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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 16 OCTOBER 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3zscr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvql360x4pg)
British member of Parliament dies after stabbing

The British Conservative MP Sir David Amess has died after being stabbed multiple times at his constituency surgery in Essex, England. We get an update on the tragedy from Rob Watson, the World Service's political correspondent. Also in the programme, Italy has made it mandatory to prove Covid vaccination, or a negative test, to go to work. Thousands of workers at Trieste port have gone on strike over the mandate, and we get reaction to the new policy from Alessandro Borghese, who is a chef with two restaurants in Milan, and another opening soon in Venice. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis heads to the TED Countdown climate summit in Edinburgh, to find out about innovative approaches to tackling climate change. And Lucy Burton talks to Katherine O'Brien of the British Pregnancy Advisory Service about why women are deciding that it's not a good idea to have a baby in these uncertan times. Plus, we have a report from Arunoday Mukharji in India as the country's festival season gets under way. He hears that whilst there seems to be more enthusiasm on the streets compared to last year, it does not necessarily mean more business. Additionally, a report from Kai Ryssdal from our partner programme Marketplace; Kai has been speaking to the CEO of a flower deivery company to see how she's been affected by the last year.
Lucy Burton is joined throughout the programme by Sinead Mangan of the ABC in Perth, Western Australia.

(Picture: Conservative MP Sir David Amess. Credit: UK PARLIAMENT)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3zx3w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw482j34)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qp8d8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lc3)
Hosting the ICC T20 World Cup 'is a dream come true'

We discuss the finale of the Indian Premier League and after Virat Kohli played his last game as captain of Royal Challengers Bangalore, the team look at how his tenure as captain will be remembered.

We speak to the Chairman of Oman Cricket, Pankaj Khimji who tells us how he feels about hosting the T20 World Cup, how the country has prepared and his predictions on how far his team can go.

And as part of Black History Month in the UK, we hear how the African Caribbean Engagement programme (ACE) is aiming get more British black people playing cricket and improve the number of black professional cricket players in the UK, which has declined by 75% in the last 25 years, and is at less than 1% at recreational level.

(Photo: Khawar Aliof Oman is congratulated after taking the wicket of Namibia’s Zane Green during a ICC Men’s T20 World Cup warm up match between Oman and Namibia. Credit: ICC/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g400w0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fl)
Why I became a journalist

For many the decision to become a journalist emerges slowly, but not for Nataliya Zotova. Writing was always a passion, and the killing of Novaya Gazeta's Anna Politkovskaya inspired her to work at the same newspaper. She shares her journey from shy teenager to BBC Russian reporter.

The Chinese workers who live in fear in Pakistan
Chinese workers who move to Pakistan to work on projects connected to China’s Belt and Road initiative are increasingly being targeted by local militant groups. BBC Urdu's Sarah Atiq visited a factory in Balochistan where the Chinese employees have to live on site under armed guard.

Give us back our gold!
The theme of stolen gold is a popular internet meme used by Brazilians against the Portuguese. Brazil had a huge gold rush in the 18th century, and there's a feeling that nearly all that wealth ended up in Portugal. As BBC Brasil's Vitor Tavares explains, the real story is much more complex.

1, 2, 3: counting around the world
Counting on your fingers is as easy as 1, 2, 3 right? But do you start with your thumb, or your pinkie, or even your index finger? Maybe you get clever and use each finger segment to triple up the number? Counting around the world, with Suping of BBC Chinese, Devina Gupta of BBC Hindi, Grigor Atanesian of BBC Russian and Iman Mohammed of BBC Somali.

Vietnam's pets killed for Covid
Vietnam's extended lockdowns have left many people out of work and forced them to return to their home towns. The story of one family’s return sparked outrage when the authorities destroyed their pets – 15 dogs and one cat. BBC Vietnamese journalist Bui Thu spoke to the family.

Image: Nataliya Zotova at work
Credit: Georgy Malets


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz6)
The doctor killed by an anti-abortion extremist

In America, there are few issues as controversial as abortion. It’s a major fault line that runs through society, dividing families and even influencing elections. In the 1980s and 1990s, some groups within America’s anti-abortion movement became militant. There were hundreds of bombing and arson attacks on clinics. Some groups began to argue that to save the lives of what they called ‘pre-born babies’, it was morally justifiable to murder abortion providers. Journalist Amanda Robb tells Viv Jones how her uncle, Dr Barnett Slepian, was killed in 1998. An anti-abortion extremist shot him through his kitchen window in front of his wife and four young sons. His shooting followed years of harassment and intimidation.

(Photo: Portrait of Doctor Barnett Slepian, his wife and his four sons. Getty/Liaison)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g404m4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1ht2)
Climate change: Lessons from Denmark

Denmark is at the forefront of the global effort to fight climate change. It has committed to cut emissions by 70% below 1990 levels by 2030. It also wants to be carbon neutral by 2050 and end all fossil fuel exploration. Denmark was an early adopter of climate friendly policies and successive governments have taken a consensus driven approach to putting the green transition into motion. Danish start-ups are among those driving innovation to reduce carbon dependency in the cities and in the country. There is even a plan to build artificial “energy islands” in the sea. As governments grasp for solutions to the growing challenge of climate change, can the success enjoyed by a small, rich, northern European nation be scaled up and applied elsewhere in the world?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts in Copenhagen.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g408c8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw482wbj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qpmmn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kpb)
Manta ray and pollution solution

Will a ray save the day? It’s inspiring a way to prevent more pollution of our oceans. As sea water enters a manta ray’s large mouth, plankton are captured and other particles are thrown up by whirlpools. Systems are being developed to extract or capture microplastics from water. To listen online, visit www.bbcworldservice.com/30animals


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dnx)
China-Taiwan tensions

In recent weeks, China has sent a record number of military jets into Taiwan’s air defence zone. The Taiwanese Defence Minister, Chiu Kuo-cheng, has said that tensions between China and the self-governing island are the worst in 40 years. Ros Atkins examines what’s behind China’s military pressure on Taiwan. (PHOTO: Military helicopters carrying a big Taiwanese flag conduct a flyby rehearsal ahead of National Day celebration on 7 October 2021. Credit: Ceng Shou Yi/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g40d3d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytf36vbsch)
Police: British MP's murder a terrorist incident

Police declare the murder of British MP a terrorist incident, as tributes are paid to the late David Amess, after he was stabbed to death while meeting constituents.

Also, the family devastated by the street-fighting in Beirut on Thursday.

Plus, we hear why one woman refuses to accept the Taleban's attempts to stop girls getting a secondary school education.

And New Zealand is holding what it's calling a 'Vaxathon', live on television, to encourage more people to get COVID jabs.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Tom Rivers, a foreign correspondent for ABC News Radio in London, and Shrabani Basu, Indian journalist, author, and historian.

(Image: David Amess with his pugs, Lily and Boat, at the Westminster Dog of the Year competition in London. Credit: PA Wire)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g40hvj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytf36vbx3m)
Tributes pour in for murdered British MP

Tributes are being paid to a British member of parliament, David Amess, after he was stabbed to death while meeting constituents. Police say his murder has been declared a terrorist incident.

Also, an unlikely bond between two mothers, one who lost her daughter to drugs, and the other whose teenager supplied the substance that killed her.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Tom Rivers, a foreign correspondent for ABC News Radio in London, and Shrabani Basu, Indian journalist, author, and historian.

(Image: A vigil is held at Saint Peter's Catholic Church in Leigh-on-Sea, UK, for the murdered MP, David Amess. Credit: REUTERS)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g40mln)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytf36vc0vr)
Afghan intelligence officers fear Taliban reprisals

Afghan special intelligence unit officers trained by the UK say they have been abandoned and are at risk of being killed by the Taliban.

Plus, why one woman refuses to accept the Taliban's attempts to stop girls getting a secondary school education?

And NASA launches a mission to Jupiter, the largest planet in our Solar System.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Tom Rivers, a foreign correspondent for ABC News Radio in London, and Shrabani Basu, Indian journalist, author, and historian.

(Image: Members of the British armed forces disembarking at RAF Brize Norton, Oxfordshire, following their return from Afghanistan. Credit: PA Wire)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qpzw1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p94)
Sisters of skydiving

What does it feel like to fall through the sky? Two women who have broken barriers and mastered the art of skydiving from India and the United States tell Kim Chakanetsa the answer.

The very first time Rachel Thomas flew in an aeroplane, she jumped out of it at 4,500 feet. Fast forward to 2002 and she became the first Indian woman to skydive and set foot on the North Pole. In her 25-year career she has completed 650 skydives in 11 countries, has been a judge at skydiving competitions and has received many awards including the Padma Shri, India’s fourth highest civilian award.

Danielle Williams is an African American disabled skydiver who is an advocate for greater diversity in outdoor adventure sports. She graduated from Harvard in 2008 and spent a decade in the U.S. Army. She has completed over 600 jumps, and in 2014 co-founded Team Blackstar Skydivers. This team, originally made up of six African Americans who linked up in a "black star" formation skydive, has now grown to a diverse group of over 330 skydivers in six countries. She is also the Founder and Senior Editor of Melanin Base Camp, an outdoor blog promoting diversity.

Produced by Emily Naylor and Alice Gioia.

IMAGES:
(L) Rachel Thomas, courtesy of Rachel Thomas
(R) Danielle Williams, credit Ro Asgari


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g40rbs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6c)
Climate: Activists

World leaders, scientists and activists are preparing for next month’s UN climate change summit in Scotland. These talks have been taking place for decades - but you sense the world is watching like never before, as awareness increases around how the planet is changing.

In 1992, a 12-year-old called Severn Cullis-Suzuki from Canada gave a rousing speech and appeal for action at the Earth Summit in Rio. Severn and her father remain long-term environmental activists and host Nuala McGovern brings them together in conversation to hear their thoughts on whether Severn’s speech would be any different today.

Nuala also considers the decisions people are taking to make their contribution towards saving the planet. Three activists in India, Wales and the United States discuss how they’ve changed their lifestyles and why they don’t want to bring children into a world whose future is uncertain due to climate change.


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qq3m5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hds)
Forgiveness

Forgiving someone who has hurt us badly can seem impossible. Bearing a grudge can feel like carry a bag or rocks. Can we learn to move on and forgive?Author of 'Universal Human' Gary Zukav offers insights to Joey from Lebanon, now living in Germany, as he struggles to forgive his brother for creating problems in his marriage and seeks to heal the rift it has caused in his family.

Produced by Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l22)
How a review of the BBC might affect what your hear

The BBC has recently published its five-year review of the World Service. But why is this report of any importance to World Service listeners? And how might it affect what you hear? We hear from the newly appointed director of BBC World Service Liliane Landor to answer your questions.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g40w2x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q65h9h93k)
'The Afghanistan team transformed me'

For a number of years up to 2020, Kelly Lindsey was Head Coach of the Afghan women's football team. Recently she's taken up a position in England with Lewes FC, the first club in the country to pay its female players exactly the same as it's male players. It's no surprise that Kelly should be at such a progressive club, she's always lead by example, and as she explained her experiences in Afghanistan were life changing.

In what’s been a difficult week for American football, we look at the fallout from Jon Gruden's resignation as the Las Vegas Raiders' head coach after allegations of the existence of numerous inappropriate emails surfaced. Plus on the weekend London hosts Miami Dolphins and the Jacksonville Jaguars, we’ll look at the NFL’s plan to expand its International Series to Germany with former NFL star Markus Kuhn.

Before the Olympics in July much of the talk was of whether athletes would use their time on the podium to protest against injustice. As it turns out there was hardly any athlete activism on display in Tokyo, which makes what Raven Saunders did when she received her silver medal in the shot put even more noteworthy. Saunders explains why during the medal ceremony she raised her arms and crossed them in the shape of an X to show support for "oppressed" people.

We drop in on the final day of action at the Huntsman World Senior Games which have been taking place this week in Utah, and we're live at Watford as Claudio Ranieri returns to the Premier league.

Photo: A player of Afghanistan national women football team arrives for a training session at Odivelas, outskirts of Lisbon on September 30, 2021 (Credit: PATRICIA DE MELO MOREIRA/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g40zv1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw483lt9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qqc3f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3t)
How to make your CV stand out

Job applications can be tricky. Most parts of the process are tedious, requiring sharp focus and attention to detail. Catching a recruiter’s eye is not easy, and a growing number of firms are now using artificial intelligence in the initial screening and hiring of candidates.

What is the secret to getting invited for an interview? What about applying for senior leadership positions? And how creative can you get in the age of video resumes and social media hiring?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the do’s and don’ts that make or break a CV.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Harlina Sodhi, entrepreneur, HR professional and leadership coach; Ankit Vengurlekar, India managing editor, LinkedIn News; Rajat Rai Handa, environmental consultant; Rupak Agrawal, CEO, EvueMe Selection Robot; Rajneesh Singh, managing partner, SimplyHR Solutions


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g413l5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Story of Aids (w3ct2wp8)
2. Act Up fights back

The rise of the Aids protest group Act Up accelerated America's response to the crisis.

It began in March of 1987, when the playwright Larry Kramer gave a speech at the Lesbian and Gay Community Services Center in New York’s West Village, telling half the room to stand up. He bluntly informed those in attendance, that was how many people would be dead from Aids in just a few years, if they didn’t fight back.

The US government’s response to the HIV-Aids crisis had been slow, with President Reagan reticent to offend the conservative morals of the Christian Coalition who helped secure his election. In response, the Aids Coalition to Unleash Power - Act Up - took to the streets to demand politicians and public health agencies do more.

In this programme, we hear stories from activists who themselves were living with Aids, who led audacious protests which helped secure numerous concessions from the US government and drugs companies, vastly accelerating the US response to the HIV-Aids crisis. We also hear how in a time when effective treatment was limited, the underworld of the Buyers Clubs stepped in to sell counterfeit medication to those unable to get onto official drugs trials, and hear of the snake-oil opportunists who profited from the desperation of terminally ill people.

The early 1990s were the darkest days of the Aids crisis in America, as it became the leading cause of death for men aged 25-44, but when the ground-breaking combination therapy was introduced in 1996, its impact was immediate.

Presenter: Audrey Brown
Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith
Sound Engineer: Tom Brignell


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g417b9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswcj6mx)
UK Police are describing the murder of a politician as a "terrorist incident"

Following the murder of the Conservative MP Sir David Amess, two other MPs, Joanna Cherry from the SNP and Rupa Huq from the Labour party, tell us about threats they have received in their working lives.

Also on the programme, Min Aung Hlaing, the army general who seized power in Myanmar, has been excluded from an ASEAN meeting. Will this have any effect in Myanmar itself? And New Zealand pushes hard to get 99% of its population fully vaccinated against Covid 19.

(Picture: Floral tributes to the murdered MP Sir David Amess in the town of Leigh On Sea. Credit: Reuters / O'Brien)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g41c2f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tgydq7zt7)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Matthew Peters/Manchester United via Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g41v1y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw484g16)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qr6bb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kpb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8v)
Born to Run: Mexico's Tarahumara Indians

In 2006, Scott Jurek, one of the world's best ultramarathon runners, travelled to the remote canyons of Northern Mexico to race the best athletes from an ancient Mexican tribe. The Tarahumara have a tradition of running huge distances and they gave Jurek one of his toughest races, inspiring the best-selling book, Born To Run. Scott Jurek talked to Simon Watts in 2014.

(Photo: Scott Jurek with Tarahumara runner, Arnulfo Quimare. Credit: Luis Escobar)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g41yt2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfm)
Climate change: Southern hemisphere

The BBC’s Shaimaa Khalil looks ahead to the COP climate change conference in the UK with a panel of guests to discuss the world’s most pressing issues from the perspective of the southern hemisphere. She is joined by Malcolm Turnbull, former Australian Prime Minister; Juliet Kabera, Director General of the Rwanda Environment Management Authority (REMA); Mbong Akiy, spokeswoman for Greenpeace Africa; Natalia Greene, environmental campaigner in Ecuador.

Producers: Helen Towner and Steven Williams
Engineers: Darren Brown, Ian Mitchell and Duncan Hannant

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: A family wading through sea water that flooded their village In Kiribati Credit: Jonas Gratzer/LightRocket/Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g422k6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtl)
The BFI London Film Festival 2021

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined by film critic Anna Bogutskaya to look at this year’s London Film Festival. Interviews with prize-winning film makers and celebrity attendees from around the world

Director Jeymes Samuel and Oscar-winning actor Regina King on the Western The Harder They Fall

Director Justin Kurzel on Nitram, his film that’s causing controversy in Australia

Sir Kenneth Branagh tells us about Belfast – his lightly-fictionalised autobiographical film of his early years growing up in Northern Ireland

A Cop Movie is an unsettling, genre-bending documentary from Mexico about corruption in the police force. We speak with director Alonso Ruizpalacios

Radu Jude - Romanian director of Bad Luck Banging or Loony Porn – tells us why he has included explicit material in his award-winning film

Producer: Oliver Jones

(Image: The cast of The Harder They Fall. Credit: David Lee/Netflix)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g4269b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswck5ly)
Russian Covid daily deaths pass 1,000

Russia has passed 1,000 daily Covid-related deaths for the first time since the pandemic began. The Kremlin has blamed the number on people not taking up the vaccination. Only about a third of the nation has had the vaccine.

Also in the programme: British politicians reflect on the murder of their colleague David Amess, and anti-government protesters take to the streets in Sudan.

(Picture: Health workers escort a Covid-19 patient to a hospital in Moscow. CREDIT: EPA/MAXIM SHIPENKOV)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g42b1g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcj)
Chaotic composing with Jabu Morales, Luedji Luna, Céu and Sara Tavares

Jabu Morales, Luedji Luna, Céu and Sara Tavares discuss how chaotic composing can be, what’s it’s like to write music as a mother, singing in multiple languages, and recording with musical legends.

Jabu Morales is a Brazillian vocalist and percussionist, and a member of the band Ayom, which blends “century old traditions with the black and rhythmical language of lusophone cultures”. Jabu also teaches percussion and studies Candomblé and Afro-Brazilian rhythms, as well as working as a solo artist.

Brazilian singer Luedji Luna's latest album, Bom Mesmo É Estar Debaixo D’Água (It’s Really Good to Be Underwater), has been described by many as the best Brazilian album of the year. It references the Afro-Brazilian religion Candomblé - imported and developed by slaves – as well as Black feminism, love, revenge and celebration, along with her views on Brazil’s social and political issues.

Céu is a Latin Grammy and Grammy Award-nominated singer from São Paulo. She blends “post-Tropicalia samba, valsa, choro, soul, reggae, hip-hop, and jazz”. Her latest album is Acustico, released earlier this year, featuring stripped-back versions of her songs from various albums over the last 13 years.

Portuguese singer, guitarist, and percussionist Sara Tavares released her debut Balancê in 1996. Her latest album was 2017’s Fitxadu, and she’s back with brand new material this year.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g42fsl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywwfdngrbk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0snhp3lsz6)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qrt1z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt8)
South African writing: Damon Galgut, Lebo Mashile, and Kaaps

This week on The Cultural Frontline, Tumi Morake looks at writing from her country, South Africa – focussing on fiction, poetry, and language reflecting the country’s history, politics, social make-up, and identity.

Multi-award-winning author Damon Galgut’s latest novel, The Promise, is his third to be nominated for the Booker Prize, and is in the final running. Set during South Africa’s transition from apartheid, it explores its legacy through the decline of a white farming family, whose promise to their black maid - to give her the house she lives in - remains unfulfilled, as we follow them from the height of apartheid to the present day.

Lebo Mashile is an acclaimed poet, actress and writer. It’s been a tough year in South Africa – with the pandemic, political scandal, and violent civil unrest – but Lebo uses her poetry to try to make sense of what’s happening in the world. She’s been performing at the recent Poetry Africa international festival at the University of KwaZulu Natal, and spoke to reporter Mpho Lakaje about tackling big issues in her work.

Plus, how a new dictionary - with the help of hip hop - can overcome inequality. The South African Kaaps language is commonly used by working class people, however speakers can be negatively stereotyped and suffer discrimination. Now a new Dictionary of Kaaps - in Kaaps, English, and Afrikaans - is being launched by the University of the Western Cape and a hip hop charity, Heal The Hood. Shaquile Southgate of the charity explains the difference he hopes the dictionary will make.

And South African actor, activist, and playwright Dr John Kani. In spring 2020 he was in London performing in his new play, Kunene And The King, when the pandemic sadly brought it to a close. He speaks about the art that lifted his spirits in lockdown, and his love for the jazz of Hugh Masekela.

Presented by Tumi Morake
Produced by Emma Wallace, Mpho Lakaje, Mugabi Turya and Jack Thomason

(Photo: Damon Galgut)



SUNDAY 17 OCTOBER 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g42p8v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yvv)
Wetlands under attack

Since its introduction four decades ago, Spartina alterniflora, a salt-water cordgrass from the USA, has been spreading along China’s coasts.

Today, it covers nearly half of the country’s salt marshes. As the UN Biodiversity Conference COP 15 kicks off in China, we look at how this invasive plant species threatens native species in protected coastal wetlands. Featuring Yuan Lin, East China Normal University, and Qiang He, Fudan University.

In January 2020, Barney Graham and Jason McLellan teamed up to engineer a coronavirus spike protein that now powers the COVID-19 vaccines for Moderna, Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson and Novavax. They discuss their work, a next-generation vaccine using chicken eggs, and the future of pandemic preparedness. Also, a recent Nature survey reveals the extent of abuse against scientists who speak about COVID-19 publicly. Deepti Gurdasani, Queen Mary University of London, shares her experiences of trolling and online abuse and discusses the implications for academia and scientific discourse going forward. And Tom Scott explains how his team uses novel robots and sensors to go into and create 3D digital radiation maps of the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding areas.


Philosophers have long pondered the concept of a brain in a jar, hooked up to a simulated world. Though this has largely remained a thought experiment, CrowdScience listener JP wants to know if it might become reality in the not-too-distant future, with advances in stem cell research.

In the two decades since stem cell research began, scientists have learned how to use these cells to create the myriad of cell types in our bodies, including those in our brains, offering researchers ways to study neurological injuries and neurodegenerative disorders. Some labs have actually started 3D printing stem cells into sections of brain tissue in order to study specific interactions in the brain. Human brain organoids offer another way to study brain development and diseases from autism to the Zika virus.

So, might stem cell research one day lead to a fully-grown human brain, or is that resolutely in the realm of science fiction? If something resembling our brains is on the horizon, is there any chance that it could actually become conscious? And how would we even know if it was?

Host Marnie Chesterton takes a peek inside the human brain and speaks with leading scientists in the field, including a philosopher and ethicist who talks about the benefits – and potential pitfalls – of growing human brain models. Along the way, we'll pull apart the science from what still remains (at least for now) fiction.

(Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g42t0z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw485f07)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qs59c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvx)
The legacy of Henrietta Lacks

Henrietta Lacks died in 1951 from a virulent cervical cancer. A sample of those cancer cells was taken at the time, and the way they behave has changed medical science forever, contributing to everything from the polio vaccine to drugs for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. As the WHO give a posthumous award, Claudia discusses how the Henrietta Lacks legacy raises issues of global health equity.

Plus with a Malaria Vaccine given a historic green light by the WHO to protect children in Africa, what are the distribution difficulties in countries which carry the greatest burden of disease?

And what’s behind the low rate of Covid-19 vaccinations in Taiwan? We hear from one resident about why she’s chosen to have a home-grown Medigen vaccine which hasn’t yet completed all its clinical trials – and another who wants to wait for an alternative. Scientists say that trials about to start in Paraguay should show whether it stimulates enough immunity to protect people in the way the AstraZeneca vaccine does.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Henrietta Lacks, after whom HeLa cells are named, standing outside her home in Baltimore, USA. Photo credit: Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g42xs3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Story of Aids (w3ct2wp8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g431j7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvh)
Japan's Grey Politics

Pascale Harter introduces reportage, analysis and impressions from around the world.

Japanese politics can seem to be set on a repeating loop: regular elections, familiar faces, not much public debate, and an altogether predictable result. Even – or especially – in times of natural disaster, the political scene remains stable. Yet Japan faces a number of increasingly urgent tests. The government’s response to the pandemic – and its decision to go ahead and hold the Olympic Games – did not satisfy everyone. The country’s been watching with alarm as one neighbour, China, builds up its military might - even as another, North Korea, tests out ever more powerful ground-launched missiles. The economy is stagnant, with some deep-seated structural problems, and the population is one of the fastest-ageing in the world. So who have the Japanese turned to, to be the country’s new Prime Minister and lead them through this time of serious challenges? Rupert Wingfield-Hayes reports from Tokyo.

In Iraq politics can often be a matter of life or death. But since the first elections after the US-led international intervention were first held in Iraq in 2005, voter turnout has plummeted. Less than half of eligible Iraqis turned up to last Sunday’s parliamentary polls. People widely say they don’t have much faith in Iraq’s current political system, and many are so disillusioned that they see no point in taking part. Candidates often still run on tribal, ethnic and sectarian lines, rather than by proposing solid policies. Lizzie Porter has been wondering what that says about the county’s future.

Questions about the future of coal have caused some of the deepest divisions in modern Australia. The debate may soon get more heated - as COP26, and other climate-change summits, try to push rich nations to go faster in giving up fossil fuels. Australia still uses coal to generate about 70% of its electricity, making it one of the most carbon-polluting nations per person in the world. And the coal sector’s a huge part of the Australian economy – its exports have kept the country well insulated from global economic shocks. So pushing to go greener, faster, can be a tough sell to voters. Phil Mercer in Sydney explains why the coal habit's so hard to break.

Food is so deeply tied up with our memories and our identity – the language we speak and what we cook are often the most enduring traces of our roots. Migrant communities everywhere hang on to their heritage in the kitchen, and that can end up changing the world. In East Africa, the Asian communities which grew up during the age of British colonial rule certainly left their mark on local tastes – with samosas, curries and chapatis becoming firm favourites among all communities, and African ingredients being cooked with Indian influence. Reha Kansara was brought up in the UK, and recently explored some of her family history in Kenya. She went hunting for the place in Nairobi where one of her oldest favourites was first dreamed up… the delicious potato fritter known as maru bhajia.



(Image: Newly elected Prime Minister Fumio Kishida with his cabinet members. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency/Stanislav Kogiku/Pool)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qsdsm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g4358c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw485s7m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qsjjr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2wpc)
Somalia’s forgotten hostages

The sailors held captive for years, and the man who managed to free them.

Somali pirates made millions of dollars hijacking ships and holding their crews hostage, if no ransom was paid though, sailors could spend years languishing in captivity.

When retired British Army Colonel John Steed set out to try to free what he called ‘Somalia’s forgotten hostages’ he had no money and no hostage-negotiation experience, so how did he do it?

Colin Freeman, who was himself taken hostage in Somalia, hears the remarkable stories of the sailors and their saviours.

Producer: Joe Kent
Sound: Rob Farquhar and Neil Churchill

(Image: Armed Somali pirate standing on the coast looking to sea. Credit: Mohamed Dahir/AFP/Getty Images)

Archive: Captain Phillips (Columbia Pictures) directed by Paul Greengrass


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g4390h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytf36vfp8l)
Maduro aide extradited to US

Alex Saab, one of the closest associates of the Venezuelan president, Nicolas Maduro, has been extradited to the United States to face money laundering charges. In response, the Venezuelan government has called off talks with the opposition.

Plus, a Russian doctor explains why some of his colleagues are often reluctant to recommend the Covid vaccine.

Also, we hear from a Peruvian singer who has politics in her blood - Susana Baca.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Holly Dagres, a nonresident senior fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Middle East Programmes and a specialist on Iran; and Bobby Ghosh, Opinion Editor at Bloomberg and foreign affairs specialist.

(Image: A mural in Caracas, Venezuela in support of the liberation of businessman Alex Saab, detained on money laundering charges. Credit: REUTERS)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g43drm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytf36vft0q)
Ally of Maduro extradited to US

One of the closest associates of the Venezuelan president, Nicolas Maduro, has been extradited to the United States to face money laundering charges. In response, the government suspended talks with the opposition.

Plus, the Pentagon’s first chief software officer explains why he resigned: because the US is lagging behind China on Artificial Intelligence technology.

And Michael Rosen talks about his newest book of poems which explores his past and the relatives he lost in the Holocaust.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Holly Dagres, a non-resident senior fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Middle East Programmes, and Bobby Ghosh, Opinion Editor at Bloomberg.

(Image: Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro. Credit: REUTERS)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g43jhr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytf36vfxrv)
US gains extradition of ally of Venezuelan president

One of the closest associates of the Venezuelan president, Nicolas Maduro, has been extradited to the United States to face money-laundering charges. In response, the government suspended talks with the opposition.

Plus, how a battle with Covid-19 affected one woman’s pregnancy when she was offered the vaccine too late.

And Squid Game, the South Korean dystopian drama that has become Netflix’s biggest debut hit with 111 million views.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Holly Dagres, a non-resident senior fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Middle East Programmes, and Bobby Ghosh, Opinion Editor at Bloomberg.

(Image: The Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro. Credit: REUTERS)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qsws4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg9)
Last orders: Why I quit hospitality

The hospitality industry is facing a staffing crisis, but why have thousands of chefs and waiters quit, and why now?

Tamasin Ford speaks to three former restaurant and bar workers to find out why the coronavirus pandemic prompted them to leave, and what they're doing instead.

We find out what, if anything, might tempt them back - higher pay, more sociable hours, or better work culture, maybe kinder customers? And we ask whether Covid-19 might really be the moment for industry reform.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:
Adam Reiner, New York;
Melissa Sosa, Miami;
Renée Harper, Phoenix.

(Picture: Upset waitress leaning on a bar. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g43n7w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qt0j8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxk)
The uncomfortable truth hidden in my DNA

Hiram Johnson is a former policeman who decided to use his investigative skills on his own family. He grew up knowing nothing about this father’s ancestry. In his quest for answers, he uncovered a murder case and an incarceration in the notorious Parchman Farm prison that would change the course of his family’s future. Hiram's written a book about his journey called: Reason to Fight: A Search for Truth. This interview was first broadcast on 5th December 2019.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Hiram Johnson holding a photo of his father
Credit: Courtesy of Hiram Johnson


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g43s00)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 A Geochemical History of Life on Earth (w3ct2kyn)
3. A series of unfortunate events

Justin Rowlatt discovers how phosphorus may have held evolution back for a billion years. How plants first colonised the land - precipitating an ice age in the process. And why volcanoes have both rescued and almost wiped out life on the planet, thanks to the carbon dioxide they emit.

Anjali Goswami of the Natural History Museum takes Justin on a tour of the big five mass extinction events in the fossil record over the last half billion years. But could we humans be adding a sixth one to the list? Tim Lenton of Exeter University explains why he thinks lowly lichen may have turned the Earth into a snowball. And Graham Shields of UCL tells us why we should all hug a volcano, even if one does occasionally wipe out 95% of all life on Earth.

Producer: Laurence Knight

Image: Tyrannosaurus Rex looking up at an incoming meteor (Credit: Detlev van Ravenswaay / Science Photo Library)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qt48d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2yn5)
Activist Sikh

Many Sikhs all over the world have joined together in support of protests by Indian farmers against new laws proposed by the Indian government. Solidarity has come from musicians, singers, sportspeople and many young second and third generation diaspora Sikhs who have joined social media and local drive-thru protests in British, Canadian and American cities.

A culture of protest is embedded in Sikhism through prayer, songs and stories, which inspires this sense of activism.

Modern-day Sikhs, through their poetry or music or through their voluntary work or political campaigns, explain how their religion’s history of protest against persecution and standing up to injustice, inspires their view of the world in 2021. Pavneet is a poet whose work is unapologetic and seeks to stand up for women, against a caste and patriarchal system.

DJ Rekha, based in New York, ran a broadcast through the 2020 US Presidential election night live on Twitch, and linked her music playlists to political campaigns against poverty, racism and sexism.

Sukhdeep Singh stood for the rights of gay people in India by setting up Gaylaxy, an online magazine, at 22 years old. He started a queer collective on Instagram in 2019 and he wore a rainbow turban to the Golden Temple in Amritsar.

The roots and passing down of stories in families from Sikh history, as well as the use of social media to spread campaign messages, are, they say, helping to nurture and grow a shared sense of Sikh activism against inequality and oppression.

Produced by Nina Robinson for BBC World Service. Executive Producer: Rajeev Gupta

(Photo: Farmers shout slogans as they take part in a protest rally against the central government's agricultural reforms in Amritsar on September 28, 2021. Credit: NARINDER NANU/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g43wr4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw486hqd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qt80j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2wpd)
The Public Misunderstanding Of Science

Trust: What is the best way to communicate public health messages?

Anti-vaxxers, flat Earthers, 5G arsonists and climate change deniers – why have so many people given up on science and where are governments, scientists and the media going wrong?

As Covid-19 continues to affect us all, what is the best way to communicate public health messages, when the bottom line is saving lives? Umaru Fofana reports from Sierra Leone on the Ebola prevention and vaccine campaigns and former BBC science correspondent, Sue Nelson, speaks to public health experts and fact checkers about efforts to combat misinformation.

(Photo: Pupils look at an Ebola prevention poster during a sensibilisation campaign provided by United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), in Abidjan. Credit: Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g440h8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g4447d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswcm3k0)
Venezuelan government suspends talks with the opposition

The Venezuelan government has suspended talks with the opposition, following the extradition to the US of a close aide to President Nicolas Maduro. Mr Alexander Saab was detained in June last year as his plane made a stopover to refuel in Cape Verde. Venezuela has accused the US of kidnapping diplomatic personnel.

Also in the programme: American Christian missionaries and their families have reportedly been kidnapped by gang members in Haiti, and we hear from billionaire hedge-fund manager Chris Hohn on his work to force banks to stop financing fossil-fuel projects and come clean about the environmental impact of their investments.

(Picture: The image of Alexander Saab is projected on a screen at the National Assembly, in Caracas. CREDIT: FEDERICO PARRA/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g447zj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlt)
A dirty history of diamonds

We seem to have an almost insatiable appetite for the glitter and sparkle of diamonds. Yet transforming these stones into jewels fit for princesses and film stars involves a long chain of production and distribution. And the diamond industry has long been bound up with a much darker side: the exploitation of workers, environmental damage, all-powerful monopolies and violent mafias, not to mention the so-called Blood Diamonds used to finance armed conflict. So how is the industry trying to clean up its image and regulate the trade?

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss the history of the diamond trade are:

Dr. Lansana Gberie, former coordinator for the UN Security Council Panel of Experts on Liberia. He is the author of A Dirty War in West Africa: The RUF and the Destruction of Sierra Leone. He’s also Sierra Leone’s current Permanent Representative to the UN in Geneva and the Sierra Leonean Ambassador to Switzerland - though his contributions to this programme are in a personal capacity.

Ian Smillie, founder of the Diamond Development Initiative, now DDI at Resolve, an organisation which works to improve conditions for small-scale miners. He is the author of several books, including Blood on the Stone: Greed, Corruption and War in the Global Diamond Trade. He is based in Canada.

Dr. Tijl Vanneste, researcher at the Portuguese Institute of International Relations at Nova University in Lisbon. He is the author of Blood, Sweat and Earth: The Struggle for Control over the World's Diamonds Throughout History.

[Image: Examining a gem diamond in Antwerp, Belgium; Credit: Paul O'Driscoll/Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkn)
The prize-winning economics of migration and the minimum wage

Do immigrants drive down wages, do minimum wage increases reduce job opportunities, and do people who did well in school earn more money?
These are questions that the winners of the 2021 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics looked to the world around them for answers to.
David Card, Joshua Angrist, and Guido Imbens developed ways of interpreting what they saw that changed the way economists think about what they see.
In this episode of More or Less, presenter-turned-guest Tim Harford explains how.

(Image: Mariel boat lift, which brought over 100,000 Cubans into the United States: Photo by Tim Chapman/Miami Herald)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g44cqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g44hgs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tgydqc46l)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Robbie Jay Barratt - AMA/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g44vq5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw487gpf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qv6zk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2yn5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g44zg9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhd)
An urgent call for Afghanistan

Millions of people in Afghanistan are living in extreme poverty as prices rise and salaries go unpaid. There are warnings that hunger will follow the devastating drought, just as the cold weather sets in. How will the world respond to calls for help? Business Weekly hears from development economist and former World Bank expert in Afghanistan Dr William Byrd. Plus, as the supply chain gets clogged across the world- we’ll ask how they can be made more resilient? We also hear from Berlin, where voters have said yes to a radical plan to help make housing more affordable. And as William Shatner blasts off into space, we ask if the 90-year-old actor can be called an influencer? Business Weekly is produced by Matthew Davies and presented by Lucy Burton.

(Image: Afghan flag with coins in front, Depth of Field)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g4536f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswcn2j1)
North American missionaries kidnapped in Haiti

Officials from Port-au-Prince claim that a notorious gang is behind the kidnap of at least 17 North American missionaries. The 400 Mawozo gang is also being blamed for the kidnap of Catholic clergy in April.

Also in the programme; we speak to an activist about the continued protests in Sudan, and we hear from the founder of a new campaign to help migrants on the Poland-Belarus border.

(Picture: A view of Port-au-Prince. CREDIT: REUTERS/Andres Martinez Casares/File Photo)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g456yk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 A Geochemical History of Life on Earth (w3ct2kyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qvl6y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hds)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g45bpp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywwfdnkn7n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0snhp3ppw9)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qvpz2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 18 OCTOBER 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqf9fg3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlfh5mp1mc)
Apple privacy change attracts criticism

Tech giant Apple’s recent privacy changes have piqued the interest of some of its critics for not being as private as advertised – ahead of a slate of new products being launched. China’s economic growth is linked with resilience in the rest of the world – but energy price fluctuations could stifle its growth, as our regular economic commentator Michael Hughes explains. Finally, hybrid working has increased hugely during the pandemic; research from IT behemoth Cisco shows that half of people in online meetings don’t participle. Chief Technologist for Cisco UK, Chintan Patel, tells us how to improve that.

Presented by Gareth Barlow and produced by Faarea Masud.

(Image: An iPhone with a German covid privacy message displayed. Credit: Adam Berry/ Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g0zsqh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2ymx)
Earthshot 2 – Tackling our energy crisis

Just how do we balance the growing demand for electricity worldwide with the need to reduce fossil fuel emissions to address climate change?

In our second programme on the Earthshot prize Chhavi Sachdev looks at some of the solutions. From projects looking at providing green hydrogen to industry worldwide and remote communities, to village scale solar electricity networks in Bangladesh and a portable pay as you go powerpack in Nigeria.

Also how to provide a livelihood for people who live in areas where conservation concerns mean they are no longer able to follow their traditional hunting practices .
And we feature solutions for dealing with our wastes in their many forms from cleaning up polluted water to recycling human and agricultural organic waste – including an innovative city based system for collecting and redistributing food that would otherwise be destroyed.

The Earthshot Prize is an initiative from the Royal Foundation designed to highlight and reward inspiring solutions to some of the world’s greatest challenges. There are 5 categories with a million pound prize available in each.

Protect and restore nature.
Clean our air.
Revive our oceans.
Build a waste-free world.
Fix our climate.

Image: Earth at night, Credit: Roydee/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqf9k67)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkd55h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g0zxgm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr5)
Putin and the planet

Russia is the world’s fourth-largest emitter of greenhouse gasses. Any talk of changing that needs to focus on President Vladimir Putin. Under his leadership, Russia has become a fossil fuel powerhouse. Since he took office in 2000, Russian oil production has risen by 70%. Today, the state is dependent on its revenues. Four in every ten dollars Moscow spends comes from fossil fuels. So the idea that Russia needs to shift away from fossil fuels to prevent the worst effects of climate change strikes at the very heart of Mr Putin’s power.

But Russia is already suffering more than most from the effects of climate change. Arctic temperatures are rising faster than the global average, forests the size of countries are going up in smoke. Two thirds of the country’s permafrost - permanently frozen ground - has roads, homes, schools, oil and pipelines and even nuclear reactors are built on it. And the permafrost is starting to melt.
Putin’s latest national security document for the first time mentions climate change as a risk. But can he do what is necessary to prevent things from getting worse?

Contributors -
Angelina Davydova - Environmental Journalist
Chris Miller - Director of the Foreign Policy Research Institute’s Eurasia Program
Vladimir Chuprov - Director of the Energy Program, Greenpeace Russia

Presenters: Neal Razzell and Kate Lamble
Reporter - Olga Dobrovidova
Producer: Jordan Dunbar


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqf9nyc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 A Geochemical History of Life on Earth (w3ct2kyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1016r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hds)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqf9sph)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkddnr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g104yw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p95)
From start-up to success: Women rolling the dice in business

The stereotype in the entrepreneurial world is that women are too risk averse to lead companies. But is that true? Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women who turned their start-ups into successful enterprises.

Linh Thai is one of Vietnam’s top female entrepreneurs. She was brought up in the USA, after her mother fled their war-torn home country with Linh and her sister, who died during the journey. Her mum’s leap of faith inspired Linh to move back to Vietnam and become an entrepreneur. She is now a co-star on the investment reality show Shark Tank Vietnam and founder of TVL Group, a workplace skills training company focused on early- and mid-career professionals.

Monica Musonda is a Zambian lawyer who decided to quit her high-flying corporate career to start her own company. She’s now the CEO of Java Foods, a food processing company providing affordable nutrition to the southern African market. She is one of the few Zambian women involved in manufacturing and agro-processing and she is a member of the UN Lead Group of the Scaling Up Nutrition Movement.

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGES:
(L) Linh Thai, courtesy of Linh Thai
(R) Monica Musonda, courtesy of Monica Musonda


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqf9xfm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyvqzgc)
China's hypersonic missile test 'wake up call' for US

The nuclear-capable missile flew through low-orbit space and circled the earth before landing about 40 km off target.

Protesters in the streets in El Salvador against the government of President Bukele. He's accused of undermining democracy and favouring the rich and powerful.

And a Taliban spokesman denies girls are banned from secondary education in Afghanistan - and puts the blame on them for not attending.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfb15r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyvr36h)
US Congressman: Chinese hypersonic missile should be 'call to action'

The nuclear-capable missile circled the earth before landing about 40 km off target - apparently catching out US intelligence.

After the murder of a British Member of Parliament, questions are being asked about how MPs can meet their constituents safely.

And we get an update on the fate of 17 Christian missionaries kidnapped in Haiti.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfb4xw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyvr6ym)
China tests hypersonic missile

A US Congressman warns it should serve as a call to action for the United States.

Economic data from China suggests the country's recovery from the pandemic is losing steam.

And a Taliban spokesman denies banning girls from secondary education - and instead blames them for not attending classes.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfb8p0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6d)
Philippe Sands: Is international justice working?

When the first Nuremberg trial of Nazi war criminals came to an end, the ground-breaking international tribunal handed down 12 death sentences. Seventy-five years on, is the world any better at delivering justice for the worst of crimes? In the years that followed, there were hopes that an evolving mechanism of international justice would deter and punish further heinous acts of mass murder and genocide. Does it remain an impossible ideal? Stephen Sackur speaks to international lawyer and author Philippe Sands.

(Photo: Philippe Sands in the Hardtalk studio)


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g10myd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5d)
Rethinking the future: cleaning up big emitters

We report from the Countdown summit in Edinburgh where fresh ideas to fight climate change are taking centre stage ahead of the UN climate talks, starting in Glasgow later this month. Vivienne Nunis hears from the business leaders and scientists coming up with new ways to cut carbon emissions in some of the world’s dirtiest industries. Mahendra Singhi is the boss of Dalmia Cement, one of India's biggest cement manufacturers. He tells us how his company plans to become carbon neutral by 2040. In the accessories market, Modern Meadow co-founder Andras Forgacs and CEO Anna Bakst explain how their plant-based leather alternative could shake up fashion supply chains. And what if cows everywhere could be made to emit lower levels of methane when they burp? Biologist Ermias Kebreab says adding seaweed to their diet could be key. Producer: Sarah Treanor Image: A cow chewing cud. Credit: Getty


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1h)
The first transgender minister in the Church of England

Sarah Jones is the first person who had undergone a gender change to be ordained in the Church of England. She has been talking to Phil Marzouk about her journey towards the priesthood. She says that in her early life she knew that although she had been born a boy, she wasn’t one. She also knew that she wanted to work in the church. She transitioned as a woman in 1991, and was first ordained as a deacon in the Church of England in 2004.

Photo: Sarah Jones.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfbdf4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g10rpj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr2)
Can we grow a conscious brain?

Philosophers have long pondered the concept of a brain in a jar, hooked up to a simulated world. Though this has largely remained a thought experiment, CrowdScience listener JP wants to know if it might become reality in the not-too-distant future, with advances in stem cell research.

In the two decades since stem cell research began, scientists have learned how to use these cells to create the myriad of cell types in our bodies, including those in our brains, offering researchers ways to study neurological injuries and neurodegenerative disorders. Some labs have actually started 3D printing stem cells into sections of brain tissue in order to study specific interactions in the brain. Human brain organoids offer another way to study brain development and diseases from autism to the Zika virus.

So, might stem cell research one day lead to a fully-grown human brain, or is that resolutely in the realm of science fiction? If something resembling our brains is on the horizon, is there any chance that it could actually become conscious? And how would we even know if it was?

Host Marnie Chesterton takes a peek inside the human brain and speaks with leading scientists in the field, including a philosopher and ethicist who talks about the benefits – and potential pitfalls – of growing human brain models. Along the way, we'll pull apart the science from what still remains (at least for now) fiction.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton
Produced by Sam Baker for BBC World Service


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfbj58)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g10wfn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kpb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfbmxd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkf7wn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1105s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p95)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfbrnj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtq)
‘Born lucky’: Escaping the Khmer Rouge

According to Cambodian folklore, Sieu Do was born with a ‘cloak of good fortune’. His family believed it helped them to survive under the brutal regime in the late 1970s. Sieu was a teenager who could speak seven languages. This made him a target for the Khmer Rouge, who wanted to exterminate the educated classes. But those language skills would save his life when he found work as a physician’s assistant treating thousands of refugees alongside international aid agencies.

Image: Composite of Sieu Do images
Credit: Courtesy of Sieu Do


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfbwdn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkfhcx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g117p1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfc04s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5c54ntzgd)
Colin Powell, former US Secretary of State, has died

The former US Secretary of State and four-star general Colin Powell has died at the age of 84 from complications of COVID-19, despite having been fully vaccinated. He was the first African American secretary of state, under President George W. Bush, and served in several Republican administrations. He is best known for the speech he gave to the United Nations Security Council in February 2003 that helped pave the way for the invasion of Iraq; a speech he came to deeply regret.

Also in the programme: energy shortages and concerns about the property market sees China's economic growth slump to its slowest pace in a year; and a portable machine created to turn agricultural waste into fertiliser is one of the winners of the inaugural Earthshot Prize.

(Image: US Secretary of State Colin Powell at the UN Headquarters in New York, 21 August 2003 / Credit: EPA/Matt Campbell)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfc3wx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g11h59)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y485wgcxc0r)
Car makers boost electric vehicle investments

There have been a flurry of announcements of investment in the manufacture of electric cars. Toyota will spend $3.5bn to build car batteries in the United States, while Europe's Stellantis has done a deal with LG to produce battery cells for North America. Meanwhile, Ford is investing $300m to convert a plant in the UK to make electric car components, as the firm's Europe president, Stuart Rowley, explains. And we get wider context on the market for electric vehicles from Professor Jillian Anable, who is an expert in transport and energy at the University of Leeds in the UK. Also in the programme, a BBC Panorama investigation found that women in public life are disproportionately targeted on social media, with abuse frequently rooted in misogyny. We talk to Bruce Daisley, a former executive at Twitter and YouTube, about what can be done to tackle such abuse. Plus, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis meets with business leaders and scientists coming up with new ways to cut carbon emissions in some of the world's dirtiest industries.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Benjie Guy and Susan Karanja.

(Picture: A worker at Ford's Halewood plant. Picture credit: Ford Europe.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfc7n1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxrp1jt7lh)
Ex-US Secretary of State Colin Powell dies

Colin Powell, America's first black Secretary of State and youngest ever Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has died at the age of 84. We look back at his life and career including the role he played in garnering support for the Iraq war.

We speak to our colleague from BBC Persian who has been been investigating the impact of the pandemic on children in Iran.

And our regular coronavirus expert Dr Eleanor Murray, assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health, explains today's other coronavirus stories.

Nigerian journalist Ugochi Anyaka-Oluigbo, covering environmental issues in Africa and Europe, joins us to answer audience questions about climate change.

(Photo: Former US Secretary of State Colin Powell speaks during the virtual 2020 Democratic National Convention. Credit: Democratic National Convention/Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfccd5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxrp1jtcbm)
COP26: Marshall Islands

One of the countries where climate change is likely to have the most dramatic impact is the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean. We speak to Senator Hilda Heine who was President of the Marshall Islands until last year. She speaks about life and the results of climate change she is seeing on the islands.

We'll hear about the discussion in the UK surrounding politicians security, sparked by the killing of the British MP David Amess. We'll also speak to our disinformation reporter about a BBC investigation into the rise of online abuse against women -- it has revealed that social media companies are failing to act when abuse is reported.

Facebook has announced it's going to hire 10,000 people in Europe to develop the "metaverse". We'll explain what exactly metaverse is.

Professor Manfred Green, a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel will answer your questions on the latest coronavirus stories

(Photo: Marshall Islands' (now former) president Hilda Heine answers questions by the AFP during an interview on June 21, 2019 in Geneva. Credit: FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP via Getty Images)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfch49)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfclwf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkg6vp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g11z4t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nkn9dggps)
2021/10/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfcqmk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g122wy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2ymy)
Earthshot 3 - The prize winners

Over the last 2 weeks we have featured the 15 finalists in the Earthshot prize, an initiative to highlight and award projects designed to conserve and sustain natural environments, and improve our lives in ways that are sensitive to issues such as climate change and biodiversity loss. Here we discuss this year’s winning projects and what future investment could mean for them.

There are five prize categories with a million pounds up for grabs in each.

Protect and restore nature.
Clean our air.
Revive our oceans.
Build a waste-free world.
Fix our climate.


Image: Europe, Middle East and Africa region on planet Earth from space. (Elements by NASA)
Credit: Harvepino/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfcvcp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5c54nvtp9)
Remembering US statesman Colin Powell

Former US Secretary of State Colin Powell, who has died of Covid-related complications, inspired deep respect across the political spectrum. He was also a trail-blazer, as an African-American at the heart of government, But his reputation was tainted by his advocacy of a war against in Iraq based on 'evidence' that turned out to be faulty. We speak to one of his colleagues, former White House Chief of Staff Andrew Card, and another high-ranking African-American, retired army general Dana Pittard.

Also in the programme: a BBC investigation that suggests Facebook and other social media companies are amplifying abuse against women; and the tragedy of Iran's Covid orphans.

(US Secretary of State Colin Powell holds up a vial during his speech at the United Nations in 2003. Credit: Reuters)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfcz3t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 Interview With Colin Powell (w3csxg5g)
An interview with Colin Powell

Outside his stellar military and political career, education for the disadvantaged has been Powell's life's mission. His activities in this area focus principally on founding the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership at City College New York. Here nearly 3000 students, most of them first generation scholars, the sons and daughters of immigrants, enjoy a university education predicated on not just academic achievement but experience in the working world – Wall Street, Washington, corporate life and not-for-profits. Powell uses all his influence to network these young people and the school is adamant that it will educate students regardless of the ‘documented’ or ‘undocumented’ status.

In this programme, Powell tells his own story: a child of poor immigrants – who himself graduated from City College in the 1950s, and who rose to the very highest levels of the US military and the government. We meet many of the students of the Colin Powell School and hear their stories; many have faced hardship, family tragedy and discrimination. For them the Colin Powell School has opened doors and offered hope for a brighter future.

Image: Colin Powell, Credit: Getty Images


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g12bd6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p95)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfd2vy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywwsnysddx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0snvydxg1k)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g12g4b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y490b5zmmf2)
Car makers boost electric vehicle investments

There's been a flurry of announcements of investment in the manufacture of electric cars. Toyota will spend $3.5bn to build car batteries in the United States, while Europe's Stellantis has done a deal with LG to produce battery cells for North America. Meanwhile Ford is investing $300m to convert a plant in the UK to make electric car components, as the firm's Europe president, Stuart Rowley, explains. And we get wider context on the market for electric vehicles from Professor Jillian Anable, who is an expert in transport and energy at the University of Leeds in the UK. Also in the programme, BBC disinformation and social media reporter Marianna Spring talks us through her research for BBC Panorama into how social media sites can amplify hatred against women. Plus, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis meets some of the business leaders and scientists coming up with new ways to cut carbon emissions in some of the world's dirtiest industries.

(Picture: A worker at Ford's Halewood plant. Picture credit: Ford Europe.)



TUESDAY 19 OCTOBER 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfdbc6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqlggb9pnx)
Amazon denies misleading Congress

The firm was questioned over its business practices and accused of copying other peoples’ products, and rigging search results to boost its own branded products. The US car giant Ford has unveiled a $300m plan to convert a plant in the UK to make electrical components. Plus, after a BBC investigation about online hatred against women, we hear from former Scottish politician Ruth Davidson and Love Island’s Kaz Kamwi about their experiences – and why tech companies aren’t doing as much as they could. And finally, Apple’s latest slew of products have proven to be lacklustre for some – the BBC’s James Clayton at the latest tech giant launch tells us why. We discuss all this with live guests Peter Morici, Professor Emeritus of International Business at the R.H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland, and in Hong Kong, Shuli Ren, Bloomberg Opinion columnist.

Presented by Jamie Robertson, and produced by Gareth Barlow.


(Image: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos testifies via video conference during the House Judiciary Subcommittee last year. Credit:Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfdg3b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkh22l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g12tcq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2yn6)
The lost art of breathing

After recovering from pneumonia for the third time, journalist James Nestor took decisive action to improve his lungs. He questioned why so many humans - and only humans - have to contend with stuffy noses, snoring, asthma, allergies, sinusitis and sleep apnoea, to name but a few.

James hears remarkable stories of others who have changed their lives through the power of breath. His deep dive into the unconscious and oft-ignored act of human respiration offers us all a way to breathe easier.

With contributions from Dr Richard Brown, who worked with 9/11 survivors; Dr Margaret Chesney, professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco on screen apnoea; Mandar Apte and Rosa Lagunas on Sudarshan Kriya Yoga; Chuck McGee III on the Wim Hof Method; Dr Andrew Hubermann, professor of neurobiology at Stanford University on the brain-body relationship and Dr Kevin Boyd, paediatric dentist, on the changes to the human skull.

(Photo: Journalist James Nestor)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfdkvg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfdpll)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkh9kv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g131vz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdn)
Dan Meis: Designing a stadium

Dan Meis has developed a reputation for out-of-the-box, innovative thinking while creating projects that redefine their respective building types. This include a “transformable” venue in Japan that mechanically changes from arena to stadium. He also led the design for the Staples Center in Los Angeles.

Host and professional football player Neil Danns gets an exclusive insight into the innovative sports architect's creative process reflected in past, present and future projects, including Everton FC’s new football stadium, a tennis centre in Los Angeles and a pitch for a yet to be named project.

Neil examines the creativity it takes to bring a design to life, exploring the process of the designs, how progress is made and how the ever-present challenges are overcome.


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfdtbq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyvtwcg)
Afghanistan: US envoy Zalmay Khalilzad steps down

Investigations are being carried out in the US and the UK over the countries' policies on Afghanistan - with big names giving evidence.

At least 26 people are killed in devastating floods in the Indian state of Kerala.

And we hear about the thousands of children orphaned by Covid-19 in Iran.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfdy2v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyvv03l)
Afghanistan: A resignation and investigations

The top US envoy to Afghanistan steps down from his role less than two months after the withdrawal of American forces - just as two major investigations in the US and UK get underway into the pull out.

We have had Brexit, could Polexit be next ? Brussels threatens to withhold funds unless the Polish Government abides by the European Union laws.

And who is in charge of the Czech Republic? Election results cannot be ratified there as the head of state is too ill to carry out his duties.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqff1tz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyvv3vq)
Afghanistan investigations: Big names give evidence

So what will be learnt and will it change how foreign policy is done by the US and UK?

The trial of a 96-year-old woman who worked as a secretary at the Nazi concentration camp is due to appear before a German court today. We speak to one of the lawyers of the prosecution.

And the story of possibly the most honest teenager in Liberia - or the world? He handed back $50,000 in cash which he found at the side of the road to the woman who had lost it - now he has been rewarded by the president.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqff5l3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plj)
Talking signs, amazing peas and planes mapping fires

Signs that connect to a mobile phone app, which then reads the information out loud, are appearing in some cities. The technology is designed to help blind and visually impaired people find their way around more easily.

People Fixing the World puts the system to the test to see how well it works and finds out what else they’re being used for.

There’s also a clever solution to single-use plastics from a company who’re turning the proteins in peas into a biodegradable type of packaging. Plus, how pilots taking aerial pictures of forest fires in California are helping to tackle the flames.

Producer: Nick Holland
Presenters: Emma Tracey and Nick Holland

Image: A NaviLens code on a street sign


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g13jvh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgf)
Bug burger anyone?

Is the Western diet ready for farmed insects in food? Although insects are consumed by more than two billion people worldwide, acceptance of them in the Western diet is still low, but could that be changing? With climate change, a growing population and an increased demand for protein all putting pressure on our food system, insects offer an interesting and more planet friendly alternative to meat and fish. Malena Sigurgeirsdottir is the co-founder of Hey Planet which has just launched a meat substitute using buffalo beetle powder (that's the lesser mealworm or Alphitobius Diaperinus), in Denmark, Germany and Sweden. She tells us how great insects taste, especially when they're ground up. Professor Matan Shelomi, from National Taiwan University, Department of Entomology outlines how farming insects can have a much lower carbon foot-print than farming animals. Meanwhile in the UK, Kieran Olivares Whittaker has received millions of dollars in funding for his Entocycle project, researching the optimum way to farm black soldier fly larvae to feed fish and poultry instead of using soy and fishmeal which causes deforestation and overfishing. And we meet Aly Moore of Bugible who makes a living from eating and promoting bugs as a source of protein.
Produced and presented by Clare Williamson.
(Image credit: HeyPlanet burger; Credit: Hey-Planet.com)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x60)
The mysterious death of Samora Machel

When the socialist leader of Mozambique and some of his senior advisers were killed in a plane crash on the border with South Africa, many were suspicious. It was 19 October 1986 and the two countries were divided over Apartheid. The plane made a sudden direct turn straight into a range of mountains, and one of the air crash investigators at the scene, Dr Alan Diehl, told Rebecca Kesby there are reasons to suspect the plane was deliberately diverted off course.

(Photo: The socialist leader of Mozambique Samora Machel delivers a speech. Credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqff9b7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2yn6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g13nlm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2ymy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfff2c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqffjth)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkj4sr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g13x2w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqffnkm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwz)
The spy who pretended to be homeless

To mark the latest James Bond film release, we speak to three people who've been on Outlook in the past, all with an intriguing connection to 007.

Tom Marcus - not his real name - was a spy; an undercover agent for the British security agency, MI5. For several months, he pretended to be a homeless man living on the streets of London. He went to great lengths to blend in, and it was all worth it when he ended up preventing two coaches full of school children from being blown up. He gave this interview in January 2017.

Hum Fleming is the great-niece of Bond creator Ian, and she has her own unique story to tell. When was 13 she had her first epileptic seizure. It took a while to work out that she has temporal lobe epilepsy, and that the seizures had left a scar on her hippocampus - part of the brain that's involved in forming new memories and storing them longer term. This means that most of her memories fade after around six months. Hum hid her condition for years because she was afraid of people's reactions but started talking about it to try to raise awareness of epilepsy. Jo Fidgen spoke to her in May 2019.

And finally, we dug deep into the archives to find out what life is like for a real-life James Bond. This James Bond, who we found in an edition of Outlook which aired in 2002, was a computer salesman from the UK.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: A homeless man in the streets of London
Credit: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqffs9r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkjd90)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g144l4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2ymy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqffx1w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5c54nxwch)
Clashes in European Parliament over rule of law in Poland

The President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, has accused Poland of threatening the fundamental legal order of the EU. Today the European Parliament is debating threats to the rule of law in Poland, where the Constitutional Court recently rejected the primacy of EU law.

Also in the programme: the Ethiopian federal government has admitted carrying out air strikes on the Tigrayan regional capital Mekelle – but is a peace process possible? And new research on the genetic bases of drug resistance in tuberculosis could be a game-changer in the fight to eliminate the disease that killed 1.4 million people last year.

(Image: Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki delivers a speech during a debate on Poland's challenge to the supremacy of EU laws at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France October 19, 2021 / Credit: Ronald Wittek/Pool via Reuters)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfg0t0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g14d2d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bn6n6256q)
UK: gas boilers phased out by 2035

The UK government wants to phase out gas boilers by 2035, to be replaced by heat pumps. We get a sense of the picture for alternative heating technologies across Europe, and Dr David Glew, head of energy efficiency at Leeds Beckett University in the UK discusses the country's plans. Also in the programme, the BBC's Clare Williamson reports on whether edible insects are likely to become a significant source of protein for humans in the coming years. Plus, the television show Squid Game has become streaming giant Netflix's most popular series. But it has led to a row between South Korea's SK Broadband and Netflix, as the internet service provider is suing Netflix to pay for costs from increased network traffic and maintenance work, thanks to the surge in viewers. June Yoon is a columnist for the Financial Times in Seoul, and explains the background to the dispute.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Benjie Guy and Susan Karanja.

(Picture: A heat pump being installed. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfg4k4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxrp1jx4hl)
UK's net zero plans for greenhouse gases

The British government has set out its plan to reach net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 -- as it prepares to host the UN climate summit. Our science editor will give us the details.

We'll have the latest on Myanmar where the military government has begun releasing political prisoners.

We’ll explain what’s behind the growing row between Poland and the European Union and the concerns that Poland could be taking steps to leave the EU.

We’ll answer your questions and talk through the latest news on Covid-19 with one of our regular experts, Dr Isaac Bogoch in Canada.

We’ll also continue our climate conversations and hear from three people in the Caribbean who live in regions affected by sea level rise.

(Photo: Teesside - Northeast England: Offshore wind farm with calm sea. Credit: Philip Silverman/Gettys Creative)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfg898)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxrp1jx87q)
COP26: Sea level rise

In the lead up to COP26 climate conference, we are speaking to people who are affected by climate change. We'll hear from three people discussing sea level rise in Jamaica, Florida Keys and the Bahamas.

We'll also get details of a new research warning that all of Africa’s remaining glaciers are on track to disappear by the 2040s.

We’ll hear how vaccine mandates have become a big talking point in many professional sports leagues.

And Dr Swapneil Parikh, an infectious disease researcher in Mumbai India will talk about today's other Covid stories and answer audience questions.

(Photo: A view of public cemetery which submerged by flood waters from rising sea levels on July 18, 2020 in North Jakarta, Indonesia. Since the 1970s, parts of Jakarta have sunk more than four metres, at a rate of up to 25 centimetres a year. Credit: Afriadi Hikmal/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfgd1d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfghsj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkk3rs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g14w1x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nkn9dkclw)
2021/10/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfgmjn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2yn6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g14zt1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsq)
Women's safety online

False information online has left one in five girls feeling physically unsafe, according to The Truth Gap, a new report by Plan International.

One in three say false information is affecting their mental health, leaving them feeling stressed, worried and anxious. Others reported concerns about bogus events advertised on social media placing them at physical risk, or unreliable medical advice that could harm their health.

Girls and young women from low and middle-income countries were more likely to be affected by unreliable or false information online, and twice as likely to have questioned whether to get the vaccine than those in high income countries.

The researchers are calling on governments to educate children and young people in digital literacy.

Related to this, BBC Misinformation reporter Marianna Spring, who has also been subjected to misogynistic online, abuse set out to understand how why such content seems to be promoted on some social media platforms. We examine her findings.

There is more from Marianna’s investigation in Panorama ‘ Online abuse :why do you hate me?’

And Emily Bird reports on robots used to study glaciers in situations which would be far too dangerous for human researchers.


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington

Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
Producer: Julian Siddle

(Image: ‘Barry’ CGI image from Panorama ‘ Online abuse :why do you hate me?. Credit: thispersondoesnotexist.com)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfgr8s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5c54nyqld)
Polish PM accuses EU of blackmail in law row

Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki has accused the EU of blackmail in a heated debate with European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen over the rule of law.
The clash in the European Parliament follows a top Polish court ruling that rejected key parts of EU law.
Also in the programme; Eric Zemmour, the outspoken former journalist who is causing a stir in France's presidential race before it's even begun; and a Portuguese diplomat who was punished by his government for helping Jewish refugees during World War two has now been given the highest honour by his government.

(Picture shows Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki delivering a speech at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, France. Credit: Ronald Wittek/Pool via Reuters)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfgw0x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g15799)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfgzs1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywwsnyw9b0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0snvyf0byn)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g15c1f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y490b5zqjb5)
Credit Suisse pays $475m in fines to settle Mozambique ‘tuna bonds’ case

Credit Suisse Group is to pay $475 million to American and British authorities to resolve bribery and fraud charges related to a $2 billion scandal over Mozambican government-guaranteed loans which came to be known as tuna bonds - they were originally intended to help build up a domestic tuna fishing fleet in the country. A Credit Suisse subsidiary also pleaded guilty to a conspiracy charge in New York.

Nine companies including Amazon, IKEA, Unilever and Michelin have pledged to use only zero carbon emitting container shipping by 2040. 90% of world trade is transported by sea, and global shipping accounts for nearly 3% of the world's CO2 emissions. But environmental campaigners want the shipping industry to move faster. The pressure group Ship It Zero says the switch to zero-emissions should be done by 2030

Also in the programme, the BBC's Clare Williamson reports on whether edible insects are likely to become a significant source of protein for humans in the coming years.

Plus, the television show Squid Game has become streaming giant Netflix's most popular series. But it has led to a row between South Korea's SK Broadband and Netflix, as the internet service provider is suing Netflix to pay for costs from increased network traffic and maintenance work, thanks to the surge in viewers.

(Picture: A heat pump being installed. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 20 OCTOBER 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfh789)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqlggbdll0)
NYC taxi drivers to go on hunger strike over debt

The yellow taxi is a symbol of New York, but the industry has collapsed under compounding economic pressures, and many drivers say the city’s response has been woefully inadequate. Now they’re planning a hunger strike. Medallions are permits that allow drivers to own their taxis. Buying one used to be a path to a middle-class life. With prices reaching $1 million, buyers were pushed toward reckless loans, while the city made a profit. The drivers have lobbied for relief and the city’s Taxi and Limousine Commission has finally proposed a relief plan. We hear more from one of the drivers camping in front of the City Hall - Augustine Tang.

Also in the programme, Credit Suisse Group is to pay $475 million to American and British authorities to resolve bribery and fraud charges related to a $2 billion scandal over Mozambican government-guaranteed loans which came to be known as tuna bonds - they were originally intended to help build up a domestic tuna fishing fleet in the country. A Credit Suisse subsidiary also pleaded guilty to a conspiracy charge in New York.

Plus - the BBC's Clare Williamson reports on whether edible insects are likely to become a significant source of protein for humans in the coming years.

And, the television show Squid Game has become streaming giant Netflix's most popular series. But it has led to a row between South Korea's SK Broadband and Netflix, as the internet service provider is suing Netflix to pay for costs from increased network traffic and maintenance work, thanks to the surge in viewers.

PHOTO: New York City taxi drivers protesting/Augustine Tang


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfhc0f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkkyzp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g15q8t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2wpf)
The Public Misunderstanding Of Science

Toxic debates

Across Europe, activists fearful of 5G technology have attacked phone masts. Science journalist and former BBC Science correspondent Sue Nelson teams up with science reporter Hidde Boersma in the Netherlands to find out how conspiracy theories take root and what can be done to combat them. She also hears how scientists can improve their communication and what they have learnt from debates around climate change.

(Photo: Protesters march against 5G technology in 2019, The Hague, Netherlands. Credit: Michel Porro/Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfhgrk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfhlhp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkl6gy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g15ys2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jng)
8. The musicians

Keeping music alive under the Taliban - 21-year-old pianist, composer and conductor Arson Fahim and cellist Meena have both had to leave Afghanistan to continue studying and performing the music they love. Arson created the music for this series. The last time the Taliban were in power, in the 90s, music was banned; today Afghan musicians live in fear. But Arson and Meena, who have studied and composed together, tell Lyse Doucet they are a new generation - playing music is their way of protesting and they will not be silenced


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfhq7t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyvxs8k)
US Capitol riot investigation: Vote held to hold Steve Bannon in contempt

US lawmakers have voted to hold the ex-Trump aide Steve Bannon in contempt after he refused to testify before the Congressional committee investigating the Capitol riots - we have reaction.

We're also in Brazil where a committee is looking into the handling of Covid by President Jair Bolsonaro - are they about to accuse him of murder?

And we hear about the vaccines being wasted in the US rather than going to the rest of the world.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfhtzy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyvxx0p)
UN: Climate pledges won't be met with planned fossil fuel extraction

The UN says plans by governments to continue to extract fossil fuels up to 2030 are incompatible with keeping global temperatures to safe levels. We hear from a NASA climate scientist.

A new report says many European countries returning Syrian refugees are sending them back to face torture and even death. We speak to its author.

And we have the latest on the kidnapping at the week-end of missionaries and their families in Haiti.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfhyr2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyvy0rt)
Major coal, gas, oil producers warned over their fossil fuel extraction plans

The UNEP report says there is a huge and growing gap between the fossil fuel production plans of major countries and the limits that science says are necessary to keep the global rise in temperatures to safe levels. We hear a view from Malaysia.

The Real Madrid forward Karim Benzema goes on trial accused of complicity in the attempted blackmail of a former teammate. We are live in Paris.

And she has just started the final leg of an 8,000 kilometres long journey across Europe. She's Amal, the giant puppet, who's drawing attention to the plight of young migrants. We speak to a producer involved in this project.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfj2h6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbx)
Henry Marsh: A doctor arguing for assisted dying

Stephen Sackur speaks to brain surgeon Henry Marsh whose book “Do No Harm” became a bestseller. Now he is confronting his own advanced cancer, and lobbying for the legislation of assisted dying for the terminally ill. Should death ever be the desired outcome for a doctor?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g16frl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jp6)
Ticking timebomb in the Red Sea

Decaying oil tanker could trigger an environmental and humanitarian disaster. The FSO Safer is marooned off the coast of Yemen in the Red Sea, close to one of the world's biggest shipping lanes. A massive oil spill or explosion from it could disrupt global trade for months and lead to an environmental and humanitarian catastrophe. It's loaded with hundreds of tons of crude oil, its hull is rusting and it hasn't moved in years. So why isn't anybody doing anything about it? Nominally the Safer is the property of the Saudi-backed Yemeni government. Right now though, both it and its multi-million dollar cargo are controlled by the Houthi rebels in Yemen. UN officials say the Houthis have broken an agreement to allow an inspection of the vessel. The Saudis accuse them of holding the world to ransom over the potential disaster. The Houthis disagree. Ed Butler speaks to Ghiwa Naket, the executive director of Greenpeace for the Middle East and North Africa, to Ben Huynh a researcher at Stanford University, to Hussain Albukhaiti a Yemeni journalist with close links to the Houthi leadership and to Peter Salisbury, senior analyst for Yemen at the International Crisis Group.
(Picture description: Maxar Satellite image of the FSO Safer tanker moored off Ras Issa port, in Yemen. Picture credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x88)
Polish refugees in Africa

During World War Two, close to 20,000 Polish people found refuge in Africa. They arrived after surviving imprisonment in Soviet labour camps and a harrowing journey across the Soviet Union to freedom. Casimir Szczepanik arrived as a child in a refugee camp in Zimbabwe (then Southern Rhodesia). He talks to Rob Walker about his life there and the impact the war still has on him.


Photo:Casimir Szczepanik and his mother in the refugee camp. Credit:Casimir Szczepanik


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfj67b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2wpf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g16khq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfj9zg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Story of Aids (w3ct2wp8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfjfql)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkm1pv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g16szz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jng)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfjkgq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz7)
The locked-in boy and the brain experiment

Erik Ramsey was seriously injured in a car crash when he was 16 years old. He became locked-in and lost all voluntary muscle function except for the ability to move his eyes up and down. His father Eddie, desperate to help his son communicate, reached out to neurologist and neuroscientist Dr Phil Kennedy. Phil was known for his pioneering work helping paralysed patients communicate again. His method was to implant electrodes in their brains that would transmit their thoughts to a computer. He started working with Erik and Eddie but eventually, in order to advance his research, Phil decided to experiment by implanting the same electrodes into his own, healthy brain. It was a drastic and controversial step - if the surgery on Phil's brain went wrong, he risked losing his ability to speak. Phil, Eddie and Erik are featured in the documentary, The Father of the Cyborgs. And Phil has written a book called Unlocking Erik.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Phil Kennedy before his brain implant surgery
Credit: Paul Powton


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x88)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfjp6v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkm963)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g171h7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfjsyz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5c54p0s8l)
Covid: Brazil's Bolsonaro 'should be charged with crimes against humanity'

The report is the culmination of a six-month inquiry that has revealed scandals and corruption in government. President Bolsonaro has been accused of failing to control the virus that has killed more than 600,000 Brazilians.

Also on the programme: we hear from one of the prisoners released in Myanmar; and how pig kidneys could be used in surgery on humans.

(Image: Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro gestures during the ceremony for the Modernization of Occupational Health and Safety Regulations on 7 October 2021. Credit: Reuters/Marcelino)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfjxq3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g178zh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cwcr360rr)
Brazil's economic challenges

A Brazilian parliamentary committee is calling for President Bolsonaro to face charges. These would be related to Mr Bolsonaro's handling of the coronavirus pandemic, which has claimed the lives of more than 600,000 Brazilians. We get a sense of Brazil's economic challenges as a result of how Covid ripped through the country, from economist Daniel Duque of the Brazilian Institute of Economics. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on a rusting oil tanker moored off the coast of Yemen that poses a major environmental risk. Plus, as the world's largest book fair gets under way in Frankfurt, we hear how the pandemic has impacted book sales from Bodour Al Qasimi, founder of children's publisher Kalimat in the United Arab Emirates, who is also president of the International Publishers' Association.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson and produced by Clare Williamson and Benjie Guy.

(Picture: Scarves represent Covid deaths outside Brazil's Congress. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfk1g7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxrp1k01dp)
Covid-19 in Brazil: Calls for president to face charges

We’ll be getting reaction from doctors in Brazil to a major inquiry that has said that the President Bolsonaro should be accused of crimes over his handling of the Covid-19 pandemic. We'll also be joined by our correspondent in Sao Paulo for more details on that report.

We’ll hear more about the situation on the ground in the Indian states of Kerala and Uttarakhand impacted by heavy rains and flooding.

And Egypt has appointed nearly 100 women as judges in one of its main judicial bodies – the state council. It is a first for the country. One recent female law graduate tells us what this means to her.

(Photo: A woman holds up a band as people attend a protest to demand the impeachment of Brazil"s President Jair Bolsonaro and against his handling of the coronavirus disease pandemic in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Credit: Reuters/Amanda Perobelli)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfk56c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxrp1k054t)
Covid-19 in Russia: Infections on the rise

There are fears that Moscow will go into a strict lockdown if coronavirus infections continue to rise. Unvaccinated people over 60 in the Russian capital have also been told to stay at home starting from October 25th. We hear reaction to his news from inside the country.

We’ll also be getting the view from doctors in Brazil to a major inquiry that has said that the President Bolsonaro should be accused of crimes over his handling of the Covid-19 pandemic.

And Egypt has appointed nearly 100 women as judges in one of its main judicial bodies – the state council. It is a first for the country. One recent female law graduate tells us what this means to her.

(Photo: A specialist wearing personal protective equipment sprays disinfectant while sanitizing the Leningradsky railway station amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease in Moscow in October. Credit: Reuters/Maxim Shemetov)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfk8yh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x88)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfkdpm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkn0nw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g17rz0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nkn9dn8hz)
2021/10/20 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfkjfr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2wpf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g17wq4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvy)
New Covid vaccine

New Covid vaccine from Valneva produces stronger immune response when compared to AstraZeneca, the French company reports, with no severe cases of Covid-19 seen in either group. And new positive research on lateral flow tests.

Plus guest Graham Easton discusses the urgent need for teaching climate and environmental health in medical schools.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Coronavirus vaccine vials on a laboratory shelf. Photo credit: Joao Paulo Burini/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfkn5w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5c54p1mhh)
Brazil Covid report: Bolsonaro should be charged over pandemic

A Senate inquiry in Brazil says President Jair Bolsonaro should be charged for crimes against humanity over his handling of the covid pandemic. It accused the president of deliberately acting too slowly and exposing Brazilians to the virus. Mr Bolsanaro says he is guilty of nothing.

Also, the European parliament has awarded the Sakharov human rights prize to the jailed Russian opposition figure, Alexei Navalny. We hear from the Russian author, Boris Akunin.

Plus, the Afghan evacuees in the UK who say their lives are on hold, and the Myanmar political prisoner let out of jail and remaining defiant.

(Photo: With over 600,000 fatalities, Brazil has the second-highest Covid-related death toll in the world behind only the US. Credit: Reuters)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfkry0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1846d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jng)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfkwp4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywwsnyz673)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0snvyf37vr)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g187yj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y490b5ztf78)
Brazil's economic challenges

A Brazilian parliamentary committee is calling for President Bolsonaro to face charges. These would be related to Mr Bolsonaro's handling of the coronavirus pandemic, which has claimed the lives of more than 600,000 Brazilians. We get a sense of Brazil's economic challenges as a result of how Covid ripped through the country, from economist Daniel Duque of the Brazilian Institute of Economics. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on a rusting oil tanker moored off the coast of Yemen that poses a major environmental risk. Plus, as the world's largest book fair gets under way in Frankfurt, we hear how the pandemic has impacted book sales from Bodour Al Qasimi, founder of children's publisher Kalimat in the United Arab Emirates, who is also president of the International Publishers' Association.

(Picture: Scarves represent Covid deaths outside Brazil's Congress. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 21 OCTOBER 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfl45d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqlggbhhh3)
Brazil president rejects covid lockdown claims

President Jair Bolsonaro rejects claims that he prioritised the economy over his peoples’ health in Brazil, as people give moving testimony to senators, who want to bring criminal charges against him. Latvia re-enters lockdown – evening curfew, home schooling and working from home are all back in place. We speak to investigative journalist Inga Springe. An oil tanker has been marooned in the Red Sea off the coast of Yemen for years – loaded with crude oil, and rusting away, it’s stuck near one of the world’s biggest shipping lanes. The BBC’s Ed Butler investigates why nobody is doing anything about it so far. Finally, the Frankfurt Book Fair, one of the biggest of its kind, is back: as people have dived in to reading during the pandemic to escape, we speak with Bodour Al Qasimi, founder and chief executive of publisher Kalimat, who is there. We discuss all this with guests Zyma Islam who is a journalist for the Daily Star in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and in Canada Ralph Silva, educator and broadcaster.

(Image: President of Brazil Jair Bolsonaro. Credit: Andressa Anholete/Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfl7xj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dknvws)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g18m5x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gy0)
Denmark’s Red Van

Every weekend night in Copenhagen’s red light district of Vesterbro, a group of volunteers pull up and park a Red Van. This is no ordinary vehicle. The interior is lit with fairy lights. There is a bed – and a ready supply of condoms. The Red Van constitutes a harm reduction strategy like no other. It is designed for use by women selling sex on the streets – somewhere they can bring their clients. Just as health workers might argue addicts should have a safe place where they can take their drugs to prevent overdoses, the Red Van NGO’s volunteers believe they are creating a more secure environment for Copenhagen’s sex workers or prostitutes.

Producer/presenter: Linda Pressly

(Image: The Red Van with some of its volunteers – Pauline Hoffman Schroder, Sine Plambech and Aphinya Jatuparisakul. Credit: Linda Pressly)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqflcnn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x88)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqflhds)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkp3d1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g18vp5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgb)
A farmer's nightmare

The UK food industry relies on foreign workers, but what happens when they stop coming?
A combination of COVID-19 and Brexit has led to fewer workers available to pick, process and transport food. For some farmers it has led to heartbreaking dilemmas. Tamasin Ford speaks to two pig farmers who face having to kill thousands of healthy pigs, and a salad farmer who has seen millions of lettuce heads rot in his fields.

(Picture: farmer in field, Credit: Getty/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:
Vicky Morgan, pig farmer, Pockthorpe Hall Farm, East Yorkshire, UK
Kate Morgan, pig farmer, Pockthorpe Hall Farm, East Yorkshire, UK
Nick Ottewell, Farming and Commercial Director at LJ Betts Ltd, Kent, England


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqflm4x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyw0p5n)
WHO warns the pandemic will last longer than it needs to

The World Health Organization has told the BBC that the coronavirus pandemic will drag on for a year longer than it needs to, because of the failure of rich nations to share vaccines. We have the latest figures.

It's been called the world's most locked-down city but now Melbourne is opening up, after a vaccine threshold was met.

And Sudan is bracing for a huge day of protests, with supporters of civilian rule potentially coming up against those calling for the military to reinforce its power. We are live in Khartoum.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqflqx1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyw0sxs)
Leak reveals lobbying to change key climate report

A huge leak of documents seen by BBC News shows how countries are trying to change a crucial scientific report on how to tackle climate change, as our Climate Editor tells us.

Latvia enters a national lockdown following a spike in coronavirus cases. We are live in Riga to hear about the new tough measures which come into force today.

And we go to Khartoum as a major protest is expected today in Sudan's capital. There are plans by both those supporting the civilian arm of the interim transitional government and those who want to see the army take control to take to the streets.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqflvn5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyw0xnx)
Leaked documents, seen by the BBC, show lobbying to change key climate report

The BBC has obtained a huge data leak that shows countries are asking the UN to play down the need to move rapidly away from fossil fuels to tackle climate change. We have all the details.

Also the World Health Organisation tells the BBC the global pandemic will go on for a year longer than it needs to because of the unequal distribution of vaccines. We find out where improvements need to be made.

And tension is escalating between Sudan’s military and civilian leaders as supporters of each side hold protests in the capital Khartoum. We speak to a government minister.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqflzd9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2n)
Are we running out of water?

We cannot survive without water. But for a quarter of the world’s population, there just isn’t enough. The most vulnerable are those with the least access, and even if there is enough, it’s often in the wrong place. So, Tanya Beckett asks, are we running out of water?

Experts:
James Famiglietti, Executive Director at the Global Institute for Water Security at the University of Saskatchewan.
Samrat Basak, Director of India’s Urban Water Programme for the World Resources Institute.
Kate Brauman, Lead Scientist for the Global Water Initiative at the University of Minnesota.
Daniel Shemie, Resilient Watersheds Strategy Director at The Nature Conservancy.

Presenter: Tanya Becket
Producer: Soila Apparicio
Researcher: Matt Murphy
Production Co-ordinator: Jacqui Johnson
Sound Engineer: Rod Farquhar
Editor: Richard Vadon

(Image: Aerial View of Dry River in Nevada, USA / Getty Images: Bim)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g19bnp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9x)
'Fixing' Facebook's algorithm

The social media giant's algorithm has been accused of amplifying divisive content and disinformation. Could regulating it make Facebook a kinder platform? Ed Butler speaks to the BBC's Silicon Valley correspondent James Clayton about the latest revelations from Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen, and renewed demands for a crackdown by US lawmakers. Former Facebook data scientist Roddy Lindsay explains how Facebook's alogrithm became the focus of criticism of the platform, and how a change to the law could solve it. Daphne Keller from Stanford's Cyber Policy Center explains the legal minefield when it comes to regulating what social media users can say, and what platforms can promote, online.

(Photo: Frances Haugen testifies in Congress in October 2021, Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3r)
The Greenham Common women's peace camp

The anti-nuclear weapons protest was the biggest women-led movement in the UK since the Suffragettes. It began in 1981 when Ann Pettitt from Wales organised a women-led peace march from the Welsh capital Cardiff to the airbase at Greenham Common, where American nuclear-tipped cruise missiles were being kept. A small group of women decided to set up camp outside the fences of Greenham Common to continue their protest. Women from all over the UK joined the demonstrations, some travelled from Europe and beyond to lend their support. At its peak, thousands of women camped around the base, and some form of protest camp remained for 19 years until all the nuclear weapons were moved and the airbase was decommissioned. It's now an open nature reserve. Ann Pettitt has been telling Rebecca Kesby why the women were prepared to leave jobs and families to sleep out in the cold to try to stop a nuclear war.

Photo: Women from the Greenham Common peace camp blocking Yellow Gate into RAF Greenham Common , 1st April 1983 . (Photo by Staff/Reading Post/MirrorpixGetty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfm34f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gy0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g19gdt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfm6wk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlv)
Sarah Bernhardt: Queen of stage and screen

Whether photographed in a coffin or depicted on an Art Nouveau poster, the French actor Sarah Bernhardt knew exactly how to get maximum publicity. Although her first outings on the stage were unremarkable, she refined her skills and rose to become the leading actor of her generation and a world-famous name. Her life off-stage was a further source of endless fascination, her eccentric and occasionally arrogant behaviour only adding to her allure. Her critics saw her as manipulative and hackneyed. For her admirers, seeing Bernhardt ‘die’ on stage was a moment to be treasured for ever.

Bridget Kendall charts Sarah Bernhardt’s life and career with John Stokes, emeritus professor of modern British literature at King’s College London and author of The French Actress and Her English Audience; Victoria Duckett, senior lecturer in screen and design at Deakin University in Melbourne and the author of Seeing Sarah Bernhardt: Performance and Silent Film; and Sharon Marcus, the Orlando Harriman professor of English and comparative literature at Columbia University. Her 2019 book The Drama of Celebrity is an exploration of the processes that propel a figure such as Sarah Bernhardt to global fame.

Producer: Fiona Clampin

(Photo: Posters showing Sarah Bernhardt as Camille in La Dame Aux Camelias (Lady of the Camellias) by Alphonse Mucha. Credit: Universal History Archive/UIG/DeAgostini/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8w)
Jackie Joyner-Kersee - Heptathlon Queen

In 1988, the American athlete, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, put in one of the greatest performances in the history of women’s athletics at the Seoul Olympics. She set a world record that still stands in the Heptathlon and won a second gold medal in the individual High Jump event. Jackie Joyner Kersee talks to Ashley Byrne.

PHOTO: Jackie Joyner-Kersee at the 1988 Olympics (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfmbmp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkpyly)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g19px2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfmgct)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3r)
The secret that nearly destroyed our marriage

For nearly 30 years Bobby and Cheryl Love lived a very ordinary married life together in New York. They raised four children, worked hard, attended church... but Cheryl could never shake the feeling that Bobby was hiding something from her. It was in 2015 that she finally found out the truth, when armed police burst through the door of their apartment one morning. Bobby and Cheryl tell Jo Fidgen what the secret did to their marriage.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Rebecca Vincent

Picture: Bobby and Cheryl Love
Credit: Brandon Stanton


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfml3y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkq636)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g19ydb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfmpw2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5c54p3p5p)
Documents reveal countries lobbying to change climate report

Saudi Arabia, Australia and Japan are among the countries asking the United Nations to play down the need to move rapidly away from fossil fuels. Leading scientists in India warn that coal is likely to remain as a mainstay of energy production for decades.

Also on the programme: we hear from Sudan where rival protesters have taken to the streets of Khartoum; and how gene silencing, a new medical practice, could be used to stop pain.

(Image: Workers unload coal from a supply truck at a yard on the outskirts of Ahmedabad, India. Credit: Reuters/Amit)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfmtm6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1b5wl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49f1k970cz)
Poland row overshadows EU summit

A dispute between Brussels and Warsaw threatens to overshadow a summit for EU leaders. A Polish court recently found parts of EU law were incompatible with the country's constitution, and there have been calls from some quarters to withhold EU funds from Poland in response. Anna Wojcik is a researcher at the Polish Academy of Sciences and editor of the Rule of Law publication, and discusses the background to the dispute. Also in the programme, shares in the Chinese property conglomerate Evergrande fell by 11.5% when they resumed trading in Hong Kong today. Sherry Fei Ju is a freelance journalist in Beijing, and brings us the latest developments. The BBC's Theo Leggett tells us about research at the University of Mannheim in Germany that indicates governments worldwide may have lost around $175bn in revenue, because of tax schemes relating to the payments companies make to their shareholders. It's the beginning of India's festival season, and our workplace commentator Sandip Roy considers the challenges of trying to work through the mega festival Durga Puja, when millions are on the streets partying til dawn. Plus, ahead of next month's World Cheese Awards in Oviedo northern Spain, judge Morgan McGlynn, who is also a British cheesemaker, explains what makes a winning cheese.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Clare Williamson.

(Picture: Poland's prime minister arrives at the European Council meeting. Picture credit: Reuters.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfmycb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxrp1k2y9s)
COP26: Leaks reveal nations lobbying to change key climate report

We’ll explain the leaked document which reveals how nations have been lobbying the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to change its crucial report ahead of the COP26 climate summit. We’ll speak to our BBC language services about what is revealed in the interventions from the countries they cover, including Saudi Arabia lobbying over oil, Brazil and Argentina over beef and India over coal. We’ll also find out about attitudes towards climate change among young people in those countries.

As we continue to reflect conversations about climate change in the run-up to the Glasgow summit, we’ll hear about the impact on animals in different parts of the world. We brought together experts on snow leopards, polar bears and bumblebees to compare notes.

One of our regular coronavirus experts will talk us through the news of the day on the pandemic and answer your questions. Dr Rick Malley works at Boston Children’s Hospital. We’ll also discuss the latest developments on the pandemic in Russia, with further restrictions announced in Moscow to try to halt an alarming rise in infections.

(Photo: Maria de Almeida 61, daughter of Gertrudes Freire, walks next the cattle at their property in Ouro Preto do Oeste, Rondonia state, Brazil, August 11, 2021. Picture taken August 11, 2021. Credit: Ricardo Moraes/Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfn23g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxrp1k321x)
COP26: Impact of climate change on animals

As we continue to reflect conversations about climate change in the run-up to the Glasgow summit, we’ll hear about the impact on animals in different parts of the world. We brought together experts on snow leopards, polar bears and bumblebees to compare notes.

We’ll explain the leaked document which reveals how nations have been lobbying the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to change its crucial report ahead of the COP26 climate summit. We’ll explain what the IPCC is. We’ll speak to our BBC language services about what is revealed in the interventions from the countries they cover, including Saudi Arabia lobbying over oil, Brazil and Argentina over beef and India over coal.

One of our regular coronavirus experts will talk us through the news of the day on the pandemic and answer your questions. Dr Helen Wimalarathna is an epidemiologist at the University of Buckingham in the UK. We’ll talk about the WHO warning that the pandemic will drag on longer than it needs to because of the ongoing vaccine inequality between rich and poor countries.

(Photo: Two polar bears on a small ice floe surrounded by water. Symbolic for climate situation in the arctic. Credit: SeppFriedhuber/Getty Creative)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfn5vl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfn9lq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkqxkz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1bnw3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nkn9dr5f2)
2021/10/21 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfnfbv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gy0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1bsm7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4c)
Red blood cells’ surprising immune function

We’ve talked a huge amount the past 18 months, for obvious reasons, about the way that white blood cells protect us from infection. But red blood cells – it’s probably among the earliest things I learned in human biology that they’re simple bags for carrying oxygen around the body. But over recent years, immunologist Nilam Mangalmurti, University of Pennsylvania, has been finding several clues to challenge that dogma – including molecules on the surface of red blood cells known from other parts of the immune system.

The Last Ice Area, home to the oldest and thickest ice in the Arctic, is expected to act as the last refuge for ice-dependent wildlife as the rest of the Arctic melts. Kent Moore, University of Toronto-Mississauga, tells us that the formation of a 3,000 square kilometre rift in the area means the ice is not as resilient as we once thought.

Also on the programme, an obituary for the renowned Dutch climate scientist and physicist Geert Jan van Oldenborgh (October 22, 1961 – October 12, 2021), and, Dominique Gonçalves, Gorongosa National Park, explains how ivory poaching during the Mozambican civil war led to the rapid evolution of tusklessness in African elephants.

Image: Confocal microscopy of CpG-treated human RBCs stained for Band 3. Credit: Mangalmurti Lab / Nilam Mangalmurti, MD)




Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Samara Linton


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfnk2z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5c54p4jdl)
Sudan protesters take to the streets of Khartoum

Supporters of Sudan's transitional government have turned out in Khartoum as rival protesters continue a sit-in to demand a military government. Deep divisions between military and civilian leaders are threatening to derail the transition to democracy. Tensions have grown since a coup attempt attributed to followers of president Bashir was foiled in September.

Also in the programme: the amount of plastic in the sea is on course to triple within twenty years, according to a new United Nations’ report; and a document leak reveals some nations lobbying to change a key climate report ahead of COP26.

(Photo: A person wearing a Sudan"s flag stand in front of a burning pile of tyres in Khartoum, Sudan October 21, 2021. Credit: Reuters.)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfnnv3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1c13h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rgb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfnsl7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywwsnz2346)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0snvyf64rv)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1c4vm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y490b5zxb4c)
WeWork shares jump more than 13 per cent in public markets debut

Shares of the office-leasing company WeWork closed up more than 13.49 per cent on Thursday after the company went public through a special purpose acquisition, more than two years after its failed IPO. We hear from Peter Eavis of The New York Times, who has been following the ups and downs of the company. A dispute between Brussels and Warsaw threatens to overshadow a summit for EU leaders. A Polish court recently found parts of EU law were incompatible with the country's constitution, and there have been calls from some quarters to withhold EU funds from Poland in response. Anna Wojcik is a researcher at the Polish Academy of Sciences and editor of the Rule of Law publication, and discusses the background to the dispute. Also in the programme, shares in the Chinese property conglomerate Evergrande fell by 11.5% when they resumed trading in Hong Kong today. Sherry Fei Ju is a freelance journalist in Beijing, and brings us the latest developments. The Austrian city of Vienna is known for its collection of art galleries and museums. But some of the exhibits, it seems, are a little too racy for some social media networks. So the tourism board is posting images on the website OnlyFans, the only social network that permits depictions of nudity. We hear from Norbert Kettner of the Vienna Tourist Board. Plus, it's the beginning of India's festival season, and our workplace commentator Sandip Roy considers the challenges of trying to work through the mega festival Durga Puja, when millions are on the streets partying til dawn.

(Picture: A WeWork office building. Credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 22 OCTOBER 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfp12h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqlggbldd6)
WeWork shares jump more than 13 per cent in public markets debut

Shares of the office-leasing company WeWork closed up more than 13.49 per cent on Thursday, after the company went public through a special purpose acquisition. We hear from Peter Eavis of The New York Times, who has been following the ups and downs of the company. A dispute between Brussels and Warsaw threatens to overshadow a summit for EU leaders. A Polish court recently found parts of EU law were incompatible with the country's constitution, and there have been calls from some quarters to withhold EU funds from Poland in response. Anna Wojcik is a researcher at the Polish Academy of Sciences and editor of the Rule of Law publication, and discusses the background to the dispute.

The company behind a new cryptocurrency called Worldcoin wants to give away its tokens for free. But in exchange, users have to agree to have their eyes' iris scanned. This is, the website says, to "prove that they are indeed human... and that they have not received their free share of Worldcoin already". But there are already privacy concerns, as we hear from Sam Biddle of The Intercept.

Shares in the Chinese property conglomerate Evergrande fell by 11.5% when they resumed trading in Hong Kong today. Sherry Fei Ju is a freelance journalist in Beijing, and brings us the latest developments. The Austrian city of Vienna is known for its collection of art galleries and museums. But some of the exhibits, it seems, are a little too racy for some social media networks. So the tourism board is posting images on the website OnlyFans, the only social network that permits depictions of nudity. We hear from Norbert Kettner of the Vienna Tourist Board. Plus, it's the beginning of India's festival season, and our workplace commentator Sandip Roy considers the challenges of trying to work through the mega festival Durga Puja, when millions are on the streets
partying til dawn.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Paddy Hirsch, a contributing editor at US National Public Radio, in Los Angeles. And writer Rachel Cartland, in Hong Kong.

(Picture: A WeWork office building. Credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfp4tm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkrrsw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1cj30)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tzq)
Biennial World Cups and Belgium's surprise league leaders

Gambia coach Tom Saintfiet gives an insight into the recent biennial World Cup discussions. We also hear from history graduate turned defender Chris Burgess who currently plays for Belgium's Union Saint-Gilloise.


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfp8kr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfpd9w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dks094)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1crl8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyj)
Trying to Save the Latin Mass

Communities that celebrate with the Latin Mass have prospered. Now, Pope Francis has ruled that Catholics may only use the Latin Mass if their bishops agree to let them. Instead of a rule of tolerance for the Old Rite, wherever Catholics want it, there will be tolerance on a case-by-case basis. Many traditionally-minded Catholics believe that what is at stake here is the soul of the Catholic church with a liberal old guard with Francis at their head hoping to snuff out a rising generation of conservatives before they take over.

In France, the more old-fashioned Catholics still often have very large families and, proportionately, many more of their sons become priests. In this edition of Heart and Soul, France-based correspondent John Laurenson, takes us into the extraordinary world of traditional Catholicism in France. We go to Versailles, the former seat of the ardently-Catholic monarchy, that is today the unofficial capital of the ‘tradi’ movement. John meets young Catholics to find out what attracts so many young believers to the Old Rite

Producer and Presenter: John Laurenson
Image: John Laurenson/BBC


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfpj20)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyw3l2r)
Alec Baldwin fatally shoots woman with prop gun

A woman has died and a man has been injured after the actor fired a prop gun on a New Mexico film set.

There's a new push to end a stalemate in the nuclear talks between Western powers and Iran. We'll speak to someone able to see both sides' perspectives.

And we hear from someone who was part of a huge crowd of pro-civilian protestors gathered in Sudan when security forces opened fire.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfpmt4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyw3ptw)
Investigation launched over Alec Baldwin prop gun death

The actor fired a prop gun, killing a crew member and injuring the director.

Russia is going through a fourth and more deadly wave of coronavirus - so why are many people still reluctant to go for the vaccinations?

And we hear how more young women in the United States are donating their own eggs in order to fund their education.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfprk8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2wtyw3tl0)
Woman killed after Alec Baldwin fires prop gun on set

An investigation is underway over the death of the cinematographer. The director of the film was also injured.

Buckingham Palace says Queen Elisabeth spent Wednesday night in hospital for preliminary medical checks - but is now back at Windsor Castle.

And new research suggests that the Vikings reached modern day Canada, centuries before Christopher Columbus got to the Americas in the 15th century.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfpw9d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1w)
Andrew Forrest: Mega-polluter turned climate revolutionary

Stephen Sackur speaks to Andrew Forrest, an Australian billionaire mining magnate who is using a chunk of his fortune to push a green, hydrogen-based energy solution. In the run up to the Glasgow climate change summit, his conversion to decarbonisation is timely, but is it credible?

(Photo: Andrew Forrest in the Hardtalk studio)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1d7ks)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0w)
Big fat Indian weddings

Are the days of the big fat Indian wedding over? Since Covid Indian weddings have got a lot smaller. But will they go back to what they once were? Rahul Tandon speaks to bride to be Yashaswini Singhdeo, mother of the bride Meenal Singhdeo, Sandip Roy author and columnist, Ambika Gupta wedding planner and owner of the A cube project and Parul Bhandari a sociologist from the Indian centre of social sciences and humanities .

(Photo: Indian couple hold hands during a wedding ceremony. Credit: Amir Mukhtar/Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz7)
Britain’s lesbian families ‘scandal’

In January 1978 a London newspaper revealed how several British lesbians had conceived babies using donor sperm with the help of a respected gynaecologist. The doctor hadn’t broken any laws in providing the fertility treatment but the stigma surrounding homosexuality at the time meant the revelations started a media frenzy and a heated national debate. There were discussions in the press, in the streets and in Parliament. One MP called for a ban on the practice and called it ‘evil’, ‘selfish’ and ‘horrific’. Dr Gill Hanscombe had used artificial insemination to start a family with her two lesbian partners. When the press found out about them she was terrified that they were about to lose their jobs, and potentially their child. Produced and presented by Viv Jones.

(PHOTO: Gill Hanscombe (left) with her partners Dee and Pru, and their son. Courtesy of Gill Hanscombe.)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfq01j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhm)
Tech for future living

How the metaverse, energy tech, and AI might influence how we live in years to come. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1dc9x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfq3sn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1ht3)
Nato and China: A new rivalry?

This week in an interview with a British newspaper the Secretary General of Nato repeated his desire to widen its mandate to include China. His comments coincide with reports that Beijing has tested a hypersonic missile potentially capable of breaching US and European defences. There are concerns about China's cyber activities against Nato member states, as well as the country's increasing presence in the Arctic - raising fears over the security of Atlantic sea lanes. But some argue that Nato is in danger of going beyond its founding remit. That view is echoed by the likes of the French president who's warned that China has "little to do with the North Atlantic." So what should be the future shape of Nato? In the aftermath of its controversial withdrawal from Afghanistan, should the alliance focus more on events closer to home? And with the United States focusing its resources in Asia, is there a case to look beyond Nato and think about a broader European defence mechanism?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Produced by: Paul Schuster and Junaid Ahmed.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfq7js)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dksvj1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1dlt5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfqc8x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fm)
The 1961 Paris massacre cover-up

It’s 60 years since a peaceful march in Paris ended in the killing of at least 100 Algerian protesters by the police. An extensive cover-up meant that almost nothing was known about it for several decades, and the true facts are still emerging. BBC Arabic’s Ahmed Rouaba has been looking into the story.

The Stallion of Yennenga
As film-makers gather for the FESPACO African film festival in Ouagadougou, the capital of Burkina Faso, we ask what’s the story behind the main prize, called the Stallion of Yennenga? Who was Yennenga, and where does the stallion come in? Answers from BBC Afrique's Leone Ouedraogo, who is Burkinabè herself.

When a cobra became a murder weapon
Last week a man was convicted of using a snake as a murder weapon. The victim was his wife, who was bitten by the hooded cobra, and died. The BBC’s Soutik Biswas in Delhi was one of the journalists following the story.

Venezuelan migrants in Chile
Last month, demonstrators in a town in northern Chile marched to settler camps housing Venezuelan migrants and set their belongings on fire. It's part of the rising tension in Chile between locals and migrants, as BBC Mundo contributor Paula Molina reports.

'Got to go'
Why is a cheerful rap song about a party making people cry in Hong Kong? The lyrics of Got to go are about leaving a party, but is there another interpretation? Cho Wai Lam from BBC Chinese tells us more about what this song means to Hongkongers.

Image: Algerian flag with roses during a commemoration of the 1961 massacre in Paris
Credit: Boris Horvat/AFP via Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfqh11)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dkt309)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1dv9f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfqls5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5c54p6l2s)
Actor Alec Baldwin fatally shoots cinematographer

Actor Alec Baldwin fatally shoots the cinematographer of his latest film. The director was also shot and injured by the actor. Police are investigating and charges have not been filed.

Also on the programme, Ethiopia says its air force has carried out another strike on the regional capital of Tigray, Mekelle. And in Myanmar at least 100 anti-coup protesters have been re-arrested shortly after being let out of prison. Others who were promised release are reported never to have made it to freedom.

(Picture: Actor Alec Baldwin seen outside the Santa Fe County Sheriff's office after he was interviewed by police. Credit Weber / The New Mexican)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfqqj9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1f2sp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46yqch8006)
The threat of rising inflation

France is to pay low income families €100 each to cushion the impact of rising inflation. Meanwhile the Bank of England's chief economist has warned inflation could hit 5% in the UK in the months ahead. With prices on the rise all over the world as a result of widespread supply chain disruptions and the high cost of energy, we examine the implications of rising inflation with Helen Thomas of the economic consultancy Blonde Money. Also in the programme, Ireland had hoped to relax most coronavirus public health measures today, though with cases rising, plans have been scaled back. Whilst nightclubs and other live entertainment venues can open, digital vaccine certificates will be required for indoor hospitality venues like restaurants, cafes and pubs. Adrian Cummins is chief executive of the Restaurants Association of Ireland, and discusses the implications. Plus, the BBC's Rahul Tandon explores the future of lavish Indian weddings, after they got a lot smaller during the pandemic.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Clare Williamson.

(Picture: Petrol pump prices. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfqv8f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxrp1k5v6w)
Afghanistan: Life since Taliban takeover

The Taliban banned girls from secondary schools in most of Afghanistan, and most women have not been allowed to return to work yet. Our correspondent Yogita Limaye has returned to the country to speak to people about the life since the Taliban took control of the country in August.

The Hollywood actor, Alex Baldwin, has been questioned by police after he accidentally shot and killed a film crew member in New Mexico. We'll hear more about the incident and the reaction.

We'll go through some of the latest coronavirus stories with our regular expert Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University.

We’ll speak to our reporter about attacks against Hindus in the Muslim majority Bangladesh. Community leaders say this is the worst large-scale mob violence against Hindus in the country’s history.

(Photo: Afghan women shout slogans during a protest to demand that the Taliban government allow the reopening of girls schools and to provide ample employment opportunities, in Kabul, Afghanistan, 21 October 2021. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfqz0k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxrp1k5yz0)
Alec Baldwin 'shock and sadness' at film set death

Actor Alec Baldwin has expressed his shock and sadness after fatally shooting cinematographer Halyna Hutchins with a prop gun on a New Mexico film set. We speak to an "armourer", a person who manages firearms in film sets.

We look at today’s coronavirus stories with our regular health expert, Professor Marc Mendelson from the University of Cape Town. Also, Ros Atkins explains what’s driving the rise of Covid numbers in the UK.

Taliban banned girls from secondary schools in most of Afghanistan, and most women have not been allowed to return to work yet. Our correspondent Yogita Limaye has returned to the country to speak to people about the life since the Taliban took control of the country in August.

(Photo: A distraught Alec Baldwin lingers in the parking lot outside the Santa Fe County Sheriff"s offices on Camino Justicia after being questioned on 21/10/2021 about a shooting when a prop gun misfired earlier in the day on a local movie set. Credit: Jim Weber/The New Mexican)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfr2rp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfr6ht)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxq7dktth2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1fks6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nkn9dv2b5)
2021/10/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfrb7y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1fpjb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr3)
Should I have kids?

To be or not to be” was never your decision. No one alive today is an “exister” by consent - your parents made that call for you. But who can blame them? Animals are hardwired with strong impulses towards their procreative goals, and we humans, by and large, are no different. But for some conscientious people alive today, this most fundamental of biological impulses is butting up against a rational pessimism about the future...

With apocalyptic scenes of natural disasters, rising sea levels and global pandemics causing existential dread and actual suffering, it's understandable that CrowdScience listener Philine Hoven from Austria wrote to us asking for help her make sense of what she sees as the most difficult question she faces - should she have children?

In this episode, presenter Geoff Marsh helps Philine to predict what kind of a world her hypothetical child might inhabit, and explores the impact their existence, or indeed non-existence might have on society and the planet. Plus, we'll explore what ‘antinatalism’- a philosophical stance which argues against procreation, can tell us about the moral landscape of the unborn. With Ms Caroline Hickman, Professor Mike Berners-Lee, Professor Noriko Tsuya and Professor David Benatar.

Presented and produced by Geoff Marsh for BBC World Service


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfrg02)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5c54p7f9p)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfrkr6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1fy0l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tzq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjslqfrphb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywwsnz5019)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0snvyf91ny)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkm1g1g1rq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y490b60071g)
The threat of rising inflation

France is to pay low income families €100 each to cushion the impact of rising inflation. Meanwhile the Bank of England's chief economist has warned inflation could hit 5% in the UK in the months ahead. With prices on the rise all over the world as a result of widespread supply chain disruptions and the high cost of energy, we examine the implications of rising inflation with Helen Thomas of the economic consultancy Blonde Money. Also in the programme, Ireland had hoped to relax most coronavirus public health measures today, though with cases rising, plans have been scaled back. Whilst nightclubs and other live entertainment venues can open, digital vaccine certificates will be required for indoor hospitality venues like restaurants, cafes and pubs. Adrian Cummins is chief executive of the Restaurants Association of Ireland, and discusses the implications. Plus, the BBC's Rahul Tandon explores the future of lavish Indian weddings, after they got a lot smaller during the pandemic.

(Picture: Petrol pump prices. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 05:32 SAT (w3ct2kpb)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 18:32 SAT (w3ct2kpb)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 10:32 MON (w3ct2kpb)

A Geochemical History of Life on Earth 10:06 SUN (w3ct2kyn)

A Geochemical History of Life on Earth 22:06 SUN (w3ct2kyn)

A Geochemical History of Life on Earth 03:06 MON (w3ct2kyn)

A Wish for Afghanistan 04:32 WED (w3ct2jng)

A Wish for Afghanistan 11:32 WED (w3ct2jng)

A Wish for Afghanistan 22:32 WED (w3ct2jng)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gy0)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gy0)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gy0)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzklp5qp8d8)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzklp5qpmmn)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzklp5qpzw1)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzklp5qq3m5)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzklp5qqc3f)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzklp5qr6bb)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzklp5qrt1z)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzklp5qs59c)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzklp5qsdsm)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzklp5qsjjr)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzklp5qsws4)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzklp5qt0j8)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzklp5qt48d)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzklp5qt80j)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzklp5qv6zk)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzklp5qvl6y)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzklp5qvpz2)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkm1g0zsqh)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkm1g0zxgm)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkm1g1016r)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172xzkm1g104yw)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzkm1g10myd)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172xzkm1g10rpj)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172xzkm1g10wfn)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkm1g1105s)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkm1g117p1)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkm1g11h59)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkm1g11z4t)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkm1g122wy)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkm1g12bd6)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkm1g12g4b)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkm1g12tcq)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkm1g131vz)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzkm1g13jvh)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkm1g13nlm)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkm1g13x2w)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkm1g144l4)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkm1g14d2d)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzkm1g14w1x)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzkm1g14zt1)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzkm1g15799)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkm1g15c1f)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkm1g15q8t)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkm1g15ys2)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkm1g16frl)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172xzkm1g16khq)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkm1g16szz)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkm1g171h7)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkm1g178zh)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkm1g17rz0)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzkm1g17wq4)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkm1g1846d)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkm1g187yj)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkm1g18m5x)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkm1g18vp5)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkm1g19bnp)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzkm1g19gdt)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkm1g19px2)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzkm1g19ydb)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzkm1g1b5wl)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkm1g1bnw3)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzkm1g1bsm7)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzkm1g1c13h)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkm1g1c4vm)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkm1g1cj30)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkm1g1crl8)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzkm1g1d7ks)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172xzkm1g1dc9x)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkm1g1dlt5)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzkm1g1dv9f)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzkm1g1f2sp)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzkm1g1fks6)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172xzkm1g1fpjb)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172xzkm1g1fy0l)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkm1g1g1rq)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g3zscr)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g3zx3w)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g400w0)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g404m4)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g408c8)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g40d3d)

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BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g40mln)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g40rbs)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g40w2x)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g40zv1)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g413l5)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g417b9)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g41c2f)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g41v1y)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g41yt2)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g422k6)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g4269b)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g42b1g)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172xzjs7g42fsl)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g42p8v)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g42t0z)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g42xs3)

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BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g43wr4)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g440h8)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g4447d)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g447zj)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g44cqn)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g44hgs)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g44vq5)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g44zg9)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g4536f)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g456yk)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172xzjs7g45bpp)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjslqf9fg3)

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BBC News 03:00 MON (w172xzjslqf9nyc)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172xzjslqf9sph)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172xzjslqf9xfm)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172xzjslqfb15r)

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BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjslqfbmxd)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172xzjslqfbrnj)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172xzjslqfbwdn)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172xzjslqfc04s)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172xzjslqfc3wx)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172xzjslqfc7n1)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzjslqfccd5)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172xzjslqfch49)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172xzjslqfclwf)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172xzjslqfcqmk)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172xzjslqfcvcp)

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BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjslqfd2vy)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjslqfdbc6)

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BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172xzjslqfdpll)

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BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172xzjslqff5l3)

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BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172xzjslqfff2c)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjslqffjth)

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BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjslqffs9r)

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BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjslqfg4k4)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172xzjslqfg898)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjslqfgd1d)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzjslqfghsj)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzjslqfgmjn)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjslqfgr8s)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjslqfgw0x)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjslqfgzs1)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjslqfh789)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172xzjslqfhc0f)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172xzjslqfhgrk)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjslqfhlhp)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172xzjslqfhq7t)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172xzjslqfhtzy)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172xzjslqfhyr2)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzjslqfj2h6)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjslqfj67b)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjslqfj9zg)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjslqfjfql)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjslqfjkgq)

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BBC News 18:00 WED (w172xzjslqfk8yh)

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BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjslqfkn5w)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjslqfkry0)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjslqfkwp4)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjslqfl45d)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjslqfl7xj)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjslqflcnn)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjslqflhds)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjslqflm4x)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjslqflqx1)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjslqflvn5)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjslqflzd9)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjslqfm34f)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjslqfm6wk)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjslqfmbmp)

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BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjslqfmpw2)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjslqfmtm6)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjslqfmycb)

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BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjslqfn5vl)

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BBC News 21:00 THU (w172xzjslqfnk2z)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172xzjslqfnnv3)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjslqfnsl7)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjslqfp12h)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172xzjslqfp4tm)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172xzjslqfp8kr)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172xzjslqfpd9w)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172xzjslqfpj20)

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BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzjslqfq7js)

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BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172xzjslqfqls5)

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BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjslqfqv8f)

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BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172xzjslqfr2rp)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d6c)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxrp1jt7lh)

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BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxxrp1k321x)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172xxxrp1k5v6w)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxrp1k5yz0)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j5d)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jgf)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jp6)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1j9x)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j0w)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvql360x4pg)

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Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dhd)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pr2)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pr2)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lsq)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lsq)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lsq)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2ymx)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2ymy)

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Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2ymy)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mvh)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mvh)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n6d)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n6d)

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HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1nbx)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3ct1nbx)

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HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n1w)

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Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nvx)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nvy)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nvy)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvy)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2yn5)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2yn5)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2kyj)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tdn)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tdn)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1tdn)

Interview With Colin Powell 22:06 MON (w3csxg5g)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dkn)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2dkn)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dkn)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hcj)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hcj)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2wtyvqzgc)

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Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kxk)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3ct1kxk)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jtq)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l22)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l22)

People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1plj)

People Fixing The World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1plj)

People Fixing The World 22:06 TUE (w3ct1plj)

Ros Atkins on ... 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dnx)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l4c)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l4c)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nkn9dggps)

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Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct1l8v)

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Sports News 23:20 SAT (w172y0snhp3lsz6)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0q65h9h93k)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tgydq7zt7)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0tgydqc46l)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lc3)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1nhm)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3ct1nhm)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rtl)

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The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2dr5)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2dr5)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2dr5)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct2wpd)

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The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct2wpf)

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The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p94)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p95)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p95)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3ct1p95)

The Cultural Frontline 23:32 SAT (w3ct1pt8)

The Cultural Frontline 04:32 SUN (w3ct1pt8)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1pt8)

The Documentary 05:32 SUN (w3ct2wpc)

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The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct2yn6)

The Documentary 20:06 TUE (w3ct2yn6)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20fl)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rg9)

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The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3ct1rgb)

The Food Chain 22:32 THU (w3ct1rgb)

The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rlt)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3ct1rlv)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z2n)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct1z2n)

The Inquiry 22:06 THU (w3ct1z2n)

The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172xyxpw482j34)

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The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1ht2)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3ct1ht3)

The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3ct1yvv)

The Story of Aids 12:06 SAT (w3ct2wp8)

The Story of Aids 03:06 SUN (w3ct2wp8)

The Story of Aids 10:06 WED (w3ct2wp8)

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Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wz6)

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Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct1x1h)

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WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f3t)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzlfh5mp1mc)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y485wgcxc0r)

World Business Report 23:32 MON (w172y490b5zmmf2)

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World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172y46yqch8006)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1tzq)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1tzq)

World Football 22:32 FRI (w3ct1tzq)

World Questions 19:06 SAT (w3ct1wfm)

World Questions 12:06 SUN (w3ct1wfm)

World of Wisdom 09:32 SAT (w3ct2hds)

World of Wisdom 22:32 SUN (w3ct2hds)

World of Wisdom 03:32 MON (w3ct2hds)