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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 04 DECEMBER 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhy6p8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htf)
Omicron: Did Africa get a raw deal?

The emergence of the Omicron variant has once again highlighted the difficulty in preventing the pandemic from spreading across the globe. Health experts have long argued that regions like southern Africa, where the variant was first detected, are prone to dangerous mutations of the virus when large groups of people are left unvaccinated. Only a tenth of Africa's billion plus population have received their first dose and the continent is yet to create its own Covid vaccines. African nations are reliant on vaccines from the international alliance Covax but the supply is far less than what's required. Meanwhile many on the continent have opted to pursue traditional remedies, with some denying the existence of the virus altogether. So what's the road ahead for Africa as it tries to overcome the pandemic? What sort of public engagement is required to reduce vaccine hesitancy? And how is the fight against Covid made more difficult by other health emergencies?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Paul Schuster and Junaid Ahmed.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhybfd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlk3vq9yln)
US jobs report misses expectations

The BBC's Samira Hussain tells us about the latest US employment figures, which missed expectations - and Chris Low from FHN Financial tells us how the damp figures effected the stock markets. Mike Johnson reports on what's been described as the Great Resignation, where people are quitting their jobs in record numbers, and asks whether it is a permanent change in how we think about work. We hear from the CEO of Visa about how the pandemic has accelerated our move away from cash. And finally, an election is under way in The Gambia - Esau Williams is there to update us on the biggest economic issues on the minds of the population: youth unemployment and foreign fishing boats, seen as preventing locals' chances at a better life.

Hosted by Vivienne Nunis and produced by Faarea Masud.

(Image: General Motors employees help guide applicants through the process during a job fair. Credit: Brett Carlsen/Getty Images)


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43mpps)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f45)
How is talent migration affecting India’s workforce?

Resignations in many countries have gathered pace and made headlines around the world. More than 4.3 million workers quit their jobs in the US in August alone.

The pandemic has been a key reason why many in India have also decided to reconsider their choice of career. According to studies, nearly 68% of people in India want to switch their industries, and more than 50% of workers want to try something in which they have little to no experience.

But how easy or difficult is it to make the switch to an entirely new skillset? What is driving this migration of talent across sectors? In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how talent migration is affecting India’s job market and the workforce.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Tushar Verma, travel influencer and co-founder, Untouched Lands; Akshita Wadhwana, founder and director, The Empty Crate Company; Rajneesh Singh, managing partner, SimplyHR Solutions


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhyg5j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtw2n124s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43mtfx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lcg)
Ramiz Raja on the future of Pakistan cricket

Alison Mitchell, Jim Maxwell and Charu Sharma are joined by the Chairman of the Pakistan Cricket Board, Ramiz Raja to discuss their run in the men’s T20 World Cup. He tells us that he spoke to captain Babar Azam about how to get India player Rohit Sharma out and what more needs to be done to ensure they win a final soon. Plus he shares his hopes for a women’s Pakistan Super League and how the decision by England and New Zealand to call off their tours made them feel 'used and binned'.

Plus we look ahead to the men’s Ashes series, debate team selection and give our series predictions.

Photo: Newly-elected Pakistan's Cricket Board (PCB) chairman and former team captain Ramiz Raja smiles after addressing a press conference at the cricket academy in Lahore on September 13, 2021. (Photo by Arif ALI / AFP) (Photo by ARIF ALI/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhykxn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fy)
China surveillance system unpicked

The use of surveillance systems in China is not new, but a recent document published by local authorities in the province of Henan gave explicit details of a traffic light system, targeting international students and journalists, among others. Howard Zhang, from BBC Chinese tells us more.

Siberian husky or Andean fox?
A Peruvian family in Lima bought a puppy they believed was a Siberian Husky. But when Run Run began eating the neighbours' chickens and guinea pigs they realised something was wrong, as BBC Mundo contributor Martin Riepl explains.

Why it's hard to recruit women to Liberia's army
Liberia is trying to recruit 200 women to join the army. There are no shortage of takers - 7,000 turned out for a training event - but historically it's proved hard to find women who make the grade, as BBC Africa stringer Jonathan Paye-Leyleh in Monrovia reports.

Luxor's Avenue of the Sphinxes
Pharaonic chariots and massed ranks of performers featured in the lavish ceremony to mark the reopening of the 3,000 year old Avenue of Sphinxes in Luxor, Egypt. Reda Al Mawy of BBC Arabic explains the history, and modern day relevance, of the site.

Deportivo Palestino's going home
In 1920 Palestinian immigrants in Chile founded the 'Deportivo Palestino' football club in Santiago. A century later the club has opened its first training academy in Ramallah, in the Palestinian Territories. BBC Arabic reporter Alaa Deraghme and BBC Mundo contributor Paula Molina tells us more about the club’s history and new venture.

(Photo: Man setting up a camera. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzk)
Derek Jarman

One of the first high-profile artists to speak openly about having Aids was the British experimental film-maker, Derek Jarman. Jarman had made his name in the 1970s by directing Sebastiane, the first openly gay film in British cinema history. Vincent Dowd speaks to Keith Collins who lived with Jarman during his final years, and cared for him up to his death in 1994.

(Photo: Derek Jarman. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhypns)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Reith Lectures (w3ct2zp9)
What is AI and should we fear it?

In the first lecture, Stuart Russell, professor of Computer Science and founder of the Center for Human-Compatible Artificial Intelligence at the University of California, Berkeley, reflects on the birth of AI, tracing our thinking about it back to Aristotle. He will outline the definition of AI, its successes and failures, and potential risks for the future. Why do we often fear the potential of AI?

Referencing the representation of AI systems in film and popular culture, Russell will examine whether our fears are well founded. As professor Stephen Hawking said in 2014, “Success in creating AI would be the biggest event in human history. Unfortunately, it might also be the last, unless we learn how to avoid the risks.” Russell will ask how those risks arise and whether they can be avoided, allowing humanity and AI to coexist successfully.

The lectures examine what Russell argues is the most profound change in human history as the world becomes increasingly reliant on super-powerful AI. Examining the impact of AI on jobs, military conflict and human behaviour, Russell argues that our current approach to AI is wrong and that if we continue down this path, we will have less and less control over AI at the same time as it has an increasing impact on our lives. How can we ensure machines do the right thing? The lectures suggest a way forward based on a new model for AI, one based on machines that learn about and defer to human preferences.

The lectures are chaired by presenter, journalist and author, Anita Anand.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhytdx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtw2n1fd5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43n5p9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct2yqq)
The Denial Files

7. The truth behind Saudi’s eco-city

Saudi Arabia, one of the world's biggest oil producers, says it’s pivoting to green energy. It has a host of big projects and initiatives. But will reality live up to the country’s rhetoric? And why do some activists say they’ve become victims of the government’s grand plans?

We’ve been looking at online chatter and PR campaigns pushing the country’s green credentials. At the same time, experts say Saudi officials are trying to secure the future of the country’s huge fossil fuel energy industry.

And we hear from an activist who’s fighting on behalf of people displaced by NEOM, a brand new futuristic eco-city in the middle of the desert.

Trending and BBC Arabic have been investigating the truth behind Saudi Arabia’s green plans, and we ask whether the government is really serious about reducing its reliance on fossil fuels.

Presenter: Merlyn Thomas
Producer: Reha Kansara
Series producer: Vibeke Venema


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dp8)
America’s abortion divide

The US Supreme Court has heard arguments in the most important abortion case in a generation. It is the biggest challenge to a 1973 ruling that legalised abortion nationally, and could change reproductive rights in the country. Ros Atkins looks at the abortion debate in the US and asks why this case is happening now.

(Photo: Abortion rights advocates and anti-abortion protesters demonstrate in front of the US Supreme Court on 1, December, 2021 in Washington, DC. Credit: Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images).


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhyy51)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytk3579bf4)
Covid-19: Omicron variant continues to spread

Scientists have said that the latest variant of Covid-19, Omicron, appears to spread more than twice as fast as the Delta variant. The research has not yet been peer reviewed.

In this edition of Weekend, we speak to the Chief Scientist of the World Health Organisation, Dr Soumya Swaminathan.

Also in the programme: the parents of a fifteen-year-old student who killed four classmates in a school shooting, have been charged with involuntary manslaughter; and Iraq has begun repatriating hundreds of its citizens.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Amber Murrey, a political geographer and professor at the University of Oxford, and Dominic Jermey, Director-General of the Zoological Society of London and a former UK Ambassador to Afghanistan and the United Arab Emirates.

(Photo: COVID-19 vaccinations are pictured at a government-run clinic, in Hillbrow, Johannesburg, South Africa.The South African government is considering making Covid-19 vaccinations mandatory as the new Omicron variant cases increase across the country. EPA/Kim Ludbrook)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhz1x5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytk3579g58)
WHO: Don’t panic over Omicron variant

The World Health Organisation has urged people to not panic over the new Omicron variant. Reports suggest the new variant has been found in close to 40 countries worldwide.


On this edition of Weekend, we speak to the Chief Scientist of the World Health Organisation, Dr Soumya Swaminathan.


Also in the programme: outgoing German Chancellor Angela Merkel bids farewell, and we hear the story of a transgender Malaysian entrepreneur.


Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Amber Murrey, a political geographer and professor at the University of Oxford, and Dominic Jermey, Director-General of the Zoological Society of London and a former UK Ambassador to Afghanistan and the United Arab Emirates.


(Photo: A Thai health official carries out an antigen test for COVID-19 during a mass COVID-19 testing. CREDIT: EPA/NARONG SANGNAK)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhz5n9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytk3579kxd)
WHO: Omicron could become dominant strain of Covid-19

The latest variant of Covid-19, Omicron, has continued its spread. The World Health organisation has urged people not to panic over the new strain. The WHO said that Omicron could become the dominant strain of Covid-19 worldwide.


On this edition of Weekend, we speak to the Chief Scientist of the World Health Organisation, Dr Soumya Swaminathan.


Also in the programme: the refugee crisis caused by the war in Yemen, and the first literary work to come out of Myanmar since February’s military coup.


Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Amber Murrey, a political geographer and professor at the University of Oxford, and Dominic Jermey, Director-General of the Zoological Society of London and a former UK Ambassador to Afghanistan and the United Arab Emirates.


(Photo: A Thai health official collects swab samples for COVID-19 testing during a mass COVID-19 test to prevent the Omicron variant at a school in Thailand. CREDIT: EPA/NARONG SANGNAK)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43njxp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9h)
Women swimming in the wild

Nora Fakim talks to two women about the health benefits of swimming in the wild.

Rachel Ashe is the founder of Mental Health Swims, a peer support community organising wild swimming or dipping events in the UK. Rachel first tried cold water swimming in 2019, shortly after being diagnosed with mental health conditions, and during the pandemic she went from organising a monthly gathering at her local beach in Wales to running a social enterprise with over 80 groups across the country.

Ilse Theys Woodward is an open water swimmer, a nurse, a swimming instructor and a lifeguard. She’s based in Cape Town, South Africa and she has recently taken part in the Freedom Swim, one of the world’s toughest cold water sea swim races. She’s also a member of the Phoenix Open Water Swimming (POWS), a swimming club working with underprivileged youths in Cape Town.

Produced by Alice Gioia

(Image: (L) Ilse Theys Woodward, credit Ilse Theys Woodward. (R) Rachel Ashe, credit Laura Minns)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhz9df)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6q)
Coronavirus: Omicron

At this time of the year, many people traditionally begin to think about coming together for gatherings of family and friends to celebrate events such as Christmas, Kwanzaa and Hanukkah.

But for millions of people, their festive plans are in upheaval after the World Health Organisation identified Omicron a ‘variant of concern’ resulting in travel bans and restrictions across a number of countries. The WHO has since told nations they must prepare for coronavirus surges linked to Omicron.

We hear from restaurant and hotel owners in South Africa, the UK and Canada about the impact on the hospitality industry in the run up to one of their busiest holiday periods after a difficult 19 months. Plus we introduce two women in the Netherlands and the UK about how their plans are changing, Our guest in the UK was due to fly home to South Africa for a five-week family holiday but is now having to arrange an alternative celebration.

Picture: Christmas decorations in Tokyo after Japan effectively closed its borders in response to the Omicron variant (REUTERS/Androniki Christodoulou)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43nnnt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Explanation (w3ct2z3k)
Understanding Iran: Reconciling religion and democracy

Anu Anand talks to Rana Rahimpour about how decades of turbulence have shaped Iran, and why religion, democracy and ideals all combine to explain Iran today.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2f)
Ros Atkins on analysing news

Every week Ros Atkins analyses one of the big issues in the news. But what is his programme? A bite size documentary or an extended news feature? Listeners quiz Ros on how his series is made. Plus we hear about the welcome return of the drama set in a market in Nigeria!

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhzf4k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0qb5fpfv56)
‘We want to show how far the women’s game has come’ – Simmons on FA Cup Final

The Football Association director of the Women’s Professional Game – Kelly Simmons - tells us 5 December was chosen as the date for this year’s women’s FA Cup Final between Arsenal and Chelsea as it marks the 100 anniversary of the governing body banning women’s football. Simmons describes that decision as probably the lowest point in the history of the game and says the FA are keen to be positive about the day and celebrate how far the women’s game has come in the years since. Simmons also discusses what needs to change in international football following a series of one sided Fifa World Cup Qualifiers – including England’s 20-0 win over Latvia this week.

Jamaica netball captain Jhaniele Fowler tells us how she didn’t let a serious heart condition she developed as a child, stop her pursuing a career in sport. Fowler has only just stopped taking medication for rheumatic heart disease. She also tells us how her playing schedule and the Covid-19 pandemic have combined to keep her and her daughter apart for the last two netball seasons. Fowler describes surprising her daughter by arriving home from overseas unannounced and how her dream is to have her on the podium with her at a Commonwealth Games or World Cup.

Fiona Brady, a Special Olympian who has represented Ireland in Basketball, Tenpin Bowling and Floorball, joins us to discuss the impact of not being able to play sport during the Covid-19 pandemic has had on her. This week saw International day of persons with disabilities take place and a new campaign called "Faces of Basketball" is aiming to give people with intellectual disabilities the confidence to return to sport.

In Sporting Witness, we return to 1961, when England’s top players threatened strike action in order to force the Football League to scrap its limit on wages of 20 pounds a week. Their victory was a turning point for the sport as it ushered in the modern era of football mega-salaries. The late England captain Jimmy Armfield, gives us his recollections of the period.

And – we’re live in Saudi Arabia with Jennie Gow ahead of the first ever Formula 1 race in the country, John Southall is at the London Stadium ahead of West Ham United v Chelsea in the Premier League and Jamie Broughton joins us with the latest from the UK Snooker Championship.

(Photo: FA Women’s Super League match between Arsenal and Chelsea, London, 2021. Credit: Catherine Ivill/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhzjwp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtw2n24vy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43nx52)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhznmt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9v)
Monique Roffey: The Mermaid of Black Conch

Harriett Gilbert talks to the multi-award-winning Trinidadian-British author Monique Roffey about her enchanting novel The Mermaid of Black Conch, which won the 2020 Costa Book of the Year. Roffey spins the mesmerising tale of a cursed mermaid and the lonely fisherman who falls in love with her.

When American bounty-hunters capture Aycayia from the deep seas off the island of Black Conch, David rescues her and vows to win her trust. With Aycayia in hiding, their love grows as they navigate both the joys and dangers of life on shore. But on an island whose history reaches back to darker times nothing is straightforward as old jealousies and ancient grudges surface amongst the inhabitants.

(Photo: Monique Roffey.. Credit: Marcus Bastel.)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhzscy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5gstrgrpk)
Scientists say Omicron variant spreading twice as fast as Delta

Researchers looking into the Omicron variant say it appears to be spreading twice as fast as the Delta variant.

Also in the programme: Voters are heading to the polls in The Gambia to choose a new president and in UK the first person to die of AIDS is chronicled in a television documentary.

(Photo: A health worker tests passengers for coronavirus at Amsterdam Schiphol airport on December 2, 2021 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Credit: Photo by Pierre Crom/Getty Images)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dhzx42)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tlyc36jvw)
Live Sporting Action

Following the midweek action in the Premier League, Sportsworld returns with an exciting match between Wolves v Liverpool. We’ll also have the latest from the Premier League leaders Chelsea as they take on West Ham.

Lee James is once again joined by the ex-England and Chelsea defender Katie Chapman, former DR Congo captain Gabriel Zakuani and former West Ham and current Atlanta United executive Jonathan Spector.

We’ll preview the Ashes with England bowler Steven Finn and Alex Hartley alongside journalist Melinda Farrell, and have the latest from the Saudi Arabia Grand Prix, England v Jamaica netball and the Women's FA Cup.

Photo: Joao Moutinho of Wolverhampton Wanderers is challenged by Liverpool forward Mohamed Salah. (Credit: Pool/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj0d3l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtw2n302v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43prcz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct2yqq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l96)
The football wages revolution

In 1961, England’s top players threatened strike action in order to force the Football League to scrap its limit on wages of 20 pounds a week. Their victory was a turning point for the sport as it ushered in the modern era of football mega-salaries. In 2011, Lucy Williamson spoke to the late Jimmy Armfield, a former star defender for Blackpool and England captain.

PHOTO: The late Jimmy Armfield in the early 1960s (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj0hvq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvd)
Poison: Jacob Zuma's toxic obsession

Jacob Zuma, South Africa's former president, believes the world is out to poison him. He has claimed that the CIA, MI6, local traitors, and perhaps even one of his wives, have tried to kill him. No wonder he has ordered toxicologists to test everything he eats. But is Zuma the victim of an elaborate international conspiracy that has its roots in the Cold War and South Africa’s liberation struggle? Or is he simply trying to distract attention from a mountain of corruption allegations? BBC Africa correspondent, Andrew Harding, digs into a mystery that links a case of poisoned underpants, to a plot to kill Nelson Mandela, to this year’s riots that left 300 South Africans dead.

(Photo: Former South African President Jacob Zuma speaks to supporters after appearing at the High Court in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Credit: Rogan Ward/Reuters)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj0mlv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rty)
Film-makers Jimmy Chin and Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi

Lady Gaga and Adam Driver on Ridley Scott’s House of Gucci; high fashion and high drama.

Hollywood star Will Smith talks about his latest role in the story of the tennis-playing Williams sisters; geniuses of the game. In King Richard he plays their father. And he also talks about his autobiography.

Cuban Ballet superstar Carlos Acosta, reveals that he was expelled from school for poor attendance (because he was trying to avoid ballet!)

British actor Benedict Cumberbatch tells us how he prepared to play a cowboy in The Power of The Dog….he had to learn to roll a cigarette whilst riding a horse.

And we hear from director and legendary screenwriter Paul Schrader, whose latest film stars Oscar Isaac, as a former soldier turned gambler.

We also hear about the huge influence Nigerian drummer Tony Allen has had on other musicians.

And Nikki is joined by the Oscar-winning film-makers Jimmy Chin and Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi who talk about their latest documentary The Rescue.

(Photo: Jimmy Chin and Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi.
Credit: Kirk Edwards/National Geographic)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj0rbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5gstrhqnl)
Michigan school shooting: Suspect's parents deny involuntary manslaughter

James and Jennifer Crumbley are accused of ignoring warning signs before their son's alleged rampage.

Also on the programme, the French President Emmanuel Macron has become the first major western leader to hold in person talks with Mohammed Bin Salman since the Saudi crown prince was implicated in the murder of the Saudi journalist, Jamal Kashoggi, three years ago. And we hear the story of John Eddie, the first person to die of Aids in the UK, 40 years ago.

(Picture: James and Jennifer Crumbley, parents of Ethan Crumbley Credit: EPA)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj0w33)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx0fc1f5n2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sshmhk78q)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43q7ch)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptm)
What’s the future for culture in Afghanistan?

The Cultural Frontline asks what’s the future for arts, media and culture in Afghanistan under Taliban rule.

Using their instruments for change. Sana Safi speaks to the musicians from the Afghanistan National Institute of Music about their fight to keep traditional Afghan music alive and their fears and hopes for musicians under a Taliban government.

Over 250 newspapers, radio and TV stations closed in the first 100 days of Taliban rule following the withdrawal of US troops in August, and the Afghan press watchdog NAI says around 70% of journalists have lost their jobs. Our reporter Sahar Zand speaks to Massood Sanjer, one of Afghanistan’s leading producers, about the future of Afghanistan’s media landscape.

#DoNotTouchMyClothes: We find out how Afghan women around the world used this hashtag to share photos of themselves in colourful traditional clothes in protest in response to pro-Taliban rally of women in Kabul - dressed all in black, full-veils, and long robes. Sana Safi speaks to Dr Bahar Jalil who posted the very first picture, and to Sabrina Spanta – once a refugee, and now a fashion designer in the USA, inspired by Afghan women, and who recently starred on TV fashion show Project Runway.

(Photo: A traditional Afghan rubab. Credit: Marcus Yam)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj0zv7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcw)
The 'look at me' gene with Poté, Pierre Kwenders, TSHA and Heléna Star

Poté, Pierre Kwenders, TSHA and Heléna Star discuss what the 'look at me' gene actually is, why music is nothing without dancing, what they’ve learned about themselves through music, and the legacy of what they’d like to leave behind.

St-Lucia-born artist Poté combines Caribbean percussion, electronic sounds, and emotive songwriting that caught the attention of Damon Albarn, who appeared on his latest album A Tenuous Tale of Her.

Pierre Kwenders is a Congolese-Canadian musician known for dismantling the concept of genre with his indie-Afro-electro sound. He sings in Lingala, French, English, Tshiluba, and Kikongo, and explores themes in his lyrics such as homesickness, tormented farewells, and his love for his homeland and his brothers and sisters.

One of the most exciting producers and DJs in London, TSHA (pronounced Tee-sha) blends house, synth lines, and psychedelic noise, and has remixed the likes of Foals, Prospa, Declan McKenna, and Lianne La Havas.

Heléna Star is a regular radio presenter and DJ at some of London’s finest clubs, playing an eclectic mix of house and techno from around the world.



SUNDAY 05 DECEMBER 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj13lc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43qgvr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Trending (w3ct2yqq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj17bh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yw6)
Omicron, racism and trust

South Africa announced their discovery of the Omicron variant to the world as quickly as they could. The response from many nations was panic and the closure of transport links with southern Africa. Tulio de Oliveira who made the initial announcement and leads South Africa’s Centre for Epidemic Response and Innovation tells us this is now having a negative effect on the country, with cases rising but vital supplies needed to tackle the virus not arriving thanks to the blockade.

Omicron contains many more mutations than previous variants. However scientists have produced models in the past which can help us understand what these mutations do. Rockefeller University virologist Theodora Hatziioannou produced one very similar to Omicron and she tells us why the similarities are cause for concern.

Science sleuth Elisabeth Bik and Mohammad Razai, professor of Primary Care in St George’s University in London have just been awarded the John Maddox Prize for their campaigning investigations in science. Elisabeth is particularly concerned with mistakes, deliberate or accidental in scientific publications, and Mohammad structural racism in approaches to healthcare.

Laura Figueroa from University of Massachusetts in Amhert in the US, has been investigating bees’ digestive systems. Though these are not conventional honey bees, they are Costa Rican vulture bees. They feed on rotting meat, but still produce honey.

And, What makes things sticky? Listener Mitch from the USA began wondering while he was taking down some very sticky wallpaper. Our world would quite literally fall apart without adhesives. They are almost everywhere – in our buildings, in our cars and in our smartphones. But how do they hold things together?

To find out, presenter Marnie Chesterton visits a luthier, Anette Fajardo, who uses animal glues every day in her job making violins. These glues have been used since the ancient Egyptians –but adhesives are much older than that. Marnie speaks to archaeologist Dr Geeske Langejans from Delft University of Technology about prehistoric glues made from birch bark, dated to 200,000 years ago. She goes to see a chemist, Prof Steven Abbott, who helps her understand why anything actually sticks to anything else. And she speaks to physicist Dr Ivan Vera-Marun at the University of Manchester, about the nanotechnologists using adhesion at tiny scales to make materials of the future.

(Photo: Vaccination centre in South Africa administering Covid-19 vaccine after news of Omicron variant. Credit: Xabiso Mkhabela/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj1c2m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtw2n3z1w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43qqc0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw8)
Omicron Covid variant – what do we know?

Omicron Covid variant – what do we know? Claudia examines key questions about the new variant with Professor of Molecular Virology, Jonathan Ball.

Plus growing evidence that pollution has a negative effect on our mental health. And a new way of testing for TB in children.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Image: Microscopic view of influenza virus cells. Photo credit: Panorama Images/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj1gtr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj1lkw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvv)
The rhetorical tug-of-war over Ethiopia

The conflict in Ethiopia between the central government, based in Addis Ababa, and the leadership of the northern Tigray region is not only being fought on the ground. It's increasingly raging online and via broadcast media too. Tens of thousands of people have been killed since fighting broke out in October 2020. There are many reports of violence against civilians. Both sides have been accused of war crimes and of aggravating a growing food crisis. Andrew Harding has reported from Ethiopia many times but like most of the international press he’s been struggling to cover the war at first hand. Even from further away, though, he's seen plenty of signs of rising prejudices - and burgeoning beliefs in supposed 'conspiracies'.

Getting to the truth of what Covid is doing to a country can be difficult too. In Venezuela, the socialist government, led by Nicolas Maduro, says proudly that it is a government for and of the common people, and that healthcare is a priority. But the state of the country’s public health service was already a source of bitter controversy well before the virus arrived. Now Covid is taking a terrible toll on a health system that was already run-down. Katy Watson describes what she and a BBC team found recently in the cities of Caracas and Maracaibo.

While the world worries about Covid - or the longer-term threat of climate change – there are still other hazards to human life on earth which haven’t gone away – like the risk of nuclear confrontation. One of the touchiest sets of negotiations you can imagine is the attempt to reach an agreement to curb Iran’s nuclear activities. These long, complex, high-stakes talks were started in 2013 and did produce a deal – the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action or JCPOA – in 2015. But Donald Trump was outraged by its terms and pulled America out of the process in 2018. President Biden's administration is keen to revive the deal and diplomats are gathering in Vienna to try. The BBC’s Diplomatic Correspondent James Landale has been following the twists, turns and surprises of the negotiations.

Recently Southh Korean pop culture has been surfing a wave of popularity across the world, From boy bands, to fast foods, to viral videos – Korean is cool. Yet some of the biggest hits abroad – like the Oscar-winning movie Parasite or the recent TV sensation Squid Game – have picked away furiously at the less-pretty sides of Korean life – particularly its extreme stresses and growing class tensions. This is a hugely competitive and increasingly unequal society which demands a great deal from its students and workers … and even more from them if they’re female. In Seoul, Chloe Hadjimatheou heard about some of the things which keep some South Korean women up at night.


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43qyv8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj1qb0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtw2n4b98)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43r2ld)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2zhc)
Internet instigators

Internet instigators are organising protests and campaigns using social media and other internet tools and apps to promote their causes. Nina Robinson explores the methods used by activists to create online communities, spearheaded by their charismatic and authentic personalities and hard-hitting visual content.

The Indian fashion influencer, Masaba Gupta, explains how she is challenging stereotypes by showcasing the beauty of women with darker skin tones in a society obsessed with fairer ones.

And Aliya Curmally, from Indian Fashion Revolution, describes how she is building a movement against fast fashion. But the methods used to achieve those sort of aims can be very similar to ones activists use to spread hate speech. Internet instigators come in many guises. Professor Megan Squire from Elon University and Patrik Hermannson from the anti-racist organisation Hope Not Hate, delve into their research around extremist, far-right networks.

Presenter: Nina Robinson

(Photo: Mobile phone with social media apps on a laptop keyboard. Credit: Ercin Erturk/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj1v24)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytk357d7b7)
Pope Francis to visit migrant camp on Greek island

US President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin will hold talks next week, following rising tensions over Ukraine. The talks will be held via a video call. Tensions have risen in recent times following Russia’s decision to increase its military presence near the border with Ukraine. Russia has insisted that it is not planning an attack.

Also in the programme: talks take place between Iran and the United States on the revival of the JCPOA nuclear deal; and we speak to a member of the European Parliament about the current migration situation.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Felia Allum, Senior lecturer at the Department of Politics, Languages and International Studies at the University of Bath, and Steve Erlanger, chief diplomatic correspondent for the New York Times.

(Photo: Pope Francis writes in a book after meeting with Greek Orthodox church Archbishop Ieronimos at the Orthodox Archbishopric of Greece, in Athens, Greece. CREDIT: George Vitsaras/Pool via REUTERS)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj1yt8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytk357dc2c)
Russia boosts military presence near Ukraine border

Tensions have risen after Russia increased its military presence near the border with Ukraine. Russia has denied it is preparing an attack. NATO foreign ministers met this week in the Latvian capital, Riga. The US Secretary of State, Anthony Blinken, urged Russia to pull back its forces.

Also in the programme: the possibility of a migrant crisis in Ukraine; and the role of women in organised crime.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Felia Allum, Senior lecturer at the Department of Politics, Languages and International Studies at the University of Bath, and Steve Erlanger, chief diplomatic correspondent for the New York Times.

(Photo: Ukrainian serviceman check the situation at the positions on a front line near Svetlodarsk. CREDIT: EPA/ANATOLII STEPANOV)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj22kd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytk357dgth)
‘Coronavirus will be with us for decades’

Sir Andrew Pollard, Director of the Oxford Vaccine group tells Weekend the virus is here to stay. He explains how each country will have a different response, so direct comparison with others won’t work.

Also in the programme: a top computer scientist answers on the future of Artificial Intelligence; and Robert Plant of Led Zeppelin fame on moving on from his Rock and Roll days.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Felia Allum, Senior lecturer at the Department of Politics, Languages and International Studies at the University of Bath, and Steve Erlanger, chief diplomatic correspondent for the New York Times.

(Photo: A medical worker carries RT-PCR swab tests at a pre-departure coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing facility in Sydney, Australia. CREDIT: REUTERS/Loren Elliott/File Photo)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43rfts)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgn)
How rationing changed me

Rationing looms large in the memories of a generation who lived through World War Two. Basic groceries were limited and getting enough food on the table became a daily challenge that went on long after the last bombs fell. Ruth Alexander brings together a German and an English woman, who grew up on opposite sides of the world’s deadliest ever conflict, to share their recollections of wartime eating. What was it like struggling to find food, how did they adapt, and how has it changed their approach to food forever?

(Picture: Ingeborg Schreib-Wywiorski and Beryl Kingston, Credit: BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodhchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors: Ingeborg Schreib-Wywiorski and Beryl Kingston.

Presenter: Ruth Alexander

Producer: Sarah Stolarz


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj269j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43rkkx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxx)
The 'deepest man on earth'

Herbert Nitsch is a free diver, he dives without breathing equipment. In 2012 he broke a new world record, diving to a depth of 253 metres but on the way back up things went wrong. This episode was first broadcast on 2nd November 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Asya Fouks
Producer: Tom Harding Assinder

(Photo: Herbert Nitsch surrounded by jellyfish. Credit: ®herbertnitsch)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj2b1n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbs)
Death

Should we change the way we think about the end of our lives? It’s time to talk. It is never too late for a rigorous conversation about death activism, the guillotine, and the ferocity of human love. Dessa meets the death doulas who can help you through this, and learns why a “good death” might not be a good thing, and why it might be time to sit down with a pen and a pad and do a little thinking about your own exit.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43rpb1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2zv9)
America’s abortion wars

Jan was 33 when she had an abortion. She now believes she murdered her child and works with Catholic organisations to get the procedure banned. Erika was 14 when she terminated her first pregnancy. She is now a church minister and believes God wants her to fight to protect the rights of women to choose an abortion. Across America women and churches are divided on the issue. And it’s coming to a head as many states, emboldened by recently appointed conservative justices on the Supreme Court, are attempting to undermine federal protections.

Jane O’Brien went to Texas where the procedure has been banned after six weeks - long before most women even know they’re pregnant. She spoke with women of faith on both sides of the debate who believe God is on their side as America’s abortion wars intensify.

(Photo: Pro-choice demonstrators at the Supreme Court in Washington DC. Credit: Jane O'Brien)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj2fss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtw2n51s1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43rt25)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2zhd)
My Arab Spring

Freedom - Hurriya

Across the region in 2011, protesters in their hundreds and thousands were all asking for the same thing - their freedom. Journalist Abubakr al-Shamahi and presenter Ella al-Shamahi examine how far human rights have progressed in the countries of the Arab Spring, turning first to the country so often held up as the success story of the Spring - Tunisia. Women were central to the mobilisation of protests here; Abubakr and Ella speak to activists and lawmakers to find out whether women are better off now than under Ben Ali’s dictatorship, which crumbled in 2011.

Then to Egypt, where quickly after the euphoria that erupted with the ousting of Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians witnessed a military coup that plummeted the country into an even tougher political climate. How do Egyptians keep hope alive now?

Producers: Sasha Edye-Lindner and Gaia Caramazza

(Photo: Supporters of Nahda Movement attend a rally marking the eighth anniversary of the Arab Spring, Tunis. Credit: Yassine Gaidi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj2kjx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zvd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj2p91)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5gstrknln)
Pope Francis visits Greek refugee camp

Pope Francis has been on a visit to a refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos where he urged better treatment of migrants in Europe.


Also in the programme at least four anti-coup protesters have been killed when Myanmar security forces rammed a car into a protest in the main city of Yangon; protests are held in South African cities in opposition to oil company Shell’s plans to explore for oil and gas on the country’s wild coast.

(Picture: Pope Francis greets two refugee girls at the Reception and Identification Centre in Mytilene on the island of Lesbos, Greece, December 5, 2021. Credit: Louisa Gouliamaki/Pool via REUTERS)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj2t15)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct30fn)
Into the Stephen Sondheim archive

Multi-award winning actor, singer and director Maria Friedman has had an association with the musicals of Stephen Sondheim for 30 years ever since she starred in the UK’s National Theatre’s production of Sunday in the Park With George, in 1990.

In 2019 she was joined by a panel of guests in the BBC Radio Theatre to explore Sondheim programmes in the BBC’s archive, discuss the incredible impact of his work and perform some of the songs from his hit shows. The guests were actor Mark Umbers who starred in Maria’s revival of Merrily We Roll Along, pianist and composer Jason Carr who has done orchestrations for Sondheim musicals, critic David Benedict who is writing Sondheim's authorised biography and Catherine Jayes who worked as Musical Director on Sondheim shows.

The programme was first broadcast on BBC Radio 4 Extra and following the death of Stephen Sondheim, this revised repeat is being broadcast on World Service.

Written and presented by Maria Friedman
Producer: Emma Kingsley

(Photo: Composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim receives the Freedom of the City of London award in recognition of his outstanding contribution to musical theatre. Credit:Tim P. Whitby/Getty Images)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj2xs9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj31jf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tlyc39p87)
Live Sporting Action

Delyth Lloyd presents live Premier League commentary of Aston Villa against Leicester City. We'll also have reaction to Sunday’s four early games, including Ralf Rangnick's first game in interim charge of Manchester United, as well as bringing you the best of the action from across Europe’s top men’s and women’s leagues and the Women's FA Cup Final between Arsenal and Chelsea.

We’ll have reaction to the Saudi Arabian Grand Prix - the penultimate race of season - and the final of the Davis Cup.

Photo: Leicester City forward Jamie Vardy in action with Tyrone Mings of Aston Villa. (Credit: Leicester City FC via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj3drt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxtw2n60r2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43ss16)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2zv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj3jhy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhr)
Zara founder's family keeps control of fashion giant

The world’s biggest clothing retailer, Inditex, has a new boss, the 37-year old daughter of the company’s founder. Will Marta Ortega manage brands like Zara, Pull & Bear and Massimo Dutti in the same way her father did or will she take a different path? And do consumers still want fast fashion? Plus, we hear why mining the metals and minerals used in green technologies can contribute to the world’s climate change problems and what is needed to ensure that they are mined in a way that doesn’t infringe on human rights or damage local communities. Also, one of the founders of Transparency International tells us the money stolen by corrupt leaders is being ploughed into western assets like property – with the help of an army of financial and legal professionals. Meanwhile, Covid has forced many workers to re-assess and re-evaluate their lives and as a result, they are quitting their jobs in record numbers. It's being called the Great Resignation. And the increasing appeal of the ukulele; how the small guitar-like instrument is making a big noise among the young. Business Weekly is presented by Matthew Davies and produced by Clare Williamson.
(Image: Zara shopper with brown bag; Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj3n82)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5gstrlmkp)
Pope Francis has denounced those who use migrants for political propaganda

The Pope made his remarks on a visit to the Mavrovouni refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos.

Also on the programme; the Gambian president, Adama Barrow, appears on course for re-election with results from most districts giving him a clear lead. And former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair calls for a globally focused response to the omicron variant of Covid 19.

(Picture: Pope Francis at the Mavrovouni refugee camp in Lesbos. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj3s06)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx0fc1j2k5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sshmhn45t)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43t48l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjx7dj3wrb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkqp43t80q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 The Explanation (w3ct2z3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl0)
Does wearing a mask halve your chances of getting Covid-19?

Masks, you may not have worn them before 2020 but now we’re all at it. With the rise of the Omicron variant countries have scrambled to reintroduce public health policies, among them mask wearing. Health officials and scientists agree that masks help reduce the incidence of covid19 infections – but by how much is still debated. Several newspapers recently reported that masks could cut Covid-19 infections by 53%, we look at how they came to this number and whether we should be believe it.



(Image: Leon Neal/Getty Images)



MONDAY 06 DECEMBER 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt7vrm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1ddy710)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2zv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt7zhr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlkh40mlp0)
Covid response divides nations

Tighter restrictions to contain the spread of Coronavirus have triggered a wave of protests across Europe, but Germany looks set to follow Austria in making vaccination compulsory next year. Economist Christian Schulz of Citigroup in Frankfurt explains why the move has political consensus and what impact any further lockdowns could have on Europe's largest economy. In other health news, we hear about plans to fund supplies of a newly developed vaccine against malaria with Professor Tom Churcher, an infectious diseases epidemiologist at Imperial College, London and campaign group Malaria No More. President Putin of Russia visits India this week; will the meeting go beyond arms deals? Priyanka Kishore, from Oxford Economics gives us her thoughts and the Chinese social media site Sina Weibo tries to clean up its act.
(Image: Demonstration against Covid-19 measures; Image Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1ddybs4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqf)
Genetic dreams, genetic nightmares

Professor Matthew Cobb looks at how genetic engineering became big business - from the first biotech company that produced human insulin in modified bacteria in the late 1970s to the companies like Monsanto which developed and then commercialised the first GM crops in the 1990s. Were the hopes and fears about these products of genetic engineering realised?

Thanks to The State of Things from North Carolina Public Radio WUNC for the interview with Mary-Dell Chilton.

(Picture: DNA molecule, Credit: KTSDesign/Science Photo Library/Getty Images)


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt837w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bybq74)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1ddygj8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2drj)
Counting the cost of fashion

The journey from catwalk, to wardrobe, to landfill is getting shorter and shorter.
Our demands for fast fashion mean around 100 billion garments are produced every year. We’re buying more, then wearing them less often. Many will end up in the trash. Not only that, there’s been a big growth in clothes being made out of synthetic materials originating from crude oil.
In this edition we ask can fashion cost less to the climate?
Speaking to Kate Lamble and Sophie Eastaugh are-
• Vanessa Friedman New York Times Fashion Editor
• Lily Cole Fashion model, actress and podcast host- ‘Who Cares Wins’
• Phillip Meister - Quantis Sustainability Consulting
• Claire Bergkamp – Textile Exchange
Producer: Jordan Dunbar
Researcher: Natasha Fernandez
Series Producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Emma Rippon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt8700)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct051r)
Deeply Human

04/12/2021 GMT

Deeply Human explores “why you do what you do” and offers a deep dive into the psychology, biology, and anthropological explanations of our common traits in ways which will make you think again about the way you think.

The host is American singer and writer, Dessa Darling.

These programmes are anchored in her experience discovering the details of her own thoughts and actions. The propositions are simple – the answers are not, but the process is intimate and absorbing and adventurous.


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1ddyl8d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Explanation (w3ct2z3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt8br4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bybyqd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1ddyq0j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9j)
Unstoppable women of rugby

The first female known to have played rugby was Emily Valentine, an Irish schoolgirl, who played alongside her brothers in 1884. It took another 80 years for a women's team to be formed, and the first Women's Rugby Union World Cup was held in 1991. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women from Uganda and Spain about the game's increasing popularity and how it's changed them.

Patricia Garcia is a profession rugby player who’s competed for Spain in World Cups, Olympics and Test series, as well as appearing in 198 games over multiple 7s tournaments for her country. She now plays in the UK for Exeter Chiefs. She's also passionate about using the sport as positive force and has set up her own charity, PGR NGO, to promote social education and values through rugby.

Winnie Atyang plays rugby in Uganda and uses the sport to support and inspire young women. Winnie became a single mother to twins when she was just 17 years old, and had to drop out of school. She says the rugby community is hugely encouraging: helping her go back to school and then find work to support her family. She also believes playing the sport gives her focus, confidence and ambition.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

(Image: (L) Winnie Atyang, credit Denise Namale. (R) Patricia Garcia, credit FER (Spanish Rugby Union))


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt8gh8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv30tx7pjj0)
Gambia elections: Adama Barrow declared winner

The Gambia's President Adama Barrow has easily won re-election, authorities there said, in the first vote for decades held without long-term leader Yahya Jammeh. President Barrow received around 53% of Saturday's vote, with nearest rival - a lawyer, Ousainou Darboe - on 28%.

Thousands flee as Indonesia’s Mount Semeru volcano erupts.

And the latest from Nagaland where Indian security forces have killed at least 13 civilians in a botched ambush near the Myanmar border.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt8l7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv30tx7pn84)
Myanmar’s Aung San Suu Kyi sentenced to four years in jail

Ousted Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been sentenced to 4 years in prison, in the first in a series of verdicts that could jail her for life. She has 11 charges of inciting unrest and violating Covid restrictions against her. Ms Suu Kyi has denied all the charges.

The Gambian president, Adama Barrow, has called for unity after winning a second term in office. Gambian opposition parties earlier rejected the results which saw President Barrow take 53% of Saturday's vote, with nearest rival - a lawyer, Ousainou Darboe - on 28%.

And the Earth’s Black Box, which will tell the future what happened to us.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt8pzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv30tx7ps08)
Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi sentenced to four years

In Myanmar ousted democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been sentenced to 4 years in prison, in the first in a series of verdicts. She was found guilty on charges of inciting dissent and breaking Covid rules under a natural disasters law. Ms Suu Kyi faces 11 charges in total, all of which she has denied.

Austria gets a new chancellor: former interior minister Karl Nehammer becomes leader while the country faces a wave of coronavirus restrictions and significant resistance to vaccinations.

And Lewis Hamilton has won the Saudi Arabian Grand Prix but he's also taken a stand against the country's human rights record. We look at the relationship between sports and public relations.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt8tqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6r)
Paul Auster: Is New York still the heartbeat of America?

Stephen Sackur speaks to one of New York City's most famous writers, Paul Auster, whose novels and screenplays have done much to capture the New York state of mind. The city prides itself on being a 24/7 melting pot of glitz, glamour and buzz, but it has been hit hard by Covid; only now are overseas visitors being allowed back in. In this era of pandemic and political polarisation, is New York no longer the heartbeat of America?

(Photo: Paul Auster)


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1ddz601)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5r)
Why private adoption is big business in the US

At any given time, about a million American families are looking to adopt and most prefer newborns. The industry is regulated on a state-by-state basis and many advocates argue that, not only the existing rules are not enforced properly, but that much greater federal regulation is needed to ensure that the whole process is ethical and safe.
Ivana Davidovic hears from Shyanne Klupp, who says she felt pressured by an adoption agency to give her son up for adoption when she wanted to change her mind. She is now a reform campaigner and wants the private adoption industry, in its current form, abolished.
Maureen Flatley, who has been working in the field of adoption legislation for two decades, is very concerned about the internet blurring the lines of legality and ethics and "trading of children" on social media without proper oversight. She hopes that 2022 will see some federal legislation governing this field finally implemented.
And adoptive parents from Ohio explain why, after spending $70,000 on their first adoption through an agency, they have decided to take the matter into their own hands and advertise themselves online as prospective parents.

PHOTO: Woman holding little boys hand walking down the street/Getty Images


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1v)
Fighting 'virginity tests' in the Indonesian police

In the early 2000s, Sri Rumiati, a brigadier-general in the Indonesian police, began campaigning against intrusive examinations of female recruits to her force. Rumiati had experienced a so-called "virginity test" herself when she joined up two decades earlier. She spoke to Petra Zivic.

(Photo: Indonesian policewomen in 2007. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt8ygs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1ddz9r5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv68)
What makes stuff sticky?

What makes things sticky? Listener Mitch from the USA began wondering while he was taking down some very sticky wallpaper. Our world would quite literally fall apart without adhesives. They are almost everywhere – in our buildings, in our cars and in our smartphones. But how do they hold things together?

To find out, presenter Marnie Chesterton visits a luthier, Anette Fajardo, who uses animal glues every day in her job making violins. These glues have been used since the ancient Egyptians –but adhesives are much older than that. Marnie speaks to archaeologist Dr Geeske Langejans from Delft University of Technology about prehistoric glues made from birch bark, dated to 200,000 years ago. She goes to see a chemist, Prof Steven Abbott, who helps her understand why anything actually sticks to anything else. And she speaks to physicist Dr Ivan Vera-Marun at the University of Manchester, about the nanotechnologists using adhesion at tiny scales to make materials of the future.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton. Produced by Anand Jagatia for BBC World Service

This episode was originally broadcast on 2nd October 2020


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt926x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1ddzfh9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct2yqq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dl0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt95z1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bycsy9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1ddzk7f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt99q5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv2)
The cult, the crocodile and my journey back to love

This programme contains references to child sexual abuse.

Juliana Buhring was born into a religious cult that she says brought her up with a warped idea of love. She was separated from her mum at the age of three and ended up living in communes in more than 20 different countries. When she left the group at the age of 23, she went on to discover healthier, less exploitative ways to love. But when a crocodile took the life of the man she had fallen in love with, Juliana hatched a plan to deal with the grief and embarked on a journey that would get her into the record books. Her book about her experience is called This Road I Ride.

If you've been affected by any of the issues in the programme, you can find information about where to get help and support at Befrienders Worldwide or through the BBC Action Line.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Edgar Maddicott

(Photo: Juliana Buhring. Credit: Courtesy of Juliana Buhring)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt9fg9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byd1fk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1ddzsqp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv68)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt9k6f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5h531sjj1)
Aung San Suu Kyi sentenced to jail

Ousted Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been sentenced to prison, the first in a series of verdicts that could jail her for life.

Dr Sasa, a senior member of the National League for Democracy party and a spokesman for Myanmar's National Unity Government in exile, described it as a "show trial".

Also in the programme: the World Health Organisaton says there has been a surge in Malaria with the pandemic disrupting health services all over the world and we hear concerns about a collapse in the Chinese property sector after a real estate firm defaults on its significant debts.

(Photo: Aung San Suu Kyi in 2012, when she addressed the UK parliament. Credit: Dan Kitwood/PA)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt9nyk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df016y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y489wdrvx2d)
Putin visits India

Russian president Vladimir Putin has held high level talks with India's PM Narendra Modi. On the agenda were defence deals involving India purchasing Russian jets, and we discuss the visit with Snehesh Alex Philip, senior associate writer for The Print based in Delhi. We also get the US perspective on the meeting from Michael Kugelman, who is senior associate for south Asia at the Wilson Center think tank. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ivana Davidovic investigates America's private adoption industry, and finds out about some of the problems faced by those seeking to adopt, and those sometimes pressured into giving up their children. Plus, we hear from Julia Poliscanova, who is e-mobility lead at Transport and Environment, about concerns that cars powered by synthetic, or so called 'e-fuels', may emit as many poisonous fumes as those with fossil fuel engines.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Joshua Thorpe, Ivana Davidovic, Sarah Hawkins and Nisha Patel.

(Picture: Vladimir Putin and Narendra Modi. Picture credit: EPA.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt9spp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxwnzxrsn4)
Myanmar: Aung San Suu Kyi sentenced to jail

Myanmar's military rulers are facing international condemnation, after the deposed civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi was given a four year prison sentence, later reduced to two. Our reporter has the latest on the story and we hear reaction from people in Myanmar.

Our regular health expert, Dr Eleanor Murray, assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health answers your questions on the coronavirus stories of the day.

We go to the US where Kentucky`s Congressman Thomas Massie posted a Christmas photo of his family posing with military style rifles. The post has been condemned by families affected by gun violence, plus figures on both sides of politics.

(Photo: Aung San Suu Kyi. Credit: Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnt9xft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxwnzxrxd8)
Covid-19 pandemic: Seafarers

There are nearly two million seafarers working in the global merchant shipping industry. Many have been on their vessels for much longer than normal during the pandemic, in some cases as long as 18 months. We brought together three seafarers to get a window on their world over the past year or so.

Myanmar's military rulers are facing international condemnation, after the deposed civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi was given a four year prison sentence, later reduced to two. Our reporter has the latest on the story, and we hear reaction from people in Myanmar.

The government of Ethiopia says it has retaken two strategic seized last month by Tigrayan fighters. It comes after six leading Western powers called on the Ethiopian government to stop its policy of rounding up civilians - including mothers with children - because they are ethnic Tigrayans. We'll get more from our regional experts.

(Photo: Heather Enness. Credit: Heather Enness)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntb15y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntb4y2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bydrxb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df0j6g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0npn7sf0rf)
2021/12/06 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntb8p6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df0myl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqg)
Genetic Dreams, Genetic Nightmares

CRISPR is the latest and most powerful technique for changing the genetic code of living things. This method of gene editing is already showing great promise in treating people with gene-based diseases, from sickle cell disease to cancer. However, in 2018 the use of CRISPR to edit the genes of two human embryos, which were subsequently born as two girls in China, caused outrage. The experiment was done in secrecy and created unintended changes to the children's genomes - changes that could be inherited by their children and their children's children. The scandal underlined the grave safety and ethical concerns around heritable genome editing, and called into doubt the ability of the scientific community to self-regulate this use of CRISPR.

CRISPR gene editing might also be used to rapidly and permanently alter populations of organisms in the wild, and indeed perhaps whole ecosystems, through a technique called a gene drive. A gene drive is a way of biasing inheritance, of getting a gene (even a deleterious one) to rapidly multiply and copy itself generation after generation, sweeping exponentially through a population.

In theory, this could be used to eradicate species such as agricultural pests or disease-transmitting mosquitoes, or to alter them in some way: for example, making mosquitoes unable to carry the malaria parasite. But do we know enough about the consequences of releasing a self-perpetuating genetic technology like this into the environment, even if gene drives could, for example, eradicate insects that spread a disease which claims hundreds of thousands of deaths every year? And who should decide whether gene drives should be released?

Picture: DNA molecule, Credit: KTSDesign/SCIENCEPHOTOLIBRARY/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntbdfb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5h531tcqy)
World reacts to Aung San Suu Kyi sentence

Ousted Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been found guilty of inciting dissent and breaking Covid rules, in the first of a series of verdicts that could see her jailed for life. Her sentence has been reduced from four years to two years.

Also in the programme: Ethiopia's government says its forces have taken back two towns from Tigrayan rebels; the story of the Palestinian jailbreak that rocked Israel's security establishment; and can Joe Biden and Vladimir Putin reduce tensions over Ukraine?

(Photo: Myanmar’s leader Aung San Suu Kyi at the International Court of Justice in The Hague, Netherlands in 2019. Credit: Reuters.)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntbj5g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx0smbqtqf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172y0ssvwsvwc2)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df0wfv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrqkywvzsd)
New York City to impose vaccine mandate on all private sector workers

All New Yorkers will need to be vaccinated against Covid-19 if they want to go to work, the city's mayor, Bill de Blasio, has announced. Employees in the public sector already need to be inoculated, but the mandate will now be extended to all private sector employees. The policy will take effect on 27 December, making it the strictest vaccine mandate to be imposed anywhere in the US. We speak to the BBC's North America Business Correspondent, Samira Hussain about what the new rules mean. Also, Russian president Vladimir Putin has held high level talks with India's PM Narendra Modi. On the agenda were defence deals involving India purchasing Russian jets, and we discuss the visit with Snehesh Alex Philip, senior associate writer for The Print based in Delhi. We also get the US perspective on the meeting from Michael Kugelman, who is senior associate for south Asia at the Wilson Center think tank. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ivana Davidovic investigates America's private adoption industry, and finds out about some of the problems faced by those seeking to adopt, and those sometimes pressured into giving up their children. Plus, we hear from Julia Poliscanova, who is e-mobility lead at Transport and Environment, about concerns that cars powered by synthetic, or so called 'e-fuels', may emit as many poisonous fumes as those with fossil fuel engines.

(Picture: Mayor Bill de Blasio spoke to crowds in New York City. Picture credit: Getty.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntbmxl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df105z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



TUESDAY 07 DECEMBER 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntbrnq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z7x)
Four decades of HIV/Aids

It’s forty years since the first report on HIV/Aids appeared in a medical journal. Back in the early days in the 1980s a misunderstanding made one man the face of the epidemic. A Canadian air steward, Gaetan Dugas was mistakenly identified as ‘Patient Zero’. A misreading of scientific data had given the impression that he was responsible for the spread of the disease. We hear from people who knew him. Also one woman who was diagnosed in the 1980s tells us of the stigma at the time. And the discovery of the first successful treatment for HIV/Aids, as well as the story of how South African activists led the charge to make drugs widely available. And we hear from the former partner of the British film maker, Derek Jarman who was one of the first artists to speak openly about being HIV positive.
Photo: Gaetan Dugas. (Credit: Rand Gaynor)


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntbwdv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqqgdq87qk)
New York City to impose vaccine mandate on all private sector workers

All New Yorkers will need to be vaccinated against Covid-19 if they want to go to work, the city's mayor, Bill de Blasio, has announced. Employees in the public sector already need to be inocculated, but the mandate will now be extended to all private sector employees, making it the strictest vaccine mandate anywhere in the US. The BBC's North America Business Correspondent, Samira Hussain, tells us what the new rules mean. And Russian president Vladimir Putin has held high level talks with India's PM Narendra Modi, will this trouble the US? And American diplomats are to boycott the Winter Olympics in China over human rights abuses, so will companies and sponsors follow suit? Also in the programme, we hear from Screen Daily's Senior Correspondent, Melanie Goodfellow, as she attends Saudi Arabia's first film festival in Jeddah.

Throughout the programme we’re joined by Alison Schrager, Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute in New York and Jeanette Rodrigues, South Asia Managing Editor for Bloomberg News based in Mumbai.

(Picture: Mayor Bill de Blasio spoke to crowds in New York City. Picture credit: Getty.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntc04z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byfm47)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df1cfc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2zjj)
Only bleeding: How Swedes opened up about periods

“It’s alright (I’m only bleeding)”. In 2017, these words were emblazoned on the Stockholm subway or tunnelbana, alongside a giant poster of an ice-skater with a red-stained crotch.

The deliberately provocative image was the work of Swedish cartoonist Liv Strömquist, who was on a mission to destigmatise periods. But even in one of the most feminist countries in the world, showing images of menstrual blood in a public space offended many, and triggered a national debate.

Stockholm-based broadcaster Maddy Savage meets the artist, and discovers some of the taboo-busting initiatives in culture, business and education that have ridden on the coat-tails of her impact. These include Sweden’s first children’s book about periods (aimed at three to six year olds), featuring a smiling cartoon uterus playing with her friends: the vagina, the brain and a hormone. There is also menstruation-awareness training for industrial factory workers, and period-themed pottery designed for display in the home.

With the help of Dr Louise Klintner, a Lund University academic who wrote her thesis on the increased normalisation of menstrual products, Maddy investigates how much of an impact these and other efforts have had on destigmatisation.

Debates about public menstrual art have continued, and many on the right believe it’s not what tax payers want to spend money on. Meanwhile menstruation campaigners argue there is much more to be done; Sweden still has a 25% tax on period products and there are growing calls for free sanitary protection for school pupils.

(Photo: Liv Livmoder book launch. Credit: Maddy Savage)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntc3x3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntc7n7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byfvmh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df1lxm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf0)
Devan Shimoyama: Rhinestones and telephone lines

In The Studio enters the dazzling world of American visual artist Devan Shimoyama as he makes a brand new installation for the recently re-opened Arts and Industries Building at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington DC.

Reporter Kristin Vermilya follows Devan in the months leading up to the Smithsonian’s Futures exhibition as he completes work on The Grove, an imagined future monument created in response to the turmoil and tragedy of 2020, surrounding racial violence in the U.S. and the Coronavirus pandemic.

We hear the painstaking process of creating a shimmering urban forest of utility poles bedazzled with thousands of rhinestones and Swarovski crystals complete with gem-studded shoes and silk flowers dangling from their power lines. And how drag culture and his grandmother’s innate sense of style has inspired this radiant artwork which represents a space for both collective grieving, and the healing power of hope.

Presented by Kristin Vermilya
Produced by Edwina Pitman for the BBC World Service


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntccdc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv30tx7sff3)
Western leaders urge Russia to lower Ukraine tensions

Ahead of a scheduled video call between the Russian and American presidents, a senior US official has said Joe Biden will warn Vladimir Putin of severe economic consequences if he decides to invade Ukraine. But Moscow says it has no plan to attack Ukraine and has accused Western nations of provocation.

New York city has announced that it will introduce mandatory coronavirus vaccinations in what is being called a "pre-emptive strike" to stop another wave of infections.

And the hunting of a rare desert bird in Pakistan and why this is causing international concern.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntch4h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv30tx7sk57)
Russia warned of economic sanctions if it invades Ukraine

Tensions rise ahead of an online meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and US President Jo Biden with the US threatening economic sanctions over the build up of Russian troops close to the Ukranian border.

China has criticised the US diplomatic boycott of February's Winter Olympics over human rights concerns. It called the move a pretentious act. Other governments say they have not yet made a decision on whether they will join the boycott.

And troubling news for South Africa’s economy, which is expected to contract in the third quarter.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntclwm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv30tx7snxc)
Afghans denied UK assistance after the fall of Kabul, says whistle-blower

The UK Foreign Office's handling of the Afghan evacuation after the Taliban seized Kabul was "dysfunctional" and "chaotic", a whistle-blower has said. Raphael Marshall said the process of choosing who could get a flight out was "arbitrary" and thousands of emails with pleas for help went unread. A government spokesperson said staff had "worked tirelessly" on the "biggest mission of its kind in generations".

We'll find out why all New Yorkers need to be vaccinated against Covid-19 by December 27th if they want to go to work.

And a special report from Turkey, where opposition parties have renewed calls for early elections amid growing economic instability, following historic falls in the value of the Turkish Lira.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntcqmr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plw)
Food waste: The solar dryer solution

A simple system for saving food and empowering women on the show today.
Hundreds of millions of tonnes of food go to waste every year, much of it before it is even sold. This waste is bad for the planet, but also for farmers and consumers.

A company in India has found an solution. They collect imperfect produce that would otherwise have been left by farmers to rot and use specially designed solar dryers to remove the water. They then take the dried fruit and vegetables, process it, and sell it on.

The benefits of their system go far beyond food waste. By setting up collectives of women in rural India with the machines, they’re transforming the lives and status of a group of people who traditionally struggle to gain economic independence.

Chhavi Sachdev goes to see the system in action, finds out who is buying the dried produce and discovers what it actually tastes like.
Image: Kavita Gadekar, who uses the solar dryer


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df22x4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgs)
Super-fast grocery delivery apps are booming

But are apps that deliver from the shop floor to your front door in minutes just a pandemic-era fad or are they here to stay? Have you ever been in a situation where you needed something delivered right away? A toothbrush you forgot on a trip? Or butter for a recipe you've already started preparing? There are many apps for that – a whole fleet of them – that are now competing for your dwindling time. They promise to get everyday items to you, sometimes in 10 minutes or less. But, is it just a pandemic-era trend, or does it have staying power?
The BBC’s Victoria Craig speaks to the boss of eight-year old US-based super-fast delivery company, GoPuff. Yakir Gola started the business while at university and has grown it to become a dominant player in the American market. He talks about why the company has decided to expand in the UK, and how it plans to compete in a red-hot space. Plus, we hear from Adrian Maccelari, the director at London-based bakery Sally Clarke about whether partnering with super-fast delivery start-ups has been helpful to the business, and Elodie Perthuisot, the director of data and e-commerce at grocery chain Carrefour, explains how the model has been a game changer for the supermarket business.
There has been blockbuster growth in the super-fast delivery category over the past two years, which leads Bain and Company’s Ruth Lewis to think consolidation is an inevitability. A number of start-ups have entered the space, and already, the industry has seen some high profile mergers and acquisitions.


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6c)
The V2 rocket

Using eyewitness accounts from the BBC archives, we hear how the Nazis developed the world's first modern ballistic missile that killed thousands during World War Two. The Nazi rocket scientist Wernher von Braun was the principal architect of this revolutionary secret weapon. After the war he was recruited to work for the United States to develop its own missile programme and famously built the NASA rockets which put men on the Moon.

Photo: The launch of a captured German V2 rocket at the US military test site at White Sands, Nevada in 1946 (PhotoQuest/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntcvcw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zjj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df26n8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntcz40)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct30fn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:06 on Sunday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntd2w4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bygpvd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df2g4j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntd6m8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxb)
The chicken who sailed the world

Guirec Soudée had always dreamed of sailing around the world. He set out at the age of 21 in a rusty 30ft boat, with no communication equipment and little sailing experience. He'd wanted to take a pet but a cat or dog seemed impractical. Then, during a stop in the Canary Islands he met Monique - a Rhode Island Red chicken and, 'fell in love'. She was to become his confidante and best friend during a four-year trip. Together, they sailed across the Atlantic and then on to Greenland. They confronted icebergs and storms and were trapped in the Arctic ice for 130 days. They even crossed the treacherous Northwest Passage between the Pacific and the Atlantic. He became the youngest sailor to complete the crossing; Monique the only chicken.

Guirec has written a book about his journey with Monique called A Sailor, a Chicken, an Incredible Voyage.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Katy Takatsuki

(Photo: Monique and Guirec. Credit: Guirec Soudée)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntdbcd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bygybn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df2pms)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntdg3j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5h531wff4)
Ukraine invasion fears ahead of Biden-Putin meeting

President Biden is expected to warn Vladimir Putin that Russia will be hit with severe sanctions if it invades Ukraine, in a video call later today.

Russian troop movement on the border with Ukraine has led to fears and concerns that Moscow is planning on an invasion. Latvia's foreign minister, Edgars Rinkēvičs, warns this programme of "huge bloodshed" if the situation escalates.

Also in the programme: A whistleblower says the British operation to evacuate people from Afghanistan was dysfunctional and chaotic; we speak to one of those left behind in Kabul. Mel Brooks reflects on decades in showbusiness and we find out why the United Arab Emirates is moving its weekend.

(Picture shows a Ukrainian serviceman on the front line in Donetsk. Credit EPA)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntdkvn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df2y41)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bs6ll0q8c)
China lifts Lithuania imports block

Beijing has lifted a four day block on Lithuanian exports crossing into China. At issue was Lithuania hosting a modest Taiwanese diplomatic presence in Vilnius. Finbarr Bermingham is the Europe correspondent for the South China Morning Post and explains the background. And we get wider context on how Europe might respond to the dispute from Jonathan Hackenbroich of the European Council on Foreign Relations. Also in the programme, Presidents Biden and Putin of the United States and Russia are talking today in a bid to stave off the threat of military action against Ukraine by Russian forces. We examine what sort of sanctions the west might impose on Russia in the event of an invasion, with Professor Anders Aslund, of the Center for Eurasian, Russian and East European Studies at Georgetown University. Plus, one trend that has emerged during the coronavirus pandemic has been a plethora of services promising to deliver goods locally in a matter of minutes. The BBC's Victoria Craig reports on the growing sector, and asks whether it is here to stay.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Ivana Davidovic, Sara Parry, Nisha Patel and Tom Kavanagh.

(Picture: Rail freight is unloaded in China. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntdpls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxwnzxvpk7)
Omicron: Your questions answered

Today on the programme we spend time with Dr Margaret Harris, a spokesperson for the World Health Organisation, who will answer audience questions about coronavirus and the new Omicron variant. She will giver her reaction to the new measures some countries have imposed since the variant was detected.

And we will use her expertise to discuss global vaccine distribution and the indirect effects of Covid-19 on other health problems like malaria. With coronavirus cases surging in many parts of the world, we’ll also talk about how the pandemic might play out in 2022 and beyond.

(Photo: A woman reacts as she receives a dose of Sinovac Covid-19 vaccine during a vaccination drive in Medan, Indonesia, 29 November 2021. Credit: EPA)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntdtbx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxwnzxvt9c)
Russia Ukraine tensions

US president Joe Biden, and Russian president Vladimir Putting will hold a video conference today over tensions between Russia and Ukraine. We’ll have the the latest on the story and explain what’s behind the rising tensions.

Dr Margaret Harris from the World Health Organisation will be answering your questions on the coronavirus pandemic and the Omicron variant.

And the boss of a US firm has been criticised after he fired around 900 of his staff on a single Zoom call. We’ll speak to some of the employees about the moment they realised what was happening, and we hear about the backlash the boss is facing.

(Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky visits frontline positions in the Donetsk region, Ukraine 06/12/2021. Credit: EPA)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntdy31)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntf1v5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byhntf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df3f3k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0npn7shxnj)
2021/12/07 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntf5l9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zjj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df3jvp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt2)
Mobile phones not always beneficial to displaced people

New research shows that mobile phones may not be as beneficial to displaced people as previously thought. Using video diaries, where displaced people in Somalia recorded their mobile phone use, researchers found that women, in particular, are being exploited by employers who fail to pay them using mobile money. Professor Jutta Bakonyi from Durham University is on the show and her colleague Dr. Peter Chonka joins us in the podcast.


Slaughterbots – autonomous lethal weapons
Slaughterbots - if human: kill(), is a short film that warns of humanity's accelerating path towards the widespread use of slaughterbots – autonomous weapons that use artificial intelligence (AI) to identify, select, and kill people without human intervention. It’s produced by The Future of Life Institute and its lead on autonomous weapons Dr. Emilia Javorsky explains how the UN is currently looking at banning this type of tech.

WikiAfrica
A growing movement to create and edit Wikipedia articles in official African languages is proving successful following a series of Afrocurations, organised by the Moleskine Foundation, where young people from South Africa, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Morocco are learning how to tell the stories of their lives, culture, and history through Wikipedia. We hear from one of these students and also Lwando Xaso, a South African lawyer, writer and activist, who helped set up the events.


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: John Boland
Producers: Alex Mansfield and Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntf9bf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5h531x8n1)
Biden and Putin talk amid Russia-Ukraine tensions

During a videoconference meeting, US President Joe Biden voiced "deep concerns" over the massing of Russian troops near Ukraine, threatening "strong economic and other measures”. Moscow earlier said talks were needed as tensions were "off the scale".

Also in the programme: French police arrest of a Saudi suspected of involvement in the murder of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi; and dozens of inmates have died in a fire at a prison in Burundi.

(Photo: Russian President Vladimir Putin and US President Joe Biden videoconference on 07th of December 2021. Credit: Reuters).


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntff2k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx0smbtqmj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0ssvwsys85)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df3sby)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycsk0phn63s)
Biden and Putin hold virtual summit

In a virtual summit, US President Joe Biden voiced deep concern over Russia's build-up of forces near Ukraine, while his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin demanded legally-binding security guarantees that would rule out Ukraine ever joining the NATO military alliance. Edward Fishman from the Atlantic Council's Eurasia Center in Washington explains what kind of economic sanctions the US has at its disposal to deter Russia. Also in the programme, Beijing has lifted a four-day block on Lithuanian exports crossing into China. At issue was Lithuania hosting a modest Taiwanese diplomatic presence in Vilnius. Finbarr Bermingham is the Europe correspondent for the South China Morning Post and explains the background. Plus, one trend that has emerged during the coronavirus pandemic has been a plethora of services promising to deliver goods locally in a matter of minutes. The BBC's Victoria Craig reports on the growing sector, and asks whether it is here to stay.

(Image: Vladimir Putin speaks to Joe Biden via video link. Credit: Mikhail Metzel/Getty Images)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntfjtp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df3x32)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tf0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 08 DECEMBER 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntfnkt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rty)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntfs9y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqqgdqc4mn)
Biden and Putin hold virtual summit

In a virtual summit, US President Joe Biden voiced deep concern over Russia's build-up of forces near Ukraine, while his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin demanded legally-binding security guarantees that would rule out Ukraine ever joining the NATO military alliance. Edward Fishman from the Atlantic Council's Eurasia Center in Washington explains what kind of economic sanctions the US has at its disposal to deter Russia. Also in the programme, Lucas Chancel, Codirector and Senior economist at the World Inequality Lab, explains how the world became more unequal during the Covid-19 pandemic. And the boss of a US company has fired 900 members of staff on a single Zoom call. Was this a violation of basic firing etiquette, or a quicker way to finish an unpleasant experience for all involved? We discuss that, and all our other stories, with our contributors Stefanie Yuen Thio in Singapore and Mitchell Hartman in Portland, Oregon. (Image: Vladimir Putin speaks to Joe Biden via video link. Credit: Mikhail Metzel/Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntfx22)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byjj1b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df48bg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2zhf)
My Arab Spring

Bread

Freedom is important - but what is the use of freedom if you can’t put food on the table? Ella al-Shamahi and Abubakr al-Shamahi look at the importance of the economy in starting the protest movement itself, and how the citizens of these regions view their economic standing a decade on. They speak with young Tunisians who are bearing the brunt of a devastated economy, and investigate how power is still tied up within economic opportunities under the rule of President Al Sisi. And they hear from one of the few monarchies in the region to experience protests - Jordan.

(Photo: A protester raises a loaf of bread in protest against police brutality, marginalisation and the economic, social crisis in Tunisia. Credit: Chedly Ben Ibrahim/NurPhoto/Getty Images


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntg0t6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jxb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntg4kb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byjrjl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df4htq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2g)
The secret: ‘Neither a girl nor a boy’

Baby John Musamba was born with a rare sexual disorder which stopped her from developing either male or female reproductive organs. She was raised as a girl, and hid her truth for 26 years until finally telling her friends and the world, on a very public platform.

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/thecomb


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntg89g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv30tx7wbb6)
Australia joins Beijing 2022 diplomatic row

A little kangaroo tied to an American balloon, that's one cartoon in China criticising the Australian decision to join the US in a diplomatic boycott of the winter Olympics in Beijing.

A Saudi Arabian man has been arrested in Paris as he prepared to board a plane to Riyadh. The suspect is believed to be one of the 26 people wanted by a court in Turkey for suspected involvement in the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Environmental campaigners in South Africa fear an oil company's plans for a section of unspoilt coastline. They say it will disturb the region's wildlife.

In business we'll look at the United Arab Emirates decision to move its weekend.

And an end date for best before dates? a new way of telling if food is fit to eat has been developed. We speak to the scientist that has created smart wrapping that can tell you if its good quicker than a sniff.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntgd1l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv30tx7wg2b)
Germany's new Chancellor to be sworn in

We're live in Germany where Olaf Scholz, of the centre- left Social Democrats, today becomes the country's ninth post-war Federal Chancellor.

Gunmen in northern Nigeria have carried out a brutal attack on bus passengers, burning at least thirty people. We have the latest.

And the ground breaking test you can do at home that flags up early signs of dementia, we hear from the Professor behind it.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntghsq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv30tx7wktg)
Germany's new Chancellor to be sworn in

Today Olaf Scholz takes over as Germany's new leader and is expected to address the Bundestag to set out his government's plans for the next four years.

We mark one year since a patient was first vaccinated against Covid-19.

And we look at the reaction here in the UK to the reports that staff in Downing Street last Christmas had a party, when London was under strict Covid restrictions.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntgmjv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc8)
Moeed Yusuf: What will a Taliban-controlled Afghanistan mean for Pakistan?

Stephen Sackur speaks with Moeed Yusuf, National Security Adviser of Pakistan. The Taliban is back in power in neighbouring Afghanistan. US and Nato forces are gone. Pakistan sees opportunities in this new reality but are there grave dangers too?

(Photo: Moeed Yusuf appears via videolink on Hardtalk)


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df4zt7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jpk)
Healthcare workers are burnt out

What can be done to stem the tide of carers quitting the industry? Before the pandemic the healthcare sector struggled to recruit enough workers. Today they're leaving in droves. Citing physical and mental exhaustion, poor working conditions, a lack of appreciation and miserly pay, carers are leaving their jobs - a trend with all the makings of a future skills crisis. The BBC's Rebecca Kesby speaks to Ged Swinton, a member of the Royal College of Nursing who had to leave his job as a frontline nurse after losing patience with an unappreciative government - and abuse from the public. Will Hunter recently returned to his job as an accident and emergency junior doctor, but could only handle part time work after an intense year of pandemic conditions. In the USA we hear from Vicki Good, former president of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, who tells us people are leaving the care sector almost as soon as they join, despite spending years in training beforehand. We speak to Lori Peters of the National Association of Health Care Assistants, who says that without decent pay and conditions, the sector won't attract enough workers to fill a skills gap that will only get bigger.

This episode is produced by Russell Newlove, Sarah Hawkins and Elizabeth Hotson.


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8m)
Spies or plane-spotters?

In November 2001 a group of British aircraft enthusiasts were arrested and put on trial in Greece. Unfamiliar with their hobby, the Greek authorities had assumed they must be spies. The plane-spotters were initially jailed but later released after their case turned into a diplomatic incident. In 2011, Chloe Hadjimatheou talked to Paul Coppin, who was one of the group.

PHOTO: The plane-spotters returning to the UK (PA)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntgr8z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2zhf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df53kc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntgw13)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Reith Lectures (w3ct2zpb)
AI in warfare

From drones to robots, what should be the role of AI in military operations? Weapons that locate, select, and engage human targets without human supervision are already available for use in warfare, so what role will AI play in the future of military conflict? Will AI reduce collateral damage and civilian casualties, or will autonomous weapons kill on a scale not seen since Hiroshima and Nagasaki? Will future wars be fought entirely by machines, or will one side surrender only when its real losses, military or civilian, become unacceptable? Stuart Russell will examine the motivation of major powers developing these types of weapons, the morality of creating algorithms that decide to kill humans, and possible ways forward for the international community as it struggles with these questions.

The lectures are chaired by presenter, journalist and author, Anita Anand.


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntgzs7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byklrh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df5c1m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnth3jc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzl)
My real-life Cuban dance romance

JoAnn Jansen is a film choreographer, known for working with some of the biggest stars in Hollywood. Part of her journey to becoming a dancer herself has even been made into a film – the sequel to the Dirty Dancing movie, Dirty Dancing Havana Nights, which was based on her teenage experience in Cuba. But her dancing hopes nearly came to an abrupt end when, at 19, she found herself the single mother of a severely disabled baby. JoAnn tells Jo Fidgen that the experience eventually gave her the drive to pursue her goals.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Rebecca Vincent

(Photo: JoAnn Jansen. Credit: Michael Higgins)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnth78h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bykv7r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df5ljw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lt2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnthc0m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5h531zbb7)
Germany's new leader sworn in

Germany enters a new era as Olaf Scholz is sworn in as Chancellor, replacing Angela Merkel after her 16 years in power. He was voted in by the German parliament, where his three-party coalition has a substantial majority.

His centre-left Social Democrats will govern alongside the Greens and the business-friendly Free Democrats. We hear from the new chancellor's party about their plans for government.

Also in the programme: A helicopter carrying the head of India's armed forces crashes, killing almost everyone on board. The British prime minister is under pressure after a video emerged that shows his staff joking about a Christmas party during last year's lockdown. And we find out more about Barcelona's strained relationship with one of the city's main sights.


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnthgrr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df5v14)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4d0cph4ktd)
Scholz becomes German leader

Olaf Scholz has been sworn in as German chancellor, after 16 years of Angela Merkel rule. We find out about Germany's economic challenges from Peter Bofinger, who is a German economist, and former member of the German Council of Economic Experts. And we discuss the economic policies of the new coalition with Dr Ingrid Nestle, Green Party member of the German parliament. Also in the programme, with worrying signs that Russia may be planning new military action in Ukraine, we hear how businesses in Ukraine's second city Kharkiv are faring. Viktor Kuzmenko sells heating systems and tells us how business collapsed after hostilities broke out with Russia in 2013. Peter Dickinson is publisher of Business Ukraine magazine, and explains how the business picture has improved since then. And Olga Shapoval, executive director of the Kharkiv IT Cluster discusses how the threat of conflict with Russia has forced the IT sector in the city to change its way of working. Plus, the social media app TikTok has begun a foray into live shopping. We explore the likely success of such events with Kate Hardcastle, who is a retail consultant who advises businesses on strategy.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Tom Kavanaugh.

(Picture: Angela Merkel and Olaf Scholz. Picture credit: Reuters.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnthlhw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxwnzxylgb)
Christmas party fallout: Johnson responds

The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is under pressure to clarify whether a Christmas party took place at this official residence a year ago in breach of Covid lockdown rules. We talk about the fallout he faces with our political correspondent and hear reaction from the British public.

The World Health Organisation says the Omicron strain of the coronavirus has now spread to 57 countries since it was first detected two weeks ago. South African doctors who treat Covid patients discuss what they have learnt so far about Omicron.

And Germany’s new chancellor, Olaf Scholz, has been sworn into parliament, ending Angela Merkel’s 16-year rule. We ask young Germans – who have only ever known Merkel as chancellor – what they expect from the new government.

(Picture: Britain"s Prime Minister Boris Johnson waves outside Downing Street in London, Britain, December 8, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Tom Nicholson)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnthq80)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxwnzxyq6g)
Omicron: Two weeks on

The World Health Organisation says the Omicron strain of coronavirus has now spread to 57 countries since it was first reported two weeks ago. We bring together doctors in South Africa who treat Covid patients to discuss what they have learnt so far about Omicron.

We also answer your questions about Covid-19 with the help of Dr Pedro Hallal, an epidemiologist at the University of California in San Diego.

And the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is under pressure to clarify whether a Christmas party took place at this official residence a year ago, in breach of Covid lockdown rules. We talk about the fallout he faces with our political correspondent and hear reaction from the British public.

(Photo: A pharmacist prepares a dose of the Pfizer vaccine amidst the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 variant Omicron in Johannesburg, South Africa. Credit: Reuters/Sumaya Hisham)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnthv04)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlnthyr8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bylkqj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df6b0n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0npn7sltkm)
2021/12/08 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntj2hd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2zhf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df6frs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw9)
Omicron variant news

News update on the new Omicron variant now in many countries across the world. Plus Hannah Fisher reports on the science of smell and conditions other than Covid where it can be lost. Holly Bradshaw, Olympic pole-vaulter turned psychology researcher discusses the post-Olympic blues with Karen Howells, Senior Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology. And could Viagra be a candidate drug for Alzheimer's disease?

This week’s guest is Mathew Fox, Professor of Global Epidemiology from Boston University.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: 3D illustration of coronavirus. Credit: Maksim Tkachenko/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntj67j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5h53205k4)
WHO urges governments to act as Omicron spreads

The World Health Organisation has warned that the Omicron variant could have a major impact on the pandemic and called on all governments to accelerate their vaccination campaigns. We also explore how vaccines have changed the course of the pandemic, one year after the first internationally approved Covid-19 vaccine was administered outside of a trial.

Also in the programme: The party in Downing Street that may have flouted lockdown rules; and the new German Chancellor, Olaf Scholz, has promised a new beginning as he takes over from Angela Merkel.

(Photo: A pharmacist prepares a dose of the coronavirus disease (Covid-19) Pfizer vaccine amidst the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 variant Omicron in Johannesburg, South Africa. Credit: Reuters). s of the day’s global events.


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntj9zn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx0smbxmjm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0ssvwt1p58)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df6p81)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycsyr1t2r7j)
Scholz becomes German leader

Olaf Scholz has been sworn in as German chancellor, after 16 years of Angela Merkel rule. We find out about Germany's economic challenges from Peter Bofinger, who is a German economist, and former member of the German Council of Economic Experts. And we discuss the new coalition's ecological ambitions for the German economy with Dieter Janacek, an MP for the Green Party. Also in the programme, with worrying signs that Russia may be planning new military action in Ukraine, we hear how businesses in Ukraine's second city Kharkiv are faring. Viktor Kuzmenko sells heating systems and tells us how business collapsed after hostilities broke out with Russia in 2013. Peter Dickinson is publisher of Business Ukraine magazine, and explains how the business picture has improved since then. And Olga Shapoval, executive director of the Kharkiv IT Cluster discusses how the threat of conflict with Russia has forced the IT sector in the city to change its way of working. Plus, the social media app TikTok has begun a foray into live shopping. We explore the likely success of such events with Kate Hardcastle, who is a retail consultant who advises businesses on strategy.

(Picture: Angela Merkel and Olaf Scholz. Picture credit: Reuters.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntjfqs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 100 Women (w3ct3037)
BBC 100 Women Interviews: Chimamanda Ngozi

She became famous when her TedTalk ‘We should all be feminists’ was featured in Beyonce’s song Flawless, but her books have been translated into over 30 languages around the world. Her newest writing deals with the very personal grief of losing her father and mother in the last year. In an exclusive BBC 100 Women interview, Adichie tells us why she has chosen to be so open about this time. She also discuss the responsibilities of being seen by some as an ‘icon’, her thoughts on what she sees as ‘language orthodoxy’ around trans women, and on cancel culture.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df6t05)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 09 DECEMBER 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntjkgx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntjp71)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqqgdqg1jr)
Germany swears in new chancellor

Germany has a new chancellor and a new coalition government at the helm. We discuss its ecological ambitions for the German economy with Dieter Janacek, an MP for the Green Party. Canada has become the latest country to announce that no government representatives will be sent to the Beijing Winter Olympics next year, due to human rights concerns. And with worrying signs that Russia may be planning new military action in Ukraine, the BBC's Janet Barrie speaks to businesses in Ukraine's second city, Kharkiv, to see how they are are faring. Kharkiv is just 40 kilometres from the Russian border and was once a highly successful industrial centre. Host Fergus Nicoll discusses all this and more with our guests, Rachel Cartland in Hong Kong and Tracy Shuchart who's in Quebec, Canada.

(Image: Olaf Scholz take his oath of office Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntjsz5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bymdyf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df757k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gyc)
Poland’s fractured borderlands

Thousands of people – mostly migrants from the Middle East - are camped in freezing weather at the Poland-Belarus border. Many have spent thousands of dollars to fly into Belarus on tourist visas, with the hope of an easy crossing into the EU. They’re pawns, trapped in a battle of wills between Belarus’ autocratic president, Aleksandr Lukashenko, and Poland and the European Union. The Polish government is taking a tough line, imposing an exclusion zone along the border and sealing off the area to journalists and aid workers. Migrants caught in the forest are arrested and sent back to Belarus. Several, including two children, have died from the cold and more deaths are expected as winter sets in. Meanwhile local residents are divided about how to deal with the humanitarian disaster unfolding on their doorstep. For Assignment, Lucy Ash visits towns and villages in the area to see what impact the crisis is having on people’s lives.

Reporter: Lucy Ash
Produced by: Lucy Ash and Eva Krysiak
Editor: Bridget Harney
Research: Grzegorz Sokol

(Image: Polish volunteers provide relief to injured migrants stranded in the icy forest. Credit: Agnieszka Sadowska / Agencja Wyborcza.pl)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntjxq9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntk1gf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bymnfp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df7dqt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgp)
(Film) Set menu

Catering on film and TV sets is notorious for being one of the toughest jobs in the hospitality industry.

Imagine feeding hundreds of people in a different location every day, running your kitchen in some of the world’s most remote places, and accommodating the varied diets of the planet’s biggest stars.

Tamasin Ford speaks to three caterers to find out what it takes to succeed in Hollywood, Bollywood, and the world of reality TV, and finds out how vital food can be to the success of a shoot.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:

Sid Ghai, director of Ghai Caterers Ltd, London;
Antonia Crowley, executive chef and event stylist at Flying Trestles, Auckland;
Wayne Brown, co-founder of Red Radish, London.

(Picture: A stack of pizza boxes next to a film director's chair. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntk56k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2x679qrlp)
Hong Kong tycoon Jimmy Lai convicted for taking part in a vigil

We're live in Hong Kong for a reaction to the conviction of Jimmy Lai, the founder of the now-defunct Apple Daily newspaper, and other pro-democracy activists.

New Zealand announces ambitious plans to ban all young people from smoking. We speak to one of the ministers behind the scheme.

And the World Food Programme is suspending food distribution in some towns in Ethiopia after its warehouses were looted. We have the latest.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntk8yp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2x679qwbt)
New Zealand's radical new smoking law

We speak to New Zealand's Associate Health Minister about the sweeping crackdown on smoking they have announced. Dr Ayesha Verrall is a medical doctor who's seen the damage smoking causes.

We have the latest on the row over the reports of a staff Christmas party in 2020 in Downing Street, the residence of the British Prime Minister, while there were strict Covid restrictions.

And why have three top officials from the former ruling party in Malawi been arrested?


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntkdpt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2x679r02y)
Pressure on British PM over reports of a 2020 Christmas party

We look into the reaction to the reports of a Christmas party and other gatherings in late 2020 in Downing Street, the residence of the British Prime Minister, while London was under Covid restrictions.

Pfizer has just announced that a three-shot course of its Covid vaccine was able to neutralise the new Omicron variant in a laboratory test. We assess the results and implications of this small scale test.

And as the civil war in Ethiopia continues, the World Food Programme is suspending food distribution in some towns after its warehouses were looted.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntkjfy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z30)
How will we cope with the Omicron variant?

What are the possible implications as the Omicron variant spreads around the world? Experts from South Africa, the US and Europe assess the potential dangers and the remedies available. With Tanya Beckett.


(Image: Coronavirus in the Vein/Getty/DrPixel)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df7wqb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jb8)
The arms race in cyberspace

Will the next war be waged online? Ed Butler talks to Nicole Perlroth, winner of the 2021 Financial Times Business Book of the Year for This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends - an investigation into the how governments, spies, criminals and corporations are dealing with - and exploiting - the risks associated with doing business in the digital era.


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x43)
The ALDI kidnap

The abduction of Theo Albrecht, who co-founded the discount supermarket chain ALDI with his brother Karl. The brothers shunned publicity and there were few photos of them. So, when two armed men confronted Theo outside his company headquarters in late 1971, they demanded to see ID. They needed to be sure they were taking the right man. Albrecht later tried to claim tax back on the ransom paid to secure his release. He died in 2010, worth an estimated 16 billion dollars.
Image: Theo Albrecht in 1971. Credit: EPA


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntkn62)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df80gg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntkry6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm6)
Algae: Slime life

They’re slimy and slippery. They’re part of the green film you see on garden ponds. They can clump together and wash up on the shores of beautiful beaches. A lot of them are invisible to the naked eye. These underappreciated organisms called algae are indispensable to the presence of life on earth but not all is straightforward about them. They can be single celled or multi cellular. They can be ugly and slimy or sometimes beautiful: indeed are even a tourist attraction. They may be found in the sea or on land. They can be life-creating and yet life-destroying and toxic in excess. So perhaps it’s time we paid more attention to algae and their evolution.
Rajan Datar is joined by Ruth Kassinger, author of Slime: How algae created us, plague us and just might save us; Dr Brenda Soler-Figueroa, a marine scientist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Centre; Dr Gothamie Weerakoon Senior Curator of Lichens and Slime Moulds at the Natural History Museum of London and author of Fascinating Lichens of Sri Lanka; and Stefan Bengtson, emeritus professor at the Swedish Museum of Natural History.

(Photo: Volvox algae colonies, spherical forms outlined by biflagellate cells interconnected by cytoplasmic bridges. Credit: DeAgostini/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l97)
The Tibetan football team

In 2001, a group of Tibetan exiles and a Danish ex-footballer teamed up to create the Tibetan national football team, in the face of many obstacles, including threats from China. Robert Nicholson talked to Michael Nybrandt and team captain Sonam Wangyal about their first ever game against Greenland. A Whistledown Production, first broadcast in 2017.

PHOTO: The Tibetan team lining up for their match against Greenland (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntkwpb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bynhnl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df87yq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntl0fg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k43)
From 'half-nerd' to Hong Kong student leader

Nathan Law describes himself as an "ordinary person" and "half nerd" who, growing up in Hong Kong, just wanted to do well at school and get a good job. But his plans - and his whole life - were upended when authorities in Beijing began to threaten democracy in his city state.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Laura Thomas

(Photo: Nathan Law. Credit: Nathan Law)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntl45l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bynr4v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df8hfz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntl7xq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5h532277b)
Omicron could threaten supplies of Covid vaccines to poorer countries

The WHO is concerned that rich countries will hoard Covid vaccine in order to mobilise their response against the Omicron variant and this will leave poorer countries without vaccine. Also on the programme, New Zealand plans to ban the sale of cigarettes and we hear about a new study that has found that microplastics cause damage to human cells .


(PIC: Vials labelled AstraZeneca, PfizerBiontech, Johnson and Johnson, Sputnik V coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccines CREDIT: Reuters)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntlcnv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z30)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df8qy7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49k1hp5kfm)
New Zealand to phase out smoking

New Zealand is to ban sale of tobacco to its next generation, aiming to phase out smoking. Colin Peacock from Radio New Zealand tells us why the country has made the move now, and we find out how the plan compares to tobacco control measures in other countries with Mirte Kuipers, assistant professor in the Department of Public and Occupational Health at the University of Amsterdam. Also in the programme, the credit rating agency Fitch has declared that Chinese property conglomerate Evergrande is in default to overseas investors, after it apparently failed to make a crucial interest payment this week. Rebecca Choong Wilkins is a debt specialist from Bloomberg in Hong Kong, and discusses the implications. We hear from Nicole Perlroth, whose book This is How They Tell Me the World Ends won the 2021 Financial Times Business Book of the Year award, about the threat to the world of global cyber espionage. Plus, the British travel firm Saga has introduced paid leave for the birth of a grandchild. We explore whether it is an idea that is likely to catch on with Dame Esther Rantzen, founder of the charity The Silver Line, which offers help and support for older people.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Ivana Davidovic.

(Picture: A stubbed out cigarette. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntlhdz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxwnzy1hcf)
Ethiopia: Gunmen steal food aid

The UN has halted aid distribution to two towns in Ethiopia after its warehouses were looted. The UN says its staff were held at gunpoint by members of rebel Tigrayan forces. There are warnings the disruption to food supply will make a dire humanitarian situation even worse. We'll speak to our correspondent and hear the accounts of people whose family and friends are living through the war.

We’ll hear what smokers around the world think about New Zealand’s plan to ban young people from ever buying cigarettes in their life time.

We’ll have the latest on Covid-19 and will answer your questions about the virus with the help of Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland.

We'll take an in-depth look at the warnings of a potential Russian invasion of Ukraine, explaining what's behind them and whether they're credible. We'll talk through the history of the relationship between the two countries, including the war in eastern Ukraine, which has been going on for nearly 8 years. We'll hear a range of perspectives from people living in Ukraine, including those who want to be closer to Europe and those who want to be closer to Russia.

Picture: Internally displaced people wait to retrieve food aid being distributed by the Amhara Emergency Fund in Debark, Ethiopia, in October (J Countess / Getty Images)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntlm53)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxwnzy1m3k)
Is Russia going to invade Ukraine?

We'll take an in-depth look at the warnings of a potential Russian invasion of Ukraine, explaining what's behind them and whether they're credible. We'll talk through the history of the relationship between the two countries, including the war in eastern Ukraine, which has been going on for nearly 8 years. We'll hear a range of perspectives from people living in Ukraine, including those who want to be closer to Europe and those who want to be closer to Russia.

The UN has halted aid distribution to two towns in Ethiopia after its warehouses were looted. The UN says its staff were held at gunpoint by members of rebel Tigrayan forces. There are warnings the disruption to food supply will make a dire humanitarian situation even worse. We'll speak to our correspondent and hear the accounts of people whose family and friends are living through the war.

We’ll hear what smokers around the world think about New Zealand’s plan to ban young people from ever buying cigarettes in their life time.

We’ll have the latest on Covid-19 and will answer your questions about the virus with the help of Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland.

Picture: A handout photo made available by the Ukrainian presidential press service shows Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky visiting positions on the frontline with pro-Russian militants in the Donetsk region, Ukraine, on 6th December (EPA / PRESIDENTIAL PRESS SERVICE HANDOUT)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntlqx7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntlvnc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7bypgmm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df96xr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0npn7spqgq)
2021/12/09 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntlzdh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df9bnw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4q)
Can the weather trigger a volcano?

Which came first the volcano or the rain? Volcanic eruptions are known to influence global climate systems, even leading to the cooling of the planet. However local weather conditions can also influence the timing and ferocity of volcanic eruptions. As volcanologist Jenni Barclay explains rainwater can contribute to volcanic instability and even increase the explosiveness of eruptions.

Syria has been experiencing civil war for more than 10 years. Many people have left including many of the country's scientists. We speak with 3 exiled Syrian scientists Shaher Abdullateef, Abdulkader Rashwani, and Abdul Hafez about their current work, which involves working with other academics and students in Syria sometimes remotely and sometimes directly.

New findings from Chile reveal an unknown Tsunami emanating from an earthquake there in the 1700s. Historical records mention other ones, but not this one. Geoscientist Emma Hocking found the evidence in layers of sand.

And we discuss the development of tiny robot-like structures made from frog cells, they can move and build other copies of themselves. Sam Kreigman and Michael Levin explain how.

(Image: Eruption of Semeru. Credit: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntm34m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5h53232g7)
WFP suspends aid in Amhara after looting "by Tigrayan forces"

The World Food Programme has suspended food distribution in two towns in Ethiopia's northern Amhara province after looting of its warehouses "reportedly by elements of the Tigrayan forces and some members of the local population”. A spokesman for the Tigrayan regional government denies the charges.

Also in the programme: an unofficial London tribunal accuses China of genocide against Uyghurs and other ethnic minorities in Xinjiang; and a huge exoplanet discovered where it should not exist.

(Picture: An Ethiopian woman, who fled the ongoing fighting in Tigray region, holds her child under a World Food Programme banner in Hamdayet village on the Sudan-Ethiopia border, in the eastern Kassala state, Sudan. REUTERS)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntm6wr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx0smc0jfq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0ssvwt4l2c)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df9l54)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs49b6hbqb)
WHO warns rich countries could hoard vaccines

The World Health Organization has warned that if wealthy countries begin hoarding Covid-19 vaccines in response to the emergence of new variants of the virus, it could threaten supplies to nations where people still haven't had the jab. We hear from Lily Caprani, Head of Advocacy for Health, Vaccines and Pandemic Response at UNICEF. Plus, we speak to some of the workers at a branch of Starbucks in New York state who have made history, by voting to join a trade union. The move comes decades after the coffee chain decertified organised labour in the United States. Also in the programme, the credit rating agency Fitch has declared that Chinese property conglomerate Evergrande is in default to overseas investors, after it apparently failed to make a crucial interest payment this week. Rebecca Choong Wilkins is a debt specialist from Bloomberg in Hong Kong, and discusses the implications. We also hear from Nicole Perlroth, whose book This is How They Tell Me the World Ends won the 2021 Financial Times Business Book of the Year award, about the threat to the world of global cyber espionage.

(Picture: The World Health Organization headquarters in Geneva; Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntmbmw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z30)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1df9px8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 10 DECEMBER 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntmgd0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l97)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntml44)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqqgdqjyfv)
US Starbucks store votes to unionise

We speak to some of the employees at a Starbucks branch in New York state who have made history, voting to become the first unionised workers at one of the coffee giant's stores since the 1980s, in defiance of company bosses. Plus, the World Health Organization says the emergence of new Covid-19 variants could encourage wealthy nations to hoard Covid-19 vaccines, depriving developing countries where few people have been jabbed. We speak to Lily Caprani, Head of Advocacy for Health, Vaccines and Pandemic Response at UNICEF. Also in the programme, Nicole Perlroth, author of 'This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends', tells us why we've "never been closer to a cyber-induced Pearl Harbor". We also hear from tobacco expert Dr Mirte Kuipers, after New Zealand's government outlawed the sale of tobacco products to anyone aged 14 or under, with the new policy set to take effect in the year 2027. Host Fergus Nicoll discusses all this and more with our guests, journalist Dimuthu Attanayake in Colombo, and contributing editor at NPR Paddy Hirsch in Los Angeles.

(Picture: The WHO's headquarters in Geneva; Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntmpw8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byq9vj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfb24n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1v02)
Portland's Larrys Mabiala and Syria's Oliver Kass Kawo

Ahead of the MLS Cup final we hear from Portland Timbers defender Larrys Mabiala as his team prepare to take on New York City FC. We also hear from Oliver Kass Kawo, a 20-year-old Swedish-Syrian player who realised his dream of playing for Syria this month. Not only that, he scored for them in the FIFA Arab Cup.

Picture on website: A break in play during the MLS Cup Eastern Conference Final match between the Philadelphia Union and New York City FC (Ira L. Black - Corbis/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntmtmd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntmycj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byqkbs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfb9mx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2zw2)
Black, Jewish and proud

Journalist Nadine Batchelor-Hunt is a black, Jewish woman. She is is fiercely proud of her dual identity - even as recent political discourse around race has meant that she has been forced to defend her identity in ways she's never had to before. She is on a journey to meet one of the oldest, largest and most resilient communities of black Jews in the world: Israel’s Ethiopian Jewish minority.

Around 140,000 black Ethiopian Jews live in Israel today following several waves of emigration in the 1980s and 1990s. They left everything they knew behind to flee antisemitic persecution in Ethiopia to go the spiritual homeland they had dreamt of for millennia. But for many, that did not mean they felt welcome - with complaints of discrimination, alienation, and even police brutality.

Nadine joins the community as they celebrate a Jewish holy day unique to their community - Sigd - a festival where Ethiopian Jews remember the acceptance of the Torah, express their yearning for Jerusalem, as well as celebrate their unique culture and identity in modern Israel.

Sitting down in conversation with religious leaders, activists and other members of the community, Nadine explores if she can learn anything about her own sense of self as a Black Jewish woman. And importantly, what can they teach her about accepting her own dual identity in a world that frequently questions it?

Photo: Presenter Nadine Batchelor-Hunt in Israel Credit: Candace Wilson/BBC


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntn23n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv30tx8244d)
US Capitol riot: Court rejects Trump's request to block files

A US appeals court has rejected a bid by former President Donald Trump to block Capitol riot investigators from accessing his White House records. Mr Trump has argued that his past communications are protected by executive privilege, under which presidential files can be kept secret.

We speak to an environmentalist in Brazil who is outraged by the government's decision to hand out more gold mining licences in a remote area of the Amazon.

And we talk to our Africa correspondent who has travelled to Madagascar to investigate the threat of famine there.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntn5vs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv30tx827wj)
Capitol riot investigation can access Trump White House records

A US appeals court has rejected a bid by former President Donald Trump to block Capitol riot investigators from accessing his White House records. We look at what this could mean for the investigation.

Lebanon has lifted a ban on Palestinian refugees in the country officially joining the job market, so will they now be able to work in all levels of employment?

And we head to Nigeria to find out what impact the decision by the governor of Borno state to ban non-governmental organisations from distributing food or other aid to tens of thousands of people displaced by Islamist extremists will have.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntn9lx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv30tx82cmn)
Nicaragua breaks off diplomatic links with Taiwan

Nicaragua has cut diplomatic ties with Taiwan in favour of China. It's the latest country to turn its back on the island nation which Beijing considers a renegade province to be eventually re-unified with the mainland.

Madagascar is a country on the brink of famine, more than 1 million people are battling severe hunger - our correspondent has a special report from there.

And why can the zero-gravity environment of space affect your eyesight? We speak to a scientist who's found a solution for astronauts.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntnfc1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n27)
John Kerry: US Special Envoy for Climate

Can America lead an effective global response to the climate change emergency? At last month’s COP26 summit in Glasgow the chorus of concern from world leaders was deafening, but the really tough decisions on deeper emissions cuts to reduce global warming were put off until next year. Stephen Sackur speaks to the US Special Envoy for Climate John Kerry. His mission is to restore American leadership on the biggest existential challenge facing our planet. But is that mission impossible?

(Photo: John Kerry in the Hardtalk studio)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfbsmf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j17)
Blacklisted in China

Lithuania has provoked China's rage by going too far in recognising Taiwan. Beijing is now apparently blocking Lithuanian imports and is even threatening global firms who trade with Lithuania. The spat was started by Lithuania's decision to allow a Taiwanese Representative Office to open in Vilnius in November. China says Taiwan is part of its territory. This has all come days after Brussels proposed a new law allowing it to retaliate against economic sanctions like this. Ed Butler speaks to Finbarr Bermingham, the Brussels correspondent of the South China Morning Post, Shelley Rigger from Davidson College in the US and a leading expert on Taiwan's trade relations and Hosuk Lee-Makiyama, the director of the European Centre for International Political Economy who is advising EU member states on the new legislation.

(Picture: Made in Lithuania logo; Credit: Picitup/Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzl)
The explosion heard by millions

In 2005 thousands of tonnes of petrol ignited at a fuel depot 40 kilometres North-West of London. The explosion was the largest in the UK since the end of the WWII. The blast, which severely damaged surrounding homes and properties, was reportedly heard in Holland. Despite the enormous amount of damage, nobody was killed. The fire destroyed large parts of the depot, leading to shortages of fuel at petrol stations in the weeks that followed. Five firms were eventually fined millions of dollars for safety failures that led to the blast. Greg Smith tells Witness History what it was like to be inside the depot at the time of the explosion.

Produced and presented by Nick Holland.

Image: Fire at Buncefield oil depot on 12th December 2005. Credit: Peter MacDiarmid/Getty Images


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntnk35)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhz)
When crypto met football

Joe Tidy and Sarah Mulkerrins investigate the growing presence of cryptocurrency technology in the world of football. Some of the biggest clubs in the world are selling NFTs and their own cryptocurrencies, making hundreds of millions of dollars. But what's in it for fans? We speak to the millionaire collector who's buying up official Manchester City NFTs, and to the football fans investing in digital player cards changing hands for tens of thousands of dollars. Plus the company that’s signed up dozens of major clubs across the world to sell fan tokens. Buying them is supposed to make you feel more connected to your club, but are they putting fans at risk in the unpredictable crypto market?

Photo: Premier league champions Manchester City are one of the big clubs investing in the crypto world. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfbxck)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntnnv9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htg)
What's going wrong in the Balkans?

It’s been more than two decades since the war in Bosnia ended. It remains one of the darkest chapters in modern European history and cost over 100,000 lives. Since the Dayton Agreement was reached in 1995 a fragile peace has held, but last month the international community's chief representative there - Christian Schmidt - warned that conflict might return and the country is in danger of breaking up. Bosnia-Herzegovina's senior ethnic Serb politician, Milorad Dodik, has threatened to pull the territory he governs inside Bosnia out of state-level institutions including the army. The issue that drove so much of the war - Serb nationalism - now appears to be on the rise across the Western Balkans. Serbia has deployed armoured vehicles and aeroplanes along its border with Kosovo and is accused of stoking religious tensions in neighbouring Montenegro. So how dangerous is this moment in Balkans history? Are the EU and the US doing enough to diffuse tensions? And how much of the blame can be laid at the feet of Serbia’s ally Russia?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntnslf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byrdkp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfc4vt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1v02)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntnxbk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fz)
Reporting the Channel migrant tragedy

BBC Persian’s Soran Qurbani was recently in Calais to report on the tragic deaths of 27 people, who were attempting to cross the Channel to England when their small boat sank. He explains why their stories brought back memories of his own difficult journey to the UK 10 years ago.

Story Story
An imaginary market place in West Africa is the setting for the long-running radio drama Story Story, made by the BBC’s international charity BBC Media Action. As buyers and sellers go about their business, the latest series explores attitudes towards disability and neurodiversity. Scriptwriter Bode Asiyanbi and actor E. Daniels take us behind the scenes.

Vietnamese spy
BBC Vietnamese has been revisiting the fall of Saigon in 1975, and telling the story of a long overlooked spy whose warnings to the CIA about its imminent capture were ignored. Editor Giang Nguyen is passionate about history and tells us more about the spy who could have changed history.

Encanto through Colombian eyes
The new Disney film Encanto tells the story of a Colombian family living in a magic house. BBC Mundo’s Carlos Serrano is Colombian himself and, watching the film, discovered five details that maybe only Colombians will 'get', including music, food and yellow butterflies.

(Photo: A refugee at a migrant camp on the outskirts of Calais. Credit: Kiran Ridley/Getty Images)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntp12p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byrn1y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfcdc2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntp4tt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5h532544f)
Julian Assange can be extradited to the US, a UK court rules

Wikileaks will appeal the decision to allow the Wikileaks founder to face espionage charges. The judges said Washington had offered assurances over his treatment.

Also on the programme, more than 50 people have died in a road accident outside the city of Tuxtla Gutierrez in Mexico. Most of them were migrants from Central America. And Taiwan loses another of its diplomatic allies as Nicaragua recognises the People's Republic of China as the legitimate government of all Chinese territory.

(Picture: Julian Assange"s partner, Stella Moris, speaks outside the High Court in London Credit: Rain/EPA)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntp8ky)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfcmvb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y472q9w6k1v)
Silent strike in Myanmar

Anti-coup activists have protested against Myanmar's leaders by enacting a silent strike. Many businesses were closed, streets have been empty, and we hear about the protesters' aims from activist Thinzar Shunlei Yi. And we explore the potential impact with Anna Plunkett, lecturer in International Relations at the Department of War Studies, King's College London. Also in the programme, US inflation rose to 6.8% in November, its fastest pace for almost 40 years. The BBC's Michelle Fleury reports from a food bank in Kentucky on how people are coping with the rapidly rising cost of living. This weekend marks the 20th anniversary of China becoming a member of the World Trade Organization. Stephen Vaughn was a US trade representative during the Trump administration, and he tells us why he thinks China's accession to the WTO came at an unfair cost to the American economy. Plus, the New York Met is to remove the Sackler name from its exhibition spaces, because of the family's ownership of Purdue Pharma, a drug company accused of helping fuel America's opioid crisis. We get reaction to the move from JJ Charlesworth, who is an editor of the magazine Art Review.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Joshua Thorpe and Ivana Davidovic.

(Picture: An empty street in Yangon, Myanmar. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntpdb2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxwnzy4d8j)
Deadly Mexico truck crash

A truck has crashed in Mexico's southern state of Chiapas, killing at least 54 people. They are believed to have been Guatemalans and Hondurans trying to migrate to the United States. We'll hear from a reporter in the state and also a journalist who provides news to migrants making the journey.

Our reporter from BBC Burmese will tell us about a “silent strike” taking place in Myanmar against the country’s military rule. We’ll also hear messages people in Myanmar have sent us, describing the empty streets and closed businesses in the country’s main cities.

We’ll be answering your questions on Covid-19 with the help of Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University. We'll also hear the BBC's Ros Atkins explain the moral and scientific arguments around vaccine mandates.

Picture: The overturned truck after the crash in Chiapas (El La Mira / via Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntpj26)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxwnzy4j0n)
Formula 1 braced for dramatic final weekend

This weekend Max Verstappen and Lewis Hamilton will face off for the 2021 Formula 1 World Championship in Abu Dhabi in what is arguably the most intense title decider in the sport's history. We speak to fans of both drivers from around the world to understand the fierce rivalry of the pair.

In Mexico's southern state of Chiapas, at least 54 people have died in a truck crash. They are believed to have been Guatemalans and Hondurans trying to migrate to the United States. A reporter in the state highlights what we know so far.

A “silent strike” is taking place in Myanmar against the country’s military rule. We’ll hear the thoughts of people there as businesses in some of the country's main cities close.

(Photo: Red Bull's Max Verstappen lines up on the qualifying grid. Credit: Reuters/Nicolas Tucat)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntpmtb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntprkg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxv7byscjq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfd3tv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0npn7ssmct)
2021/12/10 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntpw9l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfd7kz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prg)
What's the best way to make a decision?

Life is full of choices, from the mundane (like what to wear today) to the critical (how should we deal with the pandemic?). So how can we make the best decisions? That’s what listener David wants to know.

To investigate, Caroline Steel learns how being smarter doesn’t necessarily make you a good decision maker. She speaks to researchers about the importance of ‘gut feelings’ – and how certain people with no intuition whatsoever can struggle to make choices. She also learns why it’s easier to give advice to other people than to follow it yourself, and how we can work together to make the best decisions in a group.

Presenter: Caroline Steel
Producer: Anand Jagatia

Contributors:
Wändy Bruin de Bruin - Professor of Public Policy, Psychology and Behavioural Science, University of Southern California, USA
David Robson, science journalist and author
Valerie van Mulukom, Assistant Professor, Coventry University, UK
Liz Steel
Igor Grossmann, Associate Professor of psychology, University of Waterloo, Canada
Anita Williams Woolley associate professor of organisational behaviour and theory, Carnegie Mellon University, USA


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntq01q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5h5325zcb)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntq3sv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xyx0smc3fbt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0ssvwt7gzg)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfdh27)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycr9vllwy64)
Silent strike in Myanmar

Anti-coup activists have protested against Myanmar's leaders by enacting a silent strike. Many businesses were closed, streets have been empty, and we hear about the protesters' aims from activist Thinzar Shunlei Yi. And we explore the potential impact with Anna Plunkett, lecturer in International Relations at the Department of War Studies, King's College London. Also in the programme, US inflation rose to 6.8% in November, its fastest pace for almost 40 years. The BBC's Michelle Fleury reports from a food bank in Kentucky on how people are coping with the rapidly rising cost of living. This weekend marks the 20th anniversary of China becoming a member of the World Trade Organization. Stephen Vaughn was a US trade representative during the Trump administration, and he tells us why he thinks China's accession to the WTO came at an unfair cost to the American economy. Plus, the New York Met is to remove the Sackler name from its exhibition spaces, because of the family's ownership of Purdue Pharma, a drug company accused of helping fuel America's opioid crisis. We get reaction to the move from JJ Charlesworth, who is an editor of the magazine Art Review.

(Picture: An empty street in Yangon, Myanmar. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjxlntq7jz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 100 Women (w3ct3036)
BBC 100 Women Interviews: Rebel Wilson

Rebel Wilson made her name in Hollywood as a comedy actress. Now a producer and director, she fought her way to the top in an industry dominated by men and ruled by beauty ideals. In an exclusive BBC 100 Women interview, she tells us what it means to be the ‘funny, fat girl’, what the #MeToo movement has actually achieved, and why speaking openly about fertility struggles benefits us all.

(Photo: Rebel Wilson)


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkr1dfdltc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1v02)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

100 Women 23:06 WED (w3ct3037)

100 Women 23:06 FRI (w3ct3036)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gyc)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gyc)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gyc)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172xzkqp43mpps)

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BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkqp43njxp)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkqp43nx52)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkqp43prcz)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172xzkqp43q7ch)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172xzkqp43qgvr)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkqp43qqc0)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkqp43qyv8)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkqp43ss16)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkqp43t80q)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkr1df105z)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkr1df1cfc)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkr1df2g4j)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkr1df2pms)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkr1df2y41)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzkr1df3f3k)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkr1df3x32)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkr1df48bg)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkr1df4htq)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkr1df4zt7)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkr1df5c1m)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkr1df5ljw)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkr1df5v14)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkr1df6b0n)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzkr1df6frs)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkr1df6p81)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkr1df6t05)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkr1df757k)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkr1df7dqt)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkr1df7wqb)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzkr1df80gg)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkr1df87yq)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzkr1df8hfz)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzkr1df8qy7)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkr1df96xr)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzkr1df9l54)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkr1df9px8)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkr1dfb24n)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkr1dfc4vt)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkr1dfdltc)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172xzjx7dhy6p8)

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BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172xzjx7dj13lc)

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BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjxlntlm53)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjxlntlqx7)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d6q)

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BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxwnzxrsn4)

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BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172xxxwnzy1hcf)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j5r)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jgs)

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Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1jb8)

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Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dhr)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3cszv68)

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Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct2cbs)

Deeply Human 23:06 SUN (w3ct2cbs)

Deeply Human 03:06 MON (w3ct051r)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lt2)

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Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lt2)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2zqf)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2zqg)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct2zqg)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2zqg)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mvv)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mvv)

From Our Own Correspondent 00:06 MON (w3ct1mvv)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n6r)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n6r)

HARDtalk 23:06 MON (w3ct1n6r)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1nc8)

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Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nw8)

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Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nw9)

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Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2zv9)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2zv9)

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In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tf0)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tf0)

In the Studio 23:32 TUE (w3ct1tf0)

More or Less 23:50 SUN (w3ct2dl0)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dl0)

Music Life 23:06 SAT (w3ct1hcw)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hcw)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv30tx7pjj0)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv30tx7pn84)

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Newshour 14:06 MON (w172xv5h531sjj1)

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Newshour 21:06 THU (w172xv5h53232g7)

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Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172xv5h5325zcb)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kxx)

Outlook 22:32 SUN (w3ct1kxx)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jv2)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct1jv2)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3ct1jv2)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3ct1jxb)

Outlook 18:06 TUE (w3ct1jxb)

Outlook 03:06 WED (w3ct1jxb)

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Outlook 03:06 THU (w3ct1jzl)

Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k43)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3ct1k43)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k43)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l2f)

Over to You 00:50 SUN (w3ct1l2f)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l2f)

People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1plw)

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Ros Atkins on ... 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dp8)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l4q)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l4q)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0npn7sf0rf)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172y0npn7shxnj)

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Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172y0npn7spqgq)

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Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct1l96)

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Sports News 22:20 SAT (w172y0sshmhk78q)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0qb5fpfv56)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tlyc36jvw)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0tlyc39p87)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lcg)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1nhz)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rty)

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The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2drj)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2drj)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2drj)

The Comb 04:32 WED (w3ct2z2g)

The Comb 11:32 WED (w3ct2z2g)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct2zhd)

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The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct2zhf)

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The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p9h)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p9j)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p9j)

The Conversation 23:32 MON (w3ct1p9j)

The Cultural Frontline 22:32 SAT (w3ct1ptm)

The Cultural Frontline 04:32 SUN (w3ct1ptm)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1ptm)

The Documentary 19:06 SAT (w3ct2zvd)

The Documentary 05:32 SUN (w3ct2zhc)

The Documentary 12:06 SUN (w3ct2zvd)

The Documentary 14:06 SUN (w3ct30fn)

The Documentary 02:32 TUE (w3ct2zjj)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct2zjj)

The Documentary 10:06 TUE (w3ct30fn)

The Documentary 20:06 TUE (w3ct2zjj)

The Explanation 09:32 SAT (w3ct2z3k)

The Explanation 23:32 SUN (w3ct2z3k)

The Explanation 03:32 MON (w3ct2z3k)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20fy)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rgn)

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The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3ct1rgp)

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The Forum 10:06 THU (w3ct1rm6)

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The History Hour 00:06 TUE (w3ct1z7x)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z30)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct1z30)

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The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3ct1htf)

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The Reith Lectures 04:06 SAT (w3ct2zp9)

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The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3ct1yw6)

Trending 05:32 SAT (w3ct2yqq)

Trending 18:32 SAT (w3ct2yqq)

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Trending 10:32 MON (w3ct2yqq)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172xytk3579bf4)

Weekend 07:06 SAT (w172xytk3579g58)

Weekend 08:06 SAT (w172xytk3579kxd)

Weekend 06:06 SUN (w172xytk357d7b7)

Weekend 07:06 SUN (w172xytk357dc2c)

Weekend 08:06 SUN (w172xytk357dgth)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wzk)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3ct1x1v)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct1x1v)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3ct1x1v)

Witness History 03:50 TUE (w3ct1x1v)

Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3ct1x6c)

Witness History 12:50 TUE (w3ct1x6c)

Witness History 18:50 TUE (w3ct1x6c)

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Witness History 08:50 WED (w3ct1x8m)

Witness History 12:50 WED (w3ct1x8m)

Witness History 18:50 WED (w3ct1x8m)

Witness History 03:50 THU (w3ct1x8m)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3ct1x43)

Witness History 12:50 THU (w3ct1x43)

Witness History 18:50 THU (w3ct1x43)

Witness History 03:50 FRI (w3ct1x43)

Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3ct1wzl)

Witness History 12:50 FRI (w3ct1wzl)

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WorklifeIndia 01:32 SAT (w3ct2f45)

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World Book Club 12:06 SAT (w3ct1x9v)

World Book Club 03:06 SUN (w3ct1x9v)

World Book Club 00:06 THU (w3ct1x9v)

World Business Report 01:06 SAT (w172xzlk3vq9yln)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzlkh40mlp0)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y489wdrvx2d)

World Business Report 22:32 MON (w172ycrqkywvzsd)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172y4bs6ll0q8c)

World Business Report 22:32 TUE (w172ycsk0phn63s)

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World Business Report 22:32 WED (w172ycsyr1t2r7j)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1v02)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1v02)

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