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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 11 DECEMBER 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntqc93)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htg)
What's going wrong in the Balkans?

It’s been more than two decades since the war in Bosnia ended. It remains one of the darkest chapters in modern European history and cost over 100,000 lives. Since the Dayton Agreement was reached in 1995 a fragile peace has held, but last month the international community's chief representative there - Christian Schmidt - warned that conflict might return and the country is in danger of breaking up. Bosnia-Herzegovina's senior ethnic Serb politician, Milorad Dodik, has threatened to pull the territory he governs inside Bosnia out of state-level institutions including the army. The issue that drove so much of the war - Serb nationalism - now appears to be on the rise across the Western Balkans. Serbia has deployed armoured vehicles and aeroplanes along its border with Kosovo and is accused of stoking religious tensions in neighbouring Montenegro. So how dangerous is this moment in Balkans history? Are the EU and the US doing enough to diffuse tensions? And how much of the blame can be laid at the feet of Serbia’s ally Russia?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntqh17)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlkh41336h)
US inflation hits highest level for nearly 40 years

American shoppers, especially those on low incomes have felt the pinch of higher prices, with annual inflation at rates not seen for 40 years.
The latest figures show prices rose 6.8% in the year to November. We hear from people struggling with those price rises in Louisville, Kentucky. And Sasha Twining speaks to former White House economic adviser, Professor Steve Hanke of Johns Hopkins University.
Also on the programme, we hear about GM's $3 billion investment in electric vehicles, hear from Myanmar as workers stage a "silent strike" and hear from the entrepreneur trying to make freelancers the new mainstream.


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfdv9m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f46)
How is rental fashion kicking off in India?

Renting high fashion is becoming popular worldwide as more and more people move towards sustainable fashion options. But the industry faces several challenges, especially stigma and taboo related to renting clothes. In India too, although the idea has been around for several decades, renting attires for occasions other than weddings, continues to raise eyebrows.

While many feel fashion rentals in the country may not be following stringent hygiene measures, others think renting clothes and handbags frequently helps the circular fashion economy. So is it mostly the Gen Z or millennials who are into fashion rentals? Is social media lifestyle making luxury designer wear more accessible and affordable through rental services? What is the new business model for subscription fashion services?

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors:
Aanchal Saini - CEO, Flyrobe
Ravina Sachdev - Fashion influencer
Gaurav Khanijo - Luxury fashion designer


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntqlsc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byt6rm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfdz1r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lch)
England's Ashes misery and the rise of captain Cummins

Alison Mitchell, Jim Maxwell and Charu Sharma discuss Pat Cummins' first match as captain of the Australian Test side in the Ashes, the omission of both Stuart Broad and James Anderson for the first Test match and if technology should be better at spotting no-balls.

Plus what’s the future of cricket’s coin toss? After two thirds of the T20 Men’s World Cup matches were won by the team that won the toss we are joined by Professor Haris Aziz who has come up with a new theory which he says would make the coin toss fairer.

Photo: Australian captain Pat Cummins celebrates with team-mates after dismissing England's Chris Woakes during the First Ashes Test Match at The Gabba. (Credit: Chris Hyde/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntqqjh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fz)
Reporting the Channel migrant tragedy

BBC Persian’s Soran Qurbani was recently in Calais to report on the tragic deaths of 27 people, who were attempting to cross the Channel to England when their small boat sank. He explains why their stories brought back memories of his own difficult journey to the UK 10 years ago.

Story Story
An imaginary market place in West Africa is the setting for the long-running radio drama Story Story, made by the BBC’s international charity BBC Media Action. As buyers and sellers go about their business, the latest series explores attitudes towards disability and neurodiversity. Scriptwriter Bode Asiyanbi and actor E. Daniels take us behind the scenes.

Vietnamese spy
BBC Vietnamese has been revisiting the fall of Saigon in 1975, and telling the story of a long overlooked spy whose warnings to the CIA about its imminent capture were ignored. Editor Giang Nguyen is passionate about history and tells us more about the spy who could have changed history.

Encanto through Colombian eyes
The new Disney film Encanto tells the story of a Colombian family living in a magic house. BBC Mundo’s Carlos Serrano is Colombian himself and, watching the film, discovered five details that maybe only Colombians will 'get', including music, food and yellow butterflies.

(Photo: A refugee at a migrant camp on the outskirts of Calais. Credit: Kiran Ridley/Getty Images)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzl)
The explosion heard by millions

In 2005 thousands of tonnes of petrol ignited at a fuel depot 40 kilometres North-West of London. The explosion was the largest in the UK since the end of the WWII. The blast, which severely damaged surrounding homes and properties, was reportedly heard in Holland. Despite the enormous amount of damage, nobody was killed. The fire destroyed large parts of the depot, leading to shortages of fuel at petrol stations in the weeks that followed. Five firms were eventually fined millions of dollars for safety failures that led to the blast. Greg Smith tells Witness History what it was like to be inside the depot at the time of the explosion.

Produced and presented by Nick Holland.

Image: Fire at Buncefield oil depot on 12th December 2005. Credit: Peter MacDiarmid/Getty Images


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntqv8m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Reith Lectures (w3ct2zpb)
AI in warfare

From drones to robots, what should be the role of AI in military operations? Weapons that locate, select, and engage human targets without human supervision are already available for use in warfare, so what role will AI play in the future of military conflict? Will AI reduce collateral damage and civilian casualties, or will autonomous weapons kill on a scale not seen since Hiroshima and Nagasaki? Will future wars be fought entirely by machines, or will one side surrender only when its real losses, military or civilian, become unacceptable? Stuart Russell will examine the motivation of major powers developing these types of weapons, the morality of creating algorithms that decide to kill humans, and possible ways forward for the international community as it struggles with these questions.

The lectures are chaired by presenter, journalist and author, Anita Anand.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntqz0r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bytl00)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dffb94)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct2yqr)
The Denial Files

8. Russia’s climate scepticism problem

In the eyes of the Kremlin, global warming is a threat that needs to be dealt with. So, President Putin is taking action: he wants Russia to go carbon neutral by 2060.

And yet, Russia remains one of the world’s top producers of fossil fuels: oil and gas that bring in big money into the state’s coffers. And that poses a question: does Moscow mean business when it comes to climate action?

If you look at the media, at what’s said in political circles, climate scepticism is still alive and kicking. Global warming is often portrayed as part of sinister Western cabal to hinder Russia’s economic progress.

Trending and BBC Russian have been investigating where those views stem from, and how damaging they could be - not only for Russia, but for the entire planet.


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dp9)
Compulsory Covid vaccinations

The new Omicron variant poses a potential risk of spiralling coronavirus infections globally and governments around the world are putting plans in place to tackle it. One solutions is to make Covid vaccines compulsory. This week, Ros Atkins, looks at the debate around Covid vaccine mandates.

(Photo: A health worker prepares a dose of a Covid-19 vaccine. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntr2rw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytkgfk2h0z)
Mexico to combat people-trafficking after deadly truck crash

After 54 migrants die in a truck crash, Mexico will work with Guatemala, the US, the Dominican Republic and Ecuador to combat people-trafficking.

Also on the programme: International donors agree to transfer hundreds of millions of dollars to prevent famine in Afghanistan. And what will Germany's new leader, Olaf Scholz, mean for the future of Europe?

Joining Anna Holligan to discuss these and other issues are Ulrike Franke, Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, and Tim Judah, Balkans correspondent at The Economist.

(Image: A group of migrants board a truck on the Puebla-Mexico highway. Credit: EPA/Hilda Rios)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntr6j0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytkgfk2ls3)
Mexico to work with international group to combat people-trafficking

After 54 migrants die in a truck crash, Mexico has announced it will work with Guatemala, the US, the Dominican Republic and Ecuador to combat people-trafficking.

Also on the programme: A Belarusian theatre group rehearsing in London have decided not to return to their country, fearing repression by Alexander Lukashenko's government. And a BBC investigation finds that the majority of female politicians in Afghanistan have fled the country since the Taliban took over.

Joining Anna Holligan to discuss these and other issues are Ulrike Franke, Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, and Tim Judah, Balkans correspondent at The Economist.

(Image: An overturned truck is seen after a trailer crash in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas killed 54 people, most of them migrants from Central America. Credit: El La Mira/via REUTERS)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntrb84)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytkgfk2qj7)
Humanitarian aid for Afghanistan released

The World Bank has said that international donors have agreed to send $280 million in humanitarian aid to Afghanistan despite the Taliban's rule.

Also on the programme: Filipino journalist Maria Ressa criticises internet firms for unleashing what she calls a "flood of toxic sludge" on social media during acceptance speech for the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo. And we speak to the Kenyan musician Willis Austin Chimano, who has come out as gay in a country where gay sex is punishable by up to 14 years in prison.

(Image: A boy sells food in a park in Kabul. Credit: REUTERS/Jorge Silva/File Photo)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dffpjj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9j)
Unstoppable women of rugby

The first female known to have played rugby was Emily Valentine, an Irish schoolgirl, who played alongside her brothers in 1884. It took another 80 years for a women's team to be formed, and the first Women's Rugby Union World Cup was held in 1991. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women from Uganda and Spain about the game's increasing popularity and how it's changed them.

Patricia Garcia is a profession rugby player who’s competed for Spain in World Cups, Olympics and Test series, as well as appearing in 198 games over multiple 7s tournaments for her country. She now plays in the UK for Exeter Chiefs. She's also passionate about using the sport as positive force and has set up her own charity, PGR NGO, to promote social education and values through rugby.

Winnie Atyang plays rugby in Uganda and uses the sport to support and inspire young women. Winnie became a single mother to twins when she was just 17 years old, and had to drop out of school. She says the rugby community is hugely encouraging: helping her go back to school and then find work to support her family. She also believes playing the sport gives her focus, confidence and ambition.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

(Image: (L) Winnie Atyang, credit Denise Namale. (R) Patricia Garcia, credit FER (Spanish Rugby Union))


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntrg08)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6r)
Coronavirus: Pandemic PTSD

Several countries are seeing the pressure that a new wave of Covid-19 is placing on their hospitals once more, and they’re reintroducing measures to try and slow down the spread of infections.

Host Nuala McGovern brings together people working in the healthcare sector to think about the pressures on people’s mental health after almost two years of caring for those who are sick or dying due to the pandemic.

Nuala talks with hospital workers in the Dominican Republic, the United States and South Africa. For some it’s constant stress, anxiety and burnout. For others, it’s led to even more serious outcomes including post-traumatic stress disorder or PTSD.

In South Africa, the new Omicron coronavirus variant is responsible for a sharp increase of Covid cases in the country. Two doctors share how it is affecting their hospitals in Odi, Pretoria, and Soweto in Johannesburg.

(Photo: Medical workers wearing protective suits attend to a COVID-19 patient, in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at Jesenice Hospital, amid the coronavirus disease pandemic, in Jesenice, Slovenia, December 8, 2021. Credit: Borut Zivulovic/Reuters)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfft8n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Explanation (w3ct2z3l)
Afghanistan: Women, girls and their rights

Anu Anand talks to Yogita Limaye about the rights of women and girls in Afghanistan. They reveal how a turbulent history dictates the ever-shifting attitudes towards women and girls in the country.

Presented by Anu Anand


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2g)
Painting pictures of a football match with words

What are the challenges of being a football commentator for the BBC? How do they prepare for a match? Listeners quiz a man at the top of his game - John Murray. Plus, do you yearn for more entertainment programmes from the World Service? A listener in Kenya argues the case.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Produce: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntrkrd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0qbjq06zs1)
“He’s the gladiator fighting on the circuit” – Van Amersfoort on Verstappen

The BBC’s Formula 1 reporter Jennie Gow joins us from Abu Dhabi, ahead of the final race of the season, with Lewis Hamilton and Max Verstappen fighting for the Drivers World Title. Verstappen is aiming for his first world title and we hear from his mentor when he started out in Formula 3. Frits Van Amersfoort tells us it became clear, within one hour of working with Max, that he was a special talent, says he hasn’t changed his approach since racing for him and compares Verstappen’s rivalry with Lewis Hamilton to the one Ayrton Senna and Alain Prost shared. Van Amersfoort also tells us he’s worked in motorsport for forty years and he’s never known people in the Netherlands as interested in the sport as they are now because of Verstappen’s success.

Paddy Lacey joins us ahead of his fight on the undercard of Katie Taylor’s defence of her undisputed lightweight titles against Kazakh challenger Firuza Sharipova. Lacey played in the same Liverpool youth team as Wolves and England defender Conor Coady before a failed drugs test ended a promising spell in the Football League. During his ban from playing football, Lacey was arrested and subsequently jailed after being found in possession of drugs and counterfeit money at the Glastonbury Festival. He’s now playing for Chester City in England’s sixth tier and forging a career as a professional boxer.

US runner Molly Seidel tells us about her route into marathon running and discusses her journey of recovery from anxiety, depression and disordered eating. Seidel won bronze at the Tokyo Olympic Games, in what was only her third ever race over the marathon distance.

In Sporting Witness, we tell the story of how a group of Tibetan exiles and a Danish ex-footballer teamed up to create the Tibetan national football team twenty years ago. Michael Nybrandt and team captain Sonam Wangyal recall the obstacles they faced, which included threats from China, and discuss their first ever game against Greenland.

Melinda Farrell brings us the latest news from the Ashes series between Australia and England and the BBC’s Juliette Ferrington joins us from the Etihad Stadium ahead of Manchester City’s game against Wolves in the Premier League.

Photo: Red Bull driver Max Verstappen looks on at the Red Bull Racing team photo during previews ahead of the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix. (Credit: Formula 1 via Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntrphj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byv9gs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfg1rx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f46)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntrt7n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvp)
Malcolm in the Midlands

Just days before his assassination, Malcolm X was to be seen striding up a quiet residential street in the English town of Smethwick – followed by a small huddle of reporters. But what led one of the world’s most prominent civil rights activists to this small town in the Midlands? And what does this have to do with British politics of the mid-1960s, and the civil rights movement in America?

Kit de Waal explores these questions, with contributions from writer and professor of sociology Gary Younge, Peniel Joseph, founding director of the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy, Malcolm X biographer Tamara Payne, and United Nations youth observer Cynthia Yue.

Kit visits Marshall Street to trace the steps Malcolm X took, over 55 years ago, and speaks to local resident and playwright Paul Magson. So intrigued was Paul by this visit and the fact he had not heard of Malcolm’s visit before, he researched and wrote a play all about it.

With interview and news archive from the time, we’ll discover just how important these visits were to the community.

Image: Malcolm X in Smethwick (Credit: Bettmann via Getty Images)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntrxzs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5h5327x9d)
G7 warns Russia over Ukraine

UK Foreign Secretary Liz Truss has warned Russia it will face "severe economic consequences" if it invades Ukraine. She said G7 foreign ministers meeting in Liverpool this weekend would put on a show of unity and make clear such a move would be a "strategic mistake". We explore the views from Moscow and Kyiv.

Also in the programme: Donors will transfer 280 million US dollars to Afghanistan for humanitarian aid; and more than 50 people are feared dead in Kentucky's worst ever tornadoes.

(Photo: G7 leaders at the Museum of Liverpool during the G7 summit of foreign and development ministers in Liverpool. Credit: Reuters).


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnts1qx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tm9mdzpgq)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld Saturday will bring the world Steven Gerrard’s return to Anfield. The former Liverpool captain has won three of his first four games as Aston Villa manager. His old club are currently second in the Premier League table and will be hoping for another win to put pressure on title rivals Manchester City, who host Wolverhampton Wanders in the early kick-off.

Once again joining Lee James on Sportsworld this week will be former Manchester United defender Jonathan Spector, former Chelsea and Arsenal midfielder Katie Chapman and former Democratic Republic of Congo captain Gabriel Zakuani.

We’ll also preview the thrilling finish to the Formula One season between World Champion Lewis Hamilton and title rival Maz Verstappen as both drivers are level on points in the title race going into the final race in Abu Dhabi. We’re joined by former F1 World Champion Mika Hakkinen, the BBC F1 team and W Series driver Jamie Chadwick.

Plus we’ll also bring updates from cricket’s first Ashes Test between England and Australia from Brisbane, European Football and the latest from the NBA.

Photo: Mohamed Salah of Liverpool in action with Tyrone Mings of Aston Villa (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntsjqf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byw4pp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfgwzt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct2yqr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l97)
The Tibetan football team

In 2001, a group of Tibetan exiles and a Danish ex-footballer teamed up to create the Tibetan national football team, in the face of many obstacles, including threats from China. Robert Nicholson talked to Michael Nybrandt and team captain Sonam Wangyal about their first ever game against Greenland. A Whistledown Production, first broadcast in 2017.

PHOTO: The Tibetan team lining up for their match against Greenland (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntsngk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfp)
Space Politics

As a new space race develops between different nations and as private companies start to explore the possibilities of space tourism, how do we regulate and govern what happens in space? Is there a danger that the environment on earth and in space could damaged by these activities ? And what are the challenges and opportunities of space exploration? Jonny Dymond brings together an expert panel to answer questions posed by World Service listeners from all over the globe.
The panel includes: former astronaut and commander of the International Space Station Chris Hadfield, Simonetta Di Pippo, Director of the United Nations Office for Outer Space (UNOOSA), Jane Poynter, US aerospace executive and founder of Space Perspective, a luxury space travel company and David Valentine, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Minnesota.

(Photo: The Ariane 5 rocket lifts off from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. Credit: JODY AMIET/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntss6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtz)
American photographer Annie Leibovitz

Over a career lasting more than half a century, American photographer extraordinaire Annie Leibovitz has photographed royalty, presidents and their wives, celebrities and stars. Her latest book is a collection of her fashion photography. In an extended interview with The Arts Hour she reveals the shots she’d like to be remembered for and the unusual request she made of The Queen of England.

Actor George Takei, best known around the world as Lieutenant Sulu talks about the on-set relationships on Star Trek and about how his campaigning work for LGBT rights was driven by being in the closet for decades.

British Asian actor Riz Ahmed on his latest film Encounter in which he plays an ex-Marine who’s on the run with his 2 sons and trying to escape an invisible enemy.

And film critic Anna Bogutskaya joins Nikki to reflect on the stories of the week.

(Photo: Annie Leibovitz. Credit: Annie Leibovitz)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntswyt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5h5328w8f)
Deadly tornadoes rip through six American states

Governor of Kentucky Andy Beshear says that at least 70 people in his state have lost their lives in a deadly tornado last night, warning that the death toll could reach beyond 100. We speak to the mayor of Bowling Green, one of the worst-hit cities.

Also in the programme: Benin's would-be first female president has been sentenced to twenty years in prison. And foreign ministers from the world's wealthiest nations meet in Liverpool, England to discuss Russia's growing military presence near the Ukrainian border.

Photo: Rescuers search through the wreckage of the Mayfield candle factory. Credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntt0py)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx0smc6b7x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0ssvwtbcwk)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfhczb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptn)
Hong Kong artists: Should I stay or should I go?

Hong Kong, once a bastion of creative freedom is becoming a city where it is difficult for artists to know what they can and cannot say through their art. Tracy Harris talks to Hong Kong artists who are asking themselves: ‘should I stay or should I go?’.

The pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong brought dissenting voices into sharp focus in 2019. They were brought to a halt by the Chinese Government’s introduction of a National Security law, aimed at curbing violent protest. Film-maker Kiwi Chow’s controversial documentary about the protests, Revolution of our Times, was screened at the Cannes Film Festival. Since then, he says his creative freedom has been curtailed, and he is under threat of arrest.

Some artists have gone underground and deleted their social media accounts. The protest group who installed a ghostly white statue of a female protester on Hong Kong’s most iconic location, Lion Rock, say they are living in fear of being reported to the authorities and for the time being, have ceased making art.

The National Security law does not allow people to criticise the state and most artists and galleries are self-censoring their work whilst some have felt they had to leave. Kacey Wong, whose art satirises those in power, says he could no longer express himself freely in Hong Kong and now makes art in self-imposed exile in Taiwan.

A prominent artist who photographed protesters facing police blockades, transformed the images by punching out their faces so they could not be identified. He used ‘a violent act’ to literally deface the pictures, a reflection on the dramatic change to life in Hong Kong. Now he is worried he too may have to leave Hong Kong.

Presenter: Tracy Harris
Producer: Chris Rushton

(Photo: Kacey Wong in a satirical performance-art work, The Patriot, in which he plays the Chinese national anthem imprisoned in a red cage. Credit: Kacey Wong)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntt4g2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcx)
'I modelled my studio on a sauna' with Sylvan Esso, Alexis Taylor, Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith and Ed Russell

Sylvan Esso's Amelia Meath and Nick Sanborn, Alexis Taylor of Hot Chip, Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith and Overmono's Ed Russell discuss how they make their music.

Amelia Meath and Nick Sanborn are the electro-pop duo Sylvan Esso. They’ve been nominated for a Grammy, played some of the world’s biggest festivals, and worked with the likes of TuneYards, Flock of Dimes, and Robert Glasper – all of whom have been on previous episode of Music Life.

Alexis Taylor is the lead singer, keyboard player and guitarist in synthpop band Hot Chip. He’s also a solo artist in his own right, having released his latest record Silence earlier in the year. Ed Russell is one half of the most talked about electronic duos this year, Overmono. His love of electronic music came from eavesdropping on his older brother, who was mixing in his bedroom next door, and listening to his records that he’d “pinched”.

Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith is an ambient composer, performer, producer and sonic explorer. Last year, she released the LPThe Mosaic of Transformation, an “expression of love and appreciation for electricity”, and followed it with this year’s I Could Be Your Dog (Prequel), a collaborative project with LA composer Emile Mosseri.



SUNDAY 12 DECEMBER 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntt866)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfhmgl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Trending (w3ct2yqr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnttcyb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yw7)
Can the weather trigger a volcano?

Which came first the volcano or the rain? Volcanic eruptions are known to influence global climate systems, even leading to the cooling of the planet. However local weather conditions can also influence the timing and ferocity of volcanic eruptions. As volcanologist Jenni Barclay explains rainwater can contribute to volcanic instability and even increase the explosiveness of eruptions.

Syria has been experiencing civil war for more than 10 years. Many people have left including many of the country's scientists. We speak with 3 exiled Syrian scientists Shaher Abdullateef, Abdulkader Rashwani, and Abdul Hafez about their current work, which involves working with other academics and students in Syria sometimes remotely and sometimes directly.

New findings from Chile reveal an unknown Tsunami emanating from an earthquake there in the 1700s. Historical records mention other ones, but not this one. Geoscientist Emma Hocking found the evidence in layers of sand.

And we discuss the development of tiny robot-like structures made from frog cells, they can move and build other copies of themselves. Sam Kreigman and Michael Levin explain how.

And, Life is full of choices, from the mundane (like what to wear today) to the critical (how should we deal with the pandemic?). So how can we make the best decisions? That’s what listener David wants to know.

To investigate, Caroline Steel learns how being smarter doesn’t necessarily make you a good decision maker. She speaks to researchers about the importance of ‘gut feelings’ – and how certain people with no intuition whatsoever can struggle to make choices. She also learns why it’s easier to give advice to other people than to follow it yourself, and how we can work together to make the best decisions in a group.

(Image: Eruption of Semeru. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntthpg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byx3nq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfhvyv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw9)
Omicron variant news

News update on the new Omicron variant now in many countries across the world. Plus Hannah Fisher reports on the science of smell and conditions other than Covid where it can be lost. Holly Bradshaw, Olympic pole-vaulter turned psychology researcher discusses the post-Olympic blues with Karen Howells, Senior Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology. And could Viagra be a candidate drug for Alzheimer's disease?

This week’s guest is Mathew Fox, Professor of Global Epidemiology from Boston University.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: 3D illustration of coronavirus. Credit: Maksim Tkachenko/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnttmfl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnttr5q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvw)
Madagascar: the threat of starvation

Pascale Harter introduces insight and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers from around the world.

The UN and its agencies have said that more than a million people in southern Madagascar are now at risk of serious food insecurity. As famine threatens, and the rains fail to break a serious drought, Catherine Byaruhanga walked the encroaching sand dunes in Ambovombe-Amboy district to hear from villagers about the desperate straits they're now in.

Hondurans recently voted in their first-ever female President - Xiomara Castro, a former First Lady of the country who returns to the national stage after years of rule by the National Party. The outgoing President, Juan Orlando Hernandez, was seriously compromised by his brother's conviction in a New York court for big-league drug smuggling, and on the streets of Tegucigalpa, Will Grant found plenty of people bidding a happy goodbye to an era of sleaze.

The recent state of stand-off at the border between Poland and Belarus, with groups of hundreds of migrants and refugees sheltering in the forests trying to cross into the EU as border guards tried to stop them, has sparked horrified reactions around the world. But what did this dispute do to the men who were charged with policing the border, and driving back desperate people? In Bialystock, eastern Poland, Lucy Ash investigated reports that some are struggling to deal with the mental burden of the job.

And in the west of Ireland, there's been quite a surge of returners recently: Irish citizens who've spent years working, studying and living abroad but now feeling the pull of their home communities. In his local pub, Kieran Cooke joined the conversation and heard stories from all over the world.

(Image: A child is checked for malnutrition at a Medecins Sans Frontières clinic in Madagascar, April 2021. Credit: MSF/ iAko M. Randrianarivelo/Mira Photo)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfj3g3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnttvxv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byxgx3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfj767)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2zjj)
Only bleeding: How Swedes opened up about periods

“It’s alright (I’m only bleeding)”. In 2017, these words were emblazoned on the Stockholm subway or tunnelbana, alongside a giant poster of an ice-skater with a red-stained crotch.

The deliberately provocative image was the work of Swedish cartoonist Liv Strömquist, who was on a mission to destigmatise periods. But even in one of the most feminist countries in the world, showing images of menstrual blood in a public space offended many, and triggered a national debate.

Stockholm-based broadcaster Maddy Savage meets the artist, and discovers some of the taboo-busting initiatives in culture, business and education that have ridden on the coat-tails of her impact. These include Sweden’s first children’s book about periods (aimed at three to six year olds), featuring a smiling cartoon uterus playing with her friends: the vagina, the brain and a hormone. There is also menstruation-awareness training for industrial factory workers, and period-themed pottery designed for display in the home.

With the help of Dr Louise Klintner, a Lund University academic who wrote her thesis on the increased normalisation of menstrual products, Maddy investigates how much of an impact these and other efforts have had on destigmatisation.

Debates about public menstrual art have continued, and many on the right believe it’s not what tax payers want to spend money on. Meanwhile menstruation campaigners argue there is much more to be done; Sweden still has a 25% tax on period products and there are growing calls for free sanitary protection for school pupils.

(Photo: Liv Livmoder book launch. Credit: Maddy Savage)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnttznz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytkgfk5cy2)
Biden promises help to tornado-hit US states

President Biden says the government will do everything it can to help US Midwest states that have been devastated by tornadoes. He has declared a state of emergency in Kentucky, where more than 100 people are feared to have died.

Also on the programme: why there is a boom in opium and crystal meth production in Afghanistan; and how serious is the risk of a Russian invasion of Ukraine?

Joining Anna Holligan to discuss these and other issues are Stephanie Baker, a senior writer at Bloomberg News, and the architect and satirist Karl Sharro.

(Image: A general view of damage and debris of a candle factory in Mayfield, Kentucky, after a devastating outbreak of tornadoes. Credit: Reuters/Cheney Orr)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntv3f3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytkgfk5hp6)
More than 100 feared dead after devastating US tornadoes

President Biden says the government will do everything it can to help US Midwest states that have been devastated by tornadoes. He has declared a state of emergency in Kentucky, where more than 100 people are feared to have died.

Also on the programme: We speak to Maria Ressa, who was presented with her Nobel Peace Prize this week; and the patients in Lebanon checking themselves out of hospital because they can't afford the medical bills.

Joining Anna Holligan to discuss these and other issues are Stephanie Baker, a senior writer at Bloomberg News, and the architect and satirist Karl Sharro.

(Image: A man sits by a fire outside his home to boil eggs and stay warm after a devastating outbreak of tornadoes in Kentucky. Credit: Reuters/Cheney Orr)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntv757)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytkgfk5mfb)
Tornadoes reduce US towns to 'matchsticks'

Emergency teams in six US states are continuing to search for survivors following one of the largest outbreaks of tornadoes in US history.

Also in the programme: Afghanistan's drug trade is booming amid its crippled economy; and more trouble for the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, as pictures emerge of him appearing to host a Christmas quiz last year, in apparent breach of Covid rules.

Joining Anna Holligan to discuss these and other issues are Stephanie Baker, senior writer at Bloomberg News based in London, and the architect and satirist, Karl Sharro.

(Image: A general view of damage and debris after a devastating outbreak of tornadoes ripped through several US states. Credit: Reuters/Cheney Orr)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfjlfm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgp)
(Film) Set menu

Catering on film and TV sets is notorious for being one of the toughest jobs in the hospitality industry.

Imagine feeding hundreds of people in a different location every day, running your kitchen in some of the world’s most remote places, and accommodating the varied diets of the planet’s biggest stars.

Tamasin Ford speaks to three caterers to find out what it takes to succeed in Hollywood, Bollywood, and the world of reality TV, and finds out how vital food can be to the success of a shoot.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:

Sid Ghai, director of Ghai Caterers Ltd, London;
Antonia Crowley, executive chef and event stylist at Flying Trestles, Auckland;
Wayne Brown, co-founder of Red Radish, London.

(Picture: A stack of pizza boxes next to a film director's chair. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntvbxc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfjq5r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxy)
The psychiatric nurse who overcame a life of addiction

The dramatic turnaround of a carnival runaway and drug addict who spent more than 20 years living on the streets. Anthony Brown became a psychiatric nurse and college professor. He has written a book about his remarkable journey called: From Park Bench to Park Avenue. A longer version of this interview was first broadcast on 28th April, 2020.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Anthony Brown. Credit: Rik Boose from Rik Boose Photography)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntvgnh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity (w3ct2zv5)
Fire: The energy revolution

Justin Rowlatt goes right back to the origin of our species two million years ago to explore how the mastery of fire by early humans transformed our metabolism, helping us to evolve our uniquely energy-hungry brains.

The physical evidence for early use of fire is frustratingly thin on the ground, according to archaeologist Carolina Mallol. But primatologist Jill Pruetz says she has learned a lot from observing chimpanzees interact with wildfires on the African savanna.

Research collaborators Rachel Carmody and Richard Wrangham theorise that our ancestors' unique ability to cook their food transformed the way our bodies access the energy it contains - something Justin seeks to test out by going on a raw food diet. The bounty of metabolic energy it delivered may have enabled us to become the formidably intelligent species we are today, according to neuroscientist Suzana Herculano-Houzel, transforming us into prolific hunters who conquered the world.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfjtxw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2zw2)
Black, Jewish and proud

Journalist Nadine Batchelor-Hunt is a black, Jewish woman. She is is fiercely proud of her dual identity - even as recent political discourse around race has meant that she has been forced to defend her identity in ways she's never had to before. She is on a journey to meet one of the oldest, largest and most resilient communities of black Jews in the world: Israel’s Ethiopian Jewish minority.

Around 140,000 black Ethiopian Jews live in Israel today following several waves of emigration in the 1980s and 1990s. They left everything they knew behind to flee antisemitic persecution in Ethiopia to go the spiritual homeland they had dreamt of for millennia. But for many, that did not mean they felt welcome - with complaints of discrimination, alienation, and even police brutality.

Nadine joins the community as they celebrate a Jewish holy day unique to their community - Sigd - a festival where Ethiopian Jews remember the acceptance of the Torah, express their yearning for Jerusalem, as well as celebrate their unique culture and identity in modern Israel.

Sitting down in conversation with religious leaders, activists and other members of the community, Nadine explores if she can learn anything about her own sense of self as a Black Jewish woman. And importantly, what can they teach her about accepting her own dual identity in a world that frequently questions it?

Photo: Presenter Nadine Batchelor-Hunt in Israel Credit: Candace Wilson/BBC


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntvldm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byy6cw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfjyp0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2zhf)
My Arab Spring

Bread - Khubz

Freedom is important - but what is the use of freedom if you can’t put food on the table? Ella al-Shamahi and Abubakr al-Shamahi look at the importance of the economy in starting the protest movement itself, and how the citizens of these regions view their economic standing a decade on. They speak with young Tunisians who are bearing the brunt of a devastated economy, and investigate how power is still tied up within economic opportunities under the rule of President Al Sisi. And they hear from one of the few monarchies in the region to experience protests - Jordan.

(Photo: A protester raises a loaf of bread in protest against police brutality, marginalisation and the economic, social crisis in Tunisia. Credit: Chedly Ben Ibrahim/NurPhoto/Getty Images


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntvq4r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntvtww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5h532bt6h)
Dozens missing after US tornadoes

Dozens of people are still missing after a series of tornadoes ripped through Kentucky and several other US states.

We speak to Kentucky's lieutenant governor live on the programme.

Also in the programme: the UK prime minister Boris Johnson is under mounting political pressure over his government's adherence to Covid-19 rules, we learn about Afghanistan's booming drugs trade under the Taliban and the novel way one Norwegian football club is taking a stand on human rights in Qatar.

(Picture shows rescuers searching through the wreckage of the Mayfield candle factory. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntvyn0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm6)
Algae: Slime life

They’re slimy and slippery. They’re part of the green film you see on garden ponds. They can clump together and wash up on the shores of beautiful beaches. A lot of them are invisible to the naked eye. These underappreciated organisms called algae are indispensable to the presence of life on earth but not all is straightforward about them. They can be single celled or multi cellular. They can be ugly and slimy or sometimes beautiful: indeed are even a tourist attraction. They may be found in the sea or on land. They can be life-creating and yet life-destroying and toxic in excess. So perhaps it’s time we paid more attention to algae and their evolution.
Rajan Datar is joined by Ruth Kassinger, author of Slime: How algae created us, plague us and just might save us; Dr Brenda Soler-Figueroa, a marine scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Centre; Dr Gothamie Weerakoon Senior Curator of Lichens and Slime Moulds at the Natural History Museum of London and author of Fascinating Lichens of Sri Lanka; and Stefan Bengtson, emeritus professor at the Swedish Museum of Natural History.

(Photo: Volvox algae colonies, spherical forms outlined by biflagellate cells interconnected by cytoplasmic bridges. Credit: DeAgostini/Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl1)
Does catching Covid give you more immunity than being vaccinated?

Immunity to Covid-19. We've all been hoping to develop it ever since the virus emerged two years ago. Since then, a race to vaccinate the world has begun in earnest, with many countries rolling out booster shots in response to the rise of the Omicron variant. Health officials and scientists agree that vaccines are the safest way to develop immunity to the disease. But when US Congresswoman Nancy Mace took to Fox News recently, citing a study showing a whooping 27 times better immunity from natural infection than vaccination, we thought we'd better investigate. How did this study arrive at this number, and is it a fair representation of its findings?


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntw2d4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntw648)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tm9mf2tw2)
Live Sporting Action

Delyth Lloyd presents live Premier League commentary of Crystal Palace against Everton (1630 kick-off). We'll also have a reaction to Sunday’s three early games, as well as bring you the best of the action from across Europe’s top men’s and women’s leagues.

We’ll also reflect on the finale of the Formula One World Championship in Abu Dhabi and the final day of the first Test between Australia and England in Brisbane.

Photo: Jordan Ayew of Crystal Palace in action with Lucas Digne of Everton (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntwkcn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byz5bx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfkxn1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2zw2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntwp3s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhs)
Germany: All change at the top

On this edition of Business Weekly, we go to Germany to see how the change in leadership from Angela Merkel to Olaf Scholz may impact the direction of the country, both domestically and on the European and world stage. We also hear how Ukrainians are faring economically as relations with Russia continue to sour. Plus we look at the business of private adoptions in the United States and hear how much money can change hands when a child is welcomed into a new home. Business Weekly is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Angela Merkel and Olaf Scholz at the Chancellery in Berlin, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntwsvx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5h532cs5j)
Search for US tornado survivors continues

The search for survivors in Kentucky continues where at least eighty people were killed when tornados ripped through the US state. We'll hear from a survivor who was working a night shift in a candle factory.

Also on the programme, Russia is again warned -this time by G7 foreign ministers - not to invade Ukraine after massing tens of thousands of troops on its border; And we report on the emergence of Afghanistan as a major manufacturer of crystal meth.

(Photo: Rescue operations in Mayfield, Kentucky; Credit: Reuters/Adrees Latif)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntwxm1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx0smc9750)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0ssvwtf8sn)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfl8wf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntx1c5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity (w3ct2zv5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfldmk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 The Explanation (w3ct2z3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]



MONDAY 13 DECEMBER 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy410cg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqqcmv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2zw2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4143l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlkvdbdr8v)
Israeli PM in landmark visit to UAE

Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett is in the United Arab Emirates, on a landmark first visit by an Israeli head of government to the country. Hussein Ibish, senior resident scholar at the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington DC, tells us about the potential for economic cooperation between the two states, who normalised relations last year.
Plus, as South Korean president Moon Jae-in travels to Australia to talk trade, honorary senior research fellow in Modern Korea at Leeds University Aidan Foster-Carter tells us what he’ll be discussing with counterpart Scott Morrison.
Last week’s announcement that inflation in the United States has reached its highest level in almost four decades came ahead of a scheduled Federal Reserve meeting this week. Economic commentator Laurie Laird tells us what she thinks will be on the agenda.
Plus, the jihadist Allied Democratic Forces militant group, based in the Democratic Republic of Congo, has been blamed for several recent suicide bombings in Uganda’s capital Kampala. Ugandan journalist Nebert Rugadya and Judith Tyson from the Overseas Development Institute tell us more about the group, and how rising insecurity is affecting the economies of both countries.

(Photo: Naftali Bennet and Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan; Credit: Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqqhcz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqg)
Genetic Dreams, Genetic Nightmares

CRISPR is the latest and most powerful technique for changing the genetic code of living things. This method of gene editing is already showing great promise in treating people with gene-based diseases, from sickle cell disease to cancer. However, in 2018 the use of CRISPR to edit the genes of two human embryos, which were subsequently born as two girls in China, caused outrage. The experiment was done in secrecy and created unintended changes to the children's genomes - changes that could be inherited by their children and their children's children. The scandal underlined the grave safety and ethical concerns around heritable genome editing, and called into doubt the ability of the scientific community to self-regulate this use of CRISPR.

CRISPR gene editing might also be used to rapidly and permanently alter populations of organisms in the wild, and indeed perhaps whole ecosystems, through a technique called a gene drive. A gene drive is a way of biasing inheritance, of getting a gene (even a deleterious one) to rapidly multiply and copy itself generation after generation, sweeping exponentially through a population.

In theory, this could be used to eradicate species such as agricultural pests or disease-transmitting mosquitoes, or to alter them in some way: for example, making mosquitoes unable to carry the malaria parasite. But do we know enough about the consequences of releasing a self-perpetuating genetic technology like this into the environment, even if gene drives could, for example, eradicate insects that spread a disease which claims hundreds of thousands of deaths every year? And who should decide whether gene drives should be released?

Picture: DNA molecule, Credit: KTSDesign/SCIENCEPHOTOLIBRARY/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy417vq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm83vtz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqqm43)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2drk)
What role is overpopulation playing in the climate crisis?

If there were fewer of us, would the amount of greenhouse gasses we emit reduce? It’s a question that often creeps up in discussions about climate change.

Studies show that the global population will decline eventually and populations in many rich nations are already declining.

However, 11,000 scientists signed a paper warning of “untold suffering due to the climate crisis” unless society transforms, including the reversal of population growth.

But an analysis by the United Nations found that affluence has a greater impact on the climate than population.

When we talk about overpopulation, what are we really saying and where does the conversation go from here?

Presenters Neal Razzell and Kate Lamble are joined by:

Nyovani Madise, head of the Malawi office of the African Institute for Development Policy.

Anu Ramaswami, professor of civil and environmental engineering at Princeton.

Arvind Ravikumar, professor in energy transition and climate policy at the University of Texas.

Producer: Darin Graham
Reporter: Rajesh Joshi
Series producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound engineer: Tom Brignell


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy41clv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity (w3ct2zv5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqqqw7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Explanation (w3ct2z3l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy41hbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm843b7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqqvmc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9k)
Women making city transport safe

It is not easy to be a woman on public transport. Across the world, you will hear reports of women being harassed, groped and even sexually assaulted. This has an enormous impact on women being able to take up employment and education opportunities, as well as accessing healthcare. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women who are trying to change this.

Angie Palacios is a Gender and Transport Specialist at CAF – Development Bank of Latin America. Her work focuses on researching and supporting projects that can improve women and girls’ safety on public transport. She’s originally from Ecuador but she’s now based in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Joanie Fredericks is an activist and entrepreneur from South Africa who recently set up Ladies Own Transport - an initiative providing safe transport options for women in Cape Flats, a crime hotspot in Cape Town. Joanie, a survivor of violence herself, had previously set up a women-only driving school. Thanks to her, nearly a 100 women have managed to get their drivers’ licences.

Produced by Alice Gioia

(Image: (L) Angie Palacios, credit Angie Palacios. (R) Joanie Fredericks, credit Joanie Fredericks.)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy41m33)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv3165kgp3v)
Leaked documents shine spotlight on Nigeria's Black Axe gang

Documents suggest that the feared mafia-style gang has infiltrated Nigeria's political system and launched a global scamming operation.

More on the devastating tornadoes which has hit the United States.

And we hear how the Formula One racing Championship was decided on the last lap of the last race... under controversial circumstances.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy41qv7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv3165kgsvz)
Nigeria: Black Axe gang documents leaked to BBC

There's evidence that the violent mafia-style gang has infiltrated the country's political system and launched a global scamming operation.

We'll go to Kentucky following the devastating tornado there and hear from the heart of what is still a search and rescue operation.

And a human rights group hands in first person testimony of abuse in Myanmar to the International Criminal Court.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy41vlc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv3165kgxm3)
BBC report: Mafia-style gang infiltrates Nigerian politics

Leaked documents reveal that the Black Axe gang has links within the political system and has launched a global scamming operation well beyond its borders.

We'll hear from a local mayor about the rescue efforts that are still ongoing after the devastating tornadoes to hit the United States.

And a human rights group has called on the International Criminal Court to open an investigation into the crackdown on dissent by Myanmar’s military rulers.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy41zbh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1r)
Roger Deakins: How is technology changing cinema?

Stephen Sackur speaks to one of the world's most celebrated cinematographers, Roger Deakins. He has won Oscars for his work on 1917 and Blade Runner 2049, and also shaped the look of modern classics such as O Brother, Where Art Thou?, Skyfall, The Big Lebowski and The Shawshank Redemption. But is technology, from CGI to the ubiquitous camera phone, changing everything we thought we knew about making films?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqrblw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5s)
The problem of parasites: who pays for neglected tropical diseases?

Leishmaniasis may not be a household name in much of the rich world, but the parasitic disease is found in over 90 countries, and can lead to agonising disfigurements, and death. It’s classified as a neglected tropical disease, which means treatment is underfunded and under-researched. We hear from British adventurer and writer Pip Stewart, who contracted Leishmaniasis on an expedition through the jungle of Guyana. She received treatment in the UK, but it was a harrowing experience. Pip explains how her Guyanese friends have to resort to excruciating home remedies to try and stem the parasite. She’s written a book about her ordeal: Life Lessons from The Amazon. We also get the view from Ethiopia, where Dr Helina Fikre explains the difficulties in treating the same parasitic illness. Dr Laurent Fraisse from the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative tells us about his organisation’s search for better treatments, while Dr Madhukar Pai calls for an overhaul of the way tropical diseases are funded. Image: The Leishmaniasis parasite under a magnification factor of 1000. Photo By BSIP/UIG Via Getty Images

Presenter: Vivienne Nunis
Producer: Sarah Treanor


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1w)
The Bengali language movement

In February 1952 thousands of people marched in Dhaka in defence of the Bengali language. Eight of the protesters were shot dead by police. It became known as Bangladesh's Language Movement Day. We hear from Abdul Gaffar Choudhury, one of the demonstrators, whose song about the protests became the anthem of the movement.

(Photo: Student demonstrators gather by Dhaka University, February 1952. Courtesy of Prof Rafiqul Islam and Liberation War Museum).


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4232m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqrgc0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prg)
What's the best way to make a decision?

Life is full of choices, from the mundane (like what to wear today) to the critical (how should we deal with the pandemic?). So how can we make the best decisions? That’s what listener David wants to know.

To investigate, Caroline Steel learns how being smarter doesn’t necessarily make you a good decision maker. She speaks to researchers about the importance of ‘gut feelings’ – and how certain people with no intuition whatsoever can struggle to make choices. She also learns why it’s easier to give advice to other people than to follow it yourself, and how we can work together to make the best decisions in a group.

Presenter: Caroline Steel
Producer: Anand Jagatia

Contributors:
Wändy Bruin de Bruin - Professor of Public Policy, Psychology and Behavioural Science, University of Southern California, USA
David Robson, science journalist and author
Valerie van Mulukom, Assistant Professor, Coventry University, UK
Liz Steel
Igor Grossmann, Associate Professor of psychology, University of Waterloo, Canada
Anita Williams Woolley associate professor of organisational behaviour and theory, Carnegie Mellon University, USA


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy426tr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqrl34)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct2yqr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy42bkw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm84yk4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqrpv8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy42gb0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv3)
The unsung pioneer of reggae's golden age

Leroy Sibbles grew up in the Kingston district known affectionately as the birthplace of reggae and burst onto the music scene as lead singer of The Heptones. Together they popularised the soulful sounds of rocksteady, and while balancing his career in the group, Leroy discovered a talent for the bass that would create an enduring musical legacy. From the legendary halls of Studio One he constructed some of the most recognisable rhythms in reggae history. Songs that would sell globally and influence a generation of musicians.

Ani Choying Drolma became a Buddhist nun when she was 13. She learnt to sing, taking part in spiritual ceremonies and was spotted by an American music producer. She's now one of Nepal's biggest music stars. She spoke to Outlook's Manuela Saragosa. This interview was first broadcast on the 8th May 2017.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb

(Photo: Leroy Sibbles performing in London in 1984. Credit: David Corio/Redferns via Getty Images)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy42l24)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8561d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqrybj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy42pt8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjcckp3w)
Nigerian mafia group linked to more than 10 countries

An exclusive BBC investigation has revealed a notorious Nigerian mafia group, called Black Axe, has links to more than 10 countries around the world. The 'cult'' has been accused of murders, rapes and torture across Nigeria, and is connected to global organised crime, involving internet fraud, drug smuggling and human trafficking. Also on the programme: Hong Kong activist and media mogul Jimmy Lai is sentenced to 13 months in jail for 'inciting others to take part in unlawful assembly'; and UN member states meet in Geneva to discuss whether a treaty is needed for autonomous weapons.

( PIC: A member of the Black Axe gang, one of Nigeria's most feared "cults" COPYRIGHT: BBC)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy42tkd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqs5ts)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y48b7p2n1p7)
UN discussions over 'killer robots'

There are discussions in Geneva over how to govern the use of lethal autonomous weapons. Some UN member states have called for an all-out ban on so-called 'killer robots', while the US says there should be a code of conduct. We find out more about the debate from Emilia Javorsky, who is director of Scientists Against Inhumane Weapons, and Justin Bronk, research fellow for airpower and military technology at the Royal United Services Institute. Also in the programme, as more and more vehicles become battery powered, demand for lithium, used in battery production, is expected to soar. The Democratic Republic of Congo is thought to have large deposits of lithium, but human rights campaign group Global Witness is warning the country may not benefit from the financial boost the industry could bring, as Paul Donowitz, head of natural resource governance for the organisation explains. Plus, despite claiming many lives each year, some diseases like Leishmaniasis and Sleeping Sickness are classed as neglected, because their treatment is underfunded by the international community. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis investigates whether the funding model for such diseases needs an overhaul.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Sarah Hawkins and Susan Karanja.

(Picture: A robot from the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots. Picture credit: Reuters.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy42y9j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxx187jy7z)
Kentucky tornadoes: Over 100 still unaccounted for

The US state of Kentucky's Governor has said 64 people are confirmed dead and another 105 are unaccounted for after tornadoes hit Midwestern states over the weekend. We get the latest and hear from people in the areas impacted by the what has been called the most devastating tornado event in the state's history.

Also, the 70th Miss Universe has been crowned. Harnaaz Sandhu of India won at the pageant held in Israel. We hear from Indians who are celebrating her win and we explain the controversy surrounding the event.

And we talk through today’s main developments with Covid-19 with the help of one of our regular expert, Dr Eleanor Murray from the Boston University School of Public Health.

(Photo: A water tower for the town is seen destroyed in the aftermath of a tornado at sunrise in Mayfield, Kentucky. Credit: Reuters/Adrees Latif)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4321n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxx187k203)
Kentucky tornadoes: Race to find survivors

The US state of Kentucky's Governor has said 64 people are confirmed dead and another 105 are unaccounted for after tornadoes hit Midwestern states over the weekend. We get the latest and hear from people in the areas impacted by what has been called the most devastating tornado event in the state's history.

An exclusive BBC investigation has revealed a notorious Nigerian mafia group has links to more than 10 countries around the world. We speak to our colleague who has been investigating the group.

And we talk through today’s main Covid-19 developments with one of our regular coronavirus experts.

(Photo: Laura Croft searches through debris near the location where her mother and aunt were found deceased after tornadoes ripped through several U.S. states in downtown Dawson Springs, Kentucky, U.S., December 13, 2021. Credit: Jon Cherry/Reuters)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy435ss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy439jx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm85xj5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqsnt9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nq0j365c8)
2021/12/13 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy43f91)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqsskf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1m8t)
The James Webb Space Telescope

The launch of the James Webb Space Telescope is only days away. Scheduled for lift off on 22 December, the largest and most complex space observatory ever built will be sent to an orbit beyond the moon.

James Webb is so huge that it has had to be folded up to fit in the rocket. There will be a tense two weeks over Christmas and the New Year as the space giant unfurls and unfolds. Its design and construction has taken about 30 years under the leadership of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center.

With its huge 6.5 metre-wide primary mirror, the giant observatory promises to extend our view across the cosmos to the first stars to shine in the early universe. That’s a vista of Cosmic Dawn: the first small clusters of stars to form and ignite out of what had been a universe of just dark clouds of primordial gas. If the James Webb succeeds in capturing the birth of starlight, we will be looking at celestial objects more than 13.5 billion light years away.

Closer to home, the telescope will also revolutionise our understanding of planets orbiting stars beyond the solar system.

BBC science correspondent Jonathan Amos reports from the European Space Agency’s launch site in French Guyana from where James Webb will be sent into space. He talks to astronomers who will be using the telescope and NASA engineers who’ve built the telescope and tested it in the years leading to launch.

Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker
Picture: James Webb Space Telescope, Credit Northrup Grumman


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy43k15)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjccljbs)
US tornadoes : More than a 100 missing

More than a hundred people are still missing in Kentucky after tornadoes hit the US state. Is climate change to blame? We hear from a prominent American Climatologist.

Also on the programme, why islanders on La Palma, in the Canaries, are still suffering the volcanic eruption that began three months ago; and a rare interview with Iran's ambassador to London, who's says it's once bitten, twice shy, when it comes to international negotiations.

(Photo: Tornado torn Mayfield town water tank; Credit: REUTERS/Cheney Orr)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy43ns9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx14wnhzb8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172y0st753n0yx)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqt11p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrqy76n4d7)
Turkish lira falls to record low

Turkey's lira currency has fallen to its lowest ever level, amid fears that the country's central bank will once again cut interest rates this week. We hear from Turkish economist Murat Sagman on why the lira has lost half of its value over the past 12 months.

Plus, Joan Solsman from CNET News tells us more on the Peloton advert responding to a Sex and the City plot line which had bitten into the company's share price.

With some UN member states calling for an all-out ban on autonomous weapons which have been dubbed 'killer robots', and the United States saying there should be a code of conduct, we find out more about the debate with Emilia Javorsky from Scientists Against Inhumane Weapons and Justin Bronk of the Royal United Services Institute.

Plus, despite claiming many lives each year, diseases such as Leishmaniasis and Sleeping Sickness are classed as neglected, because their treatment is underfunded by the international community. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis investigates whether the funding model for such diseases needs an overhaul.

(Picture: Turkey's lira currency. Picture credit: Getty Images)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy43sjf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqt4st)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



TUESDAY 14 DECEMBER 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy43x8k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z7y)
Fighting 'virginity tests' in the Indonesian police

Virginity tests for women joining the Indonesian police, the history of the Nazi V2 rocket, the British plane-spotters accused by Greece of spying, the 1970s kidnapping of a reclusive German supermarket tycoon, and the biggest post-war explosion in Britain.

Photo: Indonesian policewomen in 2007. Credit: Getty Images


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4410p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqqtp11dbd)
Why is Turkey's Lira collapsing?

Turkey's lira continues to collapse, and now seems to be causing real pain for the country's economy. So what is going on, and how can the country halt the slide? Fund manager, economist and founder of Sagam Strategy Consulting Murat Sagman gave us his take from Istanbul.
Also on the programme - we hear about concerns about the development of AI weapons, and hear news of Australia's new trade ties with South Korea.
Nick Timiraos, chief economics correspondent of the Wall Street Journal joins us to explain why central banks are trying to second guess how you feel about inflation. Nick explains how the psychology at play could tell us how long we could see high prices hang around for.
And we hear how Peloton fought back against an unlikely adversary - the Sex and the City reboot. Joan Solsman of CNET news in New York explains that one.
Throughout the programme the BBC's Jamie Robertson will be joined from Sydney by Bloomberg's Asia Finance Editor Nabila Ahmed, and by Peter Morici, Professor Emeritus at the Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland.

Picture Credit; EPA.


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy444rt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm86rr2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqtj16)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2zvg)
The big $ giveaway

Search for ''#freemoney' or '$giveaway' on any social media platform and you'll be inundated by a host of kindly benefactors; American billionaires, Saudi Sheiks and bitcoin evangelists, all pledging to give away millions to people in need at the click of a like or follow. But are they really what they claim to be? Daniel Leinhardt speaks to the genuine Twitter philanthropists, the publicity hungry influencers and the victims of the scammers to find out the truth behind this trend.

Image: Stock image of pixelated dollar signs floating over cell phone (Credit: Donald Iain Smith/Getty Images)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy448hy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy44d82)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8707b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqtrjg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf1)
Rankin: Capturing the moment

Rankin has been described as one of the UK’s greatest photographers.

Perhaps best known for his striking, playful and intimate portraits, he has photographed the likes of Britney Spears, David Bowie and Queen Elizabeth II. His work appearing in magazine’s like Vogue, GQ and Marie Claire.

Join Anna Bailey for a ringside seat as Rankin shoots the casts of shows such as The Lion King and Tina Turner The Musical - capturing the moment when London’s theatres reopen after lockdown, for a new book and exhibition.

Anna also discovers what lies behind Rankin’s creative vision as he experiments with beauty photography for his latest edition of Hunger Magazine.

Presented and produced by Anna Bailey
Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Photograph: © Rankin


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy44j06)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv3165kkl0y)
Larry Nassar abuse survivors to receive $380m settlement

Larry Nassar abuse survivors to receive $380m settlement

How one of Russia's olderst and most respected NGO's - "Memorial" set up to defend political prisoners in the country - faces "liquidation" today by the Russian Supreme Court.

And we hear how Ghana's main international airport will fine airlines $3,500 for every passenger they fly into the country who has not been vaccinated against coronavirus.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy44mrb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv3165kkps2)
Record payout for US gymnastics abuse victims

We get reaction from a woman who waived anonymity to accuse Larry Nassar and blow open an abuse scandal affecting hundreds of young gymnasts.

Why would members of UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson's own party vote against his plans to tighten restrictions around Covid?

And a court in Belarus is set to deliver a verdict in the case of Sergei Tikhanovsky - the husband of exiled the opposition leader charged with planning mass disorder during the 2020 presidential election campaign.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy44rhg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv3165kktj6)
USA Gymnastics agrees $380 million abuse settlement

We get the reaction of the woman who waived her anonymity to accuse the team doctor, Larry Nassar, of abusing her - opening the floodgates to hundreds more claims.

Why are members of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's own party getting ready to vote against his plans to tighten restrictions around Covid?

And a special report from France where America's latest import - the so-called woke culture wars - are causing an identity crisis for the French.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy44w7l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plx)
How to make electricity for your neighbours

Hundreds of millions of people don’t have access to electricity. But all over the world, people are joining forces to provide a home-grown solution — by setting up their own “microgrids” using renewable energy.

We meet the Kenyan man who got so frustrated waiting for his village to be connected to the national power grid that he built his own hydro power station. Using scrap materials and a bicycle wheel he made enough electricity for his own household and many others in the community.

We’ll also hear from Bangladesh where individual households with solar panels on their roofs have formed a local network. They sell any spare power neighbours who don’t have the panels.

Produced by Daniel Gordon and presented by Mercy Juma.

Image: John Magiro


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqv7hz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgt)
The pet food gold mine

The pet food industry is a multi billion dollar business but are premium brands - with premium ingredients - worth spending more money on? And could insect protein be the key to a more sustainable way of feeding our animal companions? Elizabeth Hotson gets the facts and figures from Kate Vlietstra, a global food and drink analyst at Mintel. We also hear from Tom Neish, founder of insect-based cat and dog food company, Yora. Plus, Rachel Grant from premium pet food brand, Laughing Dog, tells us why she believes her product is worth splashing out on. A trio of dog owners tell us what's on their pets' menu and Sean Wensley, senior vet at the pet charity, PDSA explains how to make sure your animal companion eats a balanced diet. Plus, Natalia Santis, manager at the Java Whiskers cat cafe, describes the eating habits of their eleven fussy felines. (Picture of treat time at Java Whiskers cat cafe. Picture by Elizabeth Hotson).


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6d)
The birth of Bangladesh

In December 1970, Pakistan held its first democratic elections since the end of British colonial rule in 1947. The results would lead to war, the break-up of Pakistan and the creation of Bangladesh. Farhana Haider spoke to Rehman Sobhan, an economist and leading figure in the Bengali independence movement.

(Image: The flag of Bangladesh is raised at the Awami League headquarters in 1971. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy44zzq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqvc83)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct1m8t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy453qv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy457gz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm87vg7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqvlrc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy45c73)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxc)
I was blamed for the 9/11 attacks

On 11th September 2001, Virginia Buckingham was head of Boston’s Logan Airport when two planes were hijacked after taking off from Logan and flown into New York’s World Trade Center. She immediately rushed into work to shut down the airport and help families try to find their relatives. But within days, the media and politicians began questioning her leadership and some news articles even suggested that she was to blame for the 9/11 attacks. She felt pressured to resign and was later diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The feelings of guilt continued to haunt Virginia for nearly two decades and it was only through an ongoing friendship with the mother of a woman who was killed on one of the flights and through taking part in a leadership scheme where she started to write her memoir, that Virginia finally began to recognise that she wasn’t to blame for what happened that day. Her book is called On My Watch.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Andrea Rangecroft

(Photo: Virginia Buckingham holds a press conference after her resignation as head of Boston’s Logan Airport in 2001. Credit: MediaNews Group/Boston Herald via Getty Images)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy45gz7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm882yh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqvv7m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct1m8t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy45lqc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjccnl0z)
Belarus opposition leader jailed for 18 years

In Belarus, a court has sent the opposition leader, Sergei Tikhanovsky, to 18 years in prison. His wife, Svetlana, stood against the Belarussian president Alexander Lukashenko in last year's election; she tells us "it's no time to sit and cry".

Also: record-breaking temperatures have been recorded in the Arctic; and why brain surgeons and rocket scientists may not be quite as smart as we thought.

(Picture: A supporter of Belarus opposition leader Sergei Tikhanovsky holds a photo of him. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy45qgh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqw2qw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bskvwsvw6)
The economic impact of the Omicron variant

There are warnings that the Omicron Covid variant could have a severe impact this winter. In the UK a significant rebellion of members of Parliament for the governing Conservatives is expected as the government moves to mandate Covid passes for entry to night clubs and other large venues. Michael Kill is chief executive of the Night Time Industries Association, and gives us his reaction to the new rules. We explore to what extent Covid passes work in reducing the spread of coronavirus with Professor Devi Sridhar, chair of global public health at Edinburgh University. And we hear about the remarkable effort to distribute Covid vaccines around the world from Wes Wheeler, president of shipping firm UPS's global healthcare unit. Also in the programme, with many companies cancelling Christmas parties for the second year running as a result of the pandemic, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan tells us why he thinks it is a blessing in disguise. Plus, the pet sector has experienced a boom recently as a result of coronavirus. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on whether premium pet foods, with premium ingredients, are worth spending more money on.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Faarea Masud and Susan Karanja.

(Picture: A night club. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy45v6m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxx187mv52)
Belarus: 18 year sentence for opposition leader

We’ll reflect the conversation about the prison term given to a Belarusian opposition leader who rallied mass protests against disputed elections last year. Sergei Tikhanovsky was convicted of organising riots, in a trial condemned as a sham. We’ll speak to our correspondent covering the story and hear how Belarusians are reacting.

We’ll answer your latest questions on the coronavirus pandemic with the help of one of our regular experts, Dr Isaac Bogoch in Toronto. We’ll be following the debate and voting in the UK parliament over the latest Covid restrictions proposed for England in response to the omicron variant.

We’ll also hear a conversation between healthcare workers on their experience of abuse and harassment during the pandemic.

Picture: Opposition activist and blogger Sergei Tikhanovsky at a rally in Minsk, Belarus, in May 2020 (EPA / Tatyana Zenkovich)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy45yyr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxx187myx6)
Kentucky tornadoes: Restoring power

After the deadly tornadoes in Kentucky, we speak to some of the people trying to bring back electricity supplies.

We’ll reflect the conversation about the prison term given to a Belarusian opposition leader who rallied mass protests against disputed elections last year. Sergei Tikhanovsky was convicted of organising riots, in a trial condemned as a sham. We’ll speak to our correspondent covering the story and hear how Belarusians are reacting.

We’ll answer your latest questions on the coronavirus pandemic with the help of one of our regular experts, Dr Swapneil Parikh in Mumbai. We’ll also hear a conversation between healthcare workers on their experience of abuse and harassment during the pandemic.

Picture: A downed power line after the tornado in Mayfield, Kentucky (Reuters / Cheney Orr)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy462pw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy466g0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm88tf8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqwkqd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nq0j3928c)
2021/12/14 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy46b64)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqwpgj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt3)
Brazil: Where is all the Covid data?

Ministry of Health websites in Brazil are still down following a number of cyber-attacks. Millions of people now do not have access to their Covid-19 vaccination data (including certificates). It is estimated that 50TB of data has been removed by Lapsus$ Group, which is claiming responsibility for the ransomware attack. Dr Patricia Peck, who is on the board of the National Data Protection Authority is on the programme with the latest on the attacks.

First-ever delivery of medicines by drone in Sierra Leone
The first-ever delivery of medicines by drone in Sierra Leone has been a success. The drones are not the typical helicopter drones, but small plane types with propellers that have a number of advantages. The fixed-winged drones can carry much heavier payloads over much further distances. We hear from Daniel Ronen from the UK drone specialist, UAVaid, who is behind the project.

Reimagining the new Spider-Man trailer through animation
Fans prepared to dedicate hundreds of hours looking for the perfect clips have been making their own trailers that reimagine popular content. One such creation from the YouTube channel 100Bombs Studio has recreated the latest Spider-Man trailer using clips from the original animated series. Filmmaker and critic Maxim Thompson has been talking to us about these projects and how they allow people to engage with films.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington


Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Hacker with computers in a dark room. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy46fy8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjccpf7w)
Covid: UK parliament approves new restrictions

Almost 100 members of Britain's governing Conservative party have rebelled in a Parliamentary vote over the introduction of Covid-19 passes to enter some venues and events in England. They defied the prime minister, Boris Johnson, to vote against the measure. However, the new restrictions were passed with the support of the opposition Labour Party.

The WHO says the Omicron variant of the virus is spreading so fast around the world that it could overwhelm unprepared health systems.

Britain has revoked the controversial travel bans it imposed on eleven African countries at the start of the omicron outbreak.

The prime minister of Haiti has announced three days of mourning in the Caribbean nation after more than sixty people were killed by an exploding fuel tanker.

And Congolese rumba centre stage as UNESCO accord it special cultural status.

(Photo: Health Secretary Sajid Javid tries to get Tory MPs to back the measures. Credit: Jessica Taylor)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy46kpd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx14wnlw7c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0st753qxw0)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqwxys)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycskcytfbqm)
The economic impact of the Omicron variant

There are warnings that the Omicron Covid variant could have a severe impact this winter. In the UK a significant rebellion of members of Parliament for the governing Conservatives is expected as the government moves to mandate Covid passes for entry to night clubs and other large venues. We hear from the BBC's political correspondent Rob Watson. We explore to what extent Covid passes work in reducing the spread of coronavirus with Professor Devi Sridhar, chair of global public health at Edinburgh University. And we hear about the remarkable effort to distribute Covid vaccines around the world from Wes Wheeler, president of shipping firm UPS's global healthcare unit. Also in the programme, with many companies cancelling Christmas parties for the second year running as a result of the pandemic, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan tells us why he thinks it is a blessing in disguise. Plus, the pet sector has experienced a boom recently as a result of coronavirus. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on whether premium pet foods, with premium ingredients, are worth spending more money on.

(Picture: A night club. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy46pfj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqx1px)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 15 DECEMBER 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy46t5n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy46xxs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqqtp1497h)
Covid passes for nightclubs now mandatory in England

Covid passes must be shown from Wednesday to curb the spread of the Omicron variant in England. Politicians also voted to bring back compulsory face coverings in indoor settings, and to make vaccinations compulsory for public healthcare workers. We get reaction on the critical vote in Parliament from Rob Watson, our political reporter.
The highest temperature ever recorded in the Arctic has been confirmed by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) - 38 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit) in the Siberian town of Verkhoyansk last June. Zachary Labe is a climate scientist at Colorado State University in the US and he tells us what this reveals about the rate of climate change.
And with many companies cancelling Christmas parties for the second year running because of the pandemic, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan tells us why he thinks that's a blessing in disguise.
Sasha Twining is joined throughout the programme by Sarah Birke, The Economist’s bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and The Caribbean, from Mexico City, and by Stefanie Yuen Thio, joint managing partner at TSMP Law in Singapore.

(Picture: People in a nightclub. Credit: Getty Images


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy471nx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm89nn5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqxdy9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2gdb)
Bats: Friend or foe?

What is it about bats? Do we love them or hate them? They are depicted in some cultures as devil-like vampires: images of death and Halloween. But in others they are the opposite and are believed to bring luck and good fortune in China. Fear of bats has been exacerbated in the past 18 months by the Coronavirus pandemic and a blame game, pointing the finger at bats as a potential source of Covid-19. But environmentalists love them for being natural pest controllers – hoovering up harmful insects. Scientists love them too - as a vital source of medical research. How can they carry viruses without getting ill and what is their anti-ageing secret? For their size they live a very long time and they have developed mechanisms to ward off the diseases of old-age.
Caroline Bayley talks to scientists, environmentalists, bat lovers and an eminent philosopher, all trying to uncover the secrets of these extraordinary mammals.

(Photo: Rhinolophus hipposideros (lesser horseshoe bat), Credit: Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy475f1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy47955)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm89x4f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqxnfk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2h)
PTSD and me

Flashbacks and panic attacks: Learning to overcome the impact of tragedy and trauma. What is it like to live with PTSD?

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/thecomb


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy47dx9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv3165kngy1)
Grim coronavirus milestone reached in the US

An unwelcomed milestone reached as 800,000 Americans die of Covid, but as the Omicron variant spreads we reflect on why so many people are still unvaccinated.

Claims that the Colombian military allegedly used child soldiers during its brutal war against the FARC left-wing rebels.

Basketball: Warriors star Stephen Curry sets the NBA's all-time 3-point scoring record.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy47jnf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv3165knlp5)
Australia opens up to (some) international travellers

For the first time since March of 2020, Australia is opening its borders to some international travellers including visa-holding students and skilled workers.

As an international campaign is launched to raise emergency funds for millions at risk of starvation in Afghanistan this winter we visit one hospital where resources are being stretched to the limit.

The parents of a 15-year-old high school student in the United State states appear in court to face charges alongside their son after he shot dead fellow students.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy47ndk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv3165knqf9)
Number of people to die of Covid in US passes 800,000

The number of people that have died from Coronavirus rises to more than 800,000 in the United States… most of those now dying are unvaccinated.

Also, how the Colombian military allegedly used child soldiers during its brutal war against the left wing rebels of the FARC.

And a crisis appeal for Afghanistan is being launched in the United Kingdom, with fears that millions are on the brink of famine.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy47s4p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc9)
Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov: Fighting for a free press

Stephen Sackur is in Oslo to interview the joint winners of this year’s Nobel Peace Prize. Both are independent journalists who have defied threats and repression to continue their work. Maria Ressa, founder of the Rappler news website in the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov, long time editor in chief of Novaya Gazeta in Moscow. Theirs is a fight for freedom of expression. But is it a fight they are losing?

(Photo: Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov during the Nobel Peace Prize award ceremony. Credit: Stian Lysberg Solum/NTB/Reuters)


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqy4f2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jpl)
The Meta data centre dilemma

What is at stake when a big company like Meta comes knocking on your door? The small Dutch town of Zeewolde is grappling with this. Meta - the parent company of Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp - wants to build a huge data centre in the area which could be the biggest in Europe. It is a proposal which has raised questions about land-use, water consumption, political power and energy.

The municipality says it will bring significant benefits – but not everyone agrees. Opponents like local resident Sipke Veentra, say the centre will use five times the amount of energy that their local windmills provide. And local farmer Carla Dekker is concerned that prime agricultural land is being given over to development and is worried about the amount of water Meta will use. They both claim Meta is being given preferential treatment over local businesses. But those in favour, like Egge Jan de Jonge the local cabinet member who is steering the deal through, says Meta will have to provide new power supplies to feed the centre and that they have a proven record of having done this in the past.

Stijn Grove, from the Dutch Data Centre Association says there is no Dutch national strategy and that more political leadership is needed from the top. And Sebastian Moss, who watches the data centre industry for the website DatacenterDynamics says companies face similar challenges to Meta when trying to site hyper-scale data centres all over the world.

(Picture: Data centre; Credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8n)
Rape as a weapon in Bangladesh

During the war of independence in Bangladesh in 1971, Pakistani troops and their local collaborators used systematic rape as deliberate tactic. It's estimated that hundreds of thousands of Bengali women were victims of one of the worst instances in the 20th century of rape being used as a weapon of war. Farhana Haider speaks to one of the women, and to the Bengali playwright and filmmaker Leesa Gazi, who has documented their suffering in her work.

PHOTO: Filmmaker Leesa Gazi with a ‘Birangona', one of the women who was raped during Bangladesh’s war of independence (Leesa Gazi/ Shihab Khan)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy47wwt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqy856)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy480my)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Reith Lectures (w3ct2zpc)
AI in the economy

What is the future of work? In lecture three, prof Stuart Russell explores one of the most concerning issues of AI - the threat to jobs. How will the economy adapt as work is increasingly done by machines? Economists’ forecasts range from rosy scenarios of human-AI teamwork to dystopic visions in which most people are excluded from the economy altogether. Russell tries to untangle these competing predictions and to pinpoint the comparative advantages that humans may retain over machines. Perhaps counter-intuitively, he suggests greater investment in the humanities and the arts, lead to increased status and pay for professions based on interpersonal services.


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy484d2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8brcb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqyhng)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy48846)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzm)
My sister Banaz - killed for loving the wrong man

When Payzee Mahmod was 16, she was forced to marry a man twice her age. She grew up in the UK and her family was from a tight-knit Kurdish community where strict traditions of so-called ‘honour’ played a central part in their lives. So when Banaz – Payzee’s beloved older sister who had also been forced into child marriage – left her husband and started a relationship with a man of her choice, the family thought she had 'shamed' them. The consequences would be tragic and horrific.

Payzee is now an activist and at the forefront of a campaign to end child marriage in England and Wales.

If you've been affected by any of the issues in this episode, you can find information about where to get help and support at Befrienders Worldwide or through BBC Action Line.

Presenter: Sahar Zand
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Payzee [L] and Banaz Mahmod [R] before their marriages. Credit: Courtesy of Payzee Mahmod)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy48cwb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8bzvl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqyr4q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy48hmg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjccrgy2)
Afghanistan humanitarian crisis

Afghanistan sinks further into the abyss, as millions more face a desperate struggle to survive. Can disaster be averted?

Also in the programme: German judges say the Russian state was behind an assassination in Berlin; and touching the sun -- a NASA probe braves a million degree heat.

(Image: A pharmacist from one of the Afghan Red Crescent"s mobile health teams providing much-needed medicines during a community visit / Credit: Disasters Emergency Committee/PA Wire)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy48mcl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqyzmz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4d0qysxqf7)
EU outlines new gas strategy

The European Commission has outlined a strategy to try and stabilise gas prices in the EU. We find out more from Jakob Schlandt, from the energy and climate change team at German daily Der Tagesspiegel. And we get reaction to proposals in the new package of measures to cut carbon emissions from Silvia Pastorelli of the environmental campaign group Greenpeace. Also in the programme, the BBC's Matthew Kenyon reports on a dispute in the Dutch town of Zeewolde, where Facebook's parent company Meta wants to build a massive new data centre on land just outside the town. Nike has announced the acquisition of British startup RTFKT Studios, which makes virtual trainers for the online world known as the metaverse. Richard Lawler of tech website The Verge tells us what's behind the move. Plus, ahead of special coverage tomorrow on the latest Turkish central bank decision on interest rates, the BBC's Victoria Craig explores how challenging it is for people in the country to cope with official inflation above 20%.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Tom Kavanagh and Faarea Masud.

(Picture: NordStream 2 gas pipeline's German landfall area. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy48r3q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxx187qr25)
Afghanistan faces humanitarian crisis

Concern is rising over the humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan, where an estimated 22.8 million people — that's more than half of the country's population — are facing life-threatening food insecurity. For years Afghanistan has been in dire humanitarian need, with many millions of people utterly reliant on foreign aid. But with the takeover by the Taliban earlier this year, that international funding stream has switched off. We’ll speak to our correspondent who has spent a day at one hospital where resources are being stretched to their limit.

And many exhausted healthcare workers around the world admit they feel demoralised as new Covid surges spread again in their countries. Some have also talked about compassion fatigue with un-vaccinated patients who are in majority in many ICU wards. We speak to two doctors in the US and in South Africa about their frustrations and experiences of treating patients who have refused a jab.

Also, we'll talk about the The Parker solar probe and what Nasa has described as a historic moment – the first time a spacecraft has flown through the outer atmosphere of the Sun.

(Photo: People carrying packages distributed by a Turkish humanitarian aid group, leave a distribution centre in Kabul, Afghanistan, December 15, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Ali Khara)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy48vvv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxx187qvt9)
Covid-19: Doctors treating unvaccinated patients

Many exhausted healthcare workers around the world admit they feel demoralised as new Covid surges spread again in their countries. Some have also talked about compassion fatigue with un-vaccinated patients who are in majority in many ICU wards. We speak to a doctor in the US about their frustrations and experiences of treating patients who have refused a jab.

And concern is rising over the humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan, where more than half of the country's population are facing life-threatening food insecurity. For years Afghanistan has been in dire humanitarian need, with many millions of people utterly reliant on foreign aid. But with the takeover by the Taliban earlier this year, that international funding stream has switched off. We speak to our correspondent who has spent a day at one hospital where resources are being stretched to their limit.

Also, we hear more stories by people who witnessed last weekend’s tornadoes in the US.

(Photo: Medical worker treats a patient with COVID-19 in Rennaz, Switzerland, 13 December 2021. Credit: EPA/LAURENT GILLIERON)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy48zlz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy493c3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8cqbc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqzgmh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nq0j3cz5g)
2021/12/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy49737)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqzlcm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwb)
Omicron update

Omicron update from James Gallagher, the BBC Health and Science Correspondent. And as New Zealand announce plans to ban cigarette sales to the next generation born after 2008, Claudia reviews the psychological evidence for such a policy working with Professor Robert West. And with wild birds migrating many countries are seeing an increase in Bird Flu. Dr Richard Webby, director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Studies on the Ecology of Influenza in Animals and Birds, explains the risk to human health is low but the implications are high.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A doctor with a blood sample of Covid-19 Omicron variant. Photo credit: Yalcinsonat1/Gerry Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy49bvc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjccsb4z)
Afghan children battle malnutrition and measles

The war in Afghanistan is over, but its economy is collapsing and at this hospital, in the remote, central province of Ghor, they're struggling to cope with the fallout. We have a special report from a hospital in Ghor, where scant resources are being stretched to their limit.

Also in the programme: Germany expels Russian diplomats after hitman sentenced in Berlin; and President Biden visits Kentucky after this weekend's devastating tornadoes.

(Photo: Mothers and babies, such as this girl on the malnutrition ward in Ghor, are at particular risk. Credit: BBC)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy49glh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx14wnps4g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0st753tts3)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqztvw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycsz3b3vwvc)
US central bank signals interest rate hikes in 2022

The Federal Reserve will withdraw support for the post-pandemic US economy more quickly in response to rising inflation. Chris Low of FHN Financial in New York explains the Fed's new measures, which include three possible interest rate rises in 2022.
Also in the programme, the BBC's Matthew Kenyon reports on a dispute in the Dutch town of Zeewolde, where Facebook's parent company Meta wants to build a massive new data centre on land just outside the town.
And Nike has announced the acquisition of British startup RTFKT Studios, which makes virtual trainers for the online world known as the metaverse. Richard Lawler of tech website The Verge tells us what's behind the move.
Plus, ahead of special coverage tomorrow on the latest Turkish central bank decision on interest rates, the BBC's Victoria Craig explores how challenging it is for people in the country to cope with official inflation above 20%.

(Picture: Federal Reserve head Jerome Powell. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy49lbm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnqzym0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 16 DECEMBER 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy49q2r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy49ttw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqqtp1764l)
US central bank signals interest rate hikes in 2022

The Federal Reserve will withdraw support for the post-pandemic US economy more quickly in response to rising inflation. Chris Low of FHN Financial in New York explains the Fed's new measures, which include three possible interest rate rises in 2022.
Also in the programme, nearly 12,000 outdoor eating 'sheds' have sprung up all over New York City in response to coronavirus restrictions. While they have been a lifeline for restaurants, residents are beginning to complain about the noise, the rubbish and the thriving rat population they are causing. Our reporter Lucy Hooker reports.
And Nike has announced the acquisition of British startup RTFKT Studios, which makes virtual trainers for the online world known as the metaverse. Richard Lawler of tech website The Verge tells us what's behind the move.

Ed Butler is joined throughout the programme by Tribune columnist Sushma Ramachandran in Delhi and Marketplace reporter Andy Uhler in Texas.

(Picture: Federal Reserve head Jerome Powell. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy49yl0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8dkk8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr09vd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gyd)
The fake bitcoin mine

With crypto currencies – like Bitcoin and Troon - booming there’s never been a better time to mine for crypto online. Mines in this context describe hundreds of computers that solve complex mathematical puzzles to produce cryptocurrency. And with many wanting to jump onto the crypto band wagon mines are springing up across the world - even fake ones. For Assignment, James Clayton speaks to two Indian victims of a crypto scam - who thought they were investing in a mine, which in fact did not exist. He looks at how one of his own BBC reports was used by the scammers as part of the deception. And he investigates how scammers were able to extract money from victims with seeming impunity. With India close to banning crypto currency currencies all together - are crypto scams ruining the Bitcoin dream?

Reporter: James Clayton
Producer: Regan Morris
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Hacker in front of a computer. Credit: Witthaya Prasongsin)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4b2b4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4b628)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8dt1j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr0kbn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgq)
An alternative Christmas

What dish says Christmas to you - roast turkey, goat? Carp perhaps? What about fried chicken?

In Japan nothing says ‘festive family food’ more than a bucket of KFC fried chicken. And if you’re Jewish and from the US, a Christmas meal will almost certainly mean a trip to Chinatown.

Ruth Alexander unearths the origin stories of these two unlikely, but incredibly popular, - alternative Christmas food traditions, and finds out how food can help give you a sense of belonging, even if celebrating Christmas isn’t for you.

(Picture: Bucket of fried chicken and bowl of Chinese food. Credit: Getty/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Nina Li Coomes, writer based in Chicago, USA

Rabbi Joshua Plaut, author ‘A Kosher Christmas: ‘Tis the Season to be Kosher’.

Producers: Sarah Stolarz and Simon Tulett


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4b9td)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2xkhmhx6j)
Covid-19: Omnicron variant surge in South Korea

South Korea has reintroduced covid restrictions in response to a surge in infections - the change comes just a month and a half after measures were lifted.

We hear from Pakistan where some are angry over the government talking to the group responsible for killing 134 schoolchildren.

And Wikipedia auctions the computer first used to develop the online encyclopaedia website 20 years ago.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4bfkj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2xkhmj0yn)
Highest daily Covid-19 cases recorded across the UK

The UK has recorded its worst daily figures for coronavirus infections since the start of the pandemic. There have been 78,000 new cases as the Omicron variant continues to infect people across the country.

Germany expels Russian diplomats after a Berlin judge accuses the Kremlin of orchestrating the murder of a Chechen dissident. So tension is high as EU leaders sit down to discuss how they might respond to Russian aggression on Ukraine's borders.

And legendary sprinter Usain Bolt tells us how video games sometimes distracted him from his pursuit of his athletics career.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4bk9n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2xkhmj4ps)
Fears grow over the highly transmissible Omicron variant

As nations around the world react to the emergence of the Omicron variant of the coronavirus European health authorities are warning of health services being overwhelmed unless stricter preventative measures are put in place.

Migrants, including children, who arrive illegally in the UK are often detained in very poor conditions, according to a new report - we'll bring you the details.

A $23 billion arms deal between the United States and the United Arab Emirates is in jeopardy as the Gulf nation objects to restrictions the Washington US insists on including in the contracts.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4bp1s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z31)
Should we be worried about the return of inflation?

As prices rise across the world, Tanya Beckett asks if this is a temporary blip owing to the pandemic, or a longer lasting return of inflation. Should we be worried and should policy makers be more willing to raise interest rates to deal with it?

Contributors:
Roger Bootle, Chairman, Capital Economics
Bronwyn Curtis, former Governor, London School of Economics
Claudia Sahm, Senior Fellow, Jain Family Institute
Holger Schmieding, Chief Economist, Berenberg

Presenter: Tanya Beckett
Producer: Sheila Cook


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr11b5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jb9)
The Turkish lira and red hot inflation

The official inflation rate in Turkey is above 21% and the value of the lira has plunged by nearly half this year. Victoria Craig hears from families, students and workers about what a currency crisis, fueling red-hot inflation, feels like to live through.

(Picture Description: Turkish Flag, Picture Credit: Getty Images).


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x44)
On the front line in Bangladesh

When Bangladesh fought for independence from Pakistan, thousands of Pakistani troops were sent to fight in what was then called East Pakistan. In 1971, Shujaat Latif was sent to the town of Jassore where he fought, and then surrendered. He spent two and a half years as a prisoner-of-war. Hear his story.

Photo: Indian army soldiers fire on Pakistani positions, December 15th 1971. Credit: AFP/Getty Images.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4bssx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr1529)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4bxk1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm7)
Don Quixote: Spanish masterpiece

With its multiple narrators, superb and complex characterisation, the influence of Don Quixote de la Mancha has been acknowledged by great writers through the ages as a masterpiece, and hailed as one of the most important novels in the history of literature.

On the surface the novel appears to be a comedy – of situation, of language and of character – but its author Cervantes succeeds in making Don Quixote so much more than a series of slapstick episodes. It was written during a particularly turbulent time in Spanish politics, when both Jews and Muslims were expelled from the Iberian peninsula, and this finds its way into the novel.

Bridget Kendall explores the tale of the self-styled knight Don Quixote and his sidekick Sancho Panza with Cervantes experts Ruth Fine, the Salomon and Victoria Cohen Professor in Iberian and Latin American Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Carolyn Nadeau, the Byron S. Tucci Professor of Hispanic Studies at Illinois Wesleyan University; and Edwin Williamson, the King Alfonso XIII Professor Emeritus of Spanish Studies at the University of Oxford.

(Photo: Cervantes Monument in Madrid, Spain showing Don Quixote and Sancho Panza. Credit: Sylvain Sonnet via Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l98)
Bangladesh's football heroes

In 1971, the Bangladeshi football team made history at the height of the country's war of independence when they played a series of matches in India. The games were the first to be played under the flag of a nation that was still not officially recognised and helped raise money for Bangladesh's independence struggle. Farhana Haider talks to star striker Kazi Salahuddin, who was smuggled into India so he could take part in the matches.

Photo:The Shadhin Bangla Football Dol "Free Bengal Football Team", 1971. Credit: Kazi Salahuddin.


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4c195)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8fn8f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr1dkk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4c519)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k44)
The father and daughter finding closure after a plane crash

Gonzalo Dussan and his daughter Michelle still cannot comprehend how they are able to share their story. For years, they didn't speak about it, but recent developments have given them a new purpose. Back in December 1995 they were on a flight from Miami to Cali in Colombia, when the plane crashed into a mountain, killing almost everyone on board. Michelle was only six years old at the time and the family had been planning to spend Christmas with their relatives in Colombia. Also on board were Michelle's mother and brother, who both died as a result of the crash. Gonzalo and Michelle were two of only four people to survive the crash - out of 163 people. They tell Emily Webb why a new theory about what may have caused the crash has helped them to find closure. The theory has emerged from a film by former airline pilot Tristan Loraine, called American 965.

James Redon has taken his obsession with Japanese video games to extraordinary lengths. He gave up his job and home in France and moved to Japan to create one of the largest collections of video games in the world. He now lives in a quiet suburb of Tokyo where he keeps his collection and hosts the Game Preservation Society - a group set up to gather and preserve games for future generations. Emily Webb went to meet him there in November 2016.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Gonzalo Dussan and his daughter Michelle. Credit: Courtesy of Michelle Dussan)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x44)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4c8sf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8fwrp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr1n1t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4cdjk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjccvcv5)
Turkey cuts rates despite spiralling inflation

Turkey has cut its interest rate for the fourth time in as many months. Its central bank cut its main interest rate by 1%, from 15% to 14%, amid pressure from President Recep Tayyip Erdogan for rates to be cut to stimulate the economy.

The move has sent its currency tumbling to new lows, with many people feeling the impact of inflation when buying essential items.

Also in the programme: South Korea has become the latest country to re-impose coronavirus restrictions in response to a surge of infections, five children have died after a bouncy castle was blown into the air in Australia and we hear more about the album of Australian birdsong that's outselling Justin Bieber and Michael Bublé.

(Picture shows the hands of a man counting Turkish banknotes. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4cj8p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z31)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr1wk2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49kdrzyq1g)
Turkey cuts interest rates again

We meet some of those affected by rising prices in Turkey as interest rates are cut again. The BBC's Victoria Craig is in Istanbul, and reports on the country's unorthodox approach to monetary policy. Also in the programme, there have been a raft of central bank interest rate decisions this week, including one by the Bank of England to raise rates today for the first time in more than three years, to 0.25%. We get reaction from former Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee member Andrew Sentance. Plus, as European supermarkets drop meat products linked to deforestation in Brazil, we hear how much beef production contributes to the problem from Andre Guimaraes, executive director of the Amazonian Environmental Research Institute.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young and Victoria Craig, and produced by Sarah Hawkins, Tom Kavanagh and Stephen Ryan.

(Picture: The Kirlangic family. Picture credit: BBC.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4cn0t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxx187tmz8)
Coronavirus: Omicron in Europe

We’ll look at the situation with the Omicron coronavirus variant across Europe and speak to people who are affected by restrictions imposed on travel and gatherings.

We’ll answer your questions about the virus with the help of Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland.

South Korea has announced new restrictions after a new daily record of Covid infections. We’ll bring together three Koreans to discuss how the pandemic has affected their lives and how they think the government has handled the crisis.

The BBC’s gaming reporter joins us to talk about his interview with Usain Bolt and the sprinter’s enthusiasm for video games.

Picture: A woman wearing a face mask walks near the Houses of Parliament in London (Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4crry)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxx187trqd)
Coronavirus: South Korea

South Korea has announced new restrictions after new daily record of Covid infections. We’ll bring together three Koreans to discuss how the pandemic has affected their lives and how they think the government has handled the crisis.

The Omicron coronavirus variant is spreading much faster than the previous variants but what more have we learnt about the virus? Our colleague from the BBC’s Reality Check team explains what doctors and scientists in South Africa – where the variant was first identified – have reported so far about Omicron, transmission, symptoms and the role of vaccinations.

We’ll also answer your questions about the virus with the help of Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland.

We’ll talk about Turkey’s currency crisis and explain why the lira has hit a new low and how it's affecting people’s lives.

And we hear from people in the Philippines who witnessed a strong typhoon.

Picture: A couple stands next to people waiting in a long line to get a Covid-19 test in Seoul, South Korea (Reuters / Kim Hong-Ji)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4cwj2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k44)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x44)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4d086)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8gm7g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr2cjl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nq0j3gw2k)
2021/12/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4d40b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr2h8q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4r)
Omicron’s rapid replication rate

A study from Hong Kong university shows Omicron replicates 70 times faster than two earlier variants of the SARS-Cov-2 virus. Virologist Malik Peiris, explains how tests using cells from the wind pipe showed the dramatic difference, which supports observations of increased transmission. In contrast Omicron replicated less well than other variants on cells from dep in thre lung – offering some possibility that it may produce mild infections.

Tornados in the US do not normally occur in December. The one which swept across Kentucky and 3 other states was fuelled by weather patterns likely to have been influenced by long term climate change says Geographer James Elsner of Florida State University.

The Parker Solar probe continues its mission of flying closer and closer to the sun. Results just published show what the data the probe picked up when it dipped into the surrounding plasma. NASA’s Nicky Fox is our guide.

And how many legs does a millipede have? Until now not as many as you might think. Entomologist Paul Marek of Virginia Tech reveals the Australian specimen with more legs than ever seen before.

(Image: Omicron variant (B.1.1.529): Immunofluorescence staining of uninfected and infected Vero E6 cells. Credit: Microbiology HKU/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4d7rg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjccw722)
Economic crisis in Turkey

The Turkish minimum wage is increased by 50%, but will spiralling inflation simply cancel it out?

Also on the programme; the UK Health Security Agency has said today that the R value for the Omicron variant is between three and five. Even a fraction above one is considered extremely bad. And the President of Tunisia suspends parliament for another year.

(Picture: People wait to exchange money at a currency exchange in Istanbul Credit: Reuters / Senkaya)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4dchl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx14wnsp1k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0st753xqp6)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr2qrz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs4nlj8hb5)
Turkey cuts interest rates again

We meet some of those affected by rising prices in Turkey as interest rates are cut again. The BBC's Victoria Craig is in Istanbul, and reports on the country's unorthodox approach to monetary policy. Also in the programme, meat products like corned beef and beef jerky are popular in many parts of the world- and a lot of them come from Brazil. Concerns have been voiced for years about the scale of cattle-rearing for meat production on land that's been illegally cleared in the Amazon rainforest. Now, several large European supermarket chains have said they will stop selling any beef products from Brazil. We hear from Dr Ane Alencar, from the Amazonian Environmental Research Institute in Brazil. And entertainment journalist, Caroline Frost, tells us about a new golden age for television production in the UK, powered by the huge budgets of the streaming services.

(Picture: The Kirlangic family. Picture credit: BBC.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4dh7q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z31)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr2vj3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 17 DECEMBER 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4dlzv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l98)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4dqqz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqqtp1b31p)
US Congress passes Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act

The US Congress has passed the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act, which forces importers of goods or ingredients made in Xinjiang to prove that coerced workers weren't involved in the manufacturing process. We get analysis from Isaac Stone Fish, CEO at Strategy Risks in Washington DC. Plus, we meet some of those affected by rising prices in Turkey as interest rates are cut again; the BBC's Victoria Craig is in Istanbul, and reports on the country's unorthodox approach to monetary policy. Also in the programme, meat products like corned beef and beef jerky are popular in many parts of the world- and a lot of them come from Brazil. Concerns have been voiced for years about the scale of cattle-rearing for meat production on land that's been illegally cleared in the Amazon rainforest. Now, several large European supermarket chains have said they will stop selling any beef products from Brazil. We hear from Dr Ane Alencar, from the Amazonian Environmental Research Institute in Brazil. And entertainment journalist, Caroline Frost, tells us about a new golden age for television production in the UK, powered by the huge budgets of the streaming services. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Takara Small, a tech reporter and podcast host in Toronto. And Timothy Martin, Korea Bureau Chief for the Wall Street Journal joins us from Seoul. (Image of US Congress, Image via Getty Images).


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4dvh3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8hggc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr36rh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1v03)
Champions! Atlas finally win the Mexican title

We hear from fans of Atlas after their team won the Liga MX title for the first time since 1951. And we pay tribute to Argentina's Sergio Aguero following his retirement.

Picture on website: Aldo Rocha of Atlas holds the trophy and celebrates with teammates after winning the Liga MX title (Refugio Ruiz/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4dz77)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k44)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x44)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4f2zc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8hpym)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr3g7r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2zvh)
Travelling telescope

Most people will never look through a telescope. When Chu Owen met Kenya’s official astronomer Susan Murabana during a solar eclipse, they pledged to change that. Their falling in love gave birth to the Travelling Telescope – a gathering place for people to look through a telescope and observe the wonders of the night sky.

They observe how gathering around the telescope offers an opportunity to express feelings of grief, of hope, of finding solace for earthly problems in the vastness of the Universe.

Kenyan singer Silayio – who has long-wanted to look through the telescope, describes how she discovered astronomy following a friend’s suicide which led her to question her Christian faith and go in search of a new system of belief.

Susan describes her own journey as a Kenyan woman passionate about science and astronomy. What unites all those who we meet around the telescope is a feeling of awe and wonder.

Producer: Sarah Cuddon

(Photo: Masai man looking through a telescope at the stars, with elephants in the distance. Credit: Daniel-Chu Owen)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4f6qh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv3165kv8r7)
UK Prime Minister's party defeated in by-election

The Tories lose a 'safe seat' which the party has held for nearly 200 years, as Boris Johnson's popularity continues to plummet.

Tens of thousands are forced to evacuate as super-typhoon Rai batters the Philippines.

And the plight of unmarried mothers in the United Arab Emirates - negotiating a bureaucratic maze to secure documentation for their children.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4fbgm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv3165kvdhc)
UK ruling party suffer shock by-election defeat

The Conservative party loses a seat they've held for nearly 200 years in 'a mini political earthquake'. So, is this a one-off set back or a sign of things to come?

Super Typhoon Rai has made landfall in the Philippines forcing tens of thousands from their homes.

And we hear from a man in Kentucky whose video of him playing the piano amid the devastation caused to his home by the tornadoes has gone viral.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4fg6r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv3165kvj7h)
UK by-election: A bad night for Boris

The ruling Conservative party lose a 'safe' seat they've held for nearly 200 years - apparently confirming the Prime Minister's fall in popularity in the polls.

New travel restrictions are coming into force in France for travellers from the UK which is experiencing a record number of cases - we find out how it's affecting one family.

Also scientists have found signs that microbes are breaking down some of the plastics which pollute our oceans - we speak to the biologist involved in this study.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4fkyw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n28)
Ernesto Araújo: Has Brazil failed to protect its people?

Stephen Sackur speaks to Brazil’s former Foreign Minister Ernesto Araújo who was an arch critic of global efforts to contain Covid, calling them communistic. Brazil’s government now stands accused of failing to protect its people. Is that fair?

(Photo: Ernesto Araújo appears via video-link on Hardtalk)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr3y78)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j18)
High risk investing

Why has it become so popular for millions of young people? Has the failure of conventional nest-eggs, rising student debt and high property prices forced twenty-somethings into an ever riskier outlook - and what's the pandemic got to do with it? Nachiket Tikekar, a 23 year old student of business, tells Ed Butler why he decided to stick all his spare money into stocks and shares and why he's not scared of the markets crashing. This has all been made possible by the rise of low-cost online trading platforms like The Zerodha, which is India's biggest. Somnath Mukherjee runs its business and legal operations. Ed also speaks to Sarah Pritchard, the executive director of markets at the UK's Financial Conduct Authority who are trying target these risk adverse investors with warnings through new platforms such as TikTok. And Lesley-Ann Morgan has led a global study looking at investment trends, including for younger people, across more than 20 countries for Schroders Wealth management. She says thousands of young people have been saving as a result of forced lockdowns, and are feeling more inclined to ignore traditional investment strategies. (Picture of a young investor. Picture Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzm)
Bangladesh wins independence

In December 1971, Bangladesh won independence from Pakistan after nine months of war.

Dr Kamal Hossain, a leading political figure, was jailed during the conflict and only released shortly after the Bengali fighters claimed victory.

Dr Hossain told Farhana Haider his feelings as his country won its freedom.

Photo: Kamal Hossain (l) with the founder of Bangladesh, Sheikh Mujibur Rahman. Credit Dr Kamal Hossain collection.


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4fpq0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj0)
The UK's plan to rein in big tech

Politicians in the UK push forward plans for new laws to regulate social media and the tech giants. It’s designed to protect children from harmful content and stop disinformation, but will it work? Plus the company launching a satellite that can track the amount of heat being lost from factories and houses around the world. Could it help us become more energy efficient and fight climate change? And the women using technology to fight harrassment - how phone and smart watch apps are being used to help women feel safer on the streets.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr41zd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4ftg4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hth)
Do digital currencies need policing?

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has warned that the stability of some countries’ financial systems could soon be at risk because of unregulated crypto assets. Cryptocurrencies and other digital financial products created using blockchain technology are proliferating. They’re largely free from the controls of governments and central banks, but also free from any significant regulation. The IMF believes “comprehensive, consistent and coordinated” global regulation of the sector is now needed to prevent contagion if major crypto assets begin to collapse. Myanmar’s opposition-led shadow government this week announced that it will accept Tether, a so-called stablecoin, claiming to be pegged to the US dollar, as an official currency - a way of bypassing the control of the country’s military rulers. Meanwhile, across the border in China, authorities are cracking down on crypto and pushing ahead with plans for the country’s own Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC) which critics fear could mark the beginning of the end of anonymous transactions. So, is global finance undergoing a transformation? And are more stringent rules of the road necessary to protect consumers and avoid economic calamity? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.

Producers: Zak Brophy and Paul Schuster.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4fy68)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8jk5j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr49gn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1v03)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4g1yd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g0)
Becoming a ‘foreign agent’

What’s it like to be named a ‘foreign agent’ by your own government? That’s what happened to BBC Russian journalist Andrei Zakharov in October. He’s worked in BBC Russian’s investigations unit for many years, and investigative journalists were some of the first on the list. We find out what becoming a ‘foreign agent’ has meant for him.

Reporting from the volcano
Mount Semeru in eastern Java erupted a week ago, killing dozens of people, and destroying thousands of homes. BBC Indonesian’s Valdya Baraputri reported from the path of the eruption, standing on lava and ash as high as rooftops. She explains what's happened to those who've lost their homes.

Arabic Language Day
18th December is World Arabic Language Day, and Dina Waqqaf of BBC Arabic TV is celebrating it with a Facebook live to explore the difficulties facing Arabic speakers in the modern world. She tells us what she found out.

Nigeria's women lawyers
Oluyemi Adetiba-Orija leads an all-women Nigerian law firm, which offers free support to those who cannot afford legal defence, as well as to people facing pre-trial detention. BBC Africa Women's Affairs journalist Azeezat Olaoluwa explains the problems they are tackling.

(Image: BBC Russian journalist Andrei Zakharov in the Moscow bureau. Credit: BBC)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4g5pj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8jsns)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr4jyx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4g9fn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjccy8r8)
UN human rights body holds urgent session on Ethiopia

The UN Human Rights Council is holding an urgent meeting on Ethiopia to discuss an EU proposal to appoint an international team to investigate human rights violations that rights groups say may amount to war crimes. Ethiopia has dismissed the move as "politically motivated". We speak to the EU Special Envoy to the Horn of Africa.

Also on the programme: Britain's ruling Conservative Party suffers a crushing defeat in a by-election; and President Biden warns of a winter of "illness and death" for unvaccinated Americans amid a surge in cases linked to the Omicron coronavirus variant.


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4gf5s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n28)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr4sg5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4732l5zpnp)
Coal power generation hits record

Despite the Glasgow climate summit aim of reducing coal use, coal power has hit a record. That's according to data compiled by the International Energy Agency. We ask Simon Evans, policy editor of the energy news website Carbon Brief whether coal fired power generation is likely to plateau any time soon. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on why high risk investing has become so popular among young people. Plus, the 2017 Grenfell Tower fire tragedy in London, which led to the deaths of 72 people, was blamed on the use of flammable exterior cladding in the building's renovation. The BBC's Sarah Corker reports on what can be learned from Australia's response to the problem of dangerous cladding.

Today's edition is presented by Vishala Sri-Pathma, and produced by Sarah Hawkins and Tom Kavanagh.

(Picture: A coal-fired power plant. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4gjxx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxx187xjwc)
UK Government lose historic safe seat

The UK government has been reacting to the loss of the previously ultra-safe parliamentary seat, North Shropshire. The so-called by-election was held after a week dominated by claims of Covid rule-breaking by members of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's ruling Conservative Party. We will hear reaction from the UK and explain what this loss actually means.

Western intelligence services believe up to 100,000 Russian troops are gathered near Ukraine's borders. Ukrainian authorities say Moscow could be planning a military offensive at the end of January. We ask people in Russia and Ukraine whether they are worried about escalations there.

And, as always, we ask our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Megan Murray, Covid questions from our listeners.

(Photo: Prime Minister Boris Johnson, records an address to the nation at Downing Street, London, Credit: Kirsty O"Connor/PA Wire)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4gnp1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxx187xnmh)
Russia Ukraine tensions continue

Western intelligence services believe up to 100,000 Russian troops are gathered near Ukraine's borders. Ukrainian authorities say Moscow could be planning a military offensive at the end of January. US officials however say it's not clear whether Russia's President Putin has made a decision. We ask people in both countries whether they are worried about escalations there.

Following claims of rule-breaking by members of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's ruling Conservative Party, the UK government has lost the previously ultra-safe parliamentary seat, North Shropshire. We hear reaction from UK voters and explain how by-elections work.

And, our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Megan Murray, answers questions sent in by our listeners.

(Photo: Ukrainian service members walk along a trench on the front line near the town of New York (Novhorodske) in Donetsk region, Ukraine December 17, 2021. Credit: Oleksandr Klymenko/Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4gsf5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20g0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4gx59)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxvlm8kj4k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr58fp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nq0j3krzn)
2021/12/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4h0xf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nj0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr5d5t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prh)
How can I keep fruit & veg fresh for longer?

As many of us gear up for the annual Christmas feast, some of you may be wondering how to eat everything before it goes off. It’s a great question, as the UN puts global food waste at a whopping 1.3 billion tonnes a year – that’s one third of all edible produce being thrown in the bin.

So this week the team investigates listener Peter’s query about what makes some fruit and vegetables rot faster than others. Preserving food used to be about ensuring nomadic populations could keep moving without going hungry, but these days some things seem to have an almost indefinite shelf-life. Is it about better packaging or can clever chemistry help products stay better for longer? A Master Food Preserver explains how heat and cold help keep microbes at bay, and how fermentation encourages the growth of healthy bacteria which crowd out the ones that make us ill.

Presenter Datshiane Navanayagam learns how to make a sauerkraut that could keep for weeks, and investigates the gases that food giants use to keep fruit and veg field-fresh. But as the industry searches for new techniques to stretch shelf-life even further could preservatives in food be affecting our microbiome? Research shows sulphites may be killing off ‘friendly’ gut bacteria linked to preventing conditions including cancer and Crohn’s disease.

Produced by Marijke Peters for BBC World Service.



Featuring:

Christina Ward, Master Food Preserver
Dr Heidy den Besten, Food Microbiologist, Wageningen University
Ian Shuttlewood, Tilbury Cold Store
Professor Sally Irwin, University of Hawaii


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4h4nk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5hjccz3z5)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4h8dp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx14wnwkyn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0st7540ml9)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr5mp2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrb6vxp2sz)
Coal power generation hits record

Despite the Glasgow climate summit aim of reducing coal use, coal power has hit a record. That's according to data compiled by the International Energy Agency. We ask Simon Evans, policy editor of the energy news website Carbon Brief whether coal fired power generation is likely to plateau any time soon. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on why high risk investing has become so popular among young people. Plus, the 2017 Grenfell Tower fire tragedy in London, which led to the deaths of 72 people, was blamed on the use of flammable exterior cladding in the building's renovation. The BBC's Sarah Corker reports on what can be learned from Australia's response to the problem of dangerous cladding.

(Picture: A coal-fired power plant. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxyy4hd4t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n28)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkrdnr5rf6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1v03)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity 10:06 SUN (w3ct2zv5)

A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity 23:06 SUN (w3ct2zv5)

A Pyrotechnic History Of Humanity 03:06 MON (w3ct2zv5)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gyd)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gyd)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gyd)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172xzkr1dfdv9m)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkr1dfdz1r)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkr1dffb94)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkr1dffpjj)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkr1dfft8n)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkr1dfg1rx)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkr1dfgwzt)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172xzkr1dfhczb)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172xzkr1dfhmgl)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkr1dfhvyv)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkr1dfj3g3)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkr1dfj767)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkr1dfjlfm)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkr1dfjq5r)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkr1dfjyp0)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkr1dfkxn1)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkr1dfl8wf)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkr1dfldmk)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172xzkrdnqqcmv)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkrdnqqhcz)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkrdnqqm43)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkrdnqqqw7)

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BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzkrdnqrblw)

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BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172xzkrdnqrl34)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkrdnqrpv8)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkrdnqrybj)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkrdnqs5ts)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkrdnqsnt9)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkrdnqsskf)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkrdnqt11p)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkrdnqt4st)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkrdnqtj16)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkrdnqtrjg)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzkrdnqv7hz)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkrdnqvc83)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkrdnqvlrc)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkrdnqvv7m)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkrdnqw2qw)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzkrdnqwkqd)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzkrdnqwpgj)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzkrdnqwxys)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkrdnqx1px)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkrdnqxdy9)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkrdnqxnfk)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkrdnqy4f2)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172xzkrdnqy856)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkrdnqyhng)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkrdnqyr4q)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkrdnqyzmz)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkrdnqzgmh)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzkrdnqzlcm)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkrdnqztvw)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkrdnqzym0)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkrdnr09vd)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkrdnr0kbn)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkrdnr11b5)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzkrdnr1529)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkrdnr1dkk)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzkrdnr1n1t)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzkrdnr1wk2)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkrdnr2cjl)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzkrdnr2h8q)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzkrdnr2qrz)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkrdnr2vj3)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkrdnr36rh)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkrdnr3g7r)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzkrdnr3y78)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172xzkrdnr41zd)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkrdnr49gn)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzkrdnr4jyx)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzkrdnr4sg5)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzkrdnr58fp)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172xzkrdnr5mp2)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkrdnr5rf6)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172xzjxlntqc93)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjxlntqh17)

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BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172xzjxlntr2rw)

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BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172xzjxlntrkrd)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172xzjxlntrphj)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172xzjxlntrt7n)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172xzjxlntrxzs)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172xzjxlnts1qx)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172xzjxlntsjqf)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172xzjxlntsngk)

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BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172xzjxlntswyt)

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BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172xzjxlntt4g2)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172xzjxlntt866)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjxlnttcyb)

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BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172xzjxlntvldm)

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BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172xzjxlntvyn0)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172xzjxlntw2d4)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172xzjxlntw648)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172xzjxlntwkcn)

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BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172xzjxlntwsvx)

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BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172xzjxlntx1c5)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172xzjxyy410cg)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjxyy4143l)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172xzjxyy417vq)

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BBC News 04:00 MON (w172xzjxyy41hbz)

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BBC News 06:00 MON (w172xzjxyy41qv7)

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BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjxyy42bkw)

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BBC News 15:00 MON (w172xzjxyy42tkd)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172xzjxyy42y9j)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzjxyy4321n)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172xzjxyy435ss)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172xzjxyy439jx)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172xzjxyy43f91)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172xzjxyy43k15)

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BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjxyy43sjf)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172xzjxyy43x8k)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjxyy4410p)

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BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjxyy457gz)

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BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjxyy462pw)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzjxyy466g0)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzjxyy46b64)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjxyy46fy8)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjxyy46kpd)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjxyy46pfj)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172xzjxyy46t5n)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjxyy46xxs)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172xzjxyy471nx)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172xzjxyy475f1)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjxyy47955)

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BBC News 06:00 WED (w172xzjxyy47jnf)

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BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzjxyy47s4p)

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BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjxyy480my)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjxyy484d2)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjxyy48846)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjxyy48cwb)

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BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjxyy49lbm)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172xzjxyy49q2r)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjxyy49ttw)

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BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjxyy4b2b4)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjxyy4b628)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjxyy4b9td)

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BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjxyy4bp1s)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjxyy4bssx)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjxyy4bxk1)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjxyy4c195)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjxyy4c519)

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BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172xzjxyy4dlzv)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d6r)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 SUN (w3ct2d6r)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxx187jy7z)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxx187k203)

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BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxxx187trqd)

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BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxx187xnmh)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j5s)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jgt)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jpl)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1jb9)

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Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqqtp11dbd)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqqtp1497h)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqqtp1764l)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqqtp1b31p)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dhs)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1prg)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1prg)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1prh)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lt3)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lt3)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lt3)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2zqg)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct1m8t)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct1m8t)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct1m8t)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mvw)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mvw)

From Our Own Correspondent 00:06 MON (w3ct1mvw)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n1r)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n1r)

HARDtalk 23:06 MON (w3ct1n1r)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1nc9)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1nc9)

HARDtalk 23:06 WED (w3ct1nc9)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n28)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n28)

HARDtalk 23:06 FRI (w3ct1n28)

Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nw9)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nwb)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nwb)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nwb)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2zw2)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2zw2)

Heart and Soul 00:32 MON (w3ct2zw2)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2zvh)

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More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dl1)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l2g)

Over to You 00:50 SUN (w3ct1l2g)

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People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1plx)

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Sports News 22:20 SAT (w172y0ssvwtbcwk)

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Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tm9mdzpgq)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lch)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rtz)

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The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2drk)

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The Comb 04:32 WED (w3ct2z2h)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct2zhf)

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The Cultural Frontline 22:32 SAT (w3ct1ptn)

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The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2zvp)

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The Explanation 09:32 SAT (w3ct2z3l)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rgp)

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The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rm6)

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The History Hour 00:06 TUE (w3ct1z7y)

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The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3ct1yw7)

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WorklifeIndia 01:32 SAT (w3ct2f46)

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World Business Report 01:06 SAT (w172xzlkh41336h)

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World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y48b7p2n1p7)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1v03)

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World Questions 19:06 SAT (w3ct1wfp)

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