Radio-Lists Home Now on WS Contact

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 13 NOVEMBER 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lklrvr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htb)
The future of Chinese capitalism

The Chinese Communist Party has held a high level meeting that will help propel President Xi Jinping to a level of power not seen since Chairman Mao. The gathering was essentially a celebration of Mr Xi's time in office, with a new emphasis on establishing him at the core of the party's identity. Despite the initial shock of the coronavirus pandemic China's economy has continued to grow. But there now appears to be a renewed emphasis on reducing inequality across society. The government has taken measures against property developers, tech giants, and even banned private tuition - all part of President Xi's message of 'common prosperity' which envisions a more equitable distribution of the country's wealth. So what influence will market forces have in communist China moving forward? How much control will the state impose on the private sector? And can the government reduce private and public debt without harming economic growth and hurting consumers?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Paul Schuster and Junaid Ahmed


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lklwlw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlj11rzhs4)
Britney released from conservatorship

Pop star Britney Spears celebrates the end of a legal arrangement controlling much of her life, the BBC's David Willis is outside the LA courtroom. The COP26 summit has passed its scheduled finishing time, as negotiations on a deal to avert the worst impacts of climate change continue into Saturday. The BBC's Matt McGrath brings us up to date. And US Treasury secretary Janet Yellen talks about President Biden's Build Back Better bill and why she believes it's necessary and Chris Low of FHN Financial gives his response.
(Image: Britney Spears, Image credit: Reuters)


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb597w8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f42)
How can more women join politics in India?

Despite progress in women’s representation as politicians in many parts of the world, there are deep-seated biases that they need to conquer on a daily basis. Only 24 countries have women serving as heads of State or government, according to a recent study by the United Nations; it also says that, at the current rate, gender equality in the highest positions of power cannot be attained for another 130 years.

India ranks better than the US and the UK in terms of political empowerment of women, according to a World Economic Forum report released last year. But of the country’s 28 states, only one has a woman chief minister.

How can there be better representation of women from grassroots to the highest roles in Indian politics? Would mandatory reservations for women in legislative bodies help?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how more women can join politics in India.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Supriya Shrinate, national spokesperson, Indian National Congress; Dipsita Dhar, student activist, Communist Party of India; Shaina NC, spokesperson, Bharatiya Janata Party


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkm0c0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8ppmb8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb59cmd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lcc)
Azeem Rafiq: How can complaints of racism be handled better?

On this week's Stumped, Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Jim Maxwell examine the fallout from the racism scandal which has engulfed Yorkshire County Cricket Club and the sport over the last few weeks.

The team speak with John Mehrzad QC, who has been involved in conducting independent reviews in sport, to find out what is best practice when it comes to dealing with complaints of racism or harassment in sports organisations. Mehrzad was the only lawyer on the cultural review of British Cycling, chaired the governance review of the British Equestrian Federation and chaired the review into UK Athletics’ handling of allegations concerning athletics coach Alberto Salazar.

Plus we’re also joined by Derbyshire player Anuj Dal, who is Vice Chair of the Professional Cricketers Association and part of their Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Group. He discusses how the PCA is working with players at all levels to educate them about racism and inclusivity and how the union supports its member when allegations are made.

Photo: Former Yorkshire cricketer Azeem Rafiq poses for a portrait during the Yorkshire CCC Media Day at Headingley in 2018. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkm434)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fv)
Myanmar’s women-only army

A group of women in central Myanmar have formed their own anti-junta militia, and are fighting alongside other armed groups. Armed resistance to the military regime has been increasing since the coup nine months ago. BBC Burmese editor Soe Win Than tells us more about the Myaung Women Warriors.

My Home Town: Damascus
A new episode of our series 'My Home Town', in which our language service journalists share stories about the place where they grew up. Today, Dima Babilie of BBC Arabic takes us to the vine-covered alleyways of the Syrian capital Damascus to sit in cafés, drink coffee and play cards.

Why are so many Brazilians emigrating to Italy?
There’s been a big increase in the number of Brazilians moving to Italy and applying for citizenship. Rafael Barifouse of BBC Brasil has been investigating the reasons and talking to some of those who’ve made the move.

On Tajikistan's border with Afghanistan
Known for its beautiful mountains, Tajikistan's border with Afghanistan is at the centre of a fraught political situation, with the Tajik government maintaining a hardline stance towards the Taliban regime. Olga Ivshina of BBC Russian recently went to this remote area and shares her impressions.

Reporting COP26
Rubbing shoulders with world leaders, being inspired by young activists and getting to grips with haggis - just some of the experiences of our language service journalists reporting from COP26. We hear from Peter Okwoche of BBC Africa, Shakeel Anwar of BBC Bengali and Pierre-Antoine Denis of BBC Afrique.

Image: Myanmar’s women-only army
Credit: CJ


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzg)
Kuwaiti oil fires of 1991

After the end of the Gulf War in 1991, retreating Iraqi forces set light to oil wells in the desert. Specialist firefighters were drafted in by the Kuwaiti government to help put them out. Simon Watts spoke to one of those firefighters, Richard Hatteberg, in 2010.

This is a rebroadcast.

Photo: an oil fire in Kuwait. March 1991. Credit:Getty Images.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkm7v8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkmcld)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8ppzkn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb59qvs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct2yqm)
The Denial Files

4. From Covid conspiracy to climate change denial

Covid conspiracists are now shifting focus to climate change. An online movement infected with extreme pandemic conspiracies is looking for new territory as debates over lockdowns and vaccines subside in many richer countries.

We hear from Matthew in New Zealand. His family is really worried about the future of the planet, but he’s involved in groups where people believe that climate change is a “hoax” designed to limit our personal freedoms. They’ve swapped in “climate science” for “Covid” in their viral online conspiracy theories. Matthew found himself drawn into this conspiratorial belief system through a global anti-lockdown movement called The White Rose. The White Rose has local channels around the world, and researchers at the Institute for Strategic Dialogue think tank say the local group dedicated to New Zealand is where climate change conspiracies have taken off the most. Researchers point out that a ready-made network of people who have fallen for misleading claims about global Covid-19 plots has created a receptive audience for lies about climate change.

And in Germany, we hear about how members of the Covid-denying Querdenken group travelled to a region devastated by floods, intimidating helpers and spreading confusion about what had taken place. Locals were mystified and insulted, but it was another sign that climate change has become the new front line in the fight against online misinformation.

Presenter: Marianna Spring
Reporter: Jessica Bateman
Producer: Ant Adeane


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dp5)
The fight for Nazanin’s freedom

The husband of a British-Iranian charity worker held in Iran since 2016 has been on hunger strike again to push for her release. Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe has been held there on spying charges, which she denies. Ros Atkins looks at how her story is part of a complicated history between Iran and the UK.

(Photo: Richard Ratcliffe holds up a photo of his wife Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe as he protests outside the Foreign Office while on hunger strike, 24 October, 2021, London.. Credit: Hollie Adams/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkmhbj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytj0c8ywlm)
COP26: Talks run into overtime

World leaders and policymakers in Glasgow push past a 1800 GMT deadline Friday evening to announce a new draft deal, working overnight in the hopes of securing one by the following morning.

Also in the programme: the migrant crisis at the border between Poland and Belarus intensifies, with thousands of migrants trapped between the two countries in freezing temperatures.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Rachel Kyte, an advisor to the UK government for COP26 and Gavin Jennings, presenter of Ireland's most listened-to radio programme, Morning Ireland.

(Photo: Protests at COP26 - on the last day of the conference, Glasgow, November 12, 2021. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkmm2n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytj0c8z0br)
COP26: New draft deal to be announced Saturday morning

The UN climate summit has officially run into overtime, with policymakers missing a 1800 GMT deadline Friday to ratify a binding deal. Alok Sharma, the British chair for COP26, says an agreement will be announced this morning.

Also in the programme: Today marks 20 years since the Taliban were first driven out of power in Afghanistan -- only to return with an even more secure footing in recent months. Our World Affairs editor, John Simpson, takes us on a journey through the years in Kabul. And our correspondent Jenny Hill gives us an update on the migrant crisis in Belarus and Poland, from the border on the Polish side.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Rachel Kyte, an advisor to the UK government for COP26 and Gavin Jennings, presenter of Ireland's most listened-to radio programme, Morning Ireland.

(Photo: Cop 26 President Alok Sharma surrounded by advisers before giving his speech during the Cop26 summit in Glasgow. Credit: Press Association)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkmqts)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytj0c8z42w)
COP26: Pieces of a new draft climate deal begin to emerge

Having passed the original Friday evening deadline for a climate agreement -- to be signed off by over 200 countries -- nations edge closer to a deal.

Also in the programme: Design Museum here in London explores the role of design in the battle against climate change. We hear from the co-curator Justin McGuirk.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Rachel Kyte, an advisor to the UK government for COP26 and Gavin Jennings, presenter of Ireland's most listened-to radio programme, Morning Ireland.

(Photo: Protesters around the globe have been demanding firmer commitments from world leaders on climate change. Credit: EPA).


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5b335)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9d)
Women protecting wildlife from poachers

There are many thousands of people around the world trying to protect endangered species in their natural habitat – around one in ten of them are female but that number is growing. In Africa alone 18 different countries employ female park rangers. Kim Chakanetsa is joined by two women from South Africa and Zambia to talk about what they do.

Tsakane Nxumalo is a junior ranger from The Black Mambas - an unarmed all-female ranger unit in South Africa working in the Greater Kruger National Park. Their job is to protect rhino herds from local bushmeat hunters and organised rhino-poaching syndicates. Since their foundation in 2013 they’ve removed thousands of snares and poison traps, dramatically reducing poaching activity and encouraging people to see the region as a resource for wildlife and nature tourism.

Lisa Siamusantu is part of Kufadza, Zambia’s first all-female anti-poaching community scout unit working with Conservation Lower Zambezi. She’d had to drop out of university and was supporting her mother in their village in near the Lower Zambezi National Park when she saw a recruitment advert for this armed ranger unit. She says the training was the hardest thing she’s ever done, but now she says whatever she does in the future it will have to be with nature and wildlife ‘I don’t want to stop doing this job.’

The teams are funded with money from government, non-government organisations and charity. They’ve both been recognised by World Female Ranger Day which is supporting women wildlife rangers around the world.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE
L: Tsakane Nxumalo, courtesy The Black Mambas
R: Lisa Siamusantu, credit Matt Sommerville


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkmvkx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6m)
Climate: Coal mining

Moving away from the use of fossil fuels like coal, oil and gas has been a major talking point at the COP 26 climate conference. Two coal mine workers in the United States and Canada discuss their concerns for their jobs, families and businesses within their communities. They are unhappy that coal is being painted as the “evil thing” and that all will be better if you get rid of it. They tell us at the moment they are working six days a week and can’t get enough coal out.

Host Nuala McGovern, meanwhile, also brings together professional athletes: a climber, ice climber and skier, who have witnessed, first hand, the detrimental effects of climate change on their outdoor sports and the natural landscapes.

We also discuss fashion and its impact on the planet. Three women in India, Portugal and the UK, who all run businesses specialising in sustainable fashion, tell us how we can achieve a more climate friendly wardrobe.

(Photo: Coal mining operation in Colorado. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5b6v9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Pick of the World (w3ct2z27)
Pick of the World

Listeners to the BBC World Service not only love what they hear, they love to engage with it; it's a two way relationship that has created a special bond.

Each week, Anna Doble celebrates the amazing radio the World Service produces, with clips chosen by its listeners, and explores the reaction on social media.

She also speaks to some of those listeners around the world, to find out what it was about the issue that captured them.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2b)
An editor tackling the spread of disinformation

The BBC World Service has appointed its first disinformation editor. But what exactly does this entail? And how might their work benefit you the listener?
They join us in the studio to answer your questions.
Plus the use of background music. Your reaction to the idea of having two versions of the same programme!

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkmzb1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q92mr3dbp)
Sport and the climate

Has has the past two weeks been a decisive moment for athlete climate activism? As COP26, the United Nations climate change conference, ends what impact has sport had on delivering for the future? Athletes, organisations and members of the sporting community have signed a manifesto calling on, amongst other things, net zero and to protect communities and natural habitats. We hear from English cricketer Joe Cooke, one of those who signed the manifesto. Plus Fiona Morgan is the Global Director of Purpose & Impact at SailGP, a championship that races all over the world but has added a sustainability aspect to the action, rewarding teams as much for their speed on the water as their impact on the environment. She told us about the role sport is playing at COP26 and what it's like to take part in one of the panel discussions at the summit.

It's been a busy month for Vivianne Miedema, banging in the goals for Arsenal, nominated for the BBC Women's Footballer of the Year and alongside her partner, West Ham's Lisa Evans, joined the "Common Goal" movement. Created by Manchester United's Juan Mata, people donate 1% of their wages to support those in need all over the world. Viv and Lisa reveal a little bit about their life off the field and explain why they wanted to get involved.

As a star of the NFL Mark Pattison knew what it was like to hit the heights of professional sport. When, in retirement, that feeling disappeared Mark was left asking himself questions about much more than sport. It lead him on an extraordinary adventure that saw him conquer the seven highest peaks on earth.

We also hear from the recently retired international footballer, famed for saving a Leo Messi penalty at the World Cup finals and for being part of the Icelandic team who made it to the quarter-finals of Euro 2016 by knocking out England. So what do you do if you're Hannes Thór Halldórsson and it's time to hang up the gloves? Go back to your original love... movies! Cop Secret is his first full-length film. The goalkeeper-turned-director explained all.

This time last year Germany's Andreas Seewald was an electrician but always sparked into life by sport... and eventually, he found the funding to give his first love, mountain biking, a go professionally. This time last month Andreas was crowned Mountain Bike World Champion, he explained how.


Image: Lasse Schöne of Genoa under a big banner concerning climate changes issues during a Serie A match (Photo by Paolo Rattini/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkn325)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pqq1f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5bgbk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkn6t9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z30)
On the Covid ward

Frontline medical teams in the UK have fine-tuned the physical treatment of severely ill Covid patients. But one thing that has gone largely unnoticed is their efforts to help those patients – often on ventilators for weeks – keep up the will to live, and enable their families to stay connected with these patients.

We hear from Dave Collins, who had to say goodbye to his family via Zoom before being put on a ventilator; Paul Twose, a physiotherapist working in critical care, who uses an “About Me” list to make sure that an unconscious patient is treated as an individual; Dr Niki Snook, a consultant in intensive care, who always treats unconscious patients as if they can hear and reads out messages from family members to them; and Tariq Butt, one of Niki’s patients, who was unconscious for 12 weeks.

We also witness a reunion between Rehanah Sadiq, a Muslim hospital chaplain, and Sarah Niyazi, whose husband Arif died of Covid-19 in the early weeks of the pandemic. Together they recall how Rehanah created a special Covid-compliant ritual for Sarah and Arif to replace the normal Islamic washing of the body after death.

(Photo: Medical staff at Royal Papworth hospital are tending to Covid-19 patients. Credit: Lynsey Addario/Getty Images)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lknbkf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0t49w1)
COP26: New draft aims to close lingering divisions

Talks at the climate summit in Glasgow are in the final stretch as countries try to strike a deal on tackling climate change. An unprecedented mention of phasing out coal and a call for tougher carbon-cutting targets next year both remain in the text. But developing country representatives are angry that there is nothing about a compensation fund for climate impacts. We get a reaction to the draft from New Zealand and Seychelle’s climate change ministers.

Also in the programme: Tension continues at the Poland-Belarus border while migrants remain in the area; and protestors have once again taken to the streets in Sudan to reject the 25h of October coup d’état.

(Photo: COP26 President Alok Sharma gestures during the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, Scotland, Britain November 13, 2021. Credit: Reuters).


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkng9k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tkvk4w31c)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Tottenham Hotspur FC/Tottenham Hotspur FC via Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkny92)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8prk8b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5c9kg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct2yqm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l93)
Lebanon's match-fixing scandal

In 2011, the Lebanese national football team reached the final phase of World Cup qualification for the first time, sparking wild celebrations among the fans. But within months, the game in Lebanon was engulfed in a huge match-fixing scandal focusing on a suspicious-looking goal in a match against Qatar, as well as domestic fixtures. In 2013, 24 Lebanese players were found guilty in an investigation ordered by FIFA and the national side’s World Cup campaign fizzled out. Alex Eccleston reports. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: The Lebanese team ahead of a World Cup qualifier in 2012 (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkp216)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zqt)
The hack that changed the world

In 2009, someone broke into the Climatic Research Unit of the University of East Anglia in the UK and stole emails. The material was distributed online - mainly on blogs linked to climate change sceptics. It was used to make the case that scientists were surreptitiously twisting the facts to exaggerate climate change. That was not the case. But before that became clear, events would take on a life of their own, sparking a global media storm.

This is a story that matters - firstly because it may have set back by years efforts to combat climate change. But also because it foretold a future in which emails would be stolen and weaponised and where information and social media would be used to cast doubt on science and expertise.

More than a decade on, as the UK hosts a new global climate summit - COP26 in Glasgow - the mystery of who was behind ‘Climategate’ remains. 

BBC security correspondent Gordon Corera goes on the trail of this ‘cyber cold case’, talking to the key players including police and sceptics, taking the listener on a journey to a place where climate change and information warfare met - with world-changing consequences.

Credit: MSNBC News Live 25 November 2009 and NBC Nightly News, 4 December 2009.

(Image: Graphic of the hacked emails created by Serious. Credit: BBC/Red Sky Productions)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkp5sb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtv)
Actor Arinzé Kene

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined by multi TONY-winning Broadway producer Ron Simons and in the studio by film critic Catherine Bray.

Kristen Stewart talks about playing Diana, Princess of Wales in Spencer.

Arinzé Kene, appearing on the London stage as Bob Marley in Get Up Stand Up, tells us about portraying his hero.

Cynthia Erivo on her stratospheric career on stage and screen, and her Nigerian roots.

Film director Edgar Wright reveals the challenges of making Last Night In Soho.

Ron Simons tells us his secrets to making a successful Broadway show with African American themes.

Singer, actor, activist Billy Porter on nearly three decades of performing at the top of his game.

And music from Cypriot band Monsieur Doumani.

(Photo: Arinzé Kene as Bob Marley. Credit: Craig Sugden)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkp9jg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0t58v2)
Global climate deal agreed at COP26

The UN Climate Summit in Glasgow has adopted a new pact aimed at curbing global warming. The British hosts stressed that the deal would keep within reach the goal of keeping temperature rises to 1.5 degrees Celsius, but many countries said the final text had been watered down. The main target of criticism was India's lobbying to change the expression 'phasing out' to 'phasing down' the use of coal.

Also in the programme: Belarus says it's delivering aid to migrants at its border who are trying to cross into Poland; and doctors in Sudan say the security forces have killed at least five protesters during the latest rally against military rule.

(Image: The president of the COP26 climate summit, Alok Sharma. Credit: Epa/Robert Perry)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkpf8l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzbk32qtk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srdtk6sg6)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5csjz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptj)
Crime Storytellers: Michael Connelly

This week, The Cultural Frontline investigates the world of crime in fact and fiction.

Michael Connelly is one of the world’s bestselling crime writers. One of the key elements that shaped Michael’s writing is his past career as a crime journalist for the Los Angeles Times. He speaks to Anu Anand about his latest novel, The Dark Hours, and how his work has been shaped by the pandemic and the social unrest following the murder of George Floyd.

We meet the podcast makers exploring African true crime. Investigative journalists Halima Gikandi of The Missionary and Paul McNally of Alibi discuss making podcasts that centre African experiences in telling true crime stories.

Plus has a book, a film, or a song ever changed the way you see the world? The best selling Danish crime writer Jussi Adler Olsen on the Joni Mitchell song A Case of You, which helped him during one of the most difficult times in his life.

(Photo: Michael Connelly. Credit: Mark DeLong)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkpk0q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcs)
Throwing laptops across the room with Lauren Mayberry, Bartees Strange, Ellie Rowsell and Hannah Reid

Chvrches singer Lauren Mayberry, US indie star Bartees Strange, Ellie Rowsell of Mercury Prize winners Wolf Alice and London Grammar's Hannah Reid discuss writing routines, throwing laptops across the room, falling between musical worlds, why polarising art is the best, and the realities of touring.

Lauren Mayberry fronts Scottish band Chvrches. Their glittering career has seen them release four albums, tour with Two Door Cinema Club, Depeche Mode and Passion Pit, and collaborate with the likes of Marshmello, The National, Paramore, Death Cab For Cutie, and The Cure’s Robert Smith. Ellie Rowsell is the vocalist and guitarist with British rock band Wolf Alice, whose 2017 album Visions of a Life won the Mercury Prize; their latest album Blue Weekend came out earlier this year. Hannah Reid is a singer and songwriter best known for her hypnotic vocals in pop band London Grammar. They released their debut album If You Wait in 2013, which turned them into one of the most popular bands in the UK. Bartees Strange is a producer and songwriter whose sound blurs genre and boundary. During the mid-2010s, he was a member of New York post-hardcore band Stay Inside, before embarking on a career as a solo artist in 2017 with the debut EP Magic Boy. He had his breakthrough moment in 2020 with the Say Goodbye To Pretty Boy EP, and he’s remixed tracks for the likes of Phoebe Bridgers and Illuminati Hotties.



SUNDAY 14 NOVEMBER 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkpnrv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5d117)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Trending (w3ct2yqm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkpshz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yw3)
Bambi got Covid

Up to 8 percent of deer sampled in studies in the US were found to be infected with the SARS-Cov-2 Virus. Suresh Kuchipudi from the Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences at Penn State University in the US says what they are seeing is a mixture of human to deer and deer to deer transmission of the virus. There is concern that its presence in animal reservoirs could lead to a new form of the virus emerging.

Tropical forests and spread of zoonotic diseases And as the Cop26 meeting in Glasgow draws to a close we ask how global policy on climate will impact the spread of zoonotic disease. Spill over of possible pandemic pathogens from animals to humans occurs with the destruction of tropical forests in particular and can expose people to previously unknown zoonotic diseases such as Covid 19.

Aaron Bernstein from the Coalition to Prevent Pandemics at the Source says healthcare initiatives designed to reduce the potential spread of such diseases need to be designed to work in tandem with conservation and climate change impact reduction initiatives, essentially tackling both problems simultaneously.

LED lighting Researchers in South Africa are looking into ways of making LED lighting both cheaper and more efficient. This should help reduce energy consumption, a prerequisite for effective policy on climate change.

In addition, as Professor Odireleng Martin Ntwaeaborwa tells us, the technology now has many applications in places where access to electricity is limited, including South Africa which currently has regular power outages.

Personalised medicine And personalised medicine based on our genes took a further step forward this week. Richard Scott, Chief Medical Officer for Genomics England discusses new findings which reveal the genetic basis for a range or rare diseases.

And, Concrete is the most widely used substance on earth after water. It’s quite literally the foundation of the modern world, and no wonder - it’s strong, cheap, and mouldable into nearly any shape.

But these benefits come at a cost: concrete production is responsible for around 8% of global CO2 emissions - that’s around three times more than the aviation industry.

Concrete might not look pretty, but given its carbon footprint, should we be more careful about how we use it? And rather than throwing waste into landfill, could we recycle it instead? That’s what Crowdscience listener Catherine wants to know.

To investigate, Marnie Chesterton and Anand Jagatia learn more about what makes concrete such a brilliant and versatile material. It’s down to the chemistry of how cement dries – which, it turns out, is anything but boring. They find out how the stuff is made, and why that produces so much carbon. And they hear about some ingenious projects to repurpose demolition waste – including creating underwater habitats for marine life, and using 3D printers to turn crushed concrete into street furniture.

Image: Bambi, lobbycard, 1942 Photo by LMPC via Getty Images Presenter: Roland Pease


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkpx83)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8psj7c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5d8jh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw5)
New antiviral pills to treat Covid

New antiviral pills to treat Covid are coming thick and fast. Pfizer have just announced their new antiviral Paxlovid in the same week UK’s MHRA was the first country in the world to approve Molnupiravir – Merck’s pill launched last month. So how do the two antivirals compare? And a report from the longest operating milk bank in North America. Since 1974, the Mothers’ Milk Bank in San Jose, California has been collecting breast milk to help nurture vulnerable babies (especially premature ones) at a critical time in their lives. Today it supplies about 500 gallons of breast milk a month reaching over 80% of California’s newborn intensive care units (or NICU’s) and serves eleven hospitals in other U.S. states, as far afield as New York.

Who donates all this milk and how is the milk treated to ensure it’s safe and nourishing for babies?

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A hand holding pills. Photo credit: Thana Prasongsin/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkq107)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z30)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkq4rc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvr)
Tea with the Taliban next door

Pascale Harter introduces dispatches from BBC Correspondents around the world.

The war in Afghanistan might be over, but there's a looming humanitarian crisis. The aid which used to keep the country's central government afloat is not flowing freely any more - as donor nations have misgivings over dealing direct with the new Taliban government. Andrew North has reported from Afghanistan over many points since the 2001 intervention and recently returned to Kabul to see how things had changed. In his old home there, he found some intimidating-looking new neighbours who were still keen to sit down and talk.

The conflict in Ethiopia, between the central government of Abiy Ahmed in Addis Ababa and the country's former rulers among the TPLF (Tigray People's Liberation Front), is complex and it's escalating. Recently, the TPLF signed an accord with other major rebel groupings which are keen to break down - or reform - the Ethiopian state and which argue its ethnic and political mosaic needs to be rearranged. Catherine Byaruhanga explains why the presence of the Oromo Liberation Army, which claims to fight for the rights of groups in the southern regions of Ethiopia, among the signatories to that accord matters.

President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua is now all set to remain President for another term - at least. In the most recent election he appeared to win a strong popular mandate - but given that most of his challengers had already been jailed or exiled, and that his government controlled the release of information, there have been serious questions about the poll numbers. Will Grant was just one of the reporters denied entry to the country even to report on the vote.

And Jenny Hill delves into the forest floor - and beneath the bark of the spruce trees - in Germany's Harz mountains, meeting a woodsman who sees the effects of climate change around him every day. There's a newly-vigorous pest - the bark beetle - now chewing its way through the landscape, but somehow this forester still sees reasons for optimism.

Producer: Polly Hope


(Image: Man selling Taliban flags in Kabul, September 2021. Credit: Hoshang Hashimi/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5dj0r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkq8hh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pswgr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5dmrw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2z2z)
More yield, less field

This year Zimbabwe has had a bumper crop of the staple food, maize. It is only the second time in two decades that it has grown enough food for the whole population. Last year they barely had half of what was needed and 7.7 million people went hungry.

Better rainfall is largely to thank, but a new farming technique, called Pfumvudza is also being celebrated as having a dramatic impact on the amount Zimbabwe’s smallholder farmers have produced, increasing their yields up to four times. Advocates say it holds the key to food security and makes farmers more resilient to the realities of climate change - hotter, drier, stormier weather, which makes farming even harder.

Dr Matthew Mbanga is CEO of the organisation which designed Pfumvudza. He explains the “more yield, less field” principle, which encourages farmers to more intensively cultivate a smaller area of land. They dig basins instead of ploughing rows and produce their own organic fertiliser. Dr Mbanga argues that Pfumvudza must be a central part of Zimbabwe’s climate change response because it helps farms cope better in the hotter, drier, stormier weather.

Image: Consilia Chianako, a trainer at Foundations for Farming, demonstrates how to dig holes into 'mulch' cover (Credit: Charlotte Ashton)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkqd7m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytj0c91shq)
COP26: A deal is reached

After two weeks and a missed Friday evening deadline, nations in attendance at the UN climate summit have reached a deal.

Also in the programme: Facing severe security threats, Mali turns to an unlikely ally: Russia. We hear from Manu Lekunze, a specialist on African security, on the Mali government's strategy. And we speak to the first elected albino lawmaker, Overstone Kondowe, who took his seat in Malawi's parliament last week.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Loretta Napoleoni, Italian-born author and economist and Toby Green, Professor of Precolonial and Lusophone African History and Culture at King's College, London.

(Photo: COP26 President Alok Sharma gestures to the delegates during the final COP26, Glasgow, November 13, 2021. Credit: Reuters).


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkqhzr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytj0c91x7v)
COP26: Analysing the new climate deal

After a wrought final push, the UN climate summit concluded with a new agreement signed by over two hundred nations. But critics testify dismay at last-minute amendments that changed the language around the future of coal, with the expression 'phasing out' of coal changed to 'phasing down'.

Also in the programme: Climate change is causing increased flooding and erosion in Nigeria. We hear from Ade-olu Ade-kola, a journalist in the commercial capital of Lagos. And US President Joe Biden will hold a virtual summit tomorrow with China's leader Xi Jinping.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Loretta Napoleoni, Italian-born author and economist and Toby Green, Professor of Precolonial and Lusophone African History and Culture at King's College, London.

(Photo: Hundreds of delegates walked out of the COP26 venue. Credit: PA Media).


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkqmqw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytj0c920zz)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5f008)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgk)
How to cope with cooking burnout

Throughout the coronavirus pandemic some people discovered a solace and comfort in cooking, but for many others the opposite was true - the joy they had once felt in the kitchen evaporated.

Tamasin Ford speaks to three formerly passionate cooks to find out what it’s like to lose the love of the thing you enjoy doing the most.

What’s really behind their ‘cooking burnout’, how have they tried to reignite that spark, and has this experience changed their relationship with food for good?

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:
Helen Rosner, food correspondent for The New Yorker, New York, USA;
Yamini Pustake Bhalerao, author and ideas editor at shethepeople.tv, Pune, India;
Wayne Barnard, chef and ambassador for The Burnt Chef Project, Cardiff, Wales.

(Picture: A woman making cookies. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkqrh0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5f3rd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxt)
Flying my South African flag at the top of Everest

In May 2019 Saray Khumalo became the first black African woman to summit Everest. She defied those who didn't believe she could achieve her dream of climbing the world’s highest peaks. The trek to the top wasn't easy though, Saray tells Andile Masuku about three previous attempts and her near-death experiences.

This episode was first broadcast on 15th February 2020.

Presenter: Andile Masuku
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

Picture: Saray Khumalo summiting Mount Everest
Credit: Saray Khumalo

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkqw74)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct051f)
Deeply Human

Pain

Hurting, pain and suffering might just be some of the most important things that make you who you are. That pain, though, may be almost invisible to those around you.

Suffering is often private and difficult to discuss. You can’t hold your pain up to the light for someone else to examine or drape it around their shoulders to see how it might fit. Yet our experience of pain can change the way we think about ourselves and others.

In an effort to understand how suffering works, Dessa gets burned — literally — and talks pain scales, placebos and the grade school game of sticking gum wrappers to your forehead.

(Image: Child with plaster on knee, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 10:29 Ceremony of Remembrance from the Cenotaph (w172ycr543pt216)
Ceremony of Remembrance from the Cenotaph

The BBC World Service will be joining a broadcast live from central London for the traditional Ceremony of Remembrance, where members of the British Royal Family led by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, together with political leaders and members of the armed forces from many nations lay wreaths in memory of the dead.


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5fc7n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2z3d)
One Hundred Years of Exile

Who is a refugee?

In the aftermath of World War One, as Turkey filled with refugees fleeing a brutal civil war, the first refugee camps appeared and the international community stepped in to appoint the first High Commissioner for Refugees. In this first episode Katy Long hears stories from refugees and those who work to support them from Rwanda, Germany and Russia, as she examines how refugee crises begin, and who is considered a refugee.

(Photo: A queue of refugees awaits the assistances of Turkish relief organisations in Pazarkule camp on the border between Turkey and Greece. Credit: Belal Khaled/NurPhoto/Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkr3qd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2zqt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkr7gj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0t76s4)
World reacts to COP26 climate pact

COP26 Glasgow is the first ever climate deal that plans explicitly to reduce coal - the worst fossil fuel for greenhouse gases. But some are still not satisfied as they say time is running out. We hear from Pakistan’s climate change minister and from Bolivia’s climate change chief negotiator.

Also in the programme: Austria is the latest country to bring in new Covid-19 restrictions; and the mystery of the British aircraft carrier that sank just off the coast of Scotland during the Second World War.

(Photo: COP26 President Alok Sharma attends the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, Scotland, Britain November 13. Credit: Reuters).


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkrc6n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm2)
The Malayan Emergency

One of the earliest Cold War conflicts was a 12-year guerrilla war commonly known as the Malayan Emergency and fought from 1948 in the jungles of what is now Malaysia. This communist insurgency was fuelled not only by ideology but also by the desire for Malayan independence from British colonial rule. There have been a number of books and documentaries devoted to the subject but relatively few in English capture the experiences of the Chinese community in Malaya that was at the centre of the Emergency.

Rajan Datar is joined by three guests, all with family links to the Emergency:
Sim Chi Yin, a photographer and artist from Singapore whose book She Never Rode that Trishaw Again tells the story of her grandmother widowed during the war in Malaya;
Show Ying Xin, a postdoctoral fellow at the at the Australian National University’s Malaysia Institute in Canberra;
and Rachel Leow, Associate Professor in Modern East Asian History at the University of Cambridge and author of Taming Babel: Language in the Making of Malaysia.

[Photo: Malayan police officers keeping watch from the Pengkalan police station in 1950. Credit: Haywood Magee/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkx)
The carbon cost of breakfast at COP26

A French minister told people to eat fewer croissants at this year’s COP26 summit, after the menu said the carbon cost of the pastry was higher than that of a bacon roll, even if it was made without butter. Tim Harford investigates whether this claim could be true, and how the effect of food on climate change can be measured.

(Photo: Continental breakfast with coffee and croissants: Cris Cantón/Getty Images)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkrgys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkrlpx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tkvk4z7fq)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Michael Steele-ICC/ICC via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkryy9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pvkxk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5gb6p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2z3b)
Lipa Schmelzer: The Jewish Lady Gaga

Lipa Schmeltzer is a bright star in the world of Jewish music; only his music sounds nothing like traditional Jewish music! In fact, he has been nicknamed, the ‘Jewish Lady Gaga’!

Growing up in New York, in an ultra-conservative Hasidic community, Lipa was always different. At school, he was taught all subjects in Yiddish, and when he found it hard to concentrate his teachers called him the 'dumb kid' and told him he would never amount to anything. He had a dream of being a singer, but when he started writing and performing his own songs, his father and rabbi told him to stop and concentrate on studying the Bible. Lipa agreed and publicly apologised to the community for the modern music he had been creating - but it was not long until he started again.

Lipa's music and performance style represented a split in his community: the younger Hasidic Jewish who loved the modern Jewish beats and wanted him to perform at their weddings and children's bar mitzvahs, and then the older more reserved Jewish who thought it was disrespectful and would lead people away from holy scripture and on a path to hell.

Today Lipa lives in both worlds, creating modern Jewish music while trying to stay true to his roots. But it is not always easy, as Colm Flynn found out when he went to New York to visit Lipa.

(Photo: Lipa Schmeltzer)


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lks2pf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhn)
General Electric broken up

In Business Weekly, we take a look at the splitting up of a 129-year old behemoth. General Electric announced that it will divide itself into three separate companies. Does this mean the end of conglomerates that span several sectors and make a multitude of diverse products? Also, the former finance minister of Afghanistan tells us that the Taliban takeover was due in no small part to massive corruption within the government. Plus we take a look at the row over the increasing amount of raw sewage that's being allowed to flow into the UK's rivers. Also in the programme – the sale by Elon Musk of some of his shares in Tesla after asking his Twitter followers whether or not it was a good move. And as the German media giant, Axel Springer, announces plans to force managers to tell HR departments if they start a sexual relationship with a subordinate, we take a look at the difference between American and European corporate cultures. Business Weekly is presented by Matthew Davies and produced by Philippa Goodrich.

(Image: GE engine at China International Import Expo, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lks6fk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0t85r5)
Boris Johnson: Climate deal sounds 'death knell for coal power'

The British prime minister has described the Glasgow climate deal as a "game-changing agreement". Although countries only agreed to "phase down" rather than "phase out" coal, Boris Johnson said this was a fantastic achievement. Is India, which lobbied for the last-minute change, being unfairly blamed?

Also in the programme: Austria's chancellor orders a lockdown for millions of people not fully vaccinated against Covid; and Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, the son of Libya's former dictator, has registered as a presidential candidate.

(Image: Boris Johnson speaking during a news conference following the the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26). Credit: Daniel Leal/Pool via REUTERS)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lksb5p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzbk35mqn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srdtk9pc9)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5gpg2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lksfxt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 Deeply Human (w3ct051f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5gt66)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Pick of the World (w3ct2z27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]



MONDAY 15 NOVEMBER 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvxdy3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgls6h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2z3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvxjp7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzljdb294vh)
Businesses call for urgent support, as new Austrian lockdown looms

Austria is placing about two million unvaccinated people in lockdown from Monday amid record Covid infection levels. It has led already for calls for greater government support from sectors like the hospitality and crucial winter tourism industries as the BBC's Bethany Bell in Vienna explained.
Also on the programme, how a change of phrasing on coals power usage left a cloud over the final weekend at COP26, what history can teach us about the current inflation crisis, and the return of the Dubai airshow - but will any aircraft actually get sold?

Picture credit: AFP


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylglwym)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqc)
Geoengineering The Planet

Geoengineering is already underway from Australia to the Arctic as scientists try to save places threatened by global heating. It’s time for a global conversation about how we research these powerful techniques, with agreements on how and where to deploy them.

Global temperature today is 1.2°C hotter than preindustrial levels and it is causing climate change and sea level rise, threatening the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Coral reef ecosystems are headed for extinction within decades; glacial melt is speeding up with runaway consequences; agriculture has been hit by drought and extreme weather…. And as our carbon emissions rise, it’s only going to get worse, because we’re headed this century for at least 3°C of temperature rise if governments meet their netzero targets.
Faced with this heat emergency, scientists are acting. In Australia, they are brightening clouds to make them more reflective, hoping to save the Great Barrier Reef, and coating the waters with a thin reflective film; in the Arctic, glaciers are being covered with fine glass beads to reflect the sun’s heat and slow melting; on the Asian plains, clouds are being seeded to deliver rain over droughtlands. Beaches are being coated with rock dust to try to “react out” the air’s CO2, and where coral reefs have already been destroyed by bleaching, scientists are creating artificial coral structures inhabited by genetically modified coral organisms.

No global body is overseeing any of this, but it is mostly local and small scale. As temperatures climb further, heatwaves and deadly weather events will kill even more people than today. Scientists want to look at methods of preventing catastrophic temperature rise that could help large regions – potentially cooling global temperature. They want to see if seeding stratospheric clouds with sulphates would be possible, and whether it would have any unwanted affects.

But a large vocal group of environmentalists is opposed even to feasibility studies. They claim that this sort of geoengineering is “unnatural”, and instead are pressing for huge societal change that is difficult to achieve, unpopular, and could cause hardship. Planned experiments have been cancelled after pressure by these campaigners, repeatedly, over several years. Now they are trying to get a moratorium on any research into geoengineering. Many fear that even talking about geoengineering risks reducing efforts to decarbonise.
Meanwhile, the temperature keeps rising. Undoubtedly, there will come a point when society will decide it is no longer acceptable for thousands of people to die from hot temperatures, and seek to deploy cooling technologies. Technologies that we haven’t properly researched. The government of India may decide to unilaterally cool the planet after a deadly heatwave; or the government of the US after an even more violent Sandy; or the government of an island nation after a typhoon that drowns the land…

This is not something that should be decided by a few powerful nations, but equally, ignoring these potential lifesaving technologies because of cultural reticence would be a moral and political failure. Instead, we need to have a conversation about how geoengineering should be researched, governed, regulated and deployed.

This is a programme about how we cool the planet with the latest geoengineering technologies, and the loaded cultural values and politics around the biggest planetary dilemma of our time.

Picture: Rough sea, Credit: Jacob Maentz/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvxnfc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k008dm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgm0pr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2drf)
What did we learn at COP26?

The lights have come on in Glasgow, the bar is closed and it's time to head home.
Now the 26th Conference of Parties is over we ask what's really been decided and where do we go from here?

In discussion with our presenters Neal Razzell and Kate Lamble are;
Jeffrey Sachs - Director Earth Institute, Columbia University
Dr Rose Mutiso - Research Director, Energy For Growth Hub Kenya
Helen Mountford - Vice President, Climate & Economics, World Resources Institute


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvxs5h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct051f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgm4fw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Pick of the World (w3ct2z27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l2b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvxwxm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k00hww)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgm860)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9f)
Maids to the rich and famous

Rich families around the world employ butlers and maids to look after their expensive properties. These houseworkers have access to every aspect of their employers’ lives: they get to know their habits and their deepest secrets. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two former maids who worked for wealthy families in the USA and the UK.

Stephanie Land is the bestselling author of Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother’s Will to Survive, a poignant memoir highlighting the plight of overworked and underpaid domestic workers in the USA. Her story has recently been turned into the successful Netflix series, Maid.

When she was 19, Sara Vestin Rahmani moved from Sweden to London to work as an au pair for a rich family. She thought she would only stay for a year, but she quickly became embedded in the family’s life, and was exposed to a lifestyle she never imagined was possible. She is now the director of Bespoke Bureau and the British Butler Academy, a high-end recruitment and training agency of domestic and elite service staff.

Producer: Alice Gioia

(Image: (L) Stephanie Land, credit Ashley Farr. (R) Sara Vestin Rahmani, credit Bespoke Bureau)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvy0nr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2zr39c2ph)
Tension over the migrant crisis on the Poland Belarus border escalates

Thousands of migrants have been trying to cross the border between Belarus and Poland. We have an update on the humanitarian situation and growing political crisis there.

We speak to one of the world's leading atmospheric scientists for her view on the climate deal struck at the COP26 summit.

And what is being done to end the civil conflict in Ethiopia? We have the latest on the international diplomatic efforts, ranging from the call for a ceasefire to possible sanctions.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvy4dw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2zr39c6fm)
Poland-Belarus border: What is it like for the migrants there?

Thousands of people, many from the Middle East, are stuck on the border between Belarus and Poland. We hear from some of the migrants in Belarus and we go live to Poland, as the EU prepares to discuss widening sanctions against Belarus.

In the climate deal reached at the COP26 summit, India and China weakened the pledge to phase out coal, so what does a young Indian man, who has been singled out by the United Nations for his work in promoting climate education, make of his country's stance?

And we look at the decision in Libya by the son of the late Colonel Muammar Gaddafi to officially become a candidate for next month presidential elections. He is wanted by the International Criminal Court and a High Court in Libya.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvy850)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2zr39cb5r)
India air pollution: Delhi ready to impose lockdown

The Indian Supreme Court has requested that officials in Delhi consider measures to control emissions from traffic, industry and farming. The authorities say they are ready to do so. We get the latest, and on India's stance in the COP26 climate deal.

An opposition leader in Belarus reacts to the migrant crisis on its border with Poland, as the European Union prepares to discuss widening sanctions against Minsk.

We go live to Liverpool, in the UK, where three men have been arrested under the Terrorism Act after an explosion outside a hospital killed one person and injured another.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvycx4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6n)
Ritchie Torres: Is America ready to embrace progressive politics?

Stephen Sackur is in the south Bronx, New York, to speak to Ritchie Torres, a rising star of the Democratic Party. He is the first gay black man elected to Congress, and a vocal champion for the poorest district in the country. Is America as a whole ready to embrace progressive politics?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgmr5j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5n)
What did the climate talks achieve?

What was really at stake at the COP26 negotiations in Glasgow, and how much have the politicians done to avert a climate disaster?

Justin Rowlatt speaks to two researchers on the frontline of the climate crisis. Carrie Lear, professor of earth sciences at Cardiff University, explains why she fears the Antarctic ice sheet could melt far quicker than people assume, inundating coastal cities around the globe. Meanwhile Professor Daniela Schmidt of Bristol University says the chemistry of the world's oceans is changing so fast that it could take marine ecosystems millions of years to recover.

Given how high the stakes are, how significant was the progress made in the latest iteration of climate talks? Justin speaks to sustainability expert and veteran climate diplomat Rachel Kyte, dean of the Fletcher School of international affairs at Tufts University in America.

(Picture: Globe balanced on the edge of a shelf; Credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1r)
Shoot: A milestone in performance art

In November 1971 a young American artist decided to get a friend to take a shot at him - in the name of art. His name was Chris Burden and the shooting would go down in the history of performance art. He spoke to Lucy Burns in 2012 about the ideas behind the event.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

(Photo: Chris Burden just after being shot. Courtesy of Chris Burden)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvyhn8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgmvxn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prb)
Can we recycle concrete?

Concrete is the most widely used substance on earth after water. It’s quite literally the foundation of the modern world, and no wonder - it’s strong, cheap, and mouldable into nearly any shape.

But these benefits come at a cost: concrete production is responsible for around 8% of global CO2 emissions - that’s around three times more than the aviation industry.

Concrete might not look pretty, but given its carbon footprint, should we be more careful about how we use it? And rather than throwing waste into landfill, could we recycle it instead? That’s what Crowdscience listener Catherine wants to know.

To investigate, Marnie Chesterton and Anand Jagatia learn more about what makes concrete such a brilliant and versatile material. It’s down to the chemistry of how cement dries – which, it turns out, is anything but boring. They find out how the stuff is made, and why that produces so much carbon. And they hear about some ingenious projects to repurpose demolition waste – including creating underwater habitats for marine life, and using 3D printers to turn crushed concrete into street furniture.

With Prof John Provis, Prof Becky Lunn, Chris LaPorta, Sheryl Lee, Dr Edward Randviir and David Lacy

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Anand Jagatia.
Produced by Anand Jagatia for BBC World Service

[Image: Discarded Concrete, Credit: Getty Images]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvymdd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgmzns)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct2yqm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvyr4j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k01c3s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgn3dx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvyvwn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtz)
Hostage, part 1: A spider, starvation and solitude in the desert

While travelling through West Africa in 2018, Canadian Edith Blais and her companion Luca Tacchetto were kidnapped by al-Qaeda. They were taken to the desert in a lawless area of Mali where they were, initially, held together for some months. But then they were separated, and Edith found herself alone for long periods of time. As well as suffering physically with dehydration and starvation, she had to find different techniques to keep her mind strong and stay sane. A borrowed pen enabled her to write poetry, she sang songs to remind herself of her own voice, and a very special relationship with a spider helped ease her loneliness. She has written a book about her time in captivity called The Weight of Sand.

Part two will be available in the next edition of Outlook, or click on the link below to listen to the whole interview as a podcast.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Katy Takatsuki

(Photo: Edith and Luca travelling in Africa before they were taken hostage. Credit: Edith Blais)


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvyzms)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k01lm1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgnbx5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvz3cx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5g293g2pj)
EU ministers agree new round of sanctions on Belarus

The Danish Foreign Minister, Jeppe Kofod, tells Newshour that the EU has decided to to extend sanctions on Belarus, which is accused of creating the migrant emergency on Europe's border. We also hear from our reporter on the border and ask Russian analyst Konstantin Eggert about Russia's role in the stand-off.

Also in the programme, Austria imposes a lockdown on unvaccinated people, and the Myanmar authorities release an American journalist, Danny Fenster.

(Photo: Asylum-seekers, refugees and migrants walking toward the Bruzgi-Kuznica Bialostocka border crossing, near the Belarus-Polish border, Belarus, 15 November 2021. Credit: EPA/OKSANA MANCHUK/BELTA HANDOUT)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvz741)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgnldf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y488sltjg7w)
Shell plans to move headquarters to UK

The oil giant Shell will shift its tax residence from the Netherlands to the UK. Mehreen Khan of the Financial Times explains the background to the move, and Peer de Rijk, energy and climate justice campaigner at Friends of the Earth Netherlands discusses the impact it could have on a Dutch court ruling that Shell should reduce its carbon emissions more quickly than it had planned. Also in the programme, lockdown restrictions are under consideration in Delhi, in a bid to combat rising smog levels in the Indian capital. The BBC's Arunoday Mukharji brings us the details. We have a report on an initiative to recycle the wooden pallets that large consignments of goods are often shipped on. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan considers the most graceful way to bow out of a job, when moving on to pastures new.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Joshua Thorpe and Faarea Masud.

(Picture: A Shell logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvzbw5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvl5zfbtm)
Poland Belarus border crisis: New EU sanctions

The European Union will step up sanctions against Belarus and those closest to its leader in response to an escalating migrant crisis. The government in Minsk denies that it is deliberately engineering the crisis. Thousands of people are still stranded in the freezing cold on Belarus’s border with Poland, hoping to cross into the European Union. We’ll hear from our correspondent at a border crossing in Belarus where a tense stand-off is taking place between border guards and hundreds of migrants.

Austria has introduced a partial lockdown for the two million people who haven’t had two doses of coronavirus vaccine. We’ll bring together people who are affected by the restrictions to hear why they have not had their jabs. We’ll also discuss the measures with our regular coronavirus expert Dr Eleanor Murray, an assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health.

And we'll talk about lockdown measures India is considering because of air pollution in the capital Delhi.

(Photo: A migrant holds a child at the Bruzgi-Kuznica Bialostocka border crossing on the Belarusian-Polish border in the Grodno Region, Belarus November 15, 2021. Credit: Leonid Scheglov/BelTA/Handout via REUTERS)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvzgm9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvl5zfgkr)
Covid: Austria introduces lockdown for unvaccinated

Austria is experiencing rapidly rising coronavirus infection rates. It has one of the lowest rates of vaccination in Western Europe with only about 65% of its population is fully vaccinated. In response the government has introduced a nationwide ‘lockdown for the unvaccinated’. The restrictions will affect almost two million citizens aged 12 and older. We hear from two unvaccinated people who live in Austria.

Our regular health expert, Professor Manfred Green, a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel talks us through the daily coronavirus stories.

And we hear the latest developments on the Polish-Belarus border. There's a stand off between several hundred migrants and Polish border guards.

(Photo: About 65% of Austria's population is fully vaccinated. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvzlcf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvzq3k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k02b2t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgp2cy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nnkfv2kxx)
2021/11/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvztvp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgp642)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1m8p)
Listening to coral reefs

Coral reefs are some of the most diverse ecosystems in the world, and also some of the noisiest. Up close, a healthy reef teems with trills, whoops, buzzes, hums and snaps made by the diverse lifeforms that inhabit it. But as many reefs are now degrading due to rising temperatures, their sound signatures are changing.

Conservationist Rory Crawford meets marine scientists who believe these sounds could provide a new way of monitoring the health of coral reefs, and boosting their resilience. He listens in to soundscapes that have been recorded around reefs in diverse parts of the world, and hears a selection of the sometimes surprising noises that have been picked up by researchers’ hydrophones.

Sounds are crucial to underwater species and a healthy-sounding reef will attract fish and other organisms to settle on it, so is it possible to use acoustics to boost the ecosystem on damaged coral?

Underwater recordings courtesy of: Tim Lamont/University of Exeter, Ben Gottesman, The Centre for Global Soundscapes, and Discovery of Sound in the Sea

Producer: Anne McNaught
Editor: Deborah Cohen

Picture: The underwater world of Philippines, Southeast Asia, Pacific Ocean, Credit: Giordano Cipriani/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvvzylt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5g293gxxf)
EU increases sanctions against Belarus for its alleged use of migrants for political purposes

Hundreds of migrants are at the Belarus Poland border, hoping to gain entry to the EU. We hear from the Lithuanian Foreign Minister.

Also on the programme we go to the English city of Liverpool to hear about the aftermath of the bomb outside the women's hospital which has caused the UK to raise its terrorism threat level to "severe." And we look ahead to the long delayed, albeit virtual, meeting due to take place between President Biden of the US and President Xi of China.

(Picture: Migrants at the Belarus / Poland border. Credit: Manchuk / Reuters)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw02by)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzptddcwx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srs2vjfjk)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgpfmb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrph4yjjyw)
Shell plans to move headquarters to UK

The oil giant Shell will shift its tax residence from the Netherlands to the UK. Mehreen Khan of the Financial Times explains the background to the move, and Peer de Rijk, energy and climate justice campaigner at Friends of the Earth Netherlands discusses the impact it could have on a Dutch court ruling that Shell should reduce its carbon emissions more quickly than it had planned. Also in the programme, lockdown restrictions are under consideration in Delhi, in a bid to combat rising smog levels in the Indian capital. The BBC's Arunoday Mukharji brings us the details. We have a report on an initiative to recycle the wooden pallets that large consignments of goods are often shipped on. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan considers the most graceful way to bow out of a job, when moving on to pastures new.

(Picture: A Shell logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw0632)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgpkcg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



TUESDAY 16 NOVEMBER 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw09v6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z7t)
The South African football star murdered for being a lesbian

In 2008, the brutal murder of Eudy Simelane shocked South Africa and highlighted the widespread violence faced by South African women and members of the LGTBI community. But has anything changed? We hear from a friend of Eudy and speak to Sibongile Ndashe, a South African lawyer and human rights activist. Plus, we look back at the massive oil fires in Kuwait in 1991, battling racial discrimination in British schools in the 1960s, Cold War intelligence gathering in East Germany and the invention of Chanel No.5, 100 years ago.

Photo: Eudy Simelane’s parents sat at the bridge named in their daughter’s honour. Credit: BBC


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw0flb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqpclrxsx1)
US and China leaders hold virtual summit

Joe Biden will speak to Xi Jinping over video call as the two leaders meet virtually to discuss US China relations – our correspondent in Beijing Stephen McDonnell gives us the latest, plus there’s analysis from Rui Zhong at the Wilson Centre in Washington DC. There’s a lockdown in Delhi, but this time it’s due to pollution; schools have closed and the authorities are considering imposing a city-wide curfew to keep people out of the smog. We hear from the BBC's Arunoday Mukherjee in the capital. In the US President Biden signs his infrastructure spending bill into law, in Portugal the BBC’s Alison Roberts explains how bosses have been banned from contacting workers after they’ve left the office, and Peter Morgan explains how to resign from a job with style and grace.

Throughout the programme we’re joined by Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper in Delhi, and Peter Morici, emeritus professor at the Robert H Smith Business School of University of Maryland.

Picture: Biden delivers a speech Credit: EPA


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw0kbg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0359q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgpxlv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2z31)
Trading tribulation

New apps that provide access to stock markets are revolutionising the world of trading, but they are also creating problems. A new generation of traders are emerging, fuelled by social media and with dreams of earning a fortune.

Seoul journalist Grace Moon visits the Korea Centre For Gambling Problems to explore if easily accessible trading apps are fuelling addictions, before hearing worldwide stories of stock market highs and lows.

Grace speaks to Joon Kwon, who recently started trading, and is sharing his successes with followers on social media. She also hears from Matthew Bly who has a very different story, having won big and then lost thousands on the stock market.

(Photo: Woman trading via a mobile app. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw0p2l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw0stq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k03dsz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgq533)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdx)
Billie Zangewa: Silk, stitches and feminism

Internationally-acclaimed textile artist, Billie Zangewa calls her work “daily feminism”. Crafted in silk with thousands of tiny hand sewn stitches, her creations explore the themes of feminine strength and the power of family.

As part of the BBC's 100 Women season in 2021, In The Studio joins Billie at her kitchen table in Johannesburg as she creates her latest works - visions brought to life amid one of the harshest Covid lockdowns in the world, and riots that left hundreds dead. All the while, home-schooling her 8-year-old son at the same table.

Journalist Vauldi Carelse is invited into the Malawian-born artist’s home as she transforms raw silk into intricate tapestries for solo shows opening in Seoul and London this year.

Presented by Vauldi Carelse
Produced by Vauldi Carelse and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Running Water, Lehmann Maupin, London – until 8 January 2022
Flesh and Blood, Lehmann Maupin, Seoul - 18 Nov 2021 to 15 January 2022


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw0xkv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2zr39fzll)
US and Chinese leaders conclude virtual summit

US President Joe Biden and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping have concluded their first face-to-face virtual summit - we get the latest.

The US responds to what it describes as a sham election in Nicaragua by imposing sanctions.

And we hear about the negotiators in northern Nigeria - those who serve as intermediaries between the bandits and their victims.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw119z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2zr39g3bq)
Biden-Xi concluded virtual talks

We take a look at what happened at the first virtual meeting between the US and Chinese leaders, where both were seemingly looking to de-escalate difficulties between the two superpowers.

Climate activists say the watering down of the COP26 commitment to end coal use is a disaster for the planet. We speak to an Australian Senator who says believes the summit was a "huge win for coal."

And an enquiry set up by Nigerian authorities to investigate the shooting of protesters at Lekki Gate last year, has submitted a damning report about what happened at this protest.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw1523)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2zr39g72v)
EU steps sanctions against Belarus

We speak to the President of Lithuania, a country which borders Belarus, about the situation for the thousands of migrants in Belarus who are trying to reach the EU.

Sixty one countries have today launched a plan to make school meals available for all children by 2030. We speak to the director of the UN's World Food Programme School Meal division.

And rebel Tigrayan forces in Ethiopia say that they've captured another key town, a vital junction on one of the main routes from the capital Addis Ababa to the port of Djibouti. We have the latest.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw18t7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pls)
The 15-minute city

Everything you need on your doorstep: a radical plan to improve our cities.

Imagine if everything you needed - your work, leisure and essential services - was just a 15-minute walk or cycle from where you live.

With no need to drive, there’d be less time sitting in traffic jams, the air would be less polluted and maybe we would all be a bit less stressed.

That’s the vision that many cities around the world are now trying to achieve - a new concept called the “15-minute city”.

As more and more of us join the urban sprawl, the aim is to make city life healthier, happier and better for the environment.

We visit Paris to see the plan in action.

Produced and presented by Richard Kenny.

Image: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgqn2m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgp)
Stalkerware: Tech-enabled domestic abuse skyrocketing

With the number of devices infected with stalkerware rising by over 60% in a year, many are worried about the consequences. Ivana Davidovic speaks with Maria who, even after managing to leave her abusive husband of 25 years, was still not free from his clutches.

Eva Galperin, who founded the global Coalition Against Stalkerware, explains how more training of law enforcement agencies is needed because many victims feel they are being gaslighted when they ask for help. She is also fighting for greater inclusion of stalkeware apps among anti-virus software manufacturers.

In October this year, Google pulled several stalkerware adverts for apps that encouraged prospective users to spy on their partners’ phone. One of those apps, SpyFone, was banned by the US Federal Trade Commission in September for harvesting and sharing data about people’s movements and activities via a hidden device hack. Despite these positive moves, stalkerware apps and advice on how to use them are still easily accessible online.

Xena Olsen tells how she became a cyber-security expert after being a victim of stalkerware by her then fiance - and she offers tips on what to do if you are worried for your own safety. And Rosanna Bellini, from the Clinic to End Tech Abuse, says how sometimes their clients are advised not to immediately remove cyber-stalking apps from their phones as that could increase the risk of physical violence.

(Photo: A faceless hooded person looking at a laptop. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x68)
The capture of war criminal Radovan Karadzic

In 2008, one of Europe’s most wanted fugitives, the former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, was arrested in Belgrade for war crimes. Karadzic had been in hiding for more than a decade, pretending to be an alternative medicine healer called "Dr Dabic". Serbia’s former war crimes prosecutor Vladimir Vuckevic remembers the tense days that led to Karadzic’s capture.

PHOTO: Radovan Karadzic in 1992 (Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw1dkc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z31)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgqrtr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct1m8p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw1j9h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfn)
What the world makes of COP26

Climate catastrophe threatens our planet with devastating consequences. It is in that knowledge that delegates from 197 countries came to Glasgow for the UN’s Climate Conference, COP26. Has their agreement left the world on a safer path, or is it an opportunity missed? From coal emissions to deforestation, money for developing economies and clean cars, the BBC’s Science Editor David Shukman chairs a debate which covers the big issues with questions coming from all over the world.

The panel includes Zainab Waheed, 16-year-old climate activist and Pakistan’s delegate to Youth4Climate; Philip Dunne MP, chair of the UK Parliament's Environmental Audit Committee; Senator Loren Legarda, deputy speaker of the Philippines House of Representatives; and Dr Tara Shine, climate adviser and director of Change By Degrees.

Producer: Charlie Taylor

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: An illegal fire burns in Labrea, Amazonas state, Brazil Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw1n1m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0480w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgr0b0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw1rsr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jx7)
Hostage, part 2: Escape across the sand dunes

As a young French-Canadian who'd overcome her teenage agoraphobia, Edith Blais took several years to work up the courage to go travelling - but having done it she'd got the bug. In 2018 she went to West Africa with her good friend Luca Tacchetto. When they got to Benin, they were kidnapped by armed militants, and taken to the desert in a lawless area of Mali, where groups linked to al-Qaeda were known to operate.
The couple pretended to be husband and wife so they could stay together, but Edith soon found herself held captive alone. After agreeing to convert to Islam, she was reunited with Luca - by this time they'd been held for fourteen months - and they knew they had to break free. But with their captors never more than a few feet away from them, how would they do it? Edith Blais tells Jo Fidgen how forces of nature aided their staggering escape. Her book about her time in captivity is called The Weight of Sand.

This episode comprises the final part of Edith's interview with Jo Fidgen. The first part was broadcast on yesterday's Outlook, or you can listen to the whole interview in one go, as a podcast.

Jihyun Park was a slave bride, gave birth in secret and lived in a labour camp before fleeing North Korea for the UK. She spoke to Jo Fidgen about her great escape in March 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen

Picture: Edith Blais
Credit: Sara Mauve Ravenelle


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x68)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw1wjw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k04hj4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgr7t8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct1m8p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw2090)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5g293jzlm)
President Biden and Xi Jinping hold virtual summit

President Biden and China's leader, Xi Jinping, have held an extensive video summit that contained moments of warmth -- but also warnings. We hear from Beijing and Washington DC.

Also in the programme: Russia destroys a satellite; and an interview with the Myanmar military.

Picture: A screen shows Chinese President Xi Jinping attending a virtual meeting with U.S. President Joe Biden via video link, at a restaurant in Beijing. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw2414)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pls)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgrh9j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4br3smp8fv)
Germany introduces new Covid restrictions

Coronavirus cases have risen sharply in Germany in recent weeks. Several of the worst-hit states, including Saxony and Bavaria have introduced new restrictions on unvaccinated people at indoor public venues. We get a sense of the changing picture in Munich from Rachel Preece, a writer and editor who has lived there for more than a decade. And we hear about the impact on business from Bernd Ohlmann, who is the head of Munich's association of retailers. Also in the programme, campaign group the Tax Justice Network estimates that countries are losing $483bn in tax a year because of what they term "global tax abuse". Rachel Etter-Phoya is senior researcher for the Network, and brings us the details. Plus, a sinister cybersecurity threat has emerged in the form of stalkerware - monitoring apps used for cyberstalking through the victim’s smartphone or computer. The BBC's Ivana Davidovic reports on what the tech companies doing about it and how users can avoid becoming victims.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Clare Williamson and Elizabeth Hotson.

(Picture: People wait outside a vaccination centre in Munich. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw27s8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvl5zj7qq)
Coronavirus conversations: Covid in Europe

Europe is once again becoming the epicentre of the Covid-19 pandemic with health systems across the continent under pressure. We’ll speak to three doctors - in the Netherlands, Romania and Austria - about the situation in their countries and hospitals. We’ll also answer your questions on Covid-19 with the help of one of our regular experts, Dr Isaac Bogoch in Canada.

We’ll hear from people in Uganda who today witnessed two explosions at the centre of the capital Kampala. Our BBC Africa colleague will explain what is known about the recent attacks in the country.

We’ll hear again from our correspondents on both sides of the Belarus-Poland border where migrants are stranded in freezing cold. We’ll also speak to one migrant who has managed to cross the border from Belarus to the EU and is now in Germany.

(Photo: A Romanian nurse, as seen trough the door window, checks the medication files of the patients at the intensive care unit saloon of Bucharest Emergency University Hospital, in Bucharest, Romania, 04 November 2021. Credit: ROBERT GHEMENT/EPA)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw2cjd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvl5zjcgv)
Kyle Rittenhouse: Jury begins deliberating

A jury in the United States has begun deliberating in the case of a teenager who shot dead two men and injured another during racial justice protests last year in Kenosha, Wisconsin. We'll get the latest from our correspondent.

Europe is once again becoming the epicentre of the Covid-19 pandemic with health systems across the continent under pressure. We’ll speak to three doctors - in the Netherlands, Romania and Austria - about the situation in their countries and hospitals.

Polish police say seven officers have been injured in clashes on the border with Belarus, as a group of migrants attempted to cross into Poland. We've spoken to one migrant who has managed to cross the border from Belarus to the EU and is now in Germany.

We’ll also hear from people in Uganda who today witnessed two explosions at the centre of the capital Kampala.

(Photo: Kyle Rittenhouse pulls numbers of jurors out of a tumbler during his trial at the Kenosha County Courthouse in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Credit: Sean Krajacic/Reuters)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw2h8j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x68)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw2m0n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k056zx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgrz91)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nnkfv5gv0)
2021/11/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw2qrs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z31)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgs315)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsz)
Distress of TikTok fake school accounts

TikTok School challenge
It’s November so school children in the US are being encouraged to “Kiss your friend’s girlfriend at school”. In September the TikTok school challenge suggested they “Vandalize the restroom”. These are just two of the examples that schools in the US have been dealing with following a call on TikTok to pupils. Now in the UK teachers are facing an onslaught of online abuse via TikTok too. Headteacher Sarah Raffray, who is also the Chair of the Society of Heads in the UK, is live on the show. The fake account created at her school has been removed by TikTok as have hundreds of others, but is the social media platform doing enough to control this libellous behaviour?

Disinformation campaign in Kenya
The Pandora papers revealed that Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta and his family have offshore accounts containing $30m. Following the release of this information a collaborative disinformation campaign manipulating Twitter’s algorithms was launched attempting to exonerate the President. Odanga Madung is a Mozilla fellow and is on the programme to discuss a report he’s co-authored “How to Manipulate Twitter and Influence People: Propaganda and the Pandora Papers in Kenya”. So far 400 accounts have been deleted, but with elections next year this campaign could already be influencing the outcome.

AI (lack of) diversity in the workforce
Research from the Digital Planet team at Tuft’s University has examined the world's top AI hubs and ranked them in terms of diversity. Bhaskar Chakravorti, who led the team behind the work, tells us that San Francisco has the lowest proportion of black AI talent in the US. When it comes to the proportion of women in the field, AI is much less diverse than the industry overall. 17 percent of the AI talent pool in the 50 hotspots in the world is female as compared to 27 percent in STEM overall. Tel Aviv comes out on top globally for employing women in AI. We discuss how this imbalance is impacting AI development.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.

Studio Manager: John Boland
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: TikTok logo displayed on a smart phone.
Credit: Illustration by Nikolas Joao Kokovlis/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw2vhx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5g293kttj)
English cricket is 'institutionally racist' says former player

In an emotional testimony the former Yorkshire player Azeem Rafiq claimed the sport is 'institutionally racist' in England. He told a Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee that racist language was "constantly" used during his time at Yorkshire.

Also in the programme; on the day the US journalist Danny Fenster has been released from prison in Myanmar our Asia regional editor speaks to Major-General Zaw Min Tun, Myanmar's Deputy Minister of Information and; the women in Iran risking jail time to perform underground heavy metal concerts.


Image: former cricketer Azeem Rafiqas he gives evidence at the inquiry into racism he suffered at Yorkshire County Cricket Club. Credit: House of Commons/PA


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw2z81)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzptdh8t0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srs2vmbfn)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgsbjf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycshxwk9r98)
Germany introduces new covid restrictions

Coronavirus cases have risen sharply in Germany in recent weeks. Several of the worst-hit states, including Saxony and Bavaria have introduced new restrictions on unvaccinated people at indoor public venues. We get a sense of the changing picture in Munich from Rachel Preece, a writer and editor who has lived there for more than a decade. And we hear about the impact on business from Bernd Ohlmann, who is the head of Munich's association of retailers. Also in the programme, campaign group the Tax Justice Network estimates that countries are losing $483bn in tax a year because of what they term "global tax abuse". Rachel Etter-Phoya is senior researcher for the Network, and brings us the details. Plus, a sinister cybersecurity threat has emerged in the form of stalkerware - monitoring apps used for cyberstalking through the victim’s smartphone or computer. The BBC's Ivana Davidovic reports on what the tech companies doing about it and how users can avoid becoming victims.

(Picture: People wait outside a vaccination centre in Munich. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw3305)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pls)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgsg8k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 17 NOVEMBER 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw36r9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw3bhf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqpcls0pt4)
European pipeline beset by new delays

Europe’s eastern borders are convulsing under the pressure of gas, military aggression and human migration. Germany suspends its approval of the long controversial Nord Stream 2 pipeline, Polish forces use tear gas on migrants attempting to cross the Belarusian frontier into the country, while Ukraine worries Russian troops on its border threatens its own pipelines. We speak to Professor Sergey Radchenko from Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies to pull the threads together. Further west Germany, Austria, the Netherlands and Ireland have all imposed strict curfews to mitigate against rises in Covid infections; we hear from the BBC’s Bethany Bell in Vienna. The Global Prosperity Index is published, we look at how different parts of the world have recovered, or not, from the Covid-19 pandemic by talking to Alastair Masser at the Legatum Institute.

Throughout the programme we’re joined by APM’s Marketplace presenter Andy Uhler in Louisiana, and Simon Littlewood - author broadcaster and consultant in Singapore.

Picture: A gas pipe line Credit: Reuters


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw3g7k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0626t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgsthy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2z3f)
One Hundred Years of Exile

What do we owe refugees?

Katy Long hears stories from refugees and those who work to support them from Rwanda to Russia, and Israel to Paraguay. She asks what do we owe refugees?

(Photo: A person holding a "refugees welcome" placard seen in the crowd. Credit: EPA)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw3kzp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x68)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw3pqt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k069q2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgt206)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2c)
Abortion: Breaking the silence

Every year, dozens of Kenyan women die from unsafe abortions. Why is it still so difficult to talk about? This episode includes frank discussions about abortion, including women candidly discussing their experiences. Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/thecomb


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw3tgy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2zr39jwhp)
The Russian millionaire hackers living in carefree luxury

Wanted men, living in luxury. Cyber criminals in Russia are making vast sums of money without the interference of the police. We get the latest from a cyber security expert.

There's been further border violence between Armenia and Azerbaijan which has left at least fifteen people dead. A ceasefire now seems to have been put in place.

India's capital Delhi has further extended pollution controls in an effort to tackle the city's smog, with schools and non-essential construction all shut down.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw3y72)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2zr39k07t)
The Russian hackers earning fortunes without fear of reprisal

Cyber criminals in Russia appear to be living luxurious lifestyles without fear of reprisal from the authorities. We hear a BBC investigation into what's happening there.

The United Nations says that many countries in the Western Balkans are facing issues with depopulation. But the problem in Bosnia and Herzegovina is particularly acute - so why do young people want to leave?

And extortion, embezzlement, money-laundering - all crimes being considered before a Vatican court today as the Catholic church's biggest ever criminal trial resumes. Ten people, including a cardinal, face charges.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw41z6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2zr39k3zy)
Is the Kremlin protecting millionaire hackers inside Russia?

A BBC investigation finds millionaire cyber criminals in Russia are living without fear of reprisal and in effect enjoy protection from the authorities.

The US and Mexico prepare for a summit where they'll hope to find a solution to the continuing flow of migrants from Central America - and reset in their relationship. We'll find out more.

And with powerful testimony before a parliamentary committee on Tuesday, English cricketer Azeem Rafiq lifts the lid on racism in the sport.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw45qb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc5)
George Takei: Growing up in an internment camp

Stephen Sackur talks to George Takei, forever famous as Lieutenant Sulu in Star Trek. Interned as a child in the United States for being of Japanese origin, he now campaigns for gay and immigrant rights. Do the values of Star Trek still resonate?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgtjzq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jpg)
Period pants, poverty and the environment

Can this multi-million dollar industry help the climate and fight period poverty? Tamasin Ford speaks to Marisa Meltzer, a writer in New York who recently tried them out. Maria Molland is the CEO of period underwear company, Thinx, who says that sales of their underwear, ranging from $17 to $34 a pair, boomed during the pandemic. Rochelle Burn is the Executive Director of the Environmental charity, Greener Future in Toronto, who focus on litter clean-ups. She says one of the main things they find washing up on the beach is tampon applicators. And Helen Lynn from the Women’s Environmental Network, a charity working on issues that connect gender, health and the environment says that the unaffordability of sanitary products as well as the taboos surrounding periods are still a problem.
(Picture: Period pants; Credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8j)
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

How a particular form of psychotherapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, became a common treatment for anxiety and depression. CBT was first developed by Professor Aaron T Beck in the USA. It has been rolled out as an option for people with mental health problems in the UK. Professor David Clark has been speaking to Kirsty Reid about why, and how, it works.

Photo credit: Getty Images.


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw49gg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2z3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgtnqv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw4f6l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z30)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw4jyq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k074xz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgtx73)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw4npv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzh)
Harvard Law School’s first Deafblind graduate

Haben Girma is a Harvard Law School graduate, an attorney, she's been invited to the White House... and she's Deafblind. Haben has published a book called Haben: The Deafblind Woman Who Conquered Harvard Law.

Tresor Riziki's path to superstardom in South Africa started with a journey across half of the African continent. But he’s not from South Africa, and he had a pretty tough journey getting there. Tresor started life in Goma, in the Eastern DRC, a small city that has experienced decades of armed conflict and volcanic eruptions, and he knew he'd have to leave to pursue his music.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Haben Girma meeting Barack Obama in 2015. Credit: White House/ Pete Souza)


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw4sfz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k07df7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgv4qc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw4x63)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5g293mwhq)
Cybersecurity: wanted criminals living freely in Russia

Many of the people on the FBI's cyber most wanted list are Russian. While some allegedly work for the government earning a normal salary, others are accused of making a fortune from ransomware attacks and online theft. If they left Russia they'd be arrested - but at home they appear to be given free rein.

Also on the programme: the award-winning author Patrick Radden Keefe discusses his book on the Sackler Dynasty: and we head to Sudan where new demonstrations are rocking the capital, Kharthoum.

(Image: Shot of an unrecognisable hacker using a cellphone and laptop in the dark. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw50y7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgvd6m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cz8wjt3zw)
Inflation spikes across Europe

With inflation rising across Europe, Spain is particularly hit with prices rising 5.5%. That's the highest level seen for almost 30 years, and the BBC's Guy Hedgecoe in Madrid tells us how people in the country are responding. And we get wider context on the global inflation picture from Karen Ward, chief market strategist for Europe, the Middle East and Africa at JP Morgan Asset Management, who also used to chair the UK's Council of Economic Advisers. Also in the programme, the BBC's Tamasin Ford reports on how the makers of period pants, which are underwear that absorbs liquid, hope to disrupt the global market for menstrual-related products, as well as help women and the environment. Plus, the Indian capital Delhi has introduced reforms to the way alcohol is sold, with state-run shops ceasing trade and being replaced by much more luxurious privately-owned liquor stores. The BBC's Devina Gupta in Delhi explains what was behind the move.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Vivienne Nunis and Sara Parry.

(Picture: A car is refuelled in Madrid. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw54pc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvl5zm4mt)
Ethiopia's war explained

We explain the complexities of the conflict in Ethiopia, giving the background and reflecting some of the many perspectives about what is happening there. We get the analysis of our Africa Correspondent, Andrew Harding, who answers your questions on the conflict. In addition, we hear the views of people who are connected to Ethiopia’s different communities in the global diaspora, as well as those inside the country.

Also, after schools and colleges in Delhi were shut down because of rising levels of air pollution, we hear from students who are out of classes as a result. India's coal industry was a big talking point at the COP26 climate summit, so how much is that to blame?

And we talk through the latest news on the coronavirus pandemic, with the help of one of our regular experts, Dr Maria Sundaram.

(Photo: Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed and leader of the Tigray People's Liberation Front (TPLF) party Debretsion Gebremichael are pictured on the Maleda Local News papers, showing the conflict marking one year, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, November 3, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Tiksa Negeri)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw58fh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvl5zm8cy)
Poland border crisis: EU starts talks

State media in Belarus say President Lukashenko and Germany's Chancellor Merkel have agreed that the European Union should be involved in negotiations about the migrant crisis on the Belarus-Poland border. We get the latest.

Also, we explain the complexities of the conflict in Ethiopia, giving the background and reflecting some of the many perspectives about what is happening there. We get the analysis of our Africa Correspondent, Andrew Harding, who answers your questions on the conflict. In addition, we hear the views of people who are connected to Ethiopia’s different communities in the global diaspora, as well as those inside the country.

And we talk through the latest news on the coronavirus pandemic, with the help of one of our regular experts, Dr Maria Sundaram.

(Photo: People gathering around a bonfire at the Belarusian-Polish border near the Bruzgi-Kuznica checkpoint, in the Grodno region, Belarus, 17 November 2021. Creidt: EPA/LEONID SCHEGLOV/BELTA HANDOUT)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw5d5m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw5hxr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k083x0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgvw64)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nnkfv8cr3)
2021/11/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw5mnw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2z3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgvzy8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw6)
T-cell Covid protection before the pandemic

New research on how some people had a level of Covid immunity before the pandemic started. Blood samples showed hospital staff being monitored in the first wave already had protective ‘killer’ T-cells probably from exposure to other viruses related to the one that has swept the globe. The difference between antibodies to an infection and antibodies caused by a vaccine. And the extraordinary story of a woman who rid her body of HIV.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Microbiologist studying coronavirus. Photo credit: Janiecbros/Getty Images)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw5rf0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5g293nqqm)
At least fourteen people killed in Sudan protests say doctors

Activists had called for mass demonstrations to mark the day when a civilian was supposed to assume the leadership of the governing Sovereign Council.

Also on the programme, we hear about the millionaire lifestyles of Russia's top cyber criminals. And the convictions of the two men who spent decades in jail for the murder of Malcolm X have been thrown out by New York's district attorney Cy Vance.

(Picture: Protesters take the the streets of Khartoum in Sudan. Credit: BBC)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw5w54)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzptdl5q3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srs2vq7br)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgw7fj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycsxn7vr9f0)
Inflation spikes across Europe

With inflation rising across Europe, Spain is particularly hit with prices rising 5.5%. That's the highest level seen for almost 30 years, and the BBC's Guy Hedgecoe in Madrid tells us how people in the country are responding. And we get wider context on the global inflation picture from Karen Ward, chief market strategist for Europe, the Middle East and Africa at JP Morgan Asset Management, who also used to chair the UK's Council of Economic Advisers. Also in the programme, the BBC's Tamasin Ford reports on how the makers of period pants, which are underwear that absorbs liquid, hope to disrupt the global market for menstrual-related products, as well as help women and the environment. Plus, the Indian capital Delhi has introduced reforms to the way alcohol is sold, with state-run shops ceasing trade and being replaced by much more luxurious privately-owned liquor stores. The BBC's Devina Gupta in Delhi explains what was behind the move.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Vivienne Nunis and Sara Parry.

(Picture: A car is refuelled in Madrid. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw5zx8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgwc5n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 18 NOVEMBER 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw63nd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z30)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw67dj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqpcls3lq7)
Biden in Motor City

President Biden visits Motor City: Detroit, Michigan, where General Motors unveiled their new electric vehicle plant. Biden was there to talk up his infrastructure bill and to promote the transition to electric vehicles which he says will bring jobs to America. We hear from Steve Carmody, a reporter for Radio Michigan, and speak to Edward Alden at the Council on Foreign Relations about how the infrastructure bill could ruffle feathers in Canada and Mexico. In India, taxation on alcohol is undergoing huge reforms as government run retailers are replaced by private outlets; the BBC’s Davina Gupta tells us more. Apple concedes that its customers can repair their own products after lengthy disputes against the so-called Right to Repair – Nathan Proctor of the US Public Interest Research Group explains what it all means. A Korean movie has become the biggest grossing film in the world this year, and troubling allegations are made against one of Kenya’s largest conservation agencies.

Throughout the programme we’re joined by Jyoti Malhotra, National & Strategic Affairs Editor at The Print in Delhi, and Steven Bertoni, Editor at Forbes in New York.

Picture: President Biden in a GM car Credit:Reuters


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw6c4n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k08z3x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgwqf1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gy8)
Salmon wars

Sockeye and Chinook salmon make one of the world's great animal migrations, swimming 900 miles from the Pacific Ocean up 6,500 feet into Idaho’s Sawtooth Mountains, where they spawn and die - but that journey may not happen much longer.

In addition to the gauntlet of predators the fish face, from orcas to eagles, they are also running into a man-made obstacle: huge concrete dams.

Most scientists agree the dams need to go for the fish to live, but the dams provide jobs, clean energy, and an inexpensive way for farmers to get their crops to international markets.

However, US Congressman Mike Simpson, a Republican representing Idaho, has a plan to save the salmon. He wants to blow up four dams on the Snake River and reinvent the region's energy infrastructure - a plan which has been overwhelmingly rejected by his own party.

Heath Druzin investigates how a bitter fight is now playing out in America's Pacific Northwest, pitting Native American tribes and conservationists against grain growers and power producers.

Presented by Heath Druzin
Produced by Richard Fenton-Smith

(Image: Sockeye salmon. Credit: Mike Korostelev)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw6gws)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw6lmx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k096m5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgwyx9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgl)
How a new cuisine is born

How is a new cuisine created? Ruth Alexander explores two unique cuisines in South Africa and the USA: ‘Cape-Malay’- a 300-year old tradition born out of colonialism and slavery that unites Indonesian and Dutch tastes; and ‘Viet-Cajun’ - a more recent phenomenon that has seen the Vietnamese diaspora experimenting with Cajun flavours in Texas. We explore how history’s darkest episodes can lead to some of the most captivating flavour combinations and ask why some people will cringe at the term ‘fusion food’.

(Picture: Pot lid being opened. Credit: Getty/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Cass Abrahams: Chef and Author, Cape Town, South Africa
Mai Pham: Food writer, Houston, USA


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw6qd1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3fcd9s5)
Concern over whereabouts of Chinese tennis star

There's international concern over the safety of female Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai after allegations of sexual assault against a politician.

Iraqi migrants stuck in Belarus have been offered a flight back home - so how many are prepared to take it?

And we go to Christmas Island in Australia to hear about one of the biggest animal migrations on the planet: tens of millions of red crabs.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw6v45)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3fcdfj9)
Doubt over email from Chinese tennis star

There's concern for the welfare of Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai after an email was posted online claiming she's safe and well. Many doubt it's genuine and fear for her well-being following allegations she made of sexual assault by a high ranking politician.

Can EU diplomatic efforts help end the humanitarian crisis at the Polish-Belarusian border where over a thousand desperate migrants are stuck? Iraqi officials meanwhile begin to repatriate their nationals willing to return home.

We catch up with a victim of the devastating floods in Vancouver which has cut the city off from the rest of Canada.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw6yw9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3fcdk8f)
Thousands of migrants still at Belarus-Poland border

Thousands of migrants remain on the Belarus-Polish border - hoping to find a way to cross over to Poland. Our correspondent there has been hearing about allegations of mistreatment by guards at the border zone.

Doubt has been cast on an email said to be written by the female tennis star Peng Shuai. The player hasn't been seen since she made sexual assault allegations against a senior Chinese official.

And in the United States a police officer who exposed a video showing the last moments of a man in custody is now facing charges himself.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw72mf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2x)
What is the metaverse and why is Facebook so obsessed with it?

As Facebook rebrands itself as Meta, which vision of the so-called metaverse will we adopt in the future? Will one firm dominate or will control be decentralized? And what dangers and opportunities will there be as we adopt avatars and become embodied in our online experience. With Charmaine Cozier.


(Image: Woman wearing augmented reality glasses at night / Getty/Qi Yang)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgxfwt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jb5)
Hunger crisis in Afghanistan

Is it time to stop the freeze of the country's financial assets and donor aid or will that just legitimise the Taliban? Ed Butler speaks to John Sifton, the Asia advocacy director for the campaign group Human Rights Watch, who says the west should ease up on its sanctions to help alleviate the situation. But Alex Zerden, who worked with the US Treasury department in Kabul from 2018 to 2019 and is now a senior fellow at the Centre for New American Security in Washington DC, defends the current US refusal to open the financial taps, says the Taliban itself is primarily responsible for the mess the country's in. Ed also speaks to health worker Karsten Noko from MSF (doctors without borders), who is desperately trying to keep its operations running without properly functioning bank services. And Masuda Sultan, a US-Afghan aid worker, who campaigns for the non-profit Unfreeze Afghanistan, tells him how bad the situation is there.


(Picture: Afghan grandmother and her grandchildren, members of one of the Afghan families that put their children up for sale, pose for a photo at their rental home without water and electricity in Afghanistan; Credit: Stringer/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x40)
Sudan's October Revolution

A first-hand account of how Sudanese civilian protesters first brought down a military regime in 1964. The protests began after a student was shot and killed by police during a confrontation at the prestigious University of Khartoum. Demonstrations and a nationwide general strike followed which forced the military to hand over power. Alex Last hears from historian Professor Abdullahi Ibrahim who was a prominent member of the Student's Union at Khartoum University at the time.

Photo: People celebrate the fall of the military regime in Khartoum, November 1964 (Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw76ck)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gy8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgxkmy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw7b3p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm3)
Mary Somerville: The queen of 19th-Century science

For someone who was largely self-taught, Mary Somerville's rise to renown in the male-dominated world of science was quite remarkable. Although women were barred from being members of the learned societies where knowledge was shared in the early 19th-Century, Somerville found alternative ways to become one of the most respected figures in maths and science of her day.

Scottish-born Somerville played a crucial role in communicating the latest findings in science through a series of successful books. She regretted never making any original discoveries herself however, so does her experience suggest we should re-evaluate the role of originality in science?

Bridget Kendall is joined by Jim Secord, emeritus professor of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge, who has edited the works of Mary Somerville; Dr Brigitte Stenhouse, lecturer in the History of Mathematics at the University of Oxford whose doctoral thesis looked at the mathematical work of Mary Somerville; and Ruth Boreham, former project curator at the National Library of Scotland, who is writing a biography of Mary Somerville.

Producer: Fiona Clampin

(Photo: Royal Bank of Scotland £10 note featuring Mary Somerville)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l94)
The woman who rowed the Atlantic

In December 1999, the American Tori Murden McClure became the first woman to row across the Atlantic Ocean single-handed. It was the culmination of a dream that had brought her close to death many times as she capsized again and again during a hurricane on a previous attempt. She was inspired to keep trying by working with the great boxer Muhammad Ali. Tori Murden McClure talks to Claire Bowes.

Photo: Tori Murden McClure in the 'American Pearl' 1999 (courtesy of Sector Sport Watches and Tori Murden McClure)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw7fvt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0b1v2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgxt46)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw7kly)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k40)
I still believe I'm lucky even after breaking my neck

In 2017 Ed Jackson had everything to look forward to. A professional rugby player, the 28-year-old had just signed another two-year contract with the Welsh team Dragons, and he and his girlfriend Lois had got engaged and were planning a fabulous wedding in Italy the following year. All of that changed in a split second when Ed mistakenly dived into the shallow end of a swimming pool. He hit his head with such force that he dislocated and fractured two vertebrae at the base of his neck. Paralysed from the neck down, he was told he would never walk again, but Ed quickly found the positives in his situation and says he considers himself "lucky". It's an attitude that has taken him higher than you could ever imagine - in 2019 he reached the 6,476-metre summit of Mera Peak in the Himalayas. Ed has written a book about his life called Lucky, and his charity is called Millimetres 2 Mountains.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Ed Jackson. Credit: Ross Silcocks)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw7pc2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0b9bb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgy1mg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw7t36)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5g293qsdt)
Poland border crisis: Migrants 'being used as bullets'

Poland's deputy foreign minister says Belarus' President Alexander Lukashenko is using "emotional blackmail" during the crisis at the Poland-Belarus border. Marcin Przydacz has also accused Belarus of using the 2000 migrants there as a weapon. This week, Polish troops used water cannon and tear gas against the stone-throwing migrants. The EU has pledged to send food, blankets and other aid to the people who refuse to leave the border.

Also in the programme: The Women's Tennis Association has said the world needs independent and verifiable proof that the missing Chinese player, Peng Shuai, is safe. And a global study has found that wearing a mask cuts the incidence of Covid-19 by 53%.

(Photo: A camp near the Bruzgi-Kuznica checkpoint on the Belarusian-Polish border in the Grodno region, Belarus. Credit: Reuters/Kacper Pempel)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw7xvb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgy93q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49hypqv3m3)
Turkish lira hits fresh record low

As Turkey's central bank cut rates amid high inflation, its currency hit a new record low. William Armstrong of BBC Monitoring based in Istanbul tells us what life is like for people in Turkey with such high inflation. Also in the programme, with Afghanistan teetering on the brink of full scale economic collapse, the BBC's Ed Butler explores how to get aid to Afghan citizens without enriching the Taliban. As the Dubai air show wraps up, we hear from the chief executive of the UAE-based airline Etihad, Tony Douglas. Plus, more than $40m has been raised in cryptocurrency to bid on a rare copy of the US constitution being auctioned today. We find out more from Glen Goodman, author of The Crypto Trader.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Philippa Goodrich, Elizabeth Hotson and Will Bain.

(Picture: Turkish lira. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw81lg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvl5zq1jx)
Where is Peng Shuai?

The Chinese tennis star, Peng Shuai, has not been seen since accusing a top government official of sexual assault. We'll bring together BBC Chinese and a tennis journalist to explain the story. We'll reflect the conversation in China and within the sport.

The German parliament is debating urgent measures after the country once again recorded the highest daily number of coronavirus cases so far. We'll talk to our regular expert Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland, about the different measures governments in Europe are looking at to try to contain the latest wave.

We’ll also hear from two people who are still experiencing health problems more than a year after their Covid-19 diagnosis. We’ll get a medical doctor who is an expert on what's become known as long Covid to explain what we are learning about its causes and consequences.

Picture: A file photo of China's Peng Shuai at the Australian Open in 2019 (Reuters / Edgar Sui).


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw85bl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvl5zq591)
Belarus migrants return to Iraq

Some of the people from Iraq who were stranded on Belarus's border with Poland have flown home. We speak to our BBC Arabic reporter waiting to speak to them at Baghdad's international airport.

The Chinese tennis star, Peng Shuai, has not been seen since accusing a top government official of sexual assault. We'll bring together BBC Chinese and a tennis journalist to explain the story. We'll reflect the conversation in China and within the sport.

We hear from two people who are still experiencing health problems more than a year after their Covid-19 diagnosis. We’ll get a medical doctor who is an expert on what's become known as long Covid to explain what we are learning about its causes and consequences.

Picture: Iraqis who voluntarily registered for an evacuation flight from Belarus arrive at Erbil International Airport (REUTERS / Azad Lashkari)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw892q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw8dtv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0c0t3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgys37)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nnkfvc8n6)
2021/11/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw8jkz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gy8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgywvc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4m)
The end for coal power?

The political message from the COP meeting was a fudge over coal, but what does the science say? Surprisingly India seems to be on track to switch away from coal to renewables. We explore the apparent contradiction with Lauri Myllyvirta of the thinktank Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air.

Also a synchrotron for Africa, how such a project would give a boost to scientific development across the continent, with Marielle Agbahoungbata from the X-tech Lab in Seme City in Benin.

Moriba Jah, who leads the Computational Astronautical Sciences and Technologies Group, at the University of Texas, in Austin, tells us what he saw when an exploding Russian satellite sent a shower of debris into the path of the International Space Station.

And the animals that carry SARS-Cov-2, an analysis from Barbara Han of the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in New York shows there are many more than previously thought.

Image: A coal-fired power station in Nanjing in east China
Credit: Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw8nb3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5g293rmmq)
Movement in Belarus-EU migrant crisis

The Polish authorities say a large group of migrants in a makeshift camp on the Belarusian side of their border have been moved back from the frontier to a nearby warehouse. Meanwhile, hundreds of other migrants in Belarus have been repatriated to Iraq. We hear from Poland's deputy foreign minister, a reporter who has spent the last few days talking to people on the border and an Iraqi Kurdish man whose future remains unclear.

Also on the programme: the mystery deepens over the missing Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai; and a New York judge quashes the convictions of two men for the murder of Malcolm X.

(Photo: An Iraqi migrant arrives at Baghdad International Airport in Iraq on 18th November 2021 Credit:EPA/AHMED JALIL)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw8s27)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzptdp2m6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srs2vt47v)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgz4bm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs36j84wwt)
Turkish lira hits fresh record low

As Turkey's central bank cut rates amid high inflation, its currency hit a new record low. William Armstrong of BBC Monitoring based in Istanbul tells us what life is like for people in Turkey with such high inflation. Also in the programme, with Afghanistan teetering on the brink of full scale economic collapse, the BBC's Ed Butler explores how to get aid to Afghan citizens without enriching the Taliban. As the Dubai air show wraps up, we hear from the chief executive of the UAE-based airline Etihad, Tony Douglas. Plus, more than $40m has been raised in cryptocurrency to bid on a rare copy of the US constitution being auctioned today. We find out more from Glen Goodman, author of The Crypto Trader.

(Picture: Turkish lira. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw8wtc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgz82r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 19 NOVEMBER 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw90kh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw949m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqpcls6hmb)
British Columbia hit by floods

Thousands are stranded by floods and mudslides in British Columbia in Canada – Chris Walker of CBC Radio One, who flew over the affected area on Thursday, joins us. In New York, Sotheby’s auctions a rare copy of the US Constitution, but a crowdfunding project has raised over $45m in cryptocurrency in an attempt to bring it into public ownership. We speak to one of the members behind the project, and to Matt Binder of Mashable. Elsewhere in the US, the House of Representatives looks set to vote on President Biden’s Build Back Better Bill later on Thursday- we bring you the latest. Fergus Nicholl looks at gold smuggling in Mali, and the BBC’s Sameer Hashmi is in Dubai speaking to the boss of the Etihad airline. Throughout the programme we’re joined by Peter Ryan, ABC’s Senior Business Correspondent in Sydney, and by Alison van Diggelen of freshdialogues.com in California.

Picture: A man paddles a canoe through floods in Canada Credit: Reuters


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw981r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0cw10)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgzmb4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tzz)
Serbia's Nikola Milenković and Ghana's Andy Yiadom

Reflections on a dramatic week of World Cup qualifiers with Serbia and Fiorentina defender Nikola Milenković and Ghana's Andy Yiadom. We also hear from Marseille's young American winger Konrad de la Fuente. He tells us about his journey from Miami to the south of France via Barcelona's famed La Masia academy.


Picture on website: Dusan Vlahovic and Nikola Milenković of Serbia celebrate after beating Portugal. (Zed Jameson/MB Media/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw9csw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw9hk0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0d3j8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylgzvtd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2z3c)
The hidden faiths of Northern Ireland

This year marks the centenary of Northern Ireland. Since its inception it has been divided between those who want to be Irish, who are mostly Catholic, and those who want to remain British, who are mostly Protestant. But what about the people of faith outside the sectarian divide – or those of no faith?

Reporter Julia Paul meets Joseph Nawaz, whose father was a Muslim from Pakistan and whose mother a white Catholic from Northern Ireland. His parents were married in the 1970s, at a time when most NI churches wouldn’t even marry a Catholic and Protestant. Joseph talks about his journey to embrace his mixed heritage and the two very different religions in his childhood.

Esther Chong was born in Malaysia to Chinese parents and moved to Northern Ireland for a better life. The day after she arrived she attended a service at the Chinese Christian Church in Belfast and she says God began to show her her path forward in Northern Ireland. Both her children are autistic and she now runs support groups at her church for other Chinese families, especially those who struggle with the language barrier.

Dr Satyavir Singhal is a consultant at the Royal Hospital in Belfast and a Hindu. He moved to Northern Ireland from India with his family in 2000. The more people in Northern Ireland asked him about his faith and his country of birth, the more he was drawn closer to his faith. In 2014, he became more involved in the Indian Community Centre and Hindu Temple in Belfast, and now he teaches society about Hinduism.

(Photo: Dr Satyavir Singhal. Credit: Julia Paul)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw9m94)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2zr39qp9w)
US, Mexico and Canada meet for summit

The leaders of the US, Mexico and Canada are meeting for the first North American summit in five years.

Hundreds of migrants who had been trying to get into the European Union from Belarus are now returning to Iraq.

And what role should foreign countries play in ending the crisis in Sudan? We will speak to Norway's ambassador to the country.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw9r18)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2zr39qt20)
India does U-turn over farm law reforms

In a surprise decision, India's President, Narendra Mohdi has announced he'll repeal the three controversial acts which were the source of protests by thousands of farmers and led to the death of over 600 in the past year.

The first North American summit in five years has begun. The so-called 'three amigos', Mexico, the US and Canada are hoping to rebuild relations.

Tension is brewing again around the Black Sea between Russia and Ukraine. There are fears of a build-up of tens of thousands of soldiers on the border between the two nations.

A high turnout is expected in Chile's general elections this weekend. We'll be getting a preview from Santiago.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw9vsd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2zr39qxt4)
Indian Prime Minister repeals controversial farming laws

The Indian Prime Minister has repealed three controversial farming laws. These laws led to protests by farmers in which many died. Friday's surprise announcement marks a major U-turn as the government had not taken any initiative to talk to farmers in recent months.

We'll speak to Eduard Saakashvili, he's the son of the former President of Georgia who is in prison and on hunger strike.

The BBC's World Affairs Editor investigates whether the Taliban has really halted all education for teenage girls in Afghanistan.

And we take a closer look at the drunken behaviour of our wildlife - from flies to dolphins - are they just stumbling into a drunken stupor by accident or do they enjoy a tipple?


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvw9zjj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5m)
Artists Gilbert Prousch and George Passmore

Gilbert Prousch and George Passmore first met as art students in London in the late 1960s and ever since then they have been together as a couple and as an artistic duo. From the beginning their own physical presence has been central to their work and they see themselves as living sculptures. They appear in most of their work, wearing their distinctive tweed jackets and ties. Their subject matter is the stuff of daily life in London, including the stuff other artists would never dream of using including bodily fluids, faeces and trash. Over the decades they have had work exhibited in many of the world's top modern art galleries and have sold works for millions of dollars. Now in London they have presented a collection of lockdown-era work entitled New Normal Pictures but is there anything normal about Gilbert and George?

(Photo: Still taken from a Hardtalk interview with Gilbert and George at the White Cube Gallery, showing their painting labelled Bagged 2020, in London, April 2021. Credit: Gilbert and George/BBC)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh0bsx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j14)
Why toilets matter

Happy World Toilet Day! It is that day of the year when we all need to overcome our embarrassment and discuss what is normally a taboo topic. Hundreds of millions of people still have no access to a toilet, putting them at risk of disease, sexual assault and public humiliation.

Tamasin Ford speaks to the inventor of World Toilet Day, Jack Sim, about how much has been achieved since he founded his World Toilet Organisation 20 years ago to promote discussion of this topic. We also hear from Catarina de Albuquerque, who served as the first United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to safe drinking water and sanitation, and made it one of the UN's sustainable development goals.

Also, consultant Timeyin Uwejamomere talks about the challenge of introducing proper sanitation in the slums of his native Nigeria. Plus Chilufya Chileshe, policy director at the charity WaterAid, explains how the lack of a toilet leaves women and girls vulnerable to sexual harassment, and interferes with their education.

(Photo: An eco-friendly mobile toilet in Johannesburg, South Africa. Credit: Deon Raath/Galo Images/Rapport)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzh)
Russia’s Democracy pioneer

On 20 November 1998, a pioneer of Russian democracy was assassinated. The country was awash with contract killings at the time but Galina Starovoitova’s murder sparked outrage and many saw it as an ominous turning point in Russian politics.

Born in in the Urals region in 1946, Starovoitova had a reputation for being independent, courageous and outspoken. As one of the original leaders of Russia's perestroika-era democratic movement, she was a prominent human rights advocate, working alongside Nobel Prize-winner Andrei Sakharov.
Starovoitova first worked as an ethnographer and her studies into ethnic minorities in the USSR made her sympathetic to their desire for independence. She so impressed Armenians in the mountainous Caucasus region, that in 1989 they elected her to represent them at the Congress of People’s Deputies in Moscow. After the failed 1991 coup staged by hardliners, Starovoitova served as Russian president Boris Yeltsin's adviser on ethnic issues. But she was later dismissed by Yeltsin because of her opposition to Kremlin policy in the Caucasus. She was particularly under pressure from the lobby of Russian army generals eager to start the first Chechen War.

Starovoitova was loathed by the nationalists in the Duma and her campaign for a lustration law, to ban former party members from holding certain jobs, enraged many Communists. She also tried to take on organised crime in her home city.

Theories abound about who killed her and why. Some speculate it was the communists; others the nationalists; yet others are certain it was a "St Petersburg crime" - a euphemism for the city’s powerful mafia. A queue of over 20 thousand people had gathered to pay last respects as she lay in state before her funeral. Starovoitova’s son, Platon Borchevsky, now living in the UK, shares his memories of his mother’s life and death.


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwb38n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhw)
The global rise of ransomware

How hackers stole millions from companies around the world, and why they're so difficult to stop. Chris Fox speaks to Jen Ellis from cybersecurity firm Rapid7 and to Tom Pace from NetRise about the growth in ransomware attacks in recent years, and why companies often feel they have no choice but to pay large ransoms. And Joe Tidy travels to Russia in an attempt to track down alleged ransomware gang members.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh0gk1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwb70s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htc)
Fortress Europe: Who gets to come in?

The European Union is at loggerheads with Belarus over the arrival of thousands of migrants. It alleges that President Lukashenko has created a deliberate crisis by facilitating the migrants' travel into Belarus and onwards to the country's borders with EU members Poland, Lithuania and Latvia. Belarus says the EU is breaching its humanitarian obligations by blocking the entry of those seeking asylum. The question of what to do with migrants is one of the most divisive issues within the EU. Its southern and eastern member countries - where the bulk of migrants arrive - are calling for a more equitable distribution of refugees among member states. They also want more money to support for processing of new arrivals. Meanwhile in western and northern European states, the rise of far-right groups is being seen as a warning to politicians not to be too accommodating to newcomers. So how does the EU fulfil its international obligations around migration while keeping a lid on populist opposition to it?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwbbrx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0dyr5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh0q19)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwbgj1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fw)
Afghanistan's Ministry of Vice and Virtue

Soon after taking power, the Taliban replaced the Department for Women's Affairs with the Ministry for Propagation of Virtue and Prevention of Vice. It's a name many Afghans feared during the last Taliban era, as 'morality police' enforced their extreme interpretation of Islam. BBC Afghan's Shekiba Habib lived through that era, and reports on what we know about how the current ministry is operating.

Istanbul's taxi problem
If you’ve ever struggled to hail a taxi, spare a thought for people in Istanbul. Since the 1990s, the city’s population has doubled, but the number of cabs has stayed the same, and solving the problem is a political headache for the city’s mayor. BBC Turkish journalist Esra Yalcinalp explains Istanbul's unique and frustrating taxi system.

The daily life of Colombian coca farmers
Singing local songs and celebrating harvest: some of the activities TikTok users can see from the hashtag #Catatumbo. The images show the daily lives of coca growers in one of Colombia's main coca-growing regions, and have reopened the discussion about how best to fight the drug war, as Luis Fajardo from BBC Monitoring in Miami explains.

The pirs of Pakistan
Pirs or spiritual guides are deeply embedded in Pakistani culture, including in politics. They offer blessings and guidance which many politicians feel are important for their success. BBC Urdu's Asif Farooqi reports on the complex and sometimes controversial relationship between politicians and their pirs.

(Photo: A Department for Women's Affairs sign is replaced by the Taliban with the Ministry for Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice. Credit: Javed Tanveer/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwbl85)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0f67f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh0yjk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwbq09)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5g293tp9x)
India's disputed farm laws: PM Modi backs down

Indian farmers are celebrating after Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced the repeal of controversial farm laws. We ask one of his party colleagues why he changed his mind.

Also in the programme: How China controls online chat about the missing tennis player Peng Shuai; and a rare voice from inside Belarus as freezing migrants are flown back to Iraq.

(Photo) Indian farmers celebrate in Uttar Pradesh. (Credit) EPA/ Harish Tyagi


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwbtrf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh160t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y471mhxw37b)
India scraps controversial farm reforms

India's leader Narendra Modi has abandoned agricultural reforms after a year of protests. Kavitha Kuruganti of the Alliance for Sustainable and Holistic Agriculture has been campaigning against the changes, and gives us her reaction to the news. Also in the programme, the government of Mali is embarking on a drive to persuade illegal or freelance gold miners to register with the authorities. Through what's called artisanal mining, huge amounts of the precious metal are smuggled out of the country. The BBC's Fergus Nicoll reports on the government's desire to boost national revenues by reining in the informal sector. Plus, we hear from the BBC's Mark Cieslak about new artificial intelligence technology being used to help tackle the illegal wildlife trade.

Today's edition is presented by Vishala Sri-Pathma, and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Elizabeth Hotson.

(Picture: Indian farmers celebrate the government U-turn. Picture credit: EPA.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwbyhk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvl5zsyg0)
Austria will make Covid vaccines mandatory

Austria is reintroducing a national lockdown and making Covid vaccinations compulsory. We’ll discuss today’s announcements with our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University. We’ll also get voices out of Austria to hear how the nation is reacting to the news.

The government in Germany has also introduced new measures to combat the fourth wave of the pandemic. The rise of infections is partly being fuelled by a low vaccination rate, and we’ll speak to two unvaccinated Germans to find out why they are taking this position.

The Women's Tennis Association said it is prepared to withdraw its tournaments from China unless it receives proof that the missing player Peng Shuai is safe. We’ll get messages from fans reacting to the developments on social media.

We’ll hear from Indian farmers after Prime Minister Modi announced he would scrap the controversial agriculture reform.

And Ros Atkins looks into the rising tensions between Russia and the West.

(Photo: People walk towards a vaccination center during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, as Austria"s government has imposed a lockdown on people who are not fully vaccinated, in Vienna, Austria, November 18, 2021. Credit: Leonhard Foeger/Reuters)
.


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwc27p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxvl5zt264)
Coronavirus conversations: Unvaccinated in Germany

The government in Germany has introduced new measures to combat the fourth wave of the pandemic. The rise of coronavirus infections is partly being fuelled by a low vaccination rate, and we’ll speak to two unvaccinated Germans to find out why they are taking this position.

Austria is reintroducing a national lockdown and making Covid vaccinations compulsory. We’ll discuss today’s announcements with our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Marc Mendelson in Cape Town, South Africa. We’ll also get voices out of Austria to hear how the nation is reacting to the news.

We'll hear extracts of the BBC interview with the President of Belarus, Alexander Lukashenko, who has admitted that his security forces have beaten up detained protesters and may have helped migrants try to cross into Poland.

Our colleague gives details of a BBC investigation into foreign-language Wikipedia pages that appear to be making misleading claims about climate change.

(Photo: People pass by a restaurant window displaying coronavirus disease (COVID-19) safety measures, amid the COVID-19 pandemic in Munich, Germany, November 19, 2021. Credit: Michaela Rehle/Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwc5zt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwc9qy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxt4k0fxq6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh1p0b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nnkfvg5k9)
2021/11/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwcfh2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh1srg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prc)
Would my cat survive in the wild?

Cats started hanging out with humans thousands of years ago, and nowadays these fluffy, lovable pets are found in many of our homes. But there’s no doubt lots of them still have keen hunting instincts - witness all the birds and small mammals they kill each year.

CrowdScience listener Rachel started wondering whether her cat Eva could fend for herself while watching her uncoordinated swipes at a toy on a string, and seeing her fall off the sofa. Even though Eva was once a stray, she now lives entirely indoors, and it's hard to imagine her holding her own back on the mean streets. But could this pampered pet recover her survival instincts? Or would she go hungry, or fall foul of other cats or predators?

Cat behaviour expert Roger Tabor is on hand with answers. His pioneering ‘cat-navs’ shine a light on what cats get up to inside and outside the home: we meet one of his subjects, a tiny cat with a fierce personality. Roger explains how a cat’s survival toolkit depends on their sex, breed, and above all their early life. Environment matters, too, so in Japan, where Rachel and her pet cat live, we visit a cat shelter to learn about the day-to-day challenges stray cats face

And just how ‘domestic’ are our cats, anyway? How different are they from their wildcat cousins, and how did they come to be our companions in the first place? It turns out beguiling humans might be even more of a survival trick than hunting.

Presented by Melanie Brown
Produced by Cathy Edwards for BBC World Service.

Featuring:
Roger Tabor – Chartered Biologist and Cat Behaviourist
Jamie Baker – Head Keeper, Battersea Park Children’s Zoo
Dr Eva-Maria Geigl – Research Director, CNRS (French National Centre for Scientific Research)
Susan Roberts and Cheryl Nodhturft-Mori – Japan Cat Network

[Image: Cat in Lion costume. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwck76)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5g293vjjt)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwcnzb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzptdrzj9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srs2vx14y)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh217q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycr8rsnkhcm)
India scraps controversial farm reforms

India's leader Narendra Modi has abandoned agricultural reforms after a year of protests. Kavitha Kuruganti of the Alliance for Sustainable and Holistic Agriculture has been campaigning against the changes, and gives us her reaction to the news. Also in the programme, the government of Mali is embarking on a drive to persuade illegal or freelance gold miners to register with the authorities. Through what's called artisanal mining, huge amounts of the precious metal are smuggled out of the country. The BBC's Fergus Nicoll reports on the government's desire to boost national revenues by reining in the informal sector. Plus, we hear from the BBC's Mark Cieslak about new artificial intelligence technology being used to help tackle the illegal wildlife trade.

(Picture: Indian farmers celebrate the government U-turn. Picture credit: EPA.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjwhvwcsqg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkpylh24zv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1tzz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gy8)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gy8)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gy8)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172xzkplb597w8)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkplb59cmd)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkplb59qvs)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkplb5b335)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkplb5b6v9)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkplb5bgbk)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkplb5c9kg)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172xzkplb5csjz)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172xzkplb5d117)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkplb5d8jh)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkplb5dj0r)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkplb5dmrw)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkplb5f008)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkplb5f3rd)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkplb5fc7n)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkplb5gb6p)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkplb5gpg2)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkplb5gt66)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172xzkpylgls6h)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkpylglwym)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkpylgm0pr)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkpylgm4fw)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172xzkpylgm860)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzkpylgmr5j)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172xzkpylgmvxn)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172xzkpylgmzns)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkpylgn3dx)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkpylgnbx5)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkpylgnldf)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkpylgp2cy)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkpylgp642)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkpylgpfmb)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkpylgpkcg)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkpylgpxlv)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkpylgq533)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzkpylgqn2m)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkpylgqrtr)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkpylgr0b0)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkpylgr7t8)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkpylgrh9j)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzkpylgrz91)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzkpylgs315)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzkpylgsbjf)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkpylgsg8k)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkpylgsthy)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkpylgt206)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkpylgtjzq)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172xzkpylgtnqv)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkpylgtx73)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkpylgv4qc)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkpylgvd6m)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkpylgvw64)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzkpylgvzy8)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkpylgw7fj)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkpylgwc5n)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkpylgwqf1)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkpylgwyx9)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkpylgxfwt)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzkpylgxkmy)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkpylgxt46)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzkpylgy1mg)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzkpylgy93q)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkpylgys37)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzkpylgywvc)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzkpylgz4bm)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkpylgz82r)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkpylgzmb4)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkpylgzvtd)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzkpylh0bsx)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172xzkpylh0gk1)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkpylh0q19)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzkpylh0yjk)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzkpylh160t)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzkpylh1p0b)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172xzkpylh1srg)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172xzkpylh217q)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkpylh24zv)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lklrvr)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lklwlw)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkm0c0)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkm434)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkm7v8)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkmcld)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkmhbj)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkmm2n)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkmqts)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkmvkx)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkmzb1)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkn325)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkn6t9)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lknbkf)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkng9k)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkny92)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkp216)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkp5sb)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkp9jg)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkpf8l)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172xzjw4lkpk0q)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkpnrv)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkpshz)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkpx83)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkq107)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkq4rc)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkq8hh)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkqd7m)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkqhzr)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkqmqw)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkqrh0)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkqw74)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkr3qd)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkr7gj)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkrc6n)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkrgys)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkrlpx)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lkryy9)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lks2pf)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lks6fk)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lksb5p)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172xzjw4lksfxt)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvxdy3)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvxjp7)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvxnfc)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvxs5h)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvxwxm)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvy0nr)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvy4dw)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvy850)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvycx4)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvyhn8)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvymdd)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvyr4j)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvyvwn)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvyzms)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvz3cx)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvz741)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvzbw5)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvzgm9)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvzlcf)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvzq3k)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvztvp)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172xzjwhvvzylt)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172xzjwhvw02by)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjwhvw0632)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw09v6)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw0flb)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw0kbg)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw0p2l)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw0stq)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw0xkv)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw119z)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw1523)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw18t7)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw1dkc)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw1j9h)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw1n1m)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw1rsr)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw1wjw)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw2090)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw2414)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw27s8)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw2cjd)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw2h8j)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw2m0n)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw2qrs)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw2vhx)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw2z81)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjwhvw3305)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw36r9)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw3bhf)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw3g7k)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw3kzp)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw3pqt)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw3tgy)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw3y72)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw41z6)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw45qb)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw49gg)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw4f6l)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw4jyq)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw4npv)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw4sfz)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw4x63)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw50y7)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw54pc)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw58fh)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw5d5m)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw5hxr)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw5mnw)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw5rf0)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw5w54)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjwhvw5zx8)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw63nd)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw67dj)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw6c4n)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw6gws)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw6lmx)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw6qd1)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw6v45)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw6yw9)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw72mf)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw76ck)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw7b3p)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw7fvt)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw7kly)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw7pc2)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw7t36)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw7xvb)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw81lg)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw85bl)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw892q)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw8dtv)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw8jkz)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw8nb3)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw8s27)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjwhvw8wtc)

BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvw90kh)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvw949m)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvw981r)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvw9csw)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvw9hk0)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvw9m94)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvw9r18)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvw9vsd)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvw9zjj)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwb38n)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwb70s)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwbbrx)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwbgj1)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwbl85)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwbq09)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwbtrf)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwbyhk)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwc27p)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwc5zt)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwc9qy)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwcfh2)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwck76)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwcnzb)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjwhvwcsqg)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d6m)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 SUN (w3ct2d6m)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxvl5zfbtm)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxvl5zfgkr)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxvl5zj7qq)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172xxxvl5zjcgv)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172xxxvl5zm4mt)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172xxxvl5zm8cy)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172xxxvl5zq1jx)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxxvl5zq591)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172xxxvl5zsyg0)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxvl5zt264)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j5n)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jgp)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jpg)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1jb5)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j14)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqpclrxsx1)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqpcls0pt4)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqpcls3lq7)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqpcls6hmb)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dhn)

Ceremony of Remembrance from the Cenotaph 10:29 SUN (w172ycr543pt216)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1prb)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1prb)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1prc)

Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct051f)

Deeply Human 23:06 SUN (w3ct051f)

Deeply Human 03:06 MON (w3ct051f)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lsz)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lsz)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lsz)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2zqc)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct1m8p)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct1m8p)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct1m8p)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mvr)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mvr)

From Our Own Correspondent 00:06 MON (w3ct1mvr)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n6n)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n6n)

HARDtalk 23:06 MON (w3ct1n6n)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1nc5)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1nc5)

HARDtalk 23:06 WED (w3ct1nc5)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n5m)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n5m)

HARDtalk 23:06 FRI (w3ct1n5m)

Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nw5)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nw6)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nw6)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nw6)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2z3b)

Heart and Soul 00:32 MON (w3ct2z3b)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2z3c)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tdx)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tdx)

In the Studio 23:32 TUE (w3ct1tdx)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dkx)

More or Less 23:50 SUN (w3ct2dkx)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dkx)

Music Life 23:06 SAT (w3ct1hcs)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hcs)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2zr39c2ph)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv2zr39c6fm)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172xv2zr39cb5r)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172xv2zr39fzll)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172xv2zr39g3bq)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172xv2zr39g72v)

Newsday 05:06 WED (w172xv2zr39jwhp)

Newsday 06:06 WED (w172xv2zr39k07t)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172xv2zr39k3zy)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172xv2w3fcd9s5)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172xv2w3fcdfj9)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172xv2w3fcdk8f)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172xv2zr39qp9w)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172xv2zr39qt20)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172xv2zr39qxt4)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172xv5fq0t49w1)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172xv5fq0t58v2)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172xv5fq0t76s4)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172xv5fq0t85r5)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172xv5g293g2pj)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172xv5g293gxxf)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172xv5g293jzlm)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172xv5g293kttj)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172xv5g293mwhq)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172xv5g293nqqm)

Newshour 14:06 THU (w172xv5g293qsdt)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172xv5g293rmmq)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172xv5g293tp9x)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172xv5g293vjjt)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kxt)

Outlook 22:32 SUN (w3ct1kxt)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jtz)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct1jtz)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3ct1jtz)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3ct1jx7)

Outlook 18:06 TUE (w3ct1jx7)

Outlook 03:06 WED (w3ct1jx7)

Outlook 12:06 WED (w3ct1jzh)

Outlook 18:06 WED (w3ct1jzh)

Outlook 03:06 THU (w3ct1jzh)

Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k40)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3ct1k40)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k40)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l2b)

Over to You 00:50 SUN (w3ct1l2b)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l2b)

People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pls)

People Fixing The World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pls)

People Fixing The World 23:06 TUE (w3ct1pls)

Pick of the World 09:32 SAT (w3ct2z27)

Pick of the World 23:32 SUN (w3ct2z27)

Pick of the World 03:32 MON (w3ct2z27)

Ros Atkins on ... 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dp5)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l4m)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l4m)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3ct1l4m)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nnkfv2kxx)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172y0nnkfv5gv0)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172y0nnkfv8cr3)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172y0nnkfvc8n6)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172y0nnkfvg5k9)

Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct1l93)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3ct1l94)

Sporting Witness 00:50 FRI (w3ct1l94)

Sports News 22:20 SAT (w172y0srdtk6sg6)

Sports News 22:20 SUN (w172y0srdtk9pc9)

Sports News 22:20 MON (w172y0srs2vjfjk)

Sports News 22:20 TUE (w172y0srs2vmbfn)

Sports News 22:20 WED (w172y0srs2vq7br)

Sports News 22:20 THU (w172y0srs2vt47v)

Sports News 22:20 FRI (w172y0srs2vx14y)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0q92mr3dbp)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tkvk4w31c)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0tkvk4z7fq)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lcc)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1nhw)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3ct1nhw)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rtv)

The Arts Hour 00:06 WED (w3ct1rtv)

The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2drf)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2drf)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2drf)

The Comb 04:32 WED (w3ct2z2c)

The Comb 11:32 WED (w3ct2z2c)

The Comb 23:32 WED (w3ct2z2c)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct2z3d)

The Compass 02:32 WED (w3ct2z3f)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct2z3f)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct2z3f)

The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p9d)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p9f)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p9f)

The Conversation 23:32 MON (w3ct1p9f)

The Cultural Frontline 22:32 SAT (w3ct1ptj)

The Cultural Frontline 04:32 SUN (w3ct1ptj)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1ptj)

The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2z30)

The Documentary 19:06 SAT (w3ct2zqt)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct2z30)

The Documentary 05:32 SUN (w3ct2z2z)

The Documentary 12:06 SUN (w3ct2zqt)

The Documentary 02:32 TUE (w3ct2z31)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct2z31)

The Documentary 20:06 TUE (w3ct2z31)

The Documentary 10:06 WED (w3ct2z30)

The Documentary 00:06 THU (w3ct2z30)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20fv)

The Fifth Floor 12:06 FRI (w3ct20fw)

The Fifth Floor 18:06 FRI (w3ct20fw)

The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rgk)

The Food Chain 04:32 THU (w3ct1rgl)

The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3ct1rgl)

The Food Chain 23:32 THU (w3ct1rgl)

The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rm2)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3ct1rm3)

The Forum 00:06 FRI (w3ct1rm3)

The History Hour 00:06 TUE (w3ct1z7t)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z2x)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct1z2x)

The Inquiry 23:06 THU (w3ct1z2x)

The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172xyxss8ppmb8)

The Newsroom 05:06 SAT (w172xyxss8ppzkn)

The Newsroom 11:06 SAT (w172xyxss8pqq1f)

The Newsroom 18:06 SAT (w172xyxss8prk8b)

The Newsroom 22:06 SAT (w172xywzbk32qtk)

The Newsroom 02:06 SUN (w172xyxss8psj7c)

The Newsroom 05:06 SUN (w172xyxss8pswgr)

The Newsroom 19:06 SUN (w172xyxss8pvkxk)

The Newsroom 22:06 SUN (w172xywzbk35mqn)

The Newsroom 02:06 MON (w172xyxt4k008dm)

The Newsroom 04:06 MON (w172xyxt4k00hww)

The Newsroom 11:06 MON (w172xyxt4k01c3s)

The Newsroom 13:06 MON (w172xyxt4k01lm1)

The Newsroom 19:06 MON (w172xyxt4k02b2t)

The Newsroom 22:06 MON (w172xywzptddcwx)

The Newsroom 02:06 TUE (w172xyxt4k0359q)

The Newsroom 04:06 TUE (w172xyxt4k03dsz)

The Newsroom 11:06 TUE (w172xyxt4k0480w)

The Newsroom 13:06 TUE (w172xyxt4k04hj4)

The Newsroom 19:06 TUE (w172xyxt4k056zx)

The Newsroom 22:06 TUE (w172xywzptdh8t0)

The Newsroom 02:06 WED (w172xyxt4k0626t)

The Newsroom 04:06 WED (w172xyxt4k069q2)

The Newsroom 11:06 WED (w172xyxt4k074xz)

The Newsroom 13:06 WED (w172xyxt4k07df7)

The Newsroom 19:06 WED (w172xyxt4k083x0)

The Newsroom 22:06 WED (w172xywzptdl5q3)

The Newsroom 02:06 THU (w172xyxt4k08z3x)

The Newsroom 04:06 THU (w172xyxt4k096m5)

The Newsroom 11:06 THU (w172xyxt4k0b1v2)

The Newsroom 13:06 THU (w172xyxt4k0b9bb)

The Newsroom 19:06 THU (w172xyxt4k0c0t3)

The Newsroom 22:06 THU (w172xywzptdp2m6)

The Newsroom 02:06 FRI (w172xyxt4k0cw10)

The Newsroom 04:06 FRI (w172xyxt4k0d3j8)

The Newsroom 11:06 FRI (w172xyxt4k0dyr5)

The Newsroom 13:06 FRI (w172xyxt4k0f67f)

The Newsroom 19:06 FRI (w172xyxt4k0fxq6)

The Newsroom 22:06 FRI (w172xywzptdrzj9)

The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3ct1htb)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1htb)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3ct1htc)

The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3ct1yw3)

Trending 05:32 SAT (w3ct2yqm)

Trending 18:32 SAT (w3ct2yqm)

Trending 00:32 SUN (w3ct2yqm)

Trending 10:32 MON (w3ct2yqm)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172xytj0c8ywlm)

Weekend 07:06 SAT (w172xytj0c8z0br)

Weekend 08:06 SAT (w172xytj0c8z42w)

Weekend 06:06 SUN (w172xytj0c91shq)

Weekend 07:06 SUN (w172xytj0c91x7v)

Weekend 08:06 SUN (w172xytj0c920zz)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wzg)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3ct1x1r)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct1x1r)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3ct1x1r)

Witness History 03:50 TUE (w3ct1x1r)

Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3ct1x68)

Witness History 12:50 TUE (w3ct1x68)

Witness History 18:50 TUE (w3ct1x68)

Witness History 03:50 WED (w3ct1x68)

Witness History 08:50 WED (w3ct1x8j)

Witness History 12:50 WED (w3ct1x8j)

Witness History 18:50 WED (w3ct1x8j)

Witness History 03:50 THU (w3ct1x8j)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3ct1x40)

Witness History 12:50 THU (w3ct1x40)

Witness History 18:50 THU (w3ct1x40)

Witness History 03:50 FRI (w3ct1x40)

Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3ct1wzh)

Witness History 12:50 FRI (w3ct1wzh)

Witness History 18:50 FRI (w3ct1wzh)

WorklifeIndia 01:32 SAT (w3ct2f42)

WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f42)

World Business Report 01:06 SAT (w172xzlj11rzhs4)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzljdb294vh)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y488sltjg7w)

World Business Report 22:32 MON (w172ycrph4yjjyw)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172y4br3smp8fv)

World Business Report 22:32 TUE (w172ycshxwk9r98)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172y4cz8wjt3zw)

World Business Report 22:32 WED (w172ycsxn7vr9f0)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172y49hypqv3m3)

World Business Report 22:32 THU (w172ycs36j84wwt)

World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172y471mhxw37b)

World Business Report 22:32 FRI (w172ycr8rsnkhcm)

World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1tzz)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1tzz)

World Football 23:32 FRI (w3ct1tzz)

World Questions 10:06 TUE (w3ct1wfn)