog trainer and behaviourist in Mumbai, India

Louise Glazebrook, dog trainer and behaviourist in London, UK

Marc Bekoff, professor emeritus of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Colorado Boulder, USA


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qj7kd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b6lts)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky4)
How Superman saved my life

Joe Michael Straczynski is an award-winning writer responsible for creating TV shows like Babylon 5, Sense8 and the movie Changeling, directed by Clint Eastwood and starring Angeline Jolie. But Joe had an abusive, loveless and deprived childhood. It can make for uncomfortable listening at times. He would find escape in the world of comics and science fiction. He credits one superhero in particular for forming his own moral character and steering him to a better life.

He’s written a book about his life and love of fiction, it’s called Becoming Superman.

All Superman material is copyright of DC Comics Inc.

This programme was first broadcast in October 2019.

If you are affected by issues raised in this episode there is confidential support on the BBC Action Line website, or at Befrienders.org

Presenter: Andrea Kennedy
Producer: Tom Harding Assinder

(Photo: Superman float in the Mardi Gras Parade. Credit: Carol M. Highsmith/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qjc9j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Women Building Peace (w3ct3fl9)
Afghanistan

"Lama", a student in Afghanistan who fears for her safety since the Taliban takeover, speaks to the country's former education minister Rangina Hamidi, who fled to the United States, and to former US Secretary of State and campaigner for women's rights Hillary Clinton.

A co-production by BBC and Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security

Presenter: Suzanne Kianpour
Produced by Philip Reevell for BBC World Service

Image: A former journalist silhouetted during an interview with AFP in Kabul (Credit: Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b6qkx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct38kk)
Thai Buddhism: Leaving the monkhood

In the internet age, the traditional way Thailand’s monks reach out to young followers is under threat. With nearly three quarters of Thailand’s population on Facebook, a move by two monks to broadcast their teachings live has created controversy, and exposed a growing schism within the religion. It ultimately leads one of the men to turn his back on the temple.

Thai reporter Chaiyot Yongcharoenchai hears from 30-year-old monk Phra Maha Paivan Worawono, from Bangkok who landed himself in trouble after he appeared in his sermons to laugh and joke, as he poked fun at current affairs and politics.

The Buddhist authorities did not find the sessions amusing after more than 200,000 people had logged on to watch and lead to an investigation by the National Office for Buddhism.

As more monks turn to social media in a bid to revolutionise how the Dharrma is taught, is the resignation of Thailand’s most popular internet monk a sign that traditional Buddhism must modernise, or face becoming irrelevant to the country’s young population?

(Photo: Thai monk Sompong. Credit: Thai News Pics)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qjh1n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvm30x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b6vb1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct3031)
Why We Play

Adolescence: Discovering identity through play

As we grow into adolescence, the playfulness of childhood seems to disappear. Teenagers discovering their identity are engaged in a serious quest. There are unwritten rules to learn and to follow, and to be too spontaneous puts you at risk of ridicule. But while teenagers are less playful they are playing nonetheless, the obvious examples being sport and video games. As today’s teenagers live in a culture where the boundaries of the real and virtual are ever more fluid, video games offer a space free of adult supervision, where they can make friends (both on and offline), rehearse their identities, and accumulate “cultural capital”. Far from the stereotypes of the solitary gamer playing violent shooter games, many of today’s successful video games help teenagers to navigate issues of anxiety, depression, and identity. In Lagos, we find researchers using virtual reality games to help schoolchildren to understand and develop empathy for those from different ethnic backgrounds. And we ask whether playfulness can help teenagers and young adults communicate messages to potential partners.

Presenter: Steffan Powell.
Producer: Jolyon Jenkins

(Photo: A teenager smiles as he plays a video game. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qjlss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z36)
What’s going on in Kazakhstan?

What has caused the worst unrest and political infighting in Kazakhstan’s recent history? Scores of deaths and thousands of arrests prompted the summoning of foreign troops. An elderly political leadership faces difficult choices in re-asserting its authority.

With Charmaine Cozier.


(The damage aftermath of the protests in Almaty, Kazakhstan 11 Jan 2022. Credit: Pavel Pavlov/Getty Images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b6z25)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3ct1gyk)
Hunting Syria's war criminals

Imagine walking down a street in a European capital and meeting your torturer. For many Syrian refugees fleeing war and human rights abuses, Europe was meant to be a sanctuary. So it was a shock when people began bumping into their torturers out shopping or in a cafe. In fact many of those involved in the Syrian government’s notorious interrogation facilities are hiding in plain sight in European cities having used the refugee wave as a “ratline” out of the country. More and more are now being investigated, arrested and put on trial in European courts. But with President Assad firmly in control in Syria the long arm of the state is reaching those willing to testify. For Assignment, Chloe Hadjimatheou and Michael Ertl look at how the Syrian war is continuing to play out in Europe.

Presented and produced by Chloe Hadjimatheou and Michael Ertl
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: A woman shows a picture of her Syrian relatives outside the Higher Regional Court in Koblenz, Germany, 13 January 2022. Credit: Sascha Steinbach/EPA)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qjqjx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpz0pvj)
Heavy gunfire at military bases in Burkina Faso

There has been heavy gunfire at several army barracks in Burkina Faso, including two in the capital Ouagadougou. The government has denied reports of a coup. The defence minister said it was not true that President Roch Marc Kabore had been detained. We hear from a journalist who was held by the mutineers.

Also in the programme: A Taliban delegation is in Norway for talks with western countries about the dire humanitarian situation in Afghanistan; and after a bad week for tech stocks - is a bubble created by the pandemic starting to burst?

(Photo: The military has been battling to curb a long-running insurgency. Credit: AFP)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qjv91)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmd)
Copper: From mining to microprocessors

Copper is a metal that has been with us since the dawn of civilisation. The Romans used it to build their empire, and its high thermal and electrical conductivity led to the 19th century discovery of how to generate electricity and a revolution in telecommunications. Copper was even used to build the Statue of Liberty in New York, and it’s because of copper’s tendency to oxidise that the statue is no longer shiny brown but green. Today we still depend on this 'eternal metal', so called because it doesn’t decay or rust, and it has become a staple and necessary component in new green technologies like solar power and electric cars. But extracting copper has always been very damaging to human health and the environment - so how has our relationship with copper changed over the centuries?

Joining Rajan Datar to find out more about copper past and present is Nikita Sud, Professor of Development studies at Oxford University and the author of The Making of Land and The Making of India; the archaeologist Dr William Parkinson, who is a curator at the Field Museum, and Professor of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago; and Andrea Sella, Professor of Chemistry at University College, London.

Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service.

(Image: Stripped copper cables. Credit: Christoph Burgstedt/Science Photo Library via Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl7)
Are female patients more likely to die if the surgeon is male?

In early January several newspapers ran article claiming that ‘women are 32% more likely to die after operation by male surgeon. If true, this is a terrifying figure but is all as it seems? We dig into the data to find out whether women should really be worried about having a male surgeon.


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qjz15)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qk2s9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tph79rqj3)
Live Sporting Action

Sunday Sportsworld has commentary of Chelsea versus Tottenham from Stamford Bridge, plus reaction from the day’s other Premier League games; Arsenal v Burnley, Crystal Palace v Liverpool and Leicester v Brighton. There’ll also be the latest from the Africa Cup of Nations with two matches taking place in the last 16.

Plus we get the very latest from the top men’s and women’s leagues across Europe; We’re also in Melbourne at the end of the opening week of the Australian Open, and there’ll be the latest from the Women’s Ashes – which continues with the third T20 international.

Photo: Harry Kane of Tottenham Hotspur runs with the ball whilst under pressure from Chelsea's Jorginho. (Credit: Tottenham Hotspur FC via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qkg0p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvn1zy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b7t92)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct38kk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qkkrt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhz)
Microsoft’s multi-billion dollar gaming deal

On this edition of Business Weekly, we look at the gaming industry’s biggest deal so far, as Microsoft stumps up nearly $69bn to buy Activision Blizzard, the company behind mega-games including Call of Duty and World of Warcraft. We hear how Microsoft wants to increase its slice of the gaming sector. Mobile stock trading apps have been booming in popularity during the pandemic, opening the door to millions of new, often young, or first-time investors. For many in the finance sector it is great news, but there have been questions raised about whether people always know the amount of financial risk they are taking on. Also, we focus on China’s economy, and hear what impact the ‘zero Covid’ policy and approach has made. Plus, we stop and smell the roses of the global flower industry - and follow one supply line from Kenya to Amsterdam to find out how green the sector really is. And as the original Winnie the Pooh book falls out of US copyright, we hear what potential new adventures might be in store for the “bear of very little brain”. Business Weekly is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Visitors queue to play the video game 'Call of Duty' in Paris, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qkphy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpz1ntk)
Burkina Faso soldiers mutiny at bases in Ouagadougou

Soldiers have mutinied at several barracks in Burkina Faso, demanding the sacking of military chiefs and more resources to fight militant Islamists. Hundreds of people came out in support of the troops and torched the ruling party's headquarters.

Also in the programme: Fighting continues between Kurdish fighters and Islamic State militants in northern Syria; and exactly two years on from the day Beijing ordered the lockdown of the city of Wuhan, we ask if China is struggling to maintain ‘zero Covid’.

(Photo: People hold a Burkina Faso flag as hundreds gather in downtown Ouagadougou to show support for the military. Credit: Reuters).


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qkt82)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2z77z3t1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sw1hq35fp)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b85jg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qky06)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 Women Building Peace (w3ct3fl9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b898l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]



MONDAY 24 JANUARY 2022

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0px0h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8md88w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct38kk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0q0rm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzln1072mxw)
Italy to elect a new president

This week members of the Italian Parliament will elect a new head of state in a secret ballot. The powers of the president are limited, but the role of overseeing the appointment of the prime minister will be key as the country holds a general election next year, as we hear from Paola Subacchi, professor of international economics at Queen Mary University of London. Over the weekend former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi dropped out of the running. Meanwhile, the Italian economy has been growing stronger, as Valentina Meliciani, professor of economics at Luiss University in Rome, explains.

Thousands of unvaccinated American truck drivers are banned from crossing the border into Canada and now the US is also blocking Canadian truckers. We have an extended report on the problems that could be caused by a shortage of truck drivers. Plus, we revisit the panic buying at the beginning of the pandemic. Adam Kaat worked in a supermarket in the state of Colorado in 2020 and has written a book about his experiences.

(Photo: the Quirinale presidential palace in Rome, Italy. Credit: Getty Images.)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mdd10)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct30j1)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The slippery situation

'What is the slipperiest thing in the world?' asks 8 year old Evelyn? 'Why do my feet slip on a wet floor but when my feet are even slightly moist it's nearly impossible to put on a pair of socks without falling over and cursing the universe. What is going on here?' asks Evelyn's Dad, Sam. Hannah and Adam investigate the science of friction and lubrication - so called 'tribology' with the help of tribologists and mechanical engineers Professor Ashlie Martini from California University Merced and Professor Roger Lewis from the University of Sheffield. With their help Hannah and Adam find out why leaves on the line are so slippery, what happens to graphite in space and what is the slipperiest food. Professor of Materials, Mark Miodownik from University College London explains what's going on when friction stops two materials sliding past each other and wonders whether the slipperiest substance was actually discovered accidentally in a lab by scientists looking for something completely different. Also in the programme why the ability to reduce friction, even by minuscule amounts could have a huge impact for sustainability and reducing energy use.

Producers: Jen Whyntie and Pamela Rutherford


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0q4hr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs74srh0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mdhs4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2drr)
Are we too reliant on tech that’s not invented yet?

Written into many of the promises made by countries about how they intend to achieve their UN climate pledges to reduce emissions is an assumption that technology will help them make this happen. But this technology either does not currently exist or is in its infancy.

This includes schemes to take carbon out of the air via carbon capture and storage or direct air capture and to replace our dependency on fossil fuels with green hydrogen. We visit the world’s largest direct air capture plant in Iceland and speak to the person in charge of Namibia’s grand plans to become the green hydrogen production hub of the world - can both really be scaled up in order to meet our current needs?

Presenters Kate Lamble and Jordan Dunbar are joined by:

Zeke Hausfather, Director of Climate and Energy at the Breakthrough Institute,
Victoria Gill, BBC’s Science Correspondent,
Christoph Beuttler, Head of Climate Policy at Climeworks, and
Jane Olwoch, Executive Director of South African Science Service Centre for Climate Change and Adaptive Land Management (SASSCAL)

Producer: Dearbhail Starr
Researcher: Tatyana Movshevich and Zoe Gelber
Reporter: Magnús Geir Eyjólfsson
Series Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound engineer: Tom Brignell


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0q87w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Women Building Peace (w3ct3fl9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mdmj8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0qd00)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs74szz8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mdr8d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9r)
Saving lives in the mountains

Mountain rescue volunteers are a rare breed: they’re on call 24/7, ready to risk their lives to save hikers and skiers who get stuck on the mountains. Kim Chakanetsa meets two women who lead perilous rescue missions in Canada and in the UK.

Kirsty Pallas is a mountaineering and climbing instructor based in Scotland. In 2014 she joined the Oban Mountain Rescue Team, where she’s a callout manager and a training officer. She’s also the founder of Our Shared Outdoors, an organisation set up to tackle and change the lack of diversity in the outdoors and promote underrepresented groups.

Kayla Brolly is an emergency room nurse and a crew member with North Shore Rescue, the busiest volunteer search and rescue organisation in Canada. She’s been involved in countless rescue operations in the popular hiking and skiing mountains north of Vancouver. In December 2017, whilst taking part in a delicate rescue mission on a steep slope, she suffered a severe head injury.

Produced by Alice Gioia for BBC World Service.


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0qhr4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv33csg4krw)
Burkina Faso: Shots heard near presidential palace

Shots are heard close to the Presidential palace in Burkina Faso amid reports of a mutiny by soldiers unhappy with the way the Islamist insurgency is being handled.

The US has ordered the relatives of its embassy staff in Ukraine to leave amid reports that Russia is planning significant military action against Ukraine.

And nine days after a volcanic eruption in Tonga, we see how the recovery operation is progressing.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0qmh8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv33csg4pj0)
Burkina Faso: Government denies coup rumours

There's confusion in Burkina Faso's capital, Ouagadougou, after a night of heavy clashes around the presidential palace and unconfirmed reports of a coup.

The US State Department has advised Americans against travelling to Russia, and ordered the departure of families of its diplomats in Ukraine.

And we head to Norway as a Taliban delegation holds talks with officials on human rights and humanitarian aid in their first official visit to the West since returning to power.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0qr7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv33csg4t84)
Burkina Faso: Unconfirmed reports President replaced

There's confusion in Burkina Faso's capital, Ouagadougou, after a night of heavy clashes around the presidential palace and unconfirmed reports of a coup.

As tensions rise between Washington and Moscow, US citizens have been told not to go to Russia. American diplomats' families have also been ordered to leave Ukraine.

And after the eruption and tsunami that hit Tonga, the United Nations Coordination Specialist in the country calls for help in the clean-up.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0qvzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6z)
Mohammad Marandi: Iran's nuclear negotiations

HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to the adviser to Iran’s negotiators in Vienna, Mohammad Marandi. Time is running out for negotiators trying to break the impasse between the United States and Iran and revive the deal curbing Tehran’s nuclear ambitions. Iran is still enriching uranium; the Biden administration is talking of giving up on the current diplomatic track. If a nuclear deal can’t be done, how real is the danger of a catastrophic war in the Middle East?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mf77x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5z)
The beauty tweakments industry

Demand for beauty tweakments - small changes to your appearance – as opposed to full on face changing plastic surgery, is soaring. Hours spent on video conferencing has forced people to constantly scrutinise their appearance, so what exactly are people having done and how much does it all cost? Elizabeth Hotson speaks to tweakments fan, Eddie Wunderlich, a personal trainer and stylist at the Dop Dop salon in New York and we hear about the importance of appearance at work from Dr Stefanie K. Johnson, an associate professor at the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business. Dr Hazel Mycroft, a senior lecturer in social psychology at the University of Exeter talks through the thought processes of having tweakments done and Elizabeth visits skincare guru Sarah Chapman, in her Skinesis Clinic in London to see what exactly customers want..

(Photo: LED light treatment,. Credit: Elizabeth Hotson).

Presenter: Elizabeth Hotson
Producer: Sarah Treanor


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x22)
British troops in Northern Ireland

In August 1969 the British Army was first deployed in Northern Ireland. Their job was to keep the peace on the streets of Londonderry where sectarian violence had broken out. To begin with the soldiers were welcomed by residents, but attitudes soon changed and what became known as 'The Troubles' got underway. Louise Hidalgo reports.

Picture: Armed British soldiers on the streets of Northern Ireland, 15th August 1969 (Credit: Press Association)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0qzqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mfc01)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prn)
Does dark matter still matter?

Scientists have been searching for dark matter for decades, and think there’s six times more of it in the universe than the stuff we can actually see, like stars and planets. But they still don’t know what it is. So how can we be sure dark matter really exists? And why does it matter, anyway?

Back in 2018, armed with a boiler suit, hard hat and ear defenders, Marnie Chesterton travelled over a kilometre underground into a hot and sweaty mine to see how scientists are valiantly trying to catch some elusive particles – in the hope of settling things once and for all.

Several years on we return to the problem, tackling a few more CrowdScience listeners’ questions about dark matter, and hearing whether we’re any closer to uncovering its mysteries. We’re joined in our quest by Dr Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, physicist and author of The Disordered Cosmos: A Journey into Dark Matter, Spacetime, and Dreams Deferred.


With Professor Malcolm Fairbairn, Dr Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, Dr Chamkaur Ghag and Professor Katherine Freese.


Presented by Marnie Chesterton


Produced by Graihagh Jackson and Cathy Edwards


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0r3gs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mfgr5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0r76x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs74tv65)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mflh9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0rbz1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv9)
The girl who acted before Rosa Parks

In 1955 when Claudette Colvin was just 15 years old and living in the racially-segregated city of Montgomery, Alabama, she refused to give up her seat on a bus for a white passenger - nine months before Rosa Parks did the same thing and inspired a revolution. At the time, Claudette was convicted of assaulting a police officer and her criminal record remained for 66 years, until last year when she decided to clear her name - her record was finally expunged in November 2021. Claudette spoke to Matthew Bannister about her extraordinary life. This interview was first broadcast in February 2018.

Many African-American cemeteries in the US have fallen into disrepair over the years - one of them is Geer cemetery in the city of Durham, North Carolina. It was founded in the 19th century when racial segregation laws meant that black people had to be buried separately from white people and over 1,500 people are believed to be buried at Geer. Of that number, only around 200 headstones remain and the stories of those interred were at risk of being lost forever. That was until a group of volunteers called "Friends of Geer" stepped in - they are now working to reclaim the histories of those buried there. Reporter Danny Greenwald went to meet two of the group's members - Michael Williams and Deirdre Barnes. Danny Greenwald also composed the music in this report.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Claudette Colvin as a teenager. Credit: Alamy)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0rgq5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs74v2pf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mftzk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0rlg9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz87krx)
Ukraine crisis: Nato to send additional ships and fighter jets to member states in eastern Europe

Russia has accused Nato of escalating tensions. The US has said the issue at stake is Russian aggression, not Nato expansion. Latvia's Foreign Minister joins us to discuss the situation.

Also on the programme, President Roch Kabore of Burkina Faso has been detained by the military, after a night of gunfire outside his palace in Ougadougou, and we hear from Antarctica, where a newly discovered penguin colony offers new clues about the pace of climate change.

(Photo: Natp Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg speaks at a news conference at the Alliance"s headquarters in Brussels, Belgium 12 January, 2022. Credit: Johanna Geron/Reuters)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0rq6f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mg2gt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y48df8z9yb8)
European Commission announces Ukraine financial aid

The EU Commission president has offered $1.3bn in financial assistance for Ukraine. Ursula von der Leyen's announcement came as NATO put forces on standby and Britain and the US withdrew diplomats from Ukraine, as the threat of a potential Russian invasion continues. We assess Russia's position in the dispute with Chris Weafer, who is chief executive of the Moscow-based economic consultancy Macro Advisory, and we get wider context from Georg Zachmann of the Bruegel think tank. Also in the programme, the Australian mining giant Fortescue Metals has bought the battery and technology arm of the Williams Formula One racing team. Craig Williams is chief executive of Williams Advanced Engineering, and tells us what makes the organisation attractive. Plus, Google is facing concerns from Germany's largest publishers and advertisers, which are asking the EU to intervene over the search giant's plan to stop the use of third-party tracking cookies in its Chrome web browser. Javier Espinoza from the Financial Times brings us the background.

Today's edition is presented by Rahul Tandon, and produced by Nisha Patel, Tom Kavanagh and Sara Parry.

(Picture: Ursula von der Leyen speaks about Ukraine. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0rtyk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxz6w46tx0)
Burkina Faso president detained

We go to Burkina Faso where President Roch Kabore has been detained, a day after an army mutiny. We hear from regular people in the country as well as getting the latest from our reporter.

And we get the latest from Ukraine, as the US and UK begin withdrawing staff from their embassies in the country in response to what they describe as the growing threat from Russia. We bring you the latest developments on the ground, as well as continuing to hear from ordinary Ukrainians across the country.

And based on the current statistics we have, Peru in South America has the highest number of Covid related deaths per capita, with more than 6,000 Peruvians per million having died from the disease. We speak to two healthcare professionals in Peru to find out about their experiences and how the country is coping.

Also, one of our Covid-19 experts, Dr Eleanor Murray, assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health, will be looking at the latest coronavirus headlines and answering listener questions. You can send your audio question to the OS WhatsApp on +447730 751925.

(Photo: People show their support for the military after Burkina Faso President Roch Kabore was detained at a military camp in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, January 24, 2022. Credit: REUTERS/Vincent Bado)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0rypp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxz6w46yn4)
Covid in Peru

Based on the current statistics we have, Peru in South America has the highest number of Covid related deaths per capita, with more than 6,000 Peruvians per million having died from the disease. We speak to two healthcare professionals in Peru to find out about their experiences and how the country is coping.

We go to Mexico to find out about journalist Lourdes Maldonado, who has been shot dead in the northern border city of Tijuana. She is the second journalist to be killed in the region this week. We hear from other journalists in Mexico and people who knew her.

We get the latest from Ukraine, as the US and UK begin withdrawing staff from their embassies in the country in response to what they describe as the growing threat from Russia. We bring you the latest developments on the ground, as well as continuing to hear from ordinary Ukrainians across the country.

And one of our Covid-19 experts, Professor Manfred Green, professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel, will be looking at the latest coronavirus headlines and answering listener questions. You can send your audio question to the OS WhatsApp on +447730 751925.

(Photo: Vaccination centre in Mangual, Peru October 11, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Sebastian Castaneda)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0s2ft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0s65y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs74vt56)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mgkgb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ns63zw209)
2022/01/24 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0s9y2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mgp6g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct30j2)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The venomous vendetta

Whilst watching a documentary about some poisonous frogs, Curio Janni in Amsterdam, started to wonder what would happen if a frog licked itself or another frog of the same species. She asks Dr Adam Rutherford and Professor Hannah Fry to investigate whether an animal would react badly to a toxin it itself produces? In essence 'can a venomous snake kill itself by biting itself?'

Of course the answer is complicated, but the sleuths know exactly who to ask.

Steve Backshall, award-winning wildlife explorer, best known for his BBC series 'Deadly 60'. Author of 'Venom – Poisonous Creatures in the Natural World'. Steve has been bitten, stung and spat at by a plethora of venomous creatures during his career. He also studied the first known venomous newt - the sharp-ribbed newt - a creature that has sharpened ribs that when it's under attack, it will squeeze its body force those ribs out through its skin, coating them in venom, which is then delivered into the mouth of an attacker.

Professor Nick Casewell, studies venomous snakes and their impact on humans. He works on treatments for snakebites at the Liverpool School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Snakebites have a huge impact on communities in South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa and South America. It's now been reinstated as one of the most serious neglected tropical diseases by the World Health Organisation. Traditional treatments - antivenins - can be expensive, difficult to access and don't always work - Nick is looking into alternative medicines to treat snakebite victims.

Dr. Ronald Jenner is Principle Researcher in the Comparative Venomics group at the Natural History Museum's Life Sciences, Invertebrates Division and co-wrote the book ‘Venom -the secrets of nature's deadliest weapon.’ He explains the evolutionary arms race between venomous predators and their prey and poisonous prey and their predators. He explains how resistance to venom has evolved and how venom has evolved to be more or less powerful over time, answering another Curio - Scott Probert's question on the evolution of venom.

Christie Wilcox wrote 'Venomous – How Earth’s Deadliest Creatures Mastered Biochemistry'. She studied the molecular basis of lionfish venom. Christie describes how venom and immunity to venom works at the molecular level.


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0sfp6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz88dzt)
Nato takes new defensive steps to counter Russia

Western powers are intensifying efforts to draw up a common strategy in the face of Russian troop build-up near Ukraine. We hear from Russian MP Vitaliy Milonov.

Also in the programme, Burkina Faso's military confirms president deposed; and Boris Johnson woes increase.

(Photo: Flags of Russia and the self-proclaimed Donetsk People"s Republic wave in the wind near a monument to Soviet state founder Vladimir Lenin in the rebel-held city of Donetsk. Credit: Alexander Ermochenko/Reuters)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0skfb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3bhk5vz9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172y0swds09xly)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mgxpq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrt3v3b118)
Ukraine: US troops on high alert over stand-off

Some 8,500 combat-ready US troops are on high alert to deploy at short notice amid rising tension over Ukraine, the Pentagon says. President Biden held a video call with European allies on Monday as Western powers aim for a common strategy against Russian aggression.
The Pentagon said no decision had yet been made on whether to deploy troops.We assess Russia's position in the dispute with Chris Weafer, who is chief executive of the Moscow-based economic consultancy Macro Advisory, and we get wider context from Georg Zachmann of the Bruegel think tank. Also in the programme, the Australian mining giant Fortescue Metals has bought the battery and technology arm of the Williams Formula One racing team. Craig Williams is chief executive of Williams Advanced Engineering, and tells us what makes the organisation attractive. Plus, Google is facing concerns from Germany's largest publishers and advertisers, which are asking the EU to intervene over the search giant's plan to stop the use of third-party tracking cookies in its Chrome web browser. Javier Espinoza from the Financial Times brings us the background.

(Picture: US troops/Getty Images)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0sp5g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mh1fv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



TUESDAY 25 JANUARY 2022

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0ssxl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z84)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0sxnq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqt08xq8zf)
Ukraine: US troops on high alert over stand-off

Some 8,500 combat-ready US troops are on high alert to deploy at short notice amid rising tension over Ukraine, the Pentagon says. President Biden held a video call with European allies on Monday as Western powers aim for a common strategy against Russian aggression.
The Pentagon said no decision had yet been made on whether to deploy troops. We assess Russia's position in the dispute with Chris Weafer, who is chief executive of the Moscow-based economic consultancy Macro Advisory.

Also in the programme, the Australian mining giant Fortescue Metals has bought the battery and technology arm of the Williams Formula One racing team. Craig Williams is chief executive of Williams Advanced Engineering, and tells us what makes the organisation attractive.

Google is facing concerns from Germany's largest publishers and advertisers, which are asking the EU to intervene over the search giant's plan to stop the use of third-party tracking cookies in its Chrome web browser. Javier Espinoza from the Financial Times brings us the background.

Also in the programme - Bob Dylan sells his entire recording catalogue to Sony Music.

PHOTO: US troops/Getty Images


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0t1dv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs74wnd3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mhdp7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct3c80)
Fighting tobacco in Zambia

In Zambia, smoking is on the rise. One woman wants to change that. BBC global health correspondent Tulip Mazumdar follows the story of Brenda Chitindi in her efforts to get tobacco control on the agenda.

As tobacco production and consumption increase in Zambia, Brenda and others are campaigning for the introduction of a Tobacco Control Bill to the nation's legislature. It is a campaign they have been fighting for over a decade. With a new government elected in 2021, could this be the moment for change?

Tulip speaks to those pressing for the bill as well as hearing the arguments against its introduction. She looks into the culture of tobacco use in Zambia and the role of tobacco companies in society. Widening her focus across the continent, Tulip uncovers the trends in tobacco production and consumption elsewhere in Africa. Countries such as Kenya have introduced stricter tobacco control measures - does this hint at what the future for Zambia might hold?

(Photo: Hand putting out a cigarette in an ashtray. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0t54z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0t8x3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs74wwwc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mhn5h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf7)
Stephen Page: Staging indigenous culture

Wudjang: Not the Past is Stephen Page's swan song after 30 years at the helm of Australia’s First Nation company, Bangarra Dance Theatre. This production is their biggest yet; a contemporary corroboree of story, poetry, song, dance and music, told by 26 performers on stage.

This is a new work and as the last in Stephen’s long career as artistic director of Bangarra Dance, the pressure is on to create his crowning achievement in a short eight weeks where it will premiere at Sydney Festival, a huge cultural event that takes place across Sydney in January.

The work lives close to Stephen’s experience of family, drawing on his father’s lost language of Mibinyah from Yugambeh Country and the songlines of his Aboriginal heritage. It is a work that addresses ancestors and new knowledge and connects the past with the present. It is a fusion of form that elevates and strengthens the continent’s troubled culture and moves from the land and ritual to the stage.

Join Regina Botros as she follows Stephen in his creative process from conception to completion. She also talks to other creatives in this very collaborative production including; award winning co-writer Alana Valentine, composer Steve Francis, designer Jacob Nash and dancer Daniel Mateo.

Presenter/producer: Regina Botros
Executive producer: Rebecca Armstrong


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0tdn7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv33csg7gnz)
Africa Cup of Nations: 8 people killed in stampede outside

At least eight people are reported to have been killed and dozens hurt in a crush outside an Africa Cup of Nations match in Cameroon.

We report from Ukraine as fears grow that Russia is preparing to invade.

A legal case with potentially massive ramifications in the US - the policy of affirmative action in universities, used to redress decades of racial inequalities, is under threat.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0tjdc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv33csg7lf3)
Nato warns Russia against Ukrainian threats

The Nato Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg says any further aggression by Russia against Ukraine will have severe costs.

At least eight people are reported to have been killed and dozens hurt in a crush outside an Africa Cup of Nations match in Cameroon

And reports of another social gathering when the UK was living under government imposed restrictions, this time a Birthday party for Prime Minister Boris Johnson.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0tn4h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv33csg7q57)
Russia warned against Ukrainian aggression by Nato

The Nato Secretary General has said leaders of member states have agreed that any further aggression by Russia against Ukraine will have severe costs.

Tragedy at the Africa Cup of Nations in Cameroon as 8 people die in stampede to get into a stadium.

And reports of yet another social gathering when the UK was living under government imposed restrictions, this time a Birthday party for UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0trwm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm3)
How to fight fake health news

Could a video game where you pretend to spread Covid misinformation actually make you less susceptible to real-life fake news?

Fake news, conspiracy theories and misinformation about health can stop people getting vaccinated, which in turn could cause diseases to spread and ultimately result in people dying.

In Sierra Leone, an NGO is educating people about typhoid and malaria by creating audio dramas, and sharing them over WhatsApp.

Meanwhile, a team based at Cambridge University in the UK wants to ‘inoculate’ people, to prevent them from believing fake stories if and when they see them in the future.

Presenter: Jo Mathys
Reporter/Producer: Mark Sedgwick

Image: The Go Viral game


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mj450)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jh0)
Who's winning the War on Drugs?

Mexico's cartels are thriving, and finding innovative ways to smuggle drugs across the border into the US, despite law enforcement and the pandemic.

Ed Butler speaks to Dr Irene Mia of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, who says the closing of borders due to Covid has provided the cartels with a surprising shot in the arm, as they have proved far more adept at keeping their product flowing than many other legitimate international export businesses. Speedboats, tunnels, even catapults have been deployed to get methamphetamine and fentanyl into the US.

And that's not all. The cartels have diversified, into people smuggling, wildcat mining and crude oil theft among other things, according to the Mexico-based author and journalist Ioan Grillo. And they aren't the only ones. In Brazil, a narcotics gang called First Capital Command has become so powerful that they have effectively replaced the government in some parts of the country, according to Marcos Alan Ferreira of the Federal University of Paraiba.

(Picture: Mexican Federal Police officers patrol Iguala, Guerrero state, Mexico; Credit: Yuri Cortez/AFP via Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6l)
Bloody Sunday

On 30 January 1972 British troops opened fire on a civil rights march in Northern Ireland. Thirteen people were killed that day, which became known as Bloody Sunday. Tony Doherty was nine years old at the time. In 2012 he spoke to Mike Lanchin about his father and the events that changed his life forever.

Photo: A British soldier grabs hold of a protester by the hair. (Credit: AFP/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0twmr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct3c80)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mj7x4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct30j2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0v0cw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0v440)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs74xr38)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mjhdd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0v7w4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxk)
Solving the puzzle: Crosswords, anorexia, and me

Anna Shechtman began writing crossword puzzles as a teenager - but developed an eating disorder around the same time. She became one of the youngest crossword creators to publish a puzzle in the New York Times newspaper and now writes crosswords for the New Yorker magazine, but during her recovery she sometimes feared that her illness and her love of creating crosswords were inextricably linked.

She tells Emily Webb about the art of cruciverbalism, 'crossworld', and why the creation of crossword clues is a political act.

In South Africa, Nathi Mankayi has been winning millions of fans, and many awards, with his heartfelt songs. He writes them from experience and he has had quite an experience. Poverty, crime and an eight-year prison sentence. But in just a few years he's gone from inmate to one of South Africa's top selling recording artists. Outlook's Mpho Lakaje spoke to him. This interview was first broadcast in 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb

(Photo: Anna Shechtman. Courtesy of Emily Shechtman)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0vcm8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs74xzlj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mjqwn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct30j2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0vhcd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz8bgp0)
US puts troops on alert as Ukraine crisis continues

Germany criticised by NATO allies for blocking efforts to supply weapons and soldiers to Ukraine. A German MP responds.

Also on the programme, eight football fans have died in a stampede outside the Olembe Stadium before the quarter final of the Africa Cup Of Nations in Cameroon took place. And London's Metropolitan Police announce that they are opening a criminal investigation into the reports of parties taking place at Number Ten Downing street during the lockdowns.

(Picture: US Troops standing to attention. Credit: AFP / Getty)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0vm3j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mjzcx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bvrgsgrj7)
Central Asia suffers power cuts

Millions of people in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan have suffered power cuts. The disruption has been caused by a grid failure, and Timor Karpov in the Uzbekistan capital Tashkent tells us about his experience of power shortages. And Temur Umarov of the Carnegie Moscow Centre explains the background to the problems. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on how drug cartels in Mexico have turned to innovative solutions to continue smuggling drugs across the border into the United States. The latest European Space Conference is under way in Brussels today. We explore the main items on the agenda, including a possible rival to Elon Musk's Starlink internet satellite constellation, and tackling the problem of space junk, with space journalist Jonathan O'Callaghan. Plus, the pandemic has disrupted the industry awards sector considerably over the past two years. Our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan tells us why he is happy to keep his tuxedo tucked away in the wardrobe.

Today's edition is presented by Rahul Tandon, and produced by Nisha Patel, Sara Parry and Tom Kavanagh.

(Picture: Power cables in Uzbekistan. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0vqvn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxz6w49qt3)
Crowd crush at Africa Cup of Nations in Cameroon

A crowd crush has killed at least 8 people on their way into Monday night’s Africa Cup of Nations football match in Cameroon. We’ll speak to people who were at the game in Yaoundé between Cameroon and Comoros to try to build up a picture of what happened and why.

We explain and analyse the on-going diplomacy to try to calm fears of a Russian invasion of Ukraine. We cover the day's news including key statements expected from leaders in Brussels, Berlin and Washington DC.

We’re continuing to follow events in Burkina Faso after military officers announced on TV that they had overthrown the president and seized power. They gave the deteriorating security situation due to an Islamist insurgency as the reason. We’ll speak to people who are there and find out how they’re feeling about the situation.

And we talk through today's main developments with Covid-19 with the help of one of our regular experts, Dr.Isaac Bogoch, infectious diseases physician and scientist at the University of Toronto.

(Photo: Several people were taken to hospital after the crush at the Paul Biya stadium in Yaoundé. Credit: SNTV)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0vvls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxz6w49vk7)
Ukraine-Russia tensions

We explain and analyse the on-going diplomacy to try to calm fears of a Russian invasion of Ukraine. Russia has accused the US of fuelling tension by putting thousands of American troops on heightened alert, Meanwhile, European leaders have been talking about their response in Brussels and Berlin. We hear from our correspondent monitoring the developments.

A crowd crush has killed at least 8 people on their way into Monday night’s Africa Cup of Nations football match in Cameroon. We’ll speak to people who were at the game in Yaoundé between Cameroon and Comoros to try to build up a picture of what happened and why.

We’ll answer more of your questions on coronavirus with one of our regular experts, Dr Swapneil Parikh in Mumbai. We’ll ask him to put into context headlines about so-called “stealth Omicron” and explain what we need to know.

(Photo: The Pentagon says US troops are on standby to deploy to Europe, should Russia invade Ukraine (file picture) Credit: AFP/Getty)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0vzbx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0w331)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs74yq29)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mkgcf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ns63zyyxd)
2022/01/25 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0w6v5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct3c80)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mkl3k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt9)
Internet connectivity still patchy in Tonga

Connectivity to Tonga partially restored but undersea cable repair could take weeks. The underwater volcanic eruption severed the country’s only underwater network cable and ash clouds have made satellite connectivity impossible. Professor Nicole Starosielski from NYU, an expert in underwater connectivity and author of “The undersea network”, joins us on the show. An underwater cable is severed every three days somewhere in the world, yet the network has the capacity to usually cope with this disruption. Many developing countries do not have this extra capacity as they cannot afford it. Professor Starosielski argues that richer nations should step up and fund this lack of spare connectivity.

Virtual IT brain drain in Argentina
IT workers in Argentina are being enticed by US and European tech companies to work remotely for them, by offering very attractive salaries and remote working contracts. Local IT businesses are struggling to retain workers as they leave for salaries in US$ or Euros that can be four times what they are currently earning. And this is what is different about this type of employment, unlike outsourced IT workers in India or Africa, the employees are not working on local conditions. As reporter Lucila Pelletieri from Global Press Journal tells Gareth, the loss of local talent will impact not only the country’s IT companies but potentially the economy as well.


Robot training made easy
We hear about machine learning all the time, but how does a machine actually learn? Say it’s a robot that you need to teach to perform a task in a factory, or even in your home. Well, it’s ok if you happen to be an ace programmer and are happy to dash off a load of computer code. But at the Robot Learning Lab at Imperial College London, they want to make it easier for us to train the machines - as easy as grabbing the robot’s arm and moving it through the task, so that next time, the bot does the movement itself. The Lab presented its latest work at a robot learning conference just before Christmas. The lab’s director is Dr. Edward Johns and Gareth has been to pay him – and his robot – a visit.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Underwater fiber-optic cable on ocean floor. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0wbl9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz8c9wx)
Ukraine tension: Macron to hold talks with Putin

President Emmanuel Macron has announced that he will hold talks on the phone with the Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday. He made the announcement after meeting with the German Chancellor Olaf Scholz to discuss de-escalation of the tensions between Russia and Ukraine.

Also in the programme: Police in the UK have said they will investigate alleged parties held at Downing Street during the Covid lockdown. And how will the coup in Burkina Faso affect the fight against Islamist insurgency in the region?

(Photo: French President Emmanuel Macron addresses a joint press conference with the German Chancellor ahead of talks at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany, 25 January 2022. Credit: EPA/Tobias Schwarz/Pool)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0wgbf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3bhk8rwd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0swds0dtj1)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mktlt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycsmkkq37cn)
IMF downgrades the forecast for the global economy

The International Monetary Fund has downgraded its forecast for the global economy - trimming half a percentage point off its projection - now at 4.4 per cent. The IMF's First Deputy Managing Director, Gita Gopinath tells us the focus right now is on the world’s two biggest economies - the US and China - neither of which, the IMF believes, will be immune to the slowdown. India and Japan, by contrast, are forecast to buck the trend.

Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on how drug cartels in Mexico have turned to innovative solutions to continue smuggling drugs across the border into the United States.

The latest European Space Conference is under way in Brussels today. We explore the main items on the agenda, including a possible rival to Elon Musk's Starlink internet satellite constellation, and tackling the problem of space junk, with space journalist Jonathan O'Callaghan.

Plus, Walmart has announced an investment in a vertical farming company. We discuss the merits of the concept with Leo Marcelis, professor of Horticulture and Product Physiology at Wageningen in the Netherlands.

PHOTO: IMF


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0wl2k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mkyby)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 26 JANUARY 2022

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0wptp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0wtkt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqt08xt5wj)
IMF downgrades the forecast for the global economy

The International Monetary Fund has downgraded its forecast for the global economy - trimming half a percentage point off its projection - now at 4.4 per cent. The IMF's First Deputy Managing Director, Gita Gopinath tells us the focus right now is on the world’s two biggest economies - the US and China - neither of which, the IMF believes, will be immune to the slowdown. India and Japan, by contrast, are forecast to buck the trend.

Also in the programme we discuss how Walmart has joined a couple of big venture capital firms in investing in a vertical farming company called Plenty - and is already committing to carrying its produce in all its California outlets. Leo Marcelis takes us through the benefits of the concept. He's the Professor of Horticulture and Product Physiology at Wageningen University in the Netherlands.

Glenn Hubbard is Professor of Finance and Economics at Columbia University in the United States. He tells us about his new book where he discusses economic routes towards what Edmund Phelps called "mass flourishing".

Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on how drug cartels in Mexico have turned to innovative solutions to continue smuggling drugs across the border into the United States.

Presenter Fergus Nicholl is joined by Erin Delmore in the US and Peter Landers in Japan.

PHOTO CREDT: GETTY IMAGES


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0wy9y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs74zk96)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8ml9lb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct3032)
Why We Play

Adulthood and the importance of play

As an adult you have responsibilities, and life settles into routine. Researchers have found that even in the most boring jobs, workers find ways to introduce elements of play to make the time pass, while people with more creative occupations use play to free their imaginations and release creativity. The Situationist art movement of 1950s Paris thought that play was a political act, and that the city could be used as a playground to rebel against the restrictions of capitalism. Their legacy lives on in the immersive “street games”, such as snakes and ladders played in multi storey car parks and city-wide zombie hunts. But this natural tendency to play is also being co-opted by employers, some of whom want to “gamify” boring jobs, to make workers more productive by turning the tasks into a game, or who encourage their employers to play at work to make them more creative. Can workers really be asked to play on demand, and what happens when they play in ways that the employers never expected or wanted?

Presenter: Steffan Powell
Producer: Jolyon Jenkins

(Photo: Performers of The Free Association. Credit: Lidia Crisafulli)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0x222)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0x5t6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs74zssg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mlk2l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302w)
QAnon: The plot to break reality.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0x9kb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv33csgbcl2)
‘Enormous consequences’ if Ukraine is invaded, warns Biden

Amid ongoing discussion of the developing situation in Ukraine, US President Joe Biden says an invasion by Russia “would be the largest invasion since World War II” and that there would be “enormous consequences” for Russia if an invasion were to take place.

Fears are growing over the fate of hundreds of children believed to be held by jihadist extremists inside a besieged prison in north-east Syria. We speak to Fionnuala Ní Aoláin, UN Special Rapporteur on the promotion and protection of human rights while countering terrorism.

And we hear from the South African billionaire who has just opened the first manufacturing plant in Africa to produce Covid-19 vaccines from start to finish.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0xf9g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv33csgbhb6)
Russia accuses America and NATO of flooding Ukraine with weapons

Moscow's Permanent Mission to the United Nations said in a statement that the US was cultivating anti-Russian feelings with talk of the build-up of Russian troops, while forgetting to clarify that those troops were on Russian territory. The statement follows comments by President Biden that he was prepared to impose sanctions on his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin directly, if an invasion went ahead.

A Covid outbreak on a crucial Australian aid ship bound for tsunami-battered Tonga has raised fears of contagion among vulnerable people on the island, which has thus far managed to remain largely Covid-free.

And an air and sea search is underway between Florida and the Bahamas for thirty nine people missing at sea.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0xk1l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv33csgbm2b)
Biden threatens Putin with personal sanctions if Russia invades Ukraine

Political advisors from Russia, Ukraine, Germany and France will hold talks in Paris today, as tensions continue to rise over fears of a Russian invasion of Ukraine. Earlier, Russia reacted to warnings from Washington of sanctions, saying the US and NATO had raised tensions by flooding Ukraine with weapons and western advisors.

China’s capital city is set to become the first to host both the Summer and Winter Olympic Games. However there’s a problem; with no snow to be found, Beijing has gone for fully fake flakes but at what cost to participants?

And would you use a self-flying taxi? Boeing and other backers think you would and have invested millions.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0xnsq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nch)
Dominic Lee: China's Hong Kong takeover

Stephen Sackur speaks to Hong Kong Legislative Councillor Dominic Lee Tsz-king, a high profile defender of Beijing’s increasingly tight grip on the territory. With China’s increasing crackdown in the city and pro-democracy activists arrested, exiled or cowed into silence, has "one country, two systems" become "one country, one system"?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mm123)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jps)
Who should own a football club?

It’s no surprise to anyone that money talks in English football but lately it seems louder than ever. Hollywood stars Ryan Reynolds and Rob McElhenney recently bought a club in the English lower leagues, while the Saudi Arabian Public Investment Fund completed a controversial takeover of Newcastle United. Meanwhile, a founding club of the Premier League, Oldham Athletic, faces relegation into the non-league game after years of mismanagement. Vivienne Nunis asks, is private ownership the best way to run football clubs or is it time for a rethink? Wrexham fan Gareth Davies, Tom Hocking of When Saturday Comes magazine and Maggie Murphy, CEO of Lewes Football Club, join in the discussion.
(Image: Wrexham FC owner, the actor Ryan Reynolds, attends a red carpet premiere in LA. Credit: Getty)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8v)
The Grand Hotel Bombing

In October 1984, Margaret Thatcher survived a bomb attack on the hotel where she was staying on the south coast of England. Five people were killed and more than 30 others injured in the explosion, which was carried out by the Irish Republican Army (IRA). In 2009, Lucy Williamson spoke to Michael Dobbs, who was a government official in the hotel at the time.

Photo: The Grand Hotel in Brighton after the IRA bombing (John Minihan/Express/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0xsjv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct3032)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mm4t7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0xx8z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct3c7y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0y113)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs750n0c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mmd9h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0y4s7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzt)
Anne Frank’s stepsister: How I survived Auschwitz, part 1

Eva Schloss and Anne Frank had been childhood friends and neighbours in Nazi-occupied Amsterdam. Eva remembers Anne’s nickname was ‘Miss Quack Quack’ because she always loved talking. Then, like the Franks, Eva’s Jewish family was forced into hiding. Both families were ultimately betrayed and sent to Auschwitz, the most notorious of the Nazi death camps. After the war, Eva became Anne’s posthumous stepsister when her mother married Otto Frank, Anne’s father. Together they worked tirelessly to promote Anne Frank’s legacy through her diary.

Eva shares her extraordinary Holocaust testimony over two episodes. In this first episode, she describes her life before Auschwitz and her family’s eventual capture. In part two, you can hear about her experience of the liberation of Auschwitz and her efforts to keep her brother Heinz’s memory alive.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Eva Schloss aged 11 in 1940. Credit: Courtesy of Eva Schloss)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0y8jc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs750whm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mmmsr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0yd8h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz8fcl3)
Ukrainian Former President Petro Poroshenko: Global security is at stake

Former Ukrainian President, Petro Poroshenko, has told the BBC that President Putin is “blackmailing the world”. Ukraine's foreign minister, Dmytro Kuleba, has played down concerns that a Russian invasion may be imminent. Diplomats from Russia, Ukraine, Germany and France are meeting in Paris to discuss the ongoing tensions.

Also in the programme: the continued pressure on Prime Minister Boris Johnson, and the jewel theft which led to the severing of diplomatic ties for 30 years.

(Photo: A service member of the 14th Separate Mechanized Brigade of the Ukrainian Armed Forces takes part in anti-aircraft military drills in Volyn Region, Ukraine. CREDIT: Press Service of the Ukrainian Ground Forces Command/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0yj0m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nch)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mmw90)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4d2xkplm28)
Italian business leaders meet Putin

Despite the potential Ukraine conflict, Italian business leaders have met President Putin. The virtual meeting with the Russian president went ahead amid calls from Italy's government for it to be scrapped, and we hear which Italian businesses were involved from Giorgio Leali, who is a reporter with Politico Europe. We explore Italy's commercial ties to Russia with Vincenzo Trani, chairman of the Italian-Russian Chamber of Commerce, who was on today's call. And we get Ukrainian business reaction from Dmitro Shymkiv, executive chair of Darnitsa, which is the country's largest pharmaceutical company. Plus, planemaker Boeing has unveiled a multi-billion loss in its latest financial figures. We find out more from Madhu Unnikrishnan, editor of Airline Weekly.

Today's edition is presented by Rahul Tandon, and produced by Sarah Hawkins, Tom Kavanagh and Nisha Patel.

(Picture: Vladimir Putin meets Russian business leaders. Picture credit: Reuters.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0ymrr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxz6w4dmq6)
Boris Johnson insists he won't resign

The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is waiting to receive a report on lockdown parties at his Downing Street residence that could determine his political future. We explain the developments so far and hear about the questions Mr Johnson was facing during a stormy sesson in the House of Commons.

We bring the latest on the Ukraine-Russia crisis and look at how some Russians in Moscow are viewing the situation on the border.

We also talk through the latest stories on the pandemic with one of our regular experts, Dr Maria Sundaram from Marshfield Clinic in Wisconsin.

We look at the situation in the Syrian city of Hasakah where Kurdish forces have been fighting ISIS fighters for control of a prison.

(Photo: A grab from a handout video released by the UK Parliament shows opposition British Prime Minister Boris Johnson taking a sip of water during the Prime Minister"s Questions (PMQs) at the House of Commons in London, Britain, 26 January 2022. Credit: EPA/UK PARLIAMENTARY RECORDING UNIT HANDOUT)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0yrhw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxz6w4drgb)
Russia-Ukraine crisis: Mood in Moscow

As Western fears of a Russian offensive on Ukraine continue, we hear from three people in the Russian capital about what they make of the situation.

The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is waiting to receive a report on lockdown parties at his Downing Street residence that could determine his political future. We explain the developments so far and speak to three journalists from Germany, France and the Netherlands about what their audiences make of the story.

We answer your latest questions on the coronavirus pandemic with the help of Dr Pedro Hallal, an epidemiologist in California.

(Photo: Red Square, St. Basil"s Cathedral (L) and the Spasskaya Tower of the Kremlin are seen through a gate in central Moscow, September 18, 2014. Credit: Maxim Zmeyev/File Photo/Reuters)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0yw80)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0z004)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs751lzd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mnc8j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ns6401vth)
2022/01/26 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0z3r8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct3032)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mnh0n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwj)
Gene therapy hope for sickle cell patients

Positive results for a handful of patients on a trial in the United States offers hope for the millions of people around the world living with sickle cell disease. Doctors say the gene-editing therapy literally 'turns back the clock' by reducing the number of red blood cells that are sickle-shaped and increasing the type that a baby has, which can carry more oxygen around the body. Other cheaper, more widely-available medications can work, but we hear how the health of sickle cell patients depends on where they live.

After two years of caring for patients with Covid-19, many healthcare workers are exhausted. This week’s guest, Graham Easton, who is Professor of Communication Skills at Barts and The Royal London Hospital, explains how mistakes can happen when doctors carry out repetitive tasks when they are tired.

Could changing your asthma inhaler be better for you and the planet? We hear from Caroline and her son Sebastian, who found that switching to dry-powder inhalers transformed their lives.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath and Samara Linton

(Picture: Scientist analysing a blood sample in a laboratory. Photo credit: Krisanapong Detraphiphat/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0z7hd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz8g6t0)
Ukraine: US sends response to Russian demands

The United States and NATO have told Russia they will not bow to its security demands on Ukraine and eastern Europe. The US Secretary of State, Antony Blinken, said America would defend what he called the "core principles" of Ukraine's sovereignty. He said he has laid out a "principled and pragmatic" evaluation of Russia's concerns over Ukraine and NATO's forces in former eastern bloc countries. Mr Blinken said the ball was now in Russia's court.

Also in the programme: the latest on another turbulent day in UK politics, as Prime Minister Boris Johnson awaits a report into alleged parties held at Downing Street; and we hear how 224 new species have been discovered in the greater Mekong region.

(Photo: Journalists raise their hands as U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken speaks about Russia and Ukraine during a briefing at the State Department in Washington. Brendan Smialowski/Pool via Reuters)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0zc7j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3bhkcnsh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0swds0hqf4)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mnqhx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172yct18y0jshd)
WTO lets China impose tariffs on the US

The World Trade Organisation has authorised China to impose retaliatory duties on US imports to a value of more than 600 million dollars per year. Beijing had challenged American tariffs levied on Chinese exports ranging from solar panels to steel wire - goods made by companies that Washington insists are effectively enjoying state subsidies. David Firestein - President of the George HW Bush Foundation for US-China Relations - explained the background.

Despite the potential Ukraine conflict, Italian business leaders have met President Putin. The virtual meeting with the Russian president went ahead amid calls from Italy's government for it to be scrapped. We explore Italy's commercial ties to Russia with Vincenzo Trani, chairman of the Italian-Russian Chamber of Commerce, who was on today's call. And we get Ukrainian business reaction from Dmitro Shymkiv, executive chair of Darnitsa, which is the country's largest pharmaceutical company.

Plus, who should own a football club? It’s no surprise to anyone that money talks in English football - but lately it seems louder than ever. Famously - or notoriously - Newcastle United is now owned by the Saudi Public Investment Fund. Hollywood stars Ryan Reynolds and Rob McElhenney are the unlikely owners of Wrexham FC - which competes in the 5th tier of the English football league system - even though Wrexham is in Wales. So is private ownership the best way to run football clubs - or is it time for a rethink?

(Picture: Chinese port/Getty Images)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0zgzn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nch)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mnv81)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 27 JANUARY 2022

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0zlqs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct3c7y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0zqgx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqt08xx2sm)
WTO lets China impose tariffs on the US

The World Trade Organisation has authorised China to impose retaliatory duties on US imports to a value of more than 600 million dollars per year. Beijing had challenged American tariffs levied on Chinese exports ranging from solar panels to steel wire - goods made by companies that Washington insists are effectively enjoying state subsidies. David Firestein - President of the George HW Bush Foundation for US-China Relations - explained the background.

Next we head to Italy - where a row has broken out between the government and some of the country's biggest companies. It's because of President Putin speaking to Italian business leaders on Wednesday morning - to the irritation of the government in Rome, which is sensitive to its international position amid growing tension over Ukraine.

Then we take a look at student debt which is a massive burden for millions of Americans - making those college years look a little less rosy in the rear-view mirror. 80 members of the US Senate and House of Representatives have called on President Biden to make good on his campaign promises to forgive student debt - starting right off the bat with an immediate 50k reduction. Former students shared their experiences and we also heard from Laura Beamer at the Jain Family Institute.

Lastly, would it surprise you to discover that many K-Pop stars - enjoying huge success in the South Korean music scene - commission some of their most successful tracks from ... Sweden? Fergus Nicholls spoke to one of Stockholm's most successful writers, Moa Carlebecker - better known by her stage name, Cazzi Opeia.


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0zv71)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs752g69)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mp6hf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gyl)
Hunting the darknet dealers

The high stakes cat and mouse game between police and darknet drug dealers. Police in the UK say they are finally turning the tide on drug dealers selling on the darknet – a secretive part of the internet which has been described as like “online shopping for drugs.”

The UK’s National Crime Agency says recent international takedowns of so called dark markets and arrests in multiple countries are a result of new techniques in cyber policing that is giving them the upper hand. However, BBC research suggests that police around the world have an uphill struggle on their hands as many dealers - known as vendors - have survived multiple market place collapses by operating across many different darknet sites.

The programme explores the major role played by UK dealers in the global business which is estimated to be worth more than a billion dollars a year. The BBC’s cyber reporter Joe Tidy and BBC data journalist Alison Benjamin journey into this hidden world to speak to vendors and buyers and uncover secrets of the trade.

Reporter: Joe Tidy
Producer: Paul Grant
Editor: Maggie Latham

(Image: An ecstasy pill bought on the darknet, being tested at a lab in the UK. Credit: BBC)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k0zyz5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k102q9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs752ppk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mpfzp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgx)
Cancer, food and me

Can you imagine suddenly finding that it hurts to eat? Or that when you take a bite of your favourite meal you feel nothing?

In this episode, we’re talking about something that isn’t much talked about: what happens to your relationship with food when you’ve got cancer.

Ruth Alexander is joined by three women who want you to know about a side effect of treatment that they weren’t fully prepared for - the loss of their sense of taste.

They share how what is a relatively minor detail, given a devastating diagnosis, nevertheless had a huge effect on their everyday routine, their interactions with family and friends, their sense of self.

Hear how they learned to cope and how, out of the depths of this distressing experience, came a new appreciation of the everyday.

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Grapefruit with pills coming out of it. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Producer:

Sarah Stolarz


Contributors:

Heather McCollum

Semira Oguntoyinbo

Angharad Underwood


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k106gf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv33csgf8h5)
US rejects Russian demand to bar Ukraine from Nato

Ukraine stand-off: Russian troops are still on the border and Nato nations have increased their military presence on their eastern flank, but could a new US diplomatic offensive end the stalemate?

Prince Andrew has responded to the civil case from Virginia Giuffre alleging sexual assault by calling for a jury trial; he denies the allegations.

And in Japan, survivors of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster go to court demanding compensation.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k10b6k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv33csgfd79)
Ukraine crisis: US issues formal response to Russia's demands

With Russian tanks massed on the border of Ukraine the US has rejected Moscow's central demands saying it would make no concessions on its core principles.

A group of young Japanese people are suing the operator of the Fukushima Nuclear plant, after contracting thyroid cancer in the years following the 2011 nuclear disaster.

Lawyers acting for Virginia Giuffre - who is bringing a civil case against Britain's Prince Andrew for sexual assault - have dismissed his demand for a jury trial as a "publicity stunt".


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k10fyp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv33csgfhzf)
Ukraine crisis: US sticks to its 'core principles'

No concessions to core principles - that's the message from the United States to Russia in the stand-off over Ukraine but the tanks are still on the border so can war still be averted?

When Xiomara Castro de Zelaya takes office in Honduras today she will become the country's first female president of the Central American nation.

And there's new research into the impact covid vaccinations have on women's menstrual cycle.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k10kpt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z37)
Is Turkey heading for an economic meltdown?

Turkey is suffering from an economic crisis with rampant inflation and a weakening lira. At the same time, there is a refusal by the central bank to raise interest rates. With elections due to be held next year, will the government change course?

With Tanya Beckett. Producer Bob Howard.


(shopping for fruit and vegetables at a street market in Instanbul,Turkey, 8 January 2022. Credit: Cemal Yurttas /Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mpxz6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jbh)
Funding public service broadcasting

The British Government says the BBC license fee, paid by millions of households, to finance its global broadcasting service, will be frozen for two years and wants a debate about future funding. So what are the options for the Corporation? Rob Young explores the way public service broadcasters are funded around the world and talks to Ismo Silvo, the Deputy Chief Executive of the Finnish public broadcaster YLE and Chris Turpin, NPR's Chief of Staff. We get some analysis of the advantages and limitations of each model and discuss the impact on other broadcasters with Steve Barnett, Professor of Communications at the University of Westminster and Gill Hind from Enders Analysis.
(Image: BBC Studio, Credit: BBC)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4b)
IRA gun-running in America

How an undercover FBI agent bust an IRA gun-running plot in New York in 1981. We hear from retired FBI agent, John WInslow, who posed as a gun dealer to infiltrate a network of Americans supplying weapons to the Northern Irish paramilitary group, the IRA. The United States was a key source of money and guns for the Irish republican cause.

Photo:


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k10pfy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mq1qb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k10t62)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmf)
Pleasure and pain: The philosophy of Jeremy Bentham

How do you approach the decisions you make in life? Do you think about them in terms of the maximum pleasure and minimum pain that any choice would lead to for yourself and others around you? If so, you are beginning to think along similar lines to the influential British philosopher and reformer Jeremy Bentham with his concept of Utilitarianism. This was not Bentham’s only contribution to radical thought. With the prison and judicial systems, with education, women’s suffrage, animal rights and the monarchy, throughout his life he came up with a huge body of work that challenged the status quo and still feels relevant today.

Rajan Datar is joined by three expert guests to guide us through the life and work of this remarkable thinker: professor Philip Schofield from University College London who is both the director of the Bentham Project and the general editor of the Collected Works of Jeremy Bentham; Emmanuelle de Champs who is professor of British history and civilisation at CY Cergy Paris University, and Jeffrey Kaplan who is assistant professor of philosophy at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro.

(Image: Coloured engraving of Jeremy Bentham, early 19th century. Credit: Stock Montage/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9g)
India's Luge pioneer

Shiva Keshavan was the first Indian to compete in one of the most dangerous events at the Winter Olympics – the luge. At the 1998 games in Japan, the 16-year-old was the only athlete in the Indian team and had to lead himself out in the opening ceremony in Nagano. Shiva Keshavan took part in a further five Winter Olympics and is credited with boosting awareness of snow sports in India. In 2020, he spoke to Farhana Haider.

(Photo: Shiva Keshavan in action in 2010. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k10xy6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs753jxg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mq96l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k111pb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k4b)
Anne Frank’s stepsister: How I survived Auschwitz, part 2

Eva Schloss and Anne Frank had been childhood friends and neighbours in Nazi-occupied Amsterdam. Both their families had a horrific experience at Auschwitz and after the war, Eva became Anne’s posthumous stepsister when her mother married Otto Frank, Anne’s father. When Otto first discovered Anne’s now world-famous diary, he showed it to Eva. It was an emotional experience and it reminded Eva of her last conversation with her beloved brother Heinz. He was a gifted artist and he had revealed where he had hidden his cache of secret paintings. Eva was determined to bring them to light.

Eva shares her extraordinary Holocaust testimony over two episodes. In this second episode, she describes her experience of the liberation of Auschwitz and her efforts to keep her brother Heinz’s memory alive. In part one, you can hear about her life before Auschwitz and her family’s eventual capture.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Image: Eva's mother Fritzi Geiringer painted by her father Erich between 1942-1944 when the family was in hiding. This painting was in the cache of canvases hidden by Heinz. Credit: Courtesy of Eva Schloss)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k115fg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs753sdq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mqjpv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1195l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz8j8h6)
Russia to study US proposals

Russia has said there is room for further dialogue on the Ukraine crisis. In its first reaction to a letter from the United States officially setting out Washington's position, the Kremlin said its main security demands had not been met. But the Kremlin’s spokesman said there should be no rush to judgement.

Also in the programme: crypto mining in Kazakhstan; and drug smugglers shot as they try to bring Syrian-made amphetamines into Jordan.

(Photo: A general view of the Russian Foreign Ministry main building in Moscow. CREDIT: EPA/MAXIM SHIPENKOV)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k11dxq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mqs63)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49mlcwmlph)
US economy grows at 6.9%

In the last quarter of 2021 the US economy grew at a better than expected annualised 6.9%. We get a sense of what that feels like on the ground from Curtis Blair, president and chief executive of the Utah Valley Chamber of Commerce. Also in the programme, the BBC's Mariko Oi reports from Singapore on why food price inflation across Asia is in general not as high as elsewhere in the world. As drinksmaker Diageo unveils a boost in sales for the first half of its financial year of 16%, we find out what's driving the uptick from the firm's chief executive, Ivan Menezes. Plus, following a number of recent takeovers of English football clubs by overseas owners, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on whether private ownership is the best way for clubs to operate.

Today's edition is presented by Sasha Twining, and produced by Sarah Hawkins and Sara Parry.

(Picture: A car production line in California. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k11jnv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxz6w4hjm9)
Syria prison: Scores of IS fighters refuse to surrender

The Kurdish-led militia, the Syrian Democratic Forces, say as many as 90 Islamic State militants at a jail in north-east Syria have still not surrendered despite a week of fighting. We speak to journalist in the city of Hasaka.

Our colleague from the BBC’s Russian Service explains what is known about the Russian private mercenary groups and their involvement in coups in the African continent.

In Japan, six young people are suing the operator of the Fukushima nuclear plant after contracting thyroid cancer. We ask an expert what is known about an increase in thyroid cancer after nuclear disasters.

We answer your questions about Covid-19 with the help of Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland.

As part of our conversations on the Ukraine-Russia crisis, we hear how Ukrainian civilians are getting military training to prepare for a possible Russian invasion. We bring together three women – one of them a sniper – in Kyiv to share their experiences.

And we speak to an Australian student who first discovered an unknown spinning object in the Milky Way that scientists claim is unlike anything seen before.

(Photo: Syrian Kurdish female Syria Democratic Forces (SDF) fighters pose for a photo near Ghwayran prison following the recapture, in Hassakeh, northeastern Syria, 26 January 2022. Credit: AHMED MARDNLI/EPA)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k11ndz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxz6w4hncf)
Russia-Ukraine crisis: Women in military training

As part of our conversations on the Ukraine-Russia crisis, we hear how Ukrainian civilians are getting military training to prepare for a possible Russian invasion. We bring together three women – one of them a sniper – in Kyiv to share their experiences.

We explain what happens after Justice Stephen Breyer retires from the US Supreme Court, and how President Biden will pick a successor.

The Kurdish-led militia, the Syrian Democratic Forces, say as many as 90 Islamic State militants at a jail in north-east Syria have still not surrendered despite a week of fighting. We speak to journalist in the city of Hasaka.

We answer your questions about Covid-19 with the help of Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland.

We hear from an Australian student who first discovered an unknown spinning object in the Milky Way that scientists claim is unlike anything seen before.

(Photo: Nastya, 21, a medic of the Ukrainian armed forces, stands next to a military ambulance near the line of separation from Russian-backed rebels outside a village of Pisky in Donetsk Region, Ukraine January 26, 2022. Credit: Maksim Levin/Reuters)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k11s53)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k4b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k11wx7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs754hwh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mr85m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ns6404rql)
2022/01/27 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k120nc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mrcxr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4y)
The roots of Long Covid

There are now a number of biological indicators for the potential development of long covid. Immunologist Onur Boyman of Zurich University Hospital and Claire Steves, Clinical Senior Lecturer at King’s College London strives to tell us how pinpointing these factors is now helping in the development of strategies to predict the syndrome and prepare treatment.

The James Webb telescope has reached its final orbit. The years of planning, preparation and rehearsal seem to have paid off. The telescope is now ready to begin its mission of looking back into the early universe. BBC Science correspondent Jonathan Amos has followed the mission.

The widely held view that human development was propelled by our ancestors developing a taste for meat is being questioned by a new analysis of the fossil record. Paleoanthropologist Andrew Barr of George Washington University suggests part of the reason for this assumption is the sampling method, actively looking for evidence to support the hypothesis.

And Michael Boudoin of Lille University has led a team of physicists who have produced the longest-lasting soap bubble ever – they managed to prevent the bubble from popping for well over a year.

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle

(Image credit: Horacio Villalobos/Getty Images)


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k124dh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz8k3q3)
Storm Ana kills dozens in Malawi, Madagascar and Mozambique

A tropical storm ravages southern Africa. We'll hear from the island of Madagascar - reeling from a drought and now devastated by floods.

Also in the programme: Honduras gets its first woman president; and as western governments warn ever more stridently about the dangers of war in Ukraine, what's the mood in Moscow?

(Photo: Flooding in Antananarivo, Madagascar. Credit: This still image was obtained from a social media video @dronesMg/via Reuters)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1284m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3bhkgkpl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0swds0lmb7)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mrmf0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs6v6dycz6)
Apple breaks profit records

Firstly, we look at how Apple became the first company to hit a stock market valuation of $3tn in early January of this year as well as its latest earnings.
We also discuss how chip shortages and supply chain issues have hit production. Are consumers still snapping up iPhones? Daniel Ives is Managing Director of Equity Research for Wedbush Securities in New York weighs in on the topic.

Next, figures released on Thursday in the US showed that the American economy grew at its fastest pace since 1984 - expanding by 5.7 percent during 2021. It's a stronger bounce back than expected - and in fact the last quarter showed growth at an annualised rate of 6.9 percent - despite Omicron. Of all America's 50 states, the one enjoying the biggest growth over the last ten years has been Utah - and to hear why WBR reporter Sasha Twining spoke to Curtis Blair - President and CEO of the Utah Valley Chamber of Commerce.

We also look at how global food prices have risen sharply since the pandemic began - and according to the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization they're now at their highest level in a decade. Across Asia - where price rises haven’t been as dramatic as elsewhere - the number of people seeking help has been growing - as Mariko Oi reports.


A series of slow-moving truck convoys are making their way towards the Canadian capital, Ottawa, as part of a protest against vaccine mandates. It all started with drivers hauling cargo across the border with the United States being compelled - both ways - to be vaccinated or denied permission to cross. In some provinces, the convoys have caused traffic congestion - so in terms of being an irritant the protest is certainly working. And on Thursday the Prime Minister himself, Justin Trudeau, was forced to address the issue. Nate Tabak is a reporter for the global transport and infrastructure website freightwaves.com - he spoke to us about what he made of the situation.

And lastly - it's one of those weeks where we're getting a lot of quarterly reporting - corporate as well as national. So having started the programme with Big Tech, let's end with Big Booze. Diageo is the world's biggest spirit maker - behind brands like Smirnoff, Gordon's, Johnnie Walker and Guinness. Their latest 6-month figures show a growth in sales of 16 percent. The Diageo CEO is Ivan Menezes and he spoke with us about this growth.

(Picture credit: Getty Images)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k12cwr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mrr54)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 28 JANUARY 2022

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k12hmw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k12md0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqt08xzzpq)
US economy grows at 6.9%

Figures released on Thursday in the US showed that the American economy grew at its fastest pace since 1984, expanding by 5.7 percent during 2021.The BBC's North America Business Correspondent, Samira Hussein talks us through the story. We then turn to question of how teachers are navigating hybrid education. Also on the programme, President Biden has confirmed that his first nominee to the US Supreme Court will be an African-American woman. Fergus Nicoll is joined by Kimberly Adams of our US partner station Marketplace in Washington DC and Samson Ellis, Taipei Bureau Chief for Bloomberg News.

Produced by: Nisha Patel, Elizabeth Hotson and Gabriele Shaw

(Picture: A car production line in California. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k12r44)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs755c3d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8ms3dj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1v09)
The Olembe Stadium tragedy

Cameroon football journalist Giovanni Wanneh reflects on what he saw as he was caught up in some of the crush ahead of the Africa Cup of Nations match between hosts Cameroon and Comoros.

We also look ahead to the quarter-finals of the competition with the Gambia captain Pa Modou Jagne And the Tunisia defender Mohamed Drager.

Photo: The entrance of Olembe stadium in Yaounde, Cameroon. (Credit: AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k12vw8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k4b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x4b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k12zmd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs755lln)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8msbws)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2gj2)
The Uighur poets

Uighur poetry is and has been for centuries a fundamental part of the culture and members of the community write poetry and often recite part poems that have been passed down the generations and learn off by heart. As the community face widespread persecution by the Chinese authorities and at a time of great despair and fear for them, Uighurs speak to us about the ways in which poetry offers ways of support, succour and resistance.

The programme features the voices and works of Uighurs, poets and experts from across the world.


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k133cj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv33csgj5d8)
US courts overturns convictions in decade-old financial scandal

Two financial traders have had their convictions for fixing interest rates in the Libor scandal quashed by a New York court.

Three former Minneapolis police officers who took part in the deadly arrest of George Floyd are on trial - did they fail in their duty to prevent the use of excessive force?

The US and its allies are trying to second guess how far Vladimir Putin is prepared to push in his effort to force political concessions in Ukraine.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1373n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv33csgj94d)
Libor acquittal: Two bankers found to have done nothing wrong

A key conviction obtained against two financial traders in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis has been overturned by a US court.

Rising tensions in Asia as North Korea carries out another missile test, putting pressure on its neighbours.

Plus a new survey reveals high levels of sexual harassment in newsrooms and that management is not taking the issue seriously.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k13bvs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv33csgjdwj)
Ukraine crisis: Does the country expect an invasion?

The tensions around the Ukraine are remain high on the agenda today, we'll hear from a Ukrainian MP to see how the country sees the threat of war.

This weekend will see Portuguese vote in a snap election, with the prospect that a far right party could make significant gains.

With the emergence of Omicron - research on covid vaccine is focusing on producing a second generation jab that could potentially protects against emerging variations.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k13glx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2g)
Mariana Mazzucato: The space race and our economic futures

What is the galvanising force behind transformational economic change? Capitalism encourages us to look to the raw power of markets as the driver of innovation. But is that really true? Stephen Sackur speaks to the economist Mariana Mazzucato. Her faith in the transformational power of the proactive state has made her the go-to adviser to a host of governments. Does her "moonshot" economics ignore some earthly realities?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mstw9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j1g)
The cooling conundrum

Global warming means the world will need a lot more air conditioning - but will the AC just make global warming even worse?

The Middle East already experiences peak temperatures over 50C, as the Kuwaiti social media influencer Ascia Alshammiri testifies. And things are only set to get worse. Ed Butler speaks to climatologist George Zittis, who says urban temperatures could hit 60C later this century, which combined with rising humidity could render some places uninhabitable.

In any case, it means a boom for the air conditioning industry. But AC itself is a major source of greenhouse gases, as Radhika Lalit of clean energy think tank RMI explains. So are there tech solutions available to break this vicious circle? We hear from two entrepreneurs - Kevin O'Toole of Exergyn, and Aaswath Raman of SkyCool Systems.

(Picture: Congested air conditioning units on a building in Mumbai, India; Credit: Kuni Takahashi/Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzt)
The Good Friday Agreement

In 1998, the political parties in Northern Ireland reached a peace agreement that ended decades of war. But the Good Friday Agreement, as it became known, was only reached after days of frantic last-minute negotiations. In 2012, Louise Hidalgo spoke to Paul Murphy, the junior minister for Northern Ireland at the time.

PHOTO:Irish Prime Minister Bertie Ahern (L) and British Prime Minister Tony Blair (R) pose with the mediator of the agreement, Senator George Mitchell. (AFP/Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k13lc1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj6)
Making microchips in the US

Chris Fox and Jane Wakefield discuss Intel and US efforts to make more microchips at home amid the continuing global chip shortage. Plus we hear from the inventor of a car that turns into an airplane at the push of a button, and find out why video gamers are leading the backlash against NFTs.

(Photo: US President Joe Biden holds a microchip at a press conference in February 2021, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8msymf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k13q35)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htp)
Why Putin has his sights on Ukraine

Growing fears of a Russian invasion of Ukraine have prompted the US and UK to pull the families of staff at their embassies in Kyiv out of the country. Moscow’s forces have been amassing on Ukraine’s border for months prompting fears of a major escalation in a war that’s been underway since Russia’s annexation of the Crimean Peninsula in 2014. Vladimir Putin says the Russian and Ukrainian populations are 'one people' and has blamed Nato’s expansion east for rising tensions. Joe Biden has warned Russia that an invasion of Ukraine would result in severe consequences for the Kremlin. So how likely is full-scale war? What is President Putin's strategy? And what is the likely end-game?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k13tv9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs756ftk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mt63p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1v09)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k13ylf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g6)
Myanmar coup: One year on

It's a year since Myanmar's military removed the democratically elected government from power. We share key moments in Myanmar's journey towards democracy from The Fifth Floor archive, with BBC Burmese editor Soe Win Than, former editor Tin Htar Swe and presenter Yee Yee Aung. And we hear how the service is marking the anniversary, with stories about the opposition-run 'zoom government' outside Myanmar, the past year of military leadership, and how citizens will be marking the day.

Driving on the frozen sea
Around this time of year Estonia opens up its ice roads on the frozen Baltic sea. People can drive their cars and visit some of the islands off the coast, and in 2019, two intrepid reporters from BBC Russian - Ivan Chesnokov and Yury Baranyuk - couldn’t resist driving the ice road for themselves.

Reporting from the Democratic Republic of Congo
The risks of rebel activity, capsizing boats and an active volcano – some of the challenges BBC Africa’s health correspondent Rhoda Odhiambo faced on a recent trip to eastern DRC to report on child malnutrition and a vaccination campaign.

Brazil's pioneering female football referee
Lea Campos was one of the first women in the world to become a qualified football referee. But in her home country, Brazil, she was barred from working after being told women were too emotional to referee in men’s football games. Fernando Duarte of BBC Minute tells us how she fought back.

Celebrating Vietnamese Tet
Vietnam's lunar new year celebration of Tet is the time families come together to see out the old year and welcome the new. BBC Vietnamese journalist Tran Vo is spending her first ever Tet away from home in Bangkok, and put together a report on how Bangkok's Vietnamese community celebrates with the traditional Banh Chung rice cake, to remind her of home.

(Photo: Protestors after the military coup in Myanmar, February 2021. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k142bk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs756p9t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mtfly)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1462p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz8m5d9)
Moscow insists it doesn't want war with Ukraine

The Russian foreign minister, Sergei Lavrov, insists his country does not want war with Ukraine, but said Moscow would not allow its interests to be violated or ignored. Meanwhile, intense diplomacy is continuing with France’s President Emmanuel Macron holding an hour meeting with Mr Putin.

Also in the programme: Debate in France over the suggestion of charging unvaccinated hospital patients; and a judge in the US annuls Gulf of Mexico oil auction over the climate impact.

(Photo: A Ukrainian service member holds a next generation light anti-tank weapon. Credit: Reuters).


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k149tt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mtp36)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y475862nl9q)
Strongest French economic growth for 52 years

Economic growth in France at 7% last year is its strongest performance in 52 years. But the country suffered a contraction during the pandemic of 8%, and we explore the relative economic performance of a number of European countries with Shanti Kelemen of M&G Wealth Investments. Also in the programme, the BBC's Alison Roberts assesses the health of Portugal's economy ahead of elections in the country this weekend. There's a dispute in Spain over the cultivation of strawberries in Andalucia which are taking water from the Donana National Park, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. We find out more from Javier Martin Arroyo, who is a writer for the Spanish newspaper El Pais. Plus, as climate change progresses, the demand for energy hungry air conditioning increases, which in turn exacerbates the problem. The BBC's Ed Butler reports on the potential for more energy efficient cooling systems.

Today's edition is presented by Sasha Twining, and produced by Matthew Davies and Tom Kavanagh.

(Picture: A French semiconductor production facility. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k14fky)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxz6w4lfjd)
Russia-Ukraine crisis: Your questions answered

As speculation continues on whether Russia will invade Ukraine, we answer questions about the crisis from listeners around the world.

Also, dozens of people have been killed and tens of thousands of people have been forced to flee their homes following the floods caused by tropical storm Ana in Southern Africa. Madagascar, Malawi and Mozambique are the worst affected countries. We'll speak to our correspondent to find out more and hear from people affected by the storm.

And every day we're joined by one of our regular health experts to answer your questions about coronavirus. Today our guest is Dr Megan Murray - Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University.

(Photo: Ukrainian service members hold drills in the Kherson region 26/01/2022. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k14kb2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxz6w4lk8j)
OS conversations: Book banning in US schools

A Tennessee school board has defended its ban on a Pulitzer prize-winning novel about the Holocaust being taught in its classrooms. Following a backlash, board members cited the book's use of swear words, nudity and suicide, saying it was "simply too adult-oriented" for pupils. The graphic novel Maus: A Survivor's Tale, depicts how the author's parents survived during the Holocaust. Author Art Spiegelman said he was "baffled" by the decision. The move to ban the novel comes amid a national debate over the curriculum in US public schools. We speak to two people in the US to hear their thoughts on the issue.

Also, as speculation continues on whether Russia will invade Ukraine, we answer questions about the crisis from listeners around the world.

And, every day we are joined by one of our regular health experts to answer your questions about coronavirus. Today our guest is Marc Mendelson, professor of Infectious Diseases at the University of Cape Town.

(Photo: Pages from the graphic novel Maus by American cartoonist Art Spiegelman. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k14p26)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k14stb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxs757dsl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mv52q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ns6407nmp)
2022/01/28 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k14xkg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mv8tv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prp)
How does my radio work?

How is a small budget pocket radio able to recreate all the atmosphere and sounds of a football match? CrowdScience listener Andy wants to know about the science enabling his radio listening, so presenter CrowdScience Geoff Marsh sets off - microphone in hand - to follow the journey of sound on the radio.

Starting with the microphone, Geoff learns how acoustic energy is converted into electrical signals. Then BBC World Service presenter Gareth takes Geoff to a little-known room in the BBC called the Radio Shack. Gareth demonstrates how these electrical signals are attached to radio waves before being sent over the airwaves and they take a radio kit apart to understand how these waves are received and converted back into sound waves.
Geoff talks to a speech and hearing specialist who, through the use of auditory illusions, shows Geoff that our brains are often filling in the gaps of lower quality audio.

Finally, Geoff visits an acoustic lab at Salford University where he hears a demonstration of ‘object based audio’. This technology could enable us to create our own bespoke mix of dramas and sports, such as heightening the commentary sound or choosing to hear just the crowd, just by using the everyday speakers many have lying around them, such as mobile phones.

Tune in and join us!
Presented by Geoff Marsh
Produced by Melanie Brown

[Image Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1519l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kpz8n0m6)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k1551q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx3bhkkglp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0swds0pj7b)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mvjb3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrddgtbzg0)
Strongest French economic growth for 52 years

Economic growth in France at 7% last year is its strongest performance in 52 years. But the country suffered a contraction during the pandemic of 8%, and we explore the relative economic performance of a number of European countries with Shanti Kelemen of M&G Wealth Investments. Also in the programme, the BBC's Alison Roberts assesses the health of Portugal's economy ahead of elections in the country this weekend. There's a dispute in Spain over the cultivation of strawberries in Andalucia which are taking water from the Donana National Park, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. We find out more from Javier Martin Arroyo, who is a writer for the Spanish newspaper El Pais. Plus, as climate change progresses, the demand for energy hungry air conditioning increases, which in turn exacerbates the problem. The BBC's Ed Butler reports on the potential for more energy efficient cooling systems.

(Picture: A French semiconductor production facility. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzk04k158sv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzktl8mvn27)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1v09)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3ct1gyk)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gyl)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gyl)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gyl)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172xzkt70b2qyn)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkt70b2vps)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkt70b36y5)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkt70b3l5k)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkt70b3pxp)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkt70b3ydy)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkt70b4smv)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172xzkt70b58mc)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172xzkt70b5j3m)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkt70b5rlw)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkt70b6034)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkt70b63v8)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkt70b6h2n)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkt70b6lts)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzkt70b6qkx)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkt70b6vb1)

BBC News Summary 12:30 SUN (w172xzkt70b6z25)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkt70b7t92)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkt70b85jg)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkt70b898l)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172xzktl8md88w)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzktl8mdd10)

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BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzktl8mftzk)

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BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzktl8mgp6g)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzktl8mh1fv)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzktl8mhdp7)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzktl8mhn5h)

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BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzktl8mj7x4)

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BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzktl8mjqwn)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzktl8mkgcf)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzktl8mkl3k)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzktl8mkyby)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzktl8ml9lb)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzktl8mlk2l)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzktl8mm123)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzktl8mmd9h)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzktl8mmmsr)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzktl8mnc8j)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzktl8mnqhx)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzktl8mnv81)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzktl8mp6hf)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzktl8mpfzp)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzktl8mpxz6)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzktl8mq1qb)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzktl8mq96l)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzktl8mqjpv)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzktl8mqs63)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzktl8mr85m)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzktl8mrcxr)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzktl8mrmf0)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzktl8mrr54)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzktl8ms3dj)

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BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzktl8mstw9)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172xzktl8msymf)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzktl8mt63p)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzktl8mtfly)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzktl8mv52q)

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BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172xzjzs8qd7y4)

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BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172xzjzs8qh4v7)

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