Radio-Lists Home Now on WS Contact

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 15 JANUARY 2022

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dm3b9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htm)
Climate change: A risk to food security?

While agriculture remains one of the biggest contributors to climate change, it is also most exposed to its adverse effects. Scientists say that extreme weather events will become more frequent and more intense as global temperatures continue to rise. In 2021, harsh winters, unseasonably warm summers, and sudden changes in rainfall affected food production around the globe - from the farmlands of Europe to the grasslands of Africa. There has been a jump in the prices of essential commodities like wheat and maize and traders are braced for more fluctuations. Climate risk is not only affecting farmers and their livelihoods, it is also exposing more people to food shortages. So what are the most pressing dangers and how can we protect our food supply from extreme weather events?

Paul Henley is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Ellen Otzen


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dm72f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlm9glzv7p)
EDF ordered to sell cheap nuclear power

French energy firm EDF has been ordered by the government to sell cheap nuclear power. The company says the move could cost it $9.5bn, and at one point today its shares declined by 25% on the news. We get the background from Thierry Bros who is a professor at the Paris Institute of Political Studies, and used to advise the government on energy matters.
Also in the programme, the BBC's Mike Johnson reports on the state of Brazil's economy, ahead of presidential elections due in October.
Plus, Forbes has released its YouTube rich list. The BBC's gaming reporter Steffan Powell talks us through this year's highest earners.
And Kai Ryssdal of our sister station Marketplace talks to Professor Kevin Werbach and finds out what the new era of the internet - Web 3 - will mean for us.

This edition presented by Rahul Tandon and produced by Sara Parry.

(Picture: An EDF nuclear plant in France. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr09lbt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f4c)
How is India dealing with its Covid third wave?

A sharp surge in coronavirus cases in recent weeks has made India’s key cities brace for the pandemic’s third wave. Many places have imposed weekend curfews and other restrictions to curb the spread of the virus, driven mainly by the Omicron variant. Nationwide, rising infections are a sombre reminder of the devastating second wave. Experts say the new wave may not be as devastating as the previous one, but advise caution against increasing caseloads.

How well are hospitals prepared to handle the additional pressure? Can vaccine manufacturers develop solutions for the virus’s mutations? And how can state authorities ensure social distancing and other measure to stem the spread?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how India is dealing with the third wave of the coronavirus pandemic.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Dr Murad Banaji, mathematician, University of Middlesex, London; Kirill Dmitriev, CEO, Russian Direct Investment Fund; Shobana Kamineni, executive vice chairperson, Apollo Hospitals Group; Dr Shahid Jameel, virologist, Green Templeton College, University of Oxford, UK


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dmbtk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw1)
Football, power and conflict in Cameroon

Pascale Harter introduces reports from correspondents, reporters and writers around the world.

The Africa Cup of Nations football tournament is under way in Cameroon. But in stark contrast to the joy and pageantry on the pitch, outside the stadiums, there is still ongoing conflict in the English-speaking region in the west of the country. Many people there have long complained about the political and economic dominance of their French-speaking compatriots. James Copnall joined the teams and fans who travelled to Cameroon for the tournament – and it got him thinking about what football reveals about power and politics under long-time President Paul Biya.

Tensions between the governments of Ukraine and Russia have sharpened recently - and that's alarmed diplomats and governments around the world. Recently Moscow has sent its diplomats to meet representatives of NATO, and of the United States, in rounds of talks held in Brussels and Geneva. Russia’s great unease about what it sees as its ‘back yard’ drifting further towards Western influence is deeply rooted in its history. So how are Ukranians feeling about the balance of power now? Zeinab Badawi has been in Kiev and sent us her impression.

It’s been called the priciest piece of tarmac in Europe: a mere 43 kilometres of road in Montenegro which have cost around a billion Euros - most of it borrowed from a Chinese bank. Apart from the price tag, allegations of corruption, nepotism and environmental damage have also hung around the project. And, the road’s still not open, more than 2 years after it should’ve been finished. Nonetheless there are those who have high hopes that it will eventually boost the country’s prospects by linking neighbouring Serbia to a Montenegrin port. Linda Pressly meets some of the project’s supporters and detractors.

Life within the Brazilian prison system is notoriously tough. But there’s also a more forgiving side – and that includes giving some prisoners occasional home leave. The idea is to encourage them not to end up back in trouble after they’re released. Recently Andrew Downie got an unexpected glimpse of how it works.

Producer: Polly Hope

(Image: Cameroon’s President Paul Biya and first lady Chantal Biya arrive at the stadium in Yaounde on 09 January 2022 before a football match. Credit: Reuters/Mohamed Abd El Ghany)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr09q2y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lcn)
The weekly cricket show from BBC Sport in association with ABC and All India Radio.


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dmgkp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g4)
Journalism under Taliban rule

When the Taliban took over in Afghanistan five months ago, the BBC’s Shoaib Sharifi and his team had to decide how to adapt to the new reality. Shoaib is the country director of the BBC’s international charity, BBC Media Action. He tells us how they’re trying to meet the needs of audiences who face so many new challenges.

Chinese eye row
Chinese model Cai Niangniang recently found herself in the middle of a social media storm. Pictures of her were deemed 'deliberately offensive' and 'unpatriotic' due to her narrow eyes, with many online saying this perpetuated racist stereotypes of Chinese people. The BBC's Waiyee Yip in Singapore explains the debate.

Rise of the right in Georgia
The BBC's Rayhan Demytrie, based in the Georgian capital Tbilisi, has been investigating the rise of the far right in Georgia, particularly focussing on an attack last July on the offices of the LGBT group Tbilisi Pride. Many of those involved were supporters of the broadcasting group Alt-Info, which has recently registered as a political party. Rayhan shares her insights.

Pistachios from Aleppo
Aleppo is famous for its pistachios, eaten fresh as a summertime snack, and in all manner of sweet and savoury foods. BBC Arabic recently reported on efforts by farmers to revive the industry which was devastated by war. Lina Shaikhouni is from Aleppo and shares her memories.

(Photo: Shoaib Sharifi. Credit: Shoaib Sharifi, BBC Media Action Afghanistan)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzr)
The first silicone breast implants

30-year-old Texan Timmie Jean Lindsey was the first woman in the world to have silicone breast implants. In 1962, she was offered the operation free of charge by two pioneering surgeons. It's gone on to become one of the most popular cosmetic procedures in the world. In 2012, Timmie Jean Lindsey spoke to Claire Bowes.

PHOTO: A silicone breast implant (Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dml9t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dmq1y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptt)
Art in India's 75th year of independence

75 years of independence, also means it's the 75th anniversary of partition between India and Pakistan. Author and historian Aanchal Malhotra gives reporter Paul Waters a tour of Delhi's Old Fort, or Purana Qila, searching for traces or commemoration of the huge refugee camp for Muslims there in 1947. She asks if India is yet ready to mark the more complex and painful aspects of its recent history in public art?

Playwrights and artists Amitesh Grover and Purva Naresh create art that challenges their audience to think and Indian society to confront uncomfortable truths. They share what inspires them and what they see as the threats to freedom of expression in India today.

Writer Annie Zaidi talks about her new book, City of Incident, and the uncertain position of vocal, visible women in contemporary India.

And celebrated folk singer Malini Awasthi reveals the art that changed her life and set her on a mission to ensure that traditional songs, culture and languages survive as India evolves. She was performing at the Kalinga Literary Festival in Bhubaneswar in association with the British Council.

Presenter: Anu Anand
Producer: Paul Waters

(Photo: The Indian flag. Credit: Menonsstocks /Getty)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0b2bb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwd)
Being your true self

Being the real you can be difficult, especially if it means upsetting your family. Folake from Benin tries to be a ‘good girl’ and avoids taking decisions her family would not approve of, but she wants to listen to her heart. She speaks with Dr Shefali, an Indian-born clinical psychologist – now based in New York. She is the author of A Radical Awakening, which aims to lay out a path for women to discover their inner truth.

Presented by the BBC's Sana Safi

Produced by Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dpg)
Djokovic, sport and vaccine mandates

The Covid vaccination status of men's number one tennis player, Novak Djokovic, has caused a political row. Ros Atkins looks at what Djokovic's case could mean for vaccination in sport.

(Photo: Novak Djokovic gives a press conference on the Adria Tour tennis tournament in Belgrade, 25 May, 2020. Credit: Andrej Isakovic/AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dmtt2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytm8s3z725)
Russia-Ukraine: US warns of 'false-flag' operation

A US official has said Russia is plotting to stage acts of provocation to create a pretext to invade Ukraine. A Pentagon spokesman says Russian operatives are planning a "false-flag" operation, to allow Moscow to accuse Ukraine of preparing an attack. Russia has dismissed the claims.

Also in the programme: Novak Djokovic has been detained in Australia ahead of a court hearing that will determine whether he can stay in the country. And US President Joe Biden has been negotiating with senators in his own party to try to save voting rights legislation he wants to pass through the US Congress.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Chitra Nagarajan, a writer and human rights activist specialising in Nigeria. And Paolo Gerbaudo, a political sociologist specialising in digital culture who teaches at the Scuola Normale Superiore University in Florence.

(Photo: Ukrainians and activists from different counties of the former Soviet Union attend the "Say No to Putin" rally in downtown Kiev, Ukraine, 09 January 2022. Credit: EPA/Sergey Dolzhenko)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dmyk6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytm8s3zbt9)
Novak Djokovic detained ahead of deportation appeal

Novak Djokovic has been detained in Australia ahead of a court hearing on Sunday that will determine whether he can stay in the country. The unvaccinated Serbian tennis star faces deportation after his visa was cancelled for a second time. The government say he is a threat to public health, but his lawyers are appealing against what they called an "irrational" judgement.

Also in the programme: We discuss NATO and Russia, after talks between them appear to have ended with no real progress this week. And the UK's Prime Minister Boris Johnson is under more pressure after his office apologised to Queen Elizabeth for holding parties in breach of coronavirus rules, the night before her husband's funeral last year.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Chitra Nagarajan, a writer and human rights activist specialising in Nigeria. And Paolo Gerbaudo, a political sociologist specialising in digital culture who teaches at the Scuola Normale Superiore University in Florence.

(Photo: Novak Djokovic in 2018. Credit: John Walton/PA Wire)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dn29b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytm8s3zgkf)
Novak Djokovic: Tennis star detained ahead of new hearing

Novak Djokovic has been detained in Australia ahead of a court hearing on Sunday that will determine whether he can stay in the country. The unvaccinated Serbian tennis star faces deportation after his visa was cancelled for a second time. The government say he is a threat to public health, but his lawyers are appealing against what they called an "irrational" judgement.

Also in the programme: Could growing awareness of climate change make a significant difference to the way we travel across borders either for business or leisure? We weigh up the pros and cons of cross-border night services.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Chitra Nagarajan, a writer and human rights activist specialising in Nigeria. And Paolo Gerbaudo, a political sociologist specialising in digital culture who teaches at the Scuola Normale Superiore University in Florence.

(Photo: Novak Djokovic practices at Melbourne Park in Melbourne, Australia, January 13, 2022. Credit: Reuters/Loren Elliott)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0bfkq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 Global Questions (w3ct3flj)
Crisis in Ukraine

The world enters 2022 with Russia once again flexing its muscles, and fears that President Putin is about to order an invasion of Ukraine. The United States, Nato and the EU are trying their best to deter him with threats and rhetoric, but unless they put troops on the ground, can they really stop a Russian attack?
Global Questions travels to Kyiv where Zeinab Badawi and her panel of politicians and experts will take questions from a local audience to discuss crisis in Ukraine.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dn61g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6x)
Coronavirus: Athletes and teachers

The vaccination and visa controversy around Novak Djokovic at the Australian Open tournament has made global headlines all week. It has also put focus on how sports around the world deal with vaccines in this pandemic.

Professional athletes often follow a rigorous diet and training schedule to achieve optimum fitness. Not surprisingly, athletes care about what they put in their bodies and in some cases they are delaying or avoiding getting a jab against Covid-19.

To discuss how this is playing out in different sports, host James Reynolds brings together an American professional basketball player, currently competing in Istanbul, a sports physician in Mumbai, India and a sports writer in the US. They discuss how the stance of the men's world number one tennis player and other sports stars is having an impact and what might be done to offer reassurance around Covid vaccines.

James also joins a discussion among three teachers in Mexico, the UK and the US, as schools around the world continue to consider the best and safest ways of providing education.

Picture: Elizabeth Williams playing in the WNBA for Atlanta Dream on August 21st, 2021 (Rich von Biberstein / Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0bk9v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386d)
Pick of the World: What you said on Nigeria's population

Listeners to the BBC World Service not only love what they hear, they love to engage with it; it's a two way relationship that has created a special bond.

Each week, Anna Doble celebrates the amazing radio the World Service produces, with clips chosen by its listeners, and explores the reaction on social media.

She also speaks to some of those listeners around the world, to find out what it was about the issue that captured them.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2m)
Exploring the dark undergrowth of modern America

QAnon and the plot to break reality. We speak to reporter and presenter Gabriel Gatehouse about his new series The Coming Storm and a journey that took him into the dark undergrowth of modern America. Listeners tell us what they think about what he discovered.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dn9sl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0qdc1l3qt7)
Inside the Park Hotel – the Melbourne facility where Novak Djokovic was held

We speak to a refugee held in the Park Hotel about life as a detainee. 24-year-old Adnan Choopani left Iran to seek asylum nine years ago and has been held in a variety of Australian detention facilities ever since. He explains the impact living at the Park Hotel has had on his mental health and how he hopes the world doesn’t forget the residents now Novak Djokovic has left. Adnan is joined by David Glanz from the group Refugee Action Collective, who details the poor conditions people face in the hotel – including a lack of fresh air and maggot-infested food.

Two-time Olympian and double Commonwealth Games Heptathlon silver medallist Jessica Zelinka explains the barriers women athletes face when transitioning into coaching. Zelinka – who is head track and field coach at the University of Calgary – explains why she feels more women don’t take up coaching, the unique perspectives women can provide and discusses the work Commonwealth Sport Canada are doing to prepare more women for high performance coaching roles.

Defending Olympic Alpine Combined Skiing Champion Michelle Gisin tells us how she got into crochet after being struck down by Epstein-Barr virus last year. Gisin says it was the only thing she had the energy to do and that she was fearful she may not make it to the Beijing Games. She discusses how her family got her into the sport and the strength of the field she will have to overcome to win a second Olympic Gold medal in China.

And – the BBC’s football correspondent – John Murray – joins us live from the Etihad stadium ahead of the Premier League game between Manchester City and Chelsea.

(Photo by Darrian Traynor/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dnfjq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjr1hz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0bst3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dnk8v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g92)
Silence would be treason

The last writings of Ken Saro-Wiwa from prison in Nigeria to an Irish nun in the run up to his execution in November 1995. Smuggled out of prison in bread baskets, they are the final testament of a man who gave everything he had in the struggle for social and ecological justice.

As Ken Saro-Wiwa continues to inspire people and movements across decades and continents, these letters form part of our living history, and give us an immediate link with the man behind the hero.

For years, Shell Oil with the backing of the Nigerian government drilled for oil in the mangrove swamps of the Niger Delta. The pollution that followed destroyed farms and rivers, and contaminated the fishing and drinking water of the Ogoni people. Ken Saro-Wiwa spearheaded the resistance to this destruction, and became an icon for social justice movements everywhere.

Nigerian environmental activist, Nnimmo Bassey describes these last letters as: ‘invaluable fragments of a living conversation’. And there is this sense of immediacy – they are a direct account of the events which led to the execution of the Ogoni 9.
These letters and poems of Ken Saro-Wiwa show him uncomfortable at becoming a disembodied, iconic figure. He plays down the martyred saviour narrative in favour of a more fluid sense of self as ‘voice’. A globally resonant voice, which still has relevance today.

Voiced by Ben Arogundade and presented by Noo Saro-Wiwa.

Producer: Bairbre Flood

(Photo: Ken Saro-Wiwa addressing Ogoni Day demonstration, Nigeria. Credit: Tim Lambon/Greenpeace)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dnp0z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfn4nbl)
Djokovic detained ahead of deportation appeal

Judges will rule on his final appeal against the cancellation of his visa. This is the second time that the tennis star has been detained by Australian authorities.

Also on the programme: Tonga has been hit by tsunami waves caused by a huge underwater volcanic eruption that could be heard across the South Pacific. And will a proposed new law succeed in limiting people's access to social media in Iran?

(Picture: Novak Djokovic training for the Australian Open, Credit: EPA)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dnss3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tp3yzwfhx)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld will have commentary of Newcastle against Watford at St James’ Park. Both teams are currently in the relegation places and a win for either side will help them in their quest to avoid the drop. We’ll also have updates on the top of the table clash between Manchester City and Chelsea.

Joining Lee James on the Sportsworld team will be the former Arsenal and Cameroon defender Lauren, the former Wolves and Nigeria goalkeeper Carl Ikeme and the Egypt midfielder Sarah Essam. The panel will be discussing the latest from the Premier League and the upcoming matches in the African Cup of Nations.

We’ll preview the first tennis Grand Slam of the year, the Australian Open and we’ll be speaking to former US Open champion Sam Stosur as she plays in the singles draw for the last time, and have reaction to the final test in the Ashes and the Netball Quad Series between England, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

Photo: Newcastle United's Allan Saint-Maximin and Watford's Jeremy Ngakia during the Premier League match between Watford and Newcastle United at Vicarage Road. (Credit: CameraSport via Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dp8rm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjrwqw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0cn10)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9d)
The Port Said stadium riot

In February 2012, 74 people were killed and hundreds injured at a football match in Port Said Stadium in Egypt. Although the violence started with clashes between supporters of Al-Masry and Al-Ahly, the high death toll was also blamed on the police's failure to open the stadium gates. Al-Ahly fans believe the police's actions were motivated by the club's opposition to the Egyptian regime. Aron Keller talks to journalist and Al-Ahly fan, Ahmed Sabry. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Fans throwing flares at the riot police in Port Said stadium (AFP)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dpdhr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfq)
Covid-19 and Europe

Europe faces a tidal wave of Covid infections and many countries have brought in new social measures to try to cope. There are passes that give different rights to those who are vaccinated from those who are not, some countries have curfews or lockdowns and from 1st February, Austria will make vaccines compulsory for everyone. There have been protests throughout the continent. World Questions debates the response to the pandemic with political leaders and questioners from across the continent.

Panel:
Karoline Edtstadler: Federal Minister for the EU and the Constitution in Austria
Thierry Baudet MP: Leader of Forum for Democracy in the Netherlands
Professor Agnes Wold: Chief Physician of the Department of Infectious Diseases in Gothenburg University, Sweden
Eva Kaili, MEP: Chair of the European Parliament’s Panel for the Future of Science and Technology

Presenter: Jonny Dymond
Producers: Charlie Taylor and Helen Towner

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Demonstrators hold a banner reading "Bistros, cafes, restaurants: to control is not our job" in Nantes, September 2021, Credit: Sebastien Salom-Gomis/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dpj7w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv4)
Actor Keanu Reeves

Nikki Bedi is joined by multimillion-selling author Harlan Coben, as his latest blockbuster Netflix series begins.

Nicole Kidman reveals what it was like to work with Stanley Kubrick.

Keanu Reeves reflects on the legacy of the Matrix films and how it changed his life.

Peter Dinklage explains the workout benefits of swordfighting.

Paul Thomas Anderson on his new film Licorice Pizza, set in 1970s California.

Author Adele Parks whose latest novel features a female bigamist.

Live music from the man who took over the reins of Fela Kuti’s Egypt 80; Dele Sosimi.

And critic Leila Latif joins Nikki to discuss the week’s cultural picks.

(Photo: Keanu Reeves. Credit: Jeff Kravitz/Getty)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dpn00)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfn5m9m)
Volcanic eruption off the islands of Tonga

The eruption of a giant underwater volcano in the Pacific Ocean has triggered tsunami warnings across the region. Alerts were raised from Australia to the United States, and now to Japan where there are warnings of possible three-metre waves.

Also in the programme: US Senators introduce ‘Defending Ukraine Sovereignty Act of 2022’ legislation, we hear from Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Senator Robert Menendez, and the 400th anniversary of Molière.

(Photo: A handout satellite image made available by the Tonga Meteorological Services, Government of Tonga shows an explosive eruption of the Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha"apai volcano. CREDIT: EPA/TONGA METEOROLOGICAL SERVICES HANDOUT - BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE - AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND OUT HANDOUT EDITORIAL USE ONLY/NO SALES)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dprr4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2lyy3293)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0svp7d73xr)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0d40j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Global Questions (w3ct3flj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dpwh8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd2)
The great Black music symposium with Angel Bat Dawid, Qur'an Shaheed, Dr Adam Zanolini and Ben LaMar Gay

Qur'an Shaheed, Dr Adam Zanolini and Ben LaMar Gay join composer, improviser, clarinetist, and pianist Angel Bat Dawid to discuss the importance of not conforming, the struggle to find money to do what you love doing, recognising what your gifts are, and the experience of being diasporic African and its influence on your music.

Qur'an Shaheed is an experimental pianist, poet, singer and songwriter based in Los Angeles, whose music blends jazz, neo-soul, RnB and neo-classical. She started her musical career with her mother and grandmother at the age of four, has composed for film, and is a member of Jimetta Rose’s gospel choir The Voices of Creation.

Dr Adam Zanolini is a flute player, saxophonist, oboist, percussionist, double bassist, ethnomusicologist, and arts organiser. A pivotal figure in Chicago’s music scene, he’s part of the cross-generational Great Black Music Ensemble, “which fuses the expansive sounds of traditional Black American music with styles from across Africa and its diaspora.”

Composer, multi-instrumentalist, improviser, poet and singer Ben LaMar Gay's latest LP is Open Arms to Open Us, released at the end of last year, which blends jazz, blues, R&B, tropicalia, and hip-hop, and explores thermodynamics, rhythm as an inheritance of information, and the idea that improvisation is “the one freedom that we all have access to”.



SUNDAY 16 JANUARY 2022

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dq07d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1ywd)
Have we got it wrong on Omicron?

Studies using swabs from coronavirus patients seem to contradict earlier findings from cell cultures which showed Omicon replicated faster than earlier variants. As Benjamin Meyer from the centre for Vaccinology at the University of Geneva, explains there may be other reasons why omicron is spreading faster not just how quickly it reproduces.

Predicting how the pandemic will develop is not possible, however predicting what individual mutations in the virus may develop and the impact they might have individually and collectively is getting closer,
Cyrus Maher and Amalio Telenti of the biotech company Vir, have developed a way to model potential future viral mutations which they hope will now be used by many scientists worldwide looking to understand the virus.

There are concerns that other viruses may be on the rise, bird flu in particular, which as Nicola Lewis of the Royal Veterinary College explains is now spreading to part of the world where it is not usually seen, and infecting other animals as well as birds.

And we’ve news of a massive collection of nests – at the bottom of the sea, Deep sea Ecologist Autun Perser describes how he found them in Antarctica.


Also, Are big heads smarter? We live in a world where bigger is often seen as better - and the size of someone's brain is no exception. But a listener in Nairobi wants to know, does size really matter when it comes to grey matter? CrowdScience presenter Marnie Chesterton is on a mission to find out if the physical attributes of our head and brain can tell us anything about what's going on inside. We certainly thought so in the past.

In the 1800s, phrenology – determining someone’s characteristics by their skull shape – was very fashionable and curator Malcolm MacCallum gives us a tour of the extensive phrenological collection of death masks and skulls in Edinburgh’s anatomy museum. It's a 'science' that's now been completely debunked. Yet there’s no escaping the fact that over our evolutionary history, human brain size has increased dramatically alongside our cognitive capabilities.

But is it the whole story? Rick Potts, Director of the Human Origins Program at the Smithsonian tells of the point in time when human brains expanded the most; a time when the climate was changing, resources were unreliable and the intelligence to be adaptable might mean the difference between life and death. Adaptability is also key to Professor Wendy Johnson’s definition of intelligence, although she points out that IQ test, flawed as they are, are still the best predictor we have for intelligence… and that, yes, there is a weak correlation between having a larger head, and doing better at IQ tests. Why is that? We don’t know, says Dr Stuart Ritchie from KCL. According to him, neuroscientists are only in the foothills of understanding how a physical difference in the brain might underpin a person’s psychology. But researching this could offer valuable insights into how our amazing brains work.


(Image: Getty Images)


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dq3zj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0dh7x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dq7qn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0dm01)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dqcgs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dqh6x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhy)
US annual inflation rate hits 7%

On this edition of Business Weekly, we’re looking at the US inflation rate. It has hit 7% year on year, the largest rise since 1982.
We hear from Wells Fargo Economist Sarah Watt House on why the rate still seems to be increasing, and what the Federal Reserve might do now. We also speak to Gerald Daniels, an Associate Professor of Economics at Howard University who specialises in the economics of inequality.
The BBC’s Ed Butler looks at the recent protests in Kazakhstan, and hears from experts Diana Kudaibergenova and Kate Mallinson and the former Prime Minister Azakan Kasha Geldin, about the economic state of the country.
We have a look inside the UK trials into psychedelic drugs for patients suffering with depression. Laurence Knight hears from both those with the illness, and clinicians trying to help them.
Plus, we browse the shelves of ultra rare whisky, and hear why, and how, some parts of the Scottish industry are booming. The BBC’s Elizabeth Hotson talks to both keen collectors, and dedicated producers.
Business Weekly is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Clare Williamson.
(Image: Used car forecourt with two use cars; Image credit: Getty Images)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dqlz1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0dz7f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dqqq5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytm8s423z8)
Novak Djokovic: Judges consider last-ditch visa appeal

Judges in Australia are considering a last-ditch appeal by Novak Djokovic, challenging the government's decision to cancel his visa on public health grounds. The three judges are considering their verdict after listening to more than four hours of arguments. If his appeal is successful, Novak Djokovic will start his Australian Open title defence on Monday.

Also in the programme: The Prime Minister of New Zealand says a tsunami has inflicted significant damage on Tonga. And we hear from a now former academic at Kabul University, who says he is proud to have been sacked by the Taliban.

(Photo: Novak Djokovic departs from the Park Hotel government detention facility before attending a court hearing at his lawyers office in Melbourne, Australia. Credit: EPA/James Ross)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dqvg9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytm8s427qd)
Novak Djokovic loses last-ditch visa appeal

Novak Djokovic has lost his last-ditch bid to stay in Australia after a court rejected his appeal. He faces deportation and a three-year ban on obtaining a new visa. Immigration Minister Alex Hawke cancelled Djokovic's visa on Friday, saying his presence in the country risked fanning anti-vaccine sentiment. The tennis star has not been vaccinated against Covid-19, which is a requirement for foreigners entering the country.

Also in the programme: We reflect on talks involving Russia, the US and NATO that took place this week. And Donald Trump has held a rally in Arizona, in what is his first public appearance since the anniversary of the January 6th riots at the Capitol building in Washington.

(Photo: Novak Djokovic departs from the Park Hotel government detention facility before attending a court hearing at his lawyers office in Melbourne, Australia. Credit: EPA/James Ross)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dqz6f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytm8s42cgj)
Novak Djokovic loses last-ditch visa appeal

Novak Djokovic has lost his last-ditch bid to stay in Australia after a court rejected his appeal. He faces deportation and a three-year ban on obtaining a new visa. Immigration Minister Alex Hawke cancelled Djokovic's visa on Friday, saying his presence in the country risked fanning anti-vaccine sentiment. The tennis star has not been vaccinated against Covid-19, which is a requirement for foreigners entering the country.

Also in the programme: The Prime Minister of New Zealand says a tsunami has inflicted significant damage on Tonga.

(Photo: Novak Djokovic departs from the Park Hotel government detention facility before attending a court hearing at his lawyers office in Melbourne, Australia. Credit: EPA/James Ross)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0fbgt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgv)
Sleep, eat, repeat?

A lack of sleep might leave us tired, but it can also have a major impact on what we eat, and our health.

Ruth Alexander explores the surprising relationship between diet and a poor night’s rest, and learns that it’s not just what we’re eating, but when: we hear about the perils of consuming calories late into the evening or, even worse, overnight.

But it’s not all bad news: there’s growing research into the idea that we might be able to improve our sleep quality by tweaking our diets.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:

Tania Whalen, fire brigade despatcher, Melbourne, Australia;
Matthew Walker, University of California, Berkeley, USA;
Maxine Bonham, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia;
Marie-Pierre St-Onge, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, USA.

(Picture: A young girl asleep on a plate of spaghetti. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dr2yk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0fg6y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky3)
The twists and turns of the Rubik's Cube

Outlook's Saskia Edwards goes in search of the elusive creator of what must be one of the most maddening games - the Rubik's Cube. On route she meets one of the fastest cubers in the world, Feliks Zemdegs. He can solve the puzzle in a matter of seconds, but even he can't tell Saskia where she can find its inventor - Erno Rubik. First broadcast in 2020.

Erno Rubik has a book out called Cubed: The Puzzle of Us All’.

Picture: Rubik cube's inventor Professor Erno Rubik, 1981
Credit: Getty Images­_Mirrorpix / Contributor


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dr6pp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct051p)
Deeply Human

The Teenage Brain

The experiences of being a teenager are deep and lasting - first break-ups, fierce arguments with parents, that time a friend tried to skateboard off the roof. Why is that time of life experienced so intensely and remembered so vividly?

Dessa finds that many answers lie in neuroanatomy and the way our brain rewires as we grow. She meets teens and a brain scientist to find out why the rollercoaster highs and lows of teenage life might be good for us in ways adults just don’t get.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0fkz2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct38kj)
MH17: Faith after disaster

In the summer of 2014, a passenger jet was shot out of the sky over a rural area of Ukraine. Images of suitcases and children’s toys strewn around the burning wreckage were beamed and streamed around the world. All 298 people on board were killed. Two thirds of the victims were Dutch and this air disaster is often referred to as the Netherlands 9/11 - likening the impact of the downing of flight MH17 to that of the terror attacks in New York, in terms of the way these unfathomable events ignited a collective grief and national mourning.

Four men are on trial for their alleged role in the mass murder. In the most recent hearings, relatives were given an opportunity to share their stories, the ‘victim impact’ testimonies, as they were called in court, revealed how this single event had affected so many lives in so many ways and gave a glimpse into how faith has been tested, lost and rediscovered.

Anna Holligan has been reporting on this story for the BBC since the day flight MH17 was brought down. She has got to know many of the surviving relatives, some of whom are still struggling to comprehend what happened to their loved ones. To what extent did faith has play a role in their ability to go on after they lost everything? And she speaks to experts about how the public mourning, and global attention has shaped the way in which families sought solace in their faith and found hope in the darkness.

(Photo: A religious cross marks the entrance of the village Grabovo, on the site of the flight MH17 disaster, in Grabovo, Ukraine. Credit: Pierre Crom/Getty Images)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0drbft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjtyf2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0fpq6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct3030)
Why We Play

Childhood: Exploring the world through play

In the earliest years of our lives, play is crucial to building our understanding of our surroundings, culture and even ourselves. The UN considers play to be a fundamental right for every child, and a growing body of interdisciplinary research is leading to greater implementation across the globe. But how do we begin to define something that is so intrinsic to our human nature?

We look into the very beginnings of play and how our first interactions with adults have a lasting impact on the way we deal with later life. In Bangladesh, we drop in on Play Labs run by international development organisation BRAC which works to empower preschool children in deprived and fragile communities.

We learn about a Boston elementary school which uses guided recess – not only to keep kids physically and mentally well, but to teach them skills such as conflict resolution and leadership. How does play in those first few years of life affect the way we communicate, engage with, and understand the world? What’s at stake if we lose out?

Presenter: Steffan Powell
Producer: Amelia Parker


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0drg5y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0drky2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfn7k7p)
Djokovic deported from Australia

A federal court has upheld a government decision to cancel tennis star Novak Djokovic’s visa on the grounds that his refusal to be vaccinated against Covid-19 made him a threat to public health. Djokovic has now been deported from the country, and potentially prohibited from entering for three years.

Also on the program, Australia and New Zealand are preparing to send surveillance flights to the Pacific island nation of Tonga, to assess the damage caused by a volcanic eruption and tsunami. With communication to the country completely cut off, we speak to a Tongan currently living in France; and Swedish Defence Minister Peter Hultqvist explains why the country has been moving troops on the island of Gotland on the Baltic sea.

[Photo: Novak Djokovic in Melbourne’s Tullamarine Airport before boarding his flight out of Australia. Credit: Reuters]


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0drpp6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmc)
Writer Agatha Christie: Murder and mystery

Agatha Christie put her decision to become a writer down to a lack of education and a capacity for day-dreaming. Her murder mysteries, full of ingenious plot twists, are still regarded by many as the finest examples of crime fiction and have sold in their billions in the English language and in translation.

Although the world she depicts is considered by some to be cosy and genteel, and her plots formulaic, a new generation of screenwriters is bringing out the darker side of Christie’s imagination. So what accounts for her continuing global success, when today’s crime fiction tends to be grittier and more realist?

Bridget Kendall is joined by Dr Michelle Kazmer, Professor in the School of Information at Florida State University, who’s combined a lifelong passion for crime fiction with study into how we use information – such as clues or evidence; Dr Mark Aldridge, Associate Professor of Film and Television at Solent University and the author of Agatha Christie on Screen and Poirot: The Greatest Detective in the World; and James Prichard, Agatha Christie’s great-grandson. Award-winning crime writer Ragnar Jónasson also explains how Agatha Christie's novels influenced his own work.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for BBC World Service.


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl6)
QAnon: Did 365,348 children go missing in the US in 2020?

In December, Republican politician Lauren Boebert tweeted the claim that ‘365,348 children went missing in 2020’. This is a shocking statistic but is it true and does it mean what we think it means? We speak to Gabriel Gatehouse, international editor of Newsnight, who has been investigating conspiracy theories including the Qanon conspiracy theory for a new podcast, The Coming Storm.

(Miami Florida, Interstate I-95 Missing Child Alert. Credit Jeffrey Greenberg /Getty Images)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0drtfb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dry5g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tp3yzzkx8)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0ds9dv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjvxd3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0gnp7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct38kj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dsf4z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dsjx3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfn8j6q)
Tonga still cut off after tsunami

There are fears for the people of Tonga, cut off from the world after the pacific island state was hit by a tsunami triggered by the eruption of an underwater volcano.

Also in the programme: President Biden describes yesterday's siege at a Texas synagogue as an act of terror; and after the tennis star Novak Djokovic is deported from Australia, we hear from the President of Serbia.

(Image:images on social media showed flooding as the tsunami waves began / Credit: Consulate of the Kingdom of Tonga)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dsnn7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2lyy5z66)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0svp7db0tv)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0h0xm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dssdc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 Deeply Human (w3ct051p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0h4nr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]



MONDAY 17 JANUARY 2022

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pxrdn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709m3p1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct38kj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pxw4s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlmnqx9hb1)
China's economy grows at a slower pace

Debts accumulated by construction companies, like Evergrande, are undermining the economy and the days of China enjoying expansion of double digits are expected to be over. Plus we look ahead to the World Economic Forum, which will open with an address from Chinese President Xi Jinping. Also we have an extended analysis of Turkey's economy, which is under pressure because of surging inflation. This week the central bank will consider if it should increase interest rates, but that has repeatedly been prevented by the Turkish President, Tayyip Erdogan, who has even removed staff at the central bank, to stop rates rising.

(Picture: A container port in Yantai in Shandong province, China. TANG KE/Future Publishing/Getty Images.)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709m7f5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct30j0)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The painless heart

Dr Mitch Lomax is a sports scientist at the University of Portsmouth. She helps actual Olympic swimmers get faster. She explains how most of the muscles attached to our skeletons work: Tiny fibres use small-scale cellular energy, which, when all these fibres work in concert, turns into visible muscular movement. Mitch also explains how the dreaded Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness, or DOMS, can hit, taking a stair-wincing 48-72 hours to peak after exercise.

But skeletal muscles turn out to be quite different to heart muscles, as consultant cardiologist Dr Rohin Francis explains. Heart cells are more efficient and don't get fatigued like skeletal muscle cells. They are extremely energetic and 'just want to beat'. He also explains that the sensory feedback from the heart muscles is different too. They have a different sort of nerve supply, with fewer sensory nerves, so that there is less chance of pain signals being sent to the brain.

However, heart cells' incredible abilities are counterbalanced by one Achilles-like flaw: They cannot easily heal. Professor Sanjay Sinha is a British Heart Foundation (BHF) Senior Research Fellow and a Professor in Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine at the University of Cambridge. His job is to fix broken hearts and he explains to Adam how new research into stem cells could be used to fix normally irreparable heart cells.

Producer - Jennifer Whyntie and Fiona Roberts
Presenters - Hannah Fry and Adam Rutherford


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pxzwx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv0lw5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709mc59)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2drq)
Can putting a price on nature help us care about it more?

Everyone who steps outside can appreciate the value that the natural world brings to our lives.

To some people, the idea of placing a monetary value on trees and mangrove forests is wrong because nature and its gifts are priceless. But others say the love of nature has not stopped it from being polluted or destroyed.

The natural world plays a major role in capturing the carbon from our atmosphere. A marketplace now exists where countries and big business can pay others to protect their forests, swamps and bogs in return for offsetting their emissions.

Could giving nature a dollar value make us care about it more and help us fight against climate change?

Presenters Kate Lamble and Jordan Dunbar are joined by:

Kevin Conrad, founder, Coalition for Rainforests
Tina Stege, climate envoy, Marshall Islands
Pavan Sukhdev, chief executive officer, GIST

Producer: Darin Graham
Researcher: Natasha Fernandez
Reporter: Gloria Bivigou
Series Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound engineer: Graham Puddifoot


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8py3n1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct051p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709mgxf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8py7d5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv0vcf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709mlnk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9q)
Women curating culture

Men run most of world's cultural institutions, but in recent years more women have been given top jobs at leading galleries and museums. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women from Australia and Germany about the importance of getting a woman's view on what's worth displaying and history worth preserving.

Margot Neale Ngawagurrawa is an Aboriginal Australian curator and one of the world's leading experts on Aboriginal history and culture. She's Head Indigenous Curator at the National Museum Australia and has spent seven years bringing together historical and cultural stories of the Aboriginal peoples which till now have only existed in oral form. The resulting exhibition, Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters is now on a global tour – and in Plymouth, UK till the end of February 2022.

Dr Stephanie Rosenthal has been director of Gropius Bau in Berlin, Germany since 2018. She studied art history and her work since then has focused on contemporary art and performance. The Gropius Bau has recently tackled the subjects of humanity’s relationship to nature, exploitative extraction processes and ‘how plants practice politics’.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

(Image: (L) Stephanie Rosenthal, credit Mathias Voelzke. (R) Margot Neale Ngawagurrawa, courtesy Margot Neale Ngawagurrawa. Background: Maruku Arts by Niningka Lewis.)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pyc49)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4cf51)
Concern and uncertainty remains for people in Tonga following volcanic eruption

Concern and uncertainty remain for the people of Tonga as the island nation sits under a cloud of volcanic ash. A volcanic eruption that happened on Saturday had disrupted communications and thousands of people have been affected.

Tennis superstar Novkak Djorkovic has been deported from Australia after the government revoked his visa, what will this mean for the player and the Australian Open?

And the latest following an attack on a Synagogue in Texas, which US President Biden condemned as an "act of terror".


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pygwf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4cjx5)
Pacific volcano: uncertainty in Tonga after eruption.

A great deal of uncertainty remains about the situation in Tonga following a large volcanic eruption on Saturday which triggered a tsunami. It's caused power cuts and severed communication. We hear more from Curtis Tuihalangingie, the Deputy Head of Mission for the Tonga High Commission in Canberra, Australia.

The former president of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko says he will return to Kiev today, despite the fact that he may face charges of treason once back in his homeland.

And we'll hear about the $1.4bn project to build a new port in Sri Lanka on a man-made island.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pylmk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4cnn9)
Pacific volcano: Australia and New Zealand dispatch aircraft in aid effort

Efforts are under way to assess the damage in Tonga following a volcanic explosion which triggered a tsunami on Saturday. Australia and New Zealand have dispatched reconnaissance aircraft to help in the aid effort.

People over the age of 60 in Greece who refuse Covid-19 vaccines will now be punished with a fine over $100 a month until they accept the jab.

Novak Djorkovic has been deported from Australia and the Open tennis tournament will go ahead without the world's number one male player. We'll hear from a coach whose worked with Djorkovic in Serbia and look at the player's future.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pyqcp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6y)
Kathleen Stock: The debate about sex, gender and equality

Stephen Sackur speaks to philosopher and author Kathleen Stock whose views on the immutability of biological sex and the limitations of gender self-identity have made her a hate figure for some transgender activists and supporters. Why has debate about sex, gender and identity become a culture war battleground?

(Photo: Kathleen Stock in the Hardtalk studio)


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709n2n2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5y)
The future of flying

The pandemic has been very hard on commercial aviation, but most experts believe the sector will soon be growing again – fast. The BBC's Theo Leggett takes a look at what new technologies are out there. Sandra Bour Schaeffer, Chief Executive of Airbus Upnext, tells him what the aviation giant is planning for the future. Neil Cloughley, from the much smaller Faradair Aerospace, makes the case for why their hybrid-electric technology is the way forward for flying. On the other hand, Blake Scholl of Boom Supersonic says that, two decades after the end of supersonic jet Concorde, it's time for airliners to break the sound barrier once again. But if we want to protect the environment, should we be flying at all? Matt Finch, UK policy director of the Brussels-based lobby group Transport and Environment, says yes - but not quite so often.
(Image: the ZEROe blended wing body concept, Credit: Airbus)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x21)
The rise of Boko Haram

How a small Nigerian Islamist group launched one of the deadliest insurgencies in Africa. In 2002, a new radical sect emerged in Maiduguri in north eastern Nigeria led by a charismatic preacher, Mohammed Yusuf. He preached against anything he deemed un-Islamic or having a western influence. Locals gave the group a nickname, Boko Haram - meaning "western education is forbidden". In 2009, the group launched co-ordinated attacks on police across northern Nigeria. Maiduguri saw the fiercest fighting. It was the start of an insurgency that would devastate the region. We hear from Bilkisu Babangida who was the BBC Hausa service reporter in the city at the time.

Photo: A suspected Boko Haram house in Maiduguri set ablaze by Nigerian security forces, 30th July 2009 (AFP/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pyv3t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709n6d6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prm)
Are big-heads smarter?

We live in a world where bigger is often seen as better - and the size of someone's brain is no exception. But a listener in Nairobi wants to know, does size really matter when it comes to grey matter? CrowdScience presenter Marnie Chesterton is on a mission to find out if the physical attributes of our head and brain can tell us anything about what's going on inside. We certainly thought so in the past.

In the 1800s, phrenology – determining someone’s characteristics by their skull shape – was very fashionable and curator Malcolm MacCallum gives us a tour of the extensive phrenological collection of death masks and skulls in Edinburgh’s anatomy museum. It's a 'science' that's now been completely debunked. Yet there’s no escaping the fact that over our evolutionary history, human brain size has increased dramatically alongside our cognitive capabilities.

But is it the whole story? Rick Potts, Director of the Human Origins Program at the Smithsonian tells of the point in time when human brains expanded the most; a time when the climate was changing, resources were unreliable and the intelligence to be adaptable might mean the difference between life and death. Adaptability is also key to Professor Wendy Johnson’s definition of intelligence, although she points out that IQ test, flawed as they are, are still the best predictor we have for intelligence… and that, yes, there is a weak correlation between having a larger head, and doing better at IQ tests. Why is that? We don’t know, says Dr Stuart Ritchie from KCL. According to him, neuroscientists are only in the foothills of understanding how a physical difference in the brain might underpin a person’s psychology. But researching this could offer valuable insights into how our amazing brains work.

[Image: Brain being measured. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pyyvy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709nb4b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pz2m2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv1plb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709nfwg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pz6c6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv8)
Family and forgiveness, the late Archbishop Desmond Tutu

We're celebrating the life of the late Archbishop Desmond Tutu who died late last month after a lifetime of fighting for justice in South Africa. He spoke to Jo Fidgen, alongside his daughter, Reverend Mpho Tutu van Furth, in 2014 about the private man, husband and father. They had written a book together called The Book of Forgiving.

Marie Harrower is a medal-winning Paralympian and retired physiotherapist from the Isle of Mull in Scotland. She tells Outlook's Antonia Quirke how her mother taught her not to let blindness hold her back.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen

(Photo: Archbishop Desmond Tutu and his daughter the Reverend Mpho Tutu van Furth. Credit: Oryx Media 2013)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pzb3b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv1y2l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709npcq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pzfvg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpygf52)
Tonga: Australia and New Zealand send teams to assess damage

International efforts to deliver aid to tsunami- hit islands in Tonga have been gathering pace, as further information comes in from damage assessment teams sent by Australia and New Zealand. There's been significant damage to several islands. But no mass casualties have been reported.

The ex-Ukrainian president, Petro Poroshenko is attending a court hearing in Kyiv which will decide whether he should be detained during a treason investigation.

Also, as the health authorities in Beijing call on people to avoid getting parcels from abroad – can China's zero Covid policy beat the omicron variant?

(Photo: TONGA GEOLOGICAL SERVICES)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pzkll)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709nxvz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y48d20njsqf)
Credit Suisse chairman resigns

Antonio Horta-Osorio has resigned as chairman of Credit Suisse following Covid breaches. The departure comes on the heels of a string of scandals for the beleagured bank, and we get the background from the founder of the Swiss financial news website finews.ch, Claude Bauman. Also in the programme, according the latest official figures, Chinese economic growth is slowing. The Shanghai-based economist Andy Xie brings us the details. There's a growing fuel crisis in Uganda as truck drivers protest over Covid requirements at the border, and we find out more from the BBC's Patience Atuhaire in Kampala. Plus, the BBC's Theo Leggett reports on aviation technologies that might shape the future of flying.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Will Bain, Tom Kavanagh and Gabriele Shaw.

(Picture: Antonio Horta-Osorio. Picture credit: Reuters.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pzpbq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyvltfp95)
Tonga tsunami

We speak to people who have been trying to contact their relatives in Tonga after a huge volcanic eruption covered the Pacific Islands in ash. Our Science Correspondent explains how satellite images are key to understanding what has happened.

Novak Djokovic is returning to his native Serbia following his deportation from Australia, and we speak to our colleague in the capital Belgrade about what kind of welcome awaits him. Also we speak to tennis fans from different parts of Australia about their experiences of the pandemic, their thoughts on the Djokovic saga, and their hopes for the Australian Open in his absence.

And we talk through today’s main developments with Covid-19 with the help of one of our regular experts, Dr Eleanor Murray from the Boston University School of Public Health. Send in your audio questions for our medical expert via WhatsApp to +447730 751925.

(Photo: An eruption occurs at the underwater volcano Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha"apai off Tonga, January 14, 2022 in this screen grab obtained from a social media video. Video recorded January 14, 2022. Tonga Geological Services/via REUTERS)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pzt2v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyvltft19)
Novak Djokovic: The fallout

Novak Djokovic is returning to his native Serbia following his deportation from Australia, and we speak to our colleague in the capital Belgrade about what kind of welcome awaits him. Also we speak to tennis fans from different parts of Australia about their experiences of the pandemic, their thoughts on the Djokovic saga, and their hopes for the Australian Open in his absence.

We speak to people who have been trying to contact their relatives in Tonga after a huge volcanic eruption covered the Pacific Islands in ash. Our Science Correspondent explains how satellite images are key to understanding what has happened.

And we talk through today’s main developments with Covid-19 with the help of one of our regular experts, Professor Manfred Green from the University of Haifa, Israel. Send in your audio questions for our medical expert via WhatsApp to +447730 751925.

(Photo: Novak Djokovic has lost a judicial review to have the cancellation of his Australian visa quashed following a hearing at the Federal Court of Australia. Issue date: Sunday January 16, 2022. PA Photo. See PA story TENNIS Djokovic.Photo credit should read John Walton/PA Wire.)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8pzxtz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q01l3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv2nkc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709pdvh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nrtvp2xdg)
2022/01/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q05b7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709pjlm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct30j1)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The slippery situation

'What is the slipperiest thing in the world?' asks 8 year old Evelyn? 'Why do my feet slip on a wet floor but when my feet are even slightly moist it's nearly impossible to put on a pair of socks without falling over and cursing the universe. What is going on here?' asks Evelyn's Dad, Sam. Hannah and Adam investigate the science of friction and lubrication - so called 'tribology' with the help of tribologists and mechanical engineers Professor Ashlie Martini from California University Merced and Professor Roger Lewis from the University of Sheffield. With their help Hannah and Adam find out why leaves on the line are so slippery, what happens to graphite in space and what is the slipperiest food. Professor of Materials, Mark Miodownik from University College London explains what's going on when friction stops two materials sliding past each other and wonders whether the slipperiest substance was actually discovered accidentally in a lab by scientists looking for something completely different. Also in the programme why the ability to reduce friction, even by minuscule amounts could have a huge impact for sustainability and reducing energy use.

Producers: Jen Whyntie and Pamela Rutherford


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q092c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpyh8cz)
Ukraine's former president returns to face treason charges

Former Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko flies home to face charges of high treason. All this as tens of thousands of Russian troops mass on the border. What's the significance of the timing?

Also in the programme: the UAE blames Yemeni Houthi rebels for a drone attack on fuel tankers in Abu Dhabi in which three people died; and the betrayal of Anne Frank- a new investigation names the man who gave her up to the Nazis.

(Photo: Former Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko supporters hold posters "Poroshenko come back" "The country needs order" as they gather near the Pechersky district court in Kyiv. Credit: EPA/Sergey Dolzhenko.)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q0dth)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2z77dqcg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sw1hpjs03)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709ps2w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrsrksjwff)
China cuts interest rates

China has unexpectedly cut a key interest rate for the first time in almost two years as official figures showed its economic growth had slowed. Geoffrey Yu, senior market strategist at bank of New York Mellon, explains the possible reasoning behind the move. Antonio Horta-Osorio has resigned as chairman of Credit Suisse following Covid breaches. The departure comes on the heels of a string of scandals for the beleagured bank. Also in the programme, there's a growing fuel crisis in Uganda as truck drivers protest over Covid requirements at the border, and we find out more from the BBC's Patience Atuhaire in Kampala. Plus, the BBC's Theo Leggett reports on aviation technologies that might shape the future of flying.

(Picture: An ATM issuing Yuan. koiguo/Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q0jkm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709pwv0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



TUESDAY 18 JANUARY 2022

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q0n9r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z83)
Hitler's Indian ally: Subhas Chandra Bose

The Indian independence campaigner, Subhas Chandra Bose, sided with Hitler's axis powers in World War Two to try to free his country from British rule. We'll hear from his great-niece about why she thinks that if he had lived he could have changed the course of India's history. We'll also hear from Dr Shruti Kapila of Cambridge University about why India's current government is celebrating Bose. Plus a nuclear scientist tells us about his role in a secret project to make safe vast swathes of nuclear-contaminated land in post-Soviet Kazakhstan - as well as preventing nuclear material from falling into the wrong hands. Also, the reckless actions which led to the sinking of the Costa Concordia cruise ship, the first woman to have silicone breast implants and Malick Sidibé, the Malian photographer whose work altered people's perceptions about 1960s Africa.

Photo: Subhas Chandra Bose giving a speech in Nazi Germany in 1942.


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q0s1w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqsn0ly4cl)
US Airlines ask for 'immediate intervention' on 5G

The bosses of ten of America’s biggest airlines are warning that the United States “is facing major disruption of the traveling and shipping public” if 5G mobile phone services are switched on as planned on Wednesday. They have written a letter outlining urgent concerns which has been sent to Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigeg and the head of the Federal Aviation Administration. We hear from our business correspondent Johnathan Josephs.

China has unexpectedly cut a key interest rate for the first time in almost two years as official figures showed its economic growth had slowed. Geoffrey Yu, senior market strategist at bank of New York Mellon, explains the possible reasoning behind the move.

Walmart, the giant American retailer appears to be considering a launch of a virtual currency. But governments are increasingly anxious about them. Prime Minister Modi of India on Monday called for co-ordinated intergovernmental control on cryptocurrencies. Spain has said people who advertise cryptocurrencies will be regulated by the country's financial watchdog. We speak to Glen Goodman about the lack of regulation in the crypto world.

Throughout the programme Jamie Robertson is joined by Andy Uhler of our sister programme Marketplace. He's in Austin,Texas. And Nabila Ahmed, Asia Finance Correspondent for Bloomberg in Sydney Australia.

Picture: Flight instruments of a modern jet airliner. Credit: Ollie Desforges/Getty


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q0wt0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv3hs8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709q82d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2z29)
Tale of a tiny fish: Part two

The Yaboi is a tiny silver fish from West Africa, rich in essential nutrients. It used to be known as ‘the people’s fish’, a staple for lunch for Senegal’s children and a vital fishery for the country’s thousands of women Transformatrices who dry, salt and smoke it to preserve it.

In this second programme we consider the work of Senegal’s Transformatrices. Activist Coumba Toure describes how their work is unseen and uncounted and yet they hold a critical position in a key food chain in West Africa. Tranformatrices describe how dwindling fish stocks and increasing prices are leading to a collapse in the artisanal fishing sector. We also follow the work of leader Djaba Diop who is fighting for recognised status and better working conditions for the women. We hear how this network of mobilised, energised women offer hope for the country’s food security.

Presenter: Hazel Healy
Producer: Sarah Cuddon

(Photo: A Transformatrice holds out a tray of Yaboi fish. Credit: Hazel Healy)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q10k4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q1498)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv3r8j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709qhkn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf6)
Teatro San Cassiano: Turning the impossible dream into reality

Do you have what seems like an impossible dream?

Maybe it’s to complete a marathon, swim with dolphins or win the lotto. Or, maybe, it’s to bring the world’s first public opera theatre back to life?

Well the latter is the "impossible dream" of Dr Paul Atkin, a business man and musicologist from the UK.

200 years after Teatro San Cassiano was demolished – apparently on the orders of Napoleon – Paul is attempting to recreate this lost opera house, so that the Baroque opera he loves can be performed in the very theatre it would have been composed for.

In a tale that’s as dramatic as any opera or World Cup final, join Ella-mai Robey for an episode of In the Studio, which reveals - before even a brick is laid – what it takes to try and turn an impossible dream into reality.

Presented by Ella-mai Robey
Produced by Rebecca Armstrong and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q181d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4gb24)
UAE accuses Yemeni Houthi rebels of drone strike in Abu Dhabi killing three people

Authorities in the UAE accuse Yemeni Houthi rebels of carrying out a drone strike in Abu Dhabi killing three people.

Thousands of people in Sudan HAVE protested against the country's military rule in the capital Khartoum on Monday, they were met with tear gas and gunfire from security forces. Several people were killed by live ammunition.

And we'll have more on Beijing as the city is on high alert after detecting a single case of the Omicron variant of COVID-19. Authorities suspect it may have been transmitted via a parcel coming from overseas.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q1csj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4gft8)
New Zealand sends help to Tonga following an undersea volcanic eruption

New Zealand is sending two naval vessels on a long sea journey to support Tonga as it reels from an undersea volcanic eruption and tsunami. We'll hear from one worried Tongan on the attempts to reach family cut off from communications.

The biggest US airlines have warned of a catastrophic disruption to their flights if two telecoms firms activate their 5G technology as planned on Wednesday.

The UAE says it will retaliate after a drone attack by Houthi rebels explodes an oil tanker and kills three people there, the UAE is part of the Saudi led coalition fighting the Houthis in Yemen.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q1hjn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4gkkd)
Tonga: United Nations says distress signal has been received from islands

The United Nations has said a distress signal has been received from islands in the Tonga archipelago following Saturday's massive volcanic eruption and tsunami. It said the distress beacon had come from two small low-lying islands - Fonoi and Mango. Communications were severed and it has been difficult to establish how much damage has been done.

There have been 14 deaths in the capital of Yemen after a Saudi-led coalition retaliated following a drone strike attack in the UAE which killed three people in Abu Dhabi.

Airlines in the US are concerned that mobile phones using 5G technology on flights will put them at risk, and warn it should be delayed until safety upgrades are in place.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q1m8s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm2)
Making clean water with rubbish

A Ugandan chemist has found a way to use old cattle bones and food waste to make clean water.

Timothy Kayondo turns the rubbish into activated carbon, which he uses to produce water purifiers. They’re being used in schools and hospitals.

It is estimated that one in 10 people on the planet do not have a basic level of access to clean water.

In this programme we find out about Timothy’s work and discover more ways people around the world are getting access to safe drinking water.

Presenter: Jo Mathys
Reporters: Mercy Juma, Celestina Olulode and Tom Colls
Producers: Daniel Gordon and Tom Colls
Image: Timothy Kayondo


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709qzk5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgz)
Has stock trading become 'gamified'?

Mobile trading apps have been booming in popularity, opening the door to millions of new, often young or first time investors. For many in the finance sector it is great news, but questions remain about whether people always know the amount of financial risk they are taking on.

One criticism in particular is that some of these new platforms look, act and react more like a video game than an investment platform. Is that the essential appeal that attracts new users, or does it just obscure the risks?

Rob Young speaks to the boss of one of the biggest platforms in this sector, Yoni Assia, the boss of eToro. He hears too from Vicky Bogan, professor at Cornell University’s business school, who studies the "gamification" of finance as well as Professor Erik Gordon, at the University of Michigan's Business School. And Sarah Pritchard from the UK's regulator the Financial Conduct Authority tells Rob about efforts to encourage young users to invest safely, and how protecting them is their priority.


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6k)
The first bicycle-sharing scheme

In the mid-1960s a Dutch engineer called Luud Schimmelpennink came up with a scheme to share bikes, and cut pollution. He collected about ten old bicycles, painted them white and left them at different points around Amsterdam. The first scheme didn't last, but it was hugely influential and became part of popular culture; Luud Schimmelpennink himself would go on to invent an early computerised sharing scheme for cars, and to consult on the bike-sharing schemes we see around the world today. In 2019, he spoke to Janet Ball.

Photo: Activists with one of the original white bikes from the first scheme. Credit: Luud Schimmelpennink.


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q1r0x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709r399)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct30j1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q1vs1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q1zj5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv4lhf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709rbsk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q2389)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxj)
Love on the dance floor: The refugees reunited in ballroom

When they first met in communist Vietnam in the 1970s, Paul and Millie Cao loved dancing together even though dancing to western music was frowned upon. Although they quickly fell in love, Paul had to flee Vietnam just six months after meeting Millie. He went first to Taiwan and then to the United States where finally, after six years, he and Millie were reunited. Jo Fidgen talks to them about their love story and how - now in their sixties - they're back on the dance floor, blazing a trail in competitions all over California. Their story is featured in a documentary called Walk Run Cha-Cha which was nominated for an Academy Award in 2020.

Imani Wilmot was born into a surfing family - her father is known as the "godfather" of Jamaican surfing and her brothers are also avid boarders, so she took to it like a duck to water. She was good too, winning competitions and representing her country with pride. But she soon realised that she was the only top black female surfer at those competitions, and that if she wanted a community around her, she'd have to create it herself. So Imani set up a surf school for girls and women when she was 17, sharing her confidence and discovering the healing power of the waves. This interview was first broadcast in August 2020.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen

(Photo: Millie and Paul Cao dancing together. Credit: Paul Cao)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q270f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv4tzp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709rl8t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct30j1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q2brk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpykb25)
Nato chief warns Russia against military attack on Ukraine

NATO has warned Russia that any military attack on Ukraine would come at a high cost. The NATO Secretary General, Jens Stoltenberg, said the alliance would provide support for Ukraine and help it to uphold its right to self-defence. But he said NATO was ready to engage with Moscow and listen to its security concerns.

Also in the programme: The first images emerge of the damage caused by the tsunami in Tonga; the relatives looking for the missing from Mexico's drug wars; and does 5G pose a threat to flying?

(Photo: Ukrainian army reservists took part in exercises in December as tensions with Russia mounted. Credit: EPA)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q2ghp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709rts2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bvd6gplxd)
US airlines warn of 5G flight disruption

US airlines have warned that switching on new 5G mobile services could cause disruption. The BBC's Theo Leggett discusses the background to the problem, and its implications. Also in the programme, Spain's government is taking action to try and help young people find housing, by approving a "youth bonus" voucher system worth €250 per month to help with rent costs. Eduardo Alonso Arechaga is a member of the Spanish Youth Council, which represents young Spaniards, and gives us his reaction to the news. There's been a big rise recently in the number of young people trading on the financial markets, and many are using mobile phone apps which are designed to make the process fun. The BBC's Rob Young reports on the potential pitfalls involved in the so-called gamification of stock market trading. Plus, with a virtual World Economic Forum under way in Davos, Switzerland, we hear from one of 15 winners of the Social Innovators of the Year awards, Mikaela Jade, who is a former park ranger in Australia who now runs a Canberra-based company which specialises in digital skills training.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Will Bain and Sara Parry.

(Picture: An aeroplane flies overhead. Picture credit: Press Association.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q2l7t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyvltjl68)
Tonga: Families cut off

Thousands of families around the world are unable to contact their loved ones in Tonga, following a tsunami triggered by a massive volcanic eruption on Saturday. The islands remain largely without internet, with the effort to fix a critical undersea cable expected to take weeks. We speak to women in Australia and American Samoa who have relatives there, and have faced an anxious wait for news of their safety.

In Norway, mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik is in court today seeking parole. He has served half of a 21-year sentence for killing 77 people in Norway's worst peacetime atrocity in July 2011. We hear updates from the hearing from a reporter in the country, and ask how victims' families are responding.

And we look at today's coronavirus headlines with our regular expert, Dr Isaac Bogoch, who is here to answer listener questions.

(Photo: Tonga blanketed in ash, Credit: New Zealand Defence Force)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q2pzy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyvltjpyd)
Microsoft targets major games company

Microsoft has said it is planning to acquire Activision Blizzard for almost $70bn. The proposed deal would be the largest in the company's history, and would see it take control of major franchises like Call of Duty, Warcraft and Overwatch. We speak to a gaming expert about why Microsoft has made this move, and what it could mean for the industry.

Thousands of families around the world are unable to contact their loved ones in Tonga, following a tsunami triggered by a massive volcanic eruption on Saturday. We speak to women in Australia and American Samoa who have relatives there, and have faced an anxious wait for news of their safety.

And one of our regular coronavirus experts, Dr Swapneil Parikh, is hear to talk about today's Covid-19 headlines.

(Photo: Activision Blizzard is one of the largest video gaming companies in the world, Credit: Getty)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q2tr2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q2yh6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv5kgg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709s9rl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nrtvp5t9k)
2022/01/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q327b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709sfhq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt8)
Twitter returns to Nigeria

After 222 days the social media platform is back up and running in Nigeria. The country suspended Twitter after it deleted a tweet by President Buhari and Nigerians have been accessing the platform via VPN, but now Twitter has agreed to the government's demands which include opening a local office, paying taxes, and being respectful of Nigerian laws. Abubakar Idris, the reporter for tech site Rest of World, joins us on the show. We are waiting on a response from Twitter.

100 years of the BBC
The BBC Historian Robert Seatter joins us live to talk about some of the tech innovations that the BBC developed over the last 100 years. He’s behind these amazing websites - Objects of the BBC - BBC 100 www.bbc.co.uk/100 and even more will be revealed throughout the year. He will be discussing the first OB in 1924 (The Cello and the Nightingale), the development of the first ribbon microphone by BBC engineers (as the BBC could not afford those designed in Hollywood), the fully digitised audio archive, and many other marvels of tech innovation.

Ban on online education classes in China
A few months ago, we reported on the Chinese government’s ban on online video gaming in children, where it restricted it to three hours a week. That was followed by a new set of regulations on private tutoring that has hit some of the biggest tech companies in China. While the new rules will certainly give young people more leisure, there’s a lot more to it than children’s well-being. On the show today we have science and technology journalist Yuan Ren to explain one of the biggest shakeups in Chinese education.



The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: John Boland
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


(Image: Pius Utomi Ekpei /AFP via Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q35zg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpyl592)
Tonga says tsunami was 'unprecedented disaster'

Four days after a volcano erupted and a tsunami hit, Tonga says it has suffered an "unprecedented disaster". New Zealand is leading the relief effort. We have an interview with the defence minister.

Also in the programme: the Mexicans searching for some of the tens of thousands who've disappeared during the drugs wars; and a new technique to purify water - using food waste.

(Photo: Aerial images show Tonga covered in volcanic ash. Credit: EPA)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q39ql)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2z77hm8k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sw1hpmnx6)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709snzz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycsm69db2rt)
Microsoft plans to buy Activision Blizzard for nearly $70bn

Microsoft says it plans to buy major games company Activision Blizzard in a deal worth $68.7bn. It would be the biggest acquisition in the company's history and is expected to be finalised in 2023. We speak to Carolina Milanese, Senior Technology Analyst at Creatrive Strategy to find out why Microsoft have done the deal. US mobile networks AT&T and Verizon have agreed to postpone the rollout of their new 5G service at some airports, after aircraft safety concerns from some airlines. We hear about the latest developments from the BBC's James Clayton. Also in the programme, Spain's government is taking action to try and help young people find housing, by approving a "youth bonus" voucher system worth €250 per month to help with rent costs. Eduardo Alonso Arechaga is a member of the Spanish Youth Council, which represents young Spaniards, and gives us his reaction to the news. There's been a big rise recently in the number of young people trading on the financial markets, and many are using mobile phone apps which are designed to make the process fun. The BBC's Rob Young reports on the potential pitfalls involved in the so-called gamification of stock market trading.

Photo: Activision Blizzard logo Credit: NurPhoto/Getty


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q3fgq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709ssr3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 19 JANUARY 2022

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q3k6v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q3nyz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqsn0m118p)
Microsoft plans to buy Activision Blizzard for nearly $70bn

Microsoft says it plans to buy major games company Activision Blizzard in a deal worth $68.7bn. It would be the biggest acquisition in the company's history and is expected to be finalised in 2023. We speak to Carolina Milanese, Senior Technology Analyst at Creatrive Strategies to find out why Microsoft has done the deal. US mobile networks AT&T and Verizon have agreed to postpone the rollout of their new 5G service at some airports, after aircraft safety concerns from some airlines. Also in the programme, Spain's government is taking action to try and help young people find housing, by approving a "youth bonus" voucher system worth €250 per month to help with rent costs. Eduardo Alonso Arechaga is a member of the Spanish Youth Council, which represents young Spaniards, and gives us his reaction to the news. There's been a big rise recently in the number of young people trading on the financial markets, and many are using mobile phone apps which are designed to make the process fun. The BBC's Rob Young reports on the potential pitfalls involved in the so-called gamification of stock market trading. Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Patrick Barta, Asia Enterprise Editor for Wall Street Journal in Bangkok and Takara Small, technology reporter for CBC in Toronto.

Photo: Activision Blizzard logo Credit: NurPhoto/Getty


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q3sq3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv6dpc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709t4zh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct3031)
Why We Play

Adolescence: Discovering identity through play

As we grow into adolescence, the playfulness of childhood seems to disappear. Teenagers discovering their identity are engaged in a serious quest. There are unwritten rules to learn and to follow, and to be too spontaneous puts you at risk of ridicule. But while teenagers are less playful they are playing nonetheless, the obvious examples being sport and video games. As today’s teenagers live in a culture where the boundaries of the real and virtual are ever more fluid, video games offer a space free of adult supervision, where they can make friends (both on and offline), rehearse their identities, and accumulate “cultural capital”. Far from the stereotypes of the solitary gamer playing violent shooter games, many of today’s successful video games help teenagers to navigate issues of anxiety, depression, and identity. In Lagos, we find researchers using virtual reality games to help schoolchildren to understand and develop empathy for those from different ethnic backgrounds. And we ask whether playfulness can help teenagers and young adults communicate messages to potential partners.

Presenter: Steffan Powell.
Producer: Jolyon Jenkins

(Photo: A teenager smiles as he plays a video game. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q3xg7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q416c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv6n5m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709tdgr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302v)
The Coming Storm

QAnon: The plot to break reality.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q44yh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4k6z7)
Tonga eruption: international emergency response steps up

Aid teams have started to arrive in Tonga after the recent volcanic eruption - but the full extent of the disaster is not yet known.

With a Russian military build-up increasing on Ukraine's border, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken flies to Kiev today for crisis talks.

There's been a spike in attacks on the LGBTQ community in Spain - and concerns that the coronavirus lockdown has fuelled hate crimes.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q48pm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4kbqc)
Crisis in Tonga as international aid effort begins

Following aerial pictures that show the devastation in Tonga there is great concern for the humanitarian situation there, as the first aid teams arrive in the Pacific archipelago.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken is on his way to Kiev, as concerns grow that Russia is preparing to invade Ukraine after moving troops into neighbouring Belarus.

Since the industrial revolution scientists now say more than 350,000 different manufactured chemicals have entered our lives and even our bloodstreams.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q4dfr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4kggh)
Ukraine welcomes top US diplomat as Russian troops mass on border

The US Secretary of State has arrived in Ukraine to show support, amid growing concerns about a possible Russian invasion.

Efforts are intensifying to help the people of Tonga who were hit by a volcanic eruption and tsunami on Saturday.

The committee investigating the attack on the US Congress last year has ordered three lawyers, including Donald Trump's personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, to give evidence.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q4j5w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncg)
Oleksii Reznikov: An invasion of Ukraine?

Stephen Sackur speaks to Ukraine’s Defence Minister Oleksii Reznikov. With more than 100,000 Russian troops massed on Ukraine’s border, a Russian military offensive may be imminent. If war comes, what will it mean for Ukraine and the security of Europe?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709twg8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jpr)
Why are some Chinese embracing 'lying flat'?

“Lying flat” - or tang ping - is a trend among mainly young Chinese to opt out of the rat race and it represents the antithesis of a development model that has delivered extraordinary growth for the country over four decades. The sentiment has been widespread enough to warrant a public condemnation from the President. Xi Jinping.

Ed Butler hears from "Jeff," a computer developer from Hangzhou, but working in Beijing, who explains why he decided to give up on the Chinese dream in pursuit of a better quality of life. The BBC's China specialist Kerry Allen describes how the trend has developed online and how it has been accelerated by the forced slowdown during the pandemic. And Dr Lauren Johnston, a scholar of Chinese economics with a focus on the demographic shifts, says that both the privileged and the poorer 20 and 30-somethings feel exhausted by the Chinese ultra-competitive world of work and family pressures.

Producer: Ivana Davidovic

(Photo: Illustration of the lying flat movement. Credit: Sina Weibo)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8t)
The Stanford Prison Experiment

In 1971, a group of American college students volunteered to be either prisoners or guards in a mock prison in one of the most famous and controversial psychology experiments of recent times. The study, devised by Stanford University professor Philip Zimbardo, came to be known as the Stanford Prison Experiment. Intended to last two weeks, it had to be suspended on the sixth day after those playing the guards subjected their peers, playing the prisoners, to cruel and dehumanising behaviour. Louise Hidalgo reports.

Picture: prisoner with guard in the Stanford Prison Experiment (credit: Duke Downey/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q4my0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct3031)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709v06d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q4rp4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q4wf8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv7hdj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709v7pn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q505d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzs)
Caring for my mum and the secrets of her sickness

After a lifetime of caring for her sick mother, Helen Naylor began to suspect that her mum had a very rare condition called Munchausen's Syndrome, a psychological disorder where according to the NHS, "someone pretends to be ill or deliberately produces symptoms of illness in themselves. Their main intention is to assume the "sick role" so that people care for them and they are the centre of attention." All through Helen's childhood her mother, Elinor, would stay in bed most of the time while Helen looked after her. Helen accepted that she would always be her mother's carer but after she died in 2016, Helen decided she needed to find out more about her mother and her own childhood so she started conducting her own investigation.

Helen has written a book called My Mother, Munchausen's and Me: a true story of betrayal and a shocking family secret.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Tom Harding Assinder and Rebecca Vincent

(Photo: Helen Naylor and her mother Elinor. Credit: Helen Naylor)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q53xj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv7qws)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709vh5x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q57nn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpyn6z8)
US top diplomat urges Moscow to opt for peaceful path

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken has called on Russia to take a "diplomatic and peaceful path" as fears mount of a new invasion of Ukraine.

An estimated 100,000 Russian troops have been deployed near Ukraine's borders and Mr Blinken, visiting Kyiv, said the Russians were planning to beef them up at short notice. He urged states to opt to resolve whatever differences there are peacefully through diplomacy.

Also in the programme: as communications lines start to be restored in Tonga, we ask why the country’s entire internet depends on one cable..And the UK's prime minister, Boris Johnson, faces sustained attack in the country's parliament over his handling of allegations that parties at his residence broke Covid rules.

(Photo shows U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken speaking at the U.S. Embassy, in Kyiv, Ukraine, on 19 January 2022. Credit: Alex Brandon/Pool via REUTERS)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q5cds)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709vqp5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4d2k9ctggf)
South Africa opens vaccine manufacturing site

South Africa's President Ramaphosa has opened a vaccine manufacturing site in Cape Town. The BBC's Vumani Mkhize was at the event, and brings us the details. And we get reaction to the development from Thomas Cueni, director general of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations in Basel. Also in the programme, the vice president of the European Securities and Markets Authority has called for a ban in the European Union on mining of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, on environmental grounds. Erik Thedeen explains his thinking. Rising food and fuel prices are making daily life tougher for the people of Sri Lanka, and the BBC's Anbarasan Ethirajan reports on the difficulties people in the country face. Plus, less than 10 per cent of trade involving members of the East Africa economic bloc the EAC is currently delivered by rail. Tanzania and Burundi hope to change that and are planning a new rail connection between the two countries. We hear what the countries hope to achieve with the proposal from Nuzulack Dausen, executive editor of the NuktaAfrica news agency in Dar es Salaam.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Will Bain, Tom Kavanagh and Russell Padmore.

(Picture: the new vaccine facility is opened. Picture credit: BBC/Vumani Mkhize.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q5h4x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyvltmh3c)
US urges diplomacy over Ukraine

On a visit to Ukraine, the US Secretary of State has urged Russia's President Putin to choose a diplomatic path out of the crisis which has raised concerns over a Russian invasion. We'll speak to a Ukrainian radio host to find out how he is reporting the story and what his listeners are telling him.

After the volcanic eruption and tsunami cut Tonga off from the global internet, we'll talk about the challenges of reconnecting an undersea cable with an expert in the field.

We'll hear a conversation between people who have chosen not to get a coronavirus vaccination in France, Greece and the Philippines, as they all face new restrictions on their lives because of their vaccine status.

Picture: US Secretary of State Antony Blinken greeted by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiyy before their meeting in Kyiv (Alex Brandon / Pool via REUTERS)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q5lx1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyvltmlvh)
Coronavirus: Measures against the unvaccinated

This week a number of countries have introduced new measures for those who remain unvaccinated. This includes fines, and restricting access to public transport and places. We'll hear a conversation between people who have chosen not to get the jab in France, Greece and the Philippines, about the changes this is making in their day to day lives.

On a visit to Ukraine, the US Secretary of State has urged Russia's President Putin to choose a diplomatic path out of the crisis which has raised concerns over a Russian invasion. We'll speak to our correspondent about the attitudes of Ukrainians living near the border.

And we'll hear from our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Maria Sundaram, about today's Covid-19 headlines.

(Photo: Transport authorities in the Philippines prohibiting public transport rides, Credit: EPA / Rolex Dela Pena)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q5qn5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q5vd9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv8gck)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709w6np)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nrtvp8q6n)
2022/01/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q5z4f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct3031)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709wbdt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwh)
Are people with asthma who exercise healthier?

As Omicron spreads across the US, Claudia Hammond is joined by Professor Matt Fox from Boston University to discuss the latest Covid-19 news, including President Biden’s pledge to make high-quality masks available across the country.

Wheezing and feeling breathless is a fact of life for the 262 million people around the world who have asthma. Some worry that exercise will worsen their asthma symptoms. But UK researchers say that evidence shows that all people with asthma can exercise safely – even if that’s just walking across a room. Lung specialist Andrew Wilson says that the risks are low as long as the symptoms are controlled with medication. Health psychologist Leanne Tyson recommends setting small goals and regular rewards to help keep up the habit. Asthma patient Bill Day, who’s in his 50s, says now that his asthma is under control, he can swim two miles a day to keep fit and healthy.

Yellow and green boxes on social media feeds mean that your friends have been sucked into the world of Wordle, the increasingly popular free online word game. Guessing a new five-letter word every day sounds simple, but Catherine Loveday, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Westminster, explains just how much work the brain does to help solve the puzzle.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath and Samara Linton

(Picture: A young jogger using an asthma inhaler on the beach. Photo credit: Westend61/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q62wk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpyp265)
Ukraine MP: 'Invasion is madness for both Russia and Ukraine'

With US Secretary of State Antony Blinken in Kyiv for talks with the Ukrainian government, a member of parliament from President Volodymyr Zelensky's Servant of the People party, Sviatoslav Yurash, tells Newshour, a Russian invasion would be 'madness' for both countries.

Also in the programme: British Prime Minister continues to suffer from the partygate revelations as one of his own MPs defects to the opposition Labour party, and a former cabinet minister and close ally calls for him to go; and we speak to a local journalist in Tonga about the aftermath of the tsunami.

(Photo: US Secretary of State Antony Blinken meets with Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba in Kyiv, Ukraine, 19 January 2022. Credit: Alex Brandon/Pool via Reuters)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q66mp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2z77lj5n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sw1hpqkt9)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709wkx2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172yct0xnprmwk)
Biden defends his first year

President Biden has held a rare press conference to mark a year in office. Biden has defended his administration’s response to the global economic impact of the pandemic, and concerns over supply chain problems.We speak live to the BBC's Gary O'Donoghue outside the West Wing. Also in the programme, rising food and fuel prices are making daily life tougher for the people of Sri Lanka, and the BBC's Anbarasan Ethirajan reports on the difficulties people in the country face. Plus, less than 10 per cent of trade involving members of the East Africa economic bloc the EAC is currently delivered by rail. Tanzania and Burundi hope to change that and are planning a new rail connection between the two countries. We hear what the countries hope to achieve with the proposal from Nuzulack Dausen, executive editor of the NuktaAfrica news agency in Dar es Salaam.

Picture: President Biden Holds A Press Conference At The White House Picture: Chip Somodevilla/Getty


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q6bct)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709wpn6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 20 JANUARY 2022

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q6g3y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q6kw2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqsn0m3y5s)
Biden defends his first year

President Biden has held a rare press conference to mark a year in office. Biden has defended his administration’s response to the global economic impact of the pandemic and concerns over supply chain problems. We speak to the BBC's Gary O'Donoghue outside the West Wing. Also in the programme, the vice president of the European Securities and Markets Authority has called for a ban in the European Union on mining of the cryptocurrency Bitcoin, on environmental grounds. Erik Thedeen explains his thinking. Plus, more than 100 billionaires and millionaires have issued a plea to political and business leaders, asking them to make the super rich pay more tax. Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Hayley Woodin, executive editor of Business in Vancouver and James Mayger Bloomberg’s China Economics Reporter.

Picture: President Biden Holds A Press Conference At The White House Picture: Chip Somodevilla/Getty


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q6pm6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv99lg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709x1wl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gyk)
Hunting Syria's war criminals

Imagine walking down a street in a European capital and meeting your torturer. For many Syrian refugees fleeing war and human rights abuses, Europe was meant to be a sanctuary. So it was a shock when people began bumping into their torturers out shopping or in a cafe. In fact many of those involved in the Syrian government’s notorious interrogation facilities are hiding in plain sight in European cities having used the refugee wave as a “ratline” out of the country. More and more are now being investigated, arrested and put on trial in European courts. But with President Assad firmly in control in Syria the long arm of the state is reaching those willing to testify. For Assignment, Chloe Hadjimatheou and Michael Ertl look at how the Syrian war is continuing to play out in Europe.

Presented and produced by Chloe Hadjimatheou and Michael Ertl
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: A woman shows a picture of her Syrian relatives outside the Higher Regional Court in Koblenz, Germany, 13 January 2022. Credit: Sascha Steinbach/EPA)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q6tcb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q6y3g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyv9k2q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709x9cv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgw)
How not to feed a dog

How do you feed a dog? The answer may be more fraught than you had imagined.

Should you give them ‘dog food’? Is it a step too far to feed them at the table? And can man’s best friend thrive on a vegetarian diet?

we bring together three dog-loving experts from the UK, India and the USA to analyse what dog feeding reveals about our relationship with animals and even our own relationship with food.

Be prepared to hear some surprises, some empowering advice and maybe some uncomfortable home truths. And even if you don’t have a dog, you may get some ideas that you can apply to your own life.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: dogs licks lips. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Presenter: Ruth Alexander

Producer: Sarah Stolarz

Contributors:

Shirin Merchant, dog trainer and behaviourist in Mumbai, India

Louise Glazebrook, dog trainer and behaviourist in London, UK

Marc Bekoff, professor emeritus of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Colorado Boulder, USA


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q71vl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4n3wb)
Russian will invade Ukraine, says President Biden

President Biden marks his first year in office with an attempt to convince Americans he's got the country on the right track - addressing issues including the tensions with Russia, the US pull-out from Afghanistan, and his handling of the economy and the pandemic.

Tonga is still reeling from the volcanic eruption - we will speak live to a journalist there.

And why North Korea - secretive North Korea - is willing to talk to the world about climate change


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q75lq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4n7mg)
Ukraine crisis: US top diplomat to meet Russian counterpart today

It's one year since President Biden took office and he's been speaking about the "enormous progress" achieved in that time such as dealing with the pandemic but what about a subject close to his party's heart - the voting rights of Americans?

The British Prime Minister continues to face political pressure to resign over lockdown parties held at Downing Street.

And following Saturday's eruption of an undersea volcano that blanketed Tonga with ash - communication had been down, but now lines are slowly being restored.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q79bv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4nccl)
US top diplomat to hold talks on the Ukraine crisis in Berlin

Fears of Russia invading Ukraine continue, can a visit by US Secretary of State Antony Blinken to Europe make a difference?

Political turmoil continues in the UK, with the Prime Minister Boris Johnson facing criticism from not only the official opposition but also within his own party.

The first aid flight has arrived in Tonga, hit by Tsunami waves caused by a volcano 5 days ago - we'll hear from a family in the US still trying to make contact with loved ones.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q7f2z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z36)
What’s going on in Kazakhstan?

What has caused the worst unrest and political infighting in Kazakhstan’s recent history? Scores of deaths and thousands of arrests prompted the summoning of foreign troops. An elderly political leadership faces difficult choices in re-asserting its authority.

With Charmaine Cozier.


(The damage aftermath of the protests in Almaty, Kazakhstan 11 Jan 2022. Credit: Pavel Pavlov/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709xscc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jbg)
The fight for pocket parity

How deep are your pockets? Are they big enough to carry all the things you need? Your money, keys and mobile phone? If you’re a woman, the answer is most likely a no. This little pouch has a lot to say about gender roles and a woman’s right to financial independence. We hear about the great divide in pocket designs that has existed for hundreds of years with Ariane Fennetaux, author of The Pocket: A Hidden History of Women's Lives, 1660–1900. We take a trip to London’s V&A Museum to see how pockets – or a lack of them – led to the billion-dollar handbag industry, and we hear from Indian fashion designer and founder of the Meri Pocket campaign group, Taarini Saraf on the fight for pocket justice. Presented by Vivienne Nunis. Produced by Sarah Treanor. Music used with the kind permission of: @HebontheWeb Image: A women's small jean pocket. Credit: Getty images.


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x49)
Martin Luther King Jr. Day

This week Americans have been observing the Martin Luther King Jr Day national holiday, which marks the birthday of the late civil rights leader. The campaign to have Dr King formally recognized in the US was led by his widow, Coretta Scott King. The holiday was finally signed into law in 1983. Farhana Haider has been speaking to Dr King’s youngest daughter, Dr Bernice King, about the long and fraught campaign, and the crucial role her mother played in supporting her father’s legacy.

Photo: Coretta Scott King speaking at the White House. (Credit: White House)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q7jv3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709xx3h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q7nl7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmd)
Copper: From mining to microprocessors

Copper is a metal that has been with us since the dawn of civilisation. The Romans used it to build their empire, and its high thermal and electrical conductivity led to the 19th century discovery of how to generate electricity and a revolution in telecommunications. Copper was even used to build the Statue of Liberty in New York, and it’s because of copper’s tendency to oxidise that the statue is no longer shiny brown but green. Today we still depend on this 'eternal metal', so called because it doesn’t decay or rust, and it has become a staple and necessary component in new green technologies like solar power and electric cars. But extracting copper has always been very damaging to human health and the environment - so how has our relationship with copper changed over the centuries?

Joining Rajan Datar to find out more about copper past and present is Nikita Sud, Professor of Development studies at Oxford University and the author of The Making of Land and The Making of India; the archaeologist Dr William Parkinson, who is a curator at the Field Museum, and Professor of Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago; and Andrea Sella, Professor of Chemistry at University College, London.

Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service.

(Image: Stripped copper cables. Credit: Christoph Burgstedt/Science Photo Library via Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9f)
Novak Djokovic: The road to success

Aged thirteen, Novak Djokovic appeared at coach Nikola Pilic's tennis academy near Munich. He would soon become Pilic's star pupil thanks to his incredible self-discipline and natural tennis brain. Twenty grand slams later, the Serbian star is still in touch with Nikola Pilic, and regards him as one of his mentors. Nikola Pilic speaks to Petra Zivic.

PHOTO: Novak Djokovic in 2008, the year he won his first tennis major (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q7sbc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvbd9m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709y4lr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q7x2h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k49)
The freediver who found salvation underwater

Alenka Artnik grew up in Slovenia in a loving but complicated family. Her father was an alcoholic, and her brother was addicted to drugs. Years of pain and grief meant that Alenka found herself feeling lost and alone. But then, just when she most needed it, when she'd thought about taking her own life – she found freediving and sanctuary in an underwater world. Drawing on her own personal, physical and mental strength, she is now a world champion freediver. Last year she broke world records by diving to an astonishing 122 metres.

The Outer Hebrides are made up of more than 100 islands off the coast of Scotland. Three of them are called the Shiant Isles – they are tiny, uninhabited, very wild and very beautiful. They used to belong to a man called Adam Nicolson. He inherited them from his father when he was 21. Rather an unusual inheritance, but Adam says they've taught him a lot about life and love. This interview was first broadcast 11th September 2019.

Adam wrote a book about the islands called Sea Room: An Island Life.

If you are affected by issues raised in this programme there is confidential support on the BBC Action line website, or at Befrienders.org

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen

(Photo: Alenka Artnik. Credit: DaanVerhoeven)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q80tm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvbmsw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709yd30)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q84kr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpyr3wc)
Ukraine crisis: Blinken goes to Berlin

Foreign ministers from key European countries are having talks in Berlin with the US Secretary of State, Antony Blinken, to coordinate Western strategy over a potential invasion threat to Ukraine.

Also in the programme: new coral reef discovered; Ingrid Betancourt on presidential bid.

(Picture: German Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs Annalena Baerbock welcomes US Secretary of State Antony Blinken prior to their meeting at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Berlin, Germany, 20 January 2022. Credit: EPA/KAY NIETFELD / POOL)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q889w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709yml8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49m73kvg2n)
Ukraine tension mounts

As signs of a possible Russian invasion of Ukraine mount we gauge the mood in the country. Orysia Lutsevych heads the Ukraine Forum in the Russia and Eurasia programme at Chatham House, and brings us her perspective. And we speak with Oleg Chernyak, who works for a software development company CHI Software, based in Kharkiv, but with offices around the country. Also in the programme, last weekend's underwater volcano eruption in Tonga caused a devastating oil spill thousands of miles to the east in Peru. Simeon Tegel is a freelance reporter based in Lima, and discusses the implications. Plus, the trend of "lying flat" is catching on among young Chinese who are opting out of competitive careers. The BBC's Ed Butler reports on the phenomenon.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Nisha Patel, Tom Kavanagh and Philippa Goodrich.

(Picture: Ukrainian soldiers on a training exercise. Picture credit: EPA.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q8d20)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyvltqd0g)
New report says Pope Benedict failed to act over abuse

A report commissioned by the Catholic Church has found that former Pope Benedict XVI failed to act over four child abuse cases when he was archbishop of Munich. Pope Benedict denies wrongdoing. We'll explain the key findings in the report.

Some aid has arrived in Tonga after a runway was cleared of ash following Saturday’s volcanic eruption. We hear from a woman In Australia who has managed to make contact with her husband in Tonga after telephone lines were partially restored.

We’ll bring together two Ukrainians to reflect the conversations about the potential invasion threat to their country.

We’ll have the latest on Covid-19 and will answer your questions about the virus with the help of Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland.

(Photo: Pope Benedict XVI blesses the faithful for the last time from the balcony of his summer residence in Castel Gandolfo February 28, 2013. Credit:Tony Gentile/File Photo/Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q8ht4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyvltqhrl)
Russia-Ukraine crisis: Mood in Kyiv

The US President Joe Biden has said he thinks his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin will "move in" on Ukraine but does not want "full-blown war". So what
do people in Ukraine think of a threat coming from Russia? We've spoken to two people in the capital Kyiv.

A report commissioned by the Catholic Church has found that former Pope Benedict XVI failed to act over four child abuse cases when he was archbishop of Munich. Pope Benedict denies wrongdoing. We'll explain the key findings in the report.

Some aid has arrived in Tonga after a runway was cleared of ash following Saturday’s volcanic eruption. We hear from a woman In Australia who has managed to make contact with her husband in Tonga after telephone lines were partially restored.

We'll go to Ghana where many people are feared dead following a huge explosion in Western Region.

(Photo: Service members of the Ukrainian Armed Forces gather near BM-21 "Grad" multiple rocket launchers during tactical military exercises at a shooting range in the Kherson region, Ukraine, January 19, 2022. Credit: Ukrainian Defence Ministry/Handout via REUTERS )


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q8mk8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q8r9d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvcc8n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709z3ks)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nrtvpcm3r)
2022/01/20 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q8w1j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709z79x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4x)
Tonga eruption – how it happened

The effects of the Tonga eruption could be felt around the world, many heard the boom of a sonic shock, and tsunami waves travelled far and wide. Volcanologist Shane Cronin from the University of Auckland in New Zealand is one of only a handful of people to have landed on the tiny islands above the volcano where the eruption took place. Those islands have now sunk beneath the waves but Shane tells us what he found when he went there and how his findings could inform what happens next.

Stephan Grilli from the School of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island joins us from Toulon in France where he felt the effects of the shockwave and Tsunami. He says the force of the shockwave drove those waves worldwide.

The oceans have continued to warm, producing continuous record temperature rises for several years now. That’s the finding of Michael Mann of the University of Pennsylvania and author of The New Climate Wars. He says warming occurred last year despite the presence of global weather patterns which would usually have a cooling effect.

The long-term effects of covid-19 on health are a cause of growing concern even though in many places the virus itself now appears to be taking on a milder form. Yale University neuroscientist Serena Spudich is particularly concerned with covid’s impact on the brain. She says while the SARS- CoV-2 virus might not be found in brain cells themselves there are neurological impacts.


(Image: Tonga Geological Services/via Reuters)


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q8zsn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpyrz38)
US warns that Russian threats to Ukraine risk reviving Cold War divisions

European foreign ministers spoke about Ukraine earlier today in Berlin. Moscow has repeatedly denied it's planning to invade.

Also on the programme: in western Ghana there's been a huge explosion close to the town of Bogoso. There are fears that many people may have lost their lives when a truck carrying explosives used in mining collided with a motorcycle. And we hear from 19 year old Zara Rutherford, who has become the youngest woman to fly solo around the world.

(Picture: A Ukrainian military officer on patrol at a checkpoint at the border in eastern Ukraine Credit: Getty Images)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q93js)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2z77pf2r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sw1hptgqd)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709zgt5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs6gy357cc)
Ukraine tension mounts

As signs of a possible Russian invasion of Ukraine mount we gauge the mood in the country. Orysia Lutsevych heads the Ukraine Forum in the Russia and Eurasia programme at Chatham House, and brings us her perspective. And we speak with Oleg Chernyak, who works for a software development company CHI Software, based in Kharkiv, but with offices around the country. Also in the programme, last weekend's underwater volcano eruption in Tonga caused a devastating oil spill thousands of miles to the east in Peru. Simeon Tegel is a freelance reporter based in Lima, and discusses the implications. Plus, the trend of "lying flat" is catching on among young Chinese who are opting out of competitive careers. The BBC's Ed Butler reports on the phenomenon.

(Picture: Ukrainian soldiers on a training exercise. Picture credit: EPA.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q978x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709zlk9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 21 JANUARY 2022

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q9c11)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q9gs5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqsn0m6v2w)
Massive blast in Ghana

We start the programme in Ghana where there's been a huge explosion close to the town of Bogoso. Afua Adom from Metro TV gives us insight on the accident from Accra. There's been a dramatic consequence of last week's submarine volcanic eruption and resulting tsunami in Tonga. The government of Peru says it's now grappling with the country's worst ecological disaster in years - because the tsunami prompted an oil spill at a refinery on the coast at Ventanilla. Simeon Tegel, a freelance reporter based in Lima speaks with us. What's it like for a business operating in the midst of one of the world's geo-political hot spots? We speak with Oleg Chernyak who works for a software development company, CHI Software, near the eastern border with Russia. Rising food and fuel prices are making daily life tougher for the people of Sri Lanka. Anbarasan Ethirajan reports from Columbo. It has been one of the success stories of the pandemic but is the show over for Netflix. It has just released its results for the fourth quarter and its missed its subscriber targets – we speak with Liz Duff from Total Media. Throughout the programme we’re joined by Andres Franzetti - Chief Executive Officer at Risk Cooperative and Dimuthu Attanayake - a Journalist and Researcher (big data & policy) from Sri Lanka.

(Photo: Damage after an explosion in Bogoso Credit: Ernest Lartey)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q9lj9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvd6hk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt709zysp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1v08)
Africa Cup of Nations: Into the knockouts

The Comoros captain Najim Abdou reflects on an historic moment for the country. Burkina Faso midfielder Adama Guira looks ahead to the second round of the Africa Cup of Nations. The former Ghana international Laryea Kingston discussed his country's shock exit. And we say goodbye to the defending champions Algeria.

Picture on website: Comoros' players celebrate after scoring against Ghana (DANIEL BELOUMOU OLOMO/AFP via Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q9q8f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q9v0k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvdfzt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b068y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct38kk)
Thai Buddhism: Leaving the monkhood

In the internet age, the traditional way Thailand’s monks reach out to young followers is under threat. With nearly three quarters of Thailand’s population on Facebook, a move by two monks to broadcast their teachings live has created controversy, and exposed a growing schism within the religion. It ultimately leads one of the men to turn his back on the temple.

Thai reporter Chaiyot Yongcharoenchai hears from 30-year-old monk Phra Maha Paivan Worawono, from Bangkok who landed himself in trouble after he appeared in his sermons to laugh and joke, as he poked fun at current affairs and politics.

The Buddhist authorities did not find the sessions amusing after more than 200,000 people had logged on to watch and lead to an investigation by the National Office for Buddhism.

As more monks turn to social media in a bid to revolutionise how the Dharrma is taught, is the resignation of Thailand’s most popular internet monk a sign that traditional Buddhism must modernise, or face becoming irrelevant to the country’s young population?

(Photo: Thai monk Sompong. Credit: Thai News Pics)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8q9yrp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4r0sf)
Tonga: the first shipload of aid has arrived following Saturday's huge volcanic eruption

The New Zealand navy has arrived in Tonga to provide water and other much needed help following the volcanic eruption - we'll speak to a senior officer from the New Zealand defence force to find out more.

At least seventeen people have died in Ghana after a huge explosion near a mining town in the west of the country.

We'll hear from the youngest woman to fly solo around the world - after the teenager completed her extraordinary journey.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qb2ht)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4r4jk)
Tonga: two New Zealand navy ships arrive with emergency aid

The first ships have arrived to bring aid to Tonga, following Saturday's huge volcanic eruption, which scientists say may have been the loudest event on Earth in more than a century.

At least seventeen people are known to have died in Ghana in a huge explosion that flattened most of a village.

And what can be achieved by a meeting between the top diplomats of Russia and the US today as Sergei Lavrov and Anthony Blinken meet to discuss Ukraine.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qb67y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv330j4r88p)
Tonga: New Zealand brings water desalination plant

Help has arrived for the Islands of Tonga in the form of two New Zealand navy ships which have landed with food and drinking water - we'll hear from the military officer coordinating the aid and from a disabled man who was caught up in the tsunami and forced to swim more than 24 hours.

Britain's foreign secretary has warned Russia of a terrible loss of life if it invades Ukraine - we'll hear the Russian perspective on what is going on there.

And scientists say a crop found only in Ethiopia - called the false banana - could feed millions of people and boost food supplies as the climate warms.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qbb02)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2f)
Damian Collins: Can Boris Johnson be trusted?

Stephen Sackur interviews British Conservative MP Damian Collins, who has been working on online regulation. After the stream of revelations about lockdown socialising in Downing Street, he and his party colleagues must decide whether they want Boris Johnson to continue as party leader. Is the Prime Minister damaged beyond repair?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b0p8g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j1f)
Why hair matters

To some it may sound absurd to consider hairstyles a workplace issue, but for millions of men and women with African and Afro-Caribbean hair, it is just that. For decades, some hairstyles have been discouraged at work. But things are finally starting to change. In 2021 the US Airforce changed its hair code to be more inclusive. We explore the historic racism behind hair-based discrimination and hear from the women who have united to change attitudes and laws. We speak to businesswomen, historians and those in the arts – from the UK, the US and East Africa – to find out what hair has to do with it all anyway.

Presenter: Vivienne Nunis
Producer: Sarah Treanor

This is a repeat of a programme first broadcast on 19 Feb 2021

(Image credit: Getty)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzs)
A Cold War love affair

The East German authorities built the Berlin Wall in 1961 to keep their people in. Thousands had been streaming westwards. But a few people went the other way. Frauke Naumann was one of them. She grew up in West Germany but fell love with her cousin who lived on the other side of the border. So, in 1986, at the age of 22 she left home to join him. Frauke tells Tim Mansel about the joys and the miseries of making a new life in a foreign country under the watchful eye of the secret police.

PHOTO: The Brandenburg Gate in the 1980s with the Berlin Wall passing in front (BBC)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qbfr6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj5)
The largest gaming deal in history

Microsoft said it plans to buy mega games company Activision Blizzard in deal worth almost $70bn. How will this deal transform the gaming industry? We hear from Louise Shorthouse, senior games analyst at Ampere Analysis. Plus, are we all eventually going to live in a virtual world? Philosopher David Chalmers explains why he believes that virtual reality will overtake the material world. And, what makes a game go viral? We hear from Wordle fan and associate professor at Texas Tech University, Nick Bowman.

(Image: the logos of Microsoft and Activision Blizzard. Credit: Getty).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b0t0l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qbkhb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htn)
The future of the BBC

The British Broadcasting Corporation is the world’s oldest and largest public service broadcaster. But as it prepares to mark its 100th birthday the organisation finds itself at a crossroads. The UK government has begun a review of the BBC’s long term funding structure with an aim of ending its dependency on television licence fees – effectively a tax on British owners of TV sets. The broadcaster's Director General Tim Davie says services and shows will have to be cut as a result of a funding gap arising from the latest licence fee deal. There are other challenges too. Young people are consuming less BBC content than their parents, preferring to rely on an array of different sources for their news and entertainment. So what should be the role of public service broadcasters in a world where information is curated by search engines and consumers gravitate towards streaming giants such as Netflix and Amazon Prime for their entertainment?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qbp7g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvf96q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b11hv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1v08)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qbszl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g5)
India's problem with sacred cows

Uttar Pradesh has a problem with cows. Cows are considered sacred by Hindus, and since the BJP state government banned illegal slaughterhouses five years ago, small farmers have had no way of legally disposing of unwanted cows. There are now nearly a million stray cows roaming around farmland, destroying crops, and causing injury and even death, as BBC Hindi's Nitin Srivastava reports.

Brownie, Chile's 'first dog'
Chile's recently elected president, Gabriel Boric, won with the highest number of votes in Chilean history. But equally popular is his dog, Brownie. With his own social media accounts, Brownie has proclaimed himself 'the first dog of the Republic of Chile'. BBC contributor Constanza Hola tells us more about her country's most popular pet.

Avocado rustling in Kenya
Kenya's avocado sector has become so lucrative that organised criminal gangs are targetting growers. Farmers have started to hire vigilantes and even use drones to guard their trees, as Emmanuel Igunza of BBC News in Kenya discovered.

Yoga refusenik Suhail Haleem
Another chance to enjoy BBC India's Suhail Haleem's lack of flexibility when it comes to India's famous export, yoga.

AFCON: 'fouled by the pitch' and other excuses
BBC Africa's Peter Okwoche and BBC Sport's Isaac Fanin share their experiences of covering the Africa Cup of Nations tournament in Cameroon, and taking on Yaoundé’s Greenfield Football Academy Under 10s (and losing!).

Remembering Anita Mui
There’s nostalgia in Hong Kong for singing star Anita Mui, who died in 2003, but who’s remembered by many and celebrated in a new film, Anita. Zhijie Shao has been reporting for BBC Chinese on her enduring fame.

(Photo: A cow resting in Varanasi. Credit: Enzo Tomasiello/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qbxqq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvfjpz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b1903)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qc1gv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpyv0sg)
Ukraine tension: Urgent talks as invasion fears grow

The two top diplomats from the US and Russia have concluded brief negotiations in Geneva. The talks were designed to defuse the threat of war in Ukraine. Russia's foreign minister Sergei Lavrov said the talks with the US Secretary of State Antony Blinken were constructive.

Also in the programme: We hear an extraordinary story of survival from Tonga after the volcanic eruption last Saturday. And scientists say the plant enset, which is a staple in Ethiopia, could be a new superfood and a lifesaver in the face of climate change.

(Photo: U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken greets Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov before their meeting, in Geneva, Switzerland. Russian Foreign Ministry/Handout via Reuters)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qc56z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b1jhc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y474wxrwfpw)
TotalEnergies and Chevron leave Myanmar

French and American energy giants TotalEnergies and Chevron are pulling out of Myanmar. They've cited deteriorating human rights in the wake of last year's coup in the country. We find out more from Gareth Leather, who is on the emerging markets team at Capital Economics. Also in the programme, an investment of more than 400 million dollars by the mining firm Rio Tinto on a potential lithium venture in Serbia appears to have come to nothing. The BBC's Guy Delaunay explains why. After the British culture secretary warned that the way the BBC is funded may be coming to an end in the next few years, the BBC's Rob Young explores the way public service broadcasters are funded around the world. Plus, the singer Adele has been forced to cancel a series of gigs, or residency, in Las Vegas at the last minute. Mark Mulligan of entertainment analysis company MIDiA Research tells us about the attraction to artists of the residency format.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Will Bain, Sara Parry and Philippa Goodrich.

(Picture: A TotalEnergies logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qc8z3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyvltt8xk)
Your questions on Ukraine

The US and Russia have been holding talks to try to calm tensions around Ukraine's border. The top diplomats from each country met for ninety minutes in Switzerland. We'll reflect the conversation amongst Ukrainians and bring together BBC correspondents covering the story to answer your questions about what is happening and the possible implications.

We'll remember the legendary Brazilian singer Elza Soares, who has died at the age of 91. We'll hear what she meant to Brazilians.

We'll talk through the latest stories on the coronavirus pandemic with one of our regular experts, Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University.

Picture: US Secretary of State Antony Blinken stands with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov before their meeting, in Geneva, Switzerland (Alex Brandon/Pool via Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qcdq7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyvlttdnp)
Remembering Elza Soares

The legendary Brazilian singer, Elza Soares, has died at the age of 91. We hear how Brazilians are reflecting on her life and her impact on their nation.

The US and Russia have been holding talks to try to calm tensions around Ukraine's border. The top diplomats from each country met for ninety minutes in Switzerland. We'll reflect the conversation amongst Ukrainians and bring together BBC correspondents covering the story to answer your questions about what is happening and the possible implications.

We'll talk through the latest stories on the coronavirus pandemic with one of our regular experts, Professor Marc Mendelson from the University of Cape Town.

Picture: Brazilian singer Elza Soares performs with Mocidade samba school during the second night of the Carnival parade in Rio de Janeiro in 2020 (Reuters / Sergio Moraes/File Photo)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qcjgc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qcn6h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxxdyvg85r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b20gw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nrtvpgj0v)
2022/01/21 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qcrym)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b2470)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prn)
Does dark matter still matter?

Scientists have been searching for dark matter for decades, and think there’s six times more of it in the universe than the stuff we can actually see, like stars and planets. But they still don’t know what it is. So how can we be sure dark matter really exists? And why does it matter, anyway?

Back in 2018, armed with a boiler suit, hard hat and ear defenders, Marnie Chesterton travelled over a kilometre underground into a hot and sweaty mine to see how scientists are valiantly trying to catch some elusive particles – in the hope of settling things once and for all.

Several years on we return to the problem, tackling a few more CrowdScience listeners’ questions about dark matter, and hearing whether we’re any closer to uncovering its mysteries. We’re joined in our quest by Dr Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, physicist and author of The Disordered Cosmos: A Journey into Dark Matter, Spacetime, and Dreams Deferred.


With Professor Malcolm Fairbairn, Dr Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, Dr Chamkaur Ghag and Professor Katherine Freese.


Presented by Marnie Chesterton


Produced by Graihagh Jackson and Cathy Edwards


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qcwpr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5kbpyvw0c)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qd0fw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2z77s9zv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sw1hpxcmh)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b2cq8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrd16hktv5)
TotalEnergies and Chevron leave Myanmar

French and American energy giants TotalEnergies and Chevron are pulling out of Myanmar. They've cited deteriorating human rights in the wake of last year's coup in the country. We find out more from Gareth Leather, who is on the emerging markets team at Capital Economics. Also in the programme, an investment of more than 400 million dollars by the mining firm Rio Tinto on a potential lithium venture in Serbia appears to have come to nothing. The BBC's Guy Delaunay explains why. After the British culture secretary warned that the way the BBC is funded may be coming to an end in the next few years, the BBC's Rob Young explores the way public service broadcasters are funded around the world. Plus, the singer Adele has been forced to cancel a series of gigs, or residency, in Las Vegas at the last minute. Mark Mulligan of entertainment analysis company MIDiA Research tells us about the attraction to artists of the residency format.

(Picture: A TotalEnergies logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzs8qd460)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (p0490wq8)
Meat Loaf: A rule-breaking rock legend

In an interview recorded in 2016, Stephen Sackur speaks to Meat Loaf, a rock'n'roll legend who broke the rules of the music business. He was never cool, never a pin-up, but his songs and performances have always been much larger than life. Meat Loaf shot to fame four decades ago with Bat out of Hell, an album which became one of the biggest sellers of all time. Since then his career - in music and acting - has been a crazy mix of highs and lows. How close did he get to self-destruction?

(Photo: Musician and actor Meat Loaf. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkt70b2hgd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1v08)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gyk)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gyk)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gyk)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172xzksvr09lbt)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzksvr09q2y)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzksvr0b2bb)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzksvr0bfkq)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzksvr0bk9v)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzksvr0bst3)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzksvr0cn10)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172xzksvr0d40j)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172xzksvr0dh7x)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzksvr0dm01)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzksvr0dz7f)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzksvr0fbgt)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzksvr0fg6y)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzksvr0fkz2)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzksvr0fpq6)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzksvr0gnp7)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzksvr0h0xm)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzksvr0h4nr)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172xzkt709m3p1)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkt709m7f5)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkt709mc59)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkt709mgxf)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172xzkt709mlnk)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzkt709n2n2)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172xzkt709n6d6)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172xzkt709nb4b)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkt709nfwg)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkt709npcq)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkt709nxvz)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkt709pdvh)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkt709pjlm)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkt709ps2w)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkt709pwv0)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkt709q82d)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkt709qhkn)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzkt709qzk5)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkt709r399)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkt709rbsk)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkt709rl8t)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkt709rts2)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzkt709s9rl)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzkt709sfhq)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzkt709snzz)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkt709ssr3)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkt709t4zh)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkt709tdgr)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkt709twg8)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172xzkt709v06d)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkt709v7pn)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkt709vh5x)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkt709vqp5)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkt709w6np)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzkt709wbdt)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkt709wkx2)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkt709wpn6)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkt709x1wl)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkt709x9cv)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkt709xscc)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzkt709xx3h)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkt709y4lr)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzkt709yd30)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzkt709yml8)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkt709z3ks)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzkt709z79x)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzkt709zgt5)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkt709zlk9)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkt709zysp)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkt70b068y)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzkt70b0p8g)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172xzkt70b0t0l)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkt70b11hv)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzkt70b1903)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzkt70b1jhc)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzkt70b20gw)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172xzkt70b2470)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172xzkt70b2cq8)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkt70b2hgd)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dm3b9)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dm72f)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dmbtk)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dmgkp)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dml9t)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dmq1y)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dmtt2)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dmyk6)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dn29b)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dn61g)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dn9sl)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dnfjq)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dnk8v)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dnp0z)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dnss3)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dp8rm)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dpdhr)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dpj7w)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dpn00)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dprr4)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172xzjzf0dpwh8)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dq07d)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dq3zj)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dq7qn)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dqcgs)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dqh6x)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dqlz1)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dqqq5)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dqvg9)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dqz6f)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dr2yk)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dr6pp)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0drbft)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0drg5y)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0drky2)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0drpp6)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0drtfb)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dry5g)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0ds9dv)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dsf4z)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dsjx3)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dsnn7)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172xzjzf0dssdc)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pxrdn)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pxw4s)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pxzwx)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172xzjzs8py3n1)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172xzjzs8py7d5)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pyc49)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pygwf)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pylmk)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pyqcp)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pyv3t)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pyyvy)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pz2m2)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pz6c6)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pzb3b)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pzfvg)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pzkll)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pzpbq)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pzt2v)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172xzjzs8pzxtz)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172xzjzs8q01l3)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172xzjzs8q05b7)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172xzjzs8q092c)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172xzjzs8q0dth)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjzs8q0jkm)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q0n9r)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q0s1w)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q0wt0)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q10k4)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q1498)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q181d)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q1csj)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q1hjn)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q1m8s)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q1r0x)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q1vs1)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q1zj5)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q2389)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q270f)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q2brk)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q2ghp)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q2l7t)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q2pzy)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q2tr2)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q2yh6)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q327b)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q35zg)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q39ql)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjzs8q3fgq)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q3k6v)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q3nyz)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q3sq3)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q3xg7)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q416c)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q44yh)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q48pm)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q4dfr)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q4j5w)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q4my0)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q4rp4)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q4wf8)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q505d)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q53xj)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q57nn)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q5cds)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q5h4x)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q5lx1)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q5qn5)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q5vd9)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q5z4f)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q62wk)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q66mp)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjzs8q6bct)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q6g3y)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q6kw2)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q6pm6)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q6tcb)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q6y3g)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q71vl)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q75lq)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q79bv)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q7f2z)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q7jv3)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q7nl7)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q7sbc)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q7x2h)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q80tm)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q84kr)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q889w)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q8d20)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q8ht4)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q8mk8)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q8r9d)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q8w1j)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q8zsn)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q93js)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjzs8q978x)

BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8q9c11)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8q9gs5)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8q9lj9)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8q9q8f)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8q9v0k)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8q9yrp)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qb2ht)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qb67y)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qbb02)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qbfr6)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qbkhb)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qbp7g)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qbszl)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qbxqq)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qc1gv)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qc56z)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qc8z3)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qcdq7)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qcjgc)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qcn6h)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qcrym)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qcwpr)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qd0fw)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjzs8qd460)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d6x)

BBC OS Conversations 02:06 SUN (w3ct2d6x)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxyvltfp95)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxyvltft19)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxyvltjl68)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172xxxyvltjpyd)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172xxxyvltmh3c)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172xxxyvltmlvh)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172xxxyvltqd0g)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxxyvltqhrl)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172xxxyvltt8xk)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxyvlttdnp)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j5y)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jgz)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jpr)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1jbg)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j1f)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqsn0ly4cl)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqsn0m118p)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqsn0m3y5s)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqsn0m6v2w)

Business Weekly 04:06 SUN (w3ct2dhy)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dhy)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1prm)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1prm)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1prn)

Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct051p)

Deeply Human 23:06 SUN (w3ct051p)

Deeply Human 03:06 MON (w3ct051p)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lt8)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lt8)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lt8)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct30j0)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct30j1)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct30j1)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct30j1)

From Our Own Correspondent 02:06 SAT (w3ct1mw1)

From Our Own Correspondent 05:06 SUN (w3ct1mw1)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mw1)

From Our Own Correspondent 00:06 MON (w3ct1mw1)

Global Questions 08:32 SAT (w3ct3flj)

Global Questions 22:32 SAT (w3ct3flj)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n6y)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n6y)

HARDtalk 23:06 MON (w3ct1n6y)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1ncg)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1ncg)

HARDtalk 23:06 WED (w3ct1ncg)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n2f)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n2f)

HARDtalk 23:06 FRI (p0490wq8)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nwh)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nwh)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nwh)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct38kj)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct38kj)

Heart and Soul 00:32 MON (w3ct38kj)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct38kk)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tf6)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tf6)

In the Studio 23:32 TUE (w3ct1tf6)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dl6)

More or Less 23:50 SUN (w3ct2dl6)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dl6)

Music Life 23:06 SAT (w3ct1hd2)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hd2)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv330j4cf51)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv330j4cjx5)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172xv330j4cnn9)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172xv330j4gb24)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172xv330j4gft8)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172xv330j4gkkd)

Newsday 05:06 WED (w172xv330j4k6z7)

Newsday 06:06 WED (w172xv330j4kbqc)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172xv330j4kggh)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172xv330j4n3wb)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172xv330j4n7mg)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172xv330j4nccl)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172xv330j4r0sf)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172xv330j4r4jk)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172xv330j4r88p)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172xv5jzfn4nbl)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172xv5jzfn5m9m)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172xv5jzfn7k7p)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172xv5jzfn8j6q)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172xv5kbpygf52)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172xv5kbpyh8cz)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172xv5kbpykb25)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172xv5kbpyl592)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172xv5kbpyn6z8)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172xv5kbpyp265)

Newshour 14:06 THU (w172xv5kbpyr3wc)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172xv5kbpyrz38)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172xv5kbpyv0sg)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172xv5kbpyvw0c)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1ky3)

Outlook 22:32 SUN (w3ct1ky3)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jv8)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct1jv8)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3ct1jv8)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3ct1jxj)

Outlook 18:06 TUE (w3ct1jxj)

Outlook 03:06 WED (w3ct1jxj)

Outlook 12:06 WED (w3ct1jzs)

Outlook 18:06 WED (w3ct1jzs)

Outlook 03:06 THU (w3ct1jzs)

Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k49)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3ct1k49)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k49)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l2m)

Over to You 01:50 SUN (w3ct1l2m)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l2m)

People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pm2)

People Fixing The World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pm2)

People Fixing The World 23:06 TUE (w3ct1pm2)

Pick of the World 09:32 SAT (w3ct386d)

Pick of the World 02:32 SUN (w3ct386d)

Pick of the World 23:32 SUN (w3ct386d)

Pick of the World 03:32 MON (w3ct386d)

Ros Atkins on ... 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dpg)

Science In Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l4x)

Science In Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l4x)

Science In Action 13:32 FRI (w3ct1l4x)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nrtvp2xdg)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172y0nrtvp5t9k)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172y0nrtvp8q6n)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172y0nrtvpcm3r)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172y0nrtvpgj0v)

Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct1l9d)

Sporting Witness 02:50 SUN (w3ct1l9d)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3ct1l9f)

Sporting Witness 00:50 FRI (w3ct1l9f)

Sports News 22:20 SAT (w172y0svp7d73xr)

Sports News 22:20 SUN (w172y0svp7db0tv)

Sports News 22:20 MON (w172y0sw1hpjs03)

Sports News 22:20 TUE (w172y0sw1hpmnx6)

Sports News 22:20 WED (w172y0sw1hpqkt9)

Sports News 22:20 THU (w172y0sw1hptgqd)

Sports News 22:20 FRI (w172y0sw1hpxcmh)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0qdc1l3qt7)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tp3yzwfhx)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0tp3yzzkx8)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lcn)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1nj5)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3ct1nj5)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rv4)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3ct1rv4)

The Arts Hour 00:06 WED (w3ct1rv4)

The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2drq)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2drq)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2drq)

The Coming Storm 04:32 WED (w3ct302v)

The Coming Storm 11:32 WED (w3ct302v)

The Coming Storm 23:32 WED (w3ct302v)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct3030)

The Compass 02:32 WED (w3ct3031)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct3031)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct3031)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p9q)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p9q)

The Conversation 23:32 MON (w3ct1p9q)

The Cultural Frontline 05:06 SAT (w3ct1ptt)

The Cultural Frontline 01:06 SUN (w3ct1ptt)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1ptt)

The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2g92)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct2g92)

The Documentary 02:32 TUE (w3ct2z29)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct2z29)

The Documentary 20:06 TUE (w3ct2z29)

The Documentary 10:06 WED (w3ct2g92)

The Documentary 00:06 THU (w3ct2g92)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20g4)

The Fifth Floor 12:06 FRI (w3ct20g5)

The Fifth Floor 18:06 FRI (w3ct20g5)

The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rgv)

The Food Chain 04:32 THU (w3ct1rgw)

The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3ct1rgw)

The Food Chain 23:32 THU (w3ct1rgw)

The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rmc)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3ct1rmd)

The Forum 00:06 FRI (w3ct1rmd)

The History Hour 00:06 TUE (w3ct1z83)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z36)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct1z36)

The Inquiry 23:06 THU (w3ct1z36)

The Newsroom 11:06 SAT (w172xyxx1pjr1hz)

The Newsroom 18:06 SAT (w172xyxx1pjrwqw)

The Newsroom 22:06 SAT (w172xyx2lyy3293)

The Newsroom 11:06 SUN (w172xyxx1pjtyf2)

The Newsroom 19:06 SUN (w172xyxx1pjvxd3)

The Newsroom 22:06 SUN (w172xyx2lyy5z66)

The Newsroom 02:06 MON (w172xyxxdyv0lw5)

The Newsroom 04:06 MON (w172xyxxdyv0vcf)

The Newsroom 11:06 MON (w172xyxxdyv1plb)

The Newsroom 13:06 MON (w172xyxxdyv1y2l)

The Newsroom 19:06 MON (w172xyxxdyv2nkc)

The Newsroom 22:06 MON (w172xyx2z77dqcg)

The Newsroom 02:06 TUE (w172xyxxdyv3hs8)

The Newsroom 04:06 TUE (w172xyxxdyv3r8j)

The Newsroom 11:06 TUE (w172xyxxdyv4lhf)

The Newsroom 13:06 TUE (w172xyxxdyv4tzp)

The Newsroom 19:06 TUE (w172xyxxdyv5kgg)

The Newsroom 22:06 TUE (w172xyx2z77hm8k)

The Newsroom 02:06 WED (w172xyxxdyv6dpc)

The Newsroom 04:06 WED (w172xyxxdyv6n5m)

The Newsroom 11:06 WED (w172xyxxdyv7hdj)

The Newsroom 13:06 WED (w172xyxxdyv7qws)

The Newsroom 19:06 WED (w172xyxxdyv8gck)

The Newsroom 22:06 WED (w172xyx2z77lj5n)

The Newsroom 02:06 THU (w172xyxxdyv99lg)

The Newsroom 04:06 THU (w172xyxxdyv9k2q)

The Newsroom 11:06 THU (w172xyxxdyvbd9m)

The Newsroom 13:06 THU (w172xyxxdyvbmsw)

The Newsroom 19:06 THU (w172xyxxdyvcc8n)

The Newsroom 22:06 THU (w172xyx2z77pf2r)

The Newsroom 02:06 FRI (w172xyxxdyvd6hk)

The Newsroom 04:06 FRI (w172xyxxdyvdfzt)

The Newsroom 11:06 FRI (w172xyxxdyvf96q)

The Newsroom 13:06 FRI (w172xyxxdyvfjpz)

The Newsroom 19:06 FRI (w172xyxxdyvg85r)

The Newsroom 22:06 FRI (w172xyx2z77s9zv)

The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3ct1htm)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1htm)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3ct1htn)

The Science Hour 00:06 SUN (w3ct1ywd)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172xytm8s3z725)

Weekend 07:06 SAT (w172xytm8s3zbt9)

Weekend 08:06 SAT (w172xytm8s3zgkf)

Weekend 06:06 SUN (w172xytm8s423z8)

Weekend 07:06 SUN (w172xytm8s427qd)

Weekend 08:06 SUN (w172xytm8s42cgj)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wzr)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3ct1x21)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct1x21)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3ct1x21)

Witness History 03:50 TUE (w3ct1x21)

Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3ct1x6k)

Witness History 12:50 TUE (w3ct1x6k)

Witness History 18:50 TUE (w3ct1x6k)

Witness History 03:50 WED (w3ct1x6k)

Witness History 08:50 WED (w3ct1x8t)

Witness History 12:50 WED (w3ct1x8t)

Witness History 18:50 WED (w3ct1x8t)

Witness History 03:50 THU (w3ct1x8t)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3ct1x49)

Witness History 12:50 THU (w3ct1x49)

Witness History 18:50 THU (w3ct1x49)

Witness History 03:50 FRI (w3ct1x49)

Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3ct1wzs)

Witness History 12:50 FRI (w3ct1wzs)

Witness History 18:50 FRI (w3ct1wzs)

WorklifeIndia 01:32 SAT (w3ct2f4c)

WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f4c)

WorklifeIndia 05:32 SUN (w3ct2f4c)

World Business Report 01:06 SAT (w172xzlm9glzv7p)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzlmnqx9hb1)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y48d20njsqf)

World Business Report 22:32 MON (w172ycrsrksjwff)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172y4bvd6gplxd)

World Business Report 22:32 TUE (w172ycsm69db2rt)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172y4d2k9ctggf)

World Business Report 22:32 WED (w172yct0xnprmwk)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172y49m73kvg2n)

World Business Report 22:32 THU (w172ycs6gy357cc)

World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172y474wxrwfpw)

World Business Report 22:32 FRI (w172ycrd16hktv5)

World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1v08)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1v08)

World Football 23:32 FRI (w3ct1v08)

World Questions 19:06 SAT (w3ct1wfq)

World Questions 12:06 SUN (w3ct1wfq)

World of Wisdom 05:32 SAT (w3ct2zwd)

World of Wisdom 18:32 SAT (w3ct2zwd)

World of Wisdom 01:32 SUN (w3ct2zwd)

World of Wisdom 10:32 MON (w3ct2zwd)