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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 18 DECEMBER 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4hhwy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hth)
Do digital currencies need policing?

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has warned that the stability of some countries’ financial systems could soon be at risk because of unregulated crypto assets. Cryptocurrencies and other digital financial products created using blockchain technology are proliferating. They’re largely free from the controls of governments and central banks, but also free from any significant regulation. The IMF believes “comprehensive, consistent and coordinated” global regulation of the sector is now needed to prevent contagion if major crypto assets begin to collapse. Myanmar’s opposition-led shadow government this week announced that it will accept Tether, a so-called stablecoin, claiming to be pegged to the US dollar, as an official currency - a way of bypassing the control of the country’s military rulers. Meanwhile, across the border in China, authorities are cracking down on crypto and pushing ahead with plans for the country’s own Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC) which critics fear could mark the beginning of the end of anonymous transactions. So, is global finance undergoing a transformation? And are more stringent rules of the road necessary to protect consumers and avoid economic calamity? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.

Producers: Zak Brophy and Paul Schuster.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4hmn2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlkvdbw7tb)
Covid rules tighten

As the Omicron variant sweeps the world, French prime minister, Jean Castex has said major public parties and firework displays on New Year's Eve would be banned. Meanwhile, Ireland imposes new restrictions, as does Wales, as we hear from Emma Downey, co-owner of Tides Kitchen and Wine Bar in Newport in Pembrokeshire. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on why high risk investing has become so popular among young people. Plus Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal has been looking into supply chain issues at the Port of Long Beach in California.

(Picture: A coal-fired power plant. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr5zxg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f47)
The rise of K-wave in India

Global fans of Korean popular culture, known as the K-wave or ‘hallyu’, crossed 100 million in 2020, according to a Korean government agency. In India, everything from K-dramas to music to food and beauty products seems to be making huge inroads. While Korean thriller Squid Game topped the OTT charts for weeks since its release in 2021, music streaming giant Spotify ranked BTS as its fourth most popular boy band in 2020 in India, and the Korean language has seen a dramatic rise in Indian takers.

What’s causing this Korean rush in a land hugely dominated by Bollywood culture? Is the K-wave here for the long haul? In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the rise of K-wave in India.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Anupam Tripathi, actor; Amit Shah, chief cluster officer - north, west, premium, ZEE; Nikita Engheepi, co-founder, Namaste Hallyu, PinkBox Entertainment; Orlinda Fernandes, India Korea Fans Club Mumbai


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4hrd6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8lccg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr63nl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lcj)
Steve Smith’s second chance after Cummins Covid chaos

Alison Mitchell, Jim Maxwell and Sunil Gupta discuss the chaotic start to the second men's Ashes test including Australia's captain Pat Cummins being forced to miss the match due to being deemed a close contact of a Covid-19 case. We reflect on the warm welcome Steve Smith received as he stepped up again to lead Australia, and if it was the right decision by England not to select Mark Wood or a spinner.

Plus we're joined by the captain of Team USA, Monank Patel ahead of their historic upcoming series against Ireland who will become the first full member nation to tour the US. Patel discusses what impact being chosen to co-host the men's T20 World Cup in 2024 will have on the growth of the game in the United States.

Photo: England's Jos Buttler during the first day of the second test match at the Adelaide Oval. (Photo by Chris Hyde/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4hw4b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g0)
Becoming a ‘foreign agent’

What’s it like to be named a ‘foreign agent’ by your own government? That’s what happened to BBC Russian journalist Andrei Zakharov in October. He’s worked in BBC Russian’s investigations unit for many years, and investigative journalists were some of the first on the list. We find out what becoming a ‘foreign agent’ has meant for him.

Reporting from the volcano
Mount Semeru in eastern Java erupted a week ago, killing dozens of people, and destroying thousands of homes. BBC Indonesian’s Valdya Baraputri reported from the path of the eruption, standing on lava and ash as high as rooftops. She explains what's happened to those who've lost their homes.

Arabic Language Day
18th December is World Arabic Language Day, and Dina Waqqaf of BBC Arabic TV is celebrating it with a Facebook live to explore the difficulties facing Arabic speakers in the modern world. She tells us what she found out.

Nigeria's women lawyers
Oluyemi Adetiba-Orija leads an all-women Nigerian law firm, which offers free support to those who cannot afford legal defence, as well as to people facing pre-trial detention. BBC Africa Women's Affairs journalist Azeezat Olaoluwa explains the problems they are tackling.

(Image: BBC Russian journalist Andrei Zakharov in the Moscow bureau. Credit: BBC)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzm)
Bangladesh wins independence

In December 1971, Bangladesh won independence from Pakistan after nine months of war.

Dr Kamal Hossain, a leading political figure, was jailed during the conflict and only released shortly after the Bengali fighters claimed victory.

Dr Hossain told Farhana Haider his feelings as his country won its freedom.

Photo: Kamal Hossain (l) with the founder of Bangladesh, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman. Credit Dr Kamal Hossain collection.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4hzwg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Reith Lectures (w3ct2zpc)
AI in the economy

What is the future of work? In lecture three, prof Stuart Russell explores one of the most concerning issues of AI - the threat to jobs. How will the economy adapt as work is increasingly done by machines? Economists’ forecasts range from rosy scenarios of human-AI teamwork to dystopic visions in which most people are excluded from the economy altogether. Russell tries to untangle these competing predictions and to pinpoint the comparative advantages that humans may retain over machines. Perhaps counter-intuitively, he suggests greater investment in the humanities and the arts, lead to increased status and pay for professions based on interpersonal services.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4j3ml)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8lqlv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr6gwz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zw8)
Recovery

When our bodies recover from a life-threatening illness, it can sometimes be hard for the mind and morale to follow suit. People can even say they resent their body for 'letting them down'. This was the Anne's experience. She speaks to Sister Dang Nghiem for advice about learning to love her body again and having the confidence to live a full life once more.

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producer: Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dpb)
What 2021 taught us about Covid

This year started with the focus on Covid-19 vaccine rollouts and ends with the emergence of a new coronavirus variant, Omicron. Ros Atkins looks at how the pandemic has evolved in 2021 and the challenges that lie ahead.

(Photo: A healthcare professional wearing Personal Protective Equipment. Credit: Getty Images).


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4j7cq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytktpvvmmt)
US calls for truce in Ethiopia

The United States has appealed for a truce in the war in Ethiopia. The United Nations Human Rights Council has voted to establish an independent investigation into abuses in the conflict. The Ethiopian government said the decision was "politically motivated" and said it will not cooperate.

Also in the programme: a man is sentenced to five years in prison for his role in the storming of the Capitol; and where does a by-election defeat leave Boris Johnson?

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Anna Machin, British evolutionary anthropologist, writer and broadcaster and Marc David Baer, professor of international history at the London School of Economics.

(Photo: A TV screen shows Zenebe Kebede, ambassador of the Permanent Representative Mission of the Ethiopia to Geneva, delivering his statement during the Human Rights Council special session on "the grave human rights situation in Ethiopia," at the European headquarters of the United Nations. CREDIT: EPA/SALVATORE DI NOLFI)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4jc3v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytktpvvrcy)
US appeals for end to Ethiopia conflict

The United Nations Human Rights Council has said that violations have been committed by both sides in the conflict, and they may amount to crimes against humanity. Ethiopia dismissed the decision to open an independent investigation into abuses, as politically motivated.

Also in the programme: Elon Musk is announced as Time magazine’s Person Of The Year, and legislative council elections in Hong Kong.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Anna Machin, British evolutionary anthropologist, writer and broadcaster and Marc David Baer, professor of international history at the London School of Economics.

(Photo: Members of Amhara special forces stand guard on the Ethiopia-Eritrean border near the town of Humera, Ethiopia. CREDIT: REUTERS/Stringer/File Photo)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4jgvz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytktpvvw42)
New York reports its highest daily number of Covid cases

As the Omicron variant, of Covid-19, continues to spread, governments have been tightening restrictions. We look back on what we have learnt about coronavirus this year.

Also in the programme: a man is sentenced to five years in prison for his role in the storming of the Capitol; and South Korea’s growing cultural influence.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Anna Machin, British evolutionary anthropologist, writer and broadcaster and Marc David Baer, professor of international history at the London School of Economics.

(Photo: A Covid-19 vaccination is prepared. CREDIT: Kirsty O"Connor/PA Wire)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr6v4c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9k)
Women making city transport safe

It is not easy to be a woman on public transport. Across the world, you will hear reports of women being harassed, groped and even sexually assaulted. This has an enormous impact on women being able to take up employment and education opportunities, as well as accessing healthcare. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women who are trying to change this.

Angie Palacios is a Gender and Transport Specialist at CAF – Development Bank of Latin America. Her work focuses on researching and supporting projects that can improve women and girls’ safety on public transport. She’s originally from Ecuador but she’s now based in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Joanie Fredericks is an activist and entrepreneur from South Africa who recently set up Ladies Own Transport - an initiative providing safe transport options for women in Cape Flats, a crime hotspot in Cape Town. Joanie, a survivor of violence herself, had previously set up a women-only driving school. Thanks to her, nearly a 100 women have managed to get their drivers’ licences.

Produced by Alice Gioia

(Image: (L) Angie Palacios, credit Angie Palacios. (R) Joanie Fredericks, credit Joanie Fredericks.)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4jlm3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6s)
Coronavirus: Threats to health workers

Covid-19 infections in several countries are causing pressures on hospital resources to rise again. At the same time, polarising views persist over vaccination. Some health workers have witnessed rising hostility and abuse from the public.

Hosts Nuala McGovern and James Reynolds hear from two health workers in Canada and the UK about the escalating problems they have experienced. Midwife Gill Walton, for instance, who is also the chief Executive of the UK’s Royal College of Midwives, experienced a number of threats after encouraging pregnant women on national television to get a vaccine against Covid-19.

We also consider the impact of the pandemic on patients. We introduce two women in their 20s, from the USA and UK, who share how they are still suffering the debilitating effects of "long covid", more than a year after first getting infected.

(Photo: A doctor wearing protective gear at the intensive care unit of Honved Hospital treating COVID-19 patients during the pandemic of new coronavirus COVID-19 in Budapest, Hungary, 15 December 2021 (issued on 16 December 2021). Credit: ZOLTAN BALOGH HUNGARY OUT/EPA)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr6ywh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Explanation (w3ct2z3m)
Understanding how Russia has changed under Putin

Anu Anand talks to Sarah Rainsford about how everyday life in Russia has changed under Vladimir Putin.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2h)
Why some listeners say they need to be entertained!

Last week a listener told us how he would like to hear more entertainment and less news. We asked what you thought of that suggestion and our inbox quickly filled up with your replies.

Plus the BBC has revealed its list of 100 inspiring and influential women from around the world for 2021. We find out why half of all the women are from one country alone.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4jqc7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0qbwzb04cw)
'Fighting has always been my outlet' – Kay Hansen on her eating disorder and overcoming trauma

UFC strawweight Kay Hansen opens up about how she discovered she had an eating disorder and how she believes it could be linked to the trauma she endured as a teenager. Hansen was sexually abused in her teens and says not eating and over training was her way of coping. Her issues around food came to a head when she was forced to pull out of a fight in March as her body was effectively shutting down on her.

We explore the world of pillow fighting ahead of PFC 3, which will be broadcast on pay per view television across the globe, with FightPFC chief executive Steve Williams and professional pillow fighter Terrell Jenkins. Williams believes pillow fighting is set to become the next big combat sport and explains how it works, while Jenkins tells us how he sent his last opponent to the hospital.

Stacey-Lee May tells us how being bullied during childhood led to a career in motorsport. The South African competes in spinning, which is a more extreme version of drifting, with the driver hanging out of the car as it is doing donuts. She is known as the “Queen of Smoke”, her signature move is the “superwoman” and her skill has led to her performing on a number of global television shows.

Sporting Lisbon women’s manager – Mariana Cabral – explains how she went from football journalist to football manager. Cabral also discusses how conversations with other managers when she was a journalist have influenced her and her approach to dealing with the media now she’s a football manager.

And in Sporting Witness, we go back to 1971 and a story about sport and politics. Farhana Haider explains how the Bangladesh football team played an important propaganda role as the country fought a bloody war for independence from Pakistan.

(Photo by Jeff Bottari/Zuffa LLC)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4jv3c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8mg2m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr76cr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4jyvh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvj)
Parcels of CARE

Seventy-five years ago, when aching hunger dominated people’s lives in post-war Europe, a food parcel seemed like a miracle. Particularly when it had come all the way across the Atlantic from the United States. And there’s one type of parcel that changed people’s lives across continents: The CAR.E parcel.

In 1945, the American relief organisation CARE. set out to ease the suffering of starving Europeans after World War Two. It developed into an extraordinary relief programme with a unique concept – a person to person approach where American individuals could name a recipient.

Surprisingly Germany, the former enemy, was also blessed with this kindness. American journalist Susan Stone finds out why and the legacy it left.

Travelling back in time, she unpacks the parcels’ past: The friendships they sparked, the nations they shaped and the acts of charity they inspired.

She also looks beyond the image of America as a benevolent country and discovers how the (seemingly innocent and well-meant) food parcels were drawn into the complexities of the Cold War. As we hear, even young girls played their part within global politics – or could be affected by it, such as Cynthia in America and Maria in Poland, whose friendship developed through CARE parcels.

Susan reveals why CARE. parcels are still remembered today, what made the organisation so successful and hears the story behind a tin of lard unopened for 60 years after it had been shipped to Europe.

Presenter: Susan Stone
Producer: Sabine Schereck
Readers: Jim Frank, Thomas Baecker, Neil McCaul, Christine Kavanagh

(Photo: A family carrying a CARE parcel. Credit: CARE/www.care.de)

Archive kindly granted by
CARE - for the Charlie Cheese commercial and President Truman handing CARE a check for $1500
National Archives, US - for the US Newsreel 'United News', including President Truman's speech after WW2 announcing that Germany has surrendered


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4k2lm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjcd11x7)
World Health Organisation says Omicron has now spread to 89 countries

Omicron is spreading significantly faster than the Delta strain and the WHO says it's taking only three days for cases to double.

Also on the programme; more than 30 people have been killed by super typhoon Rai in the Philippines. And we hear about the effect climate change is having on the islands of Scotland.

(Picture: Ambulances dealing with the Covid epidemic in London. Credit: Getty)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4k6br)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tmnwqrv2k)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld Saturday will bring the world commentary of Aston Villa v Burnley. Also, a review of day four of the second Ashes test, and the heavyweight clash between former world champion Joshua Parker and Derek Chisora.

Joining Lee James on Sportsworld this week will be current Birmingham City and former Arsenal defender Louise Quinn as well and Manchester United defender Jonathan Spector.

Image: Ollie Watkins of Aston Villa in action with Ben Mee of Burnley (Photo by James Gill - Danehouse/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4kpb8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8n99j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr81ln)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l98)
Bangladesh's football heroes

In 1971, the Bangladeshi football team made history at the height of the country's war of independence when they played a series of matches in India. The games were the first to be played under the flag of a nation that was still not officially recognised and helped raise money for Bangladesh's independence struggle. Farhana Haider talks to star striker Kazi Salahuddin, who was smuggled into India so he could take part in the matches.

Photo:The Shadhin Bangla Football Dol "Free Bengal Football Team", 1971. Credit: Kazi Salahuddin.


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4kt2d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvk)
When the Beatles didn't meet Imelda

The story of the disastrous visit to the Philippines in 1966 by the most famous band on the planet, the Beatles, and the international incident which followed after they refused an invitation from the now infamous First Lady of the Philippines, Imelda Marcos. 55 years on, for the first time, Filipino fans, witnesses at the palace, DJs and journalists, as well as the last surviving member of the Beatles' management team, tell the story as it happened.

Filipino-British presenter David Guerrero hears from the young teenage Filipino fans, now in their 70s, who, unexpectedly, did get to meet three of the Fab Four at their hotel; and from Peter Brown who was part of the Beatles' team in 1966, as well as from a hostess who looked after the Beatles on a luxury yacht. They explain what really happened on the ill-fated trip, which led to the Beatles being hounded out of the country.

On 4 July 1966, the Beatles played to their biggest one-day crowd at the Rizal Memorial Stadium in Manila, where 80,000 people attended two concerts. However, the Beatles' visit to The Philippines was overshadowed by an incident that hit the world's front pages - when the band famously refused an invitation to lunch at the Philippine Presidential Palace from the then First Lady Imelda Marcos. The next day at the airport, official-looking thugs gave the band and their entourage a rough send-off and scared the wits out of the touring group.

Foreground image: Images of John Lennon (Credit: Bettman via Getty Images), Paul McCartney, George Harrison (Credit: Cummings Archives/Redferns via Getty Images), Ringo Starr (Credit: Bettman via Getty Images) and Imelda Marcos (Credit: Universal History Archive/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)
Background image: Images of murals depicting the Beatles in Barangay 330, Santa Cruz, Manila (Credit: Lynaya Jorge and John Medina)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4kxtj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv0)
Actor Jaime Callica

On The Arts Hour this week, Steven Spielberg and star Ariana DeBose tell us about their take on West Side Story; retold for today.

French director Julia DuCournau explains her movie Titane and reveals the gruesome horror film she saw when she was very young.

Writer/director Aaron Sorkin on his ‘I Love Lucy’-based film Being The Ricardos.

We hear from the King of the Holiday films genre, actor Jaime Callica, on filming Christmas movies in August.

Saturday Night Live’s Bowen Yang takes us back to his high school yearbook

Seckou Keita and Omar Sosa play some music live.

And Nikki Bedi is joined by critic Hanna Flint.

(Photo: Jaime Callica. Credit: John Wolfsohn/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4l1kn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjcd20w8)
Netherlands announces strict lockdown

The prime minister of the Netherlands, Mark Rutte, has announced a stringent Christmas lockdown to begin on Sunday.

Also in the programme: how porn rewires the brain; and a controversial investigation into Angolan massacres.

(Picture: Outgoing Prime Minister Mark Rutte speaks in The Hague, the Netherlands. Credit: EPA/ROBIN UTRECHT)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4l59s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx14wnzgvr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0st7543jhd)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr8jl5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptp)
International Film: Joana Hadjithomas and Lin-Manuel Miranda

This week on The Cultural Frontline, Anu Anand talks to Joana Hadjithomas, who along with her filmmaking partner Khalil Joreige, use their art to question the role of memory and history. Joana tells us about her own personal journals and tapes from the early 1980s, made during the Lebanese Civil War, which inspired her latest film Memory Box.

The award winning actor, playwright, director and film producer Lin-Manuel Miranda, known for his musicals In the Heights, the smash hit Hamilton and his latest Tick Tick…Boom, shares with us the musical that first influenced him – Les Misérables.

With increasing tension between the studios of India’s film industry and Narendra Modi’s BJP government, amidst reports of growing Islamophobia across the country, writer and cultural commentator Sandip Roy explains the history of the relationship between the Indian government and the country’s film industry

And Filippo Scotti, who stars in the new autobiographical film, The Hand of God, by the Academy Award winning Italian director Paolo Sorrentino, speaks about his role and his admiration for Paolo as a filmmaker.

(Photo: Lin-Manuel Miranda. Credit: Monica Schipper)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4l91x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcy)
Let words come out of your body with Kae Tempest, Porridge Radio, Goat Girl and Dan Carey

Kae Tempest, Porridge Radio's Dana Margolin, Lottie Cream of Goat Girl and producer Dan Carey discuss letting go of the idea of who you are, going in hard onstage, unlocking time through repetition, being bad at singing, and mistakes on records..

Lottie Pendlebury, AKA Lottie Cream, is part of the post-punk band Goat Girl, whose latest album, On All Fours, was released earlier this year. Lottie says they use their music to “explore global, humanitarian, environmental and mindful wellbeing, through psych-rock, grunge and post-punk. The band has been through a lot this past couple of years, but being a part of Goat Girl is what brings us the most joy.”

Kae Tempest is a spoken-word artist, poet, author, and playwright from South London. One of the UK’s greatest wordsmiths, they’ve released three albums to date, as well as writing five poetry collections, three plays, and two novels.

Dana Margolin is the lead vocalist and guitarist of indie-rock band Porridge Radio. She formed the group in order to truly express herself, drawing inspiration from the sea.

Dan Carey is a producer, remix artist, and songwriter who’s worked with the likes of Grimes, Hot Chip, Lianne La Havas, La Roux, Kae Tempest, Kylie Minogue and Goat Girl. In 2013 he founded the record label Speedy Wunderground, and has received four Mercury Prize nominations for his productions.



SUNDAY 19 DECEMBER 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4ldt1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr8s2f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4ljk5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yw8)
Omicron’s rapid replication rate

A study from Hong Kong university shows Omicron replicates 70 times faster than two earlier variants of the SARS-Cov-2 virus. Virologist Malik Peiris, explains how tests using cells from the wind pipe showed the dramatic difference, which supports observations of increased transmission. In contrast Omicron replicated less well than other variants on cells from dep in thre lung – offering some possibility that it may produce mild infections.

Tornados in the US do not normally occur in December. The one which swept across Kentucky and 3 other states was fuelled by weather patterns likely to have been influenced by long term climate change says Geographer James Elsner of Florida State University.

The Parker Solar probe continues its mission of flying closer and closer to the sun. Results just published show what the data the probe picked up when it dipped into the surrounding plasma. NASA’s Nicky Fox is our guide.

And how many legs does a millipede have? Until now not as many as you might think. Entomologist Paul Marek of Virginia Tech reveals the Australian specimen with more legs than ever seen before.

As many of us gear up for the annual Christmas feast, some of you may be wondering how to eat everything before it goes off. It’s a great question, as the UN puts global food waste at a whopping 1.3 billion tonnes a year – that’s one third of all edible produce being thrown in the bin.

So this week the team investigates listener Peter’s query about what makes some fruit and vegetables rot faster than others. Preserving food used to be about ensuring nomadic populations could keep moving without going hungry, but these days some things seem to have an almost indefinite shelf-life. Is it about better packaging or can clever chemistry help products stay better for longer? A Master Food Preserver explains how heat and cold help keep microbes at bay, and how fermentation encourages the growth of healthy bacteria which crowd out the ones that make us ill.

Presenter Datshiane Navanayagam learns how to make a sauerkraut that could keep for weeks, and investigates the gases that food giants use to keep fruit and veg field-fresh. But as the industry searches for new techniques to stretch shelf-life even further could preservatives in food be affecting our microbiome? Research shows sulphites may be killing off ‘friendly’ gut bacteria linked to preventing conditions including cancer and Crohn’s disease.

(Image: Omicron variant (B.1.1.529): Immunofluorescence staining of uninfected and infected Vero E6 cells. Credit: Microbiology HKU/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4ln99)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8p88k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr90kp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwb)
Omicron update

Omicron update from James Gallagher, the BBC Health and Science Correspondent. And as New Zealand announce plans to ban cigarette sales to the next generation born after 2008, Claudia reviews the psychological evidence for such a policy working with Professor Robert West. And with wild birds migrating many countries are seeing an increase in Bird Flu. Dr Richard Webby, director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Studies on the Ecology of Influenza in Animals and Birds, explains the risk to human health is low but the implications are high.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A doctor with a blood sample of Covid-19 Omicron variant. Photo credit: Yalcinsonat1/Gerry Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4ls1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4lwsk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvx)
Turkey's spiralling prices

Pascale Harter introduces personal insights, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents and journalists around the world.

The Turkish lira has lost at least half its value against the US dollar in 2021 - and the slide seems to be continuing. Recent statements by President Erdogan have not done much to improve the exchange rate, and the economy is now a major worry for his ruling party and its voters. Ayla Jean Yackley's seen the effects of inflation on shoppers' pockets - and on wholesalers' account books - in Istanbul.

Colombia's Covid death rate was not has high as those in Peru or Brazil, but the country's health system took a battering from successive waves of the virus over the past year. One patient who saw how the system coped - or didn't - during the peaks of hospital admissions was Mathew Charles, who has his own memories of surviving the virus, and reflects on the structural inequalities embedded in its health care.

As in many European cities, the streets of Copenhagen can be dangerous at night - particularly for sex workers. In Denmark, many of the women and girls working the red-light district have already suffered abuse, trafficking and intimidation, and they also have potentially violent clients to deal with. Linda Pressly's been to meet several groups of activists who are trying out new ways of making the sex trade safer, which include free advice centres, confidential clinics and even a supervised van where the women can do business.

Do you simply have too much stuff? Hoarding can be an occupational hazard for foreign correspondents, who travel often, visit interesting places, and tend to pick up the memorabilia which clusters around big news events. Colin Freeman rummages though his own collection of souvenirs picked up during two decades' reporting abroad, from the bullet which injured him in Iraq, to the set of chess figures shaped from tin foil - now slightly squashed - which once helped distract him during weeks of being held hostage.



(Women shop at a local market in Istanbul. Credit: Reuters/Murad Sezer/File Photo)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr981y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4m0jp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8pmhy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr9ct2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2zvg)
The big $ giveaway

Search for ''#freemoney' or '$giveaway' on any social media platform and you'll be inundated by a host of kindly benefactors; American billionaires, Saudi Sheiks and bitcoin evangelists, all pledging to give away millions to people in need at the click of a like or follow. But are they really what they claim to be? Daniel Leinhardt speaks to the genuine Twitter philanthropists, the publicity hungry influencers and the victims of the scammers to find out the truth behind this trend.

Image: Stock image of pixelated dollar signs floating over cell phone (Credit: Donald Iain Smith/Getty Images)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4m48t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytktpvyjjx)
Hong Kong holds election amid Chinese control

Hong Kong is holding its first legislative council election since China introduced sweeping changes that have altered the city's political landscape. The government says the revamped electoral system will ensure only "patriots" will be allowed to stand.

Also on the programme, after weeks of rising tensions over the Russian troop build up near Ukraine's border, Moscow put forward a list of security guarantees it says it wants the west to agree to in order to reduce those tensions and defuse the crisis. We hear from Estonia’s prime minister.

And, Lithuania has been the object of a Chinese pressure campaign after the democratic island of Taiwan opened a representative office in its capital, Vilnius.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Arminka Helic, a member of the British parliament's House of Lords, and Jeremy Shapiro, research director of the European Council on Foreign Relations.

(Photo: Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam speaks to the media during the 2021 Election Committee Subsector Ordinary Elections in Hong Kong, China, 19 December 2021. EPA/JEROME FAVRE)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4m80y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytktpvyn91)
Omicron variant spreads across Europe

As countries across Europe impose travel restrictions, ban foreign visitors and lockdown ahead of Christmas, the Omicron variant is spreading exponentially, doubling every two to three days. A mathematical epidemiologist shares his thoughts.

Also on the programme, Chileans go to the polls today to vote for a new President. There are two candidates with very different political views – one is a former student protest leader, the other a far-right candidate who has glorified the country’s military dictatorship.

And, the British-Italian architect, Richard Rogers, known for his radical, modernist style that turned the world of architecture on its head has died, at the age of 88.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Arminka Helic, a member of the British parliament’s House of Lords, and Jeremy Shapiro, research director of the European Council on Foreign Relations.

(Photo: Shoppers on Oxford Street in London, Britain, 18 December 2021. London Mayor Khan has declared a major incident in London as Omicron cases surge in the capital. The UK government is considering Plan C measures including a "circuit breaker" to curb the Omicron spread. EPA/ANDY RAIN)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4mcs2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytktpvys15)
UK Brexit minister resigns in blow to PM Johnson

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has suffered another setback after his Brexit minister, Lord Frost, resigned because of his concerns about the direction of the government.

Also on the programme, leading UK aid agencies launched a joint fundraising appeal to raise money for the Afghan children this winter, 14 million of which are expected to face potentially life-threatening levels of hunger.

And, Bosnian-born writer Sasa Stanisic discusses his German Book Prize-winning novel, ‘Where You Come From’, which has now been translated into English.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Arminka Helic, a member of the British parliament’s House of Lords, and Jeremy Shapiro, research director of the European Council on Foreign Relations.

(Photo: Lord Frost who has resigned from the Cabinet. Lord Frost, who has led negotiations with the EU, is reported to have handed in his resignation letter to Boris Johnson last week. Issue date: Saturday December 18, 2021. Peter Byrne/PA Wire)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr9r1g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgq)
An alternative Christmas

What dish says Christmas to you - roast turkey, goat? Carp perhaps? What about fried chicken?

In Japan nothing says ‘festive family food’ more than a bucket of KFC fried chicken. And if you’re Jewish and from the US, a Christmas meal will almost certainly mean a trip to Chinatown.

Ruth Alexander unearths the origin stories of these two unlikely, but incredibly popular, - alternative Christmas food traditions, and finds out how food can help give you a sense of belonging, even if celebrating Christmas isn’t for you.

(Picture: Bucket of fried chicken and bowl of Chinese food. Credit: Getty/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Nina Li Coomes, writer based in Chicago, USA

Rabbi Joshua Plaut, author ‘A Kosher Christmas: ‘Tis the Season to be Kosher’.

Producers: Sarah Stolarz and Simon Tulett


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4mhj6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr9vsl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxz)
The family story that became a TV novela

Aged 11, Dirce de Assis Cavalcanti was taunted by one of her classmates. She was called the “daughter of a murderer”. Not long after, Dirce found out that her father had indeed killed a man and not just any man, he’d killed one of Brazil’s celebrated authors, a national treasure. Although he was cleared by the courts, who declared the shooting an act of self-defence, in the court of public opinion Dirce’s dad was condemned.

The story behind that fateful killing is one of love, betrayal and revenge. And it is a story that throughout her life Dirce has grappled with in her attempts to rebuild her family’s reputation. This episode was first broadcast on 21st December 2019.

Presenter: Andrea Kennedy
Producer: Andrea Kennedy and Deiniol Buxton

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Dirce de Assis Cavalcanti Credit: BBC)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4mm8b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity (w3ct2zv6)
Agriculture: The solar energy revolution

Justin Rowlatt explores what was the original solar energy revolution – harnessing the sun’s rays to grow food. Some 10,000 years ago our ancestors began to till the soil, producing the energy surpluses needed to feed the first cities and civilisations.

Growing crops was gruelling work, as Justin discovers at Butser Ancient Farm, when he tries to till some soil himself with a replica Stone Age mattock. Resident archaeologist Claire Walton gives Justin a tour through ten millennia of British farming history.

But what first prompted our ancestors to take up such an arduous way of life in the first place? Anthropologist Robert Bettinger thinks it was down to the unusually benign conditions since the end of the last Ice Age. In any case, agriculture delivered domesticated plants and animals that could sustain much bigger human populations, according to Mark Nesbitt of Kew Gardens, and Melinda Zeder of the Smithsonian Institution. And that in turn made the discovery of radical new technologies possible.

(Photo: Tomatoes. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr9zjq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2zvh)
Travelling telescope

Most people will never look through a telescope. When Chu Owen met Kenya’s official astronomer Susan Murabana during a solar eclipse, they pledged to change that. Their falling in love gave birth to the Travelling Telescope – a gathering place for people to look through a telescope and observe the wonders of the night sky.

They observe how gathering around the telescope offers an opportunity to express feelings of grief, of hope, of finding solace for earthly problems in the vastness of the Universe.

Kenyan singer Silayio – who has long-wanted to look through the telescope, describes how she discovered astronomy following a friend’s suicide which led her to question her Christian faith and go in search of a new system of belief.

Susan describes her own journey as a Kenyan woman passionate about science and astronomy. What unites all those who we meet around the telescope is a feeling of awe and wonder.

Producer: Sarah Cuddon

(Photo: Masai man looking through a telescope at the stars, with elephants in the distance. Credit: Daniel-Chu Owen)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4mr0g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8qbzq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnrb38v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct2gdb)
Bats: Friend or foe?

What is it about bats? Do we love them or hate them? They are depicted in some cultures as devil-like vampires: images of death and Halloween. But in others they are the opposite and are believed to bring luck and good fortune in China. Fear of bats has been exacerbated in the past 18 months by the Coronavirus pandemic and a blame game, pointing the finger at bats as a potential source of Covid-19. But environmentalists love them for being natural pest controllers – hoovering up harmful insects. Scientists love them too - as a vital source of medical research. How can they carry viruses without getting ill and what is their anti-ageing secret? For their size they live a very long time and they have developed mechanisms to ward off the diseases of old-age.
Caroline Bayley talks to scientists, environmentalists, bat lovers and an eminent philosopher, all trying to uncover the secrets of these extraordinary mammals.

(Photo: Rhinolophus hipposideros (lesser horseshoe bat), Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4mvrl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4mzhq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjcd3ytb)
Hong Kong goes to the polls

There's been a low turnout in the first elections in Hong Kong since Beijing increased its control over the territory. We hear from our reporter there and a pro democracy opposition activist.

Also on the programme, more turmoil for UK's Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, as his Brexit minister resigns; and we hear a tribute for one of the world's most influential architects, Richard Rogers, who has died, from his friend Renzo Piano.

(Photo: Hong Kong voter; Credit: BBC)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4n37v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm7)
Don Quixote: Spanish masterpiece

With its multiple narrators, superb and complex characterisation, the influence of Don Quixote de la Mancha has been acknowledged by great writers through the ages as a masterpiece, and hailed as one of the most important novels in the history of literature.

On the surface the novel appears to be a comedy – of situation, of language and of character – but its author Cervantes succeeds in making Don Quixote so much more than a series of slapstick episodes. It was written during a particularly turbulent time in Spanish politics, when both Jews and Muslims were expelled from the Iberian peninsula, and this finds its way into the novel.

Bridget Kendall explores the tale of the self-styled knight Don Quixote and his sidekick Sancho Panza with Cervantes experts Ruth Fine, the Salomon and Victoria Cohen Professor in Iberian and Latin American Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Carolyn Nadeau, the Byron S. Tucci Professor of Hispanic Studies at Illinois Wesleyan University; and Edwin Williamson, the King Alfonso XIII Professor Emeritus of Spanish Studies at the University of Oxford.

(Photo: Cervantes Monument in Madrid, Spain showing Don Quixote and Sancho Panza. Credit: Sylvain Sonnet via Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl2)
The psychological economics of gift giving

Christmas, the most wonderful time of the year – if you have something to sell that is. Every year we waste hundreds of dollars on gifts that aren’t appreciated, but how can you ensure that the gifts you buy hit the mark every time? We speak to behavioural scientist Professor Francesca Gino to find out more then use our newfound knowledge to exam an old Christmas classic.


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4n6zz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4nbr3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tmnwqvzgx)
Live Sporting Action

Delyth Lloyd presents live Premier League commentary of Tottenham Hotspur against Liverpool. We'll also have a reaction to Sunday’s early games, bring you the best of the action from across Europe’s top men’s and women’s leagues, and reflect on day four of the second Test between Australia and England in Adelaide.

Image: Roberto Firmino of Liverpool in action with Tanguy Ndombele of Tottenham Hotspur (Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4npzh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8r9yr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnrc27w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2zvh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4ntqm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dht)
Turkey’s interest rate slashed, despite sharp inflation

On this edition of Business Weekly, we’re looking at rising inflation in Turkey, and hear how different communities are trying to live during a period of economic uncertainty. Victoria Craig tours Istanbul to hear from shop workers and families caught up in the currency crisis.
Plus we focus on the Netherlands, and Meta’s proposals to build a giant, energy-hungry data-centre there. We hear how the community is divided on the plans from Facebook’s parent company.
We’ll look at the diplomatic spat between Lithuania and China, that now has implications for trade between the two countries and the wider European Union, and we also delve into the world of premium pet food, to hear how today’s cats and dogs are getting the luxury treatment from their owners.
Business Weekly is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Clare Williamson.
(Image: Tourist shop in Istanbul's spice market, credit: Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4nygr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjcd4xsc)
Polls close in Chile presidential election

Polls closed on Sunday in Chile's presidential elections between polar opposite right and left candidates.

Also in the programme: Renzo Piano pays tribute to architect Richard Rogers; and US Senator Manchin says 'no' to Build Back Better.

(Picture: a person casts a ballot during the presidential election, at a polling station in Santiago, Chile. Credit: REUTERS/Pablo Sanhueza)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4p26w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx14wp2crv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0st7546fdh)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnrcfh8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4p5z0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity (w3ct2zv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnrck7d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 The Explanation (w3ct2z3m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]



MONDAY 20 DECEMBER 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6ft4z9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity (w3ct2zv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1hj7p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2zvh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6ft8qf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzll6nn5wwp)
More covid restrictions introduced in Europe

As omicron covid variant cases increase across the world, the Netherlands has imposed a lockdown until at least mid-January. Germany has banned most travellers from the UK - where over 90,000 new covid cases were reported on Saturday. In the US, President Joe Biden has announced a plan that would see companies with more than a hundred employees obliged to see their workers get the jab, or have a covid test every week. But several business groups representing companies in retail, transportation and travel want the US Supreme Court to intervene to block it, as we hear from Dorit Reis, professor of Law at the University of California in San Francisco.

The Australian government is forecasting that earnings from exports of commodities like coal and gas will jump to a record for the current fiscal year. This based on increased demand from China and India, as we hear from independent economist Michael Hughes. UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres is in Lebanon, trying to encourage its politicians to agree to economic reforms, required by the IMF as a condition of receiving funds to fix its broken economy. James Swanston of Capital Economics analyses the challenges that Lebanon faces.

A rocket built by Mitsubishi will blast off from a launch pad in Japan later this week, taking one of the biggest and most complex satellites ever built into orbit. Edwina Paisley, senior director of spacecraft programmes at Inmarsat explains how it, by broadcasting on two different frequencies, its use will extend beyond relaying emergencies for ships at sea.

(Photo: a small protest against lockdown in The Hague, The Netherlands. Credit: Getty Images.)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1hmzt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf1)
Rankin: Capturing the moment

Rankin has been described as one of the UK’s greatest photographers.

Perhaps best known for his striking, playful and intimate portraits, he has photographed the likes of Britney Spears, David Bowie and Queen Elizabeth II. His work appearing in magazine’s like Vogue, GQ and Marie Claire.

Join Anna Bailey for a ringside seat as Rankin shoots the casts of shows such as The Lion King and Tina Turner The Musical - capturing the moment when London’s theatres reopen after lockdown, for a new book and exhibition.

Anna also discovers what lies behind Rankin’s creative vision as he experiments with beauty photography for his latest edition of Hunger Magazine.

Presented and produced by Anna Bailey
Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Photograph: © Rankin


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6ftdgk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6t)
Neil deGrasse Tyson: Trust in science

Stephen Sackur speaks to Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist and director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of National History in New York. He is one of America’s most popular scientists and shares his fascination with space with millions of Americans. But here on Earth, science is under pressure, from Covid to climate change. Is trust in science dwindling?


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1hrqy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prh)
How can I keep fruit & veg fresh for longer?

As many of us gear up for the annual Christmas feast, some of you may be wondering how to eat everything before it goes off. It’s a great question, as the UN puts global food waste at a whopping 1.3 billion tonnes a year – that’s one third of all edible produce being thrown in the bin.

So this week the team investigates listener Peter’s query about what makes some fruit and vegetables rot faster than others. Preserving food used to be about ensuring nomadic populations could keep moving without going hungry, but these days some things seem to have an almost indefinite shelf-life. Is it about better packaging or can clever chemistry help products stay better for longer? A Master Food Preserver explains how heat and cold help keep microbes at bay, and how fermentation encourages the growth of healthy bacteria which crowd out the ones that make us ill.

Presenter Datshiane Navanayagam learns how to make a sauerkraut that could keep for weeks, and investigates the gases that food giants use to keep fruit and veg field-fresh. But as the industry searches for new techniques to stretch shelf-life even further could preservatives in food be affecting our microbiome? Research shows sulphites may be killing off ‘friendly’ gut bacteria linked to preventing conditions including cancer and Crohn’s disease.

Produced by Marijke Peters for BBC World Service.



Featuring:

Christina Ward, Master Food Preserver
Dr Heidy den Besten, Food Microbiologist, Wageningen University
Ian Shuttlewood, Tilbury Cold Store
Professor Sally Irwin, University of Hawaii


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6ftj6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity (w3ct2zv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1hwh2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2zvh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6ftmyt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drl)
Why do we find it so hard to take action on climate change?

For decades scientists have warned us about the risks of climate change. Yet humans are badly psychologically designed to face up to the challenge of changing our behaviour. Research shows that constant threats of impending doom make us hit the snooze button rather than waking us up. And our evolutionary shortcomings mean we respond to the threat of immediate danger rather than what might happen in the future.
So what can actually work to help us change our status quo?
Presenters Kate Lamble and Neal Razzell are joined by:
George Marshall, Founder of Climate Outreach and author of Don’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Ignore Climate Change
Elke Weber, Professor of Psychology at Princeton University
Per Espen Stoknes, Psychologist, Economist and author of What We Think About When We Try Not To Think About Global Warming.

Producer: Sophie Eastaugh
Reporter: Frank Walter
Researcher: Natasha Fernandes
Series Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound Engineer: Graham Puddifoot


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1j076)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9l)
Leading women in song

Singing is said to improve your mood, relieve stress, help you sleep better and produce pain-relieving endorphins - as well as improving posture and boost immunity and lung function! Kim Chakanetsa finds out more about the benefits of singing together, and the strange world of choir competitions.

Adwoa Dickson is from Jamaica. She is Choir Director for The Amies Freedom Choir, in the UK, which supports women who've survived trafficking. Singing in the choir helps the women relax and regain confidence as they explore songs and musical styles from each others' cultures and languages.

Finnish choir director, Marjukka Riihimäki established the women’s choir, Philomela in 1984 and has taken their distinctive sound around the world, working with a composer and choreographer to give them a unique stage presence. Philomela won the Female Chamber Choir competition at the World Choir Games in Riga in 2014. Since retiring as a music teacher Marjukka also works with people in sheltered housing who have dementia.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

(Image: (L) Marjukka Riihimäki, credit Maarit Kytöharju. (R) Adwoa Dickson, courtesy Adwoa Dickson.)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6ftrpy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv31kfw7tqp)
Leftist wins Chile presidential election

Gabriel Boric becomes Chile's youngest-ever President - but can he unify the divided country?

There's been another big demonstration in Sudan on Sunday against the current military government. The authorities say more than 100 people were injured after security forces fired tear gas.

And elections have also taken place in Hong Kong - which has had its lowest ever turn out. It's the first election since the authorities introduced a security law making it easier to punish pro-democracy demonstrators.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6ftwg2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv31kfw7ygt)
Chile election: leftist candidate Gabriel Boric claims victory

The most polarised poll in decades followed mass anti-government protests.

People across Sudan have joined mass protests over the military's takeover - as they mark the third anniversary of a popular uprising. We'll hear from Khartoum.

And Germany, Ireland and the Netherlands impose new restrictions as Europe attempts to slow down the spread of the Omicron variant of Covid.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fv066)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv31kfw826y)
Leftist Gabriel Boric wins Chile's presidential election

It was a calm end to a polarised and sometimes violent campaign.

Legislative elections have taken place in Hong Kong, and have been officially recorded as having the lowest ever turn-out in electoral history for the territory. We hear from an opposition activist and former legislator who's had to flee the territory.

And animal welfare activists have raised concerns over plans for the world’s first commercial octopus farm in Spain. They say they are intelligent creatures, able to feel pain and emotions, and shouldn't be reared for food.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fv3yb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1jh6q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5t)
End of the roads

Roads? Where we’re going, do we need roads? Some countries think they've already got too many. In the face of a climate catastrophe, the Austrian and Welsh governments are reconsidering plans to expand their road networks, moving away from a car-first model to better include more environmentally modes of transport. In Wales, they’ve all but halted any new roads as Climate Minister Julie James tells us, and are instead looking at improving public transport and active travel measures. In Austria we speak to Leonore Gewessler, Minister for Climate Action in the national government, who says that to build more roads would only attract more traffic and therefore more pollution. Electric vehicles could go some way to lowering carbon emissions, but the take up isn’t fast enough, says transport researcher Giulio Mattioli and so reducing reliance on cars altogether has to be a priority. And that means reimagining how cities are built to accommodate convenience, but without the car – transport planner Susan Claris tells us how that can be done. Today’s programme is presented by Tamasin Ford and produced by Russell Newlove.


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1x)
Tanzania's first elected albino MP

How opposition politician Salum Barwany overcame discrimination and fear to become the first albino elected to office in Tanzania in 2010. Albinism is a genetic condition caused by a lack of the pigment Melanin, which affects the colour of the skin, hair and eyes. Though rare it is more common in parts of Africa, and particularly in Tanzania. There, albinos have long faced social stigma but in recent years many have been brutally murdered. The killings are carried out to harvest their body parts for witchdoctors who claim they can be used in magic potions to bestow wealth. Salum Barwany MP talks about growing up with albinism and his struggle to change attitudes. This episode is produced by Alex Last and Esther Namuhisa

Photo: Tanzania's first elected albino lawmaker Salum Khalfan Barwany gets a hug from a supporter as he walks through the town market in Lindi, just days after winning office in 2010. (YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP via Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fv7pg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1jlyv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fvcfl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1jqpz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2zw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fvh5q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywky34z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1jvg3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fvlxv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv4)
Alaska: Drag, drugs and fighting the fame monster

Alaska 5000 is one of the most successful and beloved queens to emerge from RuPaul’s Drag Race. A dry wit comedy assassin, her drag style is glitzy, absurd and profoundly shaped by a lifelong love of Catwoman. Along the way Alaska’s grappled with drugs, alcohol and the relationship-wrecking power of the 'fame monster'. She’s written a memoir called My Name’s Yours, What’s Alaska?

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Alaska performing live in 2016. Credit: Katja Ogrin/Getty Images)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fvqnz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywkybn7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1k2yc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fvvf3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5hwmpbtqq)
European governments reimpose Covid restrictions

As the Omicron variant of Covid 19 spreads rapidly through Europe, with tough new measures imposed in some countries, we ask what options governments have. The WHO has warned that the variant is present in 89 countries in the world, with cases doubling every 1.5 to 3 days. But it does appear to be sweeping across Europe in particular.

Switzerland has become the latest country to introduce new restrictions, including a mandatory work from home order. France, Germany, Austria and Cyprus have tightened travel restrictions. The UK is considering what more it can do beyond advising people to work from home and be sensible about socialising.

Also in the programme, we hear about the challenges ahead for Chile's new President, the youngest in the country's history, 35-year-old Gabriel Boric, and the big impact he has already made and a BBC investigation uncovers evidence of mass killings by the military in Myanmar.

(Picture shows syringes with needles in front of the words "Omicron SARS-CoV-2")


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fvz57)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1kbfm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y48blydf692)
US Build Back Better plan in jeopardy

A key senator has indicated he will not vote for President Biden's Build Back Better plan. The move by Joe Manchin puts the huge social spending measure in jeopardy, as Lauren Fedor, US political correspondent at the Financial Times explains. And we explore the potential impact on the US economy with Chris Low of FHN Financial. Also in the programme, the government of Ghana intends to introduce an e-levy tax on "mobile money" transactions. Bernard Mornah helped organise recent protests against the levy and explains why he is opposed to the measure. Grace Mensah farms chickens west of Accra, and tells us how much her business relies on mobile phone payments. And economist Dr Priscilla Twumasi Baffour of the University of Ghana discusses the arguments made by the government to justify the new tax. Plus, with the majority of English Premier League football matches cancelled over the weekend owing to coronavirus outbreaks, we examine the implications for the football sector with Kieran Maguire, lecturer in football finance from the University of Liverpool.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Frey Lindsay, Russell Newlove, Ivana Davidovic and Sarah Hawkins.

(Picture: Senator Joe Manchin near the Capitol. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fw2xc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxxdjkb2vt)
Gabriel Boric wins Chile's presidential election

We go to Chile, where the leftist candidate Gabriel Boric has won the presidential election to become the country's youngest ever leader. In what was expected to be a tight race, the 35-year-old former protest leader defeated his far-right rival Antonio Kast by more than 10 points. He will now lead a country that has been rocked in recent years by mass protests against inequality and corruption. We speak to our colleague from BBC Mundo and also hear from regular Chileans about their lives and what they want for the future of their country.

A BBC investigation has found that the Myanmar military carried out a series of mass killings of civilians in July that resulted in the deaths of at least 40 men. Eyewitnesses and survivors said that soldiers, some as young as 17, rounded up villagers before separating the men and killing them. We speak to our colleague from BBC Burmese and hear from Burmese people inside and outside the country.

And as the world tires to get on top of the new Omicron variant, our Covid-19 expert Dr Eleanor Murray, assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health, will be looking at the latest coronavirus headlines and answering listener questions.

(Photo: President-elect Gabriel Boric in Santiago, Chile, 19 December 2021. Credit: EPA/Elvis Gonzalez)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fw6nh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxxdjkb6ly)
Gabriel Boric wins Chile's presidential election

We go to Chile, where the leftist candidate Gabriel Boric has won the presidential election to become the country's youngest ever leader. In what was expected to be a tight race, the 35-year-old former protest leader defeated his far-right rival Antonio Kast by more than 10 points. He will now lead a country that has been rocked in recent years by mass protests against inequality and corruption. We speak to our colleague from BBC Mundo and also hear from regular Chileans about their lives and what they want for the future of their country.

Tennis star Peng Shuai has denied making an accusation of sexual assault, in her first media interview since alleging a top Chinese leader had coerced her to have sex. The Chinese player sparked global concern when she disappeared from public view after posting the allegations online. Our China media analyst has the latest on the story.

And as the world tires to get on top of the new Omicron variant, our Covid-19 expert Professor Marc Mendelson, Professor of Infectious Diseases and Head of the Division of Infectious Diseases & HIV Medicine at Groote Schuur Hospital, University of Cape Town, will be looking at the latest coronavirus headlines and answering listener questions.

(Photo: Jubilant supporters of Gabriel Boric reacted to his victory in Chile after the presidential election result. Credit: Reuters)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fwbdm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fwg4r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywkz240)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1ktf4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nqcsdz9z3)
2021/12/20 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fwkww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1ky58)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct301b)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The guiding hound

Dogs and humans have gone paw in hand for thousands of years. Historic and genetic evidence shows we’ve shaped each other's existence over millennia. But dogs were only first trained as guides for blind people in the UK 90 years ago. What’s the biology behind this extraordinary partnership? Hannah heads to Guide Dogs UK’s training school in Royal Leamington Spa. She meets up with expert Graham Kensett to find out what it takes to make a guide dog from nose to tail, starting from before birth and following the life course through to retirement.

Hannah also meets the delightful Wendy and Wilmott, a German shepherd and a retriever cross. Despite both still growing into their ears, they show her their already extraordinary skill set, from tackling obstacle courses to safely crossing roads. Cool, calm, patient, unflappable: Guide dogs are the astronauts of the canine world. But, as trainer Jenna explains, it’s all in the partnership with the owner, who needs to do plenty of work in terms of training and learning routes to journey in harmony with their furry guide.

Richard Lane has owned guide dogs for over 25 years, and confirms this first hand. He reveals just how he gets to the toothpaste aisle, and tells Adam how at its peak a partnership can navigate London Waterloo station better than some sighted people, even at rush hour. Richard also explains how deeply felt the bond that forms between owner and dog is, and describes the hardest part of guide dog ownership: Letting go at the end.


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fwpn0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5hwmpcnym)
Chile elects youngest ever president

The leftist Gabriel Boric has won Chile's presidential election to become the country's youngest ever leader. In what was expected to be a tight race, the 35-year-old former student protest leader defeated his far-right rival José Antonio Kast by 10 points. Mr Boric told supporters he would look after democracy, promising curbs on Chile's neoliberal economic model.

Also in the programme: A BBC investigation in Myanmar has gathered extensive evidence that soldiers tortured and killed dozens of men in an opposition stronghold; and Tigrayan rebels who just weeks ago were threatening the Ethiopian capital have withdrawn to the borders of their region.

(Image: President-elect Gabriel Boric is seen before his victory speech to supporters. Credit: EPA/Elvis Gonzalez)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fwtd4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx1j4z93y3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172y0stlfff5kr)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1l5nj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrr9hjf902)
US Build Back Better plan in jeopardy

A key senator has indicated he will not vote for President Biden's Build Back Better plan. The move by Joe Manchin puts the huge social spending measure in jeopardy, as Lauren Fedor, US political correspondent at the Financial Times explains. And we explore the potential impact on the US economy with Chris Low of FHN Financial. Also in the programme, the government of Ghana intends to introduce an e-levy tax on "mobile money" transactions. Bernard Mornah helped organise recent protests against the levy and explains why he is opposed to the measure. Grace Mensah farms chickens west of Accra, and tells us how much her business relies on mobile phone payments. And economist Dr Priscilla Twumasi Baffour of the University of Ghana discusses the arguments made by the government to justify the new tax. Plus, with the majority of English Premier League football matches cancelled over the weekend owing to coronavirus outbreaks, we examine the implications for the football sector with Kieran Maguire, lecturer in football finance from the University of Liverpool.

(Picture: Senator Joe Manchin near the Capitol. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fwy48)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1l9dn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



TUESDAY 21 DECEMBER 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fx1wd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z7z)
The birth of Bangladesh

A special edition on the Bangladesh War of Independence, which ended 50 years ago in December 1971. The conflict killed hundreds of thousands of people and redrew the political map of South Asia. The programme features first-hand accounts from leading activists and politicians, as well as the people caught up in the war - from a Pakistani soldier to one of the many Bangladeshi women who suffered appalling sexual violence.

There is expert analysis from Sabir Mustafa, the head of the BBC Bengali Service, and Witness History's Farhana Haider.

PHOTO: The flag of Bangladesh is raised at the Awami League headquarters in 1971. Credit: Getty Images.


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fx5mj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqr5ybtjy7)
Biden's Build Back Better plan in jeopardy

A key senator has indicated he will not vote for President Biden's Build Back Better plan. We explore the potential impact on the economy with US economist Ken Rogoff. Also in the programme, the government of Ghana intends to introduce an e-levy tax on "mobile money" transactions. Plus, business correspondent Carrie Davies explains how the BBC has discovered that Covid passes are being advertised for sale on social media to people who have not been vaccinated. Rahul Tandon is joined by Jyoti Malhotra senior consulting editor at the Print based in India and Alexander Kaufman Huffington Post in America.


Programme producers: Benjie Guy and Nisha Patel

( PIC : President Biden CREDIT: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fx9cn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1ply)
Creating an alternative gig economy

Meet the innovators who want to change gig work for the better.

When we order a pizza on a Friday night or use a ride-sharing app to get home, it’s likely that the person providing the service is a ‘gig worker’ – a flexible employee who picks their own hours and gets paid per-job.

The app-based gig economy provides convenience for consumers - and has become an increasingly important part of the global economy over the last 10 years. Workers can log on and off when they chose – but they are often managed by an absent algorithmic middleman, and don’t have access to basic workers’ rights such as sick pay, holiday pay or an hourly wage.

But people around the world think that a fairer approach to gig work is possible – from a co-operative run by ex-delivery riders in London to a blockchain based ride-sharing app launching in India. But can these upstarts provide the flexibility and convenience that both workers and consumers have come to expect?

Produced and presented by Craig Langran


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1lnn1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 Discovery (w3ct301b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fxf3s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fxjvx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvm)
CODA: I'm the thumb in my family

Humera Iqbal enters the remarkable world of Children of Deaf Adults, or CODAs. At a young age they take on the mighty responsibility of interpreting for their mums and dads outside the home…in a world built for the hearing. That means they are often emotionally switched on, assiduously punctual, confident and super-organised. Humera, associate professor of psychology at University College London, meets CODA children as they chat and translate while their parents are out and about getting things done. And she hears from adult CODAs to find out how the interpreting they did in childhood shaped them later in life.

(Photo: Khadija and Rubbena, with kind permission)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1lx49)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf2)
Nutcracker! with Sir Matthew Bourne

We follow the internationally celebrated choreographer Sir Matthew Bourne as he reimagines his popular work Nutcracker! for Autumn 2021.

Taking Tchaikovsky’s ballet and in a set heavily influenced by the lavish Hollywood musicals of the 1930s, Bourne’s production is a spectacle as it journeys between Dr. Dross’ drab Orphanage, through a shimmering, ice-skating winter wonderland, and into the mouth-watering Sweetieland full of dancing sugar coated goodies.

Complete with newly-refreshed delectable sets and costumes, combined with sparkling new choreography, Luke Whitlock explores with Bourne how this reinvention comes about.

From preparations way ahead of the opening night of the tour, and then heading to London to light up the Christmas Season, the creative process for Bourne doesn’t stop.

Presented by Luke Whitlock
Produced by Luke Whitlock for the BBC World Service

Image: Matthew Bourne (Credit: Sarah Jeynes/BBC)


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fxnm1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv31kfwbqms)
Biden urges Americans to get vaccinated

Omicron becomes the dominant strain in US, less than a month after the country registered its first case.

We'll head to the Philippines where 375 people are now known to have died from the effects of Super Typhoon Rai and hear about the humanitarian effort there.

And our correspondent Steve Rosenberg looks at the growing tensions between Russia and many Western countries - with Ukraine a major source of contention.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fxsc5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv31kfwbvcx)
South Africa scientists study link between Covid mutations and HIV

Covid lingers in people with weak immune systems for months, possibly leading to variants.

We hear from Myanmar's self declared national unity government in exile on the situation on the Thai border.

And we will be talking space tourism - as Russia enters the race to take billionaires to the stars.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fxx39)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv31kfwbz41)
Is there a link between HIV and Covid variants?

Scientists in South Africa are studying whether mutations developing in immuno-compromised people are leading to more dangerous variants.

We also go to the United States where Omicron is now the dominant variant - accounting for almost three quarters of all Covid cases.

And in New York City, the jury has began deliberations in the trial of Ghislaine Maxwell - accused of grooming underage girls for abuse by the late convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fy0vf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1ply)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1md3t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgv)
Millions still not back at school

The World Bank says this could cost the global economy $17 trillion. Coronavirus brought education systems across the world to a halt. At its height more than ninety percent of the globally enrolled student body were not in school. That’s more than 1.6 billion learners. Nearly two years on from the start of the pandemic, hundreds of millions of children are still not back in the classroom. In Uganda, as the BBC’s Patience Atuhaire tells us, schools were closed in March 2020 before the country registered a single coronavirus case. They are yet to reopen. She interviews a father whose twelve children have missed nearly two years of school. Robert Jenkins, the Director of Education and Adolescent Development at UNICEF, says the global economic impact of this lost education amounts to $17 trillion. He says the need for governments around the world to reopen all schools is critical.

(picture of Fred Ssegawa's children via BBC).


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6f)
Rudolf Nureyev defects

In 1961 the great ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev stunned the world by defecting from the Soviet Union. Nureyev escaped his KGB minders at an airport in Paris - with the help of French dancer Pierre Lacotte. Pierre Lacotte spoke to Louise Hidalgo in 2011.

PHOTO: Rudolf Nureyev at a press conference in the 1960s (Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fy4lk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1mhvy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct301b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fy8bp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fyd2t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywl1022)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1mrc6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fyhty)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxd)
'We were going to hold our ground': Behind the lines of a Mohawk protest

Tracey Deer is an award-winning director who grew up on a Mohawk reservation near Montreal, Canada. When she was 12-years-old, a nearby reservation became involved in a land dispute known as the Oka Crisis. Developers wanted to build a golf course on an indigenous burial ground, and the Mohawk organised a protest camp. Things escalated into an armed standoff, and the violence that ensued would deeply traumatise Tracey. Now she has made a film, Beans, a semi-fictional account of her experiences during the crisis.

Il Postino: The Postman, was a hugely successful Italian film made in 1994, but behind the scenes tragedy had played out during production. The lead, Massimo Troisi was plagued by heart problems relating to a childhood illness. The film’s British director, Michael Radford, was faced with a difficult decision, to finish the film or stop, as Massimo’s health deteriorated on set. He opted to push on with the production, but Massimo didn’t quite make it. He died the day after principle filming ended. Michael went on to complete the film, wanting to make it something that Massimo would have been proud of. Michael spoke to Jo Fidgen in April 2020.

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar

(Photo: A Mohawk man during the Oka Crisis. Credit: Getty Images/Christopher Morris-Corbis)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fyml2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywl17kb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1mzvg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct301b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fyrb6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5hwmpfqmt)
Omicron: Scientists probe variant link with untreated HIV

South African scientists - hailed for their discovery of Omicron - are investigating the "highly plausible hypothesis" that the emergence of new Covid-19 variants could be linked, in some cases, to mutations taking place inside infected people whose immune systems have already been weakened by other factors, including, though not limited to, untreated HIV.

Also in the programme: an update on the death toll and devastation caused by a powerful typhoon that struck the southeastern Philippines five days ago from our correspondent; and scientists say they've discovered what's believed to be the largest ever fossil of a giant millipede in the north-east of England.

(Picture shows an illustration of the Omicron variant. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fyw2b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1ply)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1n7bq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bsy46l0h1)
The economic impact of Omicron

It's predicted that the Omicron Covid variant could have a significant economic impact. We explore the implications with Lena Komileva of G+ Economics. And we get a sense of public health measures the World Health Organization would like to see implemented from Dr Margaret Harris, who is a public health doctor with the WHO. Also in the programme, the bosses of aviation giants Boeing and Airbus have called on the US government to delay the rollout of new 5G mobile service amid concerns it could interfere with aircraft electronics. We find out more from the BBC's Theo Leggett. Plus, in the United States, 2021 is seen by some as the year of the Great Resignation. Over four million Americans are leaving their jobs each month at the moment. The BBC's Michelle Fleury travelled to the state of Kentucky, where the phenomenon is widespread, to find out more.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young and produced by Sarah Hawkins and Frey Lindsay.

(Picture: An empty restaurant terrace in London. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fyztg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxxdjkdzrx)
Vaccines and religion

Vaccine hesitancy is a topic of discussion around the world, and one reason some people choose not to get the jab is religious exemption. We hear a conversation between people of different faiths from the United States and South Africa, about their personal vaccine status, and the role of religious leaders in promoting the vaccine.

In the Philippines, at least 375 people are now known to have died after Super Typhoon Rai hit the country's south-eastern islands. We hear the latest, and reach out to some of the people who have been affected.

At least thirty people died last month in a failed attempt to cross the Channel from France to Britain according to a BBC World Service Investigation. We tell you what has been reported so far.

(Photo: Syringe needle, Credit: Kirsty O"Connor/PA Wire)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fz3kl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxxdjkf3j1)
Philippines: Super Typhoon Rai

In the Philippines, at least 375 people are now known to have died and many more are injured, after Super Typhoon Rai hit the country's south-eastern islands. Rescue teams have described scenes of "complete carnage" amid fears widespread landslides and flooding may have claimed more lives. We hear the latest, and reach out to some of the people who have been affected.

What happens when your religious beliefs conflict with public health advice? We hear a conversation between people of different faiths from the United States and South Africa, about religious exemptions to vaccination, and the role of religious leaders in encouraging people to get the jab.

At least thirty people died last month in a failed attempt to cross the Channel from France to Britain according to a BBC World Service Investigation. We tell you what has been reported so far.

(Photo: Siargao Typhoon Rai, Credit: BBC News)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fz79q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fzc1v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywl1z13)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1nqb7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nqcsf26w6)
2021/12/21 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fzgsz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1nv2c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt4)
The Internet Archive is 25!

Twenty-five years ago the world wide web was 2.5 terabytes and you needed to dial-up via your phone line to get onto it, so Brewster Kahle decided to set up a project to archive what was out there already. Now the Internet Archive consists of more than 588 billion web pages, as well as 28 million books and texts, 14 million audio items, and 580,000 software titles, making it one of the world’s largest digital libraries. Brewster tells Gareth how they’ve done this – especially making content that runs on old and absolute technologies accessible today.

The Future of Text
Why is our tech for text so simple and boring – in effect it’s little more than an electronic copy of a paper page? But this changes with new technology bringing books and documents to life with interaction and metadata tags that allow you to search, source and organise text as never before. Father of the internet, Vint Cerf and Frode Hegland, Founder of the Augmented Text Company, are on the show to tell us why we’re now able to move on from using the click of a mouse to manage our text.


Moonshot – tech used to learn more about neglected diseases is fighting COVID
The COVID Moonshot project began as a virtual collaboration during UK 2020 lockdown. Scientists, academics, researchers & students started a twitter-fuelled race against the clock to identify new molecules that could block SARS-CoV-2 and develop treatments that would be globally affordable and easily manufactured for most vulnerable communities. Coordinating this effort is the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative, using the AI tools and computer crowdsourcing tech they’ve adopted for neglected diseases as well as the use of the Diamond Light Source technology. All of this tech allows the scientists to build up a huge catalogue of the structures of disease-causing parasites and then model potential treatments to see if they might work. Dr. Nathalie Strub-Wourgaft, Director of Neglected Tropical Diseases, DNDi joins us.


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Bill Nettles
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image credit: Internet Archive)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fzlk3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5hwmpgkvq)
Tigrayan commander: Withdrawal 'to give peace a chance'

What does it mean that rebel Ethiopian forces are withdrawing to the province of Tigray? Could an end to the war be within grasp? We speak to the Tigrayan military commander Tsadkan Gebretensae.

Also in the programme: A New York intensive care doctor gives us his view as Omicron coronavirus cases surge; and how it felt to come face to face with Super Typhoon Rai in the Philippines.

(Photo: A woman stands in line to receive food donations at the Tsehaye Primary School, which was turned into a temporary shelter for people displaced by conflict, in the town of Shire, Tigray region, Ethiopia. Credit: Reuters/Baz Ratner/File Photo)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fzq97)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx1j4zd0v6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0stlffj2gv)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1p2km)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycskr746hbg)
The economic impact of Omicron

It's predicted that the Omicron Covid variant could have a significant economic impact. We explore the implications with Lena Komileva of G+ Economics. And we get a sense of public health measures the World Health Organization would like to see implemented from Dr Margaret Harris, who is a public health doctor with the WHO. Also in the programme, the bosses of aviation giants Boeing and Airbus have called on the US government to delay the rollout of new 5G mobile service amid concerns it could interfere with aircraft electronics. We find out more from the BBC's Theo Leggett. Plus, in the United States, 2021 is seen by some as the year of the Great Resignation. Over four million Americans are leaving their jobs each month at the moment. The BBC's Michelle Fleury travelled to the state of Kentucky, where the phenomenon is widespread, to find out more.

(Picture: An empty restaurant terrace in London. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fzv1c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1ply)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1p69r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 22 DECEMBER 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6fzysh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rv0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g02jm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqr5ybxfvb)
America rolls out home testing scheme

US President Joe Biden announces plans to deliver hundreds of millions of lateral flow tests for Americans to use at home – it’s the first time the federal government has offered subsidised testing for coronavirus. Our correspondent in Washington, DC, Aleem Maqbool, gives us the latest. As the Christmas holiday approaches, millions of Americans are expected to travel, leading to fears the already surging Omicron variant could spread further and faster. In New York, mayor Bill de Blasio is offering cash incentives for those who are yet to be vaccinated to come forward and get their shots. Elsewhere in the US, the BBC’s Michelle Fleury speaks to people who are quitting their job in what has been dubbed the Great Resignation; in Kentucky, the rate of resignations is higher than anywhere else in the country. In China, the online retail behemoth Amazon is accused of agreeing to remove reviews of President Xi’s that were anything less than a full five out of five stars. While in Japan a shortage of chips – French fries, not microchips – has forced McDonalds to offer smaller portions to customers. Throughout the programme we’re joined from Chicago by Stephanie Hare, researcher of technology and politics - and from Seoul by Jasper Kim, attorney, author and expert on international business law.

Picture: Joe Biden addresses viewers. Credit: Reuters.


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g068r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n69)
Nitin Sawhney, Musician and Composer

Stephen Sackur speaks to renowned British Indian musician and composer Nitin Sawhney. From a childhood disfigured by racism to the embrace of the UK’s cultural elite, what are the common threads in his remarkable career?


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1pkk4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g0b0w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g0fs0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct2zhg)
My Arab Spring

War - Harb

Violence and loss of life were features of the 2011 Arab Spring from the outset - peaceful protests were met with live bullets in multiple countries, and protesters were imprisoned, tortured, and killed.

Brother and sister Abubakr and Ella al-Shamahi look at the revolutionary prisoners of Bahrain, the chaos of the conflict in Libya, the Yemeni Civil War and the destruction and devastation that Syrians have experienced over the last 10 years.

(Photo: A Yemeni sits next to the grave of his slain son at a cemetery dedicated to slain Houthi fighters. Credit: Yahya Arhab/EPA)


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1pt1d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Documentary (w3ct2zvb)
I Wonder as I Wander

As Christmas approaches, let us lead you through Advent with the Appalachian carol I Wonder as I Wander. Written by American folklorist and singer John Jacob Niles, its origins come from a song fragment collected in 1933. Mysterious, inspiring, this traditional Christmas carol reflects on the nativity and the nature of wondering.

While in the town of Murphy in Appalachian North Carolina, Niles attended a fundraising meeting held by evangelicals who had been ordered out of town by the police. He wrote of hearing the song:

“A girl had stepped out to the edge of the little platform attached to the automobile. She began to sing. Her clothes were unbelievably dirty and ragged, and she, too, was unwashed. Her ash-blond hair hung down in long skeins. ... she was beautiful, and in her untutored way, she could sing. She smiled as she sang, smiled rather sadly, and sang only a single line of a song”.

The girl, named Annie Morgan, repeated the fragment seven times in exchange for a quarter per performance, and Niles left with "three lines of verse, and a magnificent idea". Based on this fragment, Niles composed the version of I Wonder as I Wander that is known today.

This most unusual of carols touches people in different ways. With childhood memories from a 1960s RAF base in Oxfordshire, a Nigerian schoolgirl who found her place in Winchester Cathedral, reflections from a candlelit vigil in an Appalachian town, and a Christmas gift as described by world renowned singer Melanie Marshall.

(Photo: Folk singer with lute, John Jacob Niles. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g0kj4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv31kfwfmjw)
US: 500 million Covid rapid tests will be made available at no cost

President Biden has announced measures to tackle the rapidly spreading Omicron variant, including handing out half a billion free Covid tests.

We will bring you the latest from Malaysia where torrential rain has lead to flash flooding which has killed over 20 people.

We find out why the Zimbabwe Government is paying its employees bonuses in US dollars rather than in Zimbabwean pounds.

And we hear about 2 jailed Russians who missed a curfew because they were getting married?

Also on the programme how does a mother seal recognise her pup in a colony when hundreds are calling out.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g0p88)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv31kfwfr90)
Biden involves military doctors to help fight surge in Covid cases

The US President Joe Biden tells Americans it is their patriotic duty to get vaccinated to help fight off the Omicron wave - and announces a range of measures from the government too. We'll assess the approach with a Pullitzer Prize-winning science writer.

And we'll hear about the effects of the Omicron surge in Europe too.

Dozens are missing after a landslide at a jade mine in Myanmar - we'll speak to a journalist who is following the story closely.

President Vladimir Putin says Russia won't back down in the standoff over Ukraine. We'll get a contemporary and historical perspective from one of the leading historians of the end of the Cold War - and she has some startling conclusions on the motivations of the Russian leader.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g0t0d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv31kfwfw14)
Myanmar: Rescue operations underway after landslide in jade mining site

Dozens are missing after a landslide at a jade mine in Myanmar - we will get the latest on the story.

The US president Joe Biden tells Americans it is their patriotic duty to get vaccinated to help fight off the Omicron wave - and announces a range of measures from the government too. We'll assess the approach with a Pulitzer Prize-winning science writer.

Israel announces it will give a fourth Covid jabs to vulnerable people, including the over 60s.

And we go to India to hear about a new bill to increase the age at which women can get married. We speak to one of the main politicians behind the move.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g0xrj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1q90x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jpm)
Lockdown, rebound, lockdown

2021 has seen some extraordinary economic changes. First a global economic rebound, then a global supply chain crisis, then inflation of a kind not seen in western countries for decades. And finally millions of people deciding they didn't even want to go back to work after lockdown. So what could 2022 have in store? Ed Butler discusses all this with Oxford economist Linda Yueh of Oxford University and author of the Great Economists, and Mohamed El-Erian, President of Queens College Cambridge. (Picture of interest rate graph. Picture credit: Getty Images).


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8p)
The right to drive in Saudi Arabia

In 2011, cybersecurity expert Manal Al-Sharif helped found the Women2Drive movement. It was designed to force the Saudi Arabian government to overturn its ban on women driving cars - one of the many restrictions on women in the Kingdom. Inspired by the mood of the Arab Spring, Saudi women got behind the wheel and then posted videos of themselves all over social media. The movement attracted international attention and the ban on women drivers was eventually lifted in 2017. Manal Al-Sharif talks to Petra Zivic.


PHOTO: Manal Al Sharif in Dubai in 2013 (Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g11hn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2zhg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1qds1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g157s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Reith Lectures (w3ct2zpd)
AI: A Future for humans?

Prof Stuart Russell returns to the questions of human control over increasingly capable AI systems. He will argue for the abandonment of the current “standard model” of AI, proposing instead a new model based on three principles—chief among them the idea that machines should know that they don’t know what humans’ true objectives are. Echoes of the new model are already found in phenomena as diverse as menus, market research, and democracy. Machines designed according to the new model are, Russell suggests, deferential to humans, cautious and minimally invasive in their behaviour and, crucially, willing to be switched off. He will conclude by exploring further the consequences of success in AI for our future as a species.

The lectures will be chaired by presenter, journalist and author, Anita Anand.


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g18zx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywl3wz5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1qn89)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct2zvb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g1dr1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzn)
Lessons in grief from the South African wilderness

Sicelo Mbatha grew up in the remote South African region of Kwahlabisa, on the doorstep of a game reserve. Every day, he and his friends - including his best friend Sanele - would walk many miles to get to school and back. One day, on their way home, they approached their final river crossing and children started screaming - there was a crocodile. Tragically, Sicelo witnessed a brutal attack on Sanele that day. The experience traumatised him for years. But rather than turning away from nature, and being fearful of wildlife, he was drawn to it. He wanted to understand the behaviour of wild animals, so pursued his dream to become a wilderness guide. It was by being close to the often brutal world of animals that he would finally come to terms with what had happened, and find peace after grief.

In Paris, there's an historic taxidermy shop called Deyrolle that's been an inspiration for famous artists like Salvador Dali. It's even featured in movies including Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris. Reporter Saskia Edwards met the owner Prince Louis Albert de Broglie to find out more about his passion for stuffed animals. This interview was first broadcast in March 2017.

Peter Wohlleben is a tree expert with an affinity for forests. He’s the best selling author of The Hidden Life of Trees which detailed his research about the social lives of trees and how they communicate through a network of fungus. This interview was first broadcast in April 2020.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar

(Photo: Sicelo Mbatha. Credit: Bridget Pitt)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g1jh5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywl44gf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1qwrk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g1n79)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5hwmpjmjx)
Scientists in South Africa assess how dangerous Omicron is

A new study from South Africa backs up the theory that the new Omicron variant of the COVID-19 virus is milder than the Delta variant. Early data from the National Institute for Communicable Diseases suggest patients admitted in this current wave are having shorter stays and, even though case numbers are higher, hospitalisations are lower.

Also on the programme: Thirteen million people living in the north-eastern Chinese city of Xi'an are under a renewed lockdown due to a new Covid-19 outbreak; the UN's World Food Programme in Yemen says it will reduce the amount of aid it gives people there because of reduced funds; and why Zimbabwe's fragile economic prospects may be harmed further by the growing demand for foreign currencies.

(Photo: A healthcare worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer vaccine in South Africa Credit: Reuters)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g1rzf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1r47t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4d1373pw12)
The causes of Europe's gas price surge

With natural gas prices surging across Europe we explore the underlying causes. Anne-Sophie Corbeau is a global research scholar at the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University and gives us her take. And we consider the impact of Chinese gas demand on global supply with Nikos Tsafos, head of energy and geopolitics at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC. Also in the programme, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson considers the future of the retail sector, and asks whether there is a new vision emerging for shops in towns and cities. Plus, the world's biggest lottery draw, Spain's El Gordo, happened today. But ticket sellers have been striking, complaining that their commission rates haven't increased in 17 years. We find out more from Joshua Parfitt, who is a writer for Olive Press News on the Costa Blanca.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Sarah Hawkins and Sara Parry.

(Picture: A liquefied natural gas tanker. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g1wqk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxxdjkhwp0)
UN forced to cut aid to Yemen

The UN's World Food Programme says it is being forced to cut aid to hungry people in Yemen because of a lack of funds. It said that five million people at immediate risk of famine would keep the full ration, but its food stocks were dangerously low and more severe reductions would soon be unavoidable. We speak to a BBC journalist covering the story to explain the humanitarian crisis.

We get the latest from the Philippines, where rescue workers are finding more bodies in remote towns and villages flattened by a typhoon that's already known to have killed at least 400 people. We hear from those directly affected.

The United Nations has been urging every country to vaccinate at least 40% of its population by the end of this year. It had hoped that 70% of the world’s population would be vaccinated by the middle of next year. But many countries are not on track. So far, just over 7% of Africans are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, compared to 58% in both the U.S. and Europe, where booster shots are now being offered widely. We hear a conversation between health professionals in Nigeria, South Africa and Kenya.

Picture: A man in Yemen gets his grandchildren's monthly share of food aid provided by a local relief agency in Sana'a (EPA / Yahya Arhab)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g20gp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxxdjkj0f4)
Coronavirus: Vaccinating in Africa

The United Nations has been urging every country to vaccinate at least 40% of its population by the end of this year. It had hoped that 70% of the world’s population would be vaccinated by the middle of next year. But many countries are not on track. So far, just over 7% of Africans are fully vaccinated against COVID-19, compared to 58% in both the U.S. and Europe, where booster shots are now being offered widely. We hear a conversation between health professionals in Nigeria, South Africa and Kenya.

The UN's World Food Programme says it is being forced to cut aid to hungry people in Yemen because of a lack of funds. It said that five million people at immediate risk of famine would keep the full ration, but its food stocks were dangerously low and more severe reductions would soon be unavoidable. We speak to a BBC journalist covering the story to explain the humanitarian crisis.

As many as 100 people are missing following a landslide at a jade mine in northern Myanmar. They were reportedly swept into a lake by waste from a mine in Kachin state. We get the latest from our colleague at BBC Burmese.

Picture: A man gets a Covid-19 vaccine in Abuja, Nigeria (REUTERS / Afolabi Sotunde)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g246t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g27yy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywl4vy6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1rm7b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nqcsf53s9)
2021/12/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g2cq2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2zhg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1rqzg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwc)
New research on the Omicron variant

New research on the Omicron variant unpicked by James Gallagher, BBC health and science correspondent. Plus many people listen to music for hours every day, and often near bedtime in the hope of a good night’s sleep. But if you can’t get the tune out of your head could this be counter-productive? In new research, neuropsychologist Michael Scullin of Baylor University has looked at the rarely studied effect of these so called earworms. And could fish oils one day be used to treat some forms of severe depression? Claudia hears from Alessandra Borsini of King’s College London who has been examining the impact of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the lab and has followed up with a promising trial on severely depressed patients. Plus James Gallagher explains that despite there being no evidence 5G mobile networks are harmful many types of necklaces and accessories claiming to "protect" people from 5G have hit the market. Now the Dutch authority for nuclear safety and radiation protection warns that with long term use such anti-5G products themselves could be harmful due to radioactive concerns.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Omicron variant (B.1.1.529): Immunofluorescence staining of uninfected and infected Vero E6 cells. Photo credit: Microbiology HKU/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g2hg6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5hwmpkgrt)
WHO warns: you can't boost your way out of the pandemic

The head of the WHO says no country can rely on booster shots to get out of the Covid pandemic. We get an assessment from the organisation's special envoy on Covid-19, Dr David Nabarro.

Also in the programme: a well-known statue which commemorates the Tiananmen Square massacre of 1989 has been removed from a university campus in Hong Kong; and Libyan presidential elections originally scheduled to take place on 24 December have been postponed.

(Photo: Shoppers pass a poster urging people to get a booster shot against Covid-19 in Bristol, England. Credit: Ben Birchall/PA Wire)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g2m6b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx1j4zgxr9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0stlfflzcy)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1rzgq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycszglfn1g6)
The causes of Europe's gas price surge

With natural gas prices surging across Europe we explore the underlying causes. Anne-Sophie Corbeau is a global research scholar at the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University and gives us her take. And we consider the impact of Chinese gas demand on global supply with Nikos Tsafos, head of energy and geopolitics at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC. Also in the programme, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson considers the future of the retail sector, and asks whether there is a new vision emerging for shops in towns and cities. Plus, the world's biggest lottery draw, Spain's El Gordo, happened today. But ticket sellers have been striking, complaining that their commission rates haven't increased in 17 years. We find out more from Joshua Parfitt, who is a writer for Olive Press News on the Costa Blanca.

(Picture: A liquefied natural gas tanker. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g2qyg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1s36v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Documentary (w3ct2zvb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 23 DECEMBER 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g2vpl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g2zfq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqr5yc0brf)
More information on the Omicron variant emerges

Three new studies shed more light on the Omicron variant of coronavirus suggesting the risk of hospitalisation is lower than with previous variants. But there are still questions to be answered, says James Naismith, Professor of Structural Biology at the University of Oxford, about how quickly it can spread and for how long – something that will have a huge impact on recovering economies. The price of liquified natural gas is spiking around the world to around eight times what it was earlier in the year. Anne-Sophie Corbeau at the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University tells us why, and Nikos Tsafos at the Center for Stretegic and International Studies in Washington, DC, explains how Chinese demand for energy is contributing to rising prices. Apple’s investors want to investigate the company’s behaviour in China, including allegations of forced labour in the supply chain, and they might just get that: the US financial regulator has blocked Apple’s proposals to prevent shareholders from demanding those reports – Patrick McGee of the Financial Times tells us more. The BBC’s Elizabeth Hotson looks at the future of high street retail, and in Hong Kong, authorities have removed a statue commemorating the Tiananmen Square massacre under cover of darkness. throughout the programme we’re joined by Samson Ellis - Taipei Bureau Chief Bloomberg News and Diane Brady, Assistant Managing Editor of Forbes.

Picture: A coronavirus poster on a phone box Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g335v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z32)
How will Afghanistan survive the winter?

How will the 23 million Afghans who need food assistance get through the winter? The country has lost funding from Western donors and government salaries have not been paid. The Taliban are divided and facing increasing competition from Islamic State.

With Tanya Beckett.

(Turkey's AFAD provides food aid to 2,000 families in need in Kabul, Afghanistan 07 Dec 2021. Credit: Bilal Guler/Getty Images)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1sgg7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g36xz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g3bp3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyf)
The runaway maids of Oman

Hundreds of young women from Sierra Leone, West Africa, have been trapped in the Arabian sultanate of Oman, desperate to get home. Promised work in shops and restaurants, they say they were tricked into becoming housemaids, working up to 18 hours a day, often without pay, and sometimes abused by their employers. Some ran away, to live a dangerous underground existence at the mercy of the authorities. Now, they are being rescued with the help of charities and diplomats. Back home, some have empowered themselves for the first time, joining a women’s farming collective. But others can’t easily recover from the ill-treatment and isolation they suffered in Arabia.
(Updated version of a programme first broadcast earlier this year.)

Reporter: Tim Whewell.

(Photo: Sierra Leonean women hoping for repatriation after leaving their employers in Oman. Credit: Do Bold)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1spyh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgr)
Why I chose to live on rations

World War Two rationing imposed severe restrictions on food, so why would anyone voluntarily go back to it?

Ruth Alexander meets three women who chose to adopt the diet endured in 1940s and 1950s Britain, one of them for an entire year.

We hear how such scarcity inspired creativity, a reverence for the ingenuity of wartime cooks, and an enduring change of perspective on the responsibility of the 21st century food consumer.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:

Karen Burns-Booth, food writer - www.lavenderandlovage.com/category/recipes/general-recipes/wartime-recipes
Claud Fullwood, author of The Rations Challenge: Forty Days of Feasting in a Wartime Kitchen
Carolyn Ekins, blogger - https://the1940sexperiment.com

(Picture: Basket of food rations on display at the Imperial War Museum, London, in 2011. Credit: Paul Kerley/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g3gf7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2xxry91tc)
Tiananmen statue removed from University of Hong Kong

The Pillar of Shame, depicting a pile of corpses, was one of the few public reminders of the 1989 massacre.

The United Nations has removed a substantial obstacle to providing aid to Afghanistan - but will it serve to prop up the Taliban?

And our correspondent reports from one of the islands in the Philippines hardest hit by the typhoon.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g3l5c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2xxry95kh)
UN approves Afghanistan aid plan

The United Nations has removed a substantial obstacle to providing aid to Afghanistan - but will it also serve the Taliban?

Why can't the conflict in the East of Ukraine and the threat of Russian intervention be resolved?

And we go to the US with the largest sexual abuse settlement in the country's history totaling 2.7 Billion dollars, but will victims take the deal?


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g3pxh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2xxry999m)
International community opens door to Afghan aid

The UN security council passes resolution exempting aid from sanctions.

Authorities in Hong Kong remove a statue commemorating the victims of Tiananmen Square. It's left many seeing this as the latest attack on freedoms.

And we have more on the pandemic - as we get reactions from many European countries to the spread of Omicron.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g3tnm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1t5y0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jbb)
China prepares to face down Omicron

The new variant poses a particular threat to China's hitherto successful zero-Covid strategy at a time when the country's economy is looking vulnerable.

Ed Butler gets the latest on the fast-moving Omicron variant from Boston University epidemiologist Eleanor Murray. One new development is a recent study in Hong Kong that found that one of the two main Chinese vaccines offers very little resistance against it. Health security expert Nicholas Thomas of Hong Kong's City University says the Chinese government is now in a race to deliver booster vaccines to its population, while stopping Omicron from leaching across its porous land borders.

It comes at a sensitive time, with the Beijing Winter Olympics to begin in February, and the government seeking to gently deflate a property market bubble ahead of a politically sensitive Communist Party Congress in October. But independent economist Andy Xie says that when push comes to shove, the government would rather lockdown the entire national economy rather than let Covid get out of control.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: A large crowd of commuters wearing face masks at a subway station in Hong Kong; Credit: Budrul Chukrut/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x45)
Bahrain's 2011 protests

In 2011, thousands of protestors occupied Pearl Roundabout near the centre of Bahrain’s capital, Manama. Many of them were from the country's Shia religious majority. They were demanding political freedoms and calling for an end to what they said was years of discrimination by the Sunni monarchy that rules the country. Rob Walker spoke to Asma Darwish, a 20 year old student who joined the protests.

Photo: Demonstrators in Manama. Credit: Reuters/Caren Firouz.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g3ydr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1t9p4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g424w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm8)
Antarctic Treaty: Protecting the icy continent

It’s widely regarded as the most successful treaty in the world, and it was the first arms control agreement established during the Cold War. The Antarctic Treaty, which came into force in 1961, protects what is one of the most unspoilt places on earth, from mining, from military activity and allows only scientific exploration and peaceful pursuits. It was thanks to the treaty and research carried out in Antarctica that scientists identified a hole in the ozone layer in the 1980s, but it’s been most powerful as a symbol of what can be achieved to create peace between nations and give wilderness protection. So what has made this treaty so effective, and can it still hold up today in a world which is hungry for minerals and where an increasing number of states are seeking to project their technological and scientific prowess in Antarctica?

Joining Bridget Kendall is Birgit Njaastad, the Chair of the Committee for the Environmental Protection of the Antarctic, and for more than 25 years a Norwegian Polar Institute environmental expert; Professor Alan Hemmings, a specialist on the geopolitics of the Antarctic from the University of Canterbury New Zealand; and Dr Jessica O’Reilly, Associate Professor of International Studies at Indiana University in Bloomington in the United States, and the author of The Technocratic Antarctic. With poetry and song about the Antarctic by the New Zealand poet Bill Manhire.

Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service.

(Photo: Chinstrap Penguins on Half Moon Island, South Shetlands, Antarctica. Credit: V Stokes/ iStock/ Getty Images Plus)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l99)
Nigeria's Paralympic heroine

At the 2016 Paralympics in Rio, Nigerian shotputter, Lauritta Onye, became a social media sensation thanks to her cart-wheeling gold-medal celebration dance. Onye has dwarfism and has never grown beyond four foot one, or 125 centimetres. She suffered social stigma in Nigeria and at one point ended up selling DVDs on the street in order to survive. But a taster session of Paralympic sport would transform her life. She talks to Ian Williams .

PHOTO: Lauritta Onye competing at the Rio Paralympics (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g45x0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywl6sw8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1tk5d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g49n4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k45)
Falling for the stranger who saved me

In February 2019, Nupur Gupta was teaching at a yoga retreat in Goa when she got into difficulty in the sea. A Hungarian man called Attila Bosnyak who happened to be on the same yoga retreat was passing the beach, saw her in trouble and sprang into action. A dramatic rescue followed and a strong bond was formed between Nupur and Attila. That could have been the end of the story but instead it was the start of an on-going romantic relationship.

Up in the Scottish Highlands at this time of the year you’ll find 150 reindeer roaming the Cairngorms National Park, and rather a lot of visitors coming to see them. These beautiful creatures are the only free-ranging herd of reindeer in the UK and they are looked after by Tilly Smith who went to spend the summer working there back in 1981... and she never left! Our reporter Antonia Quirke braved Scotland's wintry weather to meet Tilly, her daughter Fiona and some of the reindeer they look after, at the Cairngorm Reindeer Centre.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar

(Photo: Nupur Gupta and Attila Bosnyak. Credit: Courtesy of Nupur Gupta and Attila Bosnyak)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g4fd8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywl71cj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1tsnn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g4k4d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5hwmpmjg0)
US top Covid advisor expresses concern over Omicron

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the top infectious diseases expert in the United States has warned Americans against attending large gatherings because of surging Covid cases.

Also in the programme: Belgium to shut down remaining nuclear plants; and Handel's Messiah back live on stage.

(Picture: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Dr. Anthony Fauci answers the media"s questions on the Omicron variant in the White House Briefing Room in Washington, DC, USA, 01 December 2021. Credit: EPA)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g4nwj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1v14x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49ks19qvn9)
Intel apologises to China over supplier advice

US chipmaker Intel apologised after it urged firms not to source products from Xinjiang. The US argues that China is conducting a genocide in the province, and has blocked import of goods from businesses that can't prove products sourced there are not made using Uighur slave labour. The BBC's Samira Hussain in New York fills us in on the details. Also in the programme, the government of Belgium has announced its two nuclear power plants will close in four years' time. Georg Zachmann of the Bruegel think tank tells us whether the country has a backup plan for energy supply after 2025. We examine the likely economic impact of the election of Chile's new left-wing presidential candidate Gabriel Boric with Chilean economist Francisco Meneses, who has previously worked in the country's Ministry of Education and its Central Bank. The BBC's Mariko Oi reports on Korea's ambitions to be pioneers in the Metaverse, which is seen by some as the next big thing on the internet. Plus, we explore the big economic trends of the coming 12 months with Linda Yueh of Oxford University, and Mohamed El-Erian, president of Queens' College, Cambridge.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Philippa Goodrich, Sara Parry and Ivana Davidovic.

(Picture: An Intel chip. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g4smn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxxdjklsl3)
Coronavirus: Unvaccinated and hospitalised

Many patients now in Intensive Care Units around the world are unvaccinated. On today's edition, we speak to two people in the UK and the United States, who were hospitalised with serious Covid-19, after deciding against getting the jab. They talk about their regret at turning down the vaccine, and encourage others to take it up.

Amidst the spread of Omicron, we also speak to a South Korean doctor who explains his country's continued battle with the Delta variant. The east Asian nation reached record daily deaths yesterday, and hospitals are dealing with severe shortages of ICU beds.

And, as always, we take your Coronavirus questions, with our dedicated expert, molecular epidemiologist Dr Emma Hodcroft.

(Photo: Medical workers prepare to transfer a patient for a CT scan at the intensive care unit, Credit: Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g4xcs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxxdjklxb7)
South Korea: record daily Covid deaths

South Korea has recorded its highest ever daily figure for Coronavirus deaths. Despite only 7000 daily cases, hospitals in the east Asian nation are struggling with a severe lack of ICU beds, causing government to introduce a 20 day limit to state funding for intensive care. We speak to a doctor in the country, about what he's seeing there.

With the rise of the Omicron variant, many unvaccinated people are falling seriously ill with coronavirus. We speak to two people in the UK and the United States, who were hospitalised about their regret at refusing the jab.

And, as always, we take your Coronavirus questions, with our dedicated expert, molecular epidemiologist Dr Emma Hodcroft.

(Photo: Covid testing in Seoul, South Korea, Credit: BBC)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g513x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g54w1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywl7rv9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1vj4f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nqcsf80pd)
2021/12/23 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g58m5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1vmwk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4s)
Omicron – mild or monster?

Studies from South Africa and the UK suggest Omicron may be a mild infection for the majority of people. Hospital admissions are down when compared with other variants. However, the virus is replicating at a much faster rate than earlier variants and is able to overcome vaccines to some extent. Cases studies so far have mainly been in young people. There is concern over what will now happen as Omicron spreads across Europe and the US where there are older unvaccinated populations.
Anne von Gottberg from South Africa’s National Institute for Communicable Diseases tells us what early results from studies there show and discusses the implications.

Typhoon Rai in the Philippines led to the loss of many lives and even destroyed buildings designed to resist such extreme weather events. Could more have been done either to predict the ferocity of the typhoon or to prepare for its impact?
Liz Stephens, Associate Professor in Climate Risks and Resilience from the University of Reading discusses these issues.

Beavers are making a comeback – in the Arctic. Their activity in engineering the landscape, building dams, and changing water courses is so widespread it can be picked out by satellites. However, this is not entirely welcome says Helen Wheeler Senior Lecturer in Zoology at Anglia Ruskin University. who has been working with local people concerned about the beavers impact on their livelihoods.

And the James Webb telescope is finally launching. Heidi Hammel, who has been involved in the project for over 20 years tells us what it’s all about.



(Image: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g5dc9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5hwmpncnx)
President Putin warns against NATO expansion in annual news conference

President Putin talked for four hours - but did he reveal anything about Russia's intentions towards Ukraine? We discuss his comments with former NATO secretary general Jan de Hoop Scheffer.

Also in the programme: US infectious diseases expert Dr. Anthony Fauci on what we know so far about the Omicron variant; and remembering Joan Didion, the American writer who has died, aged 87.

(Photo: Russian President Putin attends a news conference in Moscow. Credit: Sputnik/Mikhail Metzel/Pool via REUTERS)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g5j3f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx1j4zktnd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0stlffpw91)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1vwct)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs50vv1my0)
Intel apologises to China over supplier advice

US chipmaker Intel apologised after it urged firms not to source products from Xinjiang. The US argues that China is conducting a genocide in the province, and has blocked import of goods from businesses that can't prove products sourced there are not made using Uighur slave labour. Issac Stone Fish, CEO at Strategy Risks fills us in with the details. Also in the programme, the government of Belgium has announced its two nuclear power plants will close in four years' time. Georg Zachmann of the Bruegel think tank tells us whether the country has a backup plan for energy supply after 2025. And Croatia has seen its population decline dramatically in recent years so the government in Zagreb has come up with a plan that, it hopes, will reverse the trend - Croatians living in the European Union are being offered up to $29,000 to return home to start a business. We hear from the BBC's Balkans correspondent Guy Delauney. The BBC's Mariko Oi reports on Korea's ambitions to be pioneers in the Metaverse, which is seen by some as the next big thing on the internet. Plus, we explore the big economic trends of the coming 12 months with Linda Yueh of Oxford University, and Mohamed El-Erian, president of Queens' College, Cambridge.

(Picture: An Intel chip. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g5mvk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z32)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1w03y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 24 DECEMBER 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g5rlp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l99)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g5wbt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqr5yc37nj)
Biden signs a law banning goods made in Xinjiang being sold in America

President Biden has signed into law a bill banning companies from selling goods made in Xinjiang in America. The US argues that China is conducting a genocide in the province, and has blocked import of goods from businesses that can't prove products sourced there are not made using Uighur slave labour. Issac Stone Fish, CEO at Strategy Risks fills us in with the details. Also in the programme, the government of Belgium has announced its two nuclear power plants will close in four years' time. Georg Zachmann of the Bruegel think tank tells us whether the country has a backup plan for energy supply after 2025. And Croatia has seen its population decline dramatically in recent years so the government in Zagreb has come up with a plan that, it hopes, will reverse the trend - Croatians living in the European Union are being offered up to $29,000 to return home to start a business. We hear from the BBC's Balkans correspondent Guy Delauney. Rob Young is joined for comment throughout the programme by Mehmal Sarfraz in Lahore, Pakistan and Tony Nash the founder of AI firm Complete Intelligence in Texas, USA.

(Picture: President Biden. Picture credit: Getty Images.)

Show less


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g602y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n61)
Sir Hilary Beckles: Reparations for slavery

Zeinab Badawi speaks to the eminent historian professor Sir Hilary Beckles in Barbados. Over three centuries, Africans were transported to the Caribbean to toil on sugar and cotton plantations - a trade that made Britain rich. For decades there have been calls for compensation to atone for the sins of slavery. Sir Hilary is Chair of the CARICOM Reparations Commission. Can there be justice for the descendants of enslaved Africans?


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1wccb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g63v2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g67l6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj1)
Tech Tent quiz of the year 2021

What better way to review the big tech stories of 2021 than with a battle of wits? Chris Fox tests the finest minds in tech journalism on the biggest events in tech over the last 12 months. Featuring Rhiannon Williams, technology correspondent from the i Newspaper, Shona Ghosh, technology editor at Business Insider, and BBC tech reporters David Molloy and James Clayton.


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1wlvl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 World Football (w3ct1v04)
Footballers and faith

Crystal Palace defender Joel Ward and the former Portsmouth player Linvoy Primus discuss their Christian faith. We also hear from former USA international Jaelene Daniels, whose religious beliefs led her to turn down the chance to continue playing for her country.

Picture on website: Joel Ward of Crystal Palace prays on pitch before a match between against Burnley (Photo by Sebastian Frej/MB Media/Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g6cbb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv31kfwmfc2)
Former South Korean President released from jail

The disgraced former South Korean president, Park Geun-hye, has been pardoned four years into a twenty-two year prison sentence for corruption. She was the country's first democratically-elected leader to be forced from office.

The world's largest telescope is being launched on Christmas day, we'll find out how this will revolutionise space exploration.

And we'll hear from a man in the US who has invited an entire city to his Christmas lunch event.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g6h2g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv31kfwmk36)
Former South Korean President's corruption sentence pardoned

The disgraced former South Korean president, Park Geun-hye, has been pardoned four years into a twenty-two year prison sentence for corruption. Reaction has ranged from shock and outrage to celebration as we'll hear from Seoul.

South African scientists have said Omicron is a far milder variant of Covid, and now the UK government has released a study confirming this. It means even vulnerable people are less likely to require urgent treatment.

And the advertisement creating a stir in Norway showing Santa Claus in a gay kiss.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g6ltl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv31kfwmnvb)
Former South Korean President to be released from jail

Former South Korean President Park Geun-hye has been pardoned 4 years into a twenty-two year prison sentence for corruption.

We'll hear from the charity trying to help migrants on their journey through remote and dangerous snowy paths within the Alps.

And we learn more about the intelligence of crows, what useful life skills do they have?


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g6qkq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1x2v3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j19)
The ghost of Christmas yet to come

What will be left of human civilisation in the geological record 100 million years hence?

Justin Rowlatt speaks to the geologist Jan Zalasiewicz of Leicester University in an extended interview, speculating on the durability of the human legacy. We may take pride in our cathedrals, technologies and feats of engineering. But what strange fragments will survive long enough for aliens visiting our planet in the distant future to discover? And will it be enough for those future geologists to figure out what caused the mass extinction we will leave behind in the fossil record?

This is an extended version of an interview recorded for Justin's Geochemical History of Life on Earth, also available on the BBC World Service.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Photo: Skull fossil artwork from the Modern Fossils collection by Christopher Locke. Credit: Christopher Locke/Heartless Machine)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzn)
The home of Santa Claus

Rovaniemi, a small town in Lapland, is home to dozens of Christmas tourist attractions and is widely considered the unofficial home of Santa Claus. The town had to re-invent itself after being flattened during the Arctic campaign in World War Two, and was inspired to become a Christmas destination by a visit from the American first lady, Eleanor Roosevelt. Rovaniemi now gets more than half a million visitors a year. Petra Zivic talks to two local residents.

PHOTO: Father Christmas in his "office" near Rovaniemi (Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g6v9v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1x6l7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g6z1z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct302q)
Afghan girls given a sporting chance

Female athletes faced brutal choices as allied forces withdrew from Afghanistan - to flee their homes and country or to stay and possibly abandon all hope of pursing their sporting dreams.

Some made it onto those final flights out of the country, others faced dangerous journeys across borders with their friends and families. BBC journalist Sue Mitchell examines what has been happening to those who escaped and to the team mates they have left behind. Sue has been following the fortunes of teenage football players settling into new lives in the UK and female athletes stuck in limbo in Pakistan.

When the UK Government announced it was granting asylum to the Afghanistan girls development youth football team there was relief that the teenagers could continue to play. Weeks on from that decision the girls are still in Pakistan awaiting visas, new homes and training opportunities. The uncertainty is compounded by stories of brutal acts committed against female athletes still in Afghanistan and worries about family members they have left behind.

Kashif Siddiqi, the co-founder of charity Football for Peace, played a leading role in helping the girls flee Afghanistan. He said their perilous journey involved traveling in small groups and crossing the border wearing burqas. He is optimistic that sport can help them rebuild their lives and settle in communities linked by football.

In Portugal a group of girl soccer players who were part of the Afghanistan under 15 and under 17 programs are already adjusting to their new lives. They are being helped by the former captain of the Afghanistan women’s soccer team, Farkhunda Muhtaj, who was already acutely aware of how difficult things were for the girls even before the Taliban returned to power. She fears that girls left behind will never play again.

Those fears have recently been compounded by reports that a member of the Afghanistan women’s youth volleyball team has been beheaded by the Taliban in Kabul. Former team player, Zaharia Fayazi, relays the increasing anxiety she and others feel about those left behind.

(Photo: Girls from Afghanistan's National Youth team)


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g72t3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywl9psc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1xg2h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1v04)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g76k7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g1)
Songs and social media

This month BBC Persian TV launched a new show. It’s called Update and aims to bring social media trends and online discussions around the news to TV audiences. One of its first stories was the social media campaigns around Isfahan's water protests. First time presenter Taraneh Stone tells us about their agenda, and about her own launch 'wobbles'.

The tattooed women of Sindh
The women of a Hindu community in Sindh in Pakistan have a tradition of tattooing themselves before marriage. Stars, flowers and Hindu symbols adorn their arms, necks and faces. For BBC Urdu, Nazish Ayaz went to meet them to find out why this tradition is so important.

Christmas dinner on the 5th Floor
For many in the language services, arriving on the 5th floor was their first experience of a traditional British Christmas dinner. Roast turkey and potatoes, stuffing and sauces, and the dreaded Brussels sprouts, as well as mince pies and Christmas pudding - we find out what they love and loathe, and how they make it their own. With BBC Russian's Janina Litvinova, Shekiba Habib from BBC Afghan and Pierre-Antoine Denis from BBC Afrique.

Arabic vintage vinyl revival
BBC Arabic's Omar Abdel-Razek has been investigating the growing enthusiasm for old records in the Arab world. He is a keen collector himself, but says the current demand comes mostly from young people, who are hunting down nostalgic recordings of the songs their parents loved.

Bangladeshi calligrapher awarded Saudi citizenship
A Bangladeshi man has been awarded Saudi Arabian citizenship for his extraordinary work as a calligrapher. Muqtar Alim has done calligraphy for the Gilaf, the cloth covering for the Kaaba, the holiest site in Islam. Shahnewaj Rocky of BBC Bangla met him to find out what this meant to him.

(Image: Protesters in the dried up Zayandeh Rud River bed, Isfahan. Credit: Fatmeh Nasr/AFP/Getty Images)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g7b9c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywl9y8m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1xpkr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g7g1h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5hwmpqfc3)
More Hong Kong Tiananmen memorials removed

Two more universities in Hong Kong have removed memorials to the victims of the Tiananmen Square massacre. Newshour speaks to Chen Weiming who created the sculptures.

Also in the programme: Joe Biden's first year assessed; and a cinematic ode to the moon.

(Picture: Candles and images of Goddess of Democracy statue are placed by students, to pay tribute to the victims of the Tiananmen Square crackdown in Beijing on June 4, 1989, in Hong Kong. credit: Reuters)


FRI 15:00 A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols (w3ct2zvt)
Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols 2021

For many people around the world, the Festival which is broadcast live from the chapel of King's College in Cambridge, marks the beginning of Christmas. It is based around nine Bible readings which tell the story of the loving purposes of God. They are interspersed with carols old and new, sung by the distinguished Chapel Choir who also lead the congregation in traditional Christmas hymns.
A new work has been commissioned for the Christmas Eve service every year since 1983; a tradition begun by Sir Stephen Cleobury. For 2021, Cecilia McDowall has chosen to set the text of the famous fifteenth-century carol ‘There is no rose of such virtue’ in order to provide a moment of quiet contemplation and stillness in the service.
A number of pieces by significant twentieth-century composers such as Sally Beamish and Imogen Holst, sit alongside traditional carols in arrangements by Sir David Willcocks, Christopher Robinson, June Nixon, John Rutter, Simon Preston, and Daniel Hyde.

Programme for 2021:
Once in royal David's City (Irby, arr. Willcocks)
Bidding Prayer (read by the Dean)
In dulci jubilo (Old German melody, arr. Pearsall, Daniel Hyde)
First lesson: Genesis 3 vv. 8-19 (read by a Chorister)
The truth from above (Ralph Vaughan Williams, arr. Christopher Robinson)
Second lesson: Genesis 22 vv. 15-19 (read by a Choral Scholar)
The Holly and the Ivy (Trad. French, arr. June Nixon)
Third lesson: Isaiah 9 vv. 2, 6-7 (read by a representative of Eton)
Sussex Carol (Trad. English, arr. Willcocks)
O Little town of Bethlehem (Forest Green)
Fourth lesson: Isaiah 11 vv. 1-9 (read by a Fellow)
In the stillness (Sally Beamish)
Gabriel’s message (Basque Carol, arr. Willcocks)
Fifth lesson: Luke 1 vv. 26-38 (read by a member of College staff)
Make ye merry for him that is come (Imogen Holst)
There is no rose (Cecilia McDowall) – 2021 Commission
Sixth lesson: Luke 2 vv. 1-7 (read by a representative of the City of Cambridge)
Angels from the realms of glory (Old French Tune, arr. Jacques)
Wexford Carol (Trad. Irish, arr. John Rutter)
Seventh lesson: Luke 2 vv. 8-20 (read by the Director of Music)
Silent night (Grüber, arr. John Rutter)
While shepherds watched their flocks by night (Este’s Psalter, arr. Nicholas Marston)
Eighth lesson: Matthew 2 vv. 1-12 (read by the Vice-Provost)
Thou who wast rich (Old French carol, arr. Kitson, Daniel Hyde)
I saw three ships (Trad. English, arr. Simon Preston)
Ninth lesson: John 1 vv. 1-14 (read by the Provost)
O come, all ye faithful (Adeste Fideles, arr. Willcocks, Christopher Robinson, David Hill)
Collect and Blessing
Hark! the herald angels sing (Mendelssohn, arr. Willcocks)

Organ voluntaries:
In dulci jubilo, BWV 729 (Bach)
Carillon-Sortie (Mulet)

Daniel Hyde (Director of Music)
Paul Greally (Organ Scholar)
The Revd Dr Stephen Cherry (Dean)

(Photo: King's College Choir rehearse 'A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols' in 2010. Credit: Oli Scarff/Getty Images)


FRI 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1y1t4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:32 BBC OS (w172xxxxdjkpr4h)
Covid-19: Reporting the story around the world

As the world continues to battle the new Omicron Covid-19 variant, we return to speak to three health reporters in different parts of the world, that we first spoke to in March 2021. We go to Brazil, Germany and the United States of America. We hear what they’ve learnt over the past 9 months about Covid-19 and how things have changed.

Also, we go to Bangladesh, where at least 37 people have been killed and about 100 others injured after a packed ferry caught fire. The blaze started mid-river near the town of Jhalakathi as it sailed from the capital Dhaka to the town of Barguna. Our reporter gives us the latest news from the ground, as emergency response efforts continue.

And a Moscow court is fining Google $98 million for what it says are repeated failures to delete content Russia deems illegal. Our reporter has the story.

(Photo: A hospital ward at Christmas. Credit: PA Media)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g7t8w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxxdjkpt7b)
Covid-19: Reporting the story around the world

As the world continues to battle the new Omicron Covid-19 variant, we continue our conversation with three health reporters in different parts of the world, that we first spoke to in March 2021. We go to Brazil, Germany and the United States. We hear what they’ve learnt over the past 9 months about Covid-19 and how things have changed in their country.

Also, we go to Bangladesh, where at least 37 people have been killed and about 100 others injured after a packed ferry caught fire. The blaze started mid-river near the town of Jhalakathi as it sailed from the capital Dhaka to the town of Barguna. Our reporter gives us the latest news from the ground, as emergency response efforts continue.

And we hear from the United States, where former Minnesota police officer Kim Potter has been found guilty of manslaughter for the fatal shooting of a young black man in April. We hear how the local community are reacting to news of the verdict.

(Photo: District of Columbia Covid-19 testing site in Washington, DC 23/12/2021 Credit: EPA)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g7y10)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g81s4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvywlbnrd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1yf1j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nqcsfbxlh)
2021/12/24 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g85j8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1yjsn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prj)
CrowdScience Christmas bonanza

Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens – CrowdScience has covered a lot this year. And what better way to see out 2021 than to look back at a few of our (and your!) favourite things? Great questions are right at the top of the team’s list – especially with the way that for every one we answer, five more appear in our inbox!

So for a festive treat, Marnie asks the crew to answer three of them. What's the sun's role in our sense of direction? Why are we so uncomfortable with other people’s sadness? And why does listening to the radio make us sleepy? (Or is it just too much eggnog…?) From our favourite listener advice on how to keep your Christmas lights untangled to why cold swimming could activate your Vagus nerve, tune in for new questions and more CrowdScience favourites to light up your holiday season!

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and many members the CrowdScience Team – Melanie Brown, Marijke Peters, Caroline Steel, Hannah Fisher, Samara Linton and Anand Jagatia.
Produced by Sam Baker for BBC World Service.

Featuring:

• Haneul Jang, post-doctoral researcher, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
• Juliet Rosenfeld, psychotherapist and author of The State of Disbelief: A Story of Death, Love and Forgetting
• Mathias Basner, professor of psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g898d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5hwmpr8l0)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g8f0j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx1j4znqkh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0stlffss64)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1ys8x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrbl47g7dt)
South Korea pardons ex-President Park Guen-hye

The former South Korean president, Park Geun-hye, is to be granted a presidential pardon. She was convicted in 2018 for her part in a huge corruption scandal which involved major S Korean conglomerates including Samsung. We find out more from Jen Moon, editor and presenter at Arirang TV in Seoul. Also in the programme, iconic London department store chain Selfridges is sold for £4bn to Thai and Austrian buyers. The BBC's Russell Newlove reports. We also hear about the money making magic behind Harry Potter and as champagne corks pop to celebrate Christmas and the approaching New Year, Anthony Maxwell from Liv-ex tells us how vintage bubbly is back in demand from investors.

(Image: Demonstrators call for the release of Park Guen-hye in 2018, JUNG YEON-JE/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjyb6g8jrn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrry1yx11)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1v04)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols 15:00 FRI (w3ct2zvt)

A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity 10:06 SUN (w3ct2zv6)

A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity 23:06 SUN (w3ct2zv6)

A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity 00:06 MON (w3ct2zv6)

A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity 03:06 MON (w3ct2zv6)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3ct1gyf)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gyf)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gyf)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172xzkrdnr5zxg)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkrdnr63nl)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkrdnr6gwz)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkrdnr6v4c)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkrdnr6ywh)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkrdnr76cr)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkrdnr81ln)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172xzkrdnr8jl5)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172xzkrdnr8s2f)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkrdnr90kp)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkrdnr981y)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkrdnr9ct2)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkrdnr9r1g)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkrdnr9vsl)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzkrdnr9zjq)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkrdnrb38v)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkrdnrc27w)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkrdnrcfh8)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkrdnrck7d)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172xzkrry1hj7p)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkrry1hmzt)

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BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkrry1k2yc)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkrry1kbfm)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkrry1ktf4)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkrry1ky58)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkrry1l5nj)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkrry1l9dn)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkrry1lnn1)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkrry1lx49)

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BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkrry1n7bq)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkrry1pkk4)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkrry1qn89)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkrry1s36v)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkrry1sgg7)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkrry1wccb)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkrry1xg2h)

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BBC News Summary 16:30 FRI (w172xzkrry1y1t4)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkrry1yx11)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172xzjxyy4hhwy)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j5t)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lt4)

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HARDtalk 02:06 MON (w3ct1n6t)

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World Business Report 01:06 SAT (w172xzlkvdbw7tb)

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World Football 04:32 FRI (w3ct1v04)

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World of Wisdom 05:32 SAT (w3ct2zw8)

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