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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 30 OCTOBER 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrk2lf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 Business Matters (w172xvqltqngfx4)
Is net zero the right target?

There are just days to go until the much anticipated COP26 climate conference, which is taking place in Glasgow, Scotland. Net zero emissions appears to be the target that many countries have committed to - but is the right objective for all, and which nations need to be more ambitious? Trophy hunting, paying to kill large animals, often in African game reserves, promotes strong feelings; many oppose it, but some conservationists argue it adds value to wildlife and their habitats. Vivienne Nunis has an extended report. Plus, one of the most legendary music back catalogues is up for sale - David Bowie’s estate is in talks with buyers and has attracted bids of around $200m. And last year, assets under management using sustainable investing strategies in the United States reached $17.1 trillion, according to the Forum for Sustainable and Responsible Investment; Kai Ryssdal from our sister show, Marketplace talks to Emily Stewart from Vox, about the socially responsible investing trend. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Colin Peacock of Radio New Zealand. Picture description: coal fired power station in China. Picture Credit: Getty Images


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrk6bk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxqlnwmt9t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqc7kly)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 Stumped (w3ct1lc5)
Afghanistan's T20 World Cup: ‘It’s more than cricket’

We are joined by England Ashes winning coach Andy Flower who is now Afghanistan consultant for the Men’s T20 World Cup. He tells us about the pride that the Afghanistan players have to play for their country and his reason for wanting to be involved with the team. He also tells us his hopes to coach an IPL team in the future and gives his predictions on how the men's Ashes will play out with Ben Stokes back in contention.


Plus Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Jim Maxwell discuss the main talking points from the Men's T20 World Cup so far including how India will recover from losing to Pakistan and South Africa's Quinton de Kock choosing not take a knee in their opening match against the West Indies.

Photo: Andy Flower, Coach of Afghanistan looks on ahead of the ICC Men's T20 World Cup match between Afghanistan and Scotland at Sharjah Cricket Stadium on October 25, 2021 in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates. (Photo by Michael Steele-ICC/ICC via Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrkb2p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fn)
Filming Life at 50°C

COP26 kicks off in Glasgow this Sunday, and what’s at stake is the future of the planet. We speak to BBC Arabic's Namak Khoshnaw and Hanan Razek about the Life at 50°C series, highlighting the impact of living with rising temperatures and changing weather patterns around the world. And we find out what it's like trying to film when your camera's asking to cool down.

Baby elephants changing lives
A community in northern Kenya has found a sustainable way to feed orphaned baby elephants - using goats' milk. It's also meant more financial independence for the Samburu women who provide it. Francis Ontomwa of BBC Nairobi saw the scheme in action.

Nigeria's Jewish community
A small Nigerian community claims to have Jewish ancestry dating back hundreds of years, and draws parallels between the Jewish and Igbo cultures. Nduka Orjinmo of BBC Africa Online has met one of their leaders, and also investigated the Israeli response to their desire for recognition.

Modi and the vaccine certificate photo
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s image is famously everywhere, from TV to billboards to petrol stations. But one man, Peter K, says putting his face on Covid-19 vaccine certificates is a step too far, and is taking the matter to court. The BBC's Geeta Pandey in Delhi lays out the arguments.

Image: BBC Arabic’s Namak Khoshnaw filming farmers in southern Iraq at 54°C
Credit: BBC


SAT 02:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz8)
Kilimanjaro: Africa’s disappearing glaciers

The mountains of East Africa are losing their glaciers. At 5,895 metres, Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain on the continent, but it has lost about 90% of its glacial ice in the past 100 years, and scientists believe the process is accelerating. They say climate change is the cause, and that some glaciers could disappear completely within the next few years. Rebecca Kesby has been speaking to Prof Clavery Tungaraza from Tanzania, and Dr Doug Hardy from the US, who was one of the first scientists to research Kilimanjaro. Simon Mtuy has climbed the mountain many times, and his family has farmed on its slopes for centuries. He tells Rebecca that, within his own life time, he has witnessed massive changes in the mountain and the climate.

(Photo: Giraffes, fog, Kilimanjaro and acacia trees in the morning. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrkftt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Real Story (w3ct1ht4)
Why do military coups still happen?

Defiant protesters have been on the streets of Sudan this week after the country's armed forces launched a military coup. On Monday coup leader Gen Abdel Fattah Burhan dissolved civilian rule, arrested political leaders and declared a state of emergency. It wasn't meant to be like this. After long-time Sudanese ruler Omar al-Bashir was overthrown in 2019, civilian leaders and their military counterparts entered a power-sharing agreement designed to encourage democratic reform. So why has the fragile arrangement broken down and what does history tell us about the broader challenges countries face when trying to move beyond military rule? Is democracy possible without strong institutions? Why do countries like Pakistan continue to flirt with military rule despite having elections? And how have others - like Argentina - managed to break away from military rule altogether?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Produced by: Zak Brophy and Paul Schuster.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrkkky)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxqlnwn5k6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqc7xvb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:32 Trending (w3ct2yqk)
The Denial Files

2. Big oil in the dock

Is big oil trying to mislead the public about what it’s doing about climate change?

Several US states are suing some of the world’s largest oil and gas companies, accusing them of “greenwashing”.

They claim the fossil fuel industry is deceiving consumers about how much it’s actually doing to tackle climate change.

Accusations which are strongly denied by the companies who may face having to make huge compensation payouts if they lose in court.

At the heart of many of these cases are adverts which highlight how energy giants are supporting greener, more sustainable solutions, but do not mention their much greater investment in developing new oil and gas fields.

Questions about this alleged deception have now entered the political arena with big oil’s top brass being invited to appear before the US Congress.

So, why do these lawsuits matter so much? In this episode, we head to Massachusetts where one such case is playing out in the courts.


SAT 04:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dnz)
The US and China’s climate commitments

Ahead of COP26, the big climate change summit in Glasgow, Ros Atkins looks at the climate promises of two of the world’s biggest polluters – the US and China.

(Photo: Wind-powered windmills under the sunrise in Suqian, Jiangsu Province. Credit: Zhang Lianhua /Costfoto/Barcroft Media/Getty Images)


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrkpb2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 Weekend (w172xytftrgx2l5)
G-20 leaders gather in Rome

G-20 leaders have gathered in Rome. They will discuss the pandemic and climate change. It is not clear if the G-20 will do enough to end unequal Covid vaccine provision and fix the broken supply chains that are hindering economic recovery. And, ahead of the UN COP26 summit in Glasgow, there are already tensions as to whether countries will make firm commitments to cut carbon emissions

Also on the programme: The UK’s Brexit minister, Lord David Frost, said the EU's current proposals to reform the Northern Ireland Protocol didn't "go far enough", setting that new December deadline for the two sides to find a solution.

And, many US states are fighting back against President Biden’s vaccine mandates. Judges in Texas and New York have halted these requirements. So, do vaccine mandates work?

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Maria Margaronis, writer and broadcaster, and Anand Menon, Professor of European Politics and Foreign Affairs at Kings College and director of UK in a changing Europe, a research organisation on UK-EU relations.

(Photo: Italy's Prime Minister, Mario Draghi and US President Joe Biden during their meeting at the Chigi palace in Rome, Italy, 29 October 2021, ahead of an upcoming G20 summit of world leaders to discuss climate change, covid-19 and the post-pandemic global recovery. EPA/FILIPPO ATTILI / CHIGI PALACE PRESS OFFICE )


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrkt26)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytftrgx6b9)
G-20 leaders gather in Rome

G-20 leaders have gathered in Rome. They will discuss the pandemic and climate change.

Also in the programme: The future of Confucius Institutes in Germany has been thrown into doubt after two of them cancel talks on a new book on Xi Jinping under pressure from China. We’ll speak to one of the book authors, Adrian Geiges.

And, what was it like growing up in Communist Albania?

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Maria Margaronis, writer and broadcaster, and Anand Menon, Professor of European Politics and Foreign Affairs at Kings College and director of UK in a changing Europe, a research organsiation on UK-EU relations.

(Photo: Italy"s Prime Minister, Mario Draghi and his wife Maria Serenella Cappello with US President Joe Biden and US First Lady Jill Biden during their meeting at the Chigi palace in Rome, Italy, 29 October 2021, ahead of an upcoming G20 summit of world leaders to discuss climate change, covid-19 and the post-pandemic global recovery. EPA/FILIPPO ATTILI / CHIGI PALACE PRESS OFFICE)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrkxtb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytftrgxb2f)
World leaders prepare for climate summit

The Conference of the Parties, taking place in Glasgow, has been variously described as 'crucial' and 'make or break', as representatives of 200 countries aim to set out their plans to cut fossil fuel emissions by 2030. But will countries make systemic changes or superficial pledges? A German climate activist joins to discuss.

Also in the programme: The Turkish novelist and Nobel prize-winner, Orhan Pamuk, talks about the climate risks facing the lagoon city of Venice.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Maria Margaronis, writer and broadcaster, and Anand Menon, Professor of European Politics and Foreign Affairs at Kings College and director of UK in a changing Europe, a research organsiation on UK-EU relations.

(Photo: Italian Premier Mario Draghi (R) with UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres (L) during their meeting at Palazzo Chigi in Rome, Italy, 29 October 2021, ahead of an upcoming G20 summit of world leaders to discuss climate change, covid-19 and the post-pandemic global recovery. EPA/GIUSEPPE LAMI / POOL)


SAT 07:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqc892q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p96)
Women leading change in NGOs

A man is twice as likely to rise to the top of an international non-governmental organization (INGO) than a woman. Kim Chakanetsa meets two exceptions to this rule.

Amanda Khozi Mukwashi is the CEO of Christian Aid, an INGO that works to support sustainable development, eradicate poverty and provide disaster relief in South America, the Caribbean, Africa and Asia. She’s also the author of But where are you really from?

Summer Nasser is the CEO of Yemen Aid, an INGO established in late 2016 by a group of Yemeni-American women in response to the crisis in the country where, according to the UN, 80% of the population need humanitarian assistance and 1.2 million pregnant and breastfeeding women are acutely malnourished. Yemen Aid is one of the organisations providing humanitarian relief to thousands of people on the ground.

Produced by Alice Gioia.

IMAGES:
Amanda Khozi Mukwashi, credit Christian Aid/Alex Baker
Summer Nasser, courtesy of Summer Nasser


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrl1kg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6f)
Climate: Animals under threat

The changing planet is threatening a number of vulnerable and endangered specie, and host Nuala McGovern hears from three experts on polar bears, snow leopards and bumble bees on why we should all care about what’s happening to all animals. We learn about the importance of pollinators to healthy ecosystems.

We also hear from a sheep farmer in Australia and a vegetable and fish farmer in Nigeria about how climate change is affecting food security and the issues they have in common on two different continents.

(Photo: Three polar bears on the Beaufort Sea coast within the 1002 Area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqc8dtv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 Pick of the World (w3ct2z25)
Pick of the World

Listeners to the BBC World Service not only love what they hear, they love to engage with it; it's a two way relationship that has created a special bond.

Each week, Anna Doble celebrates the amazing radio the World Service produces, with clips chosen by its listeners, and explores the reaction on social media.

She also speaks to some of those listeners around the world, to find out what it was about the issue that captured them.


SAT 08:50 Over to You (w3ct1l24)
Your thoughts on the story of the HIV-Aids crisis

The Story of Aids recalls the early years of the HIV crisis, as told by the people who lived through it. We hear your comments and speak with the show’s producer about the sensitivities involved in making the series.

Plus, a listener inspired by our recent interview with Lyse Doucet offers her feedback on the BBC’s reporting of Afghanistan.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrl59l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 Sportshour (w172y0q6x0y1lb7)
Wickets, Wildlife and Why We Should Try

As Namibia's men continue to make history at their first T20 Cricket World Cup we speak to Dr Rudie van Vuuren, a two-sport international for the country. These days Dr van Vuuren combines his passion for sport with a passion for conservation. He recalls playing at both the Cricket and Rugby World Cups in 2003 and tells us what he would like to see come out of the COP26 Climate Change Conference.

We put the same question to Seyi Smith. He’s a Summer and Winter Olympian who's co-founded 'Racing to Zero' in his native Canada. The aim is to make small-scale, local sporting events carbon neutral. Seyi was a sprinter who represented his country at London 2012 and then at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Bobsled. But he’s also an engineer by trade. Once his track career had ended, it was a speech by the former US President Barack Obama which convinced him he needed to encourage grass-roots change to tackle the climate crisis.

Great Britain Rower, Melissa Wilson, joins us as she prepares to attend COP26 as a representative of the athletes’ group ‘Champions for Earth’. What does Melissa want the summit to achieve?

This week, we passed 100 days to go to the Winter Olympic Games in Beijing. Uganda's Brolin Mawejje is hoping to become the first African to snowboard at the Olympics. He was born in Uganda, who've never been represented at the Winter Games. He only saw snow for the first time at the age of 12, after moving to the United States. Having originally targeted qualification for the 2018 Winter Olympics, a heart attack suffered whilst being treated in hospital ended those hopes.

Image: Namibia's Rudie van Vuuren leaves the field after the match against England in The ICC Cricket World Cup at St George's Park stadium in Port Elizabeth 19 February 2003. (Photo credit: ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrl91q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxqlnwnx0z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqc8nb3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3w)
How is India switching to renewable energy?

India gets 70% of its energy from coal, but has very ambitious plans to get 40% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2030.

But there is also a growing demand for energy. While coal is the cheapest source of electricity, what about the long-term gains of using wind, hydro, and solar energy? And how challenging is it for India to commit to net zero emissions?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the benefits, risks and challenges that India faces in its transition to renewable energy.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Dr Ajay Mathur, director general, International Solar Alliance; Namrata Mukherjee, deputy chief of party, USAID SAREP, RTI International; Sumant Sinha, Chairman & CEO, ReNew Power


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrldsv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Story of Aids (w3ct2wpb)
4. The end of an epidemic?

When President Thabo Mbeki came to power in South Africa in 1999, the country was gripped by an Aids epidemic - and the president's decision to question scientific evidence, and reject the use of life-saving drugs, only made the situation even more dire.

But activists and medical staff were ready to fight the government's position by any means.

We hear how the charity Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders) set up an HIV-Aids clinic in the township of Khayelitsha, and despite the threat of police raids, staff smuggled life-saving medication into the country at any cost.

Relying on the protection of the local community - and customs staff willing to look the other way - they imported drugs to treat people living in one of the worst-affected communities in the country.

Meanwhile, the Aids activist group the Treatment Action Campaign were fighting another battle in the country's highest courts, in order to force the government to U-turn on Aids treatment and help save the lives of its citizens.

Today, South Africa has the largest antiretroviral programme in the world, with around 5.5 million people receiving treatment. With effective treatment also available to protect people from getting the virus in the first place, is the UNAIDS goal of ending the global Aids epidemic by 2030 a realistic one?

Narrated by Audrey Brown
Written and produced by Richard Fenton-Smith
Sound mix by James Beard


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrljjz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Newshour (w172xv5cjf02hvl)
Sudan anti-coup protests

Five days after a military coup ended the power-sharing government between the army and civilians, large protests are taking place across Sudan to demand the restoration of the administration led by Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok.

Also in the programme: the Chinese football Super League finds itself in an unprecedented financial crisis; and the fierce and bloody conflict escalating between the Taliban and the Islamic State group's affiliate in Afghanistan.

(Photo: People attend demonstrations in support of the civilian government, in Khartoum, on 21 October 2021. Credit: EPA/Mohammed Abu Obaid)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrln93)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Sportsworld (w172y0thnybt90x)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Paul Childs - Pool/Getty Images)


SAT 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrm48m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 17:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxqlnwpr7w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 17:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqc9hk0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 17:32 Trending (w3ct2yqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


SAT 17:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8x)
The Dumptruck: King of sumo

In the 1980s, a Hawaiian-born wrestler took the traditional world of Japanese sumo by storm. Known as the Dumptruck because of his huge size, he won legions of fans and paved the way for the internationalisation of the sport. The Dumptruck shares his love of Sumo - and Hawaiian hula music - with Will Yates. The programme is a Whistledown Production, first broadcast in 2014.

Photo: The Dumptruck in his prime. (Credit: Getty Images).


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrm80r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Evidence (w3ct2zpk)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

When misinformation kills

A maelstrom of misinformation and its sinister cousin, disinformation, have been swirling all around us about Covid-19. The rumours and conspiracy theories have raced around the globe as fast as the virus itself.

Untruths, half-truths, misunderstandings and deliberate mischief-making aren’t new when it comes to health of course, but a global pandemic with a novel virus means that there is much uncertainty and a lack of definite facts. In that gap, falsehoods flourish and in our super-connected world, they spread far and wide.

Claudia Hammond and her panel of global experts assess the scale of misinformation and its impact and conclude that misinformation really does cost lives.

Dr Brett Campbell, a physician in a dedicated Covid intensive care unit at Ascension St Thomas Hospital in Nashville, Tennessee, tells Claudia about the unvaccinated patients, many of them close to death, who still cannot accept that the virus is real.

Claudia’s guests include Heidi Larson , Director of the Vaccine Confidence Project and Professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; Dr Saad Omer, Director of the Yale Institute for Global Health and Professor of Medicine and Infectious Diseases in the USA and Robert Kanwagi, a public health specialist and a member of the Global Task Force on Vaccine Confidence and Uptake.

Produced by: Fiona Hill and Maria Simons
Studio Engineer: Jackie Marjoram

Picture credit: Westend61/Getty Images


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrmcrw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtn)
Singer-Songwriter Tems

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined by American comedian Iliza Shlesinger and actor Sharon Duncan Brewster alongside film critic Kaleem Aftab to discuss cultural highlights of the week.

Timothee Chalamet and Zendaya talk about their characters in the mega movie Dune, based on the sci fi classic by Frank Herbert.

Also Sharon Duncan Brewster joins Nikki to tell her about her role in Dune and her move from TV soap star to silver screen heroine.

Nigerian Afrobeat star and Billboard Top 100 singer-songwriter Tems explains how her biggest hit came about.

Actor Jamie Lee Curtis reveals why horror films are such hard work.

British musician Jarvis Cocker tells us about his role as an imaginary French pop star in Wes Anderson’s new movie The French Dispatch.

And novelist Jeanette Winterson on the female pioneers in Artificial Intelligence.

(Photo: Tems. Credit: Paras Griffin/Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrmhj0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 Newshour (w172xv5cjf03gtm)
Sudan coup: new protests

Troops in Sudan have fired live rounds and tear gas to disperse huge protests against Monday's military coup. At least three demonstrators were killed in the city of Omdurman. Protest organisers are demanding the reinstatement of the ousted prime minister, Abdullah Hamdok.

The United Arab Emirates has become the latest Gulf state to follow Saudi Arabia in taking diplomatic action against Lebanon.

Also, why the Chinese Super League, once thought ot be the next big force in football, has gone from boom to bust.

(Photo: A protester gestures as people demonstrate against the Sudanese military"s recent seizure of power and ousting of the civilian government, in the capital Khartoum, Sudan October 30, 2021. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrmm84)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcl)
'My studio is a mess', with Julien Baker, mxmtoon, Thao Nguyen and Quinn Christopherson

Julien Baker, mxmtoon, Thao Nguyen and Quinn Christopherson discuss how to separate work life and leisure time, learning to embrace being selfish, and failing at keeping your studio tidy,

Julien Baker is one-third of the group boygenius, along with Grammy-nominated Phoebe Bridgers and Lucy Dacus. She describes her music as “indie folk” and in it explores her relationship with faith, addiction, friends, and the human condition. Her third album, Little Oblivions, was released earlier this year.

Joining her is California-born musician and vlogger Maia, also known as mxmtoon. Maia’s debut EP, Plum Blossom, had over 100 million streams, with her music blending pop, folk, emo, and hip-hop. Her latest project was translating her song Prom Dress into the fictional language of Simlish for computer game The Sims.

Thao Nguyen is an American singer-songwriter based in San Francisco, who comes from a family of Vietnamese refugees. She’s released seven studio albums as a solo artist and as part of her group, Thao and the Get Down Stay Down. In 2015, her band was invited to perform in Vietnam – the first time she’d visited the country, alongside her mother.

Born and raised in Alaska, Athabaskan and Inupiaq singer-songwriter Quinn Christopherson broke onto the scene in 2019 with Erase Me, which won him NPR’s coveted Tiny Desk Contest. His music is deeply personal; Erase Me explores his experiences as a transgender man.


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrmr08)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywx4y911k7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sp76r535w)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqcb38n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptb)
Colombia’s art of migration

Experiences of migration and displacement are finding exciting form in the work of Colombian artists. Their art offers possibilities for new identities, questioning the very idea of home. Presenter Maria Wills Londoño, director of Bogotá’s Banco de la República art museum, meets migrant and displaced Colombian artists to explore art of the spaces ‘in-between’.

Turner Prize-winner Oscar Murillo exhibits work around the globe, yet his starting-point is often family history. In the sound-piece My Name is Belisario, Oscar’s father recounts his migration journey, offering a universal message within a personal tale.

In the Cauca region, Maria meets Julieth Morales, an indigenous artist from the Misak community. Julieth uses Misak fabric known as chumbe to weave textiles combining indigenous and Western knowledge. The fabric is an expression of resistance: to survive, the Misak must accept the world beyond their community.

Colombian artist Carolina Caycedo lives in Los Angeles, but returns to her homeland regularly. She grew up by the Magdalena river, which became a major focus in her work when she learned it was to be dammed. She uses fishing nets as a metaphor for a sustainable mode of environmental engagement.

In Popayán, Maria visits performance artist Edinson Quiñones. His extreme, sometimes violent performances heal past trauma. He explains the piece which defines his career: the ritual removal of a tattoo dedicated to his grandmother.

Image: A tattoo on the shoulders of Edinson Quiñones (Courtesy of Edinson Quiñones)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrmvrd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqcb70s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 Trending (w3ct2yqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


SAT 23:50 Over to You (w3ct1l24)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]



SUNDAY 31 OCTOBER 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrmzhj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yvx)
Can we still avoid climate catastrophe?

Just a few days before COP26 opens in Glasgow, the World Meteorological Organisation reported record greenhouse gas levels, despite a fall in CO2 due to pandemic restrictions.

The UN Environment Programme’s Emissions Gap Report also revealed that current country pledges will only take 7.5% off predicted greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, well below the 55% needed to limit global warming to 1.5C. Worse still, many large emission producers are not on track to meet their countries’ pledges. Rachel Warren, Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, tells us the 1.5C limit is still achievable if we work in tandem with nature.

Research by Sara Mikaloff-Fletcher, National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA), illustrates this. Her contribution to the WMO Greenhouse Bulletin revealed that New Zealand’s indigenous forests play a bigger role in absorbing carbon from the atmosphere than previously thought. Also on the programme, Abinash Mohanty, Council on Energy, Environment and Water, has been mapping climate vulnerability in India and explains why communities should be at the forefront of climate adaptation and mitigation strategies. And particle physicist Claire Malone shares her insights on how we can help women thrive in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. Picture: Aerial shot at the edge of Lake Carezza showing storm damaged forest, Dolomites, Italy.

And, As the world slowly moves away from using fossil fuels for electricity, one tiny Scottish island has proved it’s possible to rely almost entirely on renewables.

The inner Hebridean isle of Eigg used to get its power from diesel generators. But in 2008 its residents launched the world’s first electricity system powered by nature, and the Crowdscience team wants to know exactly how they did it, and whether such a model could work in other places with no national grid? Marnie discovers that the community is key to the success of this project, meeting the maintenance men who taught themselves to install equipment and solve any problems themselves, and hearing from residents who’ve changed their habits to use less juice. With the mainland more than an hour away by a once-daily ferry, this kind of resourcefulness is vital. Hydroelectric generators harness the power of running water and are complemented by wind turbines and solar panels on peoples roofs, meeting 95% of Eigg’s energy needs. Now others are learning from this unique experiment and we meet the Malawians who were inspired after visiting Eigg. A solar grid in the village of Sitolo has provided power to thousands of people, and the people who designed it are planning others.


Credit: Abstract Aerial Art/Getty Images


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrn37n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhg)
COP26: Another last chance to save the planet?

As world leaders gather in Glasgow in Scotland for the UN’s global climate conference, COP26, we ask if a new project partnering with the private sector will help save the Amazon rainforest, or whether it’s simply another way for the corporate sector to pay away its guilt. Plus, we hear from a youth delegate to the last big climate conference in Paris – what is she hoping for this time round? And, can electric freight vessels help global shipping to go green? We hear how a Norwegian company is working on one. We also look at the fight against plastic waste and how the world’s recycling systems simply aren’t working. And they’re big, glamorous and they involve hundreds of people. But are the days of the big Indian wedding over? Business Weekly is produced by Matthew Davies and presented by Tamasin Ford.

(Image: Piles of illegal wood gathered next to the rainforest. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrn6zs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxqlnwqtz1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqcbl85)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvz)
Mix and match Covid vaccines

New evidence from Sweden and France on the benefits of mixing and matching doses of different types of Covid vaccine. The impact misinformation around treating Covid with Ivermectin is having on the Neglected Tropical diseases where the drug is known to work. And are oat and soy milks as nutritious as cow’s milk?

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A healthcare worker holds vials of the Covaxin and Covisheld vaccines in Allika Village, India. Photo credit: Pallava Bagla/Corbis/ Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrnbqx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Story of Aids (w3ct2wpb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrngh1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvk)
The endless search for Colombia's missing people

Pascale Harter introduces personal insights, analysis and reportage from reporters and writers around the world.

Colombia's long years of armed struggle are supposed to be over. The largest guerrilla force, the FARC, is signed up to a peace deal with the government it fought for decades. Along with many – but not all – of the country’s rebel armies and paramilitary factions, the FARC has officially demobilised. Its fighters have been told to hang up their guns and go home. But the ghosts of the long years of violence are still everywhere. Over 8 million people fled their homes when armed groups took control of parts of the country. Many thousands more went missing during the conflict. Their fate may never be known. Mathew Charles heard the story of one woman’s quest to turn the page.

South Africa is holding the sixth round of local elections since the advent of democracy in 1994. Voters must choose the people who will sit on local and city councils – the ones who’re meant to actually deliver the results of the long struggle to end apartheid. After decades of activism and resistance to white minority rule, there is no shortage of political rhetoric and passion in the country. And it would be hard to argue there’s no space for debate – hundreds of different parties have put up candidates. But as Gregory Mthembu Salter’s been hearing – among younger South Africans, the passion for politics may be waning.

How can we feed the world – on a planet with finite resources and a growing number of people? Moreover, more of those people are eating more meat and fish – and those animals in turn need feeding, with protein, to grow. At the moment, soy and fishmeal are the main sources of protein for animal feed – but they have serious costs to the Earth. The demand for soy has been linked to deforestation in South America, while the fishmeal trade contributes to over-fishing in the oceans. So the hunt is on for alternative sources of protein. The use of insects has been permitted in fish feed for years, but the European Union recently decided to allow them in poultry and pig feed too. Emilie Filou went to visit an ultra-modern farm in France where the animals they raise might be tiny, but the ambitions are very big indeed.

In Italy, dressing correctly for each occasion is taken pretty seriously, as is dressing appropriately for the season. So as summer fades into autumn, it's time to reorganise your wardrobe. This isn't just a bit of light household tidying done at your own pace, but a major task involving considerable forethought. Dany Mitzman admits to being baffled by many Italians' commitment to this special sartorial custom.


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqcbtrf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrnl75)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxqlnwr66f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqcbyhk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cs1)
100 Women: The mushroom woman

This is the story of Chido Govera aka The Mushroom Woman. It is a story about her home, Zimbabwe. And it is also a story about mushrooms.

It never should have happened. Chido, an orphan, became the provider in her family aged seven. At 10 she was destined to marry a man 30 years older than her. But a chance encounter led her to discover the almost magical science of mushroom cultivation at a local university, and set her life on a very different course.

Cultivating mushrooms is unlike growing any other vegetable. Micro-organisms in organic matter provide fuel for air-bound silvery thread-like 'mycelium'. These anchor in damp soil and then quickly, tiny mushroom pins appear. Chido was enthralled by the way mushrooms emerge from next to nothing and colonise plant material. It reminded her of her Grandmother, who took Chido foraging for mushrooms in the forest as a child. From humble beginnings, mushrooms grow.

Chido realised she could grow these curious fungi in maize waste. She could feed herself and her family, and make a little money. What if she could teach other orphans to grow and sell edible mushrooms to provide an income? So that is what Chido did.

Today Chido runs a foundation training 1000s of other growers, mainly women and orphans, in Zimbabwe, and across Africa and the world. We hear their stories and discover the mysterious world of fungi.

Presenter: Chido Govera

(Photo: Chido Govera (Centre) Credit: The Future of Hope Foundation)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrnpz9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytftrh037d)
Troops fire on Sudanese protesters

Hundreds of thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators took to the streets, in Sudan, in protest at the military coup carried out last Monday. It's been reported that at least three demonstrators have been killed by troops in the city of Omdurman. The protestors were demanding the reinstatement of the ousted prime minister, Abdullah Hamdok.

Also in the programme: a look at a new dramatised documentary which focuses on the lives and work of two police officers in Mexico City.

And, our arts correspondent discusses Nadifa Mohamed’s new book, The Fortune Men, which tells the true story of a Somali sailor who, 70 years ago, was hanged for a murder which happened in the Welsh capital, Cardiff but which he did not commit.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Rachel Shabi, a journalist, author and broadcaster, and Paul Basu, an anthropologist and academic.

(Photo: Protesters gesture and shout slogans as they demonstrate against the Sudanese military"s recent seizure of power and ousting of the civilian government, in the capital Khartoum, Sudan October 30, 2021. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldine)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrntqf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytftrh06zj)
Leaders gather in Glasgow for climate summit

The COP-26 climate summit opens in the Scottish city of Glasgow later today. More than 120 world leaders are arriving in the UK for the two-week conference along with 25,000 delegates from 196 countries.

Also in the programme: Covid-19 cases surge in Papua New Guinea. It's the worst wave of the virus in the country since the start of the pandemic. Bodies are reportedly being stacked on top of each other.

And, a reflection on Mort Sahl who died at the age of 94. He was one of America's most influential comedians and satirists of the 1950s and 60s, known for his sharp commentaries on the political era of US President Dwight D Eisenhower.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Rachel Shabi, a journalist, author and broadcaster, and Paul Basu, an anthropologist and academic.

(Photo: Climate activists protest after arriving by train at Glasgow Central Station ahead of the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, Scotland, Britain October 30, 2021. REUTERS/Yves Herman)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrnygk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytftrh0bqn)
Leaders gather in Glasgow for climate summit

The COP-26 climate summit opens in the Scottish city of Glasgow later today. More than 120 world leaders are arriving in the UK for the two-week conference along with 25,000 delegates from 196 countries.

Also in the programme: Liraz Charhi, better known as just Liraz, is an Israeli-Persian singer, actress and dancer. She started acting at the age of 11 and has appeared in several high-profile roles in Israeli film and television - and in Hollywood.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Rachel Shabi, a journalist, author and broadcaster, and Paul Basu, an anthropologist and academic.

(Photo: Climate activist Greta Thunberg arrives at Glasgow Central train station ahead of the Cop26 summit which is taking place from Monday. Picture date: Saturday October 30, 2021. PA Photo. See PA story ENVIRONMENT Cop26. Photo credit should read: Jane Barlow/PA Wire)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqcc9qy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqt)
Selassie Atadika: My life in five dishes

Selassie Atadika spent a decade working for the UN in some of the world’s most volatile regions, and it led to a realisation - that food has an essential role to play in rebuilding economies and bringing communities together.

The Ghanaian chef is now on a mission to revive many of Africa’s lost or forgotten foods, and make the rest of the world sit up and take notice.

She tells Emily Thomas how, aged five, she was forced to flee her home in Ghana following a military coup, and why she caused a ‘scandal’ in her family by dropping her plans to be a doctor for a career in humanitarian work.

Selassie is now gaining international acclaim for Midunu, a nomadic restaurant she set up in her family’s former home in Accra, which embodies what she calls ‘new African cuisine’. She explains how she wants to use it to make the continent healthier, wealthier, and greener.

(Picture: Selassie Atadika. Credit: Selassie Atadika/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrp26p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqccfh2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxm)
I found my son 32 years after he was kidnapped

In 1988 Li Jingzhi’s 2-year-old son was abducted from a hotel lobby in China and disappeared without a trace. She never stopped looking for him, appearing on numerous Chinese television shows and distributing more than 100,000 flyers. Through her many years of searching she was able to help reunite many other parents with their missing children. Then in 2020, after 32 years she was finally reunited with her son. This interview was first broadcast on 5th August 2020.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

Picture: Mao Yin reuniting with his mother Li Jingzhi
Credit: Getty Images


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrp5yt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 A Geochemical History of Life on Earth (w3ct2x97)
5. The Anthropocene

Could human engineering stabilise the Earth's climate and chemistry in the long term? Or will life eventually be extinguished by the expanding sun? Could humans seed life on other planets? And what will be our ultimate legacy in the Earth's geological record?

Tim Lenton of Exeter University explains why the Gaia hypothesis is the key to understanding the future of life on Earth. But what about life beyond Earth? Justin Rowlatt speaks to astronomer Lisa Kaltenegger - a hunter and explorer of planets outside our solar system - and to the science fiction author David Brin. Plus paleobiologist Jan Zalasiewicz describes what might remain of human civilisation in the geological record 100 million years hence.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Photo: Skull fossil artwork from the Modern Fossils collection by Christopher Locke. Credit: Christopher Locke/Heartless Machine)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqcck76)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g94)
Finding my Hinduism

Colourful temples, bells , incense and a multitude of deities and festivals - journalist Nalini Sivathasan grew up immersed in her parents’ religion, Hinduism. But as she has grown older, she has found it harder to connect with her faith and speaking to her friends, she finds she is not alone.

Unlike most other religions, Hinduism has no single founder, no single scripture nor commonly agreed set of teachings – which for some, can make it tricky to navigate.

On her journey to discover ‘her Hinduism’, Nalini talks to the Hindu Academy, which provides online classes and resources on the religion.

It’s seen a rise in engagement among young people over the past few years, yet the number of young people attending temples has fallen across the UK. Nalini visits a temple she grew up visiting to find out why and discovers how it’s trying to engage young people in ways other than worship.

For charity Go Dharmic, which was founded on the Hindu principle of dharma, practising seva - or selfless service - is the best way for young Hindus to connect with their faith and the world around them. While for vlogger Parle Patel, social media is the place to connect with young Hindus. But Parle says he is often criticised for proudly showcasing his Hinduism identity online.

Couple Abhinaya and Rahul are planning their Hindu wedding ceremony. For them the ceremony is more of a cultural event, rather than religious. Will understanding the importance and symbolism of the rituals bring them any closer to their faith?

Nalini also speaks to Indian politician Shashi Tharoor. While unsparing in his criticism of certain elements sometimes linked to Hinduism, he describes himself as a proud, believing Hindu. How is he able to navigate the apparent contradictions he sees within his religion?

Nalini tries to make sense of what it means to be a Hindu today, talks to those practising the faith in their own distinct way and decides whether there is a version of Hinduism out there which best suits her.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrp9py)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxqlnwrxp6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqccnzb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2wpg)
The Public Misunderstanding of Science

The Public Misunderstanding of Science: Racist robots

Sometimes it’s right to be sceptical about new technologies. US tech reporter Katherine Gorman joins Sue Nelson to report on artificial intelligence and how it’s rapidly pervading our lives. Katherine reports from New York on controversial facial recognition cameras and we hear how regulators are struggling to keep up with innovation.

Image: Concept illustration of an electronic eye (Credit: ValeryBrozhinsky/Getty Creative)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrpfg2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Evidence (w3ct2zpk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrpk66)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5cjf05jht)
COP26 president says summit is ‘last’ hope to hit 1.5C target

The climate change summit, COP26, has begun in the Scottish city of Glasgow. COP26 president Alok Sharma says the summit is the world’s “last, best hope” to hit the 1.5C target

Also in the programme: Israel's young conscientious objectors; and a new life in the West for some LGBT Afghans


(Picture: Members of the press photograph speakers on stage during the opening ceremony of COP26 at SECC in Glasgow. CREDIT: Christopher Furlong/Pool via REUTERS)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrpnyb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlw)
A focus on spectacles

If you had to name the innovations that have transformed human civilisation, you might suggest the printing press or the Internet, but the humble pair of spectacles has also revolutionised the way many of us experience the world. It's said that an astonishing three quarters of those in the US use glasses or contact lenses to correct their vision. And the World Health Organisation estimates that more than a billion people in low-and-middle income countries are living with sight problems that could be corrected by the right pair of specs. But how and when were glasses first invented? What impact have they had on societal development? And what are some of the ways we've stigmatised, or even elevated, people who wear them?

Joining Rajan Datar to explore the history of spectacles are Travis Elborough, a historian of popular culture from the UK. He’s recently published a book called Through The Looking Glasses: The Spectacular Life of Spectacles; Stefana Sabin, a German literary scholar and the author of In The Blink of an Eye – A Cultural History of Spectacles – which has just been translated into English; and Professor Kovin Naidoo, Senior Vice President in social impact at the French-based optics company, Essilor. He’s also former CEO of the Brien Holden Vision Institute. He originally trained as an optometrist in his native South Africa.

[Image: Hugh of Saint-Cher, 1351-1352. Found in the Collection of Chiesa di San Nicolò, Treviso; Credit: Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkq)
The art of counting

Who is counting, why are they counting, and what are they are counting?
These three questions are important to ask when trying to understand numbers, according to Deborah Stone, author of Counting, How We Use Numbers to Decide What Matters.
In this episode, she explains how different ways of totting up can have real-world consequences.


(Image: Betta Blue Red Veiltail / Getty Images / zygotehasnobrain)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrpspg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrpxfl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0thnybxk5d)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrq8nz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxqlnwswn7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqcdmyc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrqdf3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 01:06 today]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrqj57)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5cjf06hgv)
World leaders meet ahead of summit to slow climate change

World leaders and thousands of delegates are gathering for a major UN summit to try to avert the worst ravages of global warming. Big questions remain about their ability to deliver the action needed, but the UK hosts say it’s now or never.

We asked officials, experts, and activists whether there’s the collective will to agree and implement the sort of change that's needed to limit global warming to a manageable level.

Also in the programme: Nadifa Mohamed's novel, The Fortune Men, is shortlisted for this year's Booker Prize for fiction; a new life in the West for some LGBT Afghans; and we celebrate the man whose restaurant created a timeless Italian classic - the dessert, tiramisu.

(Photo: Delegates stand in front of a banner at the UN Climate Change Conference (COP 26) in Glasgow Credit: Reuters/Yves Herman)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrqmxc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywx4y93ygb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sp76r802z)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqcf05r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjsyzrqrnh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 A Geochemical History of Life on Earth (w3ct2x97)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkmdqcf3xw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Pick of the World (w3ct2z25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]



MONDAY 01 NOVEMBER 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7c3qf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v1gzt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7c7gk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlhnsfqvmt)
Business concerns about climate ‘irreversible’

Business leaders’ concerns about the environment are here to stay, say experts, as the COP 26 summit to address global warming begins in Glasgow. We speak with one of the richest people in Australia, Dr Andrew Forrest, the chairman and major shareholder of Fortescue Metals Group. The mining magnate is talking up his new business: producing the clean fuel, green hydrogen. He tells us what's behind the pivot, and how big business has a duty to lead the charge towards a climate-friendly future. Economist Michael Hughes tells us that he has noticed a green sea change in investor behaviour, shown by the questions put to company boards. Plus, Ado Campeol, the man known in Italy as the 'father of tiramisu' has died aged 93 .We speak to food writer Lydia Capasso about the origin of the dessert, which was created by accident.

(Image: Prime Minister Scott Morrison tours Fortescue Metals mining operations with CEO Andrew Forrest on April 15, 2021 in Karratha, Western Australia. Photo by Justin Benson-Cooper/The West Australian - Pool/Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v1lqy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct1m8g)
Chilean mummies

Think of ancient mummies, and you might imagine Egyptian pharaohs in their highly decorated cases. But in actual fact, Chile has the oldest mummies in the world. Unesco recently addded the archaeological sites and the artificial mummification of the Chinchorro culture to its World Heritage List. Around 300 mummies have been excavated from three different sites in the north of the country, near the border with Peru. The nomination took decades of work, drawing on many years of different scientific studies.

Jane Chambers travels to Arica in northern Chile to find out more about the Chinchorro culture and how they used mummification to remember their dead, 7000 years ago.

Photo: Chilean mummy from the Chinchorro culture (Credit: Bioarchaeology lab of the University of Tarapaca)


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7cc6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cfz5y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v1qh2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr7)
What do young activists want from COP?

This week will bring around 25,000 world leaders, business people, policy shapers and campaigners together in Glasgow for COP26, a global climate summit that’s seen as a crucial moment in the fight to curb global warming.

Among them will be young activists who in the last few years have made global headlines with the School Strike for Climate movement. Beginning with Greta Thunberg in Sweden in 2018, millions of young people have taken to the streets to try to get their voices heard.

We hear from three young people devoted to climate activism. In the Philippines, Mitzi Jonelle Tan grew up amid severe typhoons that would flood her bedroom. In India, Disha Ravi saw her grandparents struggle to get enough water for their farm. And in the United States, 19-year-old Jerome Foster has been invited to join President Biden’s Environmental Justice Advisory Council.

Do these young activists feel their voices are being heard? What action do they most want to see from world leaders at COP – and how realistic are their demands?

Presenters Kate Lamble and Jordan Dunbar talk to Disha Ravi, Mitzi Jonelle Tan, Jerome Foster and the BBC’s Environment Correspondent, Matt McGrath.

Producer: Sophie Eastaugh
Researcher: Natasha Fernandes
Series producer: Alex Lewis
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound engineer: Neil Churchill


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7cgyt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 A Geochemical History of Life on Earth (w3ct2x97)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v1v76)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Pick of the World (w3ct2z25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l24)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7clpy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cg6p6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v1yzb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9c)
Understanding the impact of climate change on women

It’s understood the climate crisis will disproportionately disrupt the lives of women around the globe. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two academics about the work they do and the impact of changing weather patterns on women.

As the primary food growers and water collectors, women are hardest hit by floods and droughts. They’re also less financially equipped to flee when natural disaster strikes, and vulnerable to gender-based violence.

Professor Asmeret Asefaw Berhe is a biogeochemist – a soil scientist – at the University of California, Merced. Her research is focused on understanding how disturbances in the environment affect the cycles of essential elements such as carbon and nitrogen through the soil system. While extreme weather events often result in the degradation of soil, she says effective land restoration could play an important role in sequestering CO2 and slowing climate change.

Dr Katharine Vincent is a British geographer working in southern Africa. Her research has focused on vulnerability to climate change and the adaptations that can be made. She’s particularly interested in how these changes impact men and women differently, investigating institutional aspects of climate change, adaptation, food security and social protection.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE
L: Asmeret Asefaw Berhe, credit Teamrat A Ghezzehei
R: Katharine Vincent, credit Klaus Wohlmann


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7cqg2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2z0knssgt)
World leaders gather for the 'COP26' climate conference

COP 26 - its here, two weeks of highest level negotiation and argument to save the world...is that overplaying the climate conference in Glasgow?

Dozens of world leaders arrive to make promises they may or may not intend to keep on reducing emissions - throughout the programme we hear about the fear, the funding and the forever delay which has to end...

Also on the way the relaxation of travel restrictions in Australia as well as the gas war between Algeria and Morocco.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7cv66)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2z0knsx6y)
China and Russia dismiss climate criticism

As the much anticipated COP26 climate summit prepares to kick off, President Biden criticises the leaders of some of the world's biggest polluters for not attending.

We will hear from one leader who is attending - that's Prime Minister Boris Johnson who described the world at "one minute to midnight" on climate change and warned that an ambitious outcome from the summit was still "in the balance".

We also cross to China - after its leader has decided to stay at home.

And we will find out why Russia has decided to close its office at NATO?


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7cyyb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2z0knt0z2)
COP 26: Scientists concerned that action on climate has been left too late

COP 26 is here, two weeks of highest level negotiation and argument to save the world. Dozens of world leaders arrive to make promises they may or may not intend to keep on reducing emissions. We hear about the fear, the funding and the forever delay which has to end.

Also, we hear from one of the world’s foremost climate communicators on how to get the climate message across.

And why violence between Israelis and Palestinians is on the rise - a special report from our correspondent from a Palestinian village torn apart by the conflict.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7d2pg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6l)
Fatih Birol: Can greenhouse gas emissions be eliminated?

Stephen Sackur speaks to Fatih Birol, executive director of the International Energy Agency. He believes greenhouse gas emissions can effectively be eliminated within a generation. But is he ignoring the political realities he’ll encounter at the COP26 summit in Glasgow?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v2fyv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5l)
Silicon Valley and the climate crisis

As the world focuses its attention on climate, we’re looking to the money that could create real change. Venture capital is the type of financing that can take new ideas to the mass market and it’s finally looking to fund clean, green tech. First, to understand how start-ups go about seeking VC funding, Vivienne Nunis hears from founder Diedre McGettrick. Gabriel Kra, of the venture capital firm Prelude Ventures, explains the shift he's seen in low-carbon investing. But Silicon Valley attracts the world’s sharpest minds, so why aren’t more tech leaders coming up with the bright ideas needed to fight climate change? We ask founder-turned-investor, Ben Parr. Producer: Sarah Treanor. Image: Smart farming technology. Credit: Getty Images

Correction: Prelude Ventures invested approx. $125m in the past 12 months, in deals totalling $1.3bn. It didn’t invest $1.3bn on its own, as was stated in the programme.


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1p)
The miracle of walking

An American doctor, Ignacio Ponseti, revolutionised the treatment of children born with 'club foot' - where their feet are turned in and under, and which had previously been treated with surgery. His method, which relied on physiotherapy and the use of braces, was less invasive and more successful long-term. Caroline Wyatt has been hearing from one of Dr Ponseti's early patients.

This is a CTVC production.

Photo: Dr Ignacio Ponseti.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7d6fl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v2kpz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr4)
Could we completely switch to renewable energy?

As the world slowly moves away from using fossil fuels for electricity, one tiny Scottish island has proved it’s possible to rely almost entirely on renewables.

The inner Hebridean isle of Eigg used to get its power from diesel generators. But in 2008 its residents launched the world’s first electricity system powered by nature, and the Crowdscience team wants to know exactly how they did it, and whether such a model could work in other places with no national grid? Marnie discovers that the community is key to the success of this project, meeting the maintenance men who taught themselves to install equipment and solve any problems themselves, and hearing from residents who’ve changed their habits to use less juice. With the mainland more than an hour away by a once-daily ferry, this kind of resourcefulness is vital. Hydroelectric generators harness the power of running water and are complemented by wind turbines and solar panels on peoples roofs, meeting 95% of Eigg’s energy needs. Now others are learning from this unique experiment and we meet the Malawians who were inspired after visiting Eigg. A solar grid in the village of Sitolo has provided power to thousands of people, and the people who designed it are planning others.

Thanks to Eigg residents: Sue Hollands, Maggie Fyfe, Eddie Scott, Bob Wallace, Greg Carr


Presented by Marnie Chesterton
Produced by Marijke Peters for BBC World Service.

This episode of CrowdScience has been edited to correct a factual error

Image: Wind turbines on Eigg Credit: Getty Images


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7db5q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1ptb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v2pg3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct2yqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7dfxv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0ch1x3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v2t67)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p9c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7dknz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtx)
Cooking for my mother helped her share a hidden history

Grace M. Cho grew up Korean-American in a small town in Washington state. Her mother, Koonja, was a Korean woman who met Grace’s white-American father – a merchant marine – on a US military base in the aftermath of the Korean war. Charismatic and determined, Koonja did everything she could to 'fit in' in their town: she threw a party for Grace and her brother’s teachers to help them integrate at school; she learned to cook American food; and she also founded a thriving woodland-foraging business that led to her being nicknamed “the blackberry lady” by the locals. Still, Grace never felt the family was truly accepted, and they often experienced harassment. When Grace was 15, Koonja suffered a psychological breakdown that would, years later, be diagnosed as schizophrenia. Struggling to help, Grace turned detective and uncovered her mother’s traumatic history in Korea. But it was through cooking – and recreating Korean recipes Koonja had not tasted for decades – that Grace and her mother were able to find comfort and connection. Grace's memoir is called Tastes Like War.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Anu Anand
Producer: Laura Thomas

Picture: Grace M. Cho
Credit: Patrick Bower


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7dpf3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0ch9dc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v31ph)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7dt57)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrgwsgv)
COP26: Climate change summit opens in Glasgow

Opening COP26, UK PM Boris Johnson calls on his fellow leaders to "act now" on climate change as the world is running out of time. UN chief Antonio Guterres warns those assembled that we are "digging our own graves".

Also in the programme: The International Handball Federation changes its rules around women’s uniforms after widespread accusation of sexism; and the desperate situation of hundreds of migrants in Libya who've escaped from detention centres.

(Photo: U.S. President Joe Biden arrives for the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow. Credit: Reuters).


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7dxxc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v395r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y488225z516)
Glasgow climate conference under way

World leaders have converged in Glasgow, Scotland, to seek a new climate change deal. We get analysis of the role business can play in decarbonising the world economy, from Rowan Douglas of the resilience hub of the world's largest insurance broker, Willis, Towers, Watson, which is part of the coalition for climate resilient investment. Billionaire Dr Andrew Forrest tells us why his company Fortescue Future Industries is focused on the potential for green hydrogen in the world's future energy mix. And we further examine hydrogen's possible role as a clean fuel with Paul Elkins, professor of resources and environment policy at University College, London. Also in the programme, the chief executive of Barclays Bank has stepped down as UK regulators investigate his links with the convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein. BBC business editor Simon Jack explains the background. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare explores how to make the best use of our time at work.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Nisha Patel and Gareth Barlow.

(Picture: Boris Johnson and Antonio Guterres wait to greet leaders. Credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7f1nh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxtvnbw1ly)
COP26: World leaders address delegates

World leaders and activists have been addressing the delegates at the COP26 climate summit. We'll bring highlights of the main speeches and talking points at COP26. We also explain what is happening in global climate negotiations like COP26 and what’s expected from this gathering.

Among those who won’t attend the summit are the Chinese and Russian presidents. We’ll speak to our BBC Chinese and BBC Russian colleagues about why the two leaders are not there, and what their climate plans are.

Many eyes are also on the US, the world’s second-biggest emitter of carbon. We’ll speak to two journalists about two Senate Democrats from their states -West Virginia and Arizona - who are refusing to back President Biden’s climate package.

We’ll discuss today's Covid stories with our regular coronavirus expert - Dr Eleanor Murray - assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health.

(Photo: Britain"s Prime Minister Boris Johnson delivers a speech during the opening ceremony of the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, Scotland, Britain, November 1, 2021. Credit: Yves Herman/Pool/File Photo/Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7f5dm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxtvnbw5c2)
COP26: World leaders address delegates

President Biden has told the UN climate conference that the battle against global warming is a moral imperative but also offers incredible opportunities for world economies. We'll get highlights of the speeches and hear reaction from around the world.

We’ll also explain what is happening in global climate negotiations like COP26 and what’s expected from this gathering.

Rescuers in Nigeria are searching for survivors in the rubble of a high-rise building that has collapsed in the commercial capital, Lagos. We speak to our reporter and an eyewitness.

Researchers say the number of people who have died of Covid-19 has now surpassed five million. We’ll discuss that and other today’s Covid stories with our regular coronavirus expert, Professor Manfred Green, a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel.



(Photo: U.S. President Joe Biden speaks during the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, Scotland, Britain November 1, 2021.Credit: Evan Vucci/ Pool via REUTERS)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7f94r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7fdww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cj0w4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v3s58)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nmtx6j8q7)
2021/11/01 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7fjn0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v3wxd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqb)
Geoengineering The Planet

Even with the best efforts, it will be decades before we see any change in global temperatures through our mitigation efforts. Given the pace of global heating and the time lag before our emissions reductions have any impact, scientists are exploring additional ways of reducing global temperature. Gaia Vince explores ways of actively removing carbon from the atmosphere. She discusses the idea of BECCS, biological energy with carbon capture storage, and DAC, direct air capture with Simon Evans of Climate Brief. Sir David King, Chair of the Centre for Climate Repair at Cambridge University, explains how he is planning an experiment in the Arabian Sea that will allow the oceans to take up more carbon. Professor Rachael James of the University of Southampton talks about her experiments in enhanced rock weathering, where she finds ways of speeding up the slow continual process in which carbon dioxide in the atmosphere dissolves in rainwater, forming a weak acid that reacts with the surface of rocks. She hopes this will lock up more carbon and bring benefits to farmers and mining companies.

And psychologist Ben Converse of the University of Virginia considers whether we might find geoengineering a socially acceptable approach to tackling climate change.

Editor: Deborah Cohen

Picture: Clouds, Credit: Gary Yeowell/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7fnd4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrgxmpr)
Climate change summit COP26 continues

It is the second day of the international climate change summit, COP26. There are delegates from around 200 countries attending the event. Today saw speeches from United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres, US President Joe Biden and Prime Minister Boris Johnson amongst others.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi stated a number of pledges to fight climate change. One of which was a pledge that India would have net zero emissions by 2070. A key goal of the COP26 summit was for countries to commit to reaching net zero emissions by 2050.

Also in the programme: NASA calls for scientific rigour when finding signs of alien life; and the world reaches 5 million deaths from Covid-19.

(Picture: A person walks past a projection during the UN Climate Change Conference (COP26) in Glasgow, Scotland. CREDIT: REUTERS/Yves Herman/Pool)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7fs48)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 Global Questions (w3ct2zq8)
Global climate debate

In a pivotal moment in the global fight against climate change, world leaders are gathering at COP26, the UN's flagship climate conference in Glasgow. The BBC hosts a high-level global climate debate with a panel of leading international political figures, who will take questions from young people in the studio and around the world on the challenges presented by climate change, and the hopes for global solutions to be achieved at the COP climate change meeting.

Presented by Kirsty Wark, the debate will give young people across the world the chance to hold their leaders to account on action for climate change.

Panel: Kwasi Kwarteng MP, UK Secretary of State for Business; Gina McCarthy, the US National Climate Advisor to President Biden; Múte Bourup Egede, Prime Minister of Greenland; Diego Mesa, Colombia's Minister of Energy and Mining.


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7fwwd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cjhvn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v484s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172ycrnrm9zchb)
Glasgow climate conference under way

World leaders have converged in Glasgow, Scotland, to seek a new climate change deal. We get analysis of the role business can play in decarbonising the world economy, from Rowan Douglas of the resilience hub of the world's largest insurance broker, Willis, Towers, Watson, which is part of the coalition for climate resilient investment. Billionaire Dr Andrew Forrest tells us why his company Fortescue Future Industries is focused on the potential for green hydrogen in the world's future energy mix. And we further examine hydrogen's possible role as a clean fuel with Paul Elkins, professor of resources and environment policy at University College, London. Also in the programme, the chief executive of Barclays Bank has stepped down as UK regulators investigate his links with the convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein. BBC business editor Simon Jack explains the background. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare explores how to make the best use of our time at work.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Nisha Patel and Gareth Barlow.

(Picture: Boris Johnson and Antonio Guterres wait to greet leaders. Credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 02 NOVEMBER 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7g0mj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z7m)
The child environmental activist of the 1990s

To mark the start of the UN Climate Change Conference, or COP26, taking place in Glasgow in the UK, we’re looking back at the history of our awareness of climate change with some of the scientists and activists who have been trying to solve this global crisis in recent decades. We hear from environmental activist Severn Cullis-Suzuki, who was just 12 years old when she implored world leaders to take action, at the 1992 UN Earth Summit in Rio De Janeiro. Plus, how a pioneering American scientist provided compelling evidence of man-made global warming back in the 1950s, and measuring melting glaciers at the top of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania.

Photo: Severn Cullis-Suzuki (2nd left) and her friends at the Earth Summit in Rio in 1992. Courtesy of Severn Cullis-Suzuki.


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7g4cn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqnn24chpc)
COP26 kicks off

The 26th annual Conference of Parties, COP26, begins in Glasgow. World leaders met to rally each other into action against catastrophic climate change, including Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who urged developed economies to financially assist the developing economies to meet their emissions pledges. We speak to Aayushi Awasthy, a PhD scholar in Energy Economics at the University of East Anglia and Rishikesh Ram Bhandary, Assistant Director of the Global Economic Governance Initiative at the Boston University Global Development Policy Centre. Japan has a new prime minister, Fumio Kishida, and he has new ideas for the country – dubbed socialism by some and even mocked as similar to policies of the Chinese Communist Party. In Canada, a tussle for control over a media empire mirrors that of HBO’s hit comedy Succession – we hear from Jesse Brown, host of the Canadaland podcast. And Stephanie Hare talks about how best to spend that most precious asset: time.

Throughout the programme we’re joined by peter Morici, Professor Emeritus of International Business at the R.H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland and in Japan by Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus, Hitotsubashi University in Tokyo.

Photo: Indian Prime Minister arrives at the COP26 Credit: Getty Images


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7g83s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cjw31)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v4md5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct1d0b)
Warrior elephant guardians

In a remote part of Northern Kenya, former Samburu warriors are elephant keepers, rescuing and raising baby elephants in what’s thought to be Africa’s first community owned and run elephant sanctuary.

At Reteti Elephant Sanctuary they rescue baby elephants that have been injured, orphaned or abandoned. They look after them, rehabilitate them and release them back to the wild. It is transforming the way local communities relate to elephants, in a way that benefits both humans and animals. The sanctuary has brought employment, revenue and a sense of pride. Reteti is on community owned land and it is managed by community members. The local people are now protecting the animals they live alongside.

Now the sanctuary is starting to employ women from the community as keepers too, who bring their own set of skills to the work.

The elephants are also proving an unexpected catalyst for peace, bringing tribes together from all over Northern Kenya, that normally fight over land and resources. Now they are finding ways to work together in peace, to protect the elephants.

(Photo: A baby elephant saying hello to one of the keepers. Credit: Michael Kaloki)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7gcvx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7ghm1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0ck3l9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v4vwf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdv)
Ibrahim Mahama: Seeing beauty in the discarded and decayed

As the United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP26 gets under way, we meet the Ghanaian artist who is already doing his bit for the environment - by repurposing materials at the end of their working life to create his large-scale installations. Seeing beauty in the disused, discarded and decayed and telling stories of commodity and globalisation. Even turning a ruined silo in Tamale into a cultural institution.

Ibrahim Mahama’s architectural installations have been seen around the world - in cities like New York, Athens and London - but in 2019, the then 31 year old was preparing work for Ghana’s first ever National Pavilion at the Venice Biennale.

Reporter Frenny Jowi joined Ibrahim as he travelled to Sekondi-Takoradi and Accra, to meet with local workers and search for abandoned and salvaged materials to use in his creations; such as jute sacks found in food markets, old documents from a locomotive workshop, mesh cages used to smoke fish and boats no longer fit for purpose.

Join Ibrahim and Frenny for an evocative journey along the south coast of Ghana.

Presented by Frenny Jowi
Produced by Frenny Jowi and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Image Credit: White Cube George Darrell


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7gmc5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2z0knwpcx)
COP 26: Agreement to end deforestation by 2030

In the first major deal of the UN climate summit, world leaders will today announce a commitment to stop deforestation by the end of the decade.

We have a special report on logging in the Democratic Republic of Congo where large numbers of people rely on burning charcoal for their fuel.

Another big announcement was India's pledge to reach net zero emissions by 2070 -- but is that 20 years too late?

School board elections in the United States are turning into battlegrounds over masks and vaccines.

And an update from Nigeria where a race is on to find survivors of that building collapse in Lagos.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7gr39)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2z0knwt41)
Ending deforestation a top priority for leaders at COP26

World leaders gathered in Glasgow for the COP 26 climate summit agree to reverse deforestation. But how high a priority is climate for those who cut trees in the Amazon rain forest for a living?

We'll hear from a Nigerian climate activist about what her country's priorities should be at COP 26.

And we'll bring you the arresting sounds - and, we now find out - rhythm of lemurs in Madagascar.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7gvvf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2z0knwxw5)
World leaders pledge to save the world's forests

In the first major deal of the UN climate summit, world leaders will today announce a commitment to stop deforestation by the end of the decade.

Delegates at the conference will also agree to work together to promote low- carbon technology and drive out polluting industries. We'll go live to Glasgow.

Also, school board elections turning into battlegrounds in the United States over masks and vaccines.

And what does the Band Queen and Lemurs have in common? A new study shows that the Indri Indri Lemur have a fascinating call, but also a rhythm similar to a well known song.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7gzlk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plq)
Ways to save the planet: Ancient solutions

Sixteen percent of greenhouse gas emissions could be saved by using biochar, a simple fertilising technique adopted by tribes in the Amazon thousands of years ago. If produced on an industrial scale, scientists say biochar could be as powerful as renewable energy in the fight against climate change.


Picture Credit: Carbofex and Puro.earth


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v5bvy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgm)
Buy now, pay later

The future of credit for the young, or just another way of getting into debt? Would you pay for a product now, when you could simply delay payment for free? Ever since the pandemic forced millions of us to stay at home, millions more of us have been buying goods online using a new form of credit. Buy now, pay later offers goods interest free and it's proving very tempting to many younger shoppers. But is it just a new form of debt trap? Ed Butler speaks to Nick Molnar co-founder of Afterpay and Sebastian Siemiatkowski, the cofounder and CEO of Klarna, the Swedish based firm that's now the world's biggest buy now pay later provider. He also hears from Alice Tapper of personal finance forum Go Fund Yourself who says regulation is desperately needed to protect younger consumers. Plus Amber Foucault from the consumer spending analytics company Cardify who says that until global regulation comes in, we should watch out for many younger customers getting into financial trouble using this system.

(Picture: "Payment due!" written on a calendar with a bank card on top. Credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x66)
Judgement at Nuremberg

It's 75 years since verdicts were delivered on leading German Nazis at the International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg for their instrumental role in the Second World War and the killing of millions of Jews. The trial, which lasted almost a year, made history and the principles of international criminal law first established there are still fundamental to international justice today. Robby Dundas is the daughter of the British judge at the trial, Sir Geoffrey Lawrence. She was in court, watching the proceedings and talks to Caroline Bayley about her memories of the trial.

(Photo: View of the judges bench in Nuremberg International Military Tribunal (IMT) court in September 1946. Credit AFP/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7h3bp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct1d0b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v5gm2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7h72t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7hbty)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0ckyt6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v5q3b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7hgl2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jx5)
Steve Van Zandt on bands, bandanas and Bruce Springsteen

Rock guitarist and actor Steve Van Zandt has had a remarkable life by any measure. After seeing The Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show at the age of 13, he immediately knew what he wanted to do with his life. He learned guitar and formed a band, coming into contact with the man he would call The Boss - Bruce Springsteen. Steve tells Anu Anand about his many years as a guitarist for the E Street Band and how he became the man behind The Boss. He also talks about his extraordinary decision to leave the band in 1984 and how it led to him being "reborn" on a different path - that of political activist. After visiting South Africa in 1984 when the country was still living under apartheid, Steve created the movement Artists United Against Apartheid and they released a protest song called Sun City. In the late 1990s Steve's life took yet another turn when he took on the role of Silvio Dante in the hit TV show The Sopranos - a role in which, once again, he was the man behind the boss. Steve's memoir is called "Unrequited Infatuations".

The clip you heard came from The Ed Sullivan Show, broadcast on 9th February 1964, and produced by CBS, Ed Sullivan, Bob Precht and directors Tim Kiley and John Moffitt.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Anu Anand
Producer: June Christie

Picture: Steve Van Zandt performs on stage with The Disciples of Soul in 2019
Credit: Sergione Infuso/Corbis via Getty Images


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x66)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7hlb6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cl69g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v5yll)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2zqb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7hq2b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrgzpcy)
COP 26: World leaders pledge to halt and reverse deforestation

Trees are often cut down to create grazing land for cattle. The deal promises about 19 billion dollars in public and private funding. We'll have more details as well as a special report from Brazil, where deforestation in the Amazon has soared to a twelve year high.

Also on the programme we return to Afghanistan where more than twenty people have been killed in an attack on a military hospital in Kabul. And we hear about the life or Dr Aaron T Beck, who revolutionised the world of psychotherapy and who has died at the age of 100.

(Picture: Cattle in the Amazon region. Credit: Getty images)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7httg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v662v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bqd803z75)
India pledges net zero carbon by 2070

India's leader Narendra Modi committed his country to net zero carbon emissions by 2070. We get reaction to the pledge, made at the UN climate summit in Glasgow, from Sunita Narain, director of the Centre for Science and Environment in Delhi. And we get a summary of all the other significant developments at COP26 from the BBC's Matt McGrath. One of those was a pact signed by more than a hundred world leaders to end and reverse deforestation by 2030. Elodie Toto reports on a possible alternative to deforestation in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where rainforest is often turned into charcoal for fuel. Also in the programme, a digital token inspired by the popular South Korean Netflix series Squid Game has lost almost all of its value as it was revealed to be an apparent scam. Matt Binder of Mashable explains the background. Plus, on Purple Tuesday, which aims to raise awareness of the value and needs of disabled customers, the event's founder Mike Adams discusses the problems people with varying disabilities have experienced online.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Nisha Patel and Gareth Barlow.

(Picture: Narendra Modi at COP26. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7hykl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxtvnbyyj1)
COP26: World leaders pledge to end deforestation

Our coverage of the COP26 international climate summit in Glasgow continues. We’ll focus on a couple of the issues on today’s agenda: deforestation and methane emissions. After the global deal to end deforestation, we’ll bring together people who are connected to forests in their lives and work.

We’ll explore what deforestation really means in practice, where it happens and the ways in which it contributes to climate change, with the help of a BBC journalist who has been looking at the subject in-depth.

And our regular medical expert, Dr Isaac Bogoch, Infectious Diseases physician and scientist at the University of Toronto, will talk us through the day's coronavirus stories.

Picture: Burnt woodland is pictured next to a palm oil plantation following fires near Banjarmasin in South Kalimantan province, Indonesia, in 2019 (REUTERS / Willy Kurniawan / File Photo)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7j29q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxtvnbz285)
COP26: Leaders pledge to cut methane

Our coverage of the COP26 international climate summit in Glasgow continues. We’ll focus on a couple of the issues on today’s agenda: deforestation and methane emissions.

More than 80 countries have signed up to a deal to reduce methane. We'll explain where it's emitted and how it contributes to climate change.

After another pledge to end deforestation, we bring together people who are connected to forests in their lives and work.

We'll also talk through the day's coronavirus stories with our regular expert, Dr Swapneil Parikh in Mumbai.

Picture: A pipeline that moves methane gas from the Frank R. Bowerman landfill to an onsite power plant is shown in Irvine, California (REUTERS / Mike Blake / File Photo)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7j61v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jx5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x66)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7j9sz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0clxs7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v6p2c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nmtx6m5mb)
2021/11/02 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7jfk3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct1d0b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v6sth)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsx)
How green is our data?

Digital Planet is looking at green tech during COP26. Firstly, we discover the green credentials of your favourite websites with the Green Web Foundation. Can we really make the internet more environmentally friendly? Also we’ll be hearing about the homes in Sweden’s Stockholm that are heated using waste heat from local data centres. And how a company in Wyoming in the US is using technology to change the way data centres are cooled, using liquid and not air, and then using this excess heat for agriculture.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington

Studio Manager: Nigel Dix
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: A processing facility at the Riken Center for Computational Science in Japan)
Credit: STR/JIJI PRESS/AFP via Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7jk97)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrh0jlv)
More than a hundred countries agree to cut methane

It is the third day of the international climate change summit, COP26. Today, it was announced that more than a hundred countries have signed up to an agreement to cut methane emissions by 30% by 2030.

In September the United States of America and the European Union announced the pledge to cut methane emissions. Now, more than a hundred countries have signed up to the pledge. The European Union Commission Chief, Ursula von der Leyen, claimed cutting methane was "one of the most effective things we can do to reduce near-term global warming."

Also in the programme: an agreement to end deforestation; and local school board elections in America.

(Picture: Climate activists hold giant illuminated letters spelling out "End Climate Betrayal" during a gathering at Pacific Quay, Glasgow. CREDIT: Owen Humphreys/PA Wire)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7jp1c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywyz8rxzlb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sr1k7216z)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v719r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycsh6bxrg2l)
India pledges net zero carbon by 2070

India's leader Narendra Modi committed his country to net zero carbon emissions by 2070. We get reaction to the pledge, made at the UN climate summit in Glasgow, from Sunita Narain, director of the Centre for Science and Environment in Delhi. And we get a summary of all the other significant developments at COP26 from the BBC's Matt McGrath. One of those was a pact signed by more than a hundred world leaders to end and reverse deforestation by 2030. Elodie Toto reports on a possible alternative to deforestation in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where rainforest is often turned into charcoal for fuel. Also in the programme, a digital token inspired by the popular South Korean Netflix series Squid Game has lost almost all of its value as it was revealed to be an apparent scam. Matt Binder of Mashable explains the background. Plus, on Purple Tuesday, which aims to raise awareness of the value and needs of disabled customers, the event's founder Mike Adams discusses the problems people with varying disabilities have experienced online.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Nisha Patel and Gareth Barlow.

(Picture: Narendra Modi at COP26. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7jssh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v751w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 03 NOVEMBER 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7jxjm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7k18r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqnn24gdlg)
Rich nations agree to fund South Africa's transition from coal

A partnership of developed nations and economies has agreed to give South Africa $8.5bn to help the country transition away from coal-powered energy. Our reporter Vumani Mkhize visits a village on the brink of a coal mine to assess the damage to the country and its people’s health caused by coal mining, and we speak to Mafalda Duarte of Climate Investment Funds, one of the organisations responsible for helping countries swap their coal energy capacity for renewables. Elsewhere at COP26, over 100 world leaders have pledged to end major deforestation – we hear from Elodie Toto in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Taxi drivers in New York are staging a hunger strike over unpayable debts attached to their operating licences – Augustine Tang is one of them and he speaks to us on the day New Yorkers go to the polls to elect a new mayor. And the battle of the billionaire philanthropists trudges on – Elon Musk has offered to pay the $6bn the World Food Programme says would help people facing famine around the world – but only if he can see the spending plan beforehand.

Throughout the programme we’re joined by Diane Brady, Assistant Managing Editor of Forbes in New York and David Kuo, co-founder of The Smart Investor in Singapore.

Photo: US Climate Envoy John Kerry in Glasgow Credit: Reuters


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7k50w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cms04)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v7j98)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2wph)
The Public Misunderstanding of Science

Back to school

Does the misunderstanding of science begin in schools? Science journalist and former BBC Science correspondent, Sue Nelson visits the UK’s National Space Centre to discover how space is being used to entice children into studying science. She also speaks to teachers around the world about the challenges of ensuring the next generation better understand the scientific and technological world around them.

Presenter: Sue Nelson
Producer: Richard Hollingham

(Photo: Pupils of the Ecole Vivalys elementary school, wearing spacesuits costumes for their project Mission to Mars. Credit: Stefan Wermuth/Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7k8s0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jx5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x66)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7kdj4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cn0hd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v7rsj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnj)
10. Kashke

If only - Lyse Doucet talks to poet, former ambassador and former Mujahideen fighter, Massoud Khalili. Now 74, he’s lived through many of the pivotal moments of 43 years of war in Afghanistan. He and Lyse reflect on the missed opportunities and the mistakes that haunt Afghanistan's recent history. And in the last of our ten part series, Lyse asks Afghans what they want for their country: their main wish, peace.

Series Producers: Louise Hidalgo, Tim Mansel, Ed Butler, Neal Razzell
Series Editor: Penny Murphy
Commissioning Editor: Steve Titherington
Series music composed by Arson Fahim
Production Coordinators: Maria Ogundele & Iona Hammond
Studio Managers: James Beard & Tom Brignell


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7kj88)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2z0knzl90)
COP26: Private capital vow to fund carbon cuts

At COP26 in Glasgow it's finance day at the climate conference: After the grand promises of the world leaders attending, it is now down to delegates to get down to the fundamental questions of how to pay for those ambitions to limit global warming. We get a reminder - from Bangladesh - of how changes in climate are making some people's lives un-liveable.

We have news of a big election in the US state of Virginia, seen as an indicator of President Biden's popularity.

And X-ray cars that could see pedestrians round corners and through buildings with their magic X-ray eyes. It is not a joke, it is possible and we hear how it could make us all safer.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7kn0d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2z0knzq14)
COP26: Vow to switch finance away from harming nature

A $130 trillion plan to reshape the global economy around limiting global warming is announced. So what can it actually achieve? We hear from the south of Madagascar where they have not seen proper rain in four years. And in sports news, we look at how Cristiano Ronaldo saved Manchester United again in last night's Champions League.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7krrj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2z0knzts8)
COP26: Big carbon policy change from big finance

Today at the climate conference in Glasgow, hundreds of the world’s biggest banks, insurers and pension funds have promised to play their part and invest trillions of dollars to reduce carbon emissions.

How hard is it to be a climate activist in the Philippines? We speak to a young activist to find out why it is one of the most dangerous place to be an environmental campaigner.

As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention vote to recommend Covid-19 vaccinations to five to 11-year-old children. We look at why parents in Florida are resisting this move.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7kwhn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc3)
Fiona Hill: What did Trump mean for America and the world?

The Trump Presidency challenged many public officials to make a choice: obey directives from the White House against their better judgment, or take a stand and face the wrath of the pro-Trump movement. Fiona Hill, a former Russia adviser at the White House, took a stand. She was a key witness in Donald Trump’s first impeachment trial, and has since had time to reflect on what his presidency meant for America and its geopolitical standing.

(Photo: Fiona Hill, the National Security Council’s former senior director for Europe and Russia. Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v87s1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jpd)
Guy Hands on deal making and private equity

Guy Hands, the founder of Terra Firma, opens up on the highs and lows and risks involved in deal making and private equity. From being bullied at school to becoming a household name, buying and selling businesses from cinema chains and pubs to waste management, aircraft leasing and green energy companies. We hear his side of the deal that turned sour, the acquisition of multinational music company EMI in 2007, and how his addiction to doing deals has affected his personal life.
Ed Butler is in conversation with Guy Hands about his new book, The Dealmaker.
(Image: Guy Hands; image credit: John De Garis)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8g)
The enduring legend of Fu Manchu

The evil criminal mastermind Fu Manchu was a recurring character in Hollywood films for decades. He epitomised racist stereotypes about China and the Chinese which shaped popular thinking in the West. Vincent Dowd has been talking to writer Sir Christopher Frayling and academic Amy Matthewson about his long-lasting influence.

Photo: Christopher Lee as Fu Manchu in film The Vengeance of Fu Manchu. 1967.


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7l07s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2wph)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v8cj5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7l3zx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Story of Aids (w3ct2wpb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7l7r1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cnvq9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v8m0f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7lch5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzf)
My last chance to find our long-lost family

For her whole life Phyllis Herbert wondered who her mother was, having grown up in a brutal Dublin orphanage in the 1930s. But when she had her own daughter Sally, she hid the details of her troubled upbringing, despite the closeness of their relationship. Then in 2004, when Phyllis' health started to deteriorate in old age, Sally knew she didn't have much time to uncover the missing pieces of her mother's life. What she found was life-changing for both of them. Sally's book is called The Missing Pieces of Mum.

Almost every day for 40 years, expert diver Jim Abernethy has been swimming with sharks at a patch of shallow crystal-clear ocean in the Bahamas known as Tiger Beach. At any given moment Jim can be surrounded by 30 or more tiger, reef and lemon sharks. But Jim has a unique relationship with these underwater predators who swim up to him for affectionate nose-rubs. He tells Outlook's Clayton Conn about removing fishing debris from their mouths with his own hands and his mission to change the world's perception of these endangered sea creatures.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Datshiane Navanayagam

Picture: Phyllis Herbert and baby Sally
Credit: Courtesy of Sally Herbert


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7lh79)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cp36k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v8vhp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7llzf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrh2l91)
UN alleges human rights violations by all sides in Ethiopian conflict

A joint investigation by the Ethiopian and United Nations human rights bodies includes evidence of human rights violations by all parties in the conflict in the Tigray region of Ethiopia. We hear the latest from the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, and speak to UN human rights chief Michelle Bachelet.

Also in the programme: As the COP26 climate conference continues in Glasgow, we look at the prospects for international cooperation on climate change with American economist Jeffrey Sachs. And why has Facebook decided to abandon facial recognition technology?

(Photo: UN Human Rights report on Tigray region of Ethiopia discussed at press conference at United Nations in Geneva. Credit: EPA/MARTIAL TREZZINI)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7lqqk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v92zy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cykbx7ts6)
Finance sector pledges greater climate action

Hundreds of banks and money managers pledged to consider the planet when making decisions. There have been multiple promises on climate and finance in the past, and we discuss whether the new announcements are different with Tom Picken, forests and finance campaign director at the Rainforest Action Network. And Catherine McGuinness, policy chair at the City of London Corporation gives us the perspective of financial institutions. We also talk to the environmental activist George Monbiot about his view that a complete redesign of the capitalist system is needed in order to limit global temperature rises. Also in the programme, Facebook has announced that it will no longer use facial recognition technology to identify people in pictures uploaded on the social network. We get reaction to the move from Stuart Miles of the technology website Pocket Lint. Plus, the US Department of Justice is suing to prevent the takeover of publisher Simon & Schuster by Penguin Random House. Benedicte Page is deputy editor of The Bookseller, and explains the background.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Gareth Barlow and Faarea Masud.

(Picture: UK Chancellor Rishi Sunak holds up a green box. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7lvgp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxtvnc1vf4)
COP26: Who pays for transition to green economies

On day four of the COP26 climate summit, the focus has been on how the world finances the transition to green economies. We’ll explore, with the help of our business reporters, how the funding by governments and private sector is being distributed around the world, especially to the developing world.

We’ll also look at the plans to move away from the use of fossil fuels and where this leaves communities which depend on these industries. We’ll speak to two miners who live in “coal towns” and hear how they feel about the future of coal industry.

A new report into the conflict in Ethiopia says all sides may have committed war crimes. We’ll get the latest on the crisis.

The US is rolling out Covid-19 vaccines for children aged five to 11 this week. We hear from parents of young children and also speak to our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Maria Sundaram who is an infectious disease epidemiologist at Marshfield Clinic Research Institute in Wisconsin.

(Photo: Remains of the submerged Roberts Camp at Kampi ya Samaki, after it was flooded due to unprecedented rise of water levels in Lake Baringo in Baringo County, Kenya, 21 October 2021 Credit: Daniel Irungu/EPA)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7lz6t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxtvnc1z58)
COP26: Coal towns

The CO26 climate summit president Alok Sharma has said coal power should be consigned to history. So how are people whose livelihoods and family histories are built on coal feeling. We speak to two coal miners in the US and in Canada about the future of coal industry.

On day four of COP26 the focus has been on how the world finances the transition to green economies. We’ll explore, with the help of our business reporters, how the funding by governments and private sector is being distributed around the world, especially to the developing world.

A new report into the conflict in Ethiopia says all sides may have committed war crimes. We’ll get the latest on the crisis.

The US is rolling out Covid-19 vaccines for children aged five to 11 this week. We hear from parents of young children and also speak to our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Pedro Hallal.

(Photo: Craig House in Indiana, US Credit: Craig House)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7m2yy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7m6q2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cptpb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v9kzg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nmtx6q2jf)
2021/11/03 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7mbg6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2wph)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v9pql)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw4)
Hunt for rare resistance to SARS CoV-2

An International team of scientists has launched a global hunt for rare people who may be genetically resistant to SARS CoV-2 infection. Individuals who’ve been exposed to the virus living in families where everyone else in the household got infected, who repeatedly tested negative and didn’t mount an immune response. Claudia Hammond speaks to immunologist Evangelos Andreakos, part of the team at the Biomedical Research Foundation in Athens about this fascinating quest. And Claudia hears from Norway about more reassuring research into Covid vaccination in pregnancy.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A woman walking on the streets of Manhattan, New York City. Photo credit: Lechatnoir/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7mg6b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrh3fhy)
UN: all sides may have committed war crimes in Ethiopia

The United Nations and the Ethiopian Human Rights Commission have released a report, following a joint investigation, saying all sides in the conflict in Ethiopia’s Tigray region may have committed war crimes. Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed said the report had found no evidence of genocide.

Also in the programme: reaction to elections in America; and the possibility of a carbon tax.

(Picture: Michelle Bachelet, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, speaks to the media about the Tigray, joint investigation into alleged violations of international human rights. CREDIT: EPA/MARTIAL TREZZINI)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7mkyg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywyz8s0whf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sr1k74y42)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71v9y6v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycswxq7606b)
Finance sector pledges greater climate action

Hundreds of banks and money managers pledged to consider the planet when making decisions. There have been multiple promises on climate and finance in the past, and we discuss whether the new announcements are different with Tom Picken, forests and finance campaign director at the Rainforest Action Network. And Catherine McGuinness, policy chair at the City of London Corporation gives us the perspective of financial institutions. We also talk to the environmental activist George Monbiot about his view that a complete redesign of the capitalist system is needed in order to limit global temperature rises. Also in the programme, Facebook has announced that it will no longer use facial recognition technology to identify people in pictures uploaded on the social network. We get reaction to the move from Stuart Miles of the technology website Pocket Lint. Plus, the US Department of Justice is suing to prevent the takeover of publisher Simon & Schuster by Penguin Random House. Benedicte Page is deputy editor of The Bookseller, and explains the background.

(Picture: UK Chancellor Rishi Sunak holds up a green box. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7mppl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nc3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vb1yz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



THURSDAY 04 NOVEMBER 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7mtfq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Story of Aids (w3ct2wpb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:06 on Saturday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7my5v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqnn24k9hk)
Fed winds up US stimulus package

The Federal Reserve begins its long-anticipated tapering of asset purchases, effectively ending the Covid stimulus package which started more than 18 months ago. The BBC’s Business Correspondent in New York Samira Hussain tells us what it means for the future of the American economy. On the third day of COP26 in Glasgow it’s the turn of the private sector to announce its plans for how to decarbonise the various industries – we talk to Paul Simpson of the Carbon Disclosure Project to find out how it can be done; while Shell’s CEO Ben van Beurden insists the company can go carbon neutral, but it will need to be paid for using profits from fossil fuels. Private equity manager Guy Hands tells us about his most infamous deals, and the BBC’s AnaMarie Silic talks to the TikTokers using the social media platform as a digital resume. Throughout the programme we’re joined by Mehmal Sarfraz – co-founder of the Current PK – in Lahore in Pakistan and by Andy Uhler of our sister programme Marketplace in Austin, Texas.

Picture: The Federal Reserve building in Washington, DC Credit: Reuters

Presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Nisha Patel and Russell Newlove


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7n1xz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cqnx7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vbf6c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gy6)
The Ahr Valley flood

The worst effects of climate change are often framed as a problem for the future. But for some, the worst has already happened. As world leaders gather in Glasgow to talk about how to bring down emissions, Assignment tells the story of three places which have been at the sharp end of extreme weather events.

Germany's Ahr Valley was a picturesque chain of ancient towns and villages along a small, beautiful river; a region popular with tourists, famous for its wine production. Then, on one terrifying night in July, the water rose with little warning, engulfing almost every house. It was the worst flood in the valley for 700 years. People fought their way through the water, clung for hours to roofs and trees before they were rescued. More than 100 lost their lives. Almost all bridges were destroyed, most homes left uninhabitable, businesses ruined. Even now, many have been unable to return. Tim Whewell travels through the valley, meeting some of the victims as they recall how they struggled to escape the flood, remember the friends and relatives they lost and try to rebuild their lives.

Reported and produced by Tim Whewell
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Destruction in Germany’s Ahr Valley after the July 2021 floods. Credit: Reuters/Wolfgang Rattay/File Photo)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7n5p3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jzf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x8g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7n9f7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cqxdh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vbnpm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgj)
One small change

The pressure to tackle climate change by altering what we eat is huge, and it can be a daunting prospect. But you don’t have to go vegan, shop 100 per cent local, or start your own allotment to make a difference.

This week, as world leaders gather for a key climate conference in Glasgow, we’re asking you what small changes you’ve made to your everyday food habits to make them a little bit greener.

Plus, Tamasin Ford hears from a chef in Nigeria about the special role he thinks the professionals have to play, and we ask for one life-changing piece of advice from an expert and writer on food waste.

(Picture: Hand reaches for apple, Credit: Getty/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Michael Elégbèdé: chef, ÌTÀN Restaurant and Test Kitchen in Ikoyi, Nigeria
Tamar Adler: author ‘An Everlasting Meal’, New York, USA

And Food Chain listeners:

Annabell Randles: London, UK
Mike Hoey: Berkely, California
Simone Osman: Maputo, Mozambique
Yael Straver Laris: Geneva, Switzerland
Kate Minogue: Lewes, UK
Karine Young: Cape Town, South Africa
Jeremy Okware, Uganda
Rebecca Neo: Singapore


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7nf5c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwqv0kh)
Global emissions bounce back following lockdowns

Some 190 nations now say they will cut out coal - which could make a major contribution to the fight against climate change. But several of the biggest users are not signing up - so how big a step forward is it? We'll get an expert view.

We'll hear about a caravan of migrants travelling through Mexico, many of them believed to be sick - part of what is being described as a migrant crisis in the country.

And our correspondent looks back on the summer fires in Greece and asks if the country is doing enough to prepare for mega-blazes.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7njxh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwqv49m)
Despite renewable investments China's share of emissions have increased

China now accounts for almost a-third of the world's carbon dioxide emissions, which have risen back to pre-pandemic levels.

The US special envoy for the Horn of Africa is to hold talks in Ethiopia on the escalating crisis in Tigray.

New research has found that vaccination can reduce cases of cervical cancer in women by almost ninety percent.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7nnnm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwqv81r)
New report on carbon emissions gives stark warning

Today an annual report on global carbon emissions says they're shooting back up to record levels, not seen since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic.
Meanwhile delegates at the climate conference in Glasgow have pledged to end investment in coal - we'll speak to our climate correspondent.

We'll also be looking at how rising temperatures will impact on our health and well being in the future.

And the international criminal court says it's set to open up an investigation on human rights violations suffered by protestors at the hands of the Venezuelan authorities in 2017.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7nsdr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2v)
Why are we seeing global shortages?

Empty shelves are becoming commonplace. And prices are rising. Charmaine Cozier explores the role that the pandemic, and a sudden demand explosion, have had on supply chains. Around the world workers are being slow to return to their jobs, the container shipping industry is struggling to get goods to their destinations and manufacturing disruptions are causing a reduction in vital components. And in addition to the pandemic, extreme weather events have resulted in ruined harvests. How long will it take for things to return to normal?

Contributors:
Jose Sette, International Coffee Organisation
Stacy Rasgon, Bernstein Research
Dr Nela Richardson, ADP
Professor Alan MacKinnon, Kuehne Logistics University

Presenter: Charmaine Cozier
Researcher: Chris Blake
Producer: Rosamund Jones

(Image: Empty supermarket shelves: REUTERS/Henry Nicholls)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vc4p4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jb3)
Is inflation making a comeback?

Inflation has hardly been seen in the developed world economies for the last three decades. But now some economists are warning it could be returning with a vengeance, because of supply chain problems, post-Covid exuberance, and higher wage demands. What is going on, and should we all be worried? We hear opposing views from Claudia Sahm, former economic adviser to the Federal Reserve and the White House, Steve Hanke of Johns Hopkins University, and Andrew Sentance, senior adviser at Cambridge Econometrics and a former member of the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee.

Image: Full shopping cart in supermarket aisle (Credit: Getty Images).


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3y)
The end of the 1956 Hungarian Uprising

On November 4th 1956 Soviet tanks rolled into the Hungarian capital Budapest, crushing the country's short-lived popular uprising against Soviet rule. Nick Thorpe spoke to Miklos Gimes who was just six years old when the end of the revolution sent his father to his death, and Miklos and his mother into exile.

This programme is a rebroadcast.
Photo: Soviet tanks on the streets of Budapest. Credit: Getty Images.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7nx4w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gy6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vc8f8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7p0x0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm1)
The Devils: Dostoevsky’s novel of political evil

The Devils, The Possessed, or Demons, as it’s also known in translation, is Fyodor Dostoevsky’s most political novel, but it’s also his bleakest and funniest. It’s a hundred and fifty years since its publication and two hundred years since its author’s birth. The novel tells the story of a group of young revolutionaries who run riot in a small provincial town in Russia, all under the indulgent eye of their elders the liberal and progressively minded elite. It is a grim prophecy of totalitarian rule in the 20th century in what is a penetrating psychological study of the human consequences of extreme philosophical ideas.

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss Dostoevsky and his novel The Devils or Demons, is Tatyana Kovalevskaya, Professor at the Russian State University for the Humanities in Moscow and the author of the bilingual edition Fyodor Dostoevsky on the Dignity of the Human Person; Carol Apollonio, Professor of the Practice of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at Duke University in the United States and President of the International Dostoevsky Society; and Dr Sarah Hudspith, Associate Professor in Russian at the University of Leeds, and author of Dostoevsky and the idea of Russianness.

Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service.

[Image: A production of The Devils staged at the Union Theatre, London. Credit: Stagephoto (Perri Snowdon as Stavrogin), Matt Link (Tara Quinn as the little girl Matryoshka). Design by Spiff]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l92)
Zola Budd

At the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, South African-born Zola Budd collided with the home favourite, Mary Decker, in the final of the women’s 3,000 metres. Decker was left weeping on the ground, while Budd was booed by the crowd and had to leave the US with a police escort after receiving death threats. Simon Watts introduces the memories of Zola Budd as recorded in the BBC archives.

PHOTO: Zola Budd, left, with Mary Decker in the 1984 Olympic final (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7p4n4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0crrmd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vchxj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7p8d8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3y)
The medical textbook that inspired me to flee my homeland

Dr Waheed Arian spent his early childhood in Kabul, Afghanistan during the Soviet-Afghan conflict. He and his family would often hide in cellars to escape the fighting and they were soon forced to flee to a refugee camp in Pakistan. He contracted tuberculosis and during his treatment was inspired by a doctor who gave him his first ever medical textbook and a stethoscope. Aged 15, he arrived alone in the UK and worked three jobs while studying. His hard work earned him a place to study medicine at Cambridge University, but his ambitions hung in the balance as the trauma and memories of his early life came back to haunt him. He's written a book about his life called In the Wars and his charity is called Arian Teleheal.

Precious objects or artworks are at risk of theft, vandalism, even terror attacks in some cases. Protecting them is quite a task. Outlook's Alessia Cerantola went to meet one of the people doing just that - an Italian man called Alessandro Goppion who's been given the job of protecting some of the most valuable objects in the world, including the Mona Lisa painting. This report was first broadcast in February 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Datshiane Navanayagam

Picture: Dr Waheed Arian
Credit: Dr Waheed Arian


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7pd4d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cs03n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vcrds)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7phwj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrh5h64)
More than forty countries pledge to phase out coal

Major coal-using countries including Poland, Vietnam and Chile are among those to make the commitment.In a separate commitment, 20 countries, including the US, pledged to end public financing for "unabated" fossil fuel projects abroad by the end of 2022.

Also on the programme: A huge success story regarding a vaccine for cervical cancer - a study indicates it reduces cases of the disease by nearly 90 percent; we assess the cost of the year long war in Ethiopia between the government and the Tigray People's Liberation Front; and third time lucky, the South African writer, Damon Galgult has won the Booker Prize for his novel, The Promise.

(Photo: An aerial photo shows a coal electric generating plant in San Antonio, Texas, as world leaders meet at COP26 in Scotland to address reductions in carbon emissions and global warming. Credit:EPA/Tannen Maury)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7pmmn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vczx1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49h7538tdf)
Bank of England keeps rates on hold

Confounding market expectations the Bank of England kept interest rates on hold at 0.1%. With inflation rising around the world, we ask Sarah Hewin, chief economist for Europe and the Americas at Standard Chartered bank what actually might persuade policymakers to increase rates. And we examine the implications of rising inflation with Claudia Sahm, former economic advisor to the Federal Reserve and White House, and Steve Hanke of Johns Hopkins University. Also in the programme, the BBC’s Russell Padmore reports on whether the state-owned Nigeria National Petroleum Corporation could be privatised any time soon. Plus, we hear from Svein Tore Holsether, chief executive of the world’s biggest producer of fertiliser, Norway’s Yara, about the company’s ambition to make fertiliser without any fossil fuels at all.

Today’s edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Philippa Goodrich, Gareth Barlow and Faarea Masud.

(Picture: The Bank of England. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7prcs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxtvnc4rb7)
COP26: More than 40 countries pledge to quit coal

More than 40 countries have committed to move away from coal, in pledges made at the COP26 climate summit. Major coal-using countries including Poland, Vietnam and Chile are among those to make the commitment. But some of the world's biggest coal-dependent countries, including China and the US, did not sign up. We'll discuss how significant this pledge is, and how important coal is around the world.

Also, we'll discuss 'fast fashion' - the cheap mass production of garments, and the habit of wearing clothes only few times before discarding them. This can contribute to greenhouse gas levels, cause water and air pollution, and create a lot of waste. So what is the alternative? We'll speak to three people across the world who have created their own 'sustainable fashion' businesses.

And every day we're joined by a health expert to answer questions from around the world on Covid-19. Today our guest is Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland.

(Photo: People drive past a coal-fired power plant in Shanghai, China October 21, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Aly Song)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7pw3x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxtvnc4w2c)
COP26: Sustainable fashion

One of the many talking points at the COP26 climate summit is how to make the fashion industry more environmentally friendly. We'll discuss 'fast fashion' - the cheap mass production of garments, and the habit of wearing clothes only few times before discarding them. This can contribute to greenhouse gas levels, cause water and air pollution, and create a lot of waste. So what is the alternative? We'll speak to three people across the world who have created their own 'sustainable fashion' businesses.

Also, more than 40 countries have committed to move away from coal, in pledges made at the COP26 climate summit. Major coal-using countries including Poland, Vietnam and Chile are among those to make the commitment. But some of the world's biggest coal-dependent countries, including China and the US, did not sign up. We'll discuss how significant this pledge is, and how important coal is around the world

And every day we're joined by a health expert to answer questions from around the world on Covid-19. Today our guest is Dr Helen Wimalarathna, Molecular Epidemiologist at the University of Buckingham in the UK.

(Photo: Devyani Kapoor started a sustainable fashion company in India. Credit: Devyani Kapoor)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7pzw1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7q3m5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0csqlf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vdgwk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nmtx6szfj)
2021/11/04 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7q7c9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gy6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vdlmp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4k)
Jet fuel from thin air

Scientists in Switzerland have developed a system which uses solar energy to extract gases such as hydrogen and carbon dioxide from the air and turns them into fuels for transport. So far they have only made small quantities in experimental reactors, however they say with the right investment their alternatives to fossil fuels could be scaled up to provide a climate friendly way to power transport, particularly aviation and shipping. We speak to Aldo Steinfeld and Tony Patt from ETH Zurich and Johan Lilliestam from the University of Potsdam.

And what will rises in global temperature mean where you live? An interactive model developed by Bristol University’s Seb Steinig shows how an average global rise of say 1.5C affects different regions, with some potentially seeing much higher temperatures than others. Dan Lunt – one of the contributing authors to this year’s IPCC report discusses the implications.

We also look at racism in science, with problems caused by decisions on the naming of ancient bones more than 200 years ago. As more is known about human evolution, the way we classify the past seems to make less sense says Mirjana Roksandic.

And the issue of colonialism looms large in the international response to conservation. Its legacy has been discussed at COP26 and as Lauren Rudd, author of a new study on racism in conservation tells us, this hangover from colonial times is limiting the effectiveness of current conservation initiatives.

Image: President Biden and his wife travelling to the G20 summit in Rome and COP26 in Glasgow.
Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images.

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7qc3f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrh6bf1)
Ethiopia: 'This is going to get nasty'

Tigrayan forces have warned they could march on the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa to prevent what they call a "genocide" against Tigrayans. A journalist there tells Newshour people are worried.

Also in the programme: the world's first anti-viral pill to treat Covid has been approved for use in Britain, but when will it be available elsewhere?

And as the UN climate conference discusses the end of coal power, we'll hear about the impact of floods in Germany and mega-fires in Greece.

(Photo: An emotional ceremony has been held in Ethiopia to mark the first anniversary of the war. Credit: EPA)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7qgvk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywyz8s3sdj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sr1k77v15)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vdv3y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycs2gzmllp4)
Biden sets Covid vaccine mandate for businesses

President Biden has set a mandate which says workers at firms with more than 100 employees must be double vaccinated by 4th January. We get reaction from our reporter Michelle Fleury in New York.
With inflation rising around the world, we examine the implications with Claudia Sahm, former economic advisor to the Federal Reserve and White House, and Steve Hanke of Johns Hopkins University.
Also in the programme, the BBC’s Russell Padmore reports on whether the state-owned Nigeria National Petroleum Corporation could be privatised any time soon.
Plus, we hear from Jen Jenisch, chief executive of Swiss cement maker Holcim Group, about the company's plans to go green.

(Picture: President Joe Biden. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7qllp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vdyw2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]



FRIDAY 05 NOVEMBER 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7qqbt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3ct1rm1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7qv2y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqnn24n6dn)
Biden sets Covid vaccine mandate for businesses

President Biden has set a mandate which says workers at firms with more than 100 employees must be double vaccinated by 4th January. We get reaction from our reporter Michelle Fleury in New York.
As more and more of us shop online, many customers are choosing to 'buy now, pay later' with interest free credit options. But is this just tempting young shoppers to get into debt? Ed Butler has a special report.
Also in the programme, from COP26 we hear from Jen Jenisch, chief executive of Swiss cement maker Holcim Group, about the company's plans to go green.
Plus, a study in the US has shown that employees now take fewer sick days since the pandemic forced people to work at home. We speak to Erica Pandy, business reporter at Axios, about the results of the report.

Sasha Twining is joined throughout the programme by Jasper Kim, professor at Ewha University in Seoul, and by Erin Delmore, political reporter in New York.

(Picture: Joe Biden. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7qyv2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0ctktb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vfb3g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tzx)
In conversation with Barcelona's Martin Braithwaite

The Denmark international Martin Braithwaite talks about a tumultuous time for Barcelona following the exits of Lionel Messi and Ronald Koeman. And Braithwaite also describes how his positive mindset has benefitted his career and helped him top become the best possible version of himself.


Picture on website: Martin Braithwaite walks out onto the pitch for a match between Barcelona and Real Sociedad at the Camp Nou (Photo by David S. Bustamante/Soccrates/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7r2l6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7r6bb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0ctt9l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vfklq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2z39)
COP26: Faith and the environment

This week leaders from over 200 countries have been making pledges to cut carbon emission at the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26). But for many climate activists on the ground, action speaks lounder than words. Reporter Rajeev Gupta speaks to activists who say they are compelled by their faith to act now.

He hears from Alphonce Munyao, a Catholic activist from Kenya, who says climate change there is causing droughts, leading to wild animals entering urban areas in search of food and water. Alphonce says religion for him is not just about preaching, but is a call to action.

William Morris, an Evangelical, says he grew up believing there was no need to protect the planet as the world was temporary. He describes why many in his tradition believe climate change is a hoax, and how he now goes back into his church and tries to persuade people otherwise.

Rajeev also speaks to Sheila Chauhan, a Hindu who runs a project called Green Karma – Blue Planet. Sheila says the protection of the environment is one of the fundamental teachings of her faith, and that the energy of God is found in all living things. She describes her own deep connection to the environment, and how she has made it her life's work to spread the message of climate protection.

Tonga is a country that faces an extensive threat from rising sea levels: some scientists have predicted the South Pacific island could be completely drowned within 50 years. Sixteen-year-old twins Louisa and Lorrain describe how the changing weather has been affecting them, and how they want religious leaders to do more than just talk about the issues.

Finally, Rajeev speaks to Malaysian activist Aroe Ajoeni, who has been working with indigenous Malay tribes. Aroe says the indigenous people are aware things have been changing, but thought it was because the gods were angry with them. She says by helping them to understand the impacts of carbon emissions, some of the youngsters in the community have started to question why they should be affected by the pollution of others.

Presented and produced by Rajeev Gupta

Image: A protester at the COP26 summit in Glasgow (Credit: Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7rb2g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2z0kp5d36)
COP 26: Richer nations to help developing countries tackle climate crisis

Our top story today: the pledges and promises in their billions come in at the COP 26 climate change summit - but is that enough to satisfy climate activists? We'll hear from the international campaign group, 350.org.

Our correspondent has been looking at why so many North Koreans are going hungry - with fears that the most vulnerable could starve.

We'll get the latest on the conflict in Ethiopia - and a sense of how the wider region is reacting to the crisis.

And Mamma Mia! ABBA are back again - the 70s super group, now made up of musicians in their 70s, have a new album out, and our arts correspondent has been to meet them.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7rftl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2z0kp5hvb)
Billion dollar pledge to help nations struggling with climate change

The $100 billion dollars pledged for climate finance will finally start to be paid as from next year to developing nations by richer nations in order to mitigate the effects of global warming.

Europe is now the epicentre of the Coronavirus pandemic. So says the World Health organisation as COVID-19 cases on the continent surge with the prediction that half a million could die by February. This news comes as once again countries are approaching record levels - with the more transmissible Delta variant continuing to dominate transmission across Europe and Central Asia.

We hear about the trial due to begin of the three white men accused of killing Ahmaud Arbery the 25 year old African American who was shot last year while jogging.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7rkkq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2z0kp5mlg)
US Special Envoy confirms pledge on helping developing countries tackle the climate crisis by 2022

It's late in coming but developed nations will deliver one hundred billion dollars of climate finance to help developing countries every year from 2022. But the world has been warned that money alone will not fix the problem of climate change.

We'll speak to our climate correspondent this hour to get an idea of what's been achieved so far this week at the climate conference in Glasgow.

New research has uncovered a gene that doubles the risk of lung failure and death from Covid for people from a South Asian background.

We'll speak to the army captain who wants to become the first woman of colour to walk the South Pole.

And in sports news Antonio Conte wins his first game since taking over Tottenham Hotspurs.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7rp9v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n22)
Prime Minister Albin Kurti: Is he a source of instability in the Balkans?

Kosovo has enjoyed independent statehood for 13 years but almost half the world does not recognise it. Stephen Sackur speaks to Prime Minister Albin Kurti who has had a turbulent career. He has been a political prisoner, he launched five tear gas attacks on his own parliament and he has a vision of Kosovo unifying with Albania. Is he a source of instability in the Balkans?

(Photo: Prime Minister Albin Kurti appears on Hardtalk via videolink)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vg1l7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j12)
Nigeria's eNaira: Africa's first digital currency

Central Banks around the world are introducing digital currencies and last month Nigeria became the first African country to launch one - the eNaira. But what is a digital currency and how are Nigerians reacting to theirs? We hear from people on the streets of Abuja. Tamasin Ford speaks to Rakiya Mohammed, director of information security at the Central Bank of Nigeria. Chinwe Egwim, chief economist at Coronation Merchant Bank in Lagos, explains why the eNaira has been introduced and the benefits it could have. Digital currency expert Josh Lipsky of the Atlantic Council puts the launch of the eNaira in the context of the others that are springing up all over the globe.

Producer: Benjie Guy.

(Picture: the eNaira mobile phone app. Credit: enaira.gov.ng)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzf)
When Eritrea silenced its critics

In 2001, the Eritrean government suddenly arrested prominent critics and journalists, and shut down the country's independent press. None of those detained have been seen since. Eritrea, once hailed as a model for Africa, was accused of becoming one of the most repressive states in the world. We hear the story of Eritrean journalist Semret Seyoum, who'd set up the country's first private newspaper. He went into hiding and later tried to escape.

Photo: Getty Images


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7rt1z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nht)
The Squid Game coin scam

How cryptocurrency scams have become an everyday event. Joe Tidy speaks to crypto watcher Dan Arreola about the ease with which scammers can create new coins designed to tempt investors. And is your website killing the planet? Web developer Vineeta Greenwood tells us why modern websites are wasting too much energy. Plus the company behind Second Life discusses Facebook and the metaverse, and Shiona McCallum finds out what happens when your gamer handle matches the name of a popular Netflix series.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vg5bc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7rxt3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1ht9)
Who pays to fix climate change?

The UN Climate Conference in Glasgow is being described as a make-or-break moment for humanity. The purpose of the gathering is to implement the 2015 Paris Agreement, which aims to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial times. Currently the world is way off target, with temperatures still projected to rise higher than is sustainable.

A big part of the problem is the huge cost involved. Developed countries have confirmed they have failed to meet a pledge made in 2009 to provide $100 billion a year in climate finance by 2020. Developing countries say the money is needed now. They require defences to protect their populations from the growing effects of climate change, and to move away from carbon energy and towards renewable sources.

So what is climate finance, what's been promised and will it be be delivered? Join Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests from the UN summit in Glasgow as they discuss who pays to fix climate change.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7s1k7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cvnjh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vgdtm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7s59c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20ft)
Who are the Oromo Liberation Army?

As rebel TPLF forces advance towards the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, other armed groups say they are forming an alliance with them. These include the secretive Oromo Liberation Army, which first appeared in the 1970s. The BBC's Africa correspondent Catherine Byaruhanga was the first international journalist to meet them, at a desert training camp.

The dispute over Scythian gold
When Russian forces seized Crimea from Ukraine in 2014, a unique collection of Scythian treasures from museums in Kyiv and Crimea was being exhibited in Amsterdam. Last week, a Dutch court ruled that the objects were part of Ukraine’s cultural heritage and must all return to Ukraine, not Crimea. The BBC's Daria Taradai tells us what this Scythian heritage means to Ukrainians.

The banana jokes that stopped being funny
A social media craze in Turkey involving Syrian refugees filming themselves with bananas quickly turned sour. What began as a joke has inflamed tensions between Syrians and Turks, and led to the arrest and threatened deportation of some of those taking part. Dima Babilie of BBC Arabic has been investigating.

Pakistan's Taliban problem
When the Taliban took control of Afghanistan, neighbouring Pakistan experienced a rise in extremist Islamist activity in its tribal border areas. Violence and extortion have become commonplace, as BBC Urdu’s Asif Hussain discovered when he visited Orakzai and Bajaur districts in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province.

Climate change and the threat to Thailand's durians
With COP26 in full swing, the BBC's language services have been looking at the impact of climate change in their own regions. BBC Thai picked an item close to their hearts - the famously pungent durian fruit. Changing weather patterns are now interfering with the growing season, as Thanyaporn Buathong explains.

Image: A member of the Oromo Liberation Army
Credit: BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7s91h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cvx0r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vgn9w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7sdsm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrh8d37)
Anti-government alliance formed in Ethiopia

Nine Ethiopian anti-government groups, including the Tigray People’s Liberation Front (TPLF) and Oromo Liberation Army (OLA), have agreed to form an alliance against Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed's administration. It comes as pressure mounts on Mr Abiy, with rebel forces making advances towards the capital. We hear from a reporter in the capital, Addis Ababa. Also from an Ethiopian government minister.

Also in the programme: A racism scandal engulfs one of England's most famous sporting clubs, and the murder trial begins in the US state of Georgia of three white men, accused of the murder of a black man who was out jogging.

(Photo credit: AFP)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7sjjr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vgwt4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y470wz99t0n)
COP26: The story so far

At the end of the first week of climate negotiations in Glasgow we take stock of progress. Claire Shakya is director of climate change at the International Institute of Environment and Development, and discusses the commitments made to find funds to help developing economies tackle climate change. Also in the programme, the US economy added 531,000 jobs in October, beating analysts expectations. The BBC's Michelle Fleury talks us through the latest data. We have a report from Stoke-on-Trent in central England about reported taxi driver shortages, after the organisation representing the industry in the UK said more than half of the country's licensed drivers have not returned to the trade since the pandemic. Plus, the Swedish pop group Abba has released its first album in 40 years, and BBC music reporter Steve Holden tells us why the band has come back together again now.

Presenter: Lucy Burton
Producer: Philippa Goodrich and Russell Newlove

(Photo: Climate protesters on the streets of Glasgow. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7sn8w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxtvnc7n7b)
COP26: Young activists

Thousands of young people have gathered in Glasgow, Scotland, to call for action on climate change. The march has been organised by Fridays for Future, which began in 2018 when Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg and other activists skipped school to protest outside parliament. We'll hear from some of the young people taking part in today's demonstrations to hear their assessments of what the summit has achieved so far.

We'll also get the latest from Ethiopia and the conflict that began over the northern Tigray region. Nine anti-government groups have now announced that they are forming an alliance against the government of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed.

And we go through some of the latest coronavirus headlines of the day with the help of our expert, Professor Marc Mendelson from the University of Cape Town.

Picture: Climate activists Katie Hodgetts and Ruairi Brogan from the UK Youth Climate Coalition taking part in the protest in Glasgow (Credit: Katie Hodgetts)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7ss10)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxtvnc7rzg)
COP26: Delegates

It's day six of the COP26 climate summit, with thousands of young people gathering for a march in Glasgow, Scotland. We hear from some of those who are out protesting. We'll also connect to two delegates, from Jamaica and the Marshall Islands, to find out what happens behind closed doors once world leaders leave COP26.

We'll also get the latest from Ethiopia and the conflict that began over the northern Tigray region. Nine anti-government groups have now announced that they are forming an alliance against the government of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed.

And we go through some of the latest coronavirus headlines of the day with the help of our expert, Professor Marc Mendelson from the University of Cape Town.

Picture: The Climate Envoy of the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Tina Stege, at a pre conference meeting in Milan (EPA / COP26 PRESS OFFICE HANDOUT)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7sws4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20ft)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wzf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7t0j8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxsf0cwmhj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vhcsn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nmtx6wwbm)
2021/11/05 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7t48d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nht)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vhhjs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr9)
Can COP26 deliver on climate change?

The science is unequivocal: human-made climate change is leading the world into an environmental crisis, and time is running out to prevent permanent damage to ecosystems and make the planet uninhabitable for many of us humans.

As communities around the world increasingly experience the devastating effects of global warming, world leaders, policy makers and scientists from all over the globe are attending COP26, the United Nation’s major climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland. Each nation will be frantically negotiating its commitments to tackling emissions - many agree it’s a pivotal moment for the future of humanity.

Crowdscience hosts a panel of three experts taking part in the conference, to hear their thoughts on what progress has been made so far. They answer listener questions on rising sea levels, explaining that a temperature rise of more than 1.5 degrees won’t just affect small island nations but will have serious consequences for every country in the world. We hear about an interactive atlas developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that shows the impact of higher temperatures in different regions.

And presenter Marnie Chesterton asks about the financial barriers that have prevented many people from traveling to COP26 and discovers why it’s vital that people from the global south have their voices heard.

Featuring:

Ko Barrett, Vice-chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)
Dr Saleemul Huq, Director of the International Centre for Climate Change and Development in Bangladesh(ICCCAD)
Dr Tara Shine, Director of Change By Degrees


Produced by Melanie Brown and Marijke Peters for BBC World Service.

[Image: Delegates in the Action Zone at COP26 UN Climate Summit, Glasgow. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7t80j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5fbrh97b4)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7tcrn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172xywyz8s6p9m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172y0sr1k7bqy8)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vhr11)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172ycr8181064y)
COP26: the story so far

At the end of the first week of climate negotiations in Glasgow we take stock of progress. Claire Shakya is director of climate change at the International Institute of Environment and Development, and discusses the commitments made to find funds to help developing economies tackle climate change. Also in the programme, the US economy added 531,000 jobs in October, beating analysts expectations. The BBC's Michelle Fleury talks us through the latest data. We have a report from Stoke-on-Trent in central England about reported taxi driver shortages, after the organisation representing the industry in the UK said more than half of the country's licensed drivers have not returned to the trade since the pandemic. Plus, the Swedish pop group Abba has released its first album in 40 years, and BBC music reporter Steve Holden tells us why the band has come back together again now.

(Picture: Climate protesters on the streets of Glasgow. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjvsb7thhs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkp71vhvs5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3ct1tzx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Geochemical History of Life on Earth 10:06 SUN (w3ct2x97)

A Geochemical History of Life on Earth 23:06 SUN (w3ct2x97)

A Geochemical History of Life on Earth 03:06 MON (w3ct2x97)

A Wish for Afghanistan 04:32 WED (w3ct2jnj)

A Wish for Afghanistan 11:32 WED (w3ct2jnj)

A Wish for Afghanistan 23:32 WED (w3ct2jnj)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gy6)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gy6)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gy6)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SAT (w172xzkmdqc7kly)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SAT (w172xzkmdqc7xvb)

BBC News Summary 07:30 SAT (w172xzkmdqc892q)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkmdqc8dtv)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SAT (w172xzkmdqc8nb3)

BBC News Summary 17:30 SAT (w172xzkmdqc9hk0)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172xzkmdqcb38n)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkmdqcb70s)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkmdqcbl85)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkmdqcbtrf)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkmdqcbyhk)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkmdqcc9qy)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkmdqccfh2)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzkmdqcck76)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkmdqccnzb)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkmdqcdmyc)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkmdqcf05r)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkmdqcf3xw)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172xzkp71v1gzt)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkp71v1lqy)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkp71v1qh2)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkp71v1v76)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172xzkp71v1yzb)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzkp71v2fyv)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172xzkp71v2kpz)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172xzkp71v2pg3)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkp71v2t67)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkp71v31ph)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkp71v395r)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkp71v3s58)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkp71v3wxd)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkp71v484s)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkp71v4md5)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkp71v4vwf)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzkp71v5bvy)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkp71v5gm2)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkp71v5q3b)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkp71v5yll)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkp71v662v)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzkp71v6p2c)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzkp71v6sth)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzkp71v719r)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkp71v751w)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkp71v7j98)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkp71v7rsj)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkp71v87s1)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172xzkp71v8cj5)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkp71v8m0f)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkp71v8vhp)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkp71v92zy)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkp71v9kzg)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzkp71v9pql)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkp71v9y6v)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkp71vb1yz)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkp71vbf6c)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkp71vbnpm)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkp71vc4p4)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzkp71vc8f8)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkp71vchxj)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzkp71vcrds)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzkp71vczx1)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkp71vdgwk)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzkp71vdlmp)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzkp71vdv3y)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkp71vdyw2)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkp71vfb3g)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkp71vfklq)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzkp71vg1l7)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkp71vgdtm)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzkp71vgn9w)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzkp71vgwt4)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzkp71vhcsn)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172xzkp71vhhjs)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172xzkp71vhr11)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkp71vhvs5)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172xzjsyzrk2lf)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjsyzrk6bk)

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BBC News 17:00 WED (w172xzjvsb7lz6t)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172xzjvsb7m2yy)

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