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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 01 JANUARY 2022

SAT 00:06 BBC Correspondents' Look Ahead (w3ct2zvw)
What has 2022 got in store?

Razia Iqbal asks Andrew Harding, Katy Watson, Laura Trevelyan, Lyse Doucet and Yogita Limaye predict the key events and trends for 2022.

As the developed world recovers from the coronavirus pandemic, what are the risks for poorer countries – and will the global economic rebound continue? What chances are there for a dramatic breakthrough on the climate when world powers meet at Cop27 in Egypt? The American public will get their first chance for a verdict on the Biden administration in the mid-term elections – alongside a general election in Brazil, while France will choose its new president. How will this change our view of the world?

Producer: Ben Carte
Editor: Hugh Levinson


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs1xvr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlx0wmnkw6)
Cocktail trends 2022

Our love for cocktails has surged during the pandemic. Nisha Patel speaks to mixologists and bar owners from all over the world to find out what's inspiring them and what concoctions we may see across global bar menus. Hanky Panky bar in Mexico says lockdown sent everyone back to their books and emerging are pairings inspired by cook books. Two Schmucks in Barcelona say the diversity of their staff has led to a range of cocktails you'd usually see in your main meal and cocktail aficionado Lynette Marrero shares how she's seen her cocktail masterclasses filled with customers who have a thirst for premium alcohol. Phil Tate from CGA strategy analyses cocktail trends worldwide and explains how the pandemic has influenced and changed the global cocktail trend, and how this will continue into 2022.

This programme is produced and presented by Nisha Patel

(PIC: Vodka with cranberry and grapefruit CREDIT: Getty)


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cr944)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f49)
How are India’s women entrepreneurs breaking through?

Many successful start-ups have been founded in India over the last decade, but a vast majority of them are led by men. While many Indian women have entrepreneurial ambitions, it is often more difficult for them to succeed. In fact, a recent study by the World Economic Forum says that worldwide, women entrepreneurs face a systemic lack of access to capital, credit, land, or financial products that prevent them from starting a company. There is also an unconscious bias and a lack of family support and child-care options, especially in India’s patriarchal society.

So what’s holding India's women entrepreneurs back, and what needs to be done to encourage more women to break through these barriers?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how India’s women leaders and businesswomen are breaking stereotypes and making a name for themselves.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Dimpy Dewan, co-founder, Hanchens; Mona Singh, venture capitalist, India Accelerator; Sairee Chahal, founder, SHEROES, Mahila Money; Rama Gupta, founder, Shrishti


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs21lw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvz)
Insight, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers from around the world.

(Image: A fern growing out of burned soil. Credit: allg)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46crdw8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lcl)
Is this the start of a golden era for Australian cricket?

Isabelle Westbury, Jim Maxwell and Charu Sharma discuss Australia winning the Men's Ashes in just twelve days and look at whether this is the start of a golden era for the country in both red and white ball cricket. They also ask who is to blame for England's defeat and how they can improve.

Charu Sharma has been watching the first Test match between South Africa and India and tells us who his stand out players have been, why India seem unable to convert starts to big scores and whether he thinks Test captain Virat Kohli will retire soon.

Plus the team are joined by England bowler Kate Cross to preview the Women's Ashes, tell us how their preparation has been impacted by Covid-19 and the excitement building within the camp.

Photo: Australia's captain Pat Cummins (C) leads his team on a lap of the ground after Australia won the match and retained the Ashes during the third day of the third Ashes cricket Test match in Melbourne on December 28, 2021. (Credit: HAMISH BLAIR/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs25c0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g2)
Iraq 2021

BBC Arabic journalist Murad Shishani spent several weeks this year reporting from Iraq. He visited Mosul, liberated four years ago from so-called Islamic State, to gauge the mood ahead of October's election. More recently, he covered the stories of migrants, from those repatriated from Belarus to those lost in the English Channel, and those still planning to make the hazardous journey.

Benin's royal treasures
This year saw a historic moment for the West African nation of Benin, when France handed back 26 royal treasures that were looted by colonial troops in 1892. BBC Afrique contributor Rachida Houssou, interpreted by Rose-Marie Bouboutou, describes the power, wealth and craftsmanship of the former Kingdom of Dahomey.

Karachi's dwindling Parsi community
The Sohrab Katrak Parsi colony in Karachi was built nearly a century ago by the local Parsi population, who played a huge role in the development of the city. But today the community is dwindling, with many houses falling into disrepair, as BBC Urdu’s Saher Baloch discovered.

Is housework work?
A landmark ruling in Kenya answered that question with a yes, when a judge recognised its value in the division of a couple’s property. Carolyne Kiambo from BBC Nairobi explains the detail of this case, and what it means for Kenyan women.

The Passengers of the Yomei Maru
Ilia Kizirov tells the story of his BBC Russian podcast series, The Passengers of the Yomei Maru, which follows the adventures of nearly 800 Russian children who had to flee the Civil War. They travelled around the world on a Japanese freighter before arriving home over two years later.

(Photo: Election banners in Mosul on sites destroyed in the liberation battle of 2017. Credit: BBC)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzp)
The secret history of Monopoly

In 1904, a left-wing American feminist called Lizzy Magie patented a board game that evolved into what we now know as Monopoly. But 30 years later, when Monopoly was first marketed in the United States during the Great Depression, it was an out-of-work salesman from Pennsylvania who was credited with inventing it. Louise Hidalgo has been talking to American journalist Mary Pilon about the hidden history of one of the world's most popular board games, and to the economics professor Ralph Anspach who unearthed the story.

Picture: A family playing a game of Monopoly in the 1930s (Credit: SSPL/Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs2934)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 BBC Correspondents' Look Ahead (w3ct2zvw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs2dv8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptr)
Black Speculative Arts

Author, editor and publisher Sheree Renée Thomas celebrates the global moment the Black Speculative Arts movement is having.
Traditionally in popular culture Science Fiction, Fantasy and Speculative Arts have long been considered the domain of white men. Yet, contrary to popular belief, Black artists have been creating groundbreaking work in this space from the very beginning of these genres. Sheree and scholar Susana Morris re-evaluate and recognise the forgotten or underappreciated names that, without, the community would not be as recognised as it is today.

Author Nisi Shawl gives us context of what it was like to be a science fiction writer when Black Speculative Arts was not considered as part of the traditional ‘canon’. They explain, from a personal angle, how the community grew and developed into the worldwide phenomenon that it is today. In 2018, the Marvel movie Black Panther was released. After just one month it had made over a billion dollars in profit and became cherished by fans across the world. This was a watershed moment for Black Speculative Arts as it proved that there was a huge audience for the work. However, without the independent publishers allowing artists to create their work for decades on the fringes, the movie never could have happened.

With the help of Andrea Hairston, Sheree explores the importance of these presses, able to create exciting and unique work, that helped usher in a new wave of artists that are taking on the mainstream like never before. Dr Reynaldo Anderson is a curator and exhibitor of Black Speculative Arts. He talks to Sheree how one exhibition in 2015 has gone on to become a global movement with artists now across Europe, America and Africa.

Image: A picture designed for the recent exhibition in New York of the Black Speculative Arts Movement.
Credit: John Jennings, Black Speculative Arts


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46crs3n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwb)
Social distance

The pandemic has meant stopping so many of the everyday things we used to do, including not hugging and kissing others. For Susanna from Italy, not being able to connect with people socially in the way she is used to has led to a deep disorientation. Gary Zukav gives his perspective that it is not the pandemic that has led to her feeling more isolated from others, but rather it is fear of what is different.

Presented by the BBC's Sana Safi.

Produced by Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards.


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dpd)
America’s abortion divide

Towards the end of 2021, the US Supreme Court heard arguments in the most important abortion case in a generation. It is the biggest challenge to a 1973 ruling that legalised abortion nationally, and could change reproductive rights in the country. Ros Atkins looks at the abortion debate in the US and asks why this case is happening now.

Photo: Abortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the US Supreme Court on 1, December, 2021 in Washington, DC (REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs2jld)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1ywb)
2021 the year of variants

In our first programme of the year, we gathered a group of scientific experts directly involved in analysing the structure and impact of the SARS- Cov-2 coronavirus. There were concerns over the emergence of two new variants, Alfa and Beta, especially whether these variants might spread more quickly or outmanoeuvre the suite of new vaccines that were about to be rolled out.
And now with Omicron, the same questions are being asked about this variant’s ability to spread and overcome our defences.

We’ve invited the same scientists back to give us their assessment of our journey with Covid 19 over the past year and discuss their findings on Omicron.

Featuring:
Ravi Gupta Professor of Clinical Microbiology at the University of Cambridge
Tulio De Oliveria Professor on Bioinformatics, Stellenbosch University, South Africa
Dr. Allie Greaney From the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Washington School of Medicine
And Professor Jeremy Luban from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard
Should you wash your eggs? Well, believe it or not, there is quite an international debate about this question from CrowdScience listener Susan. In Canada, where Susan grew up, commercially sold eggs are washed before they reach stores, whereas in the UK where she is now living they are not. So what is best to avoid contamination?

It’s one of a number of egg-themed questions that CrowdScience tries to crack in this episode. One of our presenters, Marnie Chesterton, heads over to Susan’s home in London to cook some eggs and explore other egg cooking questions from our listeners, such as what is the science behind frying an egg without it sticking to the pan and why are some boiled eggs harder to shell than others?

Meanwhile, this episode’s other presenter, Anand Jagatia, explores questions about eggs after they have hatched. He investigates a case of curious chicken behaviour sent in by listener Laurie, as well as working out how a cuckoo knows it’s a cuckoo when it’s been raised in another bird’s nest.


Featuring: Dr. Vincent Guyonnet, Dr. Valérie Lechevalier, Dr. Siobhan Abeyesinghe and Dr. Ros Gloag






(Image:Getty Images)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs2nbj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z81)
A history of games

The inside story of games that shaped the modern world. Including Atari's Nolan Bushnell on his game Pong which helped launch the video game industry. Plus the origin of Grand Theft Auto, the man who invented Tetris, the son of the Lego brick pioneer and the true story of Monopoly. Max Pearson also talks to the technology journalist Louise Blain about the development of the huge gaming industry and where it goes next.

Photo: Pong being played at a retro games event in Germany (Getty Images)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs2s2n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n63)
Aly Raisman: Are gold medals put above athletes' wellbeing?

The athletic excellence seen at the Tokyo Olympics will live long in the memory, but so will the moment the brilliant US gymnast Simone Biles chose not to compete to safeguard her mental and physical health. US gymnastics is still reeling from the repercussions of a sex abuse scandal - what can go wrong when results are put above care of individual athletes? Stephen Sackur speaks to Aly Raisman, a multiple Olympic gold medallist who testified about being abused by the team's former doctor. Is there a wider lesson for elite sport in the shame of American gymnastics?


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cs4c1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9m)
Musical child prodigies

Very few people in the world are blessed with exceptional musical talent that is apparent from an early age. What is childhood like in the spotlight, especially as a young woman? To find out, Kim Chakanetsa meets two musicians whose careers began when they were children.

Tosin Jegede was a child singing sensation in Nigeria in the 1980s. She released her first solo album in 1985 when just five years old, and went on to release two more before her teenage years. From hiding from adoring fans, flying all over the country to perform and singing in front of Nelson Mandela, her childhood was anything but ordinary and she had to cope with publicity which went well beyond her music and its performance.

Twenty-year-old Sujari Britt is a classical cellist from the United States. She began learning the instrument at the age of four, having already studied the violin and the piano. A year later, Sujari started performing in a professional capacity with her sibling trio. By the time she was eight, she had played at the White House for President Obama. Sujari has performed at renowned venues such as Carnegie Hall and Madison Square Garden, and with reputable orchestras in Europe, Asia, Canada and the USA.

Produced by Emily Naylor and Jane Thurlow

(Image: (L) Tosin Jegede, credit Tosin Jegede. (R) Sujari Britt, credit Jamie Jung.)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs2wts)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 The Newsroom (w172xyy5s3kdjn7)
with coverage of the Funeral of Archbishop Desmond Tutu


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs30kx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0qcmhykflk)
Tokyo and beyond

A look back on some of the athletes we met at the Tokyo Games and look ahead to Beijing including Switzerland’s Jolanda Neff who won the cross-country mountain bike event, Spanish Paralympian Desirée Vila who was competing at her first Games and Georgie Cohen who will be representing Israel at the Winter Games in February, and honouring the legacy of her grandfather Maurice Cohen.

Image: Tokyo 2020 Olympic Stadium. (Photo by Toru Hanai/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs34b1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwb4x5r99)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cshlf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs3825)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9w)
Naoise Dolan: Exciting Times

The first of our season of celebrating The Exuberance of Youth in this the centenary year of the BBC, World Book Club talks to Irish writer Naoise Dolan about her dazzling novel Exciting Times. Psychologically astute and dryly funny, Exciting Times is a modern, intelligent dissection of youth, power and privilege set amongst the international circles of contemporary Hong Kong. Clever, young millennial Ava, an Irish graduate teaching English, is having an affair with rich cynical banker Julian. Then she meets Edith. Earnest, attentive and all the things Julian isn’t. A raw, intimate exploration of love and sexuality amongst millennials, Exciting Times charts the often transactional nature of relationships in our complicated modern world.

(Photo courtesy of Naoise Dolan.)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs3ct9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5j7x0lc3x)
South Africa holds state funeral for Desmond Tutu

The South African president, Cyril Ramaphosa, has delivered the eulogy for Archbishop Desmond Tutu, describing him as a crusader in the struggle for freedom, justice, equality and peace. Mr Ramaphosa said the anti-apartheid campaigner's influence had been felt not only in South Africa but around the world.

Canada says it will take in more than two-hundred Afghan female judges and their families who have fled from the Taliban. We hear from one of them.

And former armed forces chiefs and other prominent Indians have written to their Prime Minister, accusing Hindu fundamentalists of dangerous hate speech and violence.

(Photo credit: Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs3hkf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tndfcb497)
Live Sporting Action

What a way to kick off 2022 by joining Lee James for the latest edition of Sportsworld. Former West Ham midfielder Nigel Reo-Coker, current Aston Villa defender Anita Asante and current Sierra Leone striker Kei Kamara will join Lee to discuss the latest news from the Premier League. We'll have updates from the early kick off between Arsenal and Manchester City and coverage of Tottenham Hotspurs trip to Watford. Plus, we'll preview the start of the African Cup of Nations.

Image: Pierre Hojbjerg of Tottenham Hotspur tackled by Watford's Juraj Kucka (Photo by Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs3zjy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwb4x6lj6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46ctbtb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9b)
Yale women rowers protest

In 1976, the Yale women's rowing team stripped naked to demand equal treatment for women's sport. The protest attracted national attention in the USA and helped force universities to make the same funding and facilities available to women athletes as to men. Catherine Davies talks to two of the Yale protestors, Christine Ernst and Ginny Gilder.

(Photo: The 1976 Yale women's rowing team in action. Credit: Getty Images).


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs4392)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct300p)
New Year's concert

From the BBC’s studios at Maida Vale in London, Georgia Mann presents the World Service’s annual concert featuring members of the BBC New Generation Artists scheme past and present.

Founded in 1999 with the aim of nurturing and promoting some of the world’s finest young musicians at the start of their international careers, the list of NGA alumni is now well over a hundred and includes some of the biggest names in classical music, including trumpeter Alison Balsom, pianists Igor Levit and Benjamin Grosvenor, violinists Alina Ibragimova and Lisa Batiashvili, soprano Fatma Said, the Quatuor Ebene, and many more. Participants are offered the chance to make studio recordings, perform with the BBC’s orchestras, and at many of the UK’s most prestigious venues and festivals including London’s Wigmore Hall and the BBC Proms.

Today, a chance to hear from award-winning British mezzo-soprano Helen Charlston, Swedish violinist Johan Dalene – at 21, one of the youngest ever NGAs – and superstar jazz bass player Misha Mullov-Abbado, a New Generation Artist from 2017 to 2019 and now one of the biggest names on the scene.

Image foreground: New Generation Artist Johan Dalene (Credit: Mats Bäcker)
Image background: Fireworks display (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs4716)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv2)
The Arts Hour International Comedy Show

The Arts Hour celebrates the New Year with a festive feast of laughter.

Nikki Bedi and South African comedian Tumi Morake host an international line up of some of the best global comics, enjoying the funnier side of life after another challenging year.

Taking part in the New Year comedy celebrations are one of India’s biggest comedians Kanan Gill, who ponders the weird world of online product reviews and his retirement plans.

From Accra, we’re joined by the Queen of Ghanaian comedy, Nigerian Ghanaian comic Jacinta Ocansey who reveals the female freedoms within Covid 19 lockdowns.

The hugely popular Mexican comedian Daniel Sosa, fresh from his recent tour, joins us from Mexico City and tells us about the best and worst of his local traditions.

Canadian American comedian DeAnne Smith shares some of her trademark wit and wisdom.

Ugandan funny man and founder of the Africa Laughs Festival, Patrick Salvado, explains the restaurant boom in Uganda.

And Japanese writer and comedian Yumi Nagashima entertains us with tales of Snow White and subway announcements.

Producers: Lucy Collingwood and Andrea Kidd

(Photo: Tumi Morake. Credit: Kevin Mark Pass)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs4bsb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5j7x0mb2y)
Anti-apartheid icon Archbishop Desmond Tutu laid to rest

The funeral mass for South African anti-apartheid campaigner Archbishop Desmond Tutu has taken place at the Anglican cathedral in Cape Town.

In his eulogy, the country's president Cyril Ramaphosa described Tutu, a Nobel Peace Prize winner who helped end the racist regime in South Africa, as "the spiritual father of our new nation". We'll hear from a priest who came to know Archbishop Tutu over several decades.

Also in the programme: the government of Borno state in Nigeria says it has closed camps housing over a million internally displaced people. And an astonishing story from China: a 37-year-old man who was abducted from his family has found his biological mother again, after drawing a map of his childhood village from memory.

(Picture shows Floral tributes alongside a smiling picture of Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Credit: EPA)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs4gjg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx1wf9js2f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0styprntq2)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cttsv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 today]


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs4l8l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd0)
Bass: How low can you go? with Laura Lee, Blu DeTiger, Karina Rykman and Adeline

Bass players Laura Lee, Blu DeTiger, Karina Rykman and Adeline discuss what the low end brings to music, why playing for an audience is an unbeatable experience, and how where they’re from inspires their sound.

Laura Lee is the bassist in Khruangbin, formed with guitarist Mark Speer and drummer DJ Johnson Jr back in 2009 in Houston, Texas. Their music blends everything from rock, psych, funk, surf, and dub influences from across the world.

Blu DeTiger is a bassist and DJ from New York. She started playing bass when she was seven years old, inspired by her brother who was playing drums at the time, and rose to fame after videos of her playing during lockdown went viral on social media.

Karina Rykman is a member of jazz-rock musician Marco Benevento’s band, and describes herself as a “genre fluid bassist”.

French-Caribbean singer, producer, and (of course) bassist Adeline blends Funk, R&B and vintage soul and was originally the front woman for the nu-disco band Escort.



SUNDAY 02 JANUARY 2022

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs4q0q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1ywb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:06 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs4trv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cv617)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2k)
Ask the controller: Part two

The controller of BBC World Service English Jon Zilkha responds to your comments, views and questions - be they favourable or critical. Topics include what the BBC is doing to attract a younger audience and how best to report on the climate change debate.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs4yhz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6v)
Coronavirus: Tracking the pandemic

Two years after the first cases of a mysterious new virus were reported from China, host Nuala McGovern brings together experts in Switzerland, India and Israel who have been tracking the spread and impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and providing advice to governments and health officials.

What have they learnt about the effects of the pandemic? What happens next and what are the lessons for the future?

Nuala talks to Dr Emma Hodcroft, a molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland. Emma says that when the pandemic started “she had no idea it would linger this long”.

We also hear from Dr Swapneil Parikh in Mumbai, India, who has written a book about Covid-19 and warns that the impacts of the virus go far beyond the effects of the disease itself.

And Professor Manfred Green, an epidemiologist based at the University of Haifa in Israel, suggests we need to already be planning for the next pandemic.

As we look ahead to 2022, the three doctors share their experiences, concerns and hopes for the future.

Picture: Dr Emma Hodcroft from the University of Bern (Credit: Oliver Hochstrasser)


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cv9sc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386b)
Pick of the World

BBC World Service listeners not only love what they hear, they love to engage: there is a two-way relationship that creates a special bond.

Digital Editor Anna Doble celebrates the latest podcasts and programmes, with clips chosen by listeners and followers on social media.

Each week Anna explores the reaction on digital platforms and then delves into the best bits, chatting with listeners around the world to find out what captured their attention.


SUN 02:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs5283)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs5607)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhw)
Staff shortages mount as Omicron spreads

On Business Weekly, we look at the problems faced by companies affected by the spread of the Omicron variant of Covid-19. Are staff shortages just a blip or could they be more long term? Professor Joshua Hausman at the University of Michigan gives us his view. Plus, we look at efforts being made in the textile industry to move away from “fast fashion" using traditional, slow and more sustainable methods. Also, it’s 20 years since the schoolboy wizard Harry Potter first appeared on movie screens; which businesses are still feeling the marketing magic? And we shake and stir with some of the world’s top mixologists to find out about the trends in cocktails for 2022. Business Weekly is presented by Matthew Davies and produced by Clare Williamson.
(Image: People queuing at Miami airport as staff shortages cause flights to be cancelled, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs59rc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cvp0r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs5fhh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvz)
Generation change: Part two

BBC presenter Babita Sharma and correspondent Megha Mohan meet the young people from India, Nigeria, the United Kingdom, the United States and the United Arab Emirates fighting to change taboos around organ donation and for greater diversity in the critical fields of science, technology, engineering and maths. We also speak to Nobel Prize awarded contributors including kidney transfer campaigner and economist Alvin Roth as well as astronomer and Physics Laureate Andrea Ghez.

(Photo: Farmers)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs5k7m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct379f)
The advocate and the musicians

Another chance to hear from some of the BBC's acclaimed series examining the seismic events shaping Afghanistan before and after this year's return to power of the Taliban. After last week's episode featuring Taliban founder Mullah Zaeef and former President Hamid Karzai, the BBC's chief international correspondent, Lyse Doucet, hears from a younger generation. Shaharzad Akbar was raised in a refugee camp in Pakistan in the 1990s, became the first Afghan woman to get a degree at Oxford University, and went on to run the country's Human Rights Commission. Arson Fahim and Meena Karimi are both gifted composers with no memory of life before the advent of a US-backed democracy in the country. All see their lives shaped by it, and all three have had to flee Kabul since the Taliban took over. What now for the dreams they cherished?


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs5nzr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6d)
Philippe Sands: Is international justice working?

When the first Nuremberg trial of Nazi war criminals came to an end, the ground-breaking international tribunal handed down 12 death sentences. Seventy-five years on, is the world any better at delivering justice for the worst of crimes? In the years that followed, there were hopes that an evolving mechanism of international justice would deter and punish further heinous acts of mass murder and genocide. Does it remain an impossible ideal? Stephen Sackur speaks to international lawyer and author Philippe Sands.

(Photo: Philippe Sands in the Hardtalk studio)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cw184)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgs)
The Food Chain unwrapped

In this final episode of 2021, we're revisiting some of the most powerful food stories from the pandemic. Following widespread restaurant closures and labour shortages across the hospitality sector, we catch up with a New York chef who is forging a new path. And what about those people who thanks to Covid-19 can’t even smell or taste their food anymore? We’ll be finding out whether this leading symptom of the virus is now better understood. Plus, how is one of the world’s newest emojis – the arepa flatbread - faring, one year on?

(Picture: Drawing of sweet being unwrapped. Credit: BBC/Getty)

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk



Contributors:

Amanda Cohen, Chef and owner, Dirt Candy restaurant New York

Chrissi Kelly, founder, smell and taste loss charity AbScent

Sebastian Delmont, software developer and co-creator of the arepa emoji


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs5sqw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cw508)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky1)
Punk, God, and my search for truth

When 17-year-old Paloma Romero travelled to the UK in the early 1970s, she was in search of freedom and opportunities that didn't exist in her native Spain, ruled at the time by the dictator Franco. Soon, Paloma fell in with the world of punk music, and (following a mixup over her name) called herself Palmolive. She started a relationship with Joe Strummer from The Clash, taught herself to play drums and joined a band with Sid Vicious. When he kicked her out for refusing his advances, she formed a band of her own - The Slits. With their all-female lineup and collaborative approach to songwriting, The Slits are now regarded as iconic punk pioneers. Later, Paloma would play drums in another highly influential all-female punk band, The Raincoats - before turning her back on music altogether to seek spiritual truth. Now a retired teacher living in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, Paloma is thinking about a return to music. She tells Anu Anand about punk, faith, and the art of walking away. This interview was first broadcast in July 2021.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Anu Anand
Producer: Laura Thomas

(Photo: Paloma McLardy. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs5xh0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity (w3ct2zv8)
The future

Justin Rowlatt looks at the monumental challenge of weaning ourselves off fossil fuels. Solar and wind could meet all of humanity’s energy needs, but can we switch over before climate disaster strikes?

According to clean-tech enthusiast and investor Ramez Naam, we have the means at our disposal. Our fossil-fuelled global economy has enabled a rapid collapse in the cost of renewable energy and electric vehicles.

And now we are seeing a snowballing of government action to decarbonise our economies, according to UN climate negotiator Christiana Figueres. But many problems remain. Energy historian Vaclav Smil points out that we still have no easy way to store renewable energy, or use it to make billions of tonnes of cement and steel. Sheffield-based ITM Power hope that their green hydrogen could solve many of these problems. Plus electricity historian Julie Cohn says another option might be to build a global electricity grid.

Image: An array of solar panels (Credit: BBC)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cw8rd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyf)
Abused online for my faith

Sophia Smith Galer, reporter and TikTok creator, speaks to users who have faced discrimination and suppression online based on their religion. We speak to YouTuber Nada Majdy, who regularly faces abuse from Islamophobes whose sexualised comments do not get taken down; the Jewish TikTok creators who try to challenge anti-Semitism, only to have their own videos taken down in the process; and we ask why and how Instagram managed to censor #sikh for nearly three months.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs6174)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwb4x8n6d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cwdhj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2zhh)
My Arab Spring

29/12/2021 GMT

Ten years on from the Arab Spring, which redrew the political map across the Middle East and North Africa, anthropologist Ella Al-Shamahi and her journalist brother Abubakr Al-Shamahi perform an analysis of this widespread revolution in progress. Their questions include; what were the protestors fighting for and how far have they been rewarded? Have they had to shrink their dreams to feel it was worth it? What does “good” look like for the civilians of these countries? And what are their hopes for their homelands now?


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs64z8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct300p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs68qd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5j7x0p810)
Schools prepare 2022 return amidst Covid

As many schools prepare to return following the Christmas break how should pupils and teachers protect themselves against Covid-19?

Also in the programme: EU labels nuclear as 'green' energy; and Lebanon's year of hardship.

(Picture: Erin Horn looking in a mirror while taking a Lateral Flow Test as children arrive at Outwood Academy in Woodlands, Doncaster in Yorkshire. Danny Lawson/PA Wire


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs6dgj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm9)
Harry Houdini: Escape artist and showman

Harry Houdini’s story is the classic American tale of an immigrant who from impoverished beginnings made it big in the United States. Perhaps it is this early hand to mouth existence in a large family which explains his extraordinary drive to succeed. Captivated by magic shows, he began performing tricks on stage with one of his brothers, and then with his wife.

Houdini’s decision to make escape the focus of his act was well-timed, chiming with the public mood for sensational trickery. Whether it was escaping from handcuffs, a straitjacket or from a box filled with water, Houdini wowed audiences with his seemingly death-defying performance. So what motivated this complex man who spent a lifetime ‘deluding’ the public with his illusions, and how did he reconcile that with his campaign against the Spiritualist movement which he regarded as a racket?

Rajan Datar charts the life and career of the legendary Houdini, with writer and biographer Adam Begley, whose book Houdini: The Elusive American was published in 2020; Dr Matthew Solomon, Associate Professor at the University of Michigan and the author of Disappearing Tricks: Silent Film, Houdini, and the New Magic of the Twentieth Century; and Dr Katharina Rein from the University of Potsdam in Germany, who’s published widely on stage magic in the 19th and early 20th centuries, including Techniques of Illusion which will be available in 2022.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service.

(Photo: Harry Houdini chained up ready to jump into Charles River, Boston, Massachusetts in 1906. Credit: Bettmann via Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl4)
Will the population of Nigeria be larger than Europe’s?

In recent years population growth has slowed rapidly. Experts believe that the global population will stabilise somewhere around 11 billion people. But just because global population is stabilising doesn’t mean each country is following the global trend. Some projections estimate that the population of Nigeria will increase rapidly to the point that there will be more people living in Nigeria than the whole of Europe combined. We look at the methods behind this claim.


(A sea of shoppers and vendors in Lagos' crowded Oshodi Market, Nigeria. Getty images/James Marshall)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs6j6n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hd0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs6mys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tndfcf8pl)
Live Sporting Action

Delyth Lloyd presents live Premier League commentary of Chelsea against Liverpool. We'll also have a reaction to Sunday’s early games, bring you the best of the action from across Europe’s top men’s and women’s leagues, and reflect on day three of the first Test between New Zealand and Bangladesh.

(Photo by Simon Stacpoole/Offside/Offside via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs7065)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwb4x9m5f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cxcgk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs73y9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs77pf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5j7x0q701)
South Africa parliament: Man arrested over massive fire

A huge fire has completely destroyed the South African National Assembly - a man has been arrested on suspicion of arson.

The Prime Minister of Sudan, Abdalla Hamdok, has resigned after weeks of protests against the power of the military.

Also, a political flap in France over the European Union flag.

And, Richard Leakey, the conservationist who helped to explain the African origins of early humans, has died at the age of seventy seven.

(Photo: President Ramaphosa (left) visited parliament to inspect the damage. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs7cfk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx1wf9mnzj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0styprrqm5)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cxqpy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1ky1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjypgs7h5p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity (w3ct2zv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzks46cxvg2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Pick of the World (w3ct386b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]



MONDAY 03 JANUARY 2022

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2cg5z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity (w3ct2zv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp1tgc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2cky3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlwnmbqjf7)
How green is the global flower industry?

Most flowers sold in the florists and supermarkets of Europe are grown in East Africa, where the warm climate supports roses and other plants to grow year round. But is it sustainable? Vivienne Nunis follows the international supply chain from a Kenyan flower farm to the hub of the global flower trade near Amsterdam, where every morning stems are sold at auction before being transported in cold storage trucks to buyers across Europe. The Dutch have been trading flowers since medieval times, when speculators paid enormous prices for tulip bulbs. We pay a visit to Amsterdam's Tulip Museum to find out why. The worldwide flower market is worth $40bn a year, but as growing numbers of consumers start to question the true environmental cost of what they buy, some growers are advocating for a return to seasonal, local blooms. We visit English grower Tess Wardman of Iris & Wilf flowers. Producer: Sarah Treanor. Image: Bouquets of roses for sale. Credit: BBC


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp1y6h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf3)
Balla Kouyaté: 800 years of tradition

To say that balafon player Balla Kouyaté was born into a musical family is an understatement. His family line goes back 800 years to Balla Faséké, the first of an unbroken line of djelis in the Kouyaté clan. Djelis are the oral historians, musicians, and performers who keep alive the history of the Mandé people of Mali and Guinea.

The balafon is the ancestor to all marimbas and xylophones. Played with mallets, it comprises of wooden slats with rows of gourds acting as natural amplifiers underneath. The story goes that back in the 13th century, when the emperor Sundiata overthrew the villainous Soumaora Kante, he appointed the Kouyaté family to protect the Sosso Bala, the original balafon. That instrument survives today, in the safe keeping of Balla’s father’s in Guinea.

With all that history it’s no surprise that Balla is a virtuoso player of the balafon. Now living in Boston in the US, he’s a much sought-after collaborator, playing with the likes of Yo-Yo Ma in his Silk Road ensemble. As well as frequently touring with his own band, he also makes time to fulfil his responsibilities to his community as a djeli, playing traditional music at family events from weddings to baby naming ceremonies.

Presenter: Aleks Krotoski

Image: Balla Kouyaté (Credit: Tom Pich)


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2cpp7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n65)
Maggi Hambling: An evolving creative vision

Stephen Sackur speaks to the artist Maggi Hambling. Her works have won international acclaim, but some have also stirred controversy, including a sculpture unveiled in London last year for 18th century feminist Mary Wollstonecraft. How has her creative vision evolved over the last six decades?


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp21ym)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prk)
How do you like your eggs in the morning?

Should you wash your eggs? Well believe it or not, there is quite an international debate about this question from CrowdScience listener Susan. In Canada, where Susan grew up, commercially sold eggs are washed before they reach stores, whereas in the UK where she is now living they are not. So what is best to avoid contamination?

It’s one of a number of egg-themed questions that CrowdScience tries to crack in this episode. One of our presenters, Marnie Chesterton, heads over to Susan’s home in London to cook some eggs and explore other egg cooking questions from our listeners, such as what is the science behind frying an egg without it sticking to the pan and why are some boiled eggs harder to shell than others?

Meanwhile this episode’s other presenter, Anand Jagatia, explores questions about eggs after they have hatched. He investigates a case of curious chicken behaviour sent in by listener Laurie, as well as working out how a cuckoo knows it’s a cuckoo when it’s been raised in another bird’s nest.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Anand Jagatia
Produced by Jonathan Blackwell for BBC World Service

Featuring: Dr. Vincent Guyonnet, Dr. Valérie Lechevalier, Dr. Siobhan Abeyesinghe and Dr. Ros Gloag

(Photo credit: Getty Images)


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2ctfc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity (w3ct2zv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp25pr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2cy5h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drn)
Is science fiction holding back climate action?

For centuries, we’ve been reading, watching and listening to science fiction. And all too often, it’s pretty pessimistic about our future, especially when it touches on the topic of climate change.
This is leading some to ask whether these doom and gloom stories are doing the climate fight more harm than good - causing us to feel so anxious and powerless that we don’t take action.
So for this week's climate question, Graihagh Jackson is asking: Is sci-fi holding us back?

First broadcast on 5th April 2021.

Graihagh Jackson is joined by:
Amy Brady, editor-in-chief of the Chicago Review of Books, where she writes a monthly column called Burning Worlds. In it she explores how fiction addresses climate change.

Cheryl Slean is a playwright, filmmaker and educator working with the National Resource Defense Council’s Re-write the Future campaign to increase accurate climate stories in film and television.

Ken Liu is a futurist and author of speculative fiction. He has won the Nebula, Hugo, and World Fantasy awards. His debut novel, The Grace of Kings, is the first volume in a silkpunk epic fantasy series.

Producer: Jordan Dunbar
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound Engineer: Andy Garratt and Tom Brignell


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp29fw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9n)
Women in the chocolate business

Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women who are making chocolate production both more sustainable and equitable.

Vicki Bain is a South African chocolatier from Johannesburg who blends Belgian chocolate with the finest local and fresh African ingredients. Five years ago, Vicki left her job in environmental consulting to learn the craft of artisan chocolate making in Brussels. Her company, Chocoloza, is staffed only by women and has environmental and social concerns at its core.

Treena Tecson from the Philippines is a professional chocolate taster and tree-to-bar chocolate maker. In 2017, Treena used her social media account to document the art and science of chocolate making. What started as a hobby soon turned into a small business - True Chocolate PH - and now Treena is also involved in cacao farming and post-harvest processing.

Produced by Emily Naylor and Alice Gioia

(Image: (L) Vicki Bain. (R) Treena Tecson, courtesy of Treena Tecson.)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2d1xm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv328zht3yc)
Sudan political crisis: Prime Minister Hamdok resigns

Two more people die after another day of mass protests, but demonstrators say more will take place in the coming weeks.

India records its sharpest ever weekly surge in cases, with 130,000 new cases. It's all largely driven by the Omicron variant.

And a man has been arrested following a fire that devastated the South African Parliament.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2d5nr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv328zht7ph)
Sudan: Prime Minister resigns

The recently reinstated Prime Minister of Sudan, Abdalla Hamdok, has resigned following more demonstrations against the military rule. This weekend's demonstrations led to the death of another two protesters. In India, the Omicron variant of Covid drives the sharpest ever weekly rise in infections. And a man has been arrested over the devastating fire at South Africa's parliament building in Cape Town.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2d9dw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv328zhtcfm)
Sudan: Prime Minister resigns

In Sudan the recently reinstated Prime Minister, Abdalla Hamdok, has announced his resignation. This follows more demonstrations over the weekend in which another 2 people died protesting the imposition of military rule. Recent studies show that the Omicron variant of Covid is likely to infect the throat and nose and not the lungs. Scientists say this appears to make the virus more infectious but less deadly. And from China more trouble for the Chinese real estate giant Evergrande.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2df50)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n65)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp2sfd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5w)
How green is the global flower industry?

Most flowers sold in the florists and supermarkets of Europe are grown in East Africa, where the warm climate supports roses and other plants to grow year round. But is it sustainable? Vivienne Nunis follows the international supply chain from a Kenyan flower farm to the hub of the global flower trade near Amsterdam, where every morning stems are sold at auction before being transported in cold storage trucks to buyers across Europe. The Dutch have been trading flowers since medieval times, when speculators paid enormous prices for tulip bulbs. We pay a visit to Amsterdam's Tulip Museum to find out why. The worldwide flower market is worth $40bn a year, but as growing numbers of consumers start to question the true environmental cost of what they buy, some growers are advocating for a return to seasonal, local blooms. We visit English grower Tess Wardman of Iris and Wilf flowers. Producer: Sarah Treanor. Image: Bouquets of roses for sale. Credit: BBC


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1z)
The "Wild Lily" protests in Taiwan

Taiwan’s Wild Lily student movement in 1990 was the biggest student protest the country had seen and was a key turning point in the country’s path to democracy. For six days thousands of students camped out in the central square in front of the Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall in the capital, Taipei. Martial law in Taiwan had ended just a few years earlier but the country was still governed by the KMT party, which had been in power since the 1940s. The students were angry at a presidential election with only one candidate, the incumbent president, and called for wide-ranging democratic reforms. Caroline Bayley has been talking to Chiu Hua-Mei, who took part in the Wild Lily movement.

PHOTO: A huge logo of the Wild Lily movement is seen under Taipei's Taiwan Democracy Memorial Hall in January 2008 (Patrick Lin/AFP/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2djx4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp2x5j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2dnn8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp30xn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2dsdd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6hdcn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp34ns)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2dx4j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv6)
Kidnapped by Nazis as a baby

Ingrid Von Oelhafen grew up in Germany in the aftermath of the Second World War, and she never knew her biological parents. As she got older, she discovered that she had a different name on her official documents, Erika Matko. This remained a mystery for years, until she discovered that she'd been kidnapped by the Nazis as a baby during the war, and was entered into a sinister programme to cultivate a so-called 'master race'. Her biological family were still in Slovenia, and Ingrid was determined to track them down. Ingrid spoke to Emily Webb.

Dr Robert Raven is a spider expert from Australia, but it's an unusual profession for him to have chosen, given that he has a phobia of spiders. His job involves going into the outback, finding spiders and naming them. He told Emily Webb back in 2019 about some of the famous names he's given to the new species of spiders he's found.

Presenter: Emily Webb

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Babies taken during by the Lebensborn programme. Credit: Getty Images/Keystone France)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2f0wn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6hmvx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp3d51)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2f4ms)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm59x3yd)
Sudan's prime minister resigns after mass protests

Sudan's political crisis deepens after the resignation of the Prime Minister, Abdalla Hamdok. Is the country now under military rule? We speak to the UN's special representative.

Also in the programme: The annual rate of inflation in Turkey hits its highest in nearly two decades, fuelled by President Erdogan's unorthodox economic policies; and another pro-democracy publisher in Hong Kong is closing down.

(Photo: Pro-democracy protesters faced another violent crackdown from the military. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2f8cx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n65)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp3mn9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y48cbh0zhhr)
Reconnecting America: What can the trillion dollar infrastructure bill achieve?

President Trump once described America's infrastructure as "crumbling," it's perhaps why after much wrangling, the US Congress finally approved the trillion dollar bi-partisan infrastructure bill. But what can it achieve? And is it good value for money?

We'll criss-cross the United States hearing from projects hoping cash from the bill will make their visions for better connected communities a reality.
In rural Alaska we meet Jan Wrentmore and Mayor Andrew Cremata who hope to bring an electric ferry to their home of Skagway,before heading south to speak with Brian Kelly chief executive of California's High Speed Rail Authority. Liz Kirkwood of the clean water campaign group FLOW explains how money from the bill could help alleviate chronic problems with antiquated and dangerous water systems in her home of Michigan, whilst Keith Baker of ReConnect Rondo, in St Paul, Minnesota hopes new infrastructure there can repair a community torn apart by previous big building projects.

And Emily Feenstra of the US Society of Civil Engineers, and Steve Hanke, Professor of applied economics at Johns Hopkins University and a former adviser to the Reagan White House, tell us about America's infrastructure needs, and assess whether this bill actually helps address them.
The programme is presented by the BBC's Will Bain.

Picture credit: Justin Chechourka, California High Speed Rail Authority
Audio credit: With thanks to the Rondo: Beyond the Pavement documentary team


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2fd41)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxy425wd2h)
Sudan's Prime Minister resigns

Sudan's Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok has resigned after another day of mass protests in the capital Khartoum. Thousands marched against a recent deal he had made to share power with the reaction from people in the country.

Also, as we begin 2022, there are plenty of Afghans around the world who are looking ahead to a new year in a new country. Many of the people who left the country were women - fearing the erosion of their rights under the Taliban. We'll bring together two women who left to hear how they feel about the future.

And every day we're joined by a health expert to answer questions on coronavirus. Today our guest is Professor Manfred Green - medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel.

(Photo: Protesters take part in a rally against military rule following last month"s coup in Khartoum, Sudan December 30, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2fhw5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxy425whtm)
OS Conversations: Life after Afghanistan

As we begin 2022, there are plenty of Afghans around the world who are looking ahead to a new year in a new country. Many of the people who left Afghanistan were women - fearing the erosion of their rights under the Taliban, which took over in August. We connect to two women - one in the US and one in Ukraine - to hear how they feel about their futures outside of Afghanistan.

Also, we bring you the latest on the situation in Sudan following the resignation of the Prime Minister, Abdalla Hamdok. Mr Hamdok stood down following mass protests. Thousands marched against a recent deal he had done to share power with the army, who staged a coup in October. We get reaction from people in Sudan and explain how the country got here.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to answer questions on coronavirus. Today our guest is Professor Manfred Green, a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology at the University of Haifa in Israel.

(Photo: An Afghan family look out of their new apartment in Tukwila, Washington, U.S. November 3, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Lindsey Wasson)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2fmm9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2frcf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6jcbp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp43mt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nr3b1jm5s)
2022/01/03 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2fw3k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp47cy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct30hz)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The weirdness of water, Part 2 of 2

“I don’t really understand why water has so many properties on different scales ranging from very large and cosmic to very small quantum and quarky - Could you help by zooming in and out on water to explain what is known about it? Asks Neil Morton in Stirling.

“Why does boiling water sound different to cold water?’ asks Barbara Dyson in Brittany in France

Ollie Gordon, in Christchurch in New Zealand, wants to know ‘why water is essential for all life as we know it?’

And many more questions on the weirdness of water are tackled by super science sleuths Hannah and Adam helped by quantum physicist Professor Patricia Hunt, at the Victoria University in Wellington in New Zealand, science writer and author of ‘H2O – a biography of water’ Philip Ball and physicist and bubble expert in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at UCL, Dr Helen Czerski.

Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford
Producer: Fiona Roberts


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2fzvp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm59xz59)
WHO anger at failure to deliver vaccines to poorer countries

What is it going to take to beat back this pandemic? As we go into the third year of this no-longer-new coronavirus, the world's lopsided response remains painfully clear. A senior epidemiologist with the World Health Organisation, Maria van Kerkhove, warns that Omicron will not be the last coronavirus variant and it's vital that vaccines are distributed more fairly around the world.

Dr van Kerkhove tells of her anger at the failure to deliver vaccines at scale outside high-income countries.

Also in the programme: In New York, a confidential legal agreement is made public a day ahead of a critical hearing in the civil case against the UK's Prince Andrew for alleged sexual assault. Where does the Sudanese Prime Minister's resignation leave the country's hopes for democracy after the coup? And we hear from one of dozens of Muslim women in India who've been targeted by an app claiming that these women were for sale.

(Picture shows a nurse injecting an 84-year-old woman with the fourth dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in Jerusalem, Israel. Credit: EPA/ABIR SULTAN)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2g3lt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx27plvf4s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sv9z1zgsf)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp4gw6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172y48cbh10bqn)
Reconnecting America: What can the trillion dollar infrastructure bill achieve?

President Trump once described America's infrastructure as "crumbling," it's perhaps why after much wrangling, the US Congress finally approved the trillion dollar bi-partisan infrastructure bill. But what can it achieve? And is it good value for money?

We'll criss-cross the United States hearing from projects hoping cash from the bill will make their visions for better connected communities a reality.
In rural Alaska we meet Jan Wrentmore and Mayor Andrew Cremata who hope to bring an electric ferry to their home of Skagway,before heading south to speak with Brian Kelly chief executive of California's High Speed Rail Authority. Liz Kirkwood of the clean water campaign group FLOW explains how money from the bill could help alleviate chronic problems with antiquated and dangerous water systems in her home of Michigan, whilst Keith Baker of ReConnect Rondo, in St Paul, Minnesota hopes new infrastructure there can repair a community torn apart by previous big building projects.

And Emily Feenstra of the US Society of Civil Engineers, and Steve Hanke, Professor of applied economics at Johns Hopkins University and a former adviser to the Reagan White House, tell us about America's infrastructure needs, and assess whether this bill actually helps address them.
The programme is presented by the BBC's Will Bain.

Picture credit: Justin Chechourka, California High Speed Rail Authority
Audio credit: With thanks to the Rondo: Beyond the Pavement documentary team


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2g7by)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n65)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp4lmb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



TUESDAY 04 JANUARY 2022

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2gc32)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z81)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:06 on Saturday]


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2ggv6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqrxgzcv4x)
Hopes and aspirations for 2022

Rahul Tandon explores younger perspectives from around the world. Taneesha Datta from India, Alaezi Akpuru in Nigeria and Hayley Wood in Vancouver all share their thoughts on what they'd like to see change around global warming, gaming, sport and entertainment in 2022.

(Photo: Young group of teenagers activists demonstrating against global warming Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2gllb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pkr)
The forest sound detectives

Scientists are checking up on the health of forests by analysing the sounds in them. They test their vital signs by measuring the croaks, tweets and hums of resident creatures. If they can hear a full range of animals they can be confident an ecosystem is doing well. However, if gaps start to appear, it’s a sign something is up.

Nick Holland hears more about how it works and how it’s being used to strike a balance between the needs of Papua New Guinea’s growing indigenous communities and the need to preserve the biodiversity of the forests they live off.

Produced and presented by Nick Holland
Image: The Nature Conservancy


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp4yvq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 Discovery (w3ct30hz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2gqbg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2gv2l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct3035)
Gone but not forgotten: Syria's missing persons

Wafa Mustafa hasn't heard from her dad since he went missing in July 2013. She, like tens of thousands of others in her position, believes he is being detained by the Syrian government, and is searching for him. In this documentary, she explains how she uses the story of his life to campaign for justice in Syria, and how keeping the memory of her father alive is an act of protest and resistance.

Image: Wafa Mustafa and her father (Courtesy of Wafa Mustafa)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp56bz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf4)
Activism, politics and creativity

For nearly five years, In The Studio has been at the forefront of the creative process, with extraordinary access to big names and exciting talent working in the creative industries around the world. Our reporters are right there as works are brought into being, whether that be in design, music, TV and film, photography, sculpture, writing, painting or performance. During that time, activism and public discourse around issues of contemporary politics has intensified, with others left trying to make sense of it all. Artists and creatives are no exception, often making work with a political agenda, or to encourage conversation, as they engage their artistic sensibilities with the events of the real world. In this episode, Laura Hubber takes a look at some of those In the Studio moments, when creative impulses come face-to-face with realpolitik. With contributions from Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, creator of a participatory light installation on the US-Mexican border Raphael Lorenzo-Hemmer, Zanele Muholi whose photographs address hate crime in South Africa and the team behind satirical television puppetry in Kenya The XYZ Show.

Presenter: Laura Hubber
Producer: Harry Parker
Researcher: Anita Langary
Executive producer: Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2gytq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv328zhx0vg)
Elizabeth Holmes facing lengthy jail term

She was once Silicon Valley's youngest self made billionaire now Elizabeth Holmes is facing a long jail term after being found guilty of defrauding investors and lying about technology she said could detect diseases with a few drops of blood. Omicron has become the most dominant Covid variant worldwide. Dr Anthony Fauci says we should be using hospitalization figures not infection rates as they key to understanding its severity. And as South Korea pushes its defence budge to a four year high our correspondent hitches a ride with their Top Guns.






CM


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2h2kv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv328zhx4ll)
Elizabeth Holmes of Theranos found guilty

The woman whose company claimed it could detect diseases from a single drop of blood has been found guilty of defrauding millions from investors. Should the global severity of coronavirus be measured by the number of people in hospital? And one of the last independent media outlets in Hong Kong - Citizen News - closes citing safety of staff.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2h69z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv328zhx8bq)
Elizabeth Holmes convicted of fraud

Elizabeth Holmes, the founder of Theranos has been convicted of fraud - she was found guilty of lying to investors about a technology she said could detect diseases with a few drops of blood. As children in Europe return to school is enough being done to prevent the spread of Covid and ensure a full teaching staff is in place? And is anti-islam sentiment on the rise in Germany?


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2hb23)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp5pbh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgx)
Lessons from the forest for climate change

Jane Goodall, the famous primatologist, has set us a challenge: Is it possible to tackle climate change whilst also lifting people out of extreme poverty?

Her question - posed to the BBC's Climate Editor Justin Rowlatt - is inspired by her own experience of tackling deforestation in Tanzania. As her colleague Emmanuel Mtiti explains, they convinced local villagers to stop felling trees, and to restore the natural habitat of chimpanzees, by offering them an alternative path to prosperity.

So could an equivalent path be available that avoids increasing carbon emissions? If so then it would break with the pattern seen in Europe, America and China, where economic development was almost entirely fuelled by burning coal, oil and gas, according to Hannah Ritchie, head of research at Oxford University's Our World in Data team. But the micro-finance pioneer Muhamad Yunus says that solar power does now offer a carbon-free way forwards.

The programme contains audio from the 1965 National Geographic documentary film Miss Goodall and the Wild Chimpanzees, as well as audio recorded at Gombe National Park and the surrounding area by Ruth Happel and Bernie Krause.

Producer: Laurence Knight


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6h)
The end of Stalinist rule in Albania

In 1990 Albania’s communist government agreed to allow independent political parties following a wave of protests. Lea Ypi was an 11 year old schoolgirl at the time and watched events with consternation – she was a firm believer in what she had been taught about communism at school, and an admirer of Stalin. But she soon discovered that her parents had a secret past that they had been afraid to reveal to her before 1990. Lea talks to Rob Walker about her life growing up inside the world’s last Stalinist state.

Picture: Lea Ypi as a child in Albania with her grandmother. (Credit: Photo provided by Lea Ypi)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2hft7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct3035)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp5t2m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct30hz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2hkkc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2hp9h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6l98r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp61kw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2ht1m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxg)
The shocking truth about my three dads

Eve Wiley was 16 when she discovered she had been a sperm-donor baby. She was shocked, but also excited to meet her biological father as her own dad had died when she was young. When she met her donor father, the connection was instant - Eve started calling him ‘Dad’ and he even officiated at her wedding. But when Eve’s son became ill, she decided to look further into her medical history and find more family members by taking a home DNA test. What she discovered from her newly found half-siblings would appal her and eventually lead her to the Texas State Senate to change the law.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Troy Holmes

(Photo: Eve Wiley outside the Texas State Capitol building. Credit: Courtesy of Eve Wiley)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2hxsr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6ljs0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp6924)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct30hz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2j1jw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm5b00vh)
China: Will Covid lockdowns work?

China has put a city of more than one million people into lockdown - after just three Covid cases were detected in the city of Yuzhou. The city of Xi'an is also in lockdown. It's a familiar strategy by the authorities but will it work with Omicron?

Also in the programme: will we see the end of the 'fake-it-to-make-it' culture in Silicon Valley after tech entrepreneur Elizabeth Holmes is convicted of fraud?And why bees stinging police officers is a political issue in Chile.

(Photo: The Chinese city of Xi'an went into lockdown in late December 2021, due to rising cases of Covid-19. The city of Yuzhou is also now in lockdown as well. Credit: EPA)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2j590)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp6jkd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4btnnv49pq)
Apple is world's first $3tn company

As Apple briefly becomes the world's first $3tn company we ask what is behind its success. Dan Ives is senior equity analyst at Wedbush Securities, and tells us what the iPhone maker's chief executive Tim Cook has got right since taking over from Steve Jobs in 2011. Also in the programme, electric car maker Tesla has come under fire for opening a showroom in China's Xinjiang province, weeks after President Biden signed into law a bill banning goods made in the region from being imported into the US. We find out more about the move from Isaac Stone Fish, chief executive at Strategy Risks. Whilst US stock markets have been rising sharply in recent years, London's FTSE100 is just two per cent higher than it was five years ago, and the BBC's business editor, Simon Jack, reports on why the UK index seems to be under performing. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Pilita Clarke, ponders the challenges for bosses caused by hybrid working, where people work a mixture of days in the office and from home.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Nisha Patel and Russell Newlove.

(Picture: An Apple store. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2j914)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxy425z8zl)
Prince Andrew: Lawyers ask court to dismiss case

A court in New York is hearing arguments in a civil lawsuit against Britain’s Prince Andrew. He has consistently denied allegations by Virginia Giuffre that she was forced to have sex with him in 2001, when she was 17. We’ll get the latest on the proceedings and explain why his lawyers argue that the case should be dismissed because of a legal settlement she made with Jeffrey Epstein.

We hear about the wider implications for the tech world of the case of Elisabeth Holmes, the Theranos founder who has been convicted of defrauding investors.

Our regular health expert, Dr Isaac Bogoch, an infectious disease physician and scientist from the University of Toronto in Canada answers your questions about coronavirus. And we hear from a resident in the city of Yuzhou in China, where authorities have put a million people into lockdown after just three asymptomatic Covid cases were discovered.

And tennis world champion, Novak Djokovic will be able to play in the Australian Open this month after he was given a Covid medical exemption. We hear reaction from tennis fans in Australia.

(Photo: Prince Andrew, Virginia Roberts (now Giuffre) and Ghislaine Maxwell in 2001. Credit: Virginia Roberts)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2jds8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxy425zdqq)
QAnon: How it fuelled the storming of the Capitol building

On the programme today we hear about a new BBC series looking at the roots of January 6th when rioters stormed the Capitol building in Washington a year ago. Our colleague Gabriel Gatehouse explains the loyalty to the QAnon conspiracy movement among many of the rioters and what’s been happening since the attack.

A court in New York is hearing arguments in a civil lawsuit against Britain’s Prince Andrew. He has denied allegations by Virginia Giuffre that she was forced to have sex with him in 2001, when she was 17. We’ll get the latest on the proceedings and explain why his lawyers argue that the case should be dismissed because of a legal settlement she made with Jeffrey Epstein.

We’ll also look at the impact of Omicron and hear from India where several states have imposed stricter Covid measures after the country recorded its sharpest ever weekly surge in infections. Our coronavirus expert Dr Swapneil Parikh joins us from Mumbai to explain how the health sector is prepared for the third wave.

And we hear about the wider implications for the tech world of the case of Elisabeth Holmes, the Theranos founder who has been convicted of defrauding investors.

(Photo: Jacob Chansley, holding a sign referencing QAnon, speaks as supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump gather to protest about the early results of the 2020 presidential election, in front of the Maricopa County Tabulation and Election Center (MCTEC), in Phoenix, Arizona November 5, 2020. Credit: Reuters/Cheney Orr/File Photo)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2jjjd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2jn8j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6m87s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp70jx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nr3b1mj2w)
2022/01/04 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2js0n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct3035)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp7491)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt6)
Afrofuturism and tech innovation

This week we have a special programme on Afrofuturism and tech innovation. It’s a subject often covered in science fiction, but what makes Afrofuturism different from standard science fiction is that ancient African traditions and black identity is steeped throughout the story. A text that has a black character in a futuristic world is not enough. But Afrofuturism is more than just Sci-fi. It’s the reimagining of a future filled with arts, science and technology seen through the perspective of black people.
We will be exploring Afrofuturism and technology with India Gary-Martin, formerly JPMorgan’s MD and COO for investment banking tech and operations, Dr. Mave Houston, Head of UXR Disney+ and Nana Baffour, a Ghanaian born venture capitalist and investor who is now CEO of one of Brazil’s largest tech companies join us on the programme. In addition, we have an extract of Afrofuturism Sci-Fi, Ale Santos’s new book “The Last Ancestral” and his view on Afrofuturism and its role in the development of technology.
The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Angelica Mari.

Studio Manager: Bob Nettles
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2jwrs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm5b0w2d)
Decision expected soon on Prince Andrew case

A US judge will decide "soon" whether a civil sex assault case against the Duke of York will be dismissed, following the latest hearing in New York.

Prince Andrew's lawyer told Judge Lewis A Kaplan that the duke could be covered by a 2009 deal his accuser, Virginia Giuffre, made with Jeffrey Epstein. Ms Giuffre is suing the prince claiming he sexually assaulted her - when she was 17 and a minor in some US states. The duke denies the allegations. We hear the latest from New York

Also in the programme: As cases of coronavirus are surging in several countries, what needs to be done to manage the side effects of infections, such as absences from work or school. And what are the effects of deforestation in the Cerrado in Brazil, the world’s largest savannah, for climate change?

(Photo shows Prince Andrew, Virginia Roberts and Ghislaine Maxwell in 2001. Credit: Virginia Roberts)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2k0hx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx27plyb1w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sv9z22cpj)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp7cs9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycslgrrrsk4)
Toyota overtakes GM as top US car seller

After a 90-year run at the top, GM slipped behind Toyota in terms of car sales in the US in 2021. Paul Eisenstein from TheDetroitBureau.com tells us what caused the swing. Plus, reaction to Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes being found guilty on several counts of fraud. LA Times columnist Michael Hiltzik tells us why he thinks more investors will fall prey to deception in the future. As Apple briefly becomes the first publicly traded company to be valued at more than US$3 trillion, Wall Street Journal markets reporter Hardika Singh tells us why the tech giant is still going strong. Plus, Joe Saluzzi from Themis Trading gives us his take on today's movements in markets in the US. Whilst they have been rising sharply in recent years, London's FTSE100 is just two per cent higher than five years ago. The BBC's business editor, Simon Jack, reports on why the UK index seems to be under performing.

(Picture: A General Motors electric vehicle assembly plant in Detroit. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2k481)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pkr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp7hjf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 05 JANUARY 2022

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2k805)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2kcr9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqrxgzgr20)
Toyota overtakes GM as top US car seller

Toyota sold more cars in the United States than any other company in 2021, overtaking GM, which loses top spot for the first time in 90 years. Paul Eisenstein from TheDetroitBureau.com tells us what caused the swing. Plus, reaction to Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes being found guilty on several counts of fraud, as LA Times columnist Michael Hiltzik tells us he thinks more investors will fall prey to deception in the future. As Apple briefly becomes the world's first $3tn company, Dan Ives from Wedbush Securities tells us what the iPhone maker's chief executive Tim Cook has got right since taking over from Steve Jobs. And whilst US stock markets have been rising sharply in recent years, London's FTSE100 is just two per cent higher than it was five years ago. The BBC's business editor Simon Jack reports on why the UK index seems to be under performing. Throughout the programme we’re joined by Yoko Ishikuram, Professor Emeritus at Hitotsubashi University and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network, and by Takara Small, a technology and social media reporter based in Toronto, Canada.

Picture: A Toyota dealership in Houston, Texas; Credit: Getty Images


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2khhf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncd)
Laurence Tribe: Is the US system of government in peril?

Stephen Sackur speaks to Laurence Tribe, Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard University. It’s a year since pro-Trump protesters stormed the US Capitol and unleashed a spasm of violence which left five people dead. While hundreds of people have since been charged, none have been key associates of Donald Trump, and the former president seems to be contemplating another run for the White House while insisting, without evidence, that the 2020 election was stolen. Is partisanship on both sides eroding faith in American democracy?


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp7vrt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2km7k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2kqzp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct2zhj)
My Arab Spring

Hope – Amal

The road to democracy is rarely straightforward. There are steps forwards, and backwards, and times when it feels like you’re just not going anywhere at all. So what does the future hold for the countries of the 2011 Arab Spring Revolutions? Where can people look for hope now?

Abubakr and Ella al-Shamahi explore if Tunisia’s new democracy is at risk, after what some are calling the coup of July 2021, when the Tunisian President sacked the PM and assumed executive power. They ask what the solutions are for the war-torn countries of the Arab Spring, like Syria and Yemen, and consider what the legacy of 2011 is. Is it the youth who have an awareness of a revolutionary history and how far people will go to gain their freedom? Are the youth where we look for hope now?

(Photo: A Tunisian protester sits on top of a gate outside the parliament building in the capital Tunis, July 2021 follow the president's dismissal of Prime Minister, Hichem Mechichi. Credit: EPA)


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp8382)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302s)
The dead body

QAnon: The plot to break reality. When a mob storms the Capitol in Washington DC, reporter and presenter Gabriel Gatehouse sees someone he recognises: a man draped in furs with horns on his head.

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/comingstorm


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2kvqt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv328zhzxrk)
US records more than one million new Covid cases

Covid pandemic: a global infection record is set by the US as China locks down entire cities after the discovery of just a hand full of cases.

China wasn't happy when Lithuania allowed Taiwan to open an office in it's capital, now Lithuania says that was a mistake.

And how one of the most powerful drug gangs in Mexico became the biggest drug gang in Guatemala making them the primary route for drug trafficking out of South America.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2kzgy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv328zj01hp)
Covid: US breaks global record for new cases in a single day

One million Covid cases in just one day in the United States, as the government in Italy considers compulsory vaccinations and lockdown for the unvaccinated.

The president of Kazakhstan has sacked the government and declared a state of emergency after violent protests broke out when a cap on fuel prices was scrapped.

Tear gas in response to more protests in cities across Sudan - we'll assess whether there's any space for compromise between demonstrators and the military.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2l372)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv328zj057t)
Kazakh president sacks government after fuel protests

The President of Kazakhstan, Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, has dismissed the government and appointed an acting prime minister in the wake of nationwide protests over fuel prices.

In Italy, as Covid infections rise, the government meets later today to decide whether to include compulsory vaccinations for workers.

Tennis: Many Australians are angry that Novak Djokovic was granted an exemption from vaccination rules to defend his title at the Australian Open.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2l6z6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp8l7l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jpp)
The many careers of Richard Leakey

Richard Leakey died at his home outside Nairobi, Kenya, earlier this week. World-famous for his fossil discoveries, the 77-year-old had many careers - paleoanthropologist, wildlife defender, politician and anti-corruption campaigner. Business Daily's Vivienne Nunis met Richard Leakey late last year and recorded this interview with him. He looks back on his life and shares his as yet unrealised plans for a 'cathedral of life with no God', a museum dedicated to evolution on the edge of Rift Valley. Image: Richard Leakey with a pile of elephant ivory, confiscated by the Kenyan government and due to be burnt in 1989. Credit: Getty Images.


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8r)
Marcel Proust

In 2022, France is marking the centenary of the death of the novelist Marcel Proust, the author of the 20th century masterpiece Remembrance of Things Past. In this archive edition of Witness History, Proust's friend, Prince Antoine Bibescu, recalls his conversations with the author, and Proust's maid, Celeste Albaret, remembers his final hours. The programme also hears from Professor Michael Wood, an expert on Proust at Princeton University.

PHOTO: Marcel Proust (Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2lbqb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2zhj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp8pzq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2lggg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2ll6l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6p65v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp8ygz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2lpyq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzq)
The tip-off and the 30-year treasure hunt

It began with drinks one Sunday when a woman told Reg Mead a story; her father was ploughing a field when he came across a pot full of ancient silver coins. He scooped up what he could and then ploughed the rest into the field. Reg is a metal detectorist and he was instantly hooked. With his friend Richard Miles they set off on a search that would last for 30 years.

Marni Nixon was known as one of Hollywood's best 'ghost singers' and it's her voice you hear in the lead roles of the original West Side Story, The King and I and My Fair Lady; films that dominated the screens in the 50s and 60s. Marni Nixon passed away five years ago but she told Jo Fidgen in 2013 how she had to fight to get recognition for her name and her voice.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen

(Photo: Richard Miles (left) and Reg Mead. Credit: Jamie Graham, JPG Digital Imaging)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2ltpv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6pfp3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp95z7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2lyfz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm5b2xrl)
Unprecedented protests in Kazakhstan

Demonstrators have stormed the mayor's office in Kazakhstan's biggest city, Almaty, on a second day of unprecedented nationwide protests. The protests have been sparked by a government decision to double vehicle fuel prices.

Also in the programme: there's been a furious backlash in Australia to the news that the men's tennis number one, Novak Djokovic, is being allowed to compete in this month's Australian Open, after receiving an exemption from vaccination rules. And, an expedition to Antarctica will send robotic submarines, including one named Boaty McBoatface, to explore the giant Thwaites glacier which is melting at an alarming rate.

(Photo: Kazakh law enforcement officers block a street during a protest triggered by fuel price increase in Almaty, Kazakhstan January 5, 2022. REUTERS/Pavel Mikheyev)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2m263)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp9fgh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4d1trr857r)
France debates new Covid vaccination rules

French lawmakers are debating making proof of vaccination required to enter public venues. Previously a recent negative test has been an acceptable alternative, and we get reaction to the proposal from Oliver Woodhead, who owns Paris restaurant l'Entente, and would have to ensure his customers are vaccinated if the new rule is adopted. And we get a sense of how likely it is the proposal will become law from Sophie Pedder of The Economist. Also in the programme, the president of Kazakhstan has dismissed the country's entire government in a bid to quell mass protests against the rising cost of vehicle fuel. Joanna Lillis is a journalist based in Almaty, and explains the background to the dispute. Plus, following his death at the weekend, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on the life of the Kenya-based paleoanthropologist, wildlife defender and anti-corruption campaigner, Richard Leakey.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson and produced by Nisha Patel and Russell Newlove.

(Picture: A queue at a French vaccination centre. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2m5y7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxy42625wp)
Kazakhstan protests

The president of Kazakhstan, Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, has vowed a tough response to the violent anti-government protests sweeping the country. We'll explain the developments and hear from people affected by fuel price hikes.

As much of Europe combats the spread of Omicron, President Macron of France has said he wants to make life difficult for people who have not been vaccinated. We’ll reflect the conversation in the country about the government’s Covid measures.

We’ll talk through other news on the coronavirus pandemic, with the help of one of our regular experts, Dr Maria Sundaram.

We’ll also hear a conversation between people working and volunteering in vaccine centres in South Africa, the US and the UK.

And we’ll hear about the anger in Australia at the decision to exempt tennis player Novak Djokovic from vaccination rules.

(Photo: Riot police officers patrol in a street during rally over a hike in energy prices in Almaty, Kazakhstan, 05 January 2022. Protesters stormed the mayor's office in Almaty, as Kazakh President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev declared a state of emergency in the capital until 19 January 2022. EPA/STR)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2m9pc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxy42629mt)
Coronavirus: Vaccinating the public

A key part of the fight against the Covid-19 pandemic has been the vaccination drive, and the teams of thousands of health professionals and volunteers working in vaccination centres to make that a reality. We connect to three people helping to administer jabs in the UK, US and South Africa, to find out what it's like to be part of the global effort to vaccinate.

Also, as much of Europe combats the spread of Omicron, President Macron of France has said he wants to make life difficult for people who have not been vaccinated. We’ll reflect the conversation in the country about the government’s Covid measures.

Also, the president of Kazakhstan, Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, has vowed a tough response to the violent anti-government protests sweeping the country. We'll explain the developments and hear from people affected by fuel price hikes.

(Photo: A medical worker holds a syringe with a dose of the Moderna vaccine against the coronavirus disease in Rome, Italy, January 5, 2022. Credit: Reuters/Guglielmo Mangiapane)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2mffh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2mk5m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6q54w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgp9xg0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nr3b1qdzz)
2022/01/05 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2mnxr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2zhj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpb164)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwf)
Home working versus the office

As millions of us have had to stay away from our workplaces during the pandemic, Claudia Hammond explores the psychology of working from home versus the office. Some people have loved not having to commute and quietly beavering away at home, but others have missed the buzz of the office, found balancing family and work at home very difficult with lack of space or limited internet access. So in the future when Covid is less of a worry what does the evidence tell us about where it’s best to work?

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Father working from home with his son sitting next to him. Photo credit: Marko Geber/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2msnw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm5b3rzh)
Protests continue to grow in Kazakhstan

Nationwide protests in Kazakhstan see protesters in the largest city, Almaty, storm the airport and ransack the mayor’s office. Kazakhstan's president says his country is under attack from "terrorists" and has appealed to a Russia-led military alliance for help.

Also in the programme: tennis world number 1 Novak Djokovic struggles to enter Australia amid vaccine controversy; and Canada has announced the largest class-action settlement in the country's history -- worth thirty-one billion US dollars. The money will compensate indigenous children and families harmed by the welfare system.

(Photo: Burning police car at a protest in Almaty Credit: Reuters/Pavel Mikheyev)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2mxf0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx27pm16yz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sv9z258lm)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpb8pd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172yct06426bnw)
Low turnout as CES tech fair welcomes attendees

Turnout has been lower than usual at the CES 2022 tech fair in Las Vegas, with attendees able to physically attend after a virtual-only event last year. The BBC’s James Clayton tells us what the mood is like at the event, while attendee Mark Gooday of Ashdown Engineering tells us what his business is getting out of being there. Plus, airlines are still finding themselves having to fly empty or near-empty planes in order to preserve precious landing slots at airports around Europe. Andre Orban of the Belgian website Aviation24 tells us how the government there has responded. Protests in Kazakhstan which began after fuel cost rises, following the scrapping of government price caps, have spread. Dr Diana Kudaibergenova of the Department of Sociology at Cambridge University tells us more about what’s happening. And Allison Levitsky, Workplace Reporter for Protocol, tells us about how Silicon Valley companies are increasingly using T-groups, which offer a modern twist on the traditional business meeting.

(Picture: Attendees pass through a hallway at CES 2022. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2n154)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1ncd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpbdfj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Coming Storm (w3ct302s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 06 JANUARY 2022

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2n4x8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2n8nd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqrxgzkmz3)
Low turnout at in-person CES tech fair

Turnout has been lower than usual at the CES 2022 tech fair in Las Vegas, with attendees able to physically attend after a virtual-only event last year. The BBC’s James Clayton tells us what the mood is like at the event, while attendee Mark Gooday of Ashdown Engineering tells us what his business is getting out of being there. Plus, airlines are still finding themselves having to fly empty or near-empty planes in order to preserve precious landing slots at airports around Europe. Andre Orban of the Belgian website Aviation24 tells us how the government there has responded. Protests in Kazakhstan which began after fuel cost rises, following the scrapping of government price caps, have spread. Dr Diana Kudaibergenova of the Department of Sociology at Cambridge University tells us more about what’s happening. And Allison Levitsky, Workplace Reporter for Protocol, tells us about how Silicon Valley companies are increasingly using T-groups, which offer a modern twist on the traditional business meeting. Throughout the programme we’re joined by journalists Erin Delmore in New York and Sushma Ramachandran in New Delhi.


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2nddj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z34)
Can we get drugs out of prisons?

Keeping drugs out of prisons seems like an impossible task. Tanya Beckett asks four experts if it can be done and how prisoners can be helped to overcome their addictions.

Contributors:
Stuart J. Cole, drug and alcohol worker, author “Two Years”
Martin Horn, former Secretary of Corrections, Pennsylvania
Heidi Bottolfs, Department Director, Norwegian Correctional Service
Dr Ximene Rego, Researcher, School of Law, University of Minho, Portugal

Presenter: Tanya Beckett
Researcher: Chris Blake
Producer: Sheila Cook



(Image: Drug dealer and an addict exchanging drugs and money at the jail: Getty/Manuel-F-O)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpbrnx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2nj4n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2nmws)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyh)
Turkey's crazy project

A giant new canal for the world’s biggest ships is the most ambitious engineering plan yet proposed by Turkey’s President Erdogan, whose massive infrastructure projects have already changed the face of his country. The proposed waterway would slice through Istanbul, creating in effect a second Bosphorus, the busy shipping lane that is now the only outlet from the Black Sea. The president himself has called the project “crazy”. But he says it would “save the future of Istanbul”, easing traffic in the Bosphorus and reducing the risk of a terrible accident there. But the plan has met a storm of opposition. Istanbul’s mayor says it would “murder” the historic city. Critics claim the canal would be an environmental disaster, cost billions of dollars that Turkey can’t afford – and provoke severe tensions with Russia, which is determined to preserve existing rules on traffic into and out of the Black Sea. Will the canal go ahead? Who would lose – and who would benefit?

Tim Whewell reports from a divided Istanbul.

(Image: Turkish coastal safety patrol boats in the Bosphorus, Istanbul. Credit: Yörük Işık)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpc055)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgt)
So, you think you can quit caffeine?

Caffeine is a key ingredient in some of our favourite foods and drinks, but it’s also a mind-altering drug that can be very tricky to quit.

Tamasin Ford meets three people who’ve tried to cut caffeine out of their lives by eliminating some of its main sources from their diets - coffee, tea and chocolate.

We hear about some uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms, social awkwardness, and the struggle to adapt to life without a caffeine high. How long did they stay caffeine-free?

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

Producers: Simon Tulett and Sarah Stolarz

Contributors:

Petteri Rantamäki, business software professional, Helsinki, Finland;
Abigail James, aesthetician and author, London, UK;
John Horgan, science journalist, New York, USA.

(Picture: A young woman holding a cup of coffee. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2nrmx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2yn9kvc11)
Tennis ace fights to defend his Australian title

The world number one tennis player, Novak Djokovic, has been denied entry to Australia in a row about his covid vaccination status.

Russian- led regional peacekeeping troops are to be deployed to Kazakhstan, after an appeal from the country's president for help to quell widespread unrest over fuel prices.

A year on from the storming of the US Capitol by supporters of former President Trump, we'll take a look at the QAnon conspiracy theory - something many of those involved believe in.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2nwd1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2yn9kvgs5)
Kazakhstan: President to get help from Russian military

Russian-led regional troops are to be deployed to Kazakhstan, where a state of emergency is in place, following days of protests against the President after days of clashes between demonstrators and security forces.

Lawyers for the world's number one tennis seed Novak Djokovic are challenging the denial of his visa to enter Australia hours after he landed in Melbourne to defend his grand slam title.

China has been steadily expanding its state surveillance network, particularly in Uighur areas of the country - but now there are fears the attention is turning to western social media.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2p045)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2yn9kvlj9)
Kazakh President to receive help from regional allies

The president of Kazakhstan has responded to days of protests by calling for military help from a Russian-led military alliance.

Top tennis player Novak Djokovic is awaiting an appeal court decision after he was refused entry to Australia to play in the nation's Open tennis tournament over covid vaccination requirements.

One year on from the Jan 6th attack on US Capitol building, we take a look at the QAnon conspiracy theory that helped spur on the rioters.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2p3w9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpch4p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jbd)
The death of the petrol station

The rise of electric vehicles could see traditional service stations closing across the planet over the next two decades, and replacing pumps with fast chargers is unlikely to save them.

Justin Rowlatt speaks to one entrepreneur hoping to profit from the rollout of EV chargers in every home and parking space, Erik Fairbairn of Pod Point. Meanwhile Isabelle Haigh, head of national control at the UK's National Grid, explains why she is confident they can meet the electricity demand from all these new vehicles.

Across the Atlantic, another entrepreneur - Sanjiv Patel of National Petroleum - says the writing is clearly on the wall for his chain of 25 gas stations in California - but maybe not for a while yet. But could he turn them into restaurants or use them to hold séances? That's the fate of one petrol station in Leeds that is now an arts centre. We hear from its owner, Jack Simpson.

This is a repeat of an episode first broadcast on 2 June 2021.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Abandoned gas station along old Route 66 in the California desert; Credit: Lynne Rostochil/Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x47)
Mozambique's Eduardo Mondlane: From professor to freedom fighter

On February 3rd 1969, Eduardo Mondlane - the founder of FRELIMO, Mozambique’s Liberation Front against Portuguese colonial rule - was assassinated in a bomb attack in Tanzania. Mondlane started out as a teacher and academic, but his daughter Nyeleti Brooke Mondlane has been telling Rebecca Kesby why he swapped the university library for guerrilla warfare - and how it cost him his life.

PHOTO: Eduardo Mondlane in 1966 (Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2p7mf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpclwt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2pcck)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmb)
Boudica, warrior queen

Boudica, also known as Boadicea, was a member of Iron Age aristocracy in Roman occupied England and her husband was the ruler of the Iceni people. When he died in around 60AD, Boudica, driven by Roman brutality, led a rebellion against the Roman army and marched on London. It was a ferocious attack that nearly drove the Romans out of Britain before Boudica was finally defeated. Today, she is an iconic and sometimes controversial figure. To explore Boudica, Bridget Kendall is joined by professors Richard Hingley and Miranda Aldhouse-Green and Dr. Jane Webster.

(Image: Detail from Boadicea Haranguing the Britons by William Sharp, after John Opie, line engraving, published 1793. Credit: by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9c)
Skiing in Afghanistan

In 2011, the rugged mountains of Bamiyan province in central Afghanistan became the backdrop of something as unlikely as it was uplifting - an international ski scene. As Bamiyan was then relatively safe for tourists, a new travel agency, supported by a development NGO, started offering holidays to skiers seeking a unique adventure. A ski school was also set up for local villagers keen to learn, including Alishah Farhang, who went on to become one of Afghanistan's top skiers. However, as he tells Viv Jones, his hopes of competing in the Winter Olympics have been shattered by the return of the Taliban.

PHOTO: Competitors take part in the start of the fourth Afghan Ski Challenge in February 2014 (Shefayee/AFP/Getty Images).


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2ph3p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6s32y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpcvd2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2plvt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k47)
A quizmaster’s accidental route to fame

Jay Flynn worked in a pub and loved hosting pub quizzes every week. When pubs were ordered to close at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic in the UK, he started his own virtual pub quiz for family and friends but he forgot to make it private and in the end, thousands of strangers across the country played along too, and have been ever since. He’s been credited with helping people’s mental health through the pandemic. Jay spent time living on the streets in London and went through his own mental health crisis. He spoke to Andrea Kennedy. Their conversation touches on the moments he contemplated suicide.

If you are affected by issues raised in this programme there is confidential support on the BBC Action line website, or at Befrienders.org
Kamini Zantoko is a successful writer and musician, much of his work is inspired by his experience of growing up as part of the only black family in a rural French village in the 1980s. From childhood Kamini and his family faced prejudice. His father was the local doctor and treated the villagers for decades. When he died thousands turned out for his funeral. Kamini turned his family's story into an acclaimed film called The African Doctor. Today he is a comedian, rapper, writer and TV host.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb

(Photo: Jay Flynn. Credit: Courtesy of Jay Flynn)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2pqly)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6sbl6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpd2wb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2pvc2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm5b5tnp)
Violence as security forces crack down in Kazakhstan

Security forces in Kazakhstan have stated they killed dozens of anti-government protesters in the city of Almaty. The violence comes after three days of unrest in which protesters set fire to the Almaty mayor’s office.

Also on the program, we speak to Australia’s deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce about tennis star Novak Djokovic’s continued detention amid questions over his failure to provide proof of a medical vaccine exemption when entering the country; and US President Joe Biden leads events in Washington to mark the first anniversary of a storming of the Capitol meant to stop the certification of the results of the 2020 Presidential election.

[Photo: Troops pictured in the main square in Almaty. Credit: Reuters]


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2pz36)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpdbcl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49lhky94vz)
Dozens killed in protest crackdown in Kazakhstan

As Kazakh forces kill dozens of protesters we examine the economic roots of the conflict. Lilit Gevorgyan is an expert on the former Soviet republics at the research company IHS, and explains how Kazakhstan's economy actually works. Also in the programme, a group of investors are pressuring global vaccine manufacturers to do more to get Covid vaccines more widely distributed around the world. Rogier Krens is chief investment officer at Achmea Investment Management and tells us why he coordinated the effort. Kenya's government plans to cancel more then 400 infrastructure projects that have stalled because of a lack of cash. The BBC's Michael Kaloki in Nairobi brings us up to speed. With the Consumer Electronics Show now under way in Las Vegas, British entrepreneur and electronics designer Mark Gooday of Ashdown Engineering discusses why he decided to be at this year's show. Plus, with no official government subsidies to help cut the cost of electric cars in Australia, a business opportunity has opened up for firms offering to import cheaper second-hand electric vehicles from Japan. We find out more from Ben Lippa, who runs J Spec Imports in Melbourne.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Russell Padmore, Russell Newlove, Joshua Thorpe and Philippa Goodrich.

(Picture: Troops on a square in Almaty. Picture credit: Reuters.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2q2vb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxy42652ss)
Kazakhstan protests: Dozens killed in crackdown

Security forces in Kazakhstan say they have killed dozens of anti-government protesters in the main city Almaty. Unrest that began on Sunday over fuel increases culminated in days of violent anti-government protests. Russian led troops, invited by president Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, to help keep the peace are arriving. We speak to our Central Asia correspondent and BBC Russian about the developments.

It’s one year today since the supporters of then President Donald Trump stormed Capitol Hill to try to stop congress from certifying his election defeat. We look back to the day and hear the highlights of President Biden’s speech today to the nation. We’ll also discuss the deep divisions that have remained in America. We hear from the BBC’s Stephanie Hegarty, who first reported on the rise of QAnon in 2020 and has travelled back to the US to see what’s changed for those caught up in the conspiracy theory. She will be telling us about the people she’s met.

Novak Djokovic is facing a weekend of uncertainty about whether he will be deported from Australia – after being denied entry because of his Covid vaccination status. We’ll hear reaction from Australia and from his native Serbia where the President has said he’s being “harassed”.

And our regular health expert, Dr Emma Hodcroft in Switzerland will talk us through today's Covid-19 stories and the latest news on the Omicron variant.

(Photo: Troops are seen at the main square where hundreds of people were protesting against the government, in Almaty, Kazakhstan January 6, 2022. Credit: Reuters/Mariya Gordeyeva)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2q6lg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxy42656jx)
Capitol Hill attack: One year on

It’s one year today since the supporters of then President Donald Trump stormed Capitol Hill to try to stop congress from certifying his election defeat. We look back to the day and hear the highlights of President Biden’s speech today to the nation. We’ll also discuss the deep divisions that have remained in America. We hear from the BBC’s Stephanie Hegarty, who first reported on the rise of QAnon in 2020 and has travelled back to the US to see what’s changed for those caught up in the conspiracy theory. She will be telling us about the people she’s met.

Security forces in Kazakhstan say they have killed dozens of anti-government protesters in the main city Almaty. Unrest that began on Sunday over fuel increases culminated in days of violent anti-government protests. Russian led troops to help keep the peace are arriving. We speak to our Central Asia correspondent and BBC Russian about the developments

Novak Djokovic is facing a weekend of uncertainty about whether he will be deported from Australia – after being denied entry because of his Covid vaccination status. We’ll hear reaction from Australia and from his native Serbia where the President has said he’s being “harassed”.

And our regular health expert, Dr Helen Wimalarathna, a Molecular Epidemiologist at the University of Buckingham, talks us through today's news about Covid-19 and the Omicron variant.

(Photo: U.S. President Joe Biden speaks in Statuary Hall on the first anniversary of the January 6, 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol by supporters of former President Donald Trump. January 6, 2022 Credit: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2qbbl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2qg2q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6t21z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpdtc3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nr3b1t9x2)
2022/01/06 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2qktv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpdy37)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4v)
CORBEVAX – A vaccine for the world?

Now being produced in India CORBEVAX is grown in yeast in a similar way to several other widely available vaccines. The technology used to make it is far simpler and much more readily available than that used to produce mRNA vaccines. In theory, CORBEVAX could be produced cheaply in large quantities and go a long way to addressing the problems of Covid19 vaccine availability globally. It was developed by a team from Baylor College of Medicine in Texas including Maria Elena Bottazzi.
Antibiotic-resistant superbugs are thought to have emerged in repose to the use of antibiotics, however, the discovery of a superbug living on the skin of hedgehogs has challenged this view. The superbug is thought to have been living with hedgehogs long before antibiotics were discovered. Jesper and Anders Larsen at the Danish State Serum Institute in Copenhagen explain.
Modifying viruses, using them to infect or kill pest organisms is an attractive proposition. However, there are concerns over what might happen when they are released, particularly over their ability to mutate and evolve says Filippa Lentzos from Kings College Department of Global Health and Social Medicine in London.


And The Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew have released the names of over 200 new species of plants and fungi discovered last year. Mycologist Tuula Niskanen and botanist Martin Cheek tell us more.

(Image: Getty Images)


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2qpkz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm5b6nwl)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2qtb3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx27pm43w2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sv9z285hq)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpf5lh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs5rdgly4p)
India approves patent-free Covid-19 vaccine

India has approved the use of a patent-free Covid-19 vaccine, which was developed at Baylor College of Medicine in the US. We speak to Maria Elena Bottazzi, who tell us her team developed Corbevax with the aim of expanding access to essential healthcare for people in poorer countries. Plus, the United Nations says food prices increased by 28% in 2021. Abdolreza Abbassian from the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization tells us those struggling financially will be hit the hardest by the rise. With the authorities in the United States still attempting to track down everybody involved in the January 6th invasion of the US Capitol, Anjana Susarla of Michigan State University tells us why facial recognition technology is an increasingly important tool in the search. And at CES 2022, we catch up with Remane CEO Ariel Lee, who tells us about her company’s “data-driven haircare solutions”.

(Photo: Corbevax has been approved for emergency use in India; Credit: Getty Images)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2qy27)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpf9bm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 07 JANUARY 2022

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2r1tc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rmb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l9c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2r5kh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqrxgznjw6)
One year on from the US Capitol riot

It’s one year on from the day that supporters of former president Donald Trump stormed the US Capitol building in Washington DC. With the authorities still attempting to track down everybody involved, Anjana Susarla of Michigan State University tells us why facial recognition technology is an increasingly important tool in the search. Plus, India has approved the use of a patent-free Covid-19 vaccine, which was developed at Baylor College of Medicine in the US. We speak to Maria Elena Bottazzi, who tell us her team developed Corbevax with the aim of expanding access to essential healthcare for people in poorer countries. The United Nations says food prices increased by 28% in 2021. Abdolreza Abbassian from the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization tells us those struggling financially will be hit the hardest by the rise. And at CES 2022, we catch up with Remane CEO Ariel Lee, who tells us about her company’s “data-driven haircare solutions”.

(Photo: Supporters of former president Donald Trump inside the US Capitol; Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2r99m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2c)
Nureldin Satti: Sudan's coup

HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to Sudanese diplomat Nureldin Satti. It’s surely hard for the people of Sudan to be optimistic about their country’s prospects in 2022. The new year began with the nominal head of the transitional government quitting his post, leaving Sudan, once again, in the grip of the military. Street protests in recent months have left more than fifty people dead. Nureldin Satti was fired from his post as Ambassador in the US after last October's military coup. Will Sudan’s generals ever give up political power?


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpfnl0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2rf1r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2rjsw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj3)
The return of CES

The major tech show returns to Las Vegas after going virtual during the pandemic. But as the impact of the coronavirus continues to be felt, is there still a place for major industry events like these? Chris Fox speaks to CES organiser Karen Chupka, and to some of the hundreds of startups exhibiting at the show. The BBC's Lara Lewington discusses some of her favourite gadgets at the event, and Spencer Kelly tries out a taxi service made up of remote controlled cars.

(Photo: CES show in Las Vegas, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpfx28)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 World Football (w3ct1v06)
Counting down to the Africa Cup of Nations

Nigeria's Efe Ambrose and Cameroon's Patrick Suffo look ahead to the Africa Cup of Nations. We also hear from the Gambia captain Pa Modou Jagne as he prepares for his country's first ever AFCON.

Picture on website: Cameroonian football jerseys hang along a wall at the central market in Yaounde (Daniel Beloumou Olomo / AFP)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2rnk0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv328zj5qkr)
Despite security concerns Cameroon gears up for Africa’s top football tournament

We’re coming live from London and from Limbe in Cameroon, which is hosting the Africa Cup of Nations - we'll be hearing the excitement as we build towards the tournament's big kick off on Sunday amid an ongoing insurgency in the country’s anglophone regions.

In Kazakhstan dozens of police and protestors are dead amidst growing unrest.

Plus Novak Djokovic appeals his visa cancellation in Australia over the world tennis number one’s vaccination status.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2rs94)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv328zj5v9w)
Cameroon hosts African football tournament under special Covid protocols

Newsday is co-presenting live from Cameroon which plays host to the Africa Cup of Nations football tournament under special Covid conditions, limiting stadium numbers to 60 per cent.

In Kazakhstan the arrival of Russian led forces has failed to stop the protests which have been ongoing since Sunday.

The World Health Organization is warning against describing Omicron as mild, saying it is killing people across the world.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2rx18)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv328zj5z20)
Cameroon insists it is ready to host Africa's elite footballers safely

Newsday is co-presenting from Cameroon which is playing host to the African Cup of Nations from Sunday, looking at the insurgency in the anglophone areas of the country and the impact it has on young people who have lost years of education.

In Kazakhstan, Russian-led "peacekeeping" troops have now arrived in the country, but the violence on the streets is continuing.

By 2050, a new study estimates 153 million people will be living with dementia across the world - up from some 57 million people currently - with the biggest increases in the Middle East and eastern sub-Saharan Africa.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2s0sd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpgd1s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j1c)
Starting a company to fight rare disease

Mapping the human genome led to big advances in diagnosing rare disease. But diagnosis is only the first step in dealing with an illness. So what do you do if your child is found to have a condition that has no treatment? We hear from Michelle Teng, a mother who co-founded a biotech firm called SynaptixBio, that is looking to find the world’s first treatment for a rare neurodegenerative disease. Also in the programme, the Chief Medical Officer at Genomics England, Dr Richard Scott, tells us his hopes for the future of genomics medicine. And Dr Segun Fatumo of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, explains why Africa is so important when it comes to genetic research. Presented by Vivienne Nunis and produced by Sarah Treanor. Image: Scientists look at a DNA model. Credit: Getty Images.


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzq)
The sinking of the Wilhelm Gustloff

In January 1945, an estimated 9,400 people died when the German military transport ship, the Wilhelm Gustloff, was sunk in the Baltic by a Soviet submarine. The victims were almost all civilians trying to escape the advancing Red Army. In 2011, the late Horst Woit spoke to Neal Razzell about surviving what's thought to be the worst maritime disaster in history.

PHOTO: The Wilhelm Gustloff in 1944 (Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2s4jj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpghsx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2s88n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htl)
The Beijing Winter Olympics: High stakes for China

The Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics will begin in 4 weeks’ time with more than 2,000 athletes from across the globe expected to take part. Officials have set up a bubble to keep arriving athletes and officials separate from the general population, all part of attempts to prevent coronavirus infections. Some health officials fear the increased transmissibility of the Omicron variant will pose a severe challenge to organisers and athletes can expect to face tougher restrictions compared to last year's summer Olympics in Tokyo. The games are also the subject of a diplomatic boycott by the United States and some of its allies. The White House says it wants to send a clear message that it disapproves of China's human rights record, including its treatment of Uighur Muslims and a crackdown on dissents in Hong Kong. China described the move as an attempt to politicise sport. So what will success look like for the Beijing Olympics? How effective will the Covid protocols be? And how much of an impact will the diplomatic boycott have on the event’s credibility?

Paul Henley is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2sd0s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6w001)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpgr95)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1v06)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2shrx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g3)
The tale of the Gilgamesh Dream tablet

An ancient clay tablet looted from Iraq in 1991 was recently returned to the country. The Gilgamesh Dream Tablet is part of the Epic of Gilgamesh, one of the world’s oldest surviving works of literature. BBC Arabic’s Eli Melki trained as an archaeologist, and he explains what makes this tablet so remarkable.

The magic of mahjong
We revisit a story from BBC Chinese, about the enduring appeal of mahjong, which started as an exclusive game played at the imperial court. Suping and editor Howard Zhang share their insights.

When the Koreans came to town
It was a town in the middle of nowhere in northern Mexico. “Not even lizards came here”, say the locals. But suddenly Pesquería’s population grew, and shop and restaurant signs started being written in Korean. It started with a new car factory and the arrival of Korean workers, as BBC Mundo´s Carlos Serrano explains.

The Passengers of the Yomei Maru. Part two.
Ilia Kizirov continues the tale told in his BBC Russian podcast, about a group of nearly 800 children caught up in the Russian Civil War. In May 1918, they were sent from Saint Petersburg to 'feeding colonies' in the countryside, but they ended up on the wrong side of the front line. They fled east, and finally returned home more than two years later, after a journey on a Japanese freighter that took them around the world.

(Photo: The Gilgamesh Dream Tablet. Credit: REUTERS/Saba Kareem)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2smj1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6w7h9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpgzsf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science In Action (w3ct1l4v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2sr85)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm5b8qks)
Kazakh president orders troops to shoot if disturbances continue

The Kazakh president has given troops orders to shoot those he calls ‘terrorists’ without warning if there are further disturbances. He says order has been largely restored after days of anti-government protests during which security forces said they’d killed 26 people in the main city, Almaty.

Also in the programme: NATO foreign ministers hold an emergency video conference to discuss Russia’s military build-up around Ukraine; and scientists say vacuuming animal DNA out of the air could revolutionise the tracking of biodiversity.

(Photo: A vehicle that was burned during the protests triggered by fuel price increase is seen on a road in Almaty, Kazakhstan. CREDIT: REUTERS/Pavel Mikheyev)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2sw09)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgph78p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4745d4b4h6)
US jobs report paints mixed picture

The US economy added just 199,000 jobs in December but unemployment also fell to 3.9%. Ken Rogoff is a former chief economist at the International Monetary Fund, and currently professor of economics at Harvard University, and explains what the figures actually mean. Also in the programme, France's President Macron and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen have been marking the start of France's six month presidency of the Council of the European Union. Maria Demetzis is deputy director of the research institute Bruegel, and tells us what France's economic priorities are likely to be, and we also get the perspective of Mireille Clapot, who is a French Member of Parliament for Mr Macron's En Marche party. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on the potential for gene-based medicine. Plus, with excitement building ahead of football tournament the African Cup of Nations, which gets under way in Cameroon on Sunday, the BBC's Salim Kikeke in Yaounde discusses the potential economic impact of hosting the event.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson and produced by Nisha Patel, Russell Newlove, Joshua Thorpe and Philippa Goodrich.

(Picture: A 'now hiring' sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2szrf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxy4267zpw)
Kazakhstan unrest: President says order 'largely restored'

The Kazakh president has said he's brought an end to six days of protests though troops have orders to shoot if there are further disturbances. We'll hear from our correspondent in Almaty who says he's seen no sign of demonstrators today, though occasional shots can still be heard. We'll also hear from a woman who has been in touch with her family in Kazakhstan.

Tennis star Novak Djokovic has thanked people "around the world" for their support as he awaits a decision on his deportation from Australia. Another player is now known to be residing at the same detention hotel as Djokovic after her visa was cancelled. We'll hear more from our sports reporter.

Cameroon is hosting the Africa Cup of Nations football tournament which begins this weekend. James Copnall joins us from one of the host cities, Limbe, to talk about excitement over the tournament but also to explain the long-standing tensions between the country’s English and French speaking people.

The US Capitol riot on January 2, 2021 has been described by President Biden as a dark day in US history. A year on from the attack, Ros Atkins examines the legal and political fall-out from it.

(Photo: Kazakh service members stand guard at a checkpoint following the protests triggered by fuel price increase in Almaty, Kazakhstan January 7, 2022. Credit: Mariya Gordeyeva/Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2t3hk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxy42683g0)
Hollywood icon Sidney Poitier dies

One of the best known black Hollywood actors of the past century, Sidney Poitier, has died. Mr Poitier was the first black man to be awarded Best Actor at the Academy Awards in 1964 for his role in Lilies of the Field. We'll look back at his life and career.

The Kazakh president has said he's brought an end to six days of protests though troops have orders to shoot if there are further disturbances. We'll get the latest from our correspondent and hear from a woman who has been in touch with her family in Kazakhstan.

The US Supreme Court is a hearing a request to strike down President Biden's vaccine mandate on large companies. Our correspondent explains.

Cameroon is hosting the Africa Cup of Nations football tournament which begins this weekend. James Copnall is in one of the host cities, Limbe, and will be talking to us about the tournament and about the long-standing tensions between the country’s English and French speaking people.

(Photo: Actor Sidney Poitier arrives at the 2014 Vanity Fair Oscars Party in West Hollywood, California March 2, 2014. Credit: Danny Moloshok/File Photo/Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2t77p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2tbzt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxwpf6wyz2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgphq86)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nr3b1x6t5)
2022/01/07 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2tgqy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgphv0b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prl)
Why do we get bored?

“I’m bored!” We can all relate to the uncomfortable - and at times unbearable - feeling of boredom. But what is it? Why does it happen? And could this frustrating, thumb-twiddling experience actually serve some evolutionary purpose? CrowdScience listener Brian started wondering this over a particularly uninspiring bowl of washing up, and it’s ended with Marnie Chesterton going on a blessedly un-boring tour through the science and psychology of tedium. She finds out why some people are more affected than others, why boredom is the key to discovery and innovation, and how we can all start improving our lives by embracing those mind-numbing moments.

Featuring: Prof James Danckert (University of Waterloo, Canada), Dr Elizabeth Weybright (Washington State University), Dr Christian Chan (Hong Kong University) and Annie Runkel (University of Dundee).

Presented by Marnie Chesterton
Produced by Samara Linton

Image: Young Asian girl feeling lonely and bored at home. Screen addiction withdrawal symptoms (Credit: Oscar Wong, Getty Images)


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2tlh2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5jm5b9ksp)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2tq76)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx27pm70s5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sv9z2c2dt)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpj2hl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrc9nw0jmh)
US jobs report paints mixed picture

The US economy added just 199,000 jobs in December but unemployment also fell to 3.9%. Ken Rogoff is a former chief economist at the International Monetary Fund, and currently professor of economics at Harvard University, and explains what the figures actually mean. Also in the programme, France's President Macron and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen have been marking the start of France's six month presidency of the Council of the European Union. Maria Demetzis is deputy director of the research institute Bruegel, and tells us what France's economic priorities are likely to be, and we also get the perspective of Mireille Clapot, who is a French Member of Parliament for Mr Macron's En Marche party. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on the potential for gene-based medicine. Plus, with excitement building ahead of football tournament the African Cup of Nations, which gets under way in Cameroon on Sunday, the BBC's Salim Kikeke in Yaounde discusses the potential economic impact of hosting the event.

(Picture: A 'now hiring' sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjz1r2ttzb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n2c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkshgpj67q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1v06)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity 10:06 SUN (w3ct2zv8)

A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity 23:06 SUN (w3ct2zv8)

A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity 00:06 MON (w3ct2zv8)

A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity 03:06 MON (w3ct2zv8)

A Wish for Afghanistan 07:06 SUN (w3ct379f)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3ct1gyh)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gyh)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gyh)

BBC Correspondents' Look Ahead 00:06 SAT (w3ct2zvw)

BBC Correspondents' Look Ahead 04:06 SAT (w3ct2zvw)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172xzks46cr944)

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BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzks46crs3n)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzks46cshlf)

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BBC OS Conversations 02:06 SUN (w3ct2d6v)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxy425wd2h)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j5w)

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Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqrxgzcv4x)

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Business Weekly 04:06 SUN (w3ct2dhw)

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CrowdScience 02:32 MON (w3ct1prk)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lt6)

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Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct30hz)

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Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct30hz)

From Our Own Correspondent 02:06 SAT (w3ct1mvz)

From Our Own Correspondent 05:06 SUN (w3ct1mvz)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mvz)

HARDtalk 08:06 SAT (w3ct1n63)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nwf)

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Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2kyf)

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In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tf4)

In the Studio 23:32 TUE (w3ct1tf4)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dl4)

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Music Life 23:06 SAT (w3ct1hd0)

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Over to You 01:50 SUN (w3ct1l2k)

People Fixing The World 02:06 TUE (w3ct1pkr)

People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pkr)

People Fixing The World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pkr)

People Fixing The World 23:06 TUE (w3ct1pkr)

Pick of the World 02:32 SUN (w3ct386b)

Pick of the World 23:32 SUN (w3ct386b)

Ros Atkins on ... 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dpd)

Science In Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l4v)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nr3b1jm5s)

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Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct1l9b)

Sporting Witness 02:50 SUN (w3ct1l9b)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3ct1l9c)

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Sports News 22:20 SAT (w172y0styprntq2)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0qcmhykflk)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tndfcb497)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0tndfcf8pl)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lcl)

Tech Tent 04:06 FRI (w3ct1nj3)

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The Arts Hour 19:06 SAT (w3ct300p)

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The Arts Hour 12:06 SUN (w3ct300p)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3ct1rv2)

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The Climate Question 04:06 MON (w3ct2drn)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2drn)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2drn)

The Coming Storm 04:32 WED (w3ct302s)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct2zhh)

The Compass 04:06 WED (w3ct2zhj)

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The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p9m)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p9n)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p9n)

The Conversation 23:32 MON (w3ct1p9n)

The Cultural Frontline 05:06 SAT (w3ct1ptr)

The Cultural Frontline 22:32 SAT (w3ct1ptr)

The Cultural Frontline 01:06 SUN (w3ct1ptr)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1ptr)

The Documentary 06:06 SUN (w3ct2zvz)

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The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20g2)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rgs)

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The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rm9)

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The History Hour 07:06 SAT (w3ct1z81)

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The Inquiry 02:06 THU (w3ct1z34)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z34)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct1z34)

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The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3ct1htl)

The Science Hour 06:06 SAT (w3ct1ywb)

The Science Hour 00:06 SUN (w3ct1ywb)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wzp)

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Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct1x1z)

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WorklifeIndia 01:32 SAT (w3ct2f49)

WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f49)

WorklifeIndia 05:32 SUN (w3ct2f49)

World Book Club 12:06 SAT (w3ct1x9w)

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World Book Club 10:06 WED (w3ct1x9w)

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World Business Report 01:06 SAT (w172xzlx0wmnkw6)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzlwnmbqjf7)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y48cbh0zhhr)

World Business Report 22:32 MON (w172y48cbh10bqn)

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World Business Report 22:32 TUE (w172ycslgrrrsk4)

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World Football 04:32 FRI (w3ct1v06)

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World of Wisdom 05:32 SAT (w3ct2zwb)

World of Wisdom 18:32 SAT (w3ct2zwb)

World of Wisdom 01:32 SUN (w3ct2zwb)

World of Wisdom 10:32 MON (w3ct2zwb)