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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 08 JANUARY 2022

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2tyqg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htl)
The Beijing Winter Olympics: High stakes for China

The Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics will begin in 4 weeks’ time with more than 2,000 athletes from across the globe expected to take part. Officials have set up a bubble to keep arriving athletes and officials separate from the general population, all part of attempts to prevent coronavirus infections. Some health officials fear the increased transmissibility of the Omicron variant will pose a severe challenge to organisers and athletes can expect to face tougher restrictions compared to last year's summer Olympics in Tokyo. The games are also the subject of a diplomatic boycott by the United States and some of its allies. The White House says it wants to send a clear message that it disapproves of China's human rights record, including its treatment of Uighur Muslims and a crackdown on dissents in Hong Kong. China described the move as an attempt to politicise sport. So what will success look like for the Beijing Olympics? How effective will the Covid protocols be? And how much of an impact will the diplomatic boycott have on the event’s credibility?

Paul Henley is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2v2gl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlly696pmv)
US jobs report paints mixed picture

The US economy added just 199,000 jobs in December but unemployment also fell to 3.9%. The BBC's Michelle Fleury in New York tells us that the figures fell short of what economists had forecasted, and Wall Street analyst Chris Low from FHN Financial tells us how the markets have reacted. Plus, are hydrogen-powered flying cars poised to revolutionise the way we travel, and drastically reduce vehicle emissions? We speak to an entrepreneur in the field at the CES 2022 tech fair in Las Vegas. And, why Africa is so important when it comes to genetic research which is helping to find cures for rare diseases.

(Picture: A 'now hiring' sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpjfqz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f4b)
How to plan for your retirement

For many, a retirement plan is something that usually ranks far down the list of more urgent priorities - but the expectations we have for our later years may not completely match up with reality. For example, would you have a fixed income that matches the pace of inflation when you retire?

Recent studies have pointed out that most people are not aware of how much they really need to save for their silver years. Nearly 80% of urban Indians are not ready for retirement, according to one such study.

So, what should you be doing to achieve that dream life after retirement? And what if you want to retire early and pursue an alternative career?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the skills, the saving plans, and the mindset you should have as you plan for your retirement.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Surya Bhatia, financial advisor; Neha Bagaria, founder and CEO, JobsForHer; Aditi Sholapurkar, co-founder, SALT; Dinesh Mohan, model


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2v66q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw0)
China's online army of commenters

Pascale Harter introduces dispatches from correspondents, reporters and authors worldwide.

Plenty of journalists have had the experience of being “trolled” – attacked on social media for what they have written or said. But if they're published anything perceived as insulting to the People's Republic of China, the backlash can be particularly intense. Tessa Wong was trolled recently, but rather than simply accepting the abuse, she tried to find out why so many people had taken part in these attacks. Some of the storms of comment were not the spontaneous outbursts of outraged citizens which they might have appeared...

Even if coronavirus were to vanish altogether tomorrow, the effects of the past two years will be with us for a long time. In Peru tens of thousands of children have lost parents or carers to Covid, and many of them already faced widespread poverty even before the pandemic. As Jane Chambers explains, the death of a family breadwinner can leave children facing terrible hardship, along with the grief.

Meeting a rebel leader can be difficult at the best of times, but particularly so if that leader is in the custody of state security. General Simon Gatwich is the head of one of the factions which have been fighting in South Sudan since its independence from Sudan in 2011. Although a peace agreement has been reached, it’s considered a fragile one. General Gatwich had headed north to Khartoum, in Sudan - in search of allies and backers. Joshua Craze tried to find out what exactly he was up to there.

And Amy Guttman is served heaping portions of Danish language and history - as well as more cake than she can deal with - at a celebration in southern Jutland. This part of Denmark spent many years under the control of Prussian and then German occupiers - but local people devised a roundabout, and delicious, way of keeping their culture alive: the "coffee board", an elaborate selection of cakes, biscuits and pastries, served to fuel public meetings and political debate over the decades.

Producer: Polly Hope

(Image: Laptop showing binary computer code and the Flag of the People's Republic of China. Credit: Smederevac)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpjkh3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lcm)
Bangladesh's Test match dream

On this Stumped with Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Jim Maxwell, we look back as Bangladesh shocked the cricket world beating the reigning World Test champions, New Zealand by eight wickets in the opening Test at Mount Maunganui. Former Bangladesh player Shahriar Nafees joins us to explain the significance of the victory - their first against the Black Caps in any form of the game.

As England's struggles continue in the fourth Test at the SCG, we discuss the current coaching set up, and if any changes will be made, plus we discuss a dream return to Test cricket for Usman Khawaja as he hit 137 in the fourth Test against England, and we debate what the future holds for India bowler Shardul Thakur after his star performance against South Africa in the second Test.

And we go from one Ashes to another, we head to Iceland to find out about the Volcanic Ashes cricket tournament and the nation’s bid to gain international status with the ICC.

Credit: Bangladesh celebrate against New Zealand during day five of the first Test Match in the series between New Zealand and Bangladesh at Bay Oval on January 05, 2022 (Photo: Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2v9yv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g3)
The tale of the Gilgamesh Dream tablet

An ancient clay tablet looted from Iraq in 1991 was recently returned to the country. The Gilgamesh Dream Tablet is part of the Epic of Gilgamesh, one of the world’s oldest surviving works of literature. BBC Arabic’s Eli Melki trained as an archaeologist, and he explains what makes this tablet so remarkable.

The magic of mahjong
We revisit a story from BBC Chinese, about the enduring appeal of mahjong, which started as an exclusive game played at the imperial court. Suping and editor Howard Zhang share their insights.

When the Koreans came to town
It was a town in the middle of nowhere in northern Mexico. “Not even lizards came here”, say the locals. But suddenly Pesquería’s population grew, and shop and restaurant signs started being written in Korean. It started with a new car factory and the arrival of Korean workers, as BBC Mundo´s Carlos Serrano explains.

The Passengers of the Yomei Maru. Part two.
Ilia Kizirov continues the tale told in his BBC Russian podcast, about a group of nearly 800 children caught up in the Russian Civil War. In May 1918, they were sent from Saint Petersburg to 'feeding colonies' in the countryside, but they ended up on the wrong side of the front line. They fled east, and finally returned home more than two years later, after a journey on a Japanese freighter that took them around the world.

(Photo: The Gilgamesh Dream Tablet. Credit: REUTERS/Saba Kareem)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzq)
The sinking of the Wilhelm Gustloff

In January 1945, an estimated 9,400 people died when the German military transport ship, the Wilhelm Gustloff, was sunk in the Baltic by a Soviet submarine. The victims were almost all civilians trying to escape the advancing Red Army. In 2011, the late Horst Woit spoke to Neal Razzell about surviving what's thought to be the worst maritime disaster in history.

PHOTO: The Wilhelm Gustloff in 1938 (Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2vfpz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2vkg3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pts)
Music, politics and identity

Nikan Khosravi, founder of Iranian heavy metal band Confess, was arrested in 2015 for his defiant lyrics and imprisoned in the country’s notorious Evin jail - charged with blasphemy and anti-government propaganda. He later fled the country, gained political asylum in Norway and, undeterred, formed a new Iranian-Norwegian line-up, with an unflinching new album - Revenge At All Costs. Nikan talks to Anu Anand about his music and his experiences

Plus, Tamer Nafar – the Palestinian hip-hop pioneer who grew up in Israel in a city of Palestinians and Jews, and raps in Arabic, Hebrew, and English about politics, identity, women’s rights, and social justice. He tells Anu about the influence of his background and US hip hop, and his new track, The Beat Never Goes Off: recorded with 12 year-old Gaza-based rapper MC Abdul - despite being physically separated.

And LGBTQ+ rap. Whilst the community don’t always feel accepted or represented in rap due to the homophobia and misogyny sometimes present. Reporter Jaja Muhammad talks to two artists who boldly express identity in rap - agender New York rapper Angel Haze, and non-binary, Johannesburg-based electronic rapper, Mx Blouse.

And Yvonne Chaka Chaka, ‘The Princess of Africa’ - speaks to Mpho Lakaje about overcoming poverty and finding a new self through her music.

(Photo: Nikan Khosravi. Credit: Eric Bransborg)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpjxqh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwc)
Precious time in later life

It can be hard to choose how to spend our precious time. Imam Jamal Rahman, a Sufi spiritual teacher, offers a joyful perspective to Rebecca from the USA.

Presented by the BBC's Sana Safi.

Produced by Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards.


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dpf)
The storming of the US Capitol: what happened next

The US Capitol riot on January 6, 2021 has been described by President Biden as a dark day in US history. A year on since the attack, Ros Atkins examines the legal and political fall-out from it.

(Photo: The US Capitol, on 6 January, 2021, Washington, DC. Credit: Getty Images).


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2vp67)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1ywc)
CORBEVAX – A vaccine for the world?

Now being produced in India CORBEVAX is grown in yeast in a similar way to several other widely available vaccines. The technology used to make it is far simpler and much more readily available than that used to produce mRNA vaccines. In theory, CORBEVAX could be produced cheaply in large quantities and go a long way to addressing the problems of Covid19 vaccine availability globally. It was developed by a team from Baylor College of Medicine in Texas including Maria Elena Bottazzi.

Antibiotic-resistant superbugs are thought to have emerged in repose to the use of antibiotics, however, the discovery of a superbug living on the skin of hedgehogs has challenged this view. The superbug is thought to have been living with hedgehogs long before antibiotics were discovered. Jesper and Anders Larsen at the Danish State Serum Institute in Copenhagen explain.

Modifying viruses, using them to infect or kill pest organisms is an attractive proposition. However, there are concerns over what might happen when they are released, particularly over their ability to mutate and evolve says Filippa Lentzos from Kings College Department of Global Health and Social Medicine in London.

And The Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew have released the names of over 200 new species of plants and fungi discovered last year. Mycologist Tuula Niskanen and botanist Martin Cheek tell us more.

Also... “I’m bored!” We can all relate to the uncomfortable - and at times unbearable - feeling of boredom. But what is it? Why does it happen? And could this frustrating, thumb-twiddling experience actually serve some evolutionary purpose? CrowdScience listener Brian started wondering this over a particularly uninspiring bowl of washing up, and it’s ended with Marnie Chesterton going on a blessedly un-boring tour through the science and psychology of tedium. She finds out why some people are more affected than others, why boredom is the key to discovery and innovation, and how we can all start improving our lives by embracing those mind-numbing moments.

(Image: Getty Images)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2vsyc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z82)
Mozambique's Eduardo Mondlane: From professor to freedom fighter

Mozambique’s struggle to end Portuguese colonial rule and the assassination of Eduardo Mondlane, we'll hear from his daughter Nyeleti Brooke Mondlane and Dr Eric Morier-Genoud from Queen's University Belfast. Also, the brainwashing of Albanian youth under Stalinist Enver Hoxha's leadership, the fight for democracy in Taiwan and the worst ever loss of life at sea - the sinking of the German military transport ship, Wilhelm Gustloff in World War Two. All that plus, from the archives, the life and work of the celebrated French author Marcel Proust 100 years after his death.

PHOTO: Eduardo Mondlane in 1966 (Getty Images)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2vxph)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncd)
Laurence Tribe: Is the US system of government in peril?

Stephen Sackur speaks to Laurence Tribe, Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard University. It’s a year since pro-Trump protesters stormed the US Capitol and unleashed a spasm of violence which left five people dead. While hundreds of people have since been charged, none have been key associates of Donald Trump, and the former president seems to be contemplating another run for the White House while insisting, without evidence, that the 2020 election was stolen. Is partisanship on both sides eroding faith in American democracy?


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpk8yw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9n)
Women in the chocolate business

Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women who are making chocolate production both more sustainable and equitable.

Vicki Bain is a South African chocolatier from Johannesburg who blends Belgian chocolate with the finest local and fresh African ingredients. Five years ago, Vicki left her job in environmental consulting to learn the craft of artisan chocolate making in Brussels. Her company, Chocoloza, is staffed only by women and has environmental and social concerns at its core.

Treena Tecson from the Philippines is a professional chocolate taster and tree-to-bar chocolate maker. In 2017, Treena used her social media account to document the art and science of chocolate making. What started as a hobby soon turned into a small business - True Chocolate PH - and now Treena is also involved in cacao farming and post-harvest processing.

Produced by Emily Naylor and Alice Gioia

(Image: (L) Vicki Bain. (R) Treena Tecson, courtesy of Treena Tecson.)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2w1fm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6w)
Coronavirus: The vaccinators

The rapid spread of the Omicron variant of Covid-19 is leading to record infection levels in several countries, and vaccination is a key part of the fight against the pandemic. Host James Reynolds brings together vaccination workers in South Africa, Australia, the United States and the UK to share what’s it like to be part of the global effort to vaccinate.

We also hear from two people in the US and the UK who turned down a vaccination. After almost dying, they regret their decisions. “I had no idea what was going into me when they [health workers] were saving my life - the same as I don’t know what’s in the vaccine,” says Jade in the UK. “It’s silly isn’t it? You kind of overthink one thing but not the other.”

(Photo: Heide Van Reenen Credit: Heide Van Reenen)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpkdq0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386c)
Pick of the World: 8th January

BBC World Service listeners not only love what they hear, they love to engage - and that includes some high-profile members of our audience.

In this special episode, acclaimed music producer William Orbit chats about his lifelong love of the BBC World Service and BBC radio.

In conversation with our digital editor, Anna Doble, he reveals what got his attention in the first place and which shows he most enjoyed over the last 12 months.

He also reveals how he made contact with a fellow listener, who wants to work in the music industry, after hearing an interview about long Covid on BBC OS.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2l)
BBC World Service: The highs and lows of 2021

Listeners tell us what they thought of the coverage of the funeral of Desmond Tutu – why, a listener asks, did one of Newsroom’s presenters talk over South Africa’s president? Plus, your highs and lows of the BBC World Service in 2021. And, a fond farewell to Newsday's longest serving presenter Lawrence Pollard!

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2w55r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0qczs8bl6d)
Hero Ice Hockey fan on saving the life of the Vancouver Canucks’ Brian Hamilton

Ice Hockey fan Nadia Popovici tells us how she helped save the life of Vancouver Canucks assistant equipment manager Brian Hamilton after she spotted a cancerous mole on the back of his neck during a game between the Canucks and the Seattle Kraken. She warned him about the mole by banging on the plexiglass and typing a message on her phone. Popovici says she’s grateful Hamilton took her advice and had the mole removed as it was found to be cancerous. The Canucks and Kraken have then come together to award Popovici a ten thousand dollar scholarship to help with her costs at medical school.

The president of World Netball – Liz Nicholl – tells us she believes the sport still has a huge role to play across the Commonwealth as we approach the 2022 Commonwealth Games. The event in Birmingham is the last Commonwealth Games in which Netball – along with a host of other sports – is guaranteed a place.

Craig Bromfield joins us to discuss how a chance encounter with Brian Clough as a child led the legendary football manager to take Craig and his brother under his wing. The pair ended up travelling to games on Nottingham Forest’s team coach, sitting in the dug-out and spending holidays with the Clough family.

On FA Cup third round weekend, we’re joined live by the manager of Kidderminster Harriers. Russell Penn’s side go into their tie against Reading as the lowest ranked team still left in the competition.

Image: Nadia Popovici and Vancouver Canucks Brian Hamilton (Photo by Christopher Mast/NHLI via Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2w8xw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6ywx4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpkn68)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f4b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2wdp0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct379c)
Forest fear

The Amazon is the largest area of rainforest on earth. Bursting with life, it provides us with a wealth of resources. But for each of its potential riches a potential threat is lurking beneath the canopy. Increasing deforestation allows what is hidden within to find a way out, and with it the possibility for wildlife to spread deadly pathogens.

With the world still reverberating from the shock of Covid-19 environmental journalist, Lucy Jordan who lives in Brazil with her young family, wants to understand our impact on diverse, wildlife-rich ecosystems and how that may trigger future spillover diseases, those like Nipah, Swine Flu and Ebola, which have their origins in animal hosts.

Flying over the forest during her four-hour journey from Sao Paulo to Manaus she highlights the stark contrast between pristine forest and deforested areas where an increasing number of roads encroach ever further into the jungle.

Manaus lies in the heart of the Amazon rainforest thus it offers an almost unique opportunity to examine what happens when humans and wild animals interact. Lucy meets Dr Alessandra Nava, a scientist and veterinarian at Fiocruz Amazonia, who is trying to understand the patterns and triggers in the environment, which might lead to another zoonotic disease outbreak.

(Photo: Aerial view showing smoke rising from an illegal fire at the Amazonia rainforest in Labrea, Amazonas state, Brazil. Credit:Evaristo Sa/AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2wjf4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm5bchqr)
Kazakhstan: Power struggle under way?

After days of violent protests prompted by a rise in energy prices, local residents in Kazakhstan’s largest city, Almaty, are now struggling with patchy internet connectivity, and food shortages in local shops. The BBC’s Abdujalil Abdurasulov says the protests are unprecedented in Kazakhstan, and many there are surprised at the speed and the violence of the unrest.

Also on the programme: The latest on the controversy surrounding the vaccine exemption of the world's tennis number one Novak Djokovic; and we hear from the prominent Palestinian politician, Nabil Shaath, whose son has been released after almost three years of arbitrary detention in Egypt.

(Picture: Shows Russian peacekeepers prior to boarding a military flight on their way to take part in a "CSTO peacekeeping operation" in Kazakhstan Credit: EPA/RUSSIAN DEFENCE MINISTRY)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2wn58)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tnrpp38x2)
Live Sporting Action

We will have full match commentary of the FA cup match between Newcastle and Cambridge United.

Lee James is joined by former Leicester captain Steve Walsh, former Leicester player Ian Marshall and the current Watford and Wales striker Helen Ward to discuss this week’s big football stories.

Also we will be getting the latest updates on the Ashes and previewing teams ahead of AFCON 2022.

(Photo by Newcastle United/Newcastle United via Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2x44s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6zr41)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgplhf5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9c)
Skiing in Afghanistan

In 2011, the rugged mountains of Bamiyan province in central Afghanistan became the backdrop of something as unlikely as it was uplifting - an international ski scene. As Bamiyan was then relatively safe for tourists, a new travel agency, supported by a development NGO, started offering holidays to skiers seeking a unique adventure. A ski school was also set up for local villagers keen to learn, including Alishah Farhang, who went on to become one of Afghanistan's top skiers. However, as he tells Viv Jones, his hopes of competing in the Winter Olympics have been shattered by the return of the Taliban.

PHOTO: Competitors take part in the start of the fourth Afghan Ski Challenge in February 2014 (Shefayee/AFP/Getty Images).


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2x7wx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:06 today]


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2xcn1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv3)
Writers Colson Whitehead and Isabel Allende

Nikki Bedi speaks with two very different internationally-renowned, award-winning authors.

Colson Whitehead is one of Barack Obama’s favourite writers; a 2x Pulitzer Prize-winning American author whose latest novel, Harlem Shuffle, is based around a heist set in the New York of the 1960s. He talks about the art of writing, prejudice and pride, morality and power.

Isabel Allende was born in Peru in 1942 and raised in Chile. Most famous for her novel The House of the Spirits, her works have been both bestsellers and critically acclaimed, translated into more than forty-two languages and selling more than seventy-five million copies worldwide. Her latest book, Violeta, is a fictional account of one woman’s life through an extraordinary century of history. She talks about her how her own life has been - and still is - reflected through her novels.

(Photo: Isabel Allende. Credit: Lori Barra)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2xhd5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm5bdgps)
Kazakh president says stability is returning

After a week of violent anti-government protests in Kazakhstan’s main city, Almaty, President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev says that stability is returning to the country. The protestors were angry not just with the current government but also with the former President Nursultan Nazarbayev. Mr Tokayev tried to diffuse the situation by stripping Mr Nazarbayev of his remaining powers.

Also in the programme: Dozens of people are reported to have been killed in an airstrike on a camp for the displaced in the Tigray region in Northern Ethiopia; and the latest on the controversy surrounding the tennis star, Novak Djokovic, who remains in an Australian detention centre after his Covid-19 vaccine exemption was revoked.

(Photo:Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev chairs a meeting of the emergency in Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan. Credit: Reuters).


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2xm49)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx27pm9xp8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sv9z2fz9x)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgplzdp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 today]


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2xqwf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd1)
Found sounds with Matthew Herbert, Matmos, Nwando Ebizie and Kate Carr

Matthew Herbert, Kate Carr, Nwando Ebizie and Matmos's Martin Schmidt discuss making music from 'found sound' and field recordings, and the ethical, social and political implications that arise when you push music to its extreme. What happens when you record the sounds of a surgeon performing plastic surgery and turn it into an album? How can the sounds of a traffic intersection become music? Are there some sounds that you simply can't make music from?

Matthew Herbert is an artist based in the seaside town of Margate, south-east England, who is a close collaborator of Bjork and has remixed everyone from Quincy Jones and Serge Gainsbourg to Gustav Mahler. He is renowned for taking ordinary sounds and turning them into music; his 2011 record ONE PIG followed the life of a pig from birth to plate, and his 2019 album The State Between Us explored what it means to be British, featuring samples of everything from swimming in the English Channel, to a trumpet being deep-fried.

He is joined by Martin Schmidt, one half of the ground-breaking Baltimore-based duo Matmos, who have made electronic music out of everything from the sounds of brushing hair to throwing aspirin tablets at a drumkit. Matmos have worked with the likes of Yo La Tengo, Oneohtrix Point Never and Bjork, and their latest album, The Consuming Flame, came out in 2020.

Kate Carr is a field recordist and sound artist from Australia, based in London. She has recorded sounds everywhere from fishing villages in northern Iceland to the wetlands of Mexico, and runs her own sound art label, Flaming Pines.

Nwando Ebizie is a multi-disciplinary artist based in northern England, whose practice brings together music, performance art, and dance from the African diaspora. Her latest project, The Swan, will be released in 2022 and is an exploration in Afrofuturism, featuring layers of "dance-inducing polyrhythms, call-and-response chants and Afro-Cuban drums".



SUNDAY 09 JANUARY 2022

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2xvmk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1ywc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2xzcp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpmbn2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2y33t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpmgd6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2y6vy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct379c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2ybm2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhx)
Apple hits the $3 trillion valuation mark

On this edition of Business Weekly, we’re looking at the tech giant Apple. Its value tipped over the $3 trillion mark on the New York stock
Exchange at the start of the year. We hear from Dan Ives of Wedbush Securities on possible further avenues of growth for the company.
We’ll take you to the United States to hear from different communities all hoping to benefit from President Biden’s $1.2 trillion infrastructure plan. We focus on projects designed to improve the quality of drinking water, and public transport. The BBC’s Will Bain covers examples from Alaska, Michigan and California.
Plus, we remember the work of the world renowned Kenyan paleoanthropologist Richard Leakey, who died at the start of the year. We hear from Dr Paula Kahumbu who knew him from childhood, and now runs one of the organisations he founded.
Business Weekly is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Clare Williamson.
(Image: Apple shopt front with logo and female shopper; Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2ygc6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpmtml)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f4b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2yl3b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmb)
Boudica, warrior queen

Boudica, also known as Boadicea, was a member of Iron Age aristocracy in Roman occupied England and her husband was the ruler of the Iceni people. When he died in around 60AD, Boudica, driven by Roman brutality, led a rebellion against the Roman army and marched on London. It was a ferocious attack that nearly drove the Romans out of Britain before Boudica was finally defeated. Today, she is an iconic and sometimes controversial figure. To explore Boudica, Bridget Kendall is joined by professors Richard Hingley and Miranda Aldhouse-Green and Dr. Jane Webster.

(Image: Detail from Boadicea Haranguing the Britons by William Sharp, after John Opie, line engraving, published 1793. Credit: by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


SUN 06:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2ypvg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 on Saturday]


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2ytll)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2c)
Nureldin Satti: Sudan's coup

HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to Sudanese diplomat Nureldin Satti. It’s surely hard for the people of Sudan to be optimistic about their country’s prospects in 2022. The new year began with the nominal head of the transitional government quitting his post, leaving Sudan, once again, in the grip of the military. Street protests in recent months have left more than fifty people dead. Nureldin Satti was fired from his post as Ambassador in the US after last October's military coup. Will Sudan’s generals ever give up political power?


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpn5vz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgt)
So, you think you can quit caffeine?

Caffeine is a key ingredient in some of our favourite foods and drinks, but it’s also a mind-altering drug that can be very tricky to quit.

Tamasin Ford meets three people who’ve tried to cut caffeine out of their lives by eliminating some of its main sources from their diets - coffee, tea and chocolate.

We hear about some uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms, social awkwardness, and the struggle to adapt to life without a caffeine high. How long did they stay caffeine-free?

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

Producers: Simon Tulett and Sarah Stolarz

Contributors:

Petteri Rantamäki, business software professional, Helsinki, Finland;
Abigail James, aesthetician and author, London, UK;
John Horgan, science journalist, New York, USA.

(Picture: A young woman holding a cup of coffee. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2yybq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mw0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpn9m3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky2)
A mother's battle for her son's education

Education has always been important to Virginia Walden Ford. As a child she was part of the process of desegregating schools in Little Rock, Arkansas. Years later, as a parent, she watched as her son's grades dropped and his behaviour changed. She believed his school was failing him and began a long campaign for change in the US education system.

Virginia is the subject of a feature film called Miss Virginia.

This programme was first broadcast in November 2019.

Presenter: Asya Fouks
Producer: Tom Harding Assinder

Picture: Virginia Walden Ford speaking at a news conference of the Black Republican Congressional Staff Association
Credit: Tom Williams / Getty Images

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2z22v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbp)
Sad Songs

Listening to sad songs is a weird, counterintuitive thing to do. Why listen to something that moves you to tears?

As someone who’s sensitivity to sad songs sometimes means pulling over until the tears clear Dessa mulls major versus minor, explores what melody may have in common with the sound of human crying, and quizzes a fellow songwriter about the power of screaming. Do sad songs secretly make us happier?


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpnfc7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct3034)
Failing faith

Poland is often seen as a stronghold of the Catholic faith. Yet today, many Poles are now protesting against the Church’s political over-reach - by simply leaving.

With more secular, more ‘western’ ideas and movements penetrating what was once a bastion of Roman Catholicism in Eastern Europe, more and more people are deciding to part ways with the Church. While around 90% of Poles identify themselves as Catholics, only 40% go to church regularly: and that number is falling as the Church loosens its grip on society – as the country becomes what Poles themselves call ‘more European’.

The decision to leave is not an easy one. So just what is the practical side of apostasy? How does one formally ‘separate’ from the church? What does it mean for the individual as well as society? Once you are out, how does life change afterwards? And why is the phenomenon surging right now?

Presenter John Beauchamp follows the journey of a number of individuals who have either parted with the church or are in the process of doing so. We explore the struggles they have to embark on to tear themselves away from the Catholic church in Poland, which still tries to hold a firm moral grip on Polish society – and which often overreaches its permissible mandate by swaying voting habits and directly telling people how to lead their lives.

(Photo: A Pro-LGBT activist holds a portrait of the Virgin Mary that reads 'Jesus also had two fathers' during the annual Krakow Equality March 2020. Credit: Artur Widak/NurPhoto/Getty Images)

Producers: Bartosz Panek and Jarosław Kociszewski
A Free Range and Overcoat Media Production for BBC World Service


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2z5tz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf71st7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpnk3c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2zhj)
My Arab Spring

Hope – Amal

The road to democracy is rarely straightforward. There are steps forwards, and backwards, and times when it feels like you’re just not going anywhere at all. So what does the future hold for the countries of the 2011 Arab Spring Revolutions? Where can people look for hope now?

Abubakr and Ella al-Shamahi explore if Tunisia’s new democracy is at risk, after what some are calling the coup of July 2021, when the Tunisian President sacked the PM and assumed executive power. They ask what the solutions are for the war-torn countries of the Arab Spring, like Syria and Yemen, and consider what the legacy of 2011 is. Is it the youth who have an awareness of a revolutionary history and how far people will go to gain their freedom? Are the youth where we look for hope now?

(Photo: A Tunisian protester sits on top of a gate outside the parliament building in the capital Tunis, July 2021 follow the president's dismissal of Prime Minister, Hichem Mechichi. Credit: EPA)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2z9l3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z34)
Can we get drugs out of prisons?

Keeping drugs out of prisons seems like an impossible task. Tanya Beckett asks four experts if it can be done and how prisoners can be helped to overcome their addictions.

Contributors:
Stuart J. Cole, drug and alcohol worker, author “Two Years”
Martin Horn, former Secretary of Corrections, Pennsylvania
Heidi Bottolfs, Department Director, Norwegian Correctional Service
Dr Ximene Rego, Researcher, School of Law, University of Minho, Portugal

Presenter: Tanya Beckett
Researcher: Chris Blake
Producer: Sheila Cook



(Image: Drug dealer and an addict exchanging drugs and money at the jail: Getty/Manuel-F-O)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpnnvh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3ct1gyh)
Turkey's crazy project

A giant new canal for the world’s biggest ships is the most ambitious engineering plan yet proposed by Turkey’s President Erdogan, whose massive infrastructure projects have already changed the face of his country. The proposed waterway would slice through Istanbul, creating in effect a second Bosphorus, the busy shipping lane that is now the only outlet from the Black Sea. The president himself has called the project “crazy”. But he says it would “save the future of Istanbul”, easing traffic in the Bosphorus and reducing the risk of a terrible accident there. But the plan has met a storm of opposition. Istanbul’s mayor says it would “murder” the historic city. Critics claim the canal would be an environmental disaster, cost billions of dollars that Turkey can’t afford – and provoke severe tensions with Russia, which is determined to preserve existing rules on traffic into and out of the Black Sea. Will the canal go ahead? Who would lose – and who would benefit?

Tim Whewell reports from a divided Istanbul.

(Image: Turkish coastal safety patrol boats in the Bosphorus, Istanbul. Credit: Yörük Işık)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2zfb7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm5bgdmv)
African Cup of Nations begins in Cameroon

The much-awaited, long-delayed African Cup of Nations football tournament begins in Cameroon.

The competition is taking place against a backdrop of Covid restrictions and a civil war that has been going on in the English speaking regions of Cameroon, alongside the wider instability caused by the jihadist insurgency in Nigeria, Niger, Mali and Burkina Faso.

Also in the programme: Yemen, a nation torn by conflict and famine, but today we hear from one long time resident on why he loves the country. And in Serbia: fans of tennis star Novak Djokovic have been protesting his detention in an immigration centre in Australia.

[Photo shows a fan with a Cameroon hat on holding a horn. Credit: AFP]


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2zk2c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 today]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl5)
How much plastic is in the ocean and can Mr Beast make a difference?

In October of last year popular Youtubers Mark Rober and the enigmatically named Mr Beast pledged to remove 30 million pounds of plastic from the ocean – if they could raise $30 million dollars. A dollar per pound of plastic sounds like a fairly good deal, but how much plastic is out there and will they actually be removing anything from the ocean at all?


(Image: Sahika Encumen dives amid plastic waste in Ortakoy coastline / photo by Sebnem Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2znth)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2zskm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tnrpp6f9f)
Live Sporting Action

Delyth Lloyd presents live FA cup commentary of Nottingham Forrest against Arsenal.

We'll also have a reaction to Sunday’s early games, bring you the best of the action from across Europe’s top men’s and women’s leagues, and give you the latest updates from day one of Afcon.


(Photo by Jon Hobley/MI News/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r304t0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf72rs8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgppj2d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct3034)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r308k4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r30d98)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm5bhclw)
At least 164 reportedly killed in Kazakhstan crackdown

There is a nationwide state of emergency and curfew in Kazakhstan after the unrest over the last week. At least 164 people have died in Kazakhstan during violent anti-government protests, according to media reports citing health officials. There is a growing suggestion that the recent violence is linked to a power struggle within Kazakhstan's ruling elite.

Also in the programme: At least 19 people have been killed in a fire at an apartment building in New York; and the Goldens Globe are awarded this Sunday amid a diversity and ethics scandal.

(Photo: People ride a scooter near a bus, which was burnt during mass protests triggered by fuel price increase, in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Credit: Reuters.)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r30j1d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx27pmdtlc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sv9z2jw70)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgppw9s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r30msj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpq01x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]



MONDAY 10 JANUARY 2022

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d4lst)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj3)
The return of CES

The major tech show returns to Las Vegas after going virtual during the pandemic. But as the impact of the coronavirus continues to be felt, is there still a place for major industry events like these? Chris Fox speaks to CES organiser Karen Chupka, and to some of the hundreds of startups exhibiting at the show. The BBC's Lara Lewington discusses some of her favourite gadgets at the event, and Spencer Kelly tries out a taxi service made up of remote controlled cars.

(Photo: CES show in Las Vegas, Credit: Getty Images)


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqztz26)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct3034)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d4qjy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlm9gljbq6)
International shipping firms call for action to combat piracy

A rise in kidnappings and ransoms of sailors in the Gulf of Guinea prompts call for an international response to combat sea piracy. Plus we talk inflation with economist Michael Hughes and hear from the BBC's James Copnall in Cameroon as the first matches of the delayed Africa Cup of Nations 2021 kick off.

Photo: A Danish warship sets sail Credit: Reuters


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzv2tb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf4)
Activism, politics and creativity

For nearly five years, In The Studio has been at the forefront of the creative process, with extraordinary access to big names and exciting talent working in the creative industries around the world. Our reporters are right there as works are brought into being, whether that be in design, music, TV and film, photography, sculpture, writing, painting or performance. During that time, activism and public discourse around issues of contemporary politics has intensified, with others left trying to make sense of it all. Artists and creatives are no exception, often making work with a political agenda, or to encourage conversation, as they engage their artistic sensibilities with the events of the real world. In this episode, Laura Hubber takes a look at some of those In the Studio moments, when creative impulses come face-to-face with realpolitik. With contributions from Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, creator of a participatory light installation on the US-Mexican border Raphael Lorenzo-Hemmer, Zanele Muholi whose photographs address hate crime in South Africa and the team behind satirical television puppetry in Kenya The XYZ Show.

Presenter: Laura Hubber
Producer: Harry Parker
Researcher: Anita Langary
Executive producer: Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d4v92)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6x)
Bryan Stevenson: Will equality ever be more than a dream in the US?

Black and white Americans have always had vastly different experiences within their country’s justice system. You see it in so many different data sets, from police violence to incarceration and sentencing. It's impossible to understand without reference to America’s history of institutionalised racism. But understanding is one thing; the real challenge is how to change it. Stephen Sackur speaks to Bryan Stevenson, civil rights lawyer and founder of the Equal Justice Initiative. Will equality ever be more than a dream?


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzv6kg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prl)
Why do we get bored?

“I’m bored!” We can all relate to the uncomfortable - and at times unbearable - feeling of boredom. But what is it? Why does it happen? And could this frustrating, thumb-twiddling experience actually serve some evolutionary purpose? CrowdScience listener Brian started wondering this over a particularly uninspiring bowl of washing up, and it’s ended with Marnie Chesterton going on a blessedly un-boring tour through the science and psychology of tedium. She finds out why some people are more affected than others, why boredom is the key to discovery and innovation, and how we can all start improving our lives by embracing those mind-numbing moments.

Featuring: Prof James Danckert (University of Waterloo, Canada), Dr Elizabeth Weybright (Washington State University), Dr Christian Chan (Hong Kong University) and Annie Runkel (University of Dundee).

Presented by Marnie Chesterton
Produced by Samara Linton

Image: Young Asian girl feeling lonely and bored at home. Screen addiction withdrawal symptoms (Credit: Oscar Wong, Getty Images)


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d4z16)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzvb9l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct3034)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d52sb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drp)
Are we putting too much faith into electric vehicles?

Billions of dollars are being invested in electric vehicles in the name of fighting climate change. World leaders are backing them as the green fix for our burgeoning road transport emissions. But when you factor in the carbon emissions that come from manufacturing EVs, how well do they stack up against their petrol and diesel counterparts? If all the cars on the road switched to EVs, could we meet our climate targets?

This week The Climate Question looks under the bonnet of electric vehicles – and whether there is an altogether better solution.

Presenters Neal Razzell and Kate Lamble are joined by:

Heather Maclean, Professor of Civil and Mineral Engineering, University of Toronto
Quentin Willson, Motoring journalist and EV campaigner
Clarisse Cunha Linke, Brazil Director of the Institute for Transportation & Development Policy
Estelle Honnerat, reporter in Paris
Dr Emma Smith, Research Fellow in Antarctic Seismology, University of Leeds

Producer: Sophie Eastaugh
Researcher: Natasha Fernandes
Series Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound engineer: Tom Brignell


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzvg1q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9p)
Women in sound

Sound is everywhere around us: from blockbuster Hollywood films to live music events, from broadcasting the news to speaking with astronauts in space. For every broadcast, big or small, there are engineers and sound designers working behind the scenes to make sure you get the highest audio quality possible. Kim Chakanetsa explores the world of audio production with two of the best in this field.

Nina Hartstone is a supervising sound editor based in the UK. Over the course of her career Nina has received some of the industry’s highest awards - including an Oscar and a BAFTA Award for the Queen biopic Bohemian Rhapsody in 2019. She is also known for her work on the films Gravity, Cats and An Education.

Alexandria Perryman is a live broadcast engineer at NASA's Johnson Space Center, where she supports astronauts with all-things audio: from helping them communicate with mission control to facilitating media interviews. She won an Emmy Award for her work on the coverage of SpaceX’s Demonstration Mission 1 – the first orbital test of the Dragon 2 spacecraft.

Produced by Alice Gioia.

(Image: (L) Alexandria Perryman, credit Norah Moran/NASA. (R) Nina Hartstone, credit Getty Images. The background image is the waveform of the opening six seconds of an episode of The Conversation.)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d56jg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7tl8k6)
New York fire: At least 19 killed in apartment block blaze

A deadly fire in a New York apartment building - one of the worst the city has witnessed. Newsday hears from the Congressman for the area.

In Cameroon, James Copnall is joined by our sports reporter Isaac Fanin with all the latest results and excitement from the Africa Cup of Nations following the opening matches... including that of the host nation.

Plus the world number one in men's tennis, Novak Djokovic, is expected to find out shortly if he meets the criteria for a Coronavirus vaccine exemption, to enable him to defend his Australian Open title.

And ahead of substantive talks in Geneva, Russia has warned that negotiations with the United States over Ukraine will be difficult.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d5b8l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7tld9b)
Judge raises concerns over Novak Djokovic's treatment by Australian border officers

A judge in Melbourne is hearing arguments from both sides before he decides whether the world number one in men's tennis, Novak Djokovic, meets Australia's criteria for a Coronavirus vaccine exemption.

James Copnall is in Cameroon where the Africa Cup of Nations has begin despite the continuing insurgency in parts of the country. We'll be hearing from fans and pundits.

A court in military ruled Myanmar has sentenced the detained leader Aung San Suu Kyi to four more years in prison on several charges including the possession of unlicensed walkie-talkies. We'll get reaction from the opposition.

And ahead of substantive talks in Geneva, Russia has warned that negotiations with the United States over Ukraine will be difficult. We hear from Moscow.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d5g0q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7tlj1g)
Djokovic wins court battle to enter Australia

The world number one in men's tennis, Novak Djokovic, has won his case against the Australian government's decision to revoke his visa, with a ruling from a judge in Melbourne that he must immediately be released.

James Copnall is in Cameroon where the Africa Cup of Nations has finally begun after delays and postponements - we'll bring you the fans and the stars

Yet more charges against Myanmar's detained leader Aung San Suu Kyi -- four more years in prison on several charges including the possession of unlicensed walkie- talkies.

With almost eight thousand protesters under arrest, Kazakhstan is observing an official day of mourning for the victims of last week's civil unrest.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d5krv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzvy17)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5x)
Healing the mind

Psychedelic therapy could provide a major breakthrough in the treatment of mental health disorders like depression, and now it's caught the attention of start-ups and venture capitalists.

Laurence Knight hears from one man whose life was transformed by a single dose of the drug psilocybin - the psychoactive ingredient in magic mushrooms - after he volunteered for a research project exploring whether it could cure depression. He also visits the research team at King's College London, who have just wrapped up the latest trials of the drug.

The trials are being sponsored by the healthcare start-up Compass Pathways, and its founder and chief executive George Goldsmith explains why he hopes to use them to bring this therapy to the general public. Plus Amanda Eilian of venture capitalists Able Partners describes how quickly attitudes in the investor community are changing.

(Picture credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x20)
India's freedom fighter: Subhas Chandra Bose

In 2022, India is holding a series of events to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the birth of the independence campaigner, Subhas Chandra Bose. Unlike Mahatama Ghandi, Bose believed violence against the British Empire could be justified, and during World War Two he supported an alliance with Nazi Germany and Japan. Claire Bowes speaks to Bose’s great-niece, Madhuri Bose, about why many think he could have changed the course of India’s history. She also hears from Mihir Bose, author of Raj, Secrets, Revolution: A Life of Subhas Chandra Bose.


PHOTO: Subhas Chandra Bose giving a speech in Nazi Germany in 1942.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d5phz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzw1sc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d5t83)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzw5jh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d5y07)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pj8jzh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzw98m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d61rc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv7)
The factory worker who became Chile's first blind senator

In 2019, Fabiola Campillai was working in a factory where her husband Marco worked as a lorry driver. They were leading a quiet life in Santiago raising their children when a tear gas cannister changed the course of Fabiola’s life. The cannister, fired by a police officer, left her permanently blinded with multiple life-changing injuries. After spending months in hospital, Fabiola came out fighting. She had no political background, but helped by Marco, she decided to stand for election as a Senator, and won.

When Elise Wortley was in her 20s, her life was put on hold by severe anxiety. So, she turned to the travelogues of Alexandra David-Néel, the pioneering explorer who was the first European woman to trek to Tibet in 1924. It inspired Elise to recreate the same trip using equipment that only would have been available in the 1920s – including a yak wool coat and a wooden backpack fashioned out of a chair. Since then, Elise has been bringing to life the lost histories of other female adventurers.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb

(Photo: Fabiola Campillai with her husband Marco. Credit: Chile Today/Boris van der Spek)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x20)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d65hh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pj8sgr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzwjrw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d697m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfmp8k7)
Novak Djokovic wins court battle to remain in Australia

Novak Djokovic wins court battle to remain in Australia. His family say he is "free" and that "truth and justice" prevailed. Australia's Immigration Minister says considering whether to again cancel Djokovic's visa.

Also in the programme: US and Russia sit down for talks on Ukraine; and hungry and holy -- stray cows in India.

(Picture: Novak Djokovic wins court battle to remain in Australia following visa row. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d6dzr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzws84)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y48cprbrn3l)
Sri Lanka seeks China debt restructure

President Rajapaksa of Sri Lanka has asked China to restructure its debt repayments. Deshal de Mel is an economist at Verite Research, and tells us how Sri Lanka built up more than $5bn in loans from China for roads, ports and an airport over the past decade. Also in the programme, the Norwegian fertiliser giant Yara International will stop buying potash from Belarus by the end of April, due to the impact of international sanctions on the country. Hanna Liubakova is a Belarusian journalist currently in exile, and explains the significance of the potash industry to Belarus. The BBC's Laurence Knight explores the potential for psychedelic drugs in the treatment of mental health conditions. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare considers the prospects for a "basic income for the arts" scheme being introduced in Ireland, which will involve a minimum income being paid to several thousand people working in the sector.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Joshua Thorpe and George Thomas.

(Picture: Sri Lanka's President Rajapaksa and China's foreign minister Wang Yi. Picture credit: EPA.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d6jqw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyhbhnjpb)
Judge orders Djokovic release

Novak Djokovic has been practising in Melbourne's Rod Laver Arena, after Judge Anthony Kelly ordered his release from the hotel where he was being held. The men's tennis world number one had spent the weekend in detention following the Australian government's decision to revoke his visa - this has now been overturned. We hear the latest, and reach out to fans in Australia to hear their thoughts.

We will also examine the issue of vaccination amongst professional athletes and the potential implications for global competition, in conversation with a pro basketball player, a sports doctor and sports journalist.

In Uganda, children have returned to school today for the first time in almost two years, following one of the world's longest school closures. We will hear why authorities are worried that as many as 30% of students may not return.

And Dr Eleanor Murray, one of our regular coronavirus experts, will discuss some of the latest Covid-19 stories.

(Photo: World number one Novak Djokovic, Credit: John Walton/PA Wire)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d6nh0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyhbhnnfg)
Vaccination in sport

Following the order by a judge to release tennis star Novak Djokovic from detention, we examine the issue of vaccination amongst professional athletes more broadly. We'll look at the potential implications for global competition, and the reason why some are hesitant to get jabbed. We'll hear a conversation with a pro basketball player, a sports doctor and sports journalist.

We'll also hear the latest on Djokovic, who has been practising in Melbourne's Rod Laver Arena after the decision to revoke his visa was overturned. Our correspondent gives us an update on what could happen next, and reflects on a press conference with the world number one's family.

In Uganda, children have returned to school today for the first time in almost two years, following one of the world's longest school closures. We will hear why authorities are worried that as many as 30% of students may not return.

And Professor Manfred Green, one of our regular coronavirus experts, will discuss some of the latest Covid-19 stories.

(Photo: Novak Djokovic in action, Credit: John Walton/PA Wire)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d6s74)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x20)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d6wz8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pj9hyj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzx87n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nrglc9rsm)
2022/01/10 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d70qd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzxczs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct30j0)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The painless heart

Dr Mitch Lomax is a sports scientist at the University of Portsmouth. She helps actual Olympic swimmers get faster. She explains how most of the muscles attached to our skeletons work: Tiny fibres use small-scale cellular energy, which, when all these fibres work in concert, turns into visible muscular movement. Mitch also explains how the dreaded Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness, or DOMS, can hit, taking a stair-wincing 48-72 hours to peak after exercise.

But skeletal muscles turn out to be quite different to heart muscles, as consultant cardiologist Dr Rohin Francis explains. Heart cells are more efficient and don't get fatigued like skeletal muscle cells. They are extremely energetic and 'just want to beat'. He also explains that the sensory feedback from the heart muscles is different too. They have a different sort of nerve supply, with fewer sensory nerves, so that there is less chance of pain signals being sent to the brain.

However, heart cells' incredible abilities are counterbalanced by one Achilles-like flaw: They cannot easily heal. Professor Sanjay Sinha is a British Heart Foundation (BHF) Senior Research Fellow and a Professor in Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine at the University of Cambridge. His job is to fix broken hearts and he explains to Adam how new research into stem cells could be used to fix normally irreparable heart cells.

Producer - Jennifer Whyntie and Fiona Roberts
Presenters - Hannah Fry and Adam Rutherford


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d74gj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfmq3s4)
US and Russia hold talks amid Ukraine tensions

The US and Russia have met in Geneva to begin the first of a series of talks over tensions in Ukraine. The US and other Western powers want to dissuade Russia from invading Ukraine. But Russia wants to discuss its demand for NATO to retreat from eastern Europe and rule out Ukraine joining the alliance. Will the talks amount to much or will there be a renewed war in Ukraine?

Also on the program: Novak Djokovic's mother says her tennis star son has had the biggest win of his career - over the Australian immigration authorities; and Uganda's children return to school after almost two years of lockdown.

(Picture: A member of a delegation walks past US and Russian flags displayed at the US permanent Mission, in Geneva during Russia-US talks. Credit: Getty Images).


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d786n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2lyxmkrm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172y0svp7crmd8)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzxmh1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrsd9grqtl)
Sri Lanka seeks China debt restructure

President Rajapaksa of Sri Lanka has asked China to restructure its debt repayments. Deshal de Mel is an economist at Verite Research, and tells us how Sri Lanka built up more than $5bn in loans from China for roads, ports and an airport over the past decade. Also in the programme, the Norwegian fertiliser giant Yara International will stop buying potash from Belarus by the end of April, due to the impact of international sanctions on the country. Hanna Liubakova is a Belarusian journalist currently in exile, and explains the significance of the potash industry to Belarus. The BBC's Laurence Knight explores the potential for psychedelic drugs in the treatment of mental health conditions. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare considers the prospects for a "basic income for the arts" scheme being introduced in Ireland, which will involve a minimum income being paid to several thousand people working in the sector.

(Picture: Sri Lanka's President Rajapaksa and China's foreign minister Wang Yi. Picture credit: EPA.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d7cys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzxr75)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



TUESDAY 11 JANUARY 2022

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d7hpx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:06 on Saturday]


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d7mg1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqs8r94zrr)
Talks between Russia and US continue

Talks between Russia and the US over tensions in Ukraine continue, with little progress in sight. Could diplomatic sanctions be the answer? We talk to Jeffrey J. Schott, a former advisor to the US government. In Belarus, no stranger itself to economic sanctions, the state-run potash manufacture is dealt a blow; Yara, one of the world's largest producers of fertilisers and biggest buyer of potash, says it will no longer purchase it from Belarus. We speak to Hanna Liubakova from the Atlantic Council. Peter Jankovskis describes a turbulent day's trading on the US markets, Sri Lanka seeks a debt restructuring programme with its biggest lender, China, and our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare looks at an experimental basic income payment for the country's artists. Throughout the programme we're joined by Jeanette Rodrigues, Managing Editor for Bloomberg News in Mumbai and Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland.

Photo: US President Joe Biden holds talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin Credit: Reuters


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d7r65)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm1)
Catching up with our solution seekers

How are Covid sniffer dogs, a sturdy bicycle scheme and balloons beaming down the internet getting on? We catch up with a few of the projects featured on our programme to see if they are making progress.

In the UK we catch up with the sniffer dogs being trained to detect Covid 19. After promising results from a large trial, they’re onto the next stage of training.

Meanwhile Wyson in Zambia has extended his bicycle purchase scheme for rural women and even had a bit of help from a BBC World Service audience member.

We find out what happened after US company Loon launched giant balloons designed to beam down the internet to rural Kenya.

And we hear from Dhruv Boruah, who has turned his attention from running plastic hackathons to a rather unusual underwater project.

Produced and presented by Claire Bates
Reporters: Richard Kenny and Tom Colls
Image: Dhruv Boruah


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzy3gk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 Discovery (w3ct30j0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d7vy9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x20)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d7zpf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z28)
Tale of a tiny fish: Part one

The Yaboi is a tiny silver fish from West Africa, rich in essential nutrients. It used to be known as ‘the people’s fish’, a staple for lunch for Senegal’s children.
But the Yaboi is hard to fish and land these days. Overfishing and illegal fishing have put a strain on stocks but there’s another pressure. In the last five years foreign owned fishmeal factories have multiplied along the coast of West Africa. There were five in operation in Senegal in 2015. By 2018 another three had opened. In neighbouring Mauritania there are 35 more. These factories rely on small pelagic fish like Yaboi to make fishmeal which is exported to feed livestock and pets and which is also converted into fish oil to feed to farmed fish in Europe and China – in particular salmon.

In the first programme we consider how feeding fish like Yaboi to carnivorous fish like salmon is re-routing essential nutrients away from people in Senegal to nourish consumers in wealthier countries. Salmon is the most farmed fish in Europe and is in huge demand. We hear from school children in Sweden where all children have access to free meals until the age of 16 and salmon is one of the most popular fish. Professor Christina Hicks explains why, from a nutritional angle, the Swedish model is a useful one. We hear from school teachers, school children and a nutritionist in Senegal who describe why the Yaboi is essential to child nutrition there. We hear how there is no free school meals safety net to support families. Arni Mathiesen, Independent Chair of the Roundtable on Marine Ingredients, explains the alternative sources which can also be used for salmon feed.

Presenter: Hazel Healy
Producer: Sarah Cuddon

(Photo: Diaba Dop holds up a Yaboi. Credit: Hazel Healy)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzybyt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf5)
Artists' challenges: Natural and manmade

For nearly five years, In The Studio has been at the forefront of the creative process - with extraordinary access to big names and exciting talent working in the creative industries around the world. Our reporters are right there as works are brought into being, whether that be in design, music, TV and film, photography, sculpture, writing, painting or performance.

In this episode Laura Hubber delves into the archive to consider the enormous challenges artists face as they bring their projects to fruition.

One of the major obstacles to all artistic endeavours in the last couple of years has been the worldwide pandemic. This programme features Turkish author Elif Shafak who tells how her writing life was shaken up during lockdown, Britain’s Royal Shakespeare Company coping when Covid-19 closed the theatres and New Orleans’s oldest parading organisation, Krewe of Rex, working to keep the Mardi Gras Carnival flourishing despite social distancing and the wearing of very different kinds of masks.

There are contributions too from producer Linda Wong Davies battling deadlines and culture differences to stage a western opera in Shanghai, Finland’s Kari Kola struggling in Ireland to mount the world’s largest illuminated artwork and animator Phil Tippett reflecting on the stress of making a film over the course of more than thirty years.

Presenter: Laura Hubber
Producer: Harry Parker


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d83fk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7tp5g9)
Afghanistan: Millions of children at risk

The United Nations makes an urgent call for aid for the people of Afghanistan, the collapse of the government and the withdrawal of Western support has left a million children at risk of severe malnourishment.

A world first after a genetically modified pigs heart is transplanted into a man's body in the US, we hear from a surgeon who was inside the operating theatre.

One of the world's biggest darknet websites that sells Class A drugs and counterfeit cash has been shut down but new sites are already popping up.

Plus sport with Isaac Fanin live from Cameroon for the Africa Cup of Nations.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d875p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7tp96f)
Harsh winter is accelerating Afghanistan’s humanitarian crisis

We head to Afghanistan as the United Nations calls for urgent action as a million children are on the verge of malnourishment.

A world first after a genetically modified pigs heart is transplanted into a man's body in the US, we hear from a doctor on what this means for the future of medicine.

We are talking about lockdown parties at Downing street - as the British Prime Minister is under the spotlight again for breaking the rules - Rob Watson with the latest.

And we take a closer look at how China is viewing events in Kazakhstan - and what role it will play.

Issac will bring us the latest from Cameroon on the Africa Cup of Nations - may not be in the best of moods after Ghana 's loss.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d8bxt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7tpdyk)
Afghanistan's winter crisis shocks United Nations

The United Nations makes an urgent call for aid for the people of Afghanistan, the collapse of the government and the withdrawal of Western support has left a million children at risk of severe malnourishment.

A world first after a genetically modified pigs heart is transplanted into a man's body in the US, we hear from a surgeon who was inside the operating theatre.

And will Geneva talks ease tensions over Russia's troop buildup on the Ukraine border? We'll hear from a leading member of the European Parliament.

Plus sport with Isaac live from Cameroon for the Africa Cup of Nations.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d8gny)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzytyb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgy)
White privilege

Does the global economy need to start dismantling 'global white privilege'? The Black Lives matter protest movement has focussed lots of attention on racial attitudes in rich western countries. How easy is it for instance, for people of black or Asian heritage to get on the ladder to business success in those countries? But is the economics of what's now called 'white privilege' a global problem too? Ed Butler speaks to Chandran Nair, the founder and Chief Executive Officer of The Global Institute for Tomorrow, an independent think-tank in Hong Kong and the author of ‘Dismantling Global White Privilege: Equity for a Post-Western World’. And also to Lucinda Platt, from the London School of Economics, who has recently written a report for the IFS on the degree of social and economic mobility being achieved among the UK's minority racial and ethnic groups.


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6j)
Kazakhstan's nuclear legacy

After its independence, Kazakhstan had to deal with the legacy of being one of the centres of the Soviet Union's huge nuclear arsenal and nuclear weapons industry. There were particular concerns about the former nuclear testing site at Semipalatinsk, a vast swathe of contaminated land where there were tunnels with spent plutonium. When the Soviet Union ended in 1991, the site was left open to scavengers. Louise Hidalgo talks to the former head of America's nuclear weapons laboratory, Dr Siegfried Hecker, about the secret operation by Russian and American scientists to make the site safe; it's been called the greatest nuclear non-proliferation story never told.

PHOTO: The Semipalatinsk site in 1991 (Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d8lf2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z28)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzyypg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct30j0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d8q56)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d8txb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjcfwl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzz65q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d8yng)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxh)
Looking for the Liberian sister I left behind

Helene Cooper grew up in Liberia, fled during a bloody military coup and arrived in the US as a child refugee. Her background inspired her to become a journalist but there was one question that still needed to be answered: what had happened to the adopted sister she’d left behind? This interview was first broadcast in May 2019.

Paula and Bridgette Powers are identical twins from eastern Australia who have spent almost every day of their lives together - they even choose to speak at the same time. They also share a passion for seabirds, and have set up the Twinnies Pelican and Seabird Rescue refuge off the Sunshine Coast. They went into a studio in Perth to tell Jo Fidgen about themselves in August 2016.

Mehrunnisa and Tarannum Shokat Ali are Muslim sisters who work as nightclub bouncers in New Delhi. They have become famous for bringing order and protection to the clubbers of the city. Outlook reporter Sumiran Preet Kaur went to meet them at their home in September 2017.

(Photo: Eunice (in striped dress) and Helene Cooper (with sunglasses). Credit: Helene Cooper)

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d92dl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjcpcv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzzfnz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct30j0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d964q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfms5gb)
Afghanistan on brink of winter crisis

The UN has warned that a humanitarian disaster is unfolding in Afghanistan and has called for five billion dollars in aid to avoid the country's collapse. We have a special report from inside the country.

Also in the programme: the ethics of xeno-transplantation; and drugs on the Dark Net.

(Picture: A view of snow-covered landscape in Kabul, Afghanistan, 06 January 2022. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d99wv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvqzzp57)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bv0y4xg9k)
Facebook introduces employee vaccine requirement

Facebook's parent company Meta is mandating a booster Covid vaccination for office staff. It's the latest in a string of companies making life difficult for the unvaccinated, and we assess the legal picture around such moves with Richard Fox, who's an employment lawyer with the UK law firm Kingsley Napley. Also in the programme, we ask whether the global economy needs to start dismantling what's known as 'global white privilege', beyond the challenge of boosting the prospects of those from ethnic minorities in rich western countries. We find out more from Chandran Nair who has written a book on the topic. The British Museum is to sell 20 watercolour paintings by JMW Turner in the form of digital assets, or non-fungible tokens. The sale is being handled by the company La Collection, and its chief executive Jean-Sebastien Beaucamps explains the thinking behind the move. Plus, one of the biggest illegal darknet websites, Torrez, has gone offline, after two years of selling Class A drugs, counterfeit cash and hacking tools. But with new sites popping up all the time, the BBC's cyber reporter Joe Tidy tells us how resilient this small but significant part of the drugs economy has become.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Tom Kavanagh and George Thomas.

(Picture: A Facebook billboard. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d9fmz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyhbhrflf)
UN aid appeal for Afghanistan

The UN has issued an urgent call for aid for Afghanistan where one million children are at risk from severe malnourishment. We hear from a program officer for Women for Women International in Nangahar province about the increasingly desperate situation in the country.

We’ll look at how Novak Djokovic’s visa dispute in Australia has galvanised anti-vaccination activists although the player has never explicitly supported them. Our misinformation reporter will be telling us about the posts by the groups she is monitoring online.

A US man has become the first person in the world to get a heart transplant from a genetically-modified pig. We'll have two experts answering your questions on the procedure.

We’ll bring together two doctors who have been working in maternity wards throughout the pandemic to discuss what it has been like on the wards, where women are often alone and sometimes critically ill prior to giving birth.

(Photo: Afghan families receive food aid distributed by the German government in Kabul, Afghanistan, 06 December 2021.Credit: STRINGER/EPA)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d9kd3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyhbhrkbk)
Coronavirus on maternity wards

What's it like catching Covid-19 when you are due to give birth? We hear a conversation between two doctors who have been leading maternity wards throughout the pandemic. They discuss what it has been like working with women who are often alone and sometimes critically ill prior to giving birth, and why many pregnant women regret not getting vaccinated.

The UN has issued an urgent call for aid for Afghanistan where one million children are at risk from severe malnourishment. We hear from a program officer for Women for Women International in Nangahar province about the increasingly desperate situation in the country.

We’ll look at how Novak Djokovic’s visa dispute in Australia has galvanised anti-vaccination activists although the player has never explicitly supported them. Our misinformation reporter will be telling us about the posts by the groups she is monitoring online.

A US man has become the first person in the world to get a heart transplant from a genetically-modified pig. We'll hear from an expert what that could mean for transplant surgery in the future.

(Photo: Woman undergoes an ultrasound scan, Credit: Maastricht UMC+)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d9p47)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d9swc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjddvm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0054r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nrglcdnpq)
2022/01/11 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0d9xmh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z28)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr008ww)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt7)
Robots under the Thwaites Glacier

Huge robots, including a seven-metre two-tonne vessel named Ran, are on their way to the Thwaites Glacier to learn more about the retreating ice and its impact on Climate Change. But this won’t be the only tech that’s being deployed on the 65-day mission; British Antarctic Survey’s Boaty McBoatface and the Autosub Long Range vehicle operated by the National Oceanography Centre in the UK, will travel under the ice shelf along with Ran. Professor Anna Wåhlin from the University of Gothenburg tells us more about her robot Ran and about the data she’ll be collecting.

Tiny light engines
We’re talking to Ed Tang, the CEO of Avegant. They’re the company behind the world’s smallest light engines for augmented reality. Developing projectors thinner than the width of a pencil means we’re on the brink of AR glasses that will barely look different from standard glasses. Alongside talking about how this technology works, Ed also spoke to us about what this means for the future of AR.

James Webb telescope tech
Space journalist Kate Arkless-Gray is live on the show to tell us about the tech that got the James Webb Telescope into space and how vital it is that none of the tech deployed goes wrong - unlike the Hubble space telescope, repair missions to James Webb are impossible.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.

Studio Manager: Nigel Dix
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


(Image: Ran navigates its way under the ice front of Thwaites Glacier.
Photo credit: Filip Stedt)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0db1cm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfmt0p7)
Afghanistan's looming humanitarian crisis

The freezing winter and the loss of Western support will create disaster for Afghans says Red Cross. Unemployment has soared, few can afford to feed their own families, an estimated one million children are now at risk of starvation. We have a special report from that country.

The UK Prime Minister is accused of attending a drinks party with almost forty other guests at the height of the UK lockdown in 2020. We hear from a Conservative MP. And we mark twenty years since the opening of the prison in Guantanamo Bay and ask why it has proven so difficult to close it down?

(Picture: Boys playing volleyball in Afghanistan. Credit: Reuters / Khara)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0db53r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2lyxqgnq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0svp7cvj9c)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr00jd4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycslv12jy4z)
Facebook introduces employee vaccine requirement

Facebook's parent company Meta is mandating a booster Covid vaccination for office staff. It's the latest in a string of companies making life difficult for the unvaccinated, and we assess the legal picture around such moves with Richard Fox, who's an employment lawyer with the UK law firm Kingsley Napley. Also in the programme, we ask whether the global economy needs to start dismantling what's known as 'global white privilege', beyond the challenge of boosting the prospects of those from ethnic minorities in rich western countries. We find out more from Chandran Nair who has written a book on the topic. The British Museum is to sell 20 watercolour paintings by JMW Turner in the form of digital assets, or non-fungible tokens. The sale is being handled by the company La Collection, and its chief executive Jean-Sebastien Beaucamps explains the thinking behind the move. Plus, one of the biggest illegal darknet websites, Torrez, has gone offline, after two years of selling Class A drugs, counterfeit cash and hacking tools. But with new sites popping up all the time, the BBC's cyber reporter Joe Tidy tells us how resilient this small but significant part of the drugs economy has become.

(Picture: A Facebook billboard. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0db8vw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pm1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr00n48)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 12 JANUARY 2022

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dbdm0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dbjc4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqs8r97wnv)
China locks down ahead of the Winter Olympics

Millions are under lockdown in Chinese cities as the country attempts to control Covid 19 outbreaks just a few weeks before the Winter Olympics begin in Beijing. We hear from Kerry Allen, China Media Analyst at BBC Monitoring. Around the world, governments and companies are grappling with reconciling the provision of sick pay to workers who refuse to get vaccinated - Richard Fox, an employment partner at Kingsley Napley in the UK, explains the legal complications these decisions give rise to. Professor Richard Tedlow of the Harvard Business School argues that a CEO's charisma might be worth just as much as their business nous, and the British Museum gets in on the NFT trade; we speak to tech journalist and sometime crypto sceptic Matt Binder in New York. Throughout the programme we're joined by Alison Schrager, Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute and Peter Ryan, ABC's senior business correspondent in Sydney.

Picture: People queue for covid testing in Tianjin, China. Credit: EPA


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dbn38)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncf)
Sathnam Sanghera: Confronting Britain's history

Stephen Sackur speaks to author and journalist Sathnam Sanghera, whose bestselling book Empireland takes a critical look at Britain’s imperial past. Confronting truth means challenging cultural norms. Can it be done without opening another front in the culture wars?


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr010cn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dbrvd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dbwlj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct3030)
Why We Play

Childhood: Exploring the world through play

In the earliest years of our lives, play is crucial to building our understanding of our surroundings, culture and even ourselves. The UN considers play to be a fundamental right for every child, and a growing body of interdisciplinary research is leading to greater implementation across the globe. But how do we begin to define something that is so intrinsic to our human nature?

We look into the very beginnings of play and how our first interactions with adults have a lasting impact on the way we deal with later life. In Bangladesh, we drop in on Play Labs run by international development organisation BRAC which works to empower preschool children in deprived and fragile communities.

We learn about a Boston elementary school which uses guided recess – not only to keep kids physically and mentally well, but to teach them skills such as conflict resolution and leadership. How does play in those first few years of life affect the way we communicate, engage with, and understand the world? What’s at stake if we lose out?

Presenter: Steffan Powell
Producer: Amelia Parker


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr017vx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302t)
The Coming Storm

QAnon: The plot to break reality.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dc0bn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7ts2cd)
Novak Djokovic admits breaking isolation while Covid positive

Novak Djokovic has admitted breaching isolation rules after testing positive for Covid-19 last month, describing it as an "error of judgement".

US President Joe Biden has called for a historic change to Senate rules as he seeks to overhaul the country's election laws.

And can the AFCON 2022 tournament in Cameroon initiate change on a political, cultural and economic level?


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dc42s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7ts63j)
Novak Djokovic admits breaking isolation while Covid positive

The world's top men's tennis player, Novak Djokovic, has blamed his agent for a mistake on a travel declaration form which stated that he hadn't visited any other countries in the two weeks before arriving in Australia. Social media posts showed the Serbian star in Spain.

We hear from the World Health Organization, which warns that half of Europe will have caught the Omicron Covid variant within the next six to eight weeks.

And we report from Cameroon, host of the Africa Cup of Nations.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dc7tx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7ts9vn)
Novak Djokovic blames agent for Covid paperwork ‘mistake’

Novak Djokovic has admitted breaching isolation rules after testing positive for Covid-19 last month, describing it as an ‘error of judgement’. However his comments have prompted a new investigation from officials.

US President Joe Biden has called for a historic change to Senate rules as he seeks to overhaul the country's election laws.

And can the AFCON 2022 tournament in Cameroon initiate change on a political, cultural and economic level?


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dccl1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr01qvf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jpq)
What's at stake in Kazakhstan?

How might the protests shake up the economy, trade and business in the Central Asian nation?

Ed Butler speaks to Diana Kudaibergenova, a sociology professor at Cambridge University and herself Kazakh, about what motivated the protests, and whether the apparent ouster of former President Nursultan Nazarbayev plus a host of new economic reforms will be enough to appease the protesters.

But what does all this mean for foreign business interests in the country? Kate Mallinson of Chatham House says many Western oil executives will be having sleepless nights, while Russia's President Vladimir Putin may require an economic dividend for his military help in stabilising the situation.

And what of Kazakhstan's other giant neighbour, China? Raffaello Pantucci of the Royal United Services Institute says the upheaval has come at a time when many Kazakhs were questioning the seeming one-sidedness of their increasingly close economic ties.

(Picture: Kazakh security officials stand guard in the aftermath of protests in Almaty; Credit: Pavel Pavlov/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8s)
Malick Sidibé: Mali's superstar photographer

The Malian photographer, Malick Sidibé, is one of Africa’s most celebrated artists. His most famous photographs show black and white scenes of young people partying in the capital Bamako in the joyful, confident era after Mali got its independence from France in 1960. In the 1990s, a chance encounter with a French curator brought Sidibé’s work international acclaim. The wider world had been used to seeing a narrow range of images from Africa, so when Sidibé’s work went up on show in Western art galleries, audiences were stunned by the exuberant world they revealed. Viv Jones talks to someone who knew Sidibé back when he was a roving nightlife photographer - Manthia Diawara, Malian filmmaker and Professor at New York University.

(Photo: Malick Sidibé. Photo by BILLY FARRELL/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dchb5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct3030)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr01vlk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dcm29)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct379c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dcqtf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjgbsp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0232t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dcvkk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzr)
The Sami vocalist taking joik to a new generation

Joik is the traditional song of the Sami people of the Arctic circle. When singer and activist Maxida Märak was growing up, she used to joik with her grandfather Johan, a Sami priest who had revived joiking after successive Scandinavian governments had oppressed it, calling it 'the devil’s language'. Now she’s using her own unique brand of joik to campaign on Sami issues.

In New Caledonia, a collection of islands in the South Pacific, Doctor Claire Goiran discovered a new population of venomous sea snake. She’s been helped by a group of snorkelling fans who call themselves the Fantastic Grandmothers. Laura Thomas spoke to them in 2019.

Mariachi and heavy metal aren't an obvious musical match... but both of these musical genres have inspired a band called Metalachi. The group plays arrangements of heavy metal songs in a Mexican mariachi style, and say they're the first to do it. This interview was first broadcast in 2017.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Laura Thomas and Sarah Kendal

(Photo: Maxida Marak performs in Oslo, 2017. Credit: Gonzales Photo, Tor Atle Kleven via Alamy)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dcz9p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjgl8y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr02bl2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dd31t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfmw2cf)
Russia talks to Nato

As Russia talks to Nato in Brussels, we hear from Ukraine's ambassador to the UK, from our correspondent in Ukraine's capital Kyiv, and from a Russian perspective.

Also in the programme: Britain’s Prime Minister apologises for attending a party in Downing Street during Covid lockdown, but is it enough? And how much of the Djokovic controversy is about Serbian nationalism?

(Photo: Russian Deputy Defence Minister Colonel General Alexander Fomin, Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Alexander Grushko and Nato Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg are seen during Nato-Russia Council at the Alliance's headquarters in Brussels, Belgium. Credit: Olivier Hoslet/Reuters)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dd6sy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr02l2b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4d261219vl)
US inflation hits 7%

The US annual inflation rate rose to 7% in December, a figure not seen since 1982. Jayne Schaber lives in New York state and tells us about her experiences when out shopping, and we get a historical perspective on the latest figures from Professor Peter Morici of the Robert H Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland. Also in the programme, Kenya and the United Arab Emirates are embroiled in a row that has seen air links between the two countries suspended. Victor Amadala of The Star in Nairobi explains the background. The BBC's Clare Williamson reports on a fierce political row that has broken out in the European Union over how to define what is green or sustainable in new guidelines for finance and investment. Plus, a new report from the app monitoring firm App Annie indicates that smartphone users are spending an average of 4 hours and 48 minutes each day on their devices. The BBC's Jane Wakefield discusses the findings.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by George Thomas and Tom Kavanagh.

(Picture: A supermarket shopper in the US. Picture credit: EPA.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0ddbk2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyhbhvbhj)
Prince Andrew case to proceed

Britain's Prince Andrew has failed in his bid to get a civil case which alleges he sexually assaulted Virginia Giuffre dismissed. He has consistently denied the allegations. We explain why a US judge has allowed the claim to be heard.

The UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, is facing calls to resign following a gathering in the garden of his official residence which is alleged to have broken Covid restrictions. Mr Johnson apologised in parliament today, despite insisting that the event was "technically within the rules." We hear the latest, and get some reaction from the British public.

80 fact-checking organisations have sent an open letter to YouTube’s CEO calling on the video platform to take further action to fight disinformation. Our technology reporter will explain the changes they want to see.

And we’ll talk through the latest news on the coronavirus pandemic, with the help of one of our regular experts, Dr Maria Sundaram.

(Photo: Prince Andrew - Duke of York, Credit: Reuters/Chris Radburn)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0ddg96)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyhbhvg7n)
Teaching during the pandemic

What was it like when schools were forced to close their doors due to Covid-19? We hear from teachers around the world about the lessons they have learned from the pandemic. They discuss virtual learning, staff shortages, inequality, and what gives them hope for the future in their classrooms.

Britain's Prince Andrew has failed in his bid to get a civil case which alleges he sexually assaulted Virginia Giuffre dismissed. He has consistently denied the allegations. We explain why a US judge has allowed the claim to be heard.

The UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, is facing calls to resign following a gathering in the garden of his official residence which is alleged to have broken Covid restrictions. Mr Johnson apologised in parliament today, despite insisting that the event was "technically within the rules." We hear the latest, and get some reaction from the British public.

80 fact-checking organisations have sent an open letter to YouTube’s CEO calling on the video platform to take further action to fight disinformation. Our technology reporter will explain the changes they want to see.

(Photo: Chairs on top of desks in an empty classroom, Credit: Reuters)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0ddl1b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0ddpsg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjh9rq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0321v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nrglchklt)
2022/01/12 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0ddtjl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct3030)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr035sz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwg)
Omicron set to infect half of Europe

Tabitha Mwangi, programme manager at Cambridge Africa at Cambridge University, joins Claudia to discuss the latest on the rapid spread of Omicron across Europe and the factors behind the waves of Covid-19 infections in Kenya.

In light of the controversy surrounding Novak Djokovic’s participation in the Australian Open Tennis tournament, Dr Maggie Wearmouth explains the rare instances where people can be medically exempt from having a Covid vaccination.

Also, what do the lung scans of Covid-19 patients tell us about how the virus gets around the body, and should we be washing our mouths as well as our hands? Dr Graham Lloyd-Jones, a radiologist from the UK, shares his theory.

A new South African study shows how women living with HIV are able to keep healthy – but as they get older, they often develop high blood pressure and diabetes. Tabitha says that there are “missed opportunities” when they come into contact with health services where their weight and overall health could be monitored and advice shared.

And Claudia finds out how we can make buildings better for people who process their experiences of the world differently. We hear from Jill Corbyn and architect Jean Hewitt.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Paula McGrath

(Picture: A crowd of people wearing face masks to stop the spread of Covid-19 walk in Preciados Street, Madrid, on 28 December 2021. Photo credit: Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0ddy8q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfmwxlb)
UK Prime Minister apologises to parliament

Boris Johnson attended a drinks event at Downing Street during the Covid lockdown. Some members of his own party have called for his resignation. Is his authority completely in tatters?

Also on the programme; Prince Andrew, faces a civil trial in the United States over allegations of sexual assault, after a New York judge rejected an attempt to have the case dismissed. And we also hear from the leader of the Democratic Party of Kazakhstan, one of the major opposition voices in that country.

(Picture: UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson in parliament. Credit: UK Parliament / Taylor)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0df20v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2lyxtckt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0svp7cyf6g)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr03f97)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172yct0kdczh8q)
US inflation hits 7%

The US annual inflation rate rose to 7% in December, a figure not seen since 1982. Jayne Schaber lives in New York state and tells us about her experiences when out shopping, and we get a historical perspective on the latest figures from Professor Jason Furman of Harvard University, who was the top economic adviser to the White House during the eight years of the Obama presidency. And the BBC's Clare Williamson reports on a fierce political row that has broken out in the European Union over how to define what is green or sustainable in new guidelines for finance and investment. Plus, a new report from the app monitoring firm App Annie indicates that smartphone users are spending an average of 4 hours and 48 minutes each day on their devices; we hear from Lexy Sydow, Head of Insights at the app.

(Picture: A supermarket shopper in the US. Picture credit: EPA.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0df5rz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr03k1c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 13 JANUARY 2022

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0df9j3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct379c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dff87)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqs8r9bsky)
US inflation hits 7%

The US annual inflation rate rose to 7% in December, a figure not seen since 1982. Jayne Schaber lives in New York state and tells us about her experiences when out shopping, and we get a historical perspective on the latest figures from Professor Jason Furman of Harvard University, who was the top economic adviser to the White House during the eight years of the Obama presidency. And the BBC's Clare Williamson reports on a fierce political row that has broken out in the European Union over how to define what is green or sustainable in new guidelines for finance and investment. Plus, a new report from the app monitoring firm App Annie indicates that smartphone users are spending an average of 4 hours and 48 minutes each day on their devices; we hear from Lexy Sydow, Head of Insights at the app. And we're joined throughout the programme by Ralph Silva of Yorkville University -he's in Toronto. And Mehmal Safraz, Senior Producer for Neo TV and analyst on Geo TV's Report Card, who's in Lahore. (Picture: A supermarket shopper in the US. Picture credit: EPA.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dfk0c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z35)
Are we heading for space wars?

Would conflict on the ground between majors powers now inevitably spill over into space?

Experts believe we rely so much on technology in orbit that satellites will become targets. Russia blowing up one of its own satellites has sparked a global debate about whether there are enough rules governing what countries are allowed to do in space. With so much important stuff up there, what are the chances of a conflict in space?

With Tanya Beckett.



(Nasa Space Shuttle Atlantis. credit Nasa)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr03x8r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dfnrh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dfshm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyj)
Montenegro’s Chinese road

It has been called the priciest piece of tarmac in the world. In 2014 the government of Montenegro signed a contract with a state-owned Chinese company to build part of a 170 kilometre-long highway – a road that would connect its main port with the Serbian border to the north. The price-tag on the first 42 kilometres of asphalt was a staggering $1 billion - most of which has been borrowed from a Chinese bank. In Montenegro, questions continue to be asked about why the project went ahead when some experts said that it was not viable. The River Tara – a Unesco protected site – has been impacted by the building works, and allegations of corruption and kickbacks have hung around like a bad smell. Meanwhile, the economy has taken a massive hit as a result of the pandemic, and some Montenegrins worry about the country's ability to repay the loan. Worse still, a clause in the road contract states that Montenegro may relinquish sovereignty over unspecified parts of its territory if there is a default. But is everything as it seems? Assignment investigates.

Presenter: Linda Pressly
Producer: Mike Gallagher

(Photo: A slogan for Chinese construction workers adorns part of Montenegro’s new mountain road. Credit: Michael Gallagher/BBC)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr044s0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgv)
Sleep, eat, repeat?

A lack of sleep might leave us tired, but it can also have a major impact on what we eat, and our health.

Ruth Alexander explores the surprising relationship between diet and a poor night’s rest, and learns that it’s not just what we’re eating, but when: we hear about the perils of consuming calories late into the evening or, even worse, overnight.

But it’s not all bad news: there’s growing research into the idea that we might be able to improve our sleep quality by tweaking our diets.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:

Tania Whalen, fire brigade despatcher, Melbourne, Australia;
Matthew Walker, University of California, Berkeley, USA;
Maxine Bonham, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia;
Marie-Pierre St-Onge, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, USA.

(Picture: A young girl asleep on a plate of spaghetti. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dfx7r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7tvz8h)
Nigeria ends its Twitter ban

The Nigerian Government has lifted the suspension of Twitter operations in the country, months after it announced a clampdown on the social media platform.

A Judge in the US refuses to throw out Virginia Giuffre's sexual assault lawsuit against Prince Andrew.

And we find out about some of the strangest objects confiscated at airports.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dg0zw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7tw30m)
Novak Djokovic could still be deported despite being included in the draw for the Australian Open

The world number one men's tennis player, Novak Djokovic, has been included in the draw for the Australian Open, despite it still being unclear whether he'll be deported.

Boris Johnson is facing calls from senior Conservatives to stand down as Prime Minister after he admitted attending a drinks party during lockdown.

Ronnie Spector: Be My Baby singer of The Ronettes dies at 78.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dg4r0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7tw6rr)
Syrian victims brace for verdict in landmark torture trial

A German court is expected to issue a verdict against a former Syrian intelligence official accused of overseeing the murder of 58 people and the torture of thousands of others, in a landmark case expected to declare the actions of the Assad regime over the last decade a crime against humanity for the first time.

Novak Djokovic remains in the Australian Open draw but the decision over whether the defending champion can stay in the country drags on.

And British Prime Minister Boris Johnson refuses to resign despite calls from senior Conservatives after he admitted attending a drinks party during the nation’s first Covid lockdown.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dg8h4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr04mrj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jbf)
Kenya's fries crisis

Why can't multinationals like KFC source their ingredients locally? A shortage of fries at KFC restaurants in Kenya has led many to call for a boycott of the chain after it transpired that the company imported all of it's potatoes, despite them being abundantly grown in the country. Potatoes are Kenya's second-most consumed crop after maize, and are cultivated mostly by small-scale farmers. As Covid hits global supply chains and words like sustainability and climate gain greater importance, is it time for multinationals to start looking closer to home for their goods? Kathambi Kaaria is a climate change and sustainability advisor in Nairobi and comes from Meru, a potato growing region of Kenya. She told Tamasin Ford that when KFC arrived in the country eleven years ago she tried to supply them potatoes. Leonard Mudachi, the CEO of a Kenyan restaurant management company Branded Restaurants Africa Ltd, said he wasn’t surprised to learn that KFC imports its chips but does think that multinational companies should start scrutinizing how and where they get their produce from. John Quelch is the Dean of the Miami University Herbert Business School in the United States. He told Tamasin that the issue for a major international brand is the quality and consistency of locally sourced produce and that one mistake by one supplier can lead to a massive fallout for the companies.


(A boy looks at potatoes for sale in a market in the Kibera slum in Nairobi, Kenya; Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x48)
Costa Concordia

Costa Concordia hit submerged rocks off the Italian island of Giglio in January 2012, leaving a fifty-metre-long gash in the hull. More than four thousand passengers and crew were on board. Ian and Janice Donoff were hoping to get away in a lifeboat, but it got stuck as it was being lowered into the sea, so they had to find another way off. Thirty-two people died in the disaster. The captain was later found guilty of manslaughter for needlessly navigating the ship too close to the shore of an island it was sailing past.

Produced and presented by Nick Holland

PHOTO: The Costa Concordia lying aground off Giglio (2012)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dgd78)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr04rhn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dghzd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmc)
Writer Agatha Christie: Murder and mystery

Agatha Christie put her decision to become a writer down to a lack of education and a capacity for day-dreaming. Her murder mysteries, full of ingenious plot twists, are still regarded by many as the finest examples of crime fiction and have sold in their billions in the English language and in translation.

Although the world she depicts is considered by some to be cosy and genteel, and her plots formulaic, a new generation of screenwriters is bringing out the darker side of Christie’s imagination. So what accounts for her continuing global success, when today’s crime fiction tends to be grittier and more realist?

Bridget Kendall is joined by Dr Michelle Kazmer, Professor in the School of Information at Florida State University, who’s combined a lifelong passion for crime fiction with study into how we use information – such as clues or evidence; Dr Mark Aldridge, Associate Professor of Film and Television at Solent University and the author of Agatha Christie on Screen and Poirot: The Greatest Detective in the World; and James Prichard, Agatha Christie’s great-grandson. Award-winning crime writer Ragnar Jónasson also explains how Agatha Christie's novels influenced his own work.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for BBC World Service.


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9d)
The Port Said stadium riot

In February 2012, 74 people were killed and hundreds injured at a football match in Port Said Stadium in Egypt. Although the violence started with clashes between supporters of Al-Masry and Al-Ahly, the high death toll was also blamed on the police's failure to open the stadium gates. Al-Ahly fans believe the police's actions were motivated by the club's opposition to the Egyptian regime. Aron Keller talks to journalist and Al-Ahly fan, Ahmed Sabry. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Fans throwing flares at the riot police in Port Said stadium (AFP)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dgmqj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjk7ps)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr04zzx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dgrgn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k48)
I sailed the oceans in a Scientology jazz band

In 1968 Neil Sarfati was 23 and feeling "lost", when a conversation with a neighbour introduced him to Scientology. What began as self-help movement born out of the teachings of the founder, science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard, had become an organisation with a large and devoted following. Fearing the world would be destroyed unless the teachings of Scientology took hold, Neil left his job and wife and made his way to Los Angeles to sign up to the Sea Org, an elite group of its most dedicated members. He boarded their ship, the Apollo, and began playing saxophone in the crew’s new jazz band, The Apollo Stars, in ports dotted around the Atlantic coast of Africa and Europe. But as Hubbard became increasingly creatively involved, Neil started to doubt his commitment to Scientology.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb

(Photo: Neil Sarfati in 2012. Credit: Neil Sarfati)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x48)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dgw6s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjkh61)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr057h5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dgzyx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfmyz8j)
German court convicts former Syrian colonel

It's been described as the world's first criminal case brought over state-led torture in Syria. A court in Koblenz, Germany, gave a life sentence to Anwar Raslan. He's a former Syrian colonel who'd been linked to crimes against humanity at a notorious prison in Damascus during his country's civil war. Raslan was found guilty of mass torture and killings at a detention centre known as Branch 251.

Also in the programme: British and Dutch athletes heading to Beijing for next month's Winter Olympics have been warned about taking their own personal mobile phones with them over fears they could be spied on by the Chinese government; and Ronnie Spector, lead singer of the 1960s all-girl group The Ronettes, has died at the age of 78.

(Photo: A woman reacts as she shows a picture of her relatives, who died in Syria, after the verdict against a former Syrian secret police officer, at the Higher Regional Court in Koblenz, Germany, 13 January 2022. In the world's first trial on Syrian state torture, Anwar Raslan has been sentenced to life imprisonment for crimes against humanity, 27 counts of murder and other offences. This was announced by the Higher Regional Court in Koblenz. Credit: EPA/Sascha Steinbach)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dh3q1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr05gzf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49lvv829gt)
Covid closures at Chinese VW plants

Volkswagen China has closed two plants in Tianjin as a result of Covid outbreaks. James Mayger is with Bloomberg News in Beijing, and assesses the impact of China's zero Covid approach on global supply chains. Also in the programme, Twitter is freely available in Nigeria for the first time in seven months. The BBC's Chris Ewokor in Abuja tells us why the social media site had been blocked in the first place, and online food vendor Chef Marvy tells us how Twitter's suspension affected her business. Talks have begun on a multi-billion dollar trade deal between India and the United Kingdom. We explore the likelihood of success with Sujit Nair, who is chairman of the Europe India Centre for Business and Industry. Plus, following a shortage of French fries for Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurants in Kenya, the BBC's Tamasin Ford explores why multinational fast food chains don't simply turn to local suppliers to meet their needs.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by George Thomas, Tom Kavanagh and Philippa Goodrich.

(Picture: A Volkswagen plant in Tianjin, China. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dh7g5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyhbhy7dm)
Syrian colonel guilty in landmark trial

A court in the German city of Koblenz has sentenced Anwar Raslan to life in prison for crimes against humanity. Considered an historic trial, this is the first criminal case to be brought over state-led torture in Syria. We hear from our correspondent on the reaction of Syrians in Germany, and what this means for President Bashar al-Assad's regime.

In Sudan, anti-coup protests are taking place in Khartoum and other major cities, with pro-democracy demonstrators demanding full civilian leadership in the country. We discuss what exactly this means, and whether protests are likely to make a difference.

French teachers are on strike today, forcing the closure of hundreds of primary schools in protest at the government’s handling of Covid-19 measures. We hear from some of them on why they feel one of the biggest education strikes in recent years is necessary.

And our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Emma Hodcroft, is with us to answer questions about the latest Covid-related headlines.

(Photo: Anwar Raslan, Credit: Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dhc69)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyhbhyc4r)
Coronavirus: Family fallout

What happens if you disagree with your family on Covid vaccines? We'll hear the experiences of a dad in Florida and mum in Ireland on the differences of opinion in their families.

A court in the German city of Koblenz has sentenced Anwar Raslan to life in prison for crimes against humanity. Considered an historic trial, this is the first criminal case to be brought over state-led torture in Syria. We hear from our correspondent on the reaction of Syrians in Germany, and what this means for President Bashar al-Assad's regime.

In Sudan, anti-coup protests are taking place in Khartoum and other major cities, with pro-democracy demonstrators demanding full civilian leadership in the country. We discuss what exactly this means, and whether protests are likely to make a difference.

Picture: An Ivory Coast fan receives a Covid-19 vaccine at a vaccination center in Abidjan (REUTERS / Luc Gnago)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dhgyf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k48)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x48)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dhlpk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjl6nt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr05yyy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nrglclghx)
2022/01/13 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dhqfp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr062q2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4w)
Have we got it wrong on Omicron?

Studies using swabs from coronavirus patients seem to contradict earlier findings from cell cultures which showed Omicon replicated faster than earlier variants. As Benjamin Meyer from the centre for Vaccinology at the University of Geneva, explains there may be other reasons why omicron is spreading faster not just how quickly it reproduces.

Predicting how the pandemic will develop is not possible, however predicting what individual mutations in the virus may develop and the impact they might have individually and collectively is getting closer,
Cyrus Maher and Amalio Telenti of the biotech company Vir, have developed a way to model potential future viral mutations which they hope will now be used by many scientists worldwide looking to understand the virus.

There are concerns that other viruses may be on the rise, bird flu in particular, which as Nicola Lewis of the Royal Veterinary College explains is now spreading to part of the world where it is not usually seen, and infecting other animals as well as birds.

And we’ve news of a massive collection of nests – at the bottom of the sea, Deep sea Ecologist Autun Perser describes how he found them in Antarctica.

(Image: Getty Images)


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dhv5t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfmzthf)
Former colonel guilty of crimes against humanity in Syrian civil war jail

A court in Germany has sentenced a former Syrian colonel, Anwar Raslan, to life imprisonment for torture in Syria's civil war in a notorious Damascus jail known as "Hell on Earth".

The trial in Koblenz is the world's first criminal case brought over state-led torture in Syria.

Also in the programme: Buckingham Palace announces that Queen Elizabeth's second son, Prince Andrew, has been stripped of his military honours and royal title; and has a week of intensive diplomacy saved eastern Europe from renewed conflict? We'll hear from the Russian ambassador in London.

(Photo shows Syrians stood outside the court in Koblenz clutching photos of victims of the civil war. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dhyxy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2lyxx8gx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0svp7d1b3k)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr06b6b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs63nsd2rj)
India and UK begin free trade talks

Representatives of the Indian and British governments have held a first day of talks over a free trade deal, potentially worth billions of dollars. The UK’s Secretary of State for International Trade, Anne-Marie Trevelyan, told us that the proposed agreement will bring growth opportunities to British businesses. Plus, a dispute over lithium mining concessions granted by Chile’s outgoing president Sebastian Pinera has sparked fierce debate in recent days. Chilean economist Francisco Meneses tells us about the importance of lithium to the country’s economy, and how incoming head of state Gabriel Boric is walking a tightrope when it comes to building a political coalition. We’re joined by Cary Leahey of the New York-based Decision Economics for a look at what’s been happening in the US markets on Thursday. Plus, Twitter is freely available in Nigeria for the first time in seven months. The BBC's Chris Ewokor in Abuja tells us why the social media site had been blocked in the first place, and online food vendor Chef Marvy tells us how Twitter's suspension affected her business. Plus, following a shortage of French fries for Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurants in Kenya, the BBC's Tamasin Ford explores why multinational fast food chains don't simply turn to local suppliers to meet their needs.

(Picture: Indian commerce minister Piyush Goyal and UK international trade minister Anne-Marie Trevelyan in New Delhi. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dj2p2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr06fyg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 14 JANUARY 2022

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dj6f6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0djb5b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqs8r9fph1)
Row over lithium concessions in Chile

In Chile, outgoing president Sebastian Pinera has sparked a firestorm by granting lithium mining concessions to two companies. Chilean economist Francisco Meneses tells us about the importance of lithium to the country’s economy, and how incoming head of state Gabriel Boric is walking a tightrope when it comes to building a political coalition. Plus, representatives of the Indian and British governments have held a first day of talks over a free trade deal, potentially worth billions of dollars. The UK’s Secretary of State for International Trade, Anne-Marie Trevelyan, told us that the proposed agreement will bring growth opportunities to British businesses. Following a shortage of French fries for Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurants in Kenya, the BBC's Tamasin Ford explores why multinational fast food chains don't simply turn to local suppliers to meet their needs.And the head of Google in the UK, Ronan Harris, tells the BBC that hybrid working will be “experimental” over the next two years, as companies and employees try to strike a balance between home and the office. Throughout the programme we’re joined by Jyoti Malhotra, Senior Consulting Editor at The Print, in New Delhi, and by the writer and journalist Paddy Hirsch – contributing editor at National Public Radio speaking to us from Los Angeles.

(Picture: A protester holds a placard saying "let's defend lithium" at an anti-privatisation demonstration in Santiago, Chile. Credit: Getty Images)

Programme produced by Nisha Patel and Tom Kavanagh


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0djfxg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2d)
Baroness Helena Kennedy QC: Fighting for equality in British law

Women are still fighting for equality all over the world. Even in long established democracies like the UK plenty of evidence suggests that from the workplace to the law courts there is a long way to go. Stephen Sackur speaks to Baroness Helena Kennedy who has been trying to loosen the grip of the patriarchy in the British legal system for five decades.


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr06t5v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0djknl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k48)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x48)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0djpdq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj4)
Theranos and Silicon Valley

What does the conviction of Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes tell us about tech startup culture? The BBC's James Clayton is joined by NPR tech reporter Bobby Allyn to ask if any lessons are being learned by Silicon Valley, where startups are encouraged to promise world-changing technology, and investors demand sky-high valuations. We discuss the impact of the Theranos scandal with one of the whistleblowers involved, the venture capital companies funding exciting new tech companies, and the biotech startups who say blood testing technology still has a bright future.

(Photo: Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes arriving in court in November, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr071p3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 World Football (w3ct1v07)
Africa Cup of Nations: Under way in Cameroon

The former Uganda and Sierra Leone coach Johnny McKinstry discusses a slow start to the Africa Cup of Nations. We also hear from the former Cameroon coach Claude Le Roy.

Picture on website: Ivory Coast's Max Gradel celebrates after scoring a goal against Equatorial Guinea (CHARLY TRIBALLEAU/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0djt4v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7tyw5l)
Secret audio sheds light on Tunisia's Ben Ali’s frantic last hours

In exclusive, never heard before recordings believed to be of former Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, the BBC reveals the anxious telephone calls that helped seal the fate of his 23-year dictatorship and spark a wave of revolutions across the Middle East.

Why Japan is betting on railguns for missile defence.

And France presses the EU to agree sanctions against Mali, in line with ECOWAS.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0djxwz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7tyzxq)
Secret phone calls shed light on Tunisia’s Ben Ali’s last 48 hours

The BBC has obtained extraordinary recordings which we believe to be of phone calls made by a former Middle East dictator, Tunisian president Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, as he flew out of the country in 2011. The recordings give an insight into the change in Ben Ali's mood in the last 48 hours of his regime, as he slowly begins to grasp the true impact of protests rocking his feared police state.

The British prime minister, Boris Johnson, is under further pressure following new allegations of parties held at Downing Street in breach of Covid rules. The alleged gatherings took place on the eve of the funeral of Queen Elizabeth's husband, Prince Philip, during which she was seen sitting alone because of coronavirus measures.

And could a rapprochement finally be on the cards between Armenia and Turkey after 30 years of frosty relations?


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dk1n3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv32n7tz3nv)
Novak Djokovic’s Australian visa is cancelled

The Australian government has cancelled the visa of the Serbian tennis star, Novak Djokovic, for the second time. The immigration minister, Alex Hawke, said the decision was made in the public interest. The men's world number one tennis player initially had his visa revoked last week because he had not been vaccinated against Covid.

More calls for the resignation of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson after it was revealed Downing Street staff held a 'lockdown-breaking party' on the eve of Prince Philip's funeral and 'drank into the early hours' the night before the Queen sat alone to lay her husband of 70 years to rest.

And secret audio sheds light on the frantic last hours of former Middle East dictator, Tunisian president Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dk5d7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr07jnm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j1d)
Brexit and my small business

It’s just over a year since the UK’s trading relationship with the EU fundamentally changed. So how are small businesses in Britain finding life outside the single market and customs union? The BBC's Vivienne Nunis speaks with chocolate-maker Jacques Cop of Coco Caravan and Kathleen May from the London-based independent publisher, Hurst, as well as Sally Jones, trade strategist at EY. Image: Hand drawing a red line between the UK and the rest of the European Union. Credit: Getty


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzr)
The first silicone breast implants

30-year-old Texan Timmie Jean Lindsey was the first woman in the world to have silicone breast implants. In 1962, she was offered the operation free of charge by two pioneering surgeons. It's gone on to become one of the most popular cosmetic procedures in the world. In 2012, Timmie Jean Lindsey spoke to Claire Bowes.

PHOTO: A silicone breast implant (Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dk94c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr07ndr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dkdwh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htm)
Climate change: A risk to food security?

While agriculture remains one of the biggest contributors to climate change, it is also most exposed to its adverse effects. Scientists say that extreme weather events will become more frequent and more intense as global temperatures continue to rise. In 2021, harsh winters, unseasonably warm summers, and sudden changes in rainfall affected food production around the globe - from the farmlands of Europe to the grasslands of Africa. There has been a jump in the prices of essential commodities like wheat and maize and traders are braced for more fluctuations. Climate risk is not only affecting farmers and their livelihoods, it is also exposing more people to food shortages. So what are the most pressing dangers and how can we protect our food supply from extreme weather events?

Paul Henley is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Ellen Otzen


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dkjmm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjn4lw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr07wx0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1v07)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dkncr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g4)
Journalism under Taliban rule

When the Taliban took over in Afghanistan five months ago, the BBC’s Shoaib Sharifi and his team had to decide how to adapt to the new reality. Shoaib is the country director of the BBC’s international charity, BBC Media Action. He tells us how they’re trying to meet the needs of audiences who face so many new challenges.

Chinese eye row
Chinese model Cai Niangniang recently found herself in the middle of a social media storm. Pictures of her were deemed 'deliberately offensive' and 'unpatriotic' due to her narrow eyes, with many online saying this perpetuated racist stereotypes of Chinese people. The BBC's Waiyee Yip in Singapore explains the debate.

Rise of the right in Georgia
The BBC's Rayhan Demytrie, based in the Georgian capital Tbilisi, has been investigating the rise of the far right in Georgia, particularly focussing on an attack last July on the offices of the LGBT group Tbilisi Pride. Many of those involved were supporters of the broadcasting group Alt-Info, which has recently registered as a political party. Rayhan shares her insights.

Pistachios from Aleppo
Aleppo is famous for its pistachios, eaten fresh as a summertime snack, and in all manner of sweet and savoury foods. BBC Arabic recently reported on efforts by farmers to revive the industry which was devastated by war. Lina Shaikhouni is from Aleppo and shares her memories.

(Photo: Shoaib Sharifi. Credit: Shoaib Sharifi, BBC Media Action Afghanistan)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dks3w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjnd34)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr084d8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dkww0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfn1w5m)
Australia cancels Djokovic visa again

Australia has revoked tennis star Novak Djokovic's visa for a second time in a row over his right to remain in the country. The decision on "health and good order" grounds means he could be deported and get a three-year visa ban.

Also in the programme: we hear what's thought to be recordings of the final hours in power of former Tunisia’s president Zine al-Abidine in 2011; and the Russian ambassador in London on the tensions with the West over Ukraine.

Photo: Novak Djokovic practises ahead of the Australian Open at Melbourne Park in Melbourne, Australia. Credit: Reuters).


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dl0m4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr08cwj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y474jng3931)
EDF ordered to sell cheap nuclear power

French energy firm EDF has been ordered by the government to sell cheap nuclear power. The company says the move could cost it $9.5bn, and at one point today its shares declined by 25% on the news. We get the background from Thierry Bros who is a professor at the Paris Institute of Political Studies, and used to advise the government on energy matters. Also in the programme, the BBC's Mike Johnson reports on the state of Brazil's economy, ahead of presidential elections due in October. Search giant Google is investing more than $950m in buying and refurbishing its London headquarters, and we hear about the company's plans for getting workers back to the office at least some of the time, from Ronan Harris, who heads up Google in the UK. Plus, there's to be a revolution in the American condiment industry. After 70 years, the United States has decided to stop regulating the ingredients of French dressing, and we find out more from the BBC's Victoria Craig.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Joshua Thorpe, Philippa Goodrich and Gabriele Shaw.

(Picture: An EDF nuclear plant in France. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dl4c8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyhbj149q)
Djokovic visa cancelled again

We’ll explain the latest twist in the story of Novak Djokovic in Australia, after the country’s immigration minister cancelled the tennis player’s visa over his Covid vaccination status. The men’s world number one could now be deported and face a three year ban from the country, but his lawyers are appealing. We'll talk through the detail and hear from some tennis fans who have tickets to the Australian Open. We'll also talk about the impact on Novak Djokovic's brand.

As China continues to pursue a zero Covid policy by locking down entire cities over a handful of coronavirus cases, we speak to three international students at Chinese universities. How is it having an impact on their studies?

We’ll talk through the latest coronavirus stories with one of our regular experts, Dr Rick Malley from Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

Picture: Novak Djokovic trains at Melbourne Park on 13th January (EPA / DIEGO FEDELE)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dl83d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxyhbj181v)
Coronavirus: China's Covid Lockdowns

As China continues to pursue a zero Covid policy by locking down entire cities over a handful of coronavirus cases, we speak to three international students at Chinese universities. How is it having an impact on their studies?

We’ll explain the latest twist in the story of Novak Djokovic in Australia, after the country’s immigration minister cancelled the tennis player’s visa over his Covid vaccination status. The men’s world number one could now be deported and face a three year ban from the country, but his lawyers are appealing. We'll talk through the detail and hear from some tennis fans who have tickets to the Australian Open. We'll also talk about the impact on Novak Djokovic's brand.

We’ll talk through the latest coronavirus stories with one of our regular experts, Dr Rick Malley from Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

Picture: Testing at a compound under lockdown in Anyang, Henan province, China on January 12th (China Daily via Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dlcvj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dlhln)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxx1pjp3kx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr08vw1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nrglcpcf0)
2022/01/14 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dlmbs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr08zm5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prm)
Are Big-heads Smarter?

We live in a world where bigger is often seen as better - and the size of someone's brain is no exception. But a listener in Nairobi wants to know, does size really matter when it comes to grey matter? CrowdScience presenter Marnie Chesterton is on a mission to find out if the physical attributes of our head and brain can tell us anything about what's going on inside. We certainly thought so in the past.

In the 1800s, phrenology – determining someone’s characteristics by their skull shape – was very fashionable and curator Malcolm MacCallum gives us a tour of the extensive phrenological collection of death masks and skulls in Edinburgh’s anatomy museum. It's a 'science' that's now been completely debunked. Yet there’s no escaping the fact that over our evolutionary history, human brain size has increased dramatically alongside our cognitive capabilities.

But is it the whole story? Rick Potts, Director of the Human Origins Program at the Smithsonian tells of the point in time when human brains expanded the most; a time when the climate was changing, resources were unreliable and the intelligence to be adaptable might mean the difference between life and death. Adaptability is also key to Professor Wendy Johnson’s definition of intelligence, although she points out that IQ test, flawed as they are, are still the best predictor we have for intelligence… and that, yes, there is a weak correlation between having a larger head, and doing better at IQ tests. Why is that? We don’t know, says Dr Stuart Ritchie from KCL. According to him, neuroscientists are only in the foothills of understanding how a physical difference in the brain might underpin a person’s psychology. But researching this could offer valuable insights into how our amazing brains work.

[Image: Brain being measured. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dlr2x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jzfn2qdj)
US accuses Russia of planning provocative acts

The United States and Ukraine have accused Moscow of planning to stage provocative acts against its own side as a pretext for an invasion.

A Pentagon spokesman said Russian operatives were planning a "false-flag" operation, to allow Moscow to accuse Ukraine of preparing an attack. It comes after a week of US-Russian talks aimed at defusing tensions. Russia has dismissed the claims.

Also in the programme: the UK's prime minister, Boris Johnson, is under renewed pressure after his office apologised to Queen Elizabeth for parties held in breach of Covid rules the night before her husband's funeral. And we hear exclusive, previously unheard phone recordings examining the final chaotic hours in power of one of Africa’s longest-serving dictators.


(Photo shows Ukrainian Territorial Defense reservists conducting military exercises near Kiev. Credit: EPA)


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dlvv1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx2lyy05d0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0svp7d470n)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr0973f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrcny5sp7b)
EDF ordered to sell cheap nuclear power

French energy firm EDF has been ordered by the government to sell cheap nuclear power. The company says the move could cost it $9.5bn, and at one point today its shares declined by 25% on the news. We get the background from Thierry Bros who is a professor at the Paris Institute of Political Studies, and used to advise the government on energy matters. Also in the programme, the BBC's Mike Johnson reports on the state of Brazil's economy, ahead of presidential elections due in October. Search giant Google is investing more than $950m in buying and refurbishing its London headquarters, and we hear about the company's plans for getting workers back to the office at least some of the time, from Ronan Harris, who heads up Google in the UK. Plus, there's to be a revolution in the American condiment industry. After 70 years, the United States has decided to stop regulating the ingredients of French dressing, and we find out more from the BBC's Victoria Craig.

(Picture: An EDF nuclear plant in France. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjzf0dlzl5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzksvr09bvk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1v07)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3ct1gyh)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3ct1gyj)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gyj)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gyj)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172xzkshgpjfqz)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkshgpjkh3)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkshgpjxqh)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkshgpk8yw)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkshgpkn68)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkshgplhf5)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172xzkshgplzdp)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172xzkshgpmbn2)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkshgpmgd6)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkshgpmtml)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkshgpq01x)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172xzksvqztz26)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzksvqzxr75)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzksvqzy3gk)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzksvqzybyt)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzksvr0054r)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzksvr00jd4)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzksvr010cn)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzksvr017vx)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzksvr03f97)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzksvr03k1c)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzksvr03x8r)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzksvr044s0)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzksvr04mrj)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzksvr06fyg)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzksvr06t5v)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzksvr071p3)

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BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172xzjz1r2tyqg)

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BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172xzjz1r2xvmk)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d6w)

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BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxyhbhnjpb)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j5x)

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Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqs8r94zrr)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqs8r97wnv)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqs8r9bsky)

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Business Weekly 04:06 SUN (w3ct2dhx)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dhx)

CrowdScience 02:32 MON (w3ct1prl)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1prl)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1prl)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1prm)

Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct2cbp)

Deeply Human 23:06 SUN (w3ct2cbp)

Deeply Human 03:06 MON (w3ct2cbp)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lt7)

Digital Planet 02:32 WED (w3ct1lt7)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lt7)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lt7)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct30j0)

Discovery 02:32 TUE (w3ct30j0)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct30j0)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct30j0)

From Our Own Correspondent 02:06 SAT (w3ct1mw0)

From Our Own Correspondent 05:06 SUN (w3ct1mw0)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mw0)

HARDtalk 08:06 SAT (w3ct1ncd)

HARDtalk 08:06 SUN (w3ct1n2c)

HARDtalk 02:06 MON (w3ct1n6x)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n6x)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n6x)

HARDtalk 23:06 MON (w3ct1n6x)

HARDtalk 02:06 WED (w3ct1ncf)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1ncf)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1ncf)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nwg)

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Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nwg)

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Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct3034)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct3034)

Heart and Soul 00:32 MON (w3ct3034)

Heart and Soul 03:32 MON (w3ct3034)

In the Studio 01:32 MON (w3ct1tf4)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tf5)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tf5)

In the Studio 23:32 TUE (w3ct1tf5)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dl5)

More or Less 23:50 SUN (w3ct2dl5)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dl5)

Music Life 23:06 SAT (w3ct1hd1)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv32n7tl8k6)

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Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172xv5jm5bchqr)

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Newshour 14:06 MON (w172xv5jzfmp8k7)

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Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172xv5jzfn2qdj)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1ky2)

Outlook 22:32 SUN (w3ct1ky2)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jv7)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct1jv7)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3ct1jv7)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3ct1jxh)

Outlook 18:06 TUE (w3ct1jxh)

Outlook 03:06 WED (w3ct1jxh)

Outlook 12:06 WED (w3ct1jzr)

Outlook 18:06 WED (w3ct1jzr)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k48)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3ct1k48)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k48)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l2l)

Over to You 01:50 SUN (w3ct1l2l)

Over to You 06:50 SUN (w3ct1l2l)

People Fixing The World 02:06 TUE (w3ct1pm1)

People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pm1)

People Fixing The World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pm1)

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Pick of the World 09:32 SAT (w3ct386c)

Pick of the World 02:32 SUN (w3ct386c)

Pick of the World 23:32 SUN (w3ct386c)

Ros Atkins on ... 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dpf)

Science In Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l4w)

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Science In Action 13:32 FRI (w3ct1l4w)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nrglc9rsm)

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Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172y0nrglchklt)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172y0nrglclghx)

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Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct1l9c)

Sporting Witness 02:50 SUN (w3ct1l9c)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3ct1l9d)

Sporting Witness 00:50 FRI (w3ct1l9d)

Sports News 22:20 SAT (w172y0sv9z2fz9x)

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Sports News 22:20 MON (w172y0svp7crmd8)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0qczs8bl6d)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tnrpp38x2)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0tnrpp6f9f)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lcm)

Tech Tent 00:06 MON (w3ct1nj3)

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Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1nj4)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3ct1nj4)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rv3)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3ct1rv3)

The Arts Hour 00:06 WED (w3ct1rv3)

The Climate Question 04:06 MON (w3ct2drp)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2drp)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2drp)

The Coming Storm 04:32 WED (w3ct302t)

The Coming Storm 11:32 WED (w3ct302t)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct2zhj)

The Compass 04:06 WED (w3ct3030)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct3030)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct3030)

The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p9n)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p9p)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p9p)

The Conversation 23:32 MON (w3ct1p9p)

The Cultural Frontline 05:06 SAT (w3ct1pts)

The Cultural Frontline 22:32 SAT (w3ct1pts)

The Cultural Frontline 01:06 SUN (w3ct1pts)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1pts)

The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct379c)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct379c)

The Documentary 04:06 TUE (w3ct2z28)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct2z28)

The Documentary 20:06 TUE (w3ct2z28)

The Documentary 10:06 WED (w3ct379c)

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The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20g3)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rgt)

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The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3ct1rgv)

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The Forum 06:06 SUN (w3ct1rmb)

The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rmb)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3ct1rmc)

The Forum 00:06 FRI (w3ct1rmc)

The History Hour 07:06 SAT (w3ct1z82)

The History Hour 19:06 SAT (w3ct1z82)

The History Hour 00:06 TUE (w3ct1z82)

The Inquiry 12:06 SUN (w3ct1z34)

The Inquiry 02:06 THU (w3ct1z35)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z35)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct1z35)

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The Newsroom 11:06 SAT (w172xyxwpf6ywx4)

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The Newsroom 22:06 SAT (w172xyx27pm9xp8)

The Newsroom 11:06 SUN (w172xyxwpf71st7)

The Newsroom 19:06 SUN (w172xyxwpf72rs8)

The Newsroom 22:06 SUN (w172xyx27pmdtlc)

The Newsroom 11:06 MON (w172xyxx1pj8jzh)

The Newsroom 13:06 MON (w172xyxx1pj8sgr)

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The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3ct1htl)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1htl)

The Real Story 07:06 SUN (w3ct1htl)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3ct1htm)

The Science Hour 06:06 SAT (w3ct1ywc)

The Science Hour 00:06 SUN (w3ct1ywc)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wzq)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3ct1x20)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct1x20)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3ct1x20)

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Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3ct1x6j)

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Witness History 03:50 THU (w3ct1x8s)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3ct1x48)

Witness History 12:50 THU (w3ct1x48)

Witness History 18:50 THU (w3ct1x48)

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Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3ct1wzr)

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WorklifeIndia 01:32 SAT (w3ct2f4b)

WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f4b)

WorklifeIndia 05:32 SUN (w3ct2f4b)

World Business Report 01:06 SAT (w172xzlly696pmv)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzlm9gljbq6)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y48cprbrn3l)

World Business Report 22:32 MON (w172ycrsd9grqtl)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172y4bv0y4xg9k)

World Business Report 22:32 TUE (w172ycslv12jy4z)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172y4d261219vl)

World Business Report 22:32 WED (w172yct0kdczh8q)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172y49lvv829gt)

World Business Report 22:32 THU (w172ycs63nsd2rj)

World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172y474jng3931)

World Business Report 22:32 FRI (w172ycrcny5sp7b)

World Football 04:32 FRI (w3ct1v07)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1v07)

World Football 23:32 FRI (w3ct1v07)

World of Wisdom 05:32 SAT (w3ct2zwc)

World of Wisdom 18:32 SAT (w3ct2zwc)

World of Wisdom 01:32 SUN (w3ct2zwc)

World of Wisdom 10:32 MON (w3ct2zwc)