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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 06 NOVEMBER 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7tm7x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3ct1ht9)
Who pays to fix climate change?

The UN Climate Conference in Glasgow is being described as a make-or-break moment for humanity. The purpose of the gathering is to implement the 2015 Paris Agreement, which aims to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial times. Currently the world is way off target, with temperatures still projected to rise higher than is sustainable.

A big part of the problem is the huge cost involved. Developed countries have confirmed they have failed to meet a pledge made in 2009 to provide $100 billion a year in climate finance by 2020. Developing countries say the money is needed now. They require defences to protect their populations from the growing effects of climate change, and to move away from carbon energy and towards renewable sources.

So what is climate finance, what's been promised and will it be be delivered? Join Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests from the UN summit in Glasgow as they discuss who pays to fix climate change.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7tr01)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlhnsg6c59)
Democrats divided over Biden's infrastructure and social spending bills

President Biden has urged his party to pass his $1 trillion infrastructure bill. But interparty disagreement over a separate social spending bill is threatening to block the passage of both in the House of Representatives. The BBC's senior North America reporter Anthony Zurcher brings us the latest from Washington DC.
At the end of the first week of the COP26 climate conference, we take stock of progress. Claire Shakya is director of climate change at the International Institute of Environment and Development, and discusses the commitments made to find funds to help developing economies tackle climate change.
Also in the programme, the US economy added 531,000 jobs in October, beating analysts' expectations. We look at the latest data with Chris Low of FHN Financial.
And we have a report from Stoke-on-Trent in central England about taxi driver shortages, after the organisation representing the industry in the UK said more than half of licensed drivers have not returned to the trade since the pandemic.

(Picture: Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vj38f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f41)
Reviving tourism in post-pandemic India

The beleaguered tourism sector in India is showing initial signs of revival. The country’s peak travel season is just kicking off and, with the government easing restrictions on air travel, many holiday destinations are once again crowded. Foreign tourists could also be allowed in soon, after being kept away for more than a year-and-a-half.

But will this lead to complacency and trigger another wave of Covid infections? How will domestic and international tourists, and the industry, cope with new safety checks and guidelines? And is the industry expecting a rush of foreign tourists, or is it already too late for this season?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how to revive tourism in post-pandemic India.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Deep Kalra, founder and group executive chairman, MakeMyTrip; William Boulter, chief commercial officer, IndiGo; Savi & Vid, founders, Bruised Passports, travel influencers


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7tvr5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cxgqf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vj70k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lcb)
The T20 World Cup debate

Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Jim Maxwell debate where it has gone wrong for India in the men’s T20 World Cup, if South Africa are peaking at the right time and whether England or Pakistan are the tournament favourites.

Plus we are joined by the General Manager of the Big Bash Leagues in Australia, Alistair Dobson. He tells us how Covid has impacted the WBBL, the significance of having Indian players in the competition and how preparations are going for the men’s Big Bash League beginning next month.

We also speak to Will Gaffney who set up the Bat For A Chance foundation which helps underprivileged children from around the world enjoy cricket.

Photo: Credit: India captain Virat Kohli cuts a dejected figure following his side's 10 wicket defeat against Pakistan during the ICC Men's T20 World Cup. (Image: ICC via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7tzh9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20ft)
Who are the Oromo Liberation Army?

As rebel TPLF forces advance towards the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, other armed groups say they are forming an alliance with them. These include the secretive Oromo Liberation Army, which first appeared in the 1970s. The BBC's Africa correspondent Catherine Byaruhanga was the first international journalist to meet them, at a desert training camp.

The dispute over Scythian gold
When Russian forces seized Crimea from Ukraine in 2014, a unique collection of Scythian treasures from museums in Kyiv and Crimea was being exhibited in Amsterdam. Last week, a Dutch court ruled that the objects were part of Ukraine’s cultural heritage and must all return to Ukraine, not Crimea. The BBC's Daria Taradai tells us what this Scythian heritage means to Ukrainians.

The banana jokes that stopped being funny
A social media craze in Turkey involving Syrian refugees filming themselves with bananas quickly turned sour. What began as a joke has inflamed tensions between Syrians and Turks, and led to the arrest and threatened deportation of some of those taking part. Dima Babilie of BBC Arabic has been investigating.

Pakistan's Taliban problem
When the Taliban took control of Afghanistan, neighbouring Pakistan experienced a rise in extremist Islamist activity in its tribal border areas. Violence and extortion have become commonplace, as BBC Urdu’s Abid Hussain discovered when he visited Orakzai and Bajaur districts in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province.

Climate change and the threat to Thailand's durians
With COP26 in full swing, the BBC's language services have been looking at the impact of climate change in their own regions. BBC Thai picked an item close to their hearts - the famously pungent durian fruit. Changing weather patterns are now interfering with the growing season, as Thanyaporn Buathong explains.

Image: A member of the Oromo Liberation Army
Credit: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzf)
When Eritrea silenced its critics

In 2001, the Eritrean government suddenly arrested prominent critics and journalists, and shut down the country's independent press. None of those detained have been seen since. Eritrea, once hailed as a model for Africa, was accused of becoming one of the most repressive states in the world. We hear the story of Eritrean journalist Semret Seyoum, who'd set up the country's first private newspaper. He went into hiding and later tried to escape.

Photo: Getty Images


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7v37f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1ht9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7v6zk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cxtyt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vjl7y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct2yql)
The Denial Files

3. The good science of ‘bad Brazilians’

Brazil has pledged to end deforestation within a decade in a pledge signed by more than 100 nations at the COP26 climate summit. But do Brazilian leaders really believe in fighting climate change?

Inside the country, climate change disinformation is thriving, while good and credible information is being undermined, even by the country’s own president.

Influential voices with connections to the agriculture industry are spreading baseless conspiracy theories that man-made climate change is a hoax, invented by foreigners to hold the country’s economy back. Scientists at one of the government’s own agencies were accused of being “bad Brazilians” by President Jair Bolsonaro, after they produced data which showed an alarming rate of deforestation in the Amazon. The row resulted in the sacking of the head of the agency, who now fears the government is in the grip of climate change denialism.

However, President Bolsonaro insists he is stepping up protection of the environment and has warned other countries not to meddle in Brazil’s internal affairs. Is the Amazon, one of the most important regions in the world for fighting climate change, safe in his hands?


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dp4)
Tree planting and climate change

Trees absorb carbon dioxide - the main gas heating the planet - so planting more of them is seen by many as a possible climate change solution. But how impactful is it? This week, Ros Atkins, looks at why vast tree-planting initiatives are concerning some experts.

(Photo: Planting a young tree. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7vbqp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xythn2z5qzs)
US Congress passes $1.2 trillion infrastructure package

President Biden's one trillion dollar infrastructure bill has finally been approved by the US House of Representatives, the final stage in its legislative progress before it's signed into law.

Also, the United Nations Security Council calls for an end to the fighting in Ethiopia and for all parties to refrain from inflammatory hate speech and incitement to violence.

Plus, the US pharmaceutical company Pfizer says clinical trials of its experimental anti-COVID pill - Paxlovid - show it can cut the risk of hospitalisation or death from the disease by nearly ninety per cent.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Rebecca Willis, a professor of energy and climate governance at the University of Lancaster here in England; and Alex Andreou, Greek-born actor, writer and broadcaster based in London.

(Image: The American flag flies outside the U.S. Capitol before sunrise in Washington, D.C., U.S. Credit: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7vggt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xythn2z5vqx)
President Biden's trillion-dollar package passes

President Biden's one trillion dollar infrastructure bill finally gets approval from the US House of Representatives: But we hear why the President's plans for social policy and climate change are still being blocked by Congress.

Also, can international financiers help limit global warming with a promise of one hundred thirty trillion dollars?

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Rebecca Willis, a professor of energy and climate governance at the University of Lancaster here in England; and Alex Andreou, Greek-born actor, writer and broadcaster based in London.

(Image: U.S. Representative James Clyburn (D-SC) makes a statement as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) reacts at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. Credit: REUTERS)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7vl6y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xythn2z5zh1)
UN calls for peace in Ethiopia

The United Nations Security Council calls for an end to the fighting in Ethiopia. But will anyone listen?

Also, negotiating transparency at the COP26 climate change summit in Glasgow.

Plus, composing for football, we hear from the renowned classical music composer, Mark-Anthony Turnage.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Rebecca Willis, a professor of energy and climate governance at the University of Lancaster here in England; and Alex Andreou, Greek-born actor, writer and broadcaster based in London.

(Image: New Ethiopian military recruits at Abebe Bikila stadium in Addis Ababa. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vjyhb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9c)
Understanding the impact of climate change on women

It’s understood the climate crisis will disproportionately disrupt the lives of women around the globe. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two academics about the work they do and the impact of changing weather patterns on women.

As the primary food growers and water collectors, women are hardest hit by floods and droughts. They’re also less financially equipped to flee when natural disaster strikes, and vulnerable to gender-based violence.

Professor Asmeret Asefaw Berhe is a biogeochemist – a soil scientist – at the University of California, Merced. Her research is focused on understanding how disturbances in the environment affect the cycles of essential elements such as carbon and nitrogen through the soil system. While extreme weather events often result in the degradation of soil, she says effective land restoration could play an important role in sequestering CO2 and slowing climate change.

Dr Katharine Vincent is a British geographer working in southern Africa. Her research has focused on vulnerability to climate change and the adaptations that can be made. She’s particularly interested in how these changes impact men and women differently, investigating institutional aspects of climate change, adaptation, food security and social protection.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE
L: Asmeret Asefaw Berhe, credit Teamrat A Ghezzehei
R: Katharine Vincent, credit Klaus Wohlmann


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7vpz2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6l)
Climate: Civil disobedience

Usually protests against climate change take the form of marches or protests but for some activists this is not enough. Host Nuala McGovern hears from three people in Malaysia, France and Germany about why they have taken their fears about the climate much further - from interrupting a fashion show to risking their lives.

For others, their concerns about the climate provoke emotional and mental challenges that are referred to as ‘climate anxiety. Two UK-based activists explain how worrying about climate change is causing their daily lives to be affected by feelings of anger, fear and grief.

(Photo: Supporters of the climate protest group "Extinction Rebellion" block traffic near Vancouver International Airport in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada 25 October, 2021. Credit: Jennifer Gauthier/Reuters)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vk27g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Pick of the World (w3ct2z26)
Pick of the World

Listeners to the BBC World Service not only love what they hear, they love to engage with it; it's a two way relationship that has created a special bond.

Each week, Anna Doble celebrates the amazing audio the World Service produces, with clips chosen by its listeners, and explores the reaction on social media.

She also speaks to some of those listeners around the world, to find out what it was about the issue that captured them.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l29)
Reporting COP26

The COP26 climate conference in Scotland is well underway. Listeners tell us what they think of the BBC’s coverage so far - both complimentary and critical. And we look into the complex logistics of making sure the BBC’s correspondents are in the right place at the right time and that they get on air.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7vtq6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q8qcfb7qv)
Ice Hockey's sexual abuse scandal

The NHL, the professional ice hockey league in North America, has been rocked by allegations of sexual abuse and failure to investigate them when they were first made. It revolves around a law suit a former Chicago Blackhawks player has brought against the team after he allege he was abused by one of the coaches. That player, Kyle Beach, spoke out publicly this week in an emotional interview with TSN journalist Rick Westhead. We hear part of that interview and from Rick on exposing sexual abuse in the NHL and the cover up.

As COP26 continues in Glasgow we look at what role sport can play in protecting the planet. And whilst Baseball's World Series crowned its champion this week, for Milwaukee Brewer’s pitcher Brent Suter the work on making the sport environmentally conscious continues. Proudly known as the "greenest man in baseball" he tells us about the challenges he's faced trying to change minds and habits of team mates and fans.

Seeing our favourite stars doing their bit does have an impact because as fans we love our teams! After all the word 'fan' is short for fanatic. We hear from one group harnessing that deep passion in order to help the environment. Planet Super League gives fans the chance to represent the clubs they support in a sustainability league, the inaugural champions have just been crowned, we hear from the leagues CEO Tom Gribbin.

(Photo: Former NHL player Kyle Beach Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7vygb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cykfl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vk9qq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f41)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:32 today]


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7w26g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9t)
Burhan Sönmez: Istanbul, Istanbul

Continuing our month-long season to celebrate the English PEN centenary, World Book Club talks to multi-award-winning Turkish-Kurdish writer and activist Burhan Sönmez about his unforgettable novel Istanbul, Istanbul.

At once powerfully political and intensely personal, Istanbul, Istanbul is the story of four prisoners kept in underground cells beneath the city, who tell one another stories about their city to pass the time. There are two Istanbuls, one below ground and one above, yet in reality both are one and the same.

Sonmez worked as a lawyer in Istanbul and was a member of IHD, the Human Rights Society, and a founder of BirGün, a daily opposition newspaper. He was seriously injured following an assault by police in 1996 in Turkey and received treatment in Britain afterwards.

Here he discusses his novel, censorship and the tense political situation in Turkey, and the invaluable impact of English PEN and other such pressure groups with presenter Ritula Shah and readers from around the globe.

Istanbul, Istanbul was translated by Ümit Hussein.

(Picture: Burhan Sönmez. Photo credit: Roberto Gandola.)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7w5yl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrhc586)
At least 99 dead in Freetown tanker explosion

A huge fuel tanker explosion in Freetown, the capital of Sierra Leone, has killed at least 99 people. We hear from the mayor of Freetown.

Also in the programme: several dead in Texas concert crush; and Polish pro-abortion march.

(Picture: Burnt collided trucks are pictured after a fuel tanker explosion in Freetown. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7w9pq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tkh8v2yfj)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7wsp7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0czdnh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vl4ym)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct2yql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l92)
Zola Budd

At the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, South African-born Zola Budd collided with the home favourite, Mary Decker, in the final of the women’s 3,000 metres. Decker was left weeping on the ground, while Budd was booed by the crowd and had to leave the US with a police escort after receiving death threats. Simon Watts introduces the memories of Zola Budd as recorded in the BBC archives.

PHOTO: Zola Budd, left, with Mary Decker in the 1984 Olympic final (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7wxfc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z7s)
When Eritrea silenced its critics

An hour of first hand accounts from the past. Starting with a crackdown on opposition voices in Eritrea from twenty years ago, plus memories of the 1956 Hungarian uprising, the Nuremberg trials, a breakthrough in orthopaedics, and how the fictional character Fu Manchu prejudiced popular opinion against China and the Chinese for decades.


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7x15h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtt)
Actor Alan Cumming

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined in the studio by the star of film and stage Alan Cumming whose new autobiography Baggage has just been published and also, from Dallas Texas, by critic, writer and activist Minal Hajratwala.

Oscar-winning Eddie Redmayne and Jessie Buckley talk about their roles in a new West End stage production of Cabaret

Argentinian director Amalia Ulman on El Planeta, her film about a mother/daughter scamming team, starring Amalia and her own mum!

Sir Paul McCartney on his new book of song lyrics, an autobiography by any other name.

Also Scottish actor Brian Cox, aka Logan Roy, talks about his role in the hit TV series Succession.

And Oscar-winning director Chloe Zhao on directing The Eternals with a US$200m dollar budget.

(Photo: Alan Cumming. Credit: Paras Griffin/WireImage)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7x4xm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrhd477)
President Biden claims climate change success

The US House of Representatives has passed a 1.2 trillion dollar infrastructure bill. What does this mean in terms of the struggle to slow climate change? We hear from Russell Berman, a reporter in Washington DC, and the environmentally-minded Democratic governor of Washington State, Jay Inslee.

Also in the programme: the female civil rights activist killed in the Afghan city of Mazar-i-Sharif; and the musical legacy of the young Brazilian singer Marilia Mendonca, who has died in a plane crash.

(Photo: US President Biden at news conference in Washington. Credit: REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7x8nr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywyz8s9l6q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sr1k7fmvc)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vlmy4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pth)
Climate change: Amitav Ghosh, underwater sculpture, Sebastiao Salgado

As world leaders meet at COP26, we speak to writers, artists, and musicians helping us understand climate change. Presented by BBC Environment Correspondent Matt McGrath.

Authors Amitav Ghosh and Diana McCaulay discuss turning climate fact into fiction. Ghosh grew up in India, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka, and now lives in America. A leading voice on climate change, his books on the issue include novel Gun Island; the new Jungle Nama; and non-fiction The Great Derangement, and the new Nutmeg’s Curse. McCaulay is a writer and environmental activist from Jamaica, and her latest novel, Daylight Come, is a work of climate fiction, set in 2084.

Plus, Sebastiao Salgado’s musical portrait of the Amazon. The acclaimed Brazilian photographer spent seven years documenting the rainforest and its indigenous peoples. Now he and Italian-Brazilian conductor Simone Menezes have set the images to music from composer Heitor Villa-Lobos’s Floresta do Amazonas to create an Amazonia concert. They joined us to describe the work and climate change in the rainforest. An exhibition of Salgado’s Amazonia photos is at the Science Museum in London.

And a world underwater – the sculpture park below the waves. Sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor’s unique installations can be seen around the world by divers, snorkellers, and the fish which swim around them, and tell a powerful story of climate change. He spoke to The Cultural Frontline about his latest work - an underwater forest off the coast of Cyprus.

Producer: Emma Wallace, Lucy Collingwood

(Photo: One of Jason deCaires Taylor’s underwater sculptures. Credit: Jason deCaires Taylor)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7xddw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcr)
Vintage v modern with James Petralli, Jeff Parker, Heba Kadry, Eric Pulido and McKenzie Smith

White Denim frontman James Petralli, Jeff Parker, Heba Kadry and Midlake's Eric Pulido and McKenzie Smith discuss using vintage equipment and “mid-life vintage purchases”, why the sound they make comes from their hands, and why being a musician mostly means reacting to your environment.

James Petralli is aTexas-based musician and frontman of lo-fi noisemakers White Denim. Jeff Parker, is an LA-based multi-instrumentalist and composer who blends everything from jazz to rock via electronics. He’s also a member of the indie-rock group Tortoise, and has scored several documentaries, feature films, and video games. Eric Pulido and McKenzie Smith are members of the folk-rock band Midlake, and indie supergroup BNQT. Both from Texas, they’ve released four albums as Midlake, the last being 2013’s Antiphon, and they’re back next year with new material. And Heba Kadry is an Egyptian-born, Brooklyn-based mastering engineer who’s worked with Bjork, the Mars Volta, and Ryuichi Sakamoto, and has mastered soundtracks for Midsommar and the Oscar-nominated Jackie. She tells us what mastering is, and why all musicians need it.



SUNDAY 07 NOVEMBER 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7xj50)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vlwfd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Trending (w3ct2yql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3ct1l29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7xmx4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yw2)
Jet fuel from thin air

Scientists in Switzerland have developed a system which uses solar energy to extract gases such as hydrogen and carbon dioxide from the air and turns them into fuels for transport. So far they have only made small quantities in experimental reactors, however they say with the right investment their alternatives to fossil fuels could be scaled up to provide a climate friendly way to power transport, particularly aviation and shipping. We speak to Aldo Steinfeld and Tony Patt from ETH Zurich and Johan Lilliestam from the University of Potsdam.

And what will rises in global temperature mean where you live? An interactive model developed by Bristol University’s Seb Steinig shows how an average global rise of say 1.5C affects different regions, with some potentially seeing much higher temperatures than others. Dan Lunt – one of the contributing authors to this year’s IPCC report discusses the implications.

We also look at racism in science, with problems caused by decisions on the naming of ancient bones more than 200 years ago. As more is known about human evolution, the way we classify the past seems to make less sense says Mirjana Roksandic.

And the issue of colonialism looms large in the international response to conservation. Its legacy has been discussed at COP26 and as Lauren Rudd, author of a new study on racism in conservation tells us, this hangover from colonial times is limiting the effectiveness of current conservation initiatives.

And, The science is unequivocal: human-made climate change is leading the world into an environmental crisis, and time is running out to prevent permanent damage to ecosystems and make the planet uninhabitable for many of us humans.

As communities around the world increasingly experience the devastating effects of global warming, world leaders, policy makers and scientists from all over the globe are attending COP26, the United Nation’s major climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland. Each nation will be frantically negotiating its commitments to tackling emissions - many agree it’s a pivotal moment for the future of humanity.

Crowdscience hosts a panel of three experts taking part in the conference, to hear their thoughts on what progress has been made so far. They answer listener questions on rising sea levels, explaining that a temperature rise of more than 1.5 degrees won’t just affect small island nations but will have serious consequences for every country in the world. We hear about an interactive atlas developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that shows the impact of higher temperatures in different regions.

And presenter Marnie Chesterton asks about the financial barriers that have prevented many people from traveling to COP26 and discovers why it’s vital that people from the global south have their voices heard.

Image: President Biden and his wife travelling to the G20 summit in Rome and COP26 in Glasgow.
Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images.


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7xrn8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0d0cmj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vm3xn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw4)
Hunt for rare resistance to SARS CoV-2

An International team of scientists has launched a global hunt for rare people who may be genetically resistant to SARS CoV-2 infection. Individuals who’ve been exposed to the virus living in families where everyone else in the household got infected, who repeatedly tested negative and didn’t mount an immune response. Claudia Hammond speaks to immunologist Evangelos Andreakos, part of the team at the Biomedical Research Foundation in Athens about this fascinating quest. And Claudia hears from Norway about more reassuring research into Covid vaccination in pregnancy.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A woman walking on the streets of Manhattan, New York City. Photo credit: Lechatnoir/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7xwdd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7y04j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvq)
New life amid the ashes in Greece

Pascale Harter introduces insight, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers from around the world.

Bethany Bell returns to the burnt hillsides of Greece – and the island of Evia, ravaged by blazing wildfires in 2021. During a year of extreme climate events, Greece suffered what its prime minister called “the greatest ecological catastrophe in decades”. Hundreds of millions of euros’ worth of damage was done. Woodland, crops, livestock - and homes - were burned to cinders. The Greek government defends its record, saying that despite the devastationthe action it took minimized the loss of human life. But now the temperatures have dropped, the state is counting the cost and trying to reduce the losses if - or when - it happens again.

Salvaging some kind of sustainable future - not just for Greece, but for the whole planet’s climate – has been the aim for the COP26 summit in Glasgow in the UK. Big international events like this might be frustrating and unwieldy for some world leaders – but they can at least offer a brief break from their troubles back home, Take the US President Joseph Biden. Less than a year after he was elected, his public approval ratings are slumping. Anthony Zurcher has been travelling with the presidential press corps over the past week, and wondering how his global performance would be going down with voters in the American heartland.

Around the world, journalism is under threat. Whether by direct threat, legal manoeuvre, or technological hacks - states and individuals have not given up the effort to keep the news under control. And it's getting worse, says Andrew Roy. For the past three decades, he has sent BBC correspondents around the world, most recently in his role as Head of Foreign News - and he describes some of the pressures brought to bear on them and their work.

Around the world, births, weddings and funerals – the great rites of passage – take many forms, as families welcome new members and say goodbye to their loved ones. The symbolism varies and the ceremonies can be simple or very elaborate – but nearly everyone wants to mark the occasion. And emotions can run very high when the right niceties aren't observed, or some participants feel they're not getting their due. In southeastern Nigeria, Olivia Ndubuisi recently came up against one social obligation which really put a dampener on the party – at least for a while….



(Image: Trees in flames as a wildfire burns on the island of Evia, August, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Nicolas Economou)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vmcdx)
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SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pth)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7y3wn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0d0qvx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vmh51)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct1d0b)
Warrior elephant guardians

In a remote part of Northern Kenya, former Samburu warriors are elephant keepers, rescuing and raising baby elephants in what’s thought to be Africa’s first community owned and run elephant sanctuary.

At Reteti Elephant Sanctuary they rescue baby elephants that have been injured, orphaned or abandoned. They look after them, rehabilitate them and release them back to the wild. It is transforming the way local communities relate to elephants, in a way that benefits both humans and animals. The sanctuary has brought employment, revenue and a sense of pride. Reteti is on community owned land and it is managed by community members. The local people are now protecting the animals they live alongside.

Now the sanctuary is starting to employ women from the community as keepers too, who bring their own set of skills to the work.

The elephants are also proving an unexpected catalyst for peace, bringing tribes together from all over Northern Kenya, that normally fight over land and resources. Now they are finding ways to work together in peace, to protect the elephants.

(Photo: A baby elephant saying hello to one of the keepers. Credit: Michael Kaloki)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7y7ms)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xythn2z8mww)
US appeals court blocks Biden's vaccine mandate

A US appeals court has temporarily blocked President Joe Biden's plans for a vaccine mandate for businesses. We get an expert view on the ruling.

Also, the Director of the International Committee of the Red Cross for Africa on the humanitarian situation in Tigray.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Karin von Hippel, Director-General of the defence think tank RUSI, an independent defence and security research centre in London; and Ryan Heath, senior editor at Politico, the online news publication.

(Image: U.S. President Joe Biden departs from St. Edmond"s Catholic Church after attending services in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, U.S. Credit: REUTERS)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7yccx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xythn2z8rn0)
Senior Serb politician confirms to BBC that he intends to create Serb army

A senior Serb politician in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Milorad Dodik, tells Weekend that he intends to pull out of country's national army and create a new Serb army for Republika Srpska. But he says he doesn't want Bosnia to break up.

We also hear from international community's chief representative in Bosnia, Christian Schmidt who says he won't tolerate any moves to break up the country.

And Bosnian-born Baroness Helic of the British House of Lords on the perils of ignoring the current crisis in Bosnia, and the need for western powers to act immediately.


Also, Rwanda's Minister of the Environment speaks to us about being among five countries selected to trial and find new ways to easily access climate finance.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Karin von Hippel, Director-General of the defence thinktank RUSI, an independent defence and security research centre in London; and Ryan Heath, senior editor at Politico, the online news publication.

(Image: Member of Bosnia-Herzegovina's Presidency, Milorad Dodik, speaks at a summit in Budapest, Hungary. Credit: REUTERS)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7yh41)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xythn2z8wd4)
US court blocks Biden's vaccine mandate for companies

A US appeals court has temporarily blocked President Joe Biden's plans for a vaccine mandate for businesses.

Also, we hear the story of a member of the LGBT community in Afghanistan on life under the Taliban.

And what to expect during the final week of the UN climate conference in Glasgow.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Karin von Hippel, Director-General of the defence thinktank RUSI, an independent defence and security research centre in London; and Ryan Heath, senior editor at Politico, the online news publication.

(Image: A COVID-19 vaccine is being administered. Credit: REUTERS)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vmvdf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgj)
One small change

The pressure to tackle climate change by altering what we eat is huge, and it can be a daunting prospect. But you don’t have to go vegan, shop 100 per cent local, or start your own allotment to make a difference.

This week, as world leaders gather for a key climate conference in Glasgow, we’re asking you what small changes you’ve made to your everyday food habits to make them a little bit greener.

Plus, Tamasin Ford hears from a chef in Nigeria about the special role he thinks the professionals have to play, and we ask for one life-changing piece of advice from an expert and writer on food waste.

(Picture: Hand reaches for apple, Credit: Getty/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Michael Elégbèdé: chef, ÌTÀN Restaurant and Test Kitchen in Ikoyi, Nigeria
Tamar Adler: author ‘An Everlasting Meal’, New York, USA

And Food Chain listeners:

Annabell Randles: London, UK
Mike Hoey: Berkely, California
Simone Osman: Maputo, Mozambique
Yael Straver Laris: Geneva, Switzerland
Kate Minogue: Lewes, UK
Karine Young: Cape Town, South Africa
Jeremy Okware, Uganda
Rebecca Neo: Singapore


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7ylw5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vmz4k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxs)
How Springsteen became my lifeline

As a British-Pakistani teenager growing up in 1980s Luton, Sarfraz Manzoor didn’t think his future held huge promise – that is until he discovered the music of Bruce Springsteen.
Sarfraz could relate to The Boss – they both came from working class backgrounds and both had challenging relationships with their fathers. But if Springsteen had made it to the top, maybe Sarfraz could too. He's now a successful writer and journalist, and his story was turned into the film Blinded by the Light. A longer version of this interview was first broadcast on 29th August 2019.

Produced and presented by Emily Webb

Picture: Sarfraz Manzoor with Bruce Springsteen
Credit: Courtesy of Sarfraz Manzoor

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7yqm9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbf)
Dating

Why do you do what you do? Exploring our loves, fears, habits and hopes, Dessa takes a deeply personal look at what lies behind our thoughts and behaviour. Can a better understanding of human nature help us be more generous with other people’s behaviour, and even our own?

In the first episode of the series, Dessa looks at dating. We spend a lot of time looking for love – but have we got that wrong? Is love really something you discover, or something you’d be better growing into?

Dessa finds answers in the supermarket cereal aisle and the brain scans carried out by a biological anthropologist - someone who puts your life in the context of everyone else’s. If you think you’re special, think again! But then, Dessa hears some words of wisdom from her mum on how best to navigate the wilderness of dating apps.

A co-production by BBC World Service and American Public Media.

(Image: Teenage Couple, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vn2wp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2z39)
COP26: Faith and the environment

This week leaders from over 200 countries have been making pledges to cut carbon emission at the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26). But for many climate activists on the ground, action speaks lounder than words. Reporter Rajeev Gupta speaks to activists who say they are compelled by their faith to act now.

He hears from Alphonce Munyao, a Catholic activist from Kenya, who says climate change there is causing droughts, leading to wild animals entering urban areas in search of food and water. Alphonce says religion for him is not just about preaching, but is a call to action.

William Morris, an Evangelical, says he grew up believing there was no need to protect the planet as the world was temporary. He describes why many in his tradition believe climate change is a hoax, and how he now goes back into his church and tries to persuade people otherwise.

Rajeev also speaks to Sheila Chauhan, a Hindu who runs a project called Green Karma – Blue Planet. Sheila says the protection of the environment is one of the fundamental teachings of her faith, and that the energy of God is found in all living things. She describes her own deep connection to the environment, and how she has made it her life's work to spread the message of climate protection.

Tonga is a country that faces an extensive threat from rising sea levels: some scientists have predicted the South Pacific island could be completely drowned within 50 years. Sixteen-year-old twins Louisa and Lorrain describe how the changing weather has been affecting them, and how they want religious leaders to do more than just talk about the issues.

Finally, Rajeev speaks to Malaysian activist Aroe Ajoeni, who has been working with indigenous Malay tribes. Aroe says the indigenous people are aware things have been changing, but thought it was because the gods were angry with them. She says by helping them to understand the impacts of carbon emissions, some of the youngsters in the community have started to question why they should be affected by the pollution of others.

Presented and produced by Rajeev Gupta

Image: A protester at the COP26 summit in Glasgow (Credit: Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7yvcf)
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SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0d1gbp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vn6mt)
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SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2wph)
The Public Misunderstanding of Science

Back to school

Does the misunderstanding of science begin in schools? Science journalist and former BBC Science correspondent, Sue Nelson visits the UK’s National Space Centre to discover how space is being used to entice children into studying science. She also speaks to teachers around the world about the challenges of ensuring the next generation better understand the scientific and technological world around them.

Presenter: Sue Nelson
Producer: Richard Hollingham

(Photo: Pupils of the Ecole Vivalys elementary school, wearing spacesuits costumes for their project Mission to Mars. Credit: Stefan Wermuth/Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7yz3k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2v)
Why are we seeing global shortages?

Empty shelves are becoming commonplace. And prices are rising. Charmaine Cozier explores the role that the pandemic, and a sudden demand explosion, have had on supply chains. Around the world workers are being slow to return to their jobs, the container shipping industry is struggling to get goods to their destinations and manufacturing disruptions are causing a reduction in vital components. And in addition to the pandemic, extreme weather events have resulted in ruined harvests. How long will it take for things to return to normal?

Contributors:
Jose Sette, International Coffee Organisation
Stacy Rasgon, Bernstein Research
Dr Nela Richardson, ADP
Professor Alan MacKinnon, Kuehne Logistics University

Presenter: Charmaine Cozier
Researcher: Chris Blake
Producer: Rosamund Jones

(Image: Empty supermarket shelves: REUTERS/Henry Nicholls)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vnbcy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Global Questions (w3ct2zq8)
Global climate debate

In a pivotal moment in the global fight against climate change, world leaders are gathering at COP26, the UN's flagship climate conference in Glasgow. The BBC hosts a high-level global climate debate with a panel of leading international political figures, who will take questions from young people in the studio and around the world on the challenges presented by climate change, and the hopes for global solutions to be achieved at the COP climate change meeting.

Presented by Kirsty Wark, the debate will give young people across the world the chance to hold their leaders to account on action for climate change.

Panel: Kwasi Kwarteng MP, UK Secretary of State for Business; Gina McCarthy, the US National Climate Advisor to President Biden; Múte Bourup Egede, Prime Minister of Greenland; Diego Mesa, Colombia's Minister of Energy and Mining.


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7z2vp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrhg259)
Iraqi PM survives drone attack

Iraq's Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhemi said he was unhurt and appealed for "calm and restraint" after a drone attack on his residence early Sunday heightened political tensions in the war-scarred country.

Also in the programme: Bosnia-Herzegovina's senior Serb leader; and Bianca Jagger on Nicaragua's elections.

(Picture: Iraqi PM Mustafa Al-Kadhimi addresses the nation following a drone strike targeted his residence in Baghdad. credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7z6lt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm1)
The Devils: Dostoevsky’s novel of political evil

The Devils, The Possessed, or Demons, as it’s also known in translation, is Fyodor Dostoevsky’s most political novel but it’s also his bleakest and funniest. It’s a hundred and fifty years since its publication and two hundred years since its author’s birth. The novel tells the story of a group of young revolutionaries who run riot in a small provincial town in Russia, all under the indulgent eye of their elders, the liberal and progressively minded elite. It is a grim prophecy of totalitarian rule in the 20th century in what is a penetrating psychological study of the human consequences of extreme philosophical ideas.

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss Dostoevsky and his novel The Devils or Demons, is Tatyana Kovalevskaya, Professor at the Russian State University for the Humanities in Moscow and the author of the bilingual edition Fyodor Dostoevsky on the Dignity of the Human Person; Carol Apollonio, Professor of the Practice of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at Duke University in the United States and President of the International Dostoevsky Society; and Dr Sarah Hudspith, Associate Professor in Russian at the University of Leeds, and author of Dostoevsky and the idea of Russianness.

Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service.

[Image: A production of The Devils staged at the Union Theatre, London. Credit: Stagephoto (Perri Snowdon as Stavrogin), Matt Link (Tara Quinn as the little girl Matryoshka). Design by Spiff]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkw)
Same data, opposite results. Can we trust research?

When Professor Martin Schweinsberg found that he was consistently reaching different conclusions to his peers, even with the same data, he wondered if he was incompetent. So he set up an experiment.
What he found out emphasises the importance of the analyst, but calls into question the level of trust we can put into research.

Features an excerpt from TED Talks


(Image: Getty/erhui1979)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7zbby)
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SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7zg32)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tkh8v62tw)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Justin Setterfield/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7ztbg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0d2f9q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vp5lv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2z39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7zy2l)
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SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhm)
Good COP or Bad COP?

As global leaders jet out of Glasgow, leaving the hard bargaining to their delegates, Business Weekly looks at what the pledges made so far really mean. Will rich countries be able to support the financial demands made of developing nations to help them transition away from fossil fuels? And what did activists make of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s promise of reaching net-zero by 2070? Also on the programme, we hear why some people enjoy trophy hunting and ask whether it can ever be a useful tool for conservation. And as England's largest-ever hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold coins is found in Norfolk, we ask what happens to treasure when it’s discovered. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Greta Thunberg joins other demonstrators in Glasgow, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb801tq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrhh14b)
Nicaraguan presidential election described as 'farce'

Critics of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega have described today's election as a 'farce', following the arrest of seven leading opposition candidates under a treason law. Many more opponents have been forced into exile, and foreign journalists have been barred from entering the country. We hear from human rights campaigner Bianca Jagger and ask analyst Dr Paul J. Angelo how the United States might respond.

Also in the programme: the corruption allegations surrounding Britain's governing Conservative Party, and the discovery of an ancient carving associated with Henry XIII's beheaded queen, Anne Boleyn.

(Photo: First voting centers open in general elections in Nicaragua. Credit: EPA/JORGE TORRES)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb805kv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywyz8sdh3t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sr1k7jjrg)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vpjv7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb8099z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vpnlc)
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SUN 23:32 Pick of the World (w3ct2z26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]



MONDAY 08 NOVEMBER 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk48b8)
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MON 00:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4tmln)
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MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2z39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk4d2d)
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MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlj11rj07n)
US reopens to European travellers

Airlines in Europe are hoping for a surge in bookings from people who want to travel to the United States, as the country is reopening its borders from Monday, as long as they have been vaccinated against Covid 19. US aviation consultant Michael J Boyd and UK travel agent Beneditta McManus give us their perspectives on the news. China's State Grid company has warned of shortages of electricity this winter. Our regular contributor Michael Hughes analyses what this could mean for China, as well as the global economy. Nick Mabey, chief executive of the climate change think tank E3G, gives us a breakdown of what's happened at the first week of the COP26 climate conference, and what we can expect in week two. And a US court has blocked President Joe Biden's efforts to mandate that American companies with more than 100 staff ensure employees are vaccinated against Covid-19. US labour lawyer Benjamin Noren explains the case. (Image: a sign at JFK international airport in New York City. Credit: Ramin Talaie/Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4trbs)
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MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqb)
Geoengineering The Planet

Even with the best efforts, it will be decades before we see any change in global temperatures through our mitigation efforts. Given the pace of global heating and the time lag before our emissions reductions have any impact, scientists are exploring additional ways of reducing global temperature. Gaia Vince explores ways of actively removing carbon from the atmosphere. She discusses the idea of BECCS, biological energy with carbon capture storage, and DAC, direct air capture with Simon Evans of Climate Brief. Sir David King, Chair of the Centre for Climate Repair at Cambridge University, explains how he is planning an experiment in the Arabian Sea that will allow the oceans to take up more carbon. Professor Rachael James of the University of Southampton talks about her experiments in enhanced rock weathering, where she finds ways of speeding up the slow continual process in which carbon dioxide in the atmosphere dissolves in rainwater, forming a weak acid that reacts with the surface of rocks. She hopes this will lock up more carbon and bring benefits to farmers and mining companies.

And psychologist Ben Converse of the University of Virginia considers whether we might find geoengineering a socially acceptable approach to tackling climate change.

Editor: Deborah Cohen

Picture: Clouds, Credit: Gary Yeowell/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk4htj)
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MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8p73ss)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4tw2x)
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MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2drd)
How’s it going at COP26?

Climate negotiators from all over the world are gathered in Glasgow for the global summit to discuss how we can curb the worst effects of global warming.
The Conference of Parties (or COP26) has now reached its half-way point. Kate Lamble and Neal Razzell take the temperature on what has been discussed so far.


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk4mkn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4tzv1)
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MON 03:32 Pick of the World (w3ct2z26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk4r9s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8p7c91)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4v3l5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9d)
Women protecting wildlife from poachers

There are many thousands of people around the world trying to protect endangered species in their natural habitat – around one in ten of them are female but that number is growing. In Africa alone 18 different countries employ female park rangers. Kim Chakanetsa is joined by two women from South Africa and Zambia to talk about what they do.

Tsakane Nxumalo is a junior ranger from The Black Mambas - an unarmed all-female ranger unit in South Africa working in the Greater Kruger National Park. Their job is to protect rhino herds from local bushmeat hunters and organised rhino-poaching syndicates. Since their foundation in 2013 they’ve removed thousands of snares and poison traps, dramatically reducing poaching activity and encouraging people to see the region as a resource for wildlife and nature tourism.

Lisa Siamusantu is part of Kufadza, Zambia’s first all-female anti-poaching community scout unit working with Conservation Lower Zambezi. She’d had to drop out of university and was supporting her mother in their village in near the Lower Zambezi National Park when she saw a recruitment advert for this armed ranger unit. She says the training was the hardest thing she’s ever done, but now she says whatever she does in the future it will have to be with nature and wildlife ‘I don’t want to stop doing this job.’

The teams are funded with money from government, non-government organisations and charity. They’ve both been recognised by World Female Ranger Day which is supporting women wildlife rangers around the world.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE
L: Tsakane Nxumalo, courtesy The Black Mambas
R: Lisa Siamusantu, credit Matt Sommerville


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk4w1x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2zctzky2n)
US to reopen borders to vaccinated travellers

We hear how New York is preparing to greet foreign tourists - after a 20 month ban is lifted.

An investigation has revealed that Pakistan's biometric ID scheme is stripping citizenship from thousands of people.

And a major nationwide vaccination campaign restarts in Afghanistan after the Taliban changes its stance. It had previously banned immunisations.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk4zt1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2zctzl1ts)
Biden: Nicaragua's election a 'pantomime'

The US President denounces Sunday’s poll as President Daniel Ortega seeks a fourth term in office.

Tens of thousands of Ethiopians take to the streets to show support for their government in its fight against an alliance of rebel forces.

And as the second week of COP26 begins in Glasgow, we ask whether pledges to make farming greener will actually be met.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk53k5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2zctzl5kx)
COP26: Fossil fuel industry has largest delegation

Around 503 people with links to fossil fuel interests have been accredited for the climate summit in Glasgow. Is this a problem?

The head of the World Food Programme has warned that Afghanistan is facing the worst humanitarian crisis on the planet with millions of people under threat of starvation.

And a special report from Turkmenistan, one of the only places on earth that claims they still have no coronavirus cases in the country.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk5799)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6m)
Mike Leigh: Art and the cinema

Stephen Sackur speaks to Mike Leigh, the acclaimed writer and director of films such as Secrets and Lies, Vera Drake, Happy-Go-Lucky and Mr Turner. For five decades, he has told stories about believable characters facing very human dilemmas. They’re painstakingly put together and not always easy to watch. But is the demand for his kind of artistic vision dwindling?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4vlkp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5m)
Can sewage spewing into UK waters be stopped?

Sewage entered British waters for around 3 million hours in 2020 in over 400,000 pollution incidents. Hugo Tagholm, chief executive of Surfers Against Sewage tells Tamasin Ford why this is happening. Public pressure for the government and water companies to do something about this is mounting, particularly since it's become known that privately owned water companies in England paid their shareholders almost $80 billion in dividends over the last 30 years. WaterUK represents all of the water and sewage providers across the UK. We hear from their director of policy, Stuart Colville. Is tougher legislation the answer? Sweden faced similar problems with their sewage system more than fifty years ago. Peter Sörngård, an environmental expert at the Swedish Water and Waste Water Association explains how they dealt with it.

Producer: Benjie Guy

(Picture: a sewage outflow pipe discharges sewage into a river. Credit: BBC.)




sewage spewing into British waters went viral on social media. The country’s Victorian era sewage systems are struggling to cope. We find out what’s being done about it and look to Sweden where they seem to be getting things right.


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1q)
Britain's Black Schools

In 1960s mainstream schooling in Britain was failing many black immigrant children. A disproportionate number were being sent to schools for those with low intelligence. Black educationalists like Gus John and others set up supplementary Saturday schools for black children to try to mitigate the problem. Claire Bowes has been hearing how some police and headteachers tried to shut them down.

Photo: photo of an early black supplementary school courtesy of the George Padmore Institute, London.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk5c1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4vq9t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr9)
Can COP26 deliver on climate change?

The science is unequivocal: human-made climate change is leading the world into an environmental crisis, and time is running out to prevent permanent damage to ecosystems and make the planet uninhabitable for many of us humans.

As communities around the world increasingly experience the devastating effects of global warming, world leaders, policy makers and scientists from all over the globe are attending COP26, the United Nation’s major climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland. Each nation will be frantically negotiating its commitments to tackling emissions - many agree it’s a pivotal moment for the future of humanity.

Crowdscience hosts a panel of three experts taking part in the conference, to hear their thoughts on what progress has been made so far. They answer listener questions on rising sea levels, explaining that a temperature rise of more than 1.5 degrees won’t just affect small island nations but will have serious consequences for every country in the world. We hear about an interactive atlas developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that shows the impact of higher temperatures in different regions.

And presenter Marnie Chesterton asks about the financial barriers that have prevented many people from traveling to COP26 and discovers why it’s vital that people from the global south have their voices heard.

Featuring:

Ko Barrett, Vice-chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)
Dr Saleemul Huq, Director of the International Centre for Climate Change and Development in Bangladesh(ICCCAD)
Dr Tara Shine, Director of Change By Degrees


Produced by Melanie Brown and Marijke Peters for BBC World Service.

[Image: Delegates in the Action Zone at COP26 UN Climate Summit, Glasgow. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk5gsk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pth)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4vv1y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct2yql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk5ljp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8p86hy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4vyt2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk5q8t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jty)
'Honour' made my father a murderer

At the age of 16 Amina was happy and in love with a local boy in Jordan. She dreamt of their wedding and future together. But then she discovered a secret about her sister, which brought 'shame' on her family and her father went to violent extremes to protect his family's so-called honour. Emily Webb hears this harrowing story through Amina's words and Norwegian journalist Lene Wold, who spent time with her to write a book called 'Inside an Honour Killing.' This episode was first broadcast in May 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Image: Two women walking through an archway wearing hijabs
Credit: ashariat/Getty Images

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk5v0y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8p8g06)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4w69b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk5ys2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0sny2p)
Afghanistan: Millions facing starvation

The head of the United Nation's food programme has warned that Afghanistan is fast becoming the worst humanitarian crisis on earth, with millions facing starvation. David Beasley said “the next six months are going to be catastrophic. It is going to be hell on earth”. Mr Beasley was making his first visit to the country since the Taliban took power three months ago.

Also in the programme: Early results in Nicaragua show that President Daniel Ortega has won a fourth term in office, in what President Biden denounced as a pantomime election. And we speak to delegates from Tuvalu and Bangladesh on 'Loss and Damage' day at COP26. They tell us how their nations are already affected by climate change and what help they need from developed countries.

(Photo: Internally displaced people receive food aid distributed by the Turkish embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan on 30 October 2021. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk62j6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4wfsl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y488fbhr9n1)
Barack Obama attends COP26

Former US president Barack Obama has been speaking at the UN climate summit in Glasgow. Jessica Shankleman of Bloomberg tells us about the debate ongoing at COP26 today about how much rich nations should give poorer nations to switch to green energy systems, and adapt to climate change. And Gajen Kandiah, chief executive of Hitachi Vantara, discusses the role that artificial intelligence may be able to play in preventing deforestation. Also in the programme, voters in a Twitter poll initiated by Elon Musk, chief executive of Tesla Motors, have urged him to sell 10% of his stake in the company in order to pay tax. Bob Lord is a tax lawyer and associate fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, and explains the implications of such a move. Plus, water companies in the UK are facing massive public pressure after footage of sewage spewing into British waters went viral on social media. The BBC's Tamasin Ford reports on why it is happening more frequently, and what can be done about the problem.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Joshua Thorpe, Susan Karanja and Benjie Guy.

(Picture: Barack Obama gives a speech at COP26. Picture credit: Reuters.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk668b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxv6xnn66s)
Travis Scott: Lawsuit over concert crush

At least eight people were killed and hundreds injured in a crush, as rapper Travis Scott performed at his Astroworld festival in Houston, Texas, on Friday night. We'll hear accounts from some of the people who were there. We'll also get our reporter in Texas to explain the legal action being launched in response to what happened.

We'll explain the latest news from the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow. The campaign group Global Witness says delegates associated with the fossil fuel industry should not be allowed to attend. We'll hear a response from the head of one delegation which includes representatives from oil and gas companies.

We'll also hear a conversation about climate change from people who spend much of their time in the mountains. We bring together a skier and two climbers to talk about their observations of a changing climate where they are.

Picture: The Astroworld music festival venue in Houston, Texas (EPA / KEN MURRAY)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk6b0g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxv6xnn9yx)
Climate change: Mountain sports

We'll hear a conversation about climate change from people who spend much of their time in the mountains. We bring together a skier and two climbers to talk about their observations of a changing climate where they are.

We'll explain the latest news from the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow. The campaign group Global Witness says delegates associated with the fossil fuel industry should not be allowed to attend. We'll hear a response from the head of one delegation which includes representatives from oil and gas companies.

Also - at least eight people were killed and hundreds injured in a crush, as rapper Travis Scott performed at his Astroworld festival in Houston, Texas, on Friday night. We'll hear accounts from some of the people who were there. We'll also get our reporter in Texas to explain the legal action being launched in response to what happened.

Picture: Climber Will Gadd on the ice of Mount Kilimanjaro in 2014. When he returned in 2020, the ice wall was no longer there. (Red Bull / Pondella)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk6frl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jty)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk6khq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8p95gz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4wxs3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nn65j9fb2)
2021/11/08 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk6p7v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2drd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4x1j7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqc)
Geoengineering The Planet

Geoengineering is already underway from Australia to the Arctic as scientists try to save places threatened by global heating. It’s time for a global conversation about how we research these powerful techniques, with agreements on how and where to deploy them.

Global temperature today is 1.2°C hotter than preindustrial levels and it is causing climate change and sea level rise, threatening the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Coral reef ecosystems are headed for extinction within decades; glacial melt is speeding up with runaway consequences; agriculture has been hit by drought and extreme weather…. And as our carbon emissions rise, it’s only going to get worse, because we’re headed this century for at least 3°C of temperature rise if governments meet their netzero targets.
Faced with this heat emergency, scientists are acting. In Australia, they are brightening clouds to make them more reflective, hoping to save the Great Barrier Reef, and coating the waters with a thin reflective film; in the Arctic, glaciers are being covered with fine glass beads to reflect the sun’s heat and slow melting; on the Asian plains, clouds are being seeded to deliver rain over droughtlands. Beaches are being coated with rock dust to try to “react out” the air’s CO2, and where coral reefs have already been destroyed by bleaching, scientists are creating artificial coral structures inhabited by genetically modified coral organisms.

No global body is overseeing any of this, but it is mostly local and small scale. As temperatures climb further, heatwaves and deadly weather events will kill even more people than today. Scientists want to look at methods of preventing catastrophic temperature rise that could help large regions – potentially cooling global temperature. They want to see if seeding stratospheric clouds with sulphates would be possible, and whether it would have any unwanted affects.

But a large vocal group of environmentalists is opposed even to feasibility studies. They claim that this sort of geoengineering is “unnatural”, and instead are pressing for huge societal change that is difficult to achieve, unpopular, and could cause hardship. Planned experiments have been cancelled after pressure by these campaigners, repeatedly, over several years. Now they are trying to get a moratorium on any research into geoengineering. Many fear that even talking about geoengineering risks reducing efforts to decarbonise.
Meanwhile, the temperature keeps rising. Undoubtedly, there will come a point when society will decide it is no longer acceptable for thousands of people to die from hot temperatures, and seek to deploy cooling technologies. Technologies that we haven’t properly researched. The government of India may decide to unilaterally cool the planet after a deadly heatwave; or the government of the US after an even more violent Sandy; or the government of an island nation after a typhoon that drowns the land…

This is not something that should be decided by a few powerful nations, but equally, ignoring these potential lifesaving technologies because of cultural reticence would be a moral and political failure. Instead, we need to have a conversation about how geoengineering should be researched, governed, regulated and deployed.

This is a programme about how we cool the planet with the latest geoengineering technologies, and the loaded cultural values and politics around the biggest planetary dilemma of our time.

Picture: Rough sea, Credit: Jacob Maentz/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk6szz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0sps9l)
UN say 95% of Afghans don't have enough food

The head of the World Food Programme has warned that Afghanistan is facing the worst humanitarian crisis on the planet with millions of people under threat of starvation. We will hear from the head of the WFP and a Kabul based academic who is trying to organise aid.

Also, Poland accuses Belarus of trying to provoke a major incident, pushing thousands of migrants into forcing their way across the Polish border.

And is New York looking forward to a return of foreign tourists?

(Photo: Getty Images)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk6xr3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzbk2m792)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srdtjr8xq)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4x90h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycrp3wmrdc1)
Tesla shares fall after Elon Musk Twitter poll

The CEO of Tesla, Elon Musk, asked Twitter users to vote on whether he should sell 10% of his stake in the carmaker in order to pay tax on his gains. What do shareholders make of it? We get the opinion of Ross Gerber, President and CEO of Gerber Kawasaki investments based in California - who are big investors in Tesla. Former US president Barack Obama has been speaking at the UN climate summit in Glasgow. Jessica Shankleman of Bloomberg tells us about the debate ongoing at COP26 today about how much rich nations should give poorer nations to switch to green energy systems, and adapt to climate change. And Gajen Kandiah, chief executive of Hitachi Vantara, discusses the role that artificial intelligence may be able to play in preventing deforestation.

(Picture: Elon Musk. Picture credit: Pool/Getty Images)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk71h7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4xdrm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



TUESDAY 09 NOVEMBER 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk757c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk78zh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqp0bg4n96)
Tesla shares fall after Elon Musk Twitter poll

Voters in a Twitter poll have urged Elon Musk to sell 10% of his stake in Tesla in order to pay tax.
More than 3.5 million Twitter users voted in the poll, with nearly 58% voting in favour of the share sale.
The vote could see him dispose of nearly $21bn of stock. Long term Tesla investor, Ross Gerber, President of Gerber Kawasaki Investments tells us what the poll is all about, and what investors like him make of it.
Also on the programme, Delta airlines CEO Ed Bastian warns of the potential for long queues at airports as travel to the US returns to normal. We hear why the Japanese investment giant Softbank is feeling the affects of policy clampdowns in China.
And as COP26 moves into its second week we hear from businesses trying to make a difference right now. Warren East of Rolls Royce talks about the company's push into small scale nuclear reactors, whilst Gajen Kandiah, the chief executive of Hitatchi Vantara tells us how his company are using AI, to protect rainforests from deforestation.
The BBC's Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Alison Schrager, Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute in New York City, and by the Wall Street Journal's Tokyo bureau chief Peter Landers.

(Picture: Elon Musk. Picture credit: Pool/Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk7dqm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pb0pw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4xs00)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2z2z)
More yield, less field

This year Zimbabwe has had a bumper crop of the staple food, maize. It is only the second time in two decades that it has grown enough food for the whole population. Last year they barely had half of what was needed and 7.7 million people went hungry.

Better rainfall is largely to thank, but a new farming technique, called Pfumvudza is also being celebrated as having a dramatic impact on the amount Zimbabwe’s smallholder farmers have produced, increasing their yields up to four times. Advocates say it holds the key to food security and makes farmers more resilient to the realities of climate change - hotter, drier, stormier weather, which makes farming even harder.

Dr Matthew Mbanga is CEO of the organisation which designed Pfumvudza. He explains the “more yield, less field” principle, which encourages farmers to more intensively cultivate a smaller area of land. They dig basins instead of ploughing rows and produce their own organic fertiliser. Dr Mbanga argues that Pfumvudza must be a central part of Zimbabwe’s climate change response because it helps farms cope better in the hotter, drier, stormier weather.

Image: Consilia Chianako, a trainer at Foundations for Farming, demonstrates how to dig holes into 'mulch' cover (Credit: Charlotte Ashton)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk7jgr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jty)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk7n6w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pb864)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4y0h8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdw)
DRIFT: Coding nature

Working as DRIFT, Dutch art duo Lonneke Gordijn and Ralph Nauta make spectacular immersive installations. For this September's Design Miami fair in Basel, they are presenting their biggest and most complex Shylight project to date.

Seeing Shylight is a mesmerising experience, as dozens of silk flower-like lights gracefully open and close above the viewer’s head. We hear about the level of detail involved in creating the Shylights effect, with hundreds of hours spent sewing the delicate silk shapes and programming the choreography of their movement - not to mention the challenge of a global computer chip shortage.

DRIFT are known for the way they use technology to explore the hidden mechanisms of nature: the movement in Shylight is inspired by the way some flowers close at night. In other works, DRIFT have programmed drones to swarm the skies in patterns based on bird flight, made concrete blocks float, and captured the fragility of dandelion seed heads.

As she anticipates the final reveal in Basel, journalist Bidisha talks to Lonneke Gordijn and Ralph Nauta about their decades-long working partnership.

(Image: Lonneke Gordijn and Ralph Nauta. Credit: Teska Overbeeke)


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk7rz0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2zctzntzr)
Niger: Dozens of children dead in school fire

At least 26 children have died in Niger after the thatched roof of their school caught fire, seven months after a similar tragedy in the capital Niamey.

A rare insight into Bashar al Assad's torture chambers in Syria - from a survivor.

And a cry for help from the World Food Programme as it tries to tackle the desperate food shortages in Afghanistan.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk7wq4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2zctznyqw)
Hundreds of migrants trapped in freezing conditions at Belarus-Polish border

Warsaw accuses Belarus of attempting to provoke a confrontation by encouraging them to force their way across.

The Afghan humanitarian crisis extends way beyond the country's borders - we head to Iran to hear about the refugees who have fled there after the Taliban takeover.

And fancy owning the diamond bracelet Marie Antoinette wore just before she was executed during the French revolution? Well, you can... as it's up for auction today.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk80g8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2zctzp2h0)
Refugee border crisis: Thousands of Polish troops deployed

Belarus is accused of deliberately sending thousands of migrants across the border to provoke a confrontation with the European Union. They're now trapped in freezing conditions.

We have a report from the Afghan town of Zaranj, close to the borders of both Pakistan and Iran - now a people smuggling hub as more people try to leave the country.

And the incredible story of the bionic teacher - brought back into the classroom by her own students.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk846d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plr)
COP26: The tech helping you to help the planet

Climate change is set to alter our planet and human beings need to change the way we live and work. But how do we know exactly what changes to make?

New technology could help us make informed choices - from sensors counting pollinating insects in fields, to power sockets that tell us how green our energy is, to apps that enable communities to discuss change in their local area.

These ideas are part of the Tech for Our Planet challenge, which is being run by the UK government as part of the COP26 summit. We check out the three projects and explore how new technology has the potential to change our behaviour.

Produced and presented by William Kremer from COP26.

Image: The COP26 summit in Glasgow (Getty Images)


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4yhgs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgn)
EU's green new deal and Africa

Will Africa’s economic development be held back for the world’s net zero climate targets? And could banning investment in their fossil fuels do more harm than good? Tamasin Ford speaks to NJ Ayuk, the executive chair of the energy industry lobby group, Africa Energy Chamber who says the decision is a disaster for countries in Africa and to W.Gyude Moore, a Senior Policy Fellow at the Centre for Global Development and Liberia's former Minister of Public Works who says Africa can’t catch up without fossil fuels. Dr Olumide Abimbola, is the Executive Director of the Africa Policy Research Institute, a Berlin based think tank that works on Africa policy issues. He’s in Glasgow for the climate talks and Tamasin asked him whether there’s a fear the EU Green deal could restrict goods from Africa. And Adenike Oladosu, one of Nigeria’s youth delegates in Glasgow says people in her country do want to go green but it’s just not affordable.

Pic: Smoke emerging from chimneys Credit: Alexandros Margos/Getty


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x67)
Chanel No. 5

In 1921, one of the most famous perfumes in the world was launched in France. Chanel No. 5 was created for Coco Chanel, the fashion designer and good-time girl, who wanted something modern and fresh to suit the times.

(Photo: A young Coco Chanel. Credit: Getty images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk87yj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z2z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4ym6x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk8cpn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk8hfs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pc3f1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4yvq5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk8m5x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jx6)
'Love finds a way' - a bond that overcame decades of separation

Jeanne Gustavson met Steve Watts as an undergraduate at university in Chicago, but her family disapproved of their interracial relationship. The pressure became too much, and Jeanne broke up with Steve, but she never forgot him, and decades later she tracked him down. Steve was living with disabilities in a nursing home, but they realised they were still in love. Jeanne fought to get Steve back to her home so she could care for him there, and now, four decades after the start of their relationship, they're living under the same roof for the first time. Jeanne and Steve spoke to Emily Webb.

Gerald Stratford is a British gardening enthusiast whose pictures and videos of his produce have earned him the nickname ‘the undisputed king of giant veg'. The septuagenarian set up his Twitter account for his friends at first, but hundreds of thousands of people then started following him. Outlook’s Tiffany Cassidy went to find out why.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb

Picture: Jeanne and Steve this year
Credit: Jeanne Gustavson


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x67)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk8qy1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pcbx9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4z36f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk8vp5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0srtzs)
'Horrendous' situation at the Poland-Belarus border

The European Union says it will impose additional sanctions on Belarus because of its treatment of migrants at the border with Poland. The European Commission says there are around 2000 people at the border who are trying to enter the EU. The commission has accused Belarus's authoritarian leader President Alexander Lukashenko of luring migrants with the false promise of easy entry to the EU as part of an "inhuman, gangster-style approach". Medicins sans Frontieres medical emergency manager Crystal van Leeuwen tells us the situation on the border is "horrendous".

Also in the programme: Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen says the company is prioritising profit over safety and well-being, a claim which Facebook denies. And we continue our coverage of COP26, with today's theme of gender. According to the United Nations Development Programme, 80% of those displaced by climate change are women.

(Photo: Migrants gather near a barbed wire fence in an attempt to cross the border with Poland in the Grodno region, Belarus. Credit: Leonid Scheglov/BelTA/ Reuters)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk8zf9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4zbpp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bqrj9x3v0)
General Electric to split in three

The US conglomerate General Electric is to split into three publicly listed companies. We find out what's behind the move from the BBC's Michelle Fleury in New York. Also in the programme, the aircraft engine maker Rolls Royce has secured funding to develop small modular nuclear reactors, aimed at producing green electricity. Tom Samson is chief executive of Rolls Royce SMR and explains the background. The BBC's Russell Padmore reports on the growing problem of restaurant-goers booking a table and then not turning up. Plus, German media giant Axel Springer is understood to have plans to force workers to disclose intimate relationships they have with colleagues. Erika Solomon is Berlin correspondent of the Financial Times and brings us the details.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Vishala Sri-Pathma and Russell Newlove.

(Picture: The General Electric logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk935f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxv6xnr33w)
COP26: How climate change disproportionately affects women

Our coverage of the COP26 international climate summit in Glasgow continues. Today the focus turns to the effect climate change has on women and girls around the world. We’ll hear from women who explain how gender inequality and the adverse effects of climate change impacts them more than men. We'll also hear how some women are overcoming the challenges.

We’ll go back to Sierra Leone to hear more about the aftermath of the fuel tanker explosion in the capital Freetown.

And our regular health expert, Dr Rick Malley, a paediatric infectious disease doctor at Boston Children’s Hospital, talks us through some of the days coronavirus stories.

(Photo: Delegates and participants gather around 'Little Amal' at the Glasgow summit. The puppet represents a refugee girl from Syria and is seen as a beacon for equality. Credit: EPA/Robert Perry)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk96xk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxv6xnr6w0)
Poland-Belarus border crisis

We’ll look at the tensions on the border between Poland and Belarus where hundreds of migrants are caught in standoff seeking to cross the border into the EU. We’ll explain the political context and hear some of the migrants’ stories.

Our reporter explains the case of a Malaysian drug smuggler in Singapore who is facing execution.

And our regular health expert Dr Swapneil Parikh in Mumbai, will answer your coronavirus questions and discuss the days stories.

(Photo: Polish troops and border guards with shields stopped migrants from crossing into the country. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk9bnp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jx6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x67)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk9gdt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pd2d2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4ztp6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nn65jdb75)
2021/11/09 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk9l4y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2z2z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb4zyfb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsy)
Blockchain’s e-waste a growing problem

We’ve reported before on the programme about the massive energy consumption of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, which is based on blockchain technology. Now we’ll be looking at some of the other environmental impacts of blockchain. Professor Cathy Mulligan, Blockchain Expert and Member of the Institution of Engineering & Technology’s Digital Panel, joins us live to discuss the massive e-waste problem of mining cryptocurrencies and how miners change their electronic kit every six months to keep up with the ever increasing processing capacity they need to make money. This issue is not only linked to blockchain tech, it’s also seen in the mobile phone industry.

AR reducing single plastic use - 100 Days to #BeatPlasticPollution
Six out of the top 20 marine litter polluters are in Southeast Asia, so where better to launch a social media campaign to reduce single use plastic. The MeshMinds Foundation and the UNEP is behind the Instagram campaign to raise public awareness “100 Days to #BeatPlasticPollution” and we speak to Kay Vasey from MeshMinds as to how they hope AR will change habits and reduce single use plastic. We also have a campaigner from the Philippines whose own efforts to reduce plastic use are about to be showcased online.

More than a million years of data in the ice – an immersive exhibition at COP26
A new immersive exhibition, Polar Zero, is on at the Glasgow Science Centre. The idea behind the show is to pause and reflect on humanity’s impact on our past, present and future climate. The centrepieces of the exhibition are a cylindrical glass sculpture encasing Antarctic air from the year 1765 – the date that scientists say predates the Industrial Revolution – and an Antarctic ice core containing trapped air bubbles that reveal a unique record of our past climate. With more than a million years of data stored in the ice and computer modelling vital to creating the exhibits, reporter Hannah Fisher finds out how climate data is being presented to allow us to understand the science better.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Nigel Dix
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Bitcoin crypto coin mining hardware.
Credit: Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk9px2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0ssp6p)
Migrant crisis on Belarus border

At least 2,000 migrants are now at the Belarus border with Poland, not able to go forwards or turn back and facing freezing temperatures. We hear who EU politicians are blaming for the situation.

Also on the programme: The UN says sixteen of its staff have been detained by the authorities in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa; and the Israeli police hail their biggest ever arms bust.

(Photo: Migrants in a forest near the Polish-Belarusian border outside Narewka. The group was later guided out of the forest by Polish border guards and taken to a detention centre. Credit:REUTERS/Kacper Pempel)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk9tn6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzbk2q465)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srdtjv5tt)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb505xl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycshkm7jlpf)
General Electric to split in three

The US conglomerate General Electric is to split into three publicly listed companies. We find out what's behind the move from the BBC's Michelle Fleury in New York. Also in the programme, the aircraft engine maker Rolls Royce has secured funding to develop small modular nuclear reactors, aimed at producing green electricity. Tom Samson is chief executive of Rolls Royce SMR and explains the background, while South African energy analyst Chris Yelland is sceptical. The BBC's Russell Padmore reports on the growing problem of restaurant-goers booking a table and then not turning up. Plus, German media giant Axel Springer is understood to have plans to force workers to disclose intimate relationships they have with colleagues. Erika Solomon, Berlin correspondent of the Financial Times, brings us the details.

(Picture: The General Electric logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lk9ydb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb509nq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 10 NOVEMBER 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkb24g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkb5wl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqp0bg7k69)
General Electric to split in three

The US conglomerate General Electric is to split into three publicly listed companies. We find out what's behind the move from the BBC's Michelle Fleury in New York. Also in the programme, the aircraft engine maker Rolls Royce has secured funding to develop small modular nuclear reactors, aimed at producing green electricity. Tom Samson is chief executive of Rolls Royce SMR and explains the background, while South African energy analyst Chris Yelland is sceptical. Plus, German media giant Axel Springer is understood to have plans to force workers to disclose intimate relationships they have with colleagues. Erika Solomon, Berlin correspondent of the Financial Times and Ben Smith, media correspondent of the New York Times, bring us the details. Also in the programme, Mexico's president has outlined a global anti-poverty plan to the United Nations that he says would help 750 million people living on less than two dollars a day. Plus, the BBC's Russell Padmore reports on the growing problem of restaurant-goers booking a table and then not turning up.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Sarah Birke of the Economist, in Mexico City and in James Maygar, Bloomberg's correspondent in Beijing.

(Picture: General Electric logo. Credit: Getty Images.)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkb9mq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pdxlz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb50nx3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2z3d)
One Hundred Years of Exile

Who is a refugee?

In the aftermath of World War One, as Turkey filled with refugees fleeing a brutal civil war, the first refugee camps appeared and the international community stepped in to appoint the first High Commissioner for Refugees. In this first episode Katy Long hears stories from refugees and those who work to support them from Rwanda, Germany and Russia, as she examines how refugee crises begin, and who is considered a refugee.

(Photo: A queue of refugees awaits the assistances of Turkish relief organisations in Pazarkule camp on the border between Turkey and Greece. Credit: Belal Khaled/NurPhoto/Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkbfcv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jx6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x67)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkbk3z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pf537)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb50xdc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2b)
Losing my language

More than 2000 languages are spoken across Africa, but young Africans are often told that they need to speak English or French in order to succeed. In the process, native languages are being marginalised and it has resulted in a ‘linguistic famine’. Three people from South Africa, Nigeria and Ghana who have been pressured to adopt a different language reveal the impact on their lives and relationships.

Presenter: Kim Chakanetsa
Producer: Mary Goodhart


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkbnw3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2zctzrqwv)
Afghan fall of government 'caused by corruption'

Afghanistan's former finance minister tells us that widespread corruption - including in the military - led to the collapse of his government.

We'll speak to a senior MP in Lithuania to ask why the country has imposed a state of emergency - the latest sign of concern about an influx of migrants from Belarus.

Our correspondent looks at how Cape Town in South Africa has been finding new ways to deal with a shortage of water in a region heavily affected by drought.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkbsm7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2zctzrvmz)
Fall of Afghanistan: widespread corruption blamed

Corruption at the heart of the Afghan government that went on for decades, so claims the country's former finance minister. Could this be one of the reasons why the country fell so quickly to the Taliban?

With more than 600 people now dying from Covid every-day in Ukraine the EU removes the country from its Covid safe list.

And how a melting glacier in the Italian alps has revealed the secrets of life in the trenches for soldiers more than 100 years ago.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkbxcc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2zctzrzd3)
Lithuania acts over migrants from Belarus

Corruption at the heart of the Afghan government that went on for decades, so claims the country's former finance minister. Could this be one of the reasons why the country fell so quickly to the Taliban?

With more than 600 people now dying from Covid every-day in Ukraine the EU removes the country from its Covid safe list.

And how a melting glacier in the Italian alps has revealed the secrets of life in the trenches for soldiers more than 100 years ago.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkc13h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc4)
Patrice Evra: The flaws in football

Football's global appeal can’t disguise the problems facing the game. Some fans say the sport is being ruined by financial greed, and racism is still to be rooted out. Stephen Sackur speaks to the former Manchester United and France star, Patrice Evra. He’s just done something most footballers never do, by revealing his deep emotional scars. What made him do it?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb51dcw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jpf)
Corruption in Afghanistan

The former finance minister from the collapsed Afghan government, Khalid Payenda, tells Ed Butler that it was brought down by rampant corruption at a very high level. He served for six months from the beginning of this year and says that by the time US forces left and the Taliban began advancing, most of Afghanistan's supposed 300 thousand troops and police didn’t exist. He says phantom personnel were added to official lists so that generals could pocket their wages. Many Afghans feel enraged by the failures of the US-backed government and they say it abandoned them in their hour of need.

( Pic: Man counting money at a market in Afghanistan Credit: Bloomberg Creative )


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8h)
Spying in Berlin

At the height of the Cold War the German city of Berlin was known as the spy capital of the world. Spies were operating on both sides of the Berlin Wall as tensions between democratic West Germany and communist East Germany meant governments on both sides of the ideological divide were desperate to find out what the other side was planning. In the early 1980s Nina Willner became the first female US army officer to lead intelligence missions into East Germany. For her there was an added poignancy to her work, as her mother’s family were living in East Germany while Nina was operating in East Berlin. After the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 the divided family was reunited and Nina wrote a memoir, ‘Forty Autumns’ about their very different lives. Caroline Bayley spoke to Nina Willner for Witness History about her experiences of the Cold War in Berlin.

Photo by Régis BOSSU/Sygma via Getty Images - The frontier between West and East Berlin.


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkc4vm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2z3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb51j40)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkc8lr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkcdbw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pg0b4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb51rm8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkcj30)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzg)
The Holocaust survivor who became a Tiktok star

Lily Ebert was just a teenager when war broke out across Europe. Born into a large Hungarian-Jewish family, she was deported to Auschwitz concentration camp after Germany invaded Hungary in 1944. She survived the ordeal, along with two of her younger sisters. All three went on to build lives after the war; marrying, having large families – but never speaking of the horrors they had experienced.   
  
But after suffering a bereavement in the 1980s, Lily started to revisit her experiences – and began to speak out. Now, at the age of 97, with the help of her great-grandson Dov she has become an unlikely TikTok star, sharing her story with a new generation of followers online. Lily and Dov spoke to Emily Webb about Lily's experiences during the war - and the viral tweet that brought her internet fame.  
 
Andrés Ruzo is a geothermal scientist who grew up in the United States, the son of a Peruvian and Nicaraguan parents. When he used to visit Peru as a boy, his grandfather would tell him tales of mythical places and ancient legends. Little did he know one of those stories would come to life in a very real way. He spoke to Outlook in 2016. 

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb

Photo: Lily Ebert and Dov Forman
Credit: Tereza Červeňová


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkcmv4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pg7td)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5203j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkcrl8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0svqww)
More people try to cross Poland/Belarus border

The political temperature is rising fast but the onset of winter weather is already claiming lives at the border. The EU commissioner responsible for migration tell us that she is "concerned" by the lack of transparency of the Polish authorities.

Also in the programme: An Iraqi Kurdish MP on why so many of his fellow citizens are seeking to leave, for Belarus, and then onto the EU; and jitters on the Chinese property market were again laid bare today when another large developer - Fantasia - saw its value plunge on the stock market.

(Photo: Hundreds of migrants camp at the Belarus side of the border with Poland near Kuznica Bialostocka, Poland, in this photograph released by the Polish Defence Ministry, 10 November 2021. Credit: Handout via Reuters)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkcwbd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb527ls)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cyxm70zd1)
Transport day at COP26

Attendees at the UN climate conference in Glasgow are focusing on greener transport today. 33 nations and a number of automakers have committed to working towards selling only zero emission new cars in leading markets by 2035. The declaration wasn't signed by the world's two biggest car firms, Toyota and Volkswagen. But Ford did sign up, and we find out more from Cynthia Williams, global sustainability director at the firm. And we get an assessment of whether what's been agreed in Glasgow will make a serious dent in carbon emissions from Julia Poliscanova of the campaign group Transport and Environment. Also in the programme, Afghanistan's ex-finance minister has blamed the government's fall on corrupt officials who invented "ghost soldiers" and took payment from the Taliban. We have an in-depth interview with Khalid Payenda. Plus, Europe's second most powerful court, the General Court, has upheld a 2017 European Union ruling that fined Google $2.8bn for abusing its dominant position in internet search to favour its own comparison service, Google Shopping. Thomas Vinje is a lawyer at Clifford Chance who represented Google's rival internet search companies and explains the background to the case.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Vishala Sri-Pathma and Russell Newlove.

(Picture: UK transport secretary Grant Shapps charges a car. Picture credit: PA.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkd02j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxv6xnv00z)
Poland-Belarus border crisis: Migrants remain stranded

We’ll return to the border between Belarus and Poland, after another night in which Poland says there were “many attempts” to cross by the several thousand people, mostly from the Middle East, who are stranded there. We hear from a surgeon helping those who make it into Poland, as calls intensify for aid workers to be given greater access to the state of emergency zone on the Polish side of the border.

Also, as negotiations continue at COP26 on how the world should face the challenge of reducing global emissions, we connect to farmers around the world to find out how they are dealing with the effects of climate change and reducing their impact.

And we go through some of the main coronavirus headlines of the day with the help of our health expert. Today it's the turn of Dr Maria Sundaram, an infectious disease epidemiologist at Marshfield Clinic Research Institute in Wisconsin.

(Photo: Migrants gather near a barbed wire fence in an attempt to cross the border with Poland in the Grodno region, Belarus. Credit: Reuters)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkd3tn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxv6xnv3s3)
COP26: Farmers around the world

With COP26 continuing to take centre stage in politics and finance, other industries are having to make environmental adjustments of their own. We speak to farmers from across the world to find out what they are doing to reduce their impact on the planet, and the effects climate regulations could have on their livelihoods.

We’ll also hear the latest from eastern Europe's growing migrant crisis, as Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki accuses Belarus of committing "terrorism" over its role in an escalating border row between the two countries.

And we go through some of the main coronavirus headlines of the day with the help of our health expert. Today it's the turn of Dr Maria Sundaram, an infectious disease epidemiologist at Marshfield Clinic Research Institute in Wisconsin.

(Photo: Farmer, Brenda Hsueh, carrying her produce. Credit: Brenda Hsueh)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkd7ks)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkdc9x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pgz95)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb52ql9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nn65jh748)
2021/11/10 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkdh21)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2z3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb52vbf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw5)
New antiviral pills to treat Covid

New antiviral pills to treat Covid are coming thick and fast. Pfizer have just announced their new antiviral Paxlovid in the same week UK’s MHRA was the first country in the world to approve Molnupiravir – Merck’s pill launched last month. So how do the two antivirals compare? And a report from the longest operating milk bank in North America. Since 1974, the Mothers’ Milk Bank in San Jose, California has been collecting breast milk to help nurture vulnerable babies (especially premature ones) at a critical time in their lives. Today it supplies about 500 gallons of breast milk a month reaching over 80% of California’s newborn intensive care units (or NICU’s) and serves eleven hospitals in other U.S. states, as far afield as New York.

Who donates all this milk and how is the milk treated to ensure it’s safe and nourishing for babies?

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A hand holding pills. Photo credit: Thana Prasongsin/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkdlt5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0swl3s)
COP 26: US & China pledge to raise their game

The United States and China, the world's two largest emitters of carbon dioxide, unveiled a deal to ramp up cooperation tackling climate change, including by cutting methane emissions, phasing out coal consumption and protecting forests. We hear from the BBC's Environment correspondent, Matt McGrath for a roundup of the various developments today in Glasgow.

Also on the programme: two weeks after the coup in Sudan, three western ambassadors tell the General who's seized power to let go. Was he listening?; and the EU Commissioner for Migration and Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson tells Newshour how she sees the situation on the Polish-Belarussian border.

(Photo: U.S. climate envoy John Kerry looks on during his speech at a joint China/US statement on a declaration enhancing climate action, at the COP 26 climate conference in Glasgow on 10 November 2021. Credit: Reuters / Mitchell)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkdqk9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzbk2t138)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srdtjy2qx)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb532tp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycsx8zjz4t5)
China and US agree to boost climate co-operation

China and the US have agreed to boost climate co-operation over the next decade, in a surprise announcement at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow. The two countries released a joint declaration promising action. We get reaction from Jess Shankleman, an energy and environment specialist at Bloomberg. Afghanistan's ex-finance minister has blamed the government's fall on corrupt officials who invented "ghost soldiers" and took payment from the Taliban. We have an in-depth interview with Khalid Payenda. Plus, electric carmaker Rivian Automotive started trading on the Nasdaq exchange today. Shares in the company soared, boosting the market value of the firm to $100bn. The BBC's North America business correspondent Michelle Fleury has been following the story.

(Picture: US climate envoy John Kerry. Credit: Reuters.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkdv9f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb536kt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Comb (w3ct2z2b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 11 NOVEMBER 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkdz1k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkf2sp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqp0bgbg3d)
China and US agree to boost climate co-operation

China and the US have agreed to boost climate co-operation over the next decade, in a surprise announcement at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow. The two countries released a joint declaration promising action. We get reaction from Jess Shankleman, an energy and environment specialist at Bloomberg. Afghanistan's ex-finance minister has blamed the government's fall on corrupt officials who invented "ghost soldiers" and took payment from the Taliban. We have an in-depth interview with Khalid Payenda. Plus, electric carmaker Rivian Automotive started trading on the Nasdaq exchange today. Shares in the company soared, boosting the market value of the firm to $100bn. The BBC's North America business correspondent Michelle Fleury has been following the story.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Tech journalist Takara Small in Toronto and Jyoti Malhotra, senior consulting editor at The Print, in Delhi.

(Picture: US climate envoy John Kerry. Credit: Reuters.)


(Picture: US climate envoy John Kerry. Credit: Reuters.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkf6jt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8phtj2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb53kt6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gy7)
Evia’s inferno

With the UN climate conference in Glasgow drawing to a close, Assignment brings us the final programme in a series telling the stories of three places devastated by extreme weather events. Maria Margaronis travels to the Greek island of Evia, where vast areas of centuries-old forests, olive groves and houses were burned by a week-long inferno. And now come the rains, bringing polluted water and mudslides.

Presented by Maria Margaronis and produced by Mark Burman.

(Image: A firefighter tries to extinguish a wildfire on the island of Evia, August 2021. Credit: Reuters/Nikolas Economou)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkfb8y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkfg12)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pj20b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb53t9g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgk)
How to cope with cooking burnout

Throughout the coronavirus pandemic some people discovered a solace and comfort in cooking, but for many others the opposite was true - the joy they had once felt in the kitchen evaporated.

Tamasin Ford speaks to three formerly passionate cooks to find out what it’s like to lose the love of the thing you enjoy doing the most.

What’s really behind their ‘cooking burnout’, how have they tried to reignite that spark, and has this experience changed their relationship with food for good?

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:
Helen Rosner, food correspondent for The New Yorker, New York, USA;
Yamini Pustake Bhalerao, author and ideas editor at shethepeople.tv, Pune, India;
Wayne Barnard, chef and ambassador for The Burnt Chef Project, Cardiff, Wales.

(Picture: A woman making cookies. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkfks6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr51m55b)
COP26: Cautious welcome for US-China deal

China and the US agree to work together to fight climate change - an announcement that has been widely praised. So what sort of difference will it make?

Boeing has formally accepted responsibility for the crash of a 737-Max aircraft in Ethiopia which killed one-hundred-and-fifty-seven people.

A US judge has approved a six-hundred-million dollar settlement for residents of Flint, Michigan over a contaminated water scandal.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkfpjb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr51m8xg)
COP26: US-China agree joint deal to speed up action

How significant is the China and US agreement to work together to accelerate their action on climate?

We bring you a report from northern India where glaciers are shrinking at a fast rate.

Portuguese employees get a boost as bosses are banned by a new law from contacting workers after hours.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkft8g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr51mdnl)
COP26: US and China agree to speed up action

In an unexpected development the world's two biggest CO2 emitters - the United States and China - say they will work together to achieve the target temperature goal of 1.5 Celsius. We'll speak to our environment correspondent in this hour to find out what the reaction has been to this news.

Poland has accused Belarus of committing what it says is "terrorism" by escalating a border row between the two countries as thousands of migrants remain stuck at the border in freezing weather.

And a US judge has approved a settlement of $626m to the victims of Flint Michigan in one of America's worst public health cases; we'll hear from the doctor who helped bring the problem to light.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkfy0l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2w)
What are hypersonic missiles and why do they matter?

America, China and Russia are engaged in a new arms race, spending billions to develop new missile technology, but how different are these hypersonic missiles from what has gone before? And as countries work out how they might use them, are they increasing the risk of triggering conflict?

Contributors:
Dr Gustav Gressel, Berlin office, European Council on Foreign Relations
Dr Laura Grego, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Dr Marina Favaro, Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy, University of Hamburg
Dr Cameron Tracy, Centre for International Security and Cooperation, Stanford University

Presenter: Tanya Beckett
Producers: Bob Howard and Sheila Cook
Researcher: Chris Blake

Image: Military parade in Beijing marks 70th anniversary of Chinese People's Republic (Credit: Zoya Rusinova/TASS via Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb5498z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jb4)
Hong Kong, business and the national security law

Are Hong Kong's days as a major financial centre now numbered? The end of the pandemic has seen renewed economic growth. But some say tough anti-Covid rules and anti-protest laws are undermining what was once Asia's leading financial hub as thousands of people leave the territory. Ed Butler speaks to Edward Chin, a HK hedge fund manager who's now temporarily moved to Canada following the security crackdown. Tara Joseph, President of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong tells him recruiting foreign workers into the territory is now proving much harder. Vera Yuen, a business lecturer at the University of Hong Kong, says wealth management services for the Chinese are providing big growth for territory. And Mike Bird, the Hong Kong correspondent of the Economist magazine says both the Covid restrictions and the national security law may start to really hurt Hong Kong in the longer term.

( Pic: Sunrise at Victoria Peak,Hong Kong Credit: Jun Chen / Getty)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3z)
The South African football star murdered for being a lesbian

Eudy Simelane was a star of the South African women's national football team and a gay rights activist. In 2008, she was pursued by a group of men after leaving a pub close to her home in the township of Kwa-Thema. She was gang raped and stabbed to death. She was 31 years old. Her family, friends and campaigners say that her sexuality made her a target for this brutal hate crime. Viv Jones speaks to Mmapaseka 'Steve' Letsike, an LGBTI activist who was a friend of Eudy’s. They became friends when they played football together as teens. Steve describes how Eudy's murder became the focus of a campaign to draw attention to attacks on gay South Africans, and black lesbians in particular. It also started a national conversation about the horrific crime of so-called 'corrective rape', where lesbians are raped to ‘cure’ or punish them.

Photo: Eudy Simelane’s parents sat at the bridge named in their daughter’s honour. Credit: BBC


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkg1rq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gy7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb54f13)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkg5hv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm2)
The Malayan Emergency

One of the earliest Cold War conflicts was a 12-year guerrilla war commonly known as the Malayan Emergency and fought from 1948 in the jungles of what is now Malaysia. This communist insurgency was fuelled not only by ideology but also by the desire for Malayan independence from British colonial rule. There have been a number of books and documentaries devoted to the subject but relatively few in English capture the experiences of the Chinese community in Malaya that was at the centre of the Emergency.

Rajan Datar is joined by three guests, all with family links to the Emergency:
Sim Chi Yin, a photographer and artist from Singapore whose book She Never Rode that Trishaw Again tells the story of her grandmother widowed during the war in Malaya;
Show Ying Xin, a postdoctoral fellow at the at the Australian National University’s Malaysia Institute in Canberra;
and Rachel Leow, Associate Professor in Modern East Asian History at the University of Cambridge and author of Taming Babel: Language in the Making of Malaysia.

[Photo: Malayan police officers keeping watch from the Pengkalan police station in 1950. Credit: Haywood Magee/Picture Post/Hulton Archive/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l93)
Lebanon's match-fixing scandal

In 2011, the Lebanese national football team reached the final phase of World Cup qualification for the first time, sparking wild celebrations among the fans. But within months, the game in Lebanon was engulfed in a huge match-fixing scandal focusing on a suspicious-looking goal in a match against Qatar, as well as domestic fixtures. In 2013, 24 Lebanese players were found guilty in an investigation ordered by FIFA and the national side’s World Cup campaign fizzled out. Alex Eccleston reports. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: The Lebanese team ahead of a World Cup qualifier in 2012 (Getty Images)


THU 10:59 Armistice Day Silence (w3ct2zq6)
Two minute Silence for Armistice Day followed by BBC News


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pjx77)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb54njc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkgf03)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3z)
Wynton Marsalis: The making of a jazzman

Wynton Marsalis grew up in New Orleans in what’s been called America’s ‘first family of jazz’. His pianist father Ellis gave him a trumpet when he was six years old, but there was a slight issue - he didn't like practising and he didn't like jazz. But when Wynton started listening to his dad’s records, he had a musical epiphany. Mentored by his father, Wynton began a ground-breaking career. He’s sold millions of records worldwide, hosted jazz clinics on Sesame Street and at the White House, and made history by becoming the first jazz musician to win a Pulitzer Prize. After Ellis died from coronavirus, Wynton led a virtual jazz parade in memory of his beloved father. This interview was first broadcast in May 2020.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Wynton Marsalis
Credit: Patrick PIEL/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkgjr7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pk4qh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb54x0m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkgnhc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0symsz)
South Africa's ex-president De Klerk dies at 85

De Klerk shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Mandela for helping to negotiate an end to apartheid. But his legacy divides opinion in South Africa. Also on the programme: Rare face-to-face talks between British and Iranian officials in London on reviving a deal curbing Tehran's nuclear activities; and Brian Eno on making the music industry more sustainable.



(Pic: FW de Klerk addresses the Trinity College Law Society Credit: NurPhoto/ Getty


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkgs7h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb554hw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49hlff1z08)
COP26 close draws near

With the end of the Glasgow UN climate summit in sight, we take stock of progress so far. The BBC's Matt McGrath is in Glasgow, and brings us the latest developments. It's thought that Saudi Arabia may be opposed to any final agreement from the summit that explicitly mentions reducing fossil fuel use, and we further explore the country's possible objections with oil analyst Stephen Schork of the Schork Group. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on whether Hong Kong's long term future as a global finance hub is sustainable, against the backdrop of the new national security law in the territory, as well as stringent coronavirus quarantine measures. Plus, today is the festival of shopping in China known as Singles Day. We find out why this year seems to be more muted than previously, from Beijing-based freelance journalist Sherry Fei Ju.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Vishala Sri-Pathma and Russell Newlove.

(Picture: The action hub at COP26. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkgwzm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxv6xnxwy2)
COP26: 'Time is running out'

President of the COP26 climate summit, Alok Sharma, has warned that "time is running out" and that there needs to be movement on climate finance for poorer countries in the talks on a final agreement. Nuala McGovern will be hosting conversations at COP26 in Glasgow with reporters, experts and delegates who will reflect on the achievements so far.

We bring together activists from the US, Russia and China to exchange views on the summit and on their countries’ contributions.

Nuala has also been around Glasgow talking to people what they think about 30,000 people gathering in their city.

And we hear from South Africans who have been reacting to the death of the former President FW de Klerk.

(Photo: A delegate from the Marshall Islands listens to a speech by Cop26 President Alok Sharma during the Cop26 summit in Glasgow. November 11, 2021. Credit: XXXX/PA Wire)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkh0qr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxv6xny0p6)
COP26: Final days of talks

President of the COP26 climate summit, Alok Sharma, has warned that "time is running out" and that there needs to be movement on climate finance for poorer countries in the talks on a final agreement. We’ll be broadcasting live from the conference. Nuala McGovern will be hosting conversations with reporters, experts and delegates who will reflect on the achievements so far.

We bring together activists from the US, Russia and China to exchange views on the summit and on their countries’ contributions.

Nuala has also been around Glasgow talking to people what they think about 30,000 people gathering in their city.

And we hear from South Africans who have been reacting to the death of the former President FW de Klerk.

(Photo: Nuala McGovern interviewing a Zambian delegate at COP26)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkh4gw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkh870)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pkw68)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb55mhd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nn65jl41c)
2021/11/11 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkhcz4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gy7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb55r7j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4l)
Bambi got Covid

Up to 8 percent of deer sampled in studies in the US were found to be infected with the SARS-Cov-2 Virus. Suresh Kuchipudi from the Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences at Penn State University in the US says what they are seeing is a mixture of human to deer and deer to deer transmission of the virus. There is concern that its presence in animal reservoirs could lead to a new form of the virus emerging.

Tropical forests and spread of zoonotic diseases
And as the Cop26 meeting in Glasgow draws to a close we ask how global policy on climate will impact the spread of zoonotic disease. Spill over of possible pandemic pathogens from animals to humans occurs with the destruction of tropical forests in particular and can expose people to previously unknown zoonotic diseases such as Covid 19.

Aaron Bernstein from the Coalition to Prevent Pandemics at the Source says healthcare initiatives designed to reduce the potential spread of such diseases need to be designed to work in tandem with conservation and climate change impact reduction initiatives, essentially tackling both problems simultaneously.

LED lighting
Researchers in South Africa are looking into ways of making LED lighting both cheaper and more efficient. This should help reduce energy consumption, a prerequisite for effective policy on climate change.

In addition, as Professor Odireleng Martin Ntwaeaborwa tells us, the technology now has many applications in places where access to electricity is limited, including South Africa which currently has regular power outages.

Personalised medicine
And personalised medicine based on our genes took a further step forward this week. Richard Scott, Chief Medical Officer for Genomics England discusses new findings which reveal the genetic basis for a range or rare diseases.

Image: Bambi, lobbycard, 1942
Photo by LMPC via Getty Images

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkhhq8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0szh0w)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkhmgd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzbk2wy0c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srdtk0zn0)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb55zqs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs2v7ycr8z)
Belarus threatens to cut off gas to the EU

Belarus's leader has threatened to cut off gas supplies to Europe if sanctions are imposed over an escalating migrant crisis at the country's border. Thousands of people are at the border with Poland, enduring freezing conditions in the hope of crossing into the European Union. We get analysis from James Waddell, senior global gas analyst at Energy Aspects. With the end of the Glasgow UN climate summit in sight, we take stock of progress so far. The BBC's Matt McGrath is in Glasgow, and brings us the latest developments. It's thought that Saudi Arabia may be opposed to any final agreement from the summit that explicitly mentions reducing fossil fuel use, and we further explore the country's possible objections with oil analyst Stephen Schork. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on whether Hong Kong's long term future as a global finance hub is sustainable, against the backdrop of the new national security law in the territory, as well as stringent coronavirus quarantine measures.

(Picture: Belarussian President Alexander Lukashenko. Credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkhr6j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb563gx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 12 NOVEMBER 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkhvyn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l93)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkhzps)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqp0bgfc0h)
Belarus threatens to cut off gas to the EU

President Lukashenko of Belarus has threatened to cut off gas supplies to Europe if sanctions are imposed over an escalating migrant crisis at the country's border. Thousands of people are at the border with Poland, enduring freezing conditions in the hope of crossing into the European Union. We get analysis from James Waddell, senior global gas analyst at Energy Aspects. Indonesia’s council of religious leaders has forbidden the use of crypto assets as a currency for Muslims. The country's National Ulema Council has declared cryptocurrency as haram, or banned, as it has elements of uncertainty, wagering and harm. Umer Suleman an Islamic Finance expert explains Sharia law when it comes to finance. The BBC's Ed Butler reports on whether Hong Kong's long term future as a global finance hub is sustainable, against the backdrop of the new national security law in the territory, as well as stringent coronavirus quarantine measures.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Jessica Khine a financial professional in Nusajaya, Malaysia and Les Williams, associate professor at the School of Engineering, University of Virginia and co-founder of Risk Cooperative, in Arlington Virginia.

(Picture: Belarussian President Alexander Lukashenko. Credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkj3fx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8plqf5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb56gq9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tzy)
Brazil's Gilberto Silva and Thailand coach Mano Pölking

World Cup winner Gilberto Silva explains how his tough upbringing shaped him as a footballer. And Thailand's new coach Mano Pölking looks ahead to the Suzuki Cup and explains the cultural differences he's faced coaching in South East Asia.

Picture on website: Gilberto Silva of Brazil celebrates winning the World Cup (photo by Mark Leech/ Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkj761)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkjby5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8plyxf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb56q6k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2z3b)
Lipa Schmelzer: The Jewish Lady Gaga

Lipa Schmeltzer is a bright star in the world of Jewish music; only his music sounds nothing like traditional Jewish music! In fact, he has been nicknamed, the ‘Jewish Lady Gaga’!

Growing up in New York, in an ultra-conservative Hasidic community, Lipa was always different. At school, he was taught all subjects in Yiddish, and when he found it hard to concentrate his teachers called him the 'dumb kid' and told him he would never amount to anything. He had a dream of being a singer, but when he started writing and performing his own songs, his father and rabbi told him to stop and concentrate on studying the Bible. Lipa agreed and publicly apologised to the community for the modern music he had been creating - but it was not long until he started again.

Lipa's music and performance style represented a split in his community: the younger Hasidic Jewish who loved the modern Jewish beats and wanted him to perform at their weddings and children's bar mitzvahs, and then the older more reserved Jewish who thought it was disrespectful and would lead people away from holy scripture and on a path to hell.

Today Lipa lives in both worlds, creating modern Jewish music while trying to stay true to his roots. But it is not always easy, as Colm Flynn found out when he went to New York to visit Lipa.

(Photo: Lipa Schmeltzer)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkjgp9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2zctzyjq1)
COP26: Will climate conference achieve its goals?

There are growing fears that the decisions made won't limit global warming to 1.5C.

We'll consider the legacy of the last president of apartheid South Africa, FW De Klerk, who has died.

And a new case which is shining a light on the conditions of death row inmates in Japan.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkjlff)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2zctzyng5)
Climate summit: What role can business play?

There is concern that the world could miss the chance to keep temperature rises below 1.5C.

We hear from an organisation trying to help thousands of migrants stuck at the Poland-Belarus border in freezing conditions.

And can a summit in France bring Libya back on track to hold elections by December despite the turbulence in the country?


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkjq5k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2zctzys69)
COP26 climate talks enter final day

As COP26 meeting draws to a close, top UN official says talks are on 'life support'. We hear from a ministerial delegate from Chile, a nation highly vulnerable to climate change.

Our Warsaw correspondent gives us the latest on the migrant border crisis in eastern Europe.

And in Spain, the regional government that's home to one of the country's most famous dishes - paella - declares it an item of cultural significance


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkjtxp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n23)
Pawel Jablonski: Could Poland exit the EU?

Poland is the biggest rebel in the European family, and matters are coming to a head over its latest disputes with the EU. Brussels accuses the centre-right government in Warsaw of a blatant disregard for EU law, in particular over changes it wants to make to the judicial system. Zeinab Badawi speaks to Pawel Jablonski, the country's deputy foreign minister. Could Poland follow Britain’s lead and exit the EU?

(Photo: Pavel Jablonski appears on Hardtalk via video link)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb57662)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j13)
Diversity at the top

Why is the black community still so poorly represented in leadership positions? We speak to the changemakers who are doing something about it. Kike Onawinde used to represent Great Britain in the javelin before setting up the Black Young Professionals Network, which is all about connecting ambitious future leaders. Jean-Marc Laouchez is the President of the Management Consultancy firm Korn Ferry Institute in Paris, who says the main reason why things are not changing is because of the established power structure. Abdul Karim Abdullah, is a clinical trial manager for a pharmaceutical company in New York. He founded the culture festival, Afrochella, to celebrate African culture, food, music, art and fashion. Najah Roberts is the founder and CEO of Crypto Blockchain Plug in Los Angeles. It’s one of the first African American owned over the counter cryptocurrency exchanges in the US. She says a big problem for African Americans is that they have been prevented us from acquiring wealth and that virtual money could change all of that.(Picture of boardroom meeting. Picture credit: Getty Images).


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzg)
Kuwaiti oil fires of 1991

After the end of the Gulf War in 1991, retreating Iraqi forces set light to oil wells in the desert. Specialist firefighters were drafted in by the Kuwaiti government to help put them out. Simon Watts spoke to one of those firefighters, Richard Hatteberg, in 2010.

This is a rebroadcast.

Photo: an oil fire in Kuwait. March 1991. Credit:Getty Images.


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkjynt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhv)
Ransomware gangs face a crackdown

Alleged hackers are arrested and millions of dollars recovered in a global police operation. Is the tide finally turning in the battle against ransomware attacks? Jane Wakefield speaks to James Chappell from cybersecurity firm Digital Shadows. Plus companies like Facebook have virtual reality at the heart of their plans for the metaverse, but is augmented reality a better bet? We speak to Magic Leap, the company that hopes its AR glasses will become as essential to our digital lives as our phones. And just a few companies run the cloud that powers most of the websites we use. What happens when they fail? Presented by Jane Wakefield with BBC tech reporter Chris Vallance.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb579y6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkk2dy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1htb)
The future of Chinese capitalism

The Chinese Communist Party has held a high level meeting that will help propel President Xi Jinping to a level of power not seen since Chairman Mao. The gathering was essentially a celebration of Mr Xi's time in office, with a new emphasis on establishing him at the core of the party's identity. Despite the initial shock of the coronavirus pandemic China's economy has continued to grow. But there now appears to be a renewed emphasis on reducing inequality across society. The government has taken measures against property developers, tech giants, and even banned private tuition - all part of President Xi's message of 'common prosperity' which envisions a more equitable distribution of the country's wealth. So what influence will market forces have in communist China moving forward? How much control will the state impose on the private sector? And can the government reduce private and public debt without harming economic growth and hurting consumers?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Paul Schuster and Junaid Ahmed


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkk652)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pmt4b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb57kfg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkk9x6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fv)
Myanmar’s women-only army

A group of women in central Myanmar have formed their own anti-junta militia, and are fighting alongside other armed groups. Armed resistance to the military regime has been increasing since the coup nine months ago. BBC Burmese editor Soe Win Than tells us more about the Myaung Women Warriors.

My Home Town: Damascus
A new episode of our series 'My Home Town', in which our language service journalists share stories about the place where they grew up. Today, Dima Babilie of BBC Arabic takes us to the vine-covered alleyways of the Syrian capital Damascus to sit in cafés, drink coffee and play cards.

Why are so many Brazilians emigrating to Italy?
There’s been a big increase in the number of Brazilians moving to Italy and applying for citizenship. Rafael Barifouse of BBC Brasil has been investigating the reasons and talking to some of those who’ve made the move.

On Tajikistan's border with Afghanistan
Known for its beautiful mountains, Tajikistan's border with Afghanistan is at the centre of a fraught political situation, with the Tajik government maintaining a hardline stance towards the Taliban regime. Olga Ivshina of BBC Russian recently went to this remote area and shares her impressions.

Reporting COP26
Rubbing shoulders with world leaders, being inspired by young activists and getting to grips with haggis - just some of the experiences of our language service journalists reporting from COP26. We hear from Peter Okwoche of BBC Africa, Shakeel Anwar of BBC Bengali and Pierre-Antoine Denis of BBC Afrique.

Image: Myanmar’s women-only army
Credit: CJ


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkkfnb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pn1ml)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb57sxq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkkkdg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0t1jq2)
Cop 26: Coal compromise as countries race to reach a deal

The latest draft agreement reveals how the search for consensus is watering down some of the wording, particularly on the phase out of coal and other fossil fuels. We hear from US climate envoy John Kerry.

Also on the programme: An American journalist has been jailed for 11 years in Myanmar for encouraging dissent against the military; and rising tension in Iraq over last month's election results -- we'll have a special report from Baghdad.


(Pic: Climate protestor outside Cop26 venue in Glasgow Credit: Peter Summers/ Getty)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkkp4l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n23)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb581dz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y47187m2ymh)
Belarus threatens European gas supply

With tensions rising over a migrant crisis Belarus is threatening to stop EU gas supplies. Around a fifth of the gas Russia pumps to Europe runs through Belarus, and Thierry Bros, a former advisor to the French government on energy security, discusses the implications of the dispute for European energy markets. Also in the programme, it's the final scheduled day of the UN climate summit in Glasgow, known as COP26. We have the latest from there, and the BBC's Nora Fakim is in Mauritius to examine the impact climate change might have on the country. Plus, the BBC's Tamasin Ford explores why the black community is still so poorly represented in business leadership.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Joshua Thorpe and Matthew Davies.

(Picture: A gas compressor station in Belarus. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkkswq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxv6xp0sv5)
COP26: Countries work towards final deal

With the official deadline to COP26 fast approaching, we are coming to you live from Glasgow as countries around the world race to strike a deal on climate commitments. There has been hope overnight that an agreement will be reached which targets the key areas of coal and fossil fuel production.

We'll be joined by delegates, activists, and climate experts, as well as members of the press to break down exactly what is happening in the final hours and days of discussions.

And we'll take a look back over the past two weeks, and consider what exactly has been achieved with deals announced across the fortnight.

(Photo: Smoke billows from coal-fired power plant. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkkxmv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxv6xp0xl9)
COP26: Official deadline for final deal approaches

We are live from COP26 in Glasgow, in what is scheduled to be the final hour of the climate summit. With work reportedly still to do on a final deal involving 197 countries, talks are set to continue into the weekend.

We'll look at the key achievements so far alongside experts and journalists, and keep you updated on any last minute surprises.

And we'll be asking delegates and activists whether they think this summit has been a success, ahead of COP27 which Egypt's environment ministry has announced will be held in Sharm El-Sheikh next year.

(Photo: Cop 26 President Alok Sharma surrounded by advisers before giving his speech during the Cop26 summit in Glasgow. Credit: PA)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkl1cz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkl543)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxss8pns3c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb58jdh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nn65jp0yg)
2021/11/12 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkl8w7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb58n4m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1prb)
Can we recycle concrete?

Concrete is the most widely used substance on earth after water. It’s quite literally the foundation of the modern world, and no wonder - it’s strong, cheap, and mouldable into nearly any shape.

But these benefits come at a cost: concrete production is responsible for around 8% of global CO2 emissions - that’s around three times more than the aviation industry.

Concrete might not look pretty, but given its carbon footprint, should we be more careful about how we use it? And rather than throwing waste into landfill, could we recycle it instead? That’s what Crowdscience listener Catherine wants to know.

To investigate, Marnie Chesterton and Anand Jagatia learn more about what makes concrete such a brilliant and versatile material. It’s down to the chemistry of how cement dries – which, it turns out, is anything but boring. They find out how the stuff is made, and why that produces so much carbon. And they hear about some ingenious projects to repurpose demolition waste – including creating underwater habitats for marine life, and using 3D printers to turn crushed concrete into street furniture.

With Prof John Provis, Prof Becky Lunn, Chris LaPorta, Sheryl Lee, Dr Edward Randviir and David Lacy

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Anand Jagatia.
Produced by Anand Jagatia for BBC World Service

[Image: Discarded Concrete, Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkldmc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fq0t2cxz)
Climate summit approaches end of final scheduled day

Negotiations are continuing on the final scheduled day of the COP 26 summit in Glasgow, in the hope of reaching an agreement that will prevent the worst impacts of climate change.

Also in the programme: UN rapporteur criticises Lebanon's government; and Davemaoite, a major new mineral discovery.


(Picture: Climate activists protesting during the official final day of the Cop26 summit in Glasgow. Credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire)


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkljch)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywzbk2ztxg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0srdtk3wk3)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb58wmw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycr8djbsbrs)
Belarus threatens European gas supply

With tensions rising over a migrant crisis Belarus is threatening to stop EU gas supplies. Around a fifth of the gas Russia pumps to Europe runs through Belarus, and Thierry Bros, a former advisor to the French government on energy security, discusses the implications of the dispute for European energy markets. Also in the programme, it's the final scheduled day of the UN climate summit in Glasgow, known as COP26. We have the latest from there, and the BBC's Nora Fakim is in Mauritius to examine the impact climate change might have on the country. Plus, the BBC's Tamasin Ford explores why the black community is still so poorly represented in business leadership.

(Picture: A gas compressor station in Belarus. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjw4lkln3m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n23)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkplb590d0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1tzy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Armistice Day Silence 10:59 THU (w3ct2zq6)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gy7)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gy7)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gy7)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172xzkp71vj38f)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkp71vj70k)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkp71vjl7y)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkp71vjyhb)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkp71vk27g)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkp71vk9qq)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkp71vl4ym)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172xzkp71vlmy4)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172xzkp71vlwfd)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkp71vm3xn)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkp71vmcdx)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkp71vmh51)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkp71vmvdf)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkp71vmz4k)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzkp71vn2wp)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkp71vn6mt)

BBC News Summary 12:30 SUN (w172xzkp71vnbcy)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkp71vp5lv)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkp71vpjv7)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkp71vpnlc)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172xzkplb4tmln)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkplb4trbs)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkplb4tw2x)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkplb4tzv1)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172xzkplb4v3l5)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzkplb4vlkp)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172xzkplb4vq9t)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172xzkplb4vv1y)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkplb4vyt2)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkplb4w69b)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkplb4wfsl)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkplb4wxs3)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkplb4x1j7)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkplb4x90h)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkplb4xdrm)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkplb4xs00)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkplb4y0h8)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzkplb4yhgs)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkplb4ym6x)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkplb4yvq5)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkplb4z36f)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkplb4zbpp)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzkplb4ztp6)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzkplb4zyfb)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzkplb505xl)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkplb509nq)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkplb50nx3)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkplb50xdc)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkplb51dcw)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172xzkplb51j40)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkplb51rm8)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkplb5203j)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkplb527ls)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkplb52ql9)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzkplb52vbf)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkplb532tp)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkplb536kt)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkplb53kt6)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkplb53t9g)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkplb5498z)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzkplb54f13)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkplb54njc)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzkplb54x0m)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzkplb554hw)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkplb55mhd)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzkplb55r7j)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzkplb55zqs)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkplb563gx)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkplb56gq9)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkplb56q6k)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzkplb57662)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172xzkplb579y6)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkplb57kfg)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzkplb57sxq)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzkplb581dz)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzkplb58jdh)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172xzkplb58n4m)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172xzkplb58wmw)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkplb590d0)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7tm7x)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7tr01)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7tvr5)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7tzh9)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7v37f)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7v6zk)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7vbqp)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7vggt)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7vl6y)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7vpz2)

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BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7vygb)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7w26g)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7w5yl)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7w9pq)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7wsp7)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7wxfc)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7x15h)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7x4xm)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7x8nr)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172xzjvsb7xddw)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172xzjvsb7xj50)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjvsb7xmx4)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172xzjvsb7xrn8)

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BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172xzjvsb7yvcf)

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BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172xzjvsb7z2vp)

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BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172xzjvsb7zg32)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172xzjvsb7ztbg)

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BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172xzjvsb801tq)

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BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172xzjvsb8099z)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172xzjw4lk48b8)

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BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjw4lk5ljp)

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BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjw4lk71h7)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172xzjw4lk757c)

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BBC News 00:00 WED (w172xzjw4lkb24g)

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BBC News 00:00 THU (w172xzjw4lkdz1k)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjw4lkf2sp)

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BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172xzjw4lkhvyn)

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BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjw4lkkswq)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172xzjw4lkkxmv)

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Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dhm)

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Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct2cbf)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lsy)

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Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2zqb)

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Global Questions 12:32 SUN (w3ct2zq8)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n6m)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l29)

Over to You 00:50 SUN (w3ct1l29)

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People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1plr)

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Pick of the World 09:32 SAT (w3ct2z26)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nn65j9fb2)

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Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tkh8v2yfj)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lcb)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rtt)

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The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2drd)

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The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p9c)

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The Cultural Frontline 22:32 SAT (w3ct1pth)

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The Documentary 05:32 SUN (w3ct1d0b)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rgj)

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The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rm1)

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The Inquiry 12:06 SUN (w3ct1z2v)

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The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3ct1yw2)

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Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172xythn2z5qzs)

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Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wzf)

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WorklifeIndia 01:32 SAT (w3ct2f41)

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World Book Club 12:06 SAT (w3ct1x9t)

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World Business Report 01:06 SAT (w172xzlhnsg6c59)

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World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y488fbhr9n1)

World Business Report 22:32 MON (w172ycrp3wmrdc1)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1tzy)

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