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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 09 OCTOBER 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t6mrx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqkqxq402m)
Global corporate tax deal draws closer

An agreed global minimum 15% corporate tax rate draws closer as Ireland signs up. Dr Brian Keenan is director of public policy at Chartered Accountants Ireland and discusses the background to the latest developments. Also in the programme, Chris Low of FHN Financial in New York wraps up the week on Wall Street, and reflects on some lower than expected US jobs figures. The BBC's Thomas Naadi reports on the problem of discarded 'fast fashion' clothing items from western countries ending up in landfill in Africa. San Francisco Fed Chief Mary Daly speaks to Kai Ryssdal on inflation, the debt ceiling impasse and why public trust is essential for monetary policymakers at the central bank.Electric car maker Tesla's boss Elon Musk has announced that the firm will move its headquarters from California to Texas. And the BBC's Ed Butler takes a trip into the Metaverse.

All through the show we'll be joined by Peter Ryan of ABC in Sydney.

(Picture: Ireland's finance minister Paschal Donohoe. Picture credit: Press Association.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t6rj1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy9ch9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdx3sf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lc2)
Kagiso Rabada: The IPL, bio-bubbles & being a South African role model

South Africa and Delhi Capitals’ fast bowler Kagiso Rabada has told BBC Stumped that ‘bio-bubbles aren’t sustainable’ in world cricket and something must change.

Rabada, who made his IPL debut four years ago as a 22-year-old, has risen to become one of the most successful bowlers in world cricket and a role model for young South Africans. He joined Alison Mitchell, Sunil Gupta and Jim Maxwell to discuss his development as a player, what it’s like to be coached by Ricky Pointing and his hopes of lifting the Indian Premier League trophy with Delhi Capitals, after losing last year’s Final.

Also on Stumped, we discuss another week of speculation around the future of the Ashes, what will happen next and we hear from West Indies legend Michael Holding who claims England showed "Western arrogance" by cancelling their tour of Pakistan.

Photo credit: Kagiso Rabada of South Africa walks off for lunch after he took the wicket of Jonny Bairstow of England during day three of the 4th Test at Supersport Park on January 24, 2016 in Centurion, South Africa. (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t6w85)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fk)
Ecuador’s prison battle: The aftermath

The president of Ecuador has declared a state of emergency for the prison system after the country’s worst prison riot, in which 118 inmates died. It’s part of a wave of violence that has swept Ecuador's jails, as rival drug gangs fight for dominance. BBC Mundo’s Ana Maria Roura has been looking into the story.

Squid Game: kids' games and killings
‘Squid Game’ has been topping streaming charts around the world. The South Korean drama sees contestants playing popular children's games to win millions of dollars, but the cost of losing is death. BBC Korean's William Lee explains the appeal of its mix of nostalgia and horror.

Morocco’s cannabis farmers
Despite the huge profits for international dealers, Morocco’s cannabis farmers are poor. Recently the government legalised the growth and sale of cannabis for medical and industrial purposes, so will farmers benefit? BBC Arabic’s Mohamed Ibrahim visited northern Morocco to find out.

Russia's Romanov wedding
A descendant of the Russian royal family was recently married in a lavish ceremony in St Petersburg. Grand Duke George Mikhailovich Romanov is a great-grandnephew of the last tsar, Nicholas II. Olga Ivshina of BBC Russian tells us about reactions among ordinary Russians.

Afghan fruit in Pakistani markets
Pakistan imports plenty of fruit from Afghanistan, but this year there’s been more, and it’s cheaper. Since the Taliban took over, trade between the two countries has become one-sided, with Afghan farmers keen to get their produce out, as BBC Urdu’s Azizullah Khan reports.

Image: Relatives wait with caskets for inmates who died in the Litoral Penitentiary
Credit: Gerardo Menoscal/Agencia Press South/Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz5)
Clyde Best - A black footballing pioneer

Bermuda-born Clyde Best came to England as a teenager in 1968 and went on to play for West Ham United alongside the likes of Bobby Moore and Geoff Hurst. Best made a name for himself as a talented goal-scorer in more than 200 appearances for the Hammers, but he faced constant racist abuse from fans, and on occasion, from opposition players. Clyde Best told Mike Lanchin about how he stood up to the racists in English soccer.

(Photo: Clyde Best on the ball, 4 March 1972. Credit: Mirror Group Newspapers/Mirrorpix/Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t7009)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1ht1)
Empty shelves and clogged ports

The world has emerged from pandemic lockdowns more optimistic about the direction of Covid, but the sudden surge in demand for goods is creating new economic shocks from London to Los Angeles. Factories and ports are not functioning as they once did due to the pent-up demand for goods and broken supply chains. Energy prices are surging and some shelves are empty. So is this a temporary blip or a new normal? Who will be the winners and losers of the post-pandemic global economy and what opportunities do new economic landscapes provide for fighting the climate crisis?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Paul Schuster and Junaid Ahmed


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t73rf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy9qqp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdxh0t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kp9)
Cats and road safety

We love cats (well, many people do)! Thanks to one feline friend, they help keep us safe. An inventor narrowly avoided a road accident thanks to the eyes of a cat. He developed reflective road studs and named them, fittingly, ‘cat’s eyes’, which help us drive safely at night. To listen online, visit www.bbcworldservice.com/30animals


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dnw)
The UK's net zero challenge

In 2019, the UK became the first major economy to set a net zero carbon emissions goal by 2050. Now, as the country gets ready to host a major UN climate change summit in a few weeks, Ros Atkins looks at the challenges posed by the net zero ambition.

(Photo: Electricity pylons and a field of cows with blue sky. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t77hk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytdqyjkmrn)
Afghanistan: US-Taliban talks

Senior US officials are to hold their first face-to-face meetings with the Taliban since the militants
seized control of Afghanistan. We hear from a counter-terrorism expert on what this might achieve.

Also in the programme: Global leaders have signed up to the biggest corporate tax overhaul in a generation; and we speak to the French writer and philosopher Bernard-Henri Lévy about his travels around the world -- during the global pandemic -- to report on human rights abuses for his new book.

Our panellists this week are Laurie Goering, editor of the Thomson Reuters Foundation's news website on the human impacts of climate change, and Silio Boccanera, a London-based correspondent for Brazilian television.

(Picture: Taliban fighter. Credits: EPA.)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t7c7p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytdqyjkrhs)
Polls re-open in the Czech Republic

Voters in the Czech Republic head to the polls where the fight will be fierce for the billionaire-turned-prime minister, Andrej Babis, who hopes to secure another four-year term.

Also in the programme: Elon Musk throws open the doors to a new electric car and battery factory in Berlin; and an opera based on Mahatma Ghandi's early years in South Africa opens at the English National Opera.

Our panellists this week are Laurie Goering, editor of the Thomson Reuters Foundation's news website on the human impacts of climate change, and Silio Boccanera, London correspondent for Brazilian television.

(Picture: Andrej Babis (centre) is facing two opposition coalitions and is competing with the far right, Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t7gzt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytdqyjkw7x)
Angela Merkel goes to Israel on goodbye tour

Germany’s Chancellor Angela Merkel arrives in Israel, a country she transformed relations with.

Also in the programme: Senior US officials are to hold their first face-to-face meetings with the Taliban since the militants
seized control of Afghanistan; and we hear from one of the Nobel Peace Prize winners.

Our panellists this week are Laurie Goering, editor of the Thomson Reuters Foundation's news website on the human impacts of climate change, and Silio Boccanera, a London-based correspondent for Brazilian television.

(Picture: Angela Merkel. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdxv86)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Documentary (w3csz56h)
Her Story Made History

Journalist Maria Ressa

Maria Ressa, the Filipina-American journalist and author was included in Time's Person of the Year 2018 as one of a collection of journalists from around the world combating fake news. Earlier this year she was arrested for "cyber libel" amid accusations of corporate tax evasion. As an outspoken critic of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, her arrest was seen by the international community as a politically motivated act by the government.

(Photo:Chief Executive Officer of Rappler Maria Ressa. Credit: Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t7lqy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d6b)
Coronavirus: Protecting vulnerable children

Children who have a compromised immune system remain at high risk during the ongoing pandemic if they develop Covid-19. Their parents continue to protect their children from those who no longer wear masks or - in some cases - refuse to get a vaccine. We hear from three mothers, in the US and the UK, who share their hopes and fears for the future.

In some US states, mask and vaccination mandates are banned. It’s a different picture in New York, where all hospital and nursing home workers must now be vaccinated. An emergency doctor and a nurse discuss how the state and their colleagues have responded to the mandate.

In Europe, Russia now has the continent’s highest number of recorded deaths due to Covid-19. We bring together two people in Moscow, who share their deeply personal stories of loved ones lost to the virus. One discusses the feeling of guilt that resulted from being unable to persuade his late grandmother to get a vaccine.

(Photo: A stuffed toy wearing a face mask in an improvised classroom prepared for a primary school class in a recreation hall on February 20, 2021 in Wessling, Germany. Credit: Alexandra Beier/Getty Images)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdxz0b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdr)
Hope and children

The pandemic has made many people unsure about the future. Issues such as climate catastrophe have come to seem all the more real. How do we keep hope alive for our children and ourselves? Reverend Canon Mpho Tutu van Furth offers insights to Liyang from China, now living in New Zealand, as she worries about the world her children will live in and how she should prepare them for it.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l21)
Lyse Doucet reveals her personal Wish for Afghanistan

The BBC’s chief international correspondent Lyse Doucet takes us behind her new series A Wish For Afghanistan - in which Afghans discuss their fears and hopes for the country’s future. Listeners ask how interviewees are found and the challenges Lyse faced on making the series now the Taliban are in control.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t7qh2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q5t6zq4hq)
Allegations of abuse in women's football

We explore the aftermath of the shocking allegations of abuse in women's football in the USA. The news from the NWSL was particularly distressing for former Irish international Ciara McCormack, because for many years in Canada, Ciara tried to be heard and taken seriously when in 2008 she highlighted alleged mis-conduct by her coach at the Vancouver White Caps, Bob Birarda. In 2019, McCormack wrote a blog post called "A Horrific Canadian Soccer Story – The Story No One Wants to Listen To, But Everyone Needs to Hear." Birarda, who was also the coach of the Canadian women's under-20 team, was charged with multiple sex offences in 2020, which he denies and is await trial. Ciara started by explaining about the atmosphere and power dynamic at the club.

The first new sickle-cell treatment in 20 years was announced this week. It's expected to help keep thousands of people out of hospital and reduce health inequalities for black people, who are predominantly affected. Like Nigerian Rugby League star Ade Adebisi, or the "London Flyer" as he was known in his playing days. Ade holds a unique place in the history of the sport as he is the only person to have played the game professionally whilst also managing the condition.

Plus we hear from Libyan International footballer Mo Bettamer as the nation looks to qualify for it's first ever men's world cup preview the big fight in Las Vegas, Fury v Wilder III and look ahead to the Manchester derby in the Women's Super League

Photo Credit Getty Images


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t7v76)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvybg6g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdy6hl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3s)
How to ask for a pay hike

More than 18 months have passed since Covid-19 was officially declared a pandemic. Hundreds of millions of people have lived through lockdowns, adapting to the new ways of working. Millions lost their jobs, many others had to take pay cuts.

How has it impacted the way you get paid? Do you think you are paid adequately for the amount of work that you deliver? If not, then you need to ask for more. But how do you do that? Is there a right way of speaking with your manager about how much you are worth? What are the best ways to negotiate your wages? What are the common mistakes employees make when asking for a raise?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the best ways to ask for a pay rise.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Sue Ann Vaz, head of value added services and marketing, ABC Consultants; Ankur Warikoo, personal finance influencer; Aishwarya Srivastava, digital marketing professional; Pushkin Shailen, global operations leader, consultant; Smriti George, communications and digital content consultant


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t7yzb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Story of Aids (w3ct2wp7)
1. The beginning

We return to the beginning of the global Aids crisis and explore the personal and political struggles of the epidemic, as it unfolded in two very different countries – the United States and South Africa – and hear stories from people who fought through it, and survived.

The series begins in the USA, where 40 years ago the Centers for Disease Control published a memo flagging a rare pneumonia found in five previously healthy, young gay men in California. Two of the men had died. These would be the first recorded cases of Aids in the world – a disease which would go on to kill 35 million people.

We explore how Aids was first characterised as a ‘gay cancer’, decimating gay communities in cities such as San Francisco and New York - communities which found no sympathy in the Reagan White House.

The 1980s were supposed to be a time of celebration for gay people in America - a time in which they could live more openly, following a decade of campaigning for equal rights following the Stonewall uprising. Aids would roll back that progress, with gay men now portrayed as a diseased pariah.

In the face of this prejudice and stigma, we learn how a community-led response pioneered Aids care, which would be emulated around the world.

Contributors: Robert Vázquez-Pacheco; Peter Staley; Dr James Curran; Dr Anthony Fauci; Alison Moed-Paolercio; Dr Paul Volberding

Presenter: Audrey Brown
Producer: Richard Fenton-Smith
Sound Engineer: Tom Brignell


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t82qg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm1r212)
Xi Jinping calls for "reunification" with Taiwan

China's President Xi Jinping calls for "reunification" with Taiwan, as tensions remain high. We hear from Beijing and from our correspondent in Taiwan.

Also in the programme: Taleban and US officials meet for the first time since the US withdrawal from Afghanistan; and as President Biden urges companies to fire people who refuse a Covid vaccine, we hear from one teacher who'd prefer to go.

(Image: Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks at a meeting commemorating the 110th anniversary of Xinhai Revolution at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China October 9, 2021 / Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t86gl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tgl4dgv6d)
Sportsworld

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Charlotte Tattersall/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t8pg3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvyc9fc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdz1qh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kp9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8t)
Japan's Keirin cycling phenomenon

In the year 2000, the Japanese track cycling sport of Keirin made its Olympic debut at the Sydney Games. Wildly popular in Japan, Keirin races begin with the cyclists following a motorized pacer, who gradually cranks up the speed until the riders are released into a final frenetic sprint. Ashley Byrne talks to former Japanese cyclist, Shinichi Ota, about trying to win the first gold medal in the sport his country invented. The programme is a Made-In-Manchester Production.

PHOTO: A Keirin race at the 2016 Olympics (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t8t67)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Documentary (w3ct2yqb)
World Book Café: PEN

100 years ago English PEN was founded to create a “common meeting ground in every country for all writers.” and it quickly grew into an international organisation. The organisation has long campaigned for Freedom of Expression for writers. To mark the centenary, in a special edition of World Book Cafe, Ritula Shah and her guests discuss current threats to Freedom of Expression around the world and hear from writers, including Tsitsi Dangarembga, about the power and importance of storytelling.


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t8xyc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtk)
Film director Sir Ridley Scott

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined by Hmong-Australian playwright Michele Lee and film critic Anil Sinanan to discuss the cultural highlights of the past week. Three-times Oscar nominated director Ridley Scott and actor Jodie Comer talk about their new historical movie, The Last Duel.

Comedian Njambi McGrath explains how she’s confronting the colonial history of Kenya.

Dave Grohl of the Foo Fighters and Nirvana discusses his musical career.

Director Steven Soderbergh reveals how the city of Detroit shaped his latest film, No Sudden Move.

Lebanese-American writer Rabih Alameddine talks about his novel, The Wrong End of the Telescope, which tells the story of a Lebanese doctor who goes to the Greek island of Lesbos to help Syria refugees.

Michele Lee discusses her play, Rice, which has Indian and Chinese lead characters. It's co-produced by Actors Touring Company and playing at the Orange Tree Theatre in London.

And The Arts Hour also marks the legacy of Cuba’s Buena Vista Social Club.

Producers: Paul Waters & Mugabi Turya

(Photo: Ridley Scott. Credit: Marco Bertorello/AFP via Getty)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t91ph)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm1s103)
The US and the Taliban face to face

US and Taliban leaders meet for the first time since the fall of Kabul. The talks, in Doha, are part of a series of efforts by the Taliban to gain international recognition. But can they find any common ground? We hear the latest from Doha, and speak to former US ambassador to Kabul Hugo Llorens.

Also in the programme: an unexpected election result in the Czech Republic could spell the political end of billionaire prime minister Andrej Babis; and Austria's Chancellor steps down amid accusations of corruption.

(Photo: Taliban flags for sale in front of the former US embassy in Kabul. Credit: REUTERS/Jorge Silva)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t95fm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hch)
The beauty of sampling with Anchorsong, Loraine James, Gold Panda and Sandunes

Anchorsong, Loraine James, Gold Panda and Sandunes discuss what song they'd make it they knew billions of people were going to listen to it, being guided by samples, the importance of keeping in the mistakes, and the art of making organic sounds.

Masaaki Yoshida is better known as Anchorsong, an electronic musician and producer originally from Tokyo. He describes his music as being “borderless”, fusing dance music and samples with elements of rock, hip-hop and electronica. Sanaya Aredeshir, also known as Sandunes, is a composer, producer, and pianist from Mumbai, India who incorporates elements of dance and jazz to create something wholly unique. Derwin Schlecker, aka Gold Panda, is an electronic music producer and performer who creates “swirling electronic textures out of samples from pop, soul, hip-hop, or whatever happens to be lying around”. And finally, Loraine James is an experimental electronic adventurer and producer who’s breaking new ground with her sound, and is one of the most exciting talents coming out of London right now. Her latest album, Reflections, is her most critically acclaimed work to date.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t995r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyww24bplqq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sn4dstncc)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdzng4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt7)
Nigeria: Nollywood Star Richard Mofe-Damijo

This week, we focus on the booming cultural landscape of Nigeria and hear from some of the country’s most exciting creatives.

One of Nollywood’s biggest stars, Richard Mofe-Damijo, talks about his screen career and how the Nigerian film industry is bouncing back from the coronavirus pandemic.

Lisa Folawiyo is one of Nigeria’s leading fashion designers. Her work, which combines traditional Nigerian fabrics with contemporary tailoring, has been featured in Vogue and worn by celebrities, including Lupita Nyong’o, Lucy Liu and Thandiwe Newton. Lisa shares her secrets of how she created a global brand using traditional Nigerian materials.

Etinosa Yvonne is a documentary photographer who photographed the End SARS protests against police brutality. Victor Ehikhamenor is a contemporary multimedia artist, photographer, and writer, who responded to the government ban on Twitter with an illustration of the blue bird logo, silenced behind bars. They discuss their work and the power of visual art to send political messages.

Onyeka Nwelue is an award winning author, filmmaker and publisher whose latest novel, The Strangers of Braamfontein, tells the story of a young Nigerian artist, who moves to South Africa to seek new opportunities. Onyeka wrote the novel in Pidgin, he and discusses why it was important to him to bring Nigerian dialects and languages to an international audience.

Presented by Chi Chi Izundu

Produced by Candace Wilson, Emma Wallace and Jack Thomason

(Photo: Richard Mofe-Damijo. Credit: Spotlight Photos & Imagery)



SUNDAY 10 OCTOBER 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t9jp0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yvt)
Youngest rock samples from the moon

n December 2020, China's Chang'e-5 mission returned to earth carrying rock samples collected from the moon – the first lunar samples to be collected since the American Apollo and Luna missions to the moon in the 1970s.

Laboratory analysis has revealed that these are the youngest samples of rocks to be collected from the moon. Lunar geologist Katherine Joy explains what this tells us about the moon’s volcanic past. Also on the programme, a recent study reveals that the hepatitis B virus has been infecting humans for at least 10,000 years.

Denise Kühnert from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History shares what the evolution of the virus tells us about human evolution, as well as the rise and fall of civilisations. In the wake of Cyclone Shaheen, we also speak to Princeton University’s Ning Lin about how climate modelling can help us predict tropical storms in the Arabian Sea, and Fredi Otto joins us to discuss the 2021 Nobel Prizes for Science.

Snails are a major enemy of gardeners around the world, invading vegetable patches and gobbling prize plants. CrowdScience listener Alexandre reckons he’s removed thousands of them from his garden, which got him wondering: apart from eating his garden to the core, what’s their wider role in nature? Would anyone or anything miss them if they suddenly disappeared?

And for that matter, what about other creatures? We all know how complex biodiversity is, but it seems that some animals are more important than others in maintaining the balance of life on earth. Is there anything that could go extinct without having knock-on effects?

CrowdScience heads to the Hawaiian mountains, a snail diversity hotspot, to discover the deep value of snails to native ecosystems there. Researchers and conservationists are working together to protect these highly endangered snails, and their natural habitats, from multiple threats.
We hear why all snails – even the ones munching Alexandre’s petunias – have their role to play in the natural world, and get to grips with cascading extinctions: how the loss of a single species can trigger unpredictable effects on a whole ecosystem.



(Image: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t9nf4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvyd8dd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xf00pj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvw)
New antiviral Covid pill

Trials stopped early of a new Covid antiviral pill, Molnupiravir, as it may cut numbers of people in hospital by about a half. Claudia Hammond discusses the ethical questions of who should be given it. Plus Unicef report on findings about childhood mental health before and during the pandemic. And a new exhibition on the researchers and trial participants outwitting cancer.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Photo: An experimental Covid-19 treatment pill called Molnupiravir. Photo credit: Merck/Reuters)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t9s58)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Story of Aids (w3ct2wp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t9wxd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvg)
Starting again: The lives of refugees in their new home

Stories from Afghanistan and the UK, Lebanon, Mozambique and The Canary Islands

What is it like to re-start your life from scratch – to lose your home, your possessions, the familiar comfort of your friends, relatives and neighbours? There are more than 80 million displaced people around the world, the most recent wave coming from Afghanistan, after the Taliban took over. Karim Haidari had fled The Taliban the last time they ran the country, and now he has had to do so again. He describes what it was like to leave with just 30 minutes notice, and adapt to a new life in the UK.

Anna Foster chose to begin life afresh. She has just been appointed as one of the BBC’s Middle East reporters, based in Beirut. She had of course read about the current problems in Lebanon: shortages of food, medicine and power. But that did not prepare her for life in a city where even the traffic lights can’t function properly, and where power cuts are so regular that people simply factor them into their everyday lives.

Lebanon and the wider Middle East have long played host to Islamist groups, jostling for power by means both political and military. In Africa, however, modern Islamist violence is a relatively new phenomenon. Mozambique has suffered an Islamist insurgency since 2017, one which has ended up killing thousands of people. The country’s government called on Rwanda’s army to help tackle these armed groups, an intervention which Rwanda claims has been successful. Anne Soy visited the affected area, and met the troops who have been fighting there.

Nature can send people fleeing, as much as any war or economic catastrophe. A volcano on the Canary Island of La Palma has been erupting since last month, sending molten lava streaming down onto the villages below. Dan Johnson had studied volcanoes at university, but found it was a whole new experience when he arrived at the site of the disaster, and watched as people packed their possessions into cars and pickup trucks and fled for their lives.

(Image: Afghan refugees arrive at Royal Air Force Brize Norton escorted by UK Armed Forces. Credit: MoD/Crown Copyright 2021)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xf085s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tb0nj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvydmms)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xf0cxx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2pn5)
Smart women, male genius

Think of a genius. If that person is a man - be it Albert Einstein, Stephen Hawking or Isaac Newton, for instance - you are not alone. Five hundreds years ago a Spanish physiologist declared that genius was stored in the testicles. Even today, studies have shown that people associate men with genius more than women. Award-winning science writer and broadcaster Angela Saini wants to know why.

Saini examines why people are so reluctant to credit intellectual brilliance to women - now and throughout history. Einstein, for instance, needed a woman’s help. She hears about a proposal for making the concept of genius more inclusive and discusses the impact on girls in school when teachers take gender out of classrooms.

Guests include Sarah-Jane Leslie, professor of philosophy at Princeton University, in the United States; psychology professor Christia Spears Brown from Kentucky University; and Australian feminist and writer Clementine Ford.

Saini is also joined by people who have been labelled a genius - including scientist and writer Dr Camilla Pang, who was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder aged eight; writer, mathematician and concert pianist Dr Eugenia Cheng; teenager Monty Lord - who wrote a best seller when he was seven and holds five world records for memory; and eight-year-old Lillyan Lord Lancaster, who took a Mensa test when she was just five and achieved an IQ score of 158.

(Photo: Lillyan. Credit: Marya Lord Lancaster)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tb4dn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytdqyjnjnr)
Austrian chancellor resigns

Austria's leader, Sebastian Kurz, steps down after pressure triggered by a corruption scandal.

Also in the programme: We speak to North Macedonia's deputy Foreign Minister, Nikola Dimitrov, about tensions with Bulgaria and the question of EU enlargement. And a year ago this week, a sit-in outside the governor's office in Lagos sparked a protest movement across the world. We hear from one of the protest organisers.

Our panellists this week are Jana Puglierin, German political analyst and head of European Council on Foreign Affairs in Berlin and Bulama Bukarti, Nigerian analyst at the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change here in London.

(Picture: Sebastian Kurz said he would fight the charges against him. Credit: EPA)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tb84s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytdqyjnndw)
Iraqis head to the polls

Parliamentary elections are being held early in Iraq, in response to widespread pro-democracy protests that erupted in 2019. We hear what it's like living in the country today as it struggles to democratise.

Also in the programme: former President Donald Trump returned to Iowa for a campaign-style rally. And the Czech Prime Minister's party has narrowly lost to the Together coalition.

Our panellists this week are Jana Puglierin, German political analyst and head of European Council on Foreign Affairs in Berlin and Bulama Bukarti, Nigerian analyst at the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change here in London.

(Picture: A demonstrator waves an Iraqi flag during an anti-government protest in Baghdad, Iraq May 25, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tbcwx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytdqyjns50)
China-Taiwan tensions: President Tsai lashes back at China

In a speech commemorating Taiwan's National Day, President Tsai warned that her country will continue its democratic way of life, after China's President Xi Jinping vowed yesterday to "fulfil reunification". We speak to a political scientist in Taipei about what these battling speeches really mean.

Also in the programme: Beethoven's unfinished 10th symphony is resurrected using artificial intelligence. We hear from one of the musicians about what it was like playing an AI score.

Our panellists this week are Jana Puglierin, German political analyst and head of European Council on Foreign Affairs in Berlin and Bulama Bukarti, Nigerian analyst at the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change here in London.

(Picture: Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xf0r59)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg8)
The drinking experiment

Alcohol is part of the fabric of life in many cultures. It’s associated with socialising, dating, networking, even commiserating . But what happens if you take it away? Tamasin Ford brings together three people who decided to give up alcohol in a drinking culture. We ask them why and how they did it. What effect did it have on their lives professionally, socially, physically and emotionally? And would they ever want to drink again?

If you Would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

If you have found any of the issues raised in this programme upsetting and are looking for further information or support - please visit
BBC Action Line by clicking on the link below.

Contributors:
Annie Grace - Author and founder This Naked Mind Colorado, USA
Andy Ramage - Performance coach, Essex, UK
Kate Gunn - Author 'The Accidental Soberista' Whitlow, Ireland

(Picture: Hand on empty bottle. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tbhn1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xf0vxf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxj)
The inside story of a Muslim drag queen

Amrou al-Kadhi - who goes by the pronoun ‘they’ - was raised Muslim, but even as a kid Amrou was different. They had no interest in playing with boys their age, and instead loved dressing up with their mother. Amrou grappled with issues of gender identity and sexuality for years. It was not until they picked up drag as a student at Cambridge University that they were able to find solace and belonging. Amrou has written a book called Unicorn: The Memoir of a Muslim Drag Queen. Amrou spoke to Outlook’s Jo Fidgen. This interview was first broadcast 5th November 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Laura Thomas

Picture: Amrou Al-Kadhi as Glamrou
Credit: Harry Carr


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tbmd5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 A Geochemical History of Life on Earth (w3ct2kym)
2. When bacteria ruled the world

Justin explores the Precambrian period: a kind of dark ages, spanning most of our planet's history, but about which we have very few fossil records. What we do know is that it contained two of the most important developments in evolution. One gave us a breathable atmosphere. The other made possible all the animals that now breathe it.

The Natural History Museum's Imran Rahman introduces Justin to this strange bacterial world, while Aubrey Zerkle of the University of St Andrews explains why cyanobacteria may have been the greatest mass murderers in history. Meanwhile UCL's Nick Lane describes the freak event that resulted in the first non-bacterial life-form, and Rachel Wood of Edinburgh University how they eventually evolved into creatures with horrible predatory mouth-parts.

Producer: Laurence Knight

Image: A banded iron formation on display at the Natural History Museum, London (Credit: The Trustees of the Natural History Museum, London)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xf0znk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2vq9)
Getting married the Nigerian way

Hannah Ajala, a British-Yoruba broadcaster will walk us through the sounds, beats and meanings of a Yoruba engagement ceremony. Speaking to those at the heart of the traditional marriage and exploring its importance on what could be considered the most important day of their lives.

Producer: Tobi Olujinmi

(Photo: Yoruba marriage ceremony. Credit: David Olujinmi)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tbr49)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvyfc3k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xf13dp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2vq8)
Sugar-coated World

Thailand: Asia’s sugar bowl

Lainy Malkani looks into the story of sugar in Thailand, now the second biggest exporter of sugar in the world. We hear how farmers there are coping with climate change, what sustainable production might look like and what sugar cane can be used for once the sweet juice has been removed, from fuel to water bottles. Lainy looks at the future of sugar, talking to those experimenting with sugar to try to make it healthier, like the company Douxmatok, who are hacking sugar crystals at a structural level in an effort to help us eat less of it without compromising on taste.

Presenter: Lainy Malkani
Producer: Megan Jones


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tbvwf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2yqb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tbzmk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm1tyy5)
Iraqis vote in elections for reform

Iraqis head to the polls in a general election that is being held early in response to mass protests that erupted two years ago. Iraqi leaders are saying it is a chance for reform but many Iraqis believe that little will change. We have some analysis and hear from some voters.

Also in the programme: On World Day against the death penalty, we hear about the plight of women around the world on death row and what should be done to help them. And we go to the United States where Donald Trump, the former Republican president stoked speculation about his 2024 intentions by holding a rally in Iowa.

(Photo: Election poster. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tc3cp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rls)
The story of Evita

Eva Peron rose from a childhood of poverty to become one of the most powerful figures in Latin America. An illegitimate small town girl, she smashed class and gender barriers to become Argentina’s controversial First Lady. Loved and loathed, Rajan Datar discusses her life, work and remarkable afterlife with biographer Jill Hedges, historian Ranaan Rein, and cultural theorist Claudia Soria.

[Photo: Eva Peron in 1951. Credit: Keystone/Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkm)
Vaccinating the world

Tim Harford speaks to Hannah Ritchie, head of research at Our World in Data, to look at how vaccination campaigns are going in countries around the world – and the trickiness of comparing them.


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tc73t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hch)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tcbvy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tgl4dkzlr)
Sportsworld

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Mikey Williams/Top Rank Inc/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tcq3b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvygb2l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xf22cq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2vq9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tctvg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhc)
Facebook's worst ever week?

On this episode of Business Weekly, with the site down and a whistle-blower’s testimonial, was this Facebook’s worst-ever week? We hear what went wrong with their internal internet and find out why Frances Haughan’s evidence to Congress was important. Plus, we discover how a tech company is helping dispatch ambulances in Kenya where there is no centralised system. And if music be the food of love - swipe on. We hear from the app designer hoping to match-make with music. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Facebook owned apps on a French mobile, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5tcyll)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm1vxx6)
Polls close in Iraqi elections

Iraqis have voted in their fifth national parliamentary elections since the US invasion of 2003: but why was turnout so low? We hear from Jane Arraf, the New York Times bureau chief in Baghdad.

Also in the programme: the controversial life and career of A.Q.Khan, who helped Pakistan build its nuclear bomb and supplied nuclear know-how to other countries including Iran and North Korea. And a new artistic presence in a Paris Museum that commemorates a murdered Jewish family.

(Photo: Parliamentary elections in Iraq. Credit: EPA/AHMED JALIL)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5td2bq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 A Geochemical History of Life on Earth (w3ct2kym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xf2fm3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5td62v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyww24bshmt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sn4dsxk8g)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xf2kc7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 11 OCTOBER 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3j8v8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlf3x9wx0j)
Sydney reopens after 106 days in lockdown

New South Wales' largest city emerges from a lockdown lasting more than three months - we hear about the impact on the economy from Sarah Hunter at BIS Oxford Economics in Sydney. Patrick Edmond of avation consultants Altair Advisory looks back on 75 years of Alitalia as the Italian flagship airline makes its last flight this week. Fabian Bolin of War on Cancer tells us about the organisation's new app which helps track clinical trials available to cancer patients, and independent economist Michael Hughes discusses inflation and rising food prices.

This edition is presented by Russell Padmore and produced by Russell Newlove.

(Image: A person walks in front of the Sydney Opera House Credit:EPA)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q6n3n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2ymw)
Earthshot 1

While international meetings to discuss climate change and polices that affect the world can seem rather distant to us as individuals, on a local level there are many exciting and creative initiatives all over the world where people are developing practical solutions to the environmental problems they see. The Earthshot prize highlights many of these projects, ideas and initiatives which have the potential to make a difference locally and globally.

In this three part series Chhavi Sachdev looks at the practical work of the prize nominees, and profiles their solutions on a range of subjects; protecting nature, cleaning the air, ocean revival, climate change and waste.

Picture: Earth floating in space, Credit: Chris Clor/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3jdld)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47m0kn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q6rvs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr4)
Why can't we stop gas flaring?

There are thought to be over 10,000 gas flares around the world that contribute to global warming by emitting tonnes of carbon dioxide and methane.

Flared gas is a by-product of oil extraction and is frequently used as a method of eliminating unwanted gasses in countries such as Albania, Algeria, Libya, Iraq, Russia and Nigeria.

Yet, year after year deadlines set to stop the practice are missed.

The oil industry says better infrastructure is needed to stop flaring and some of the world’s largest producers of oil have committed to ending flaring by 2030. What will it take for that to happen?

Presenters Neal Razzell and Kate Lamble are joined by:

Bjørn Otto Sverdrup, chair, Oil and Gas Climate Initiative
Mark Davis, CEO of Capterio.
Sharon Wilson, senior field advocate, Earthworks

Producer: Darin Graham
Reporter: Fyneface Dumnamene
Series producer: Rosamund Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound engineer: Tom Brignell


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3jjbj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 A Geochemical History of Life on Earth (w3ct2kym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q6wlx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3jn2n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47m81x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q70c1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p94)
Sisters of skydiving

What does it feel like to fall through the sky? Two women who have broken barriers and mastered the art of skydiving from India and the United States tell Kim Chakanetsa the answer.

The very first time Rachel Thomas flew in an aeroplane, she jumped out of it at 4,500 feet. Fast forward to 2002 and she became the first Indian woman to skydive and set foot on the North Pole. In her 25-year career she has completed 650 skydives in 11 countries, has been a judge at skydiving competitions and has received many awards including the Padma Shri, India’s fourth highest civilian award.

Danielle Williams is an African American disabled skydiver who is an advocate for greater diversity in outdoor adventure sports. She graduated from Harvard in 2008 and spent a decade in the U.S. Army. She has completed over 600 jumps, and in 2014 co-founded Team Blackstar Skydivers. This team, originally made up of six African Americans who linked up in a "black star" formation skydive, has now grown to a diverse group of over 330 skydivers in six countries. She is also the Founder and Senior Editor of Melanin Base Camp, an outdoor blog promoting diversity.

Produced by Emily Naylor and Alice Gioia.

IMAGES:
(L) Rachel Thomas, courtesy of Rachel Thomas
(R) Danielle Williams, credit Ro Asgari


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3jrts)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpjytvj)
North Korea: High profile defector talks to BBC

In an exclusive interview with the BBC, the former Colonel and spy says the country will never give up its nuclear weapons programme.

Iraq votes - but will there be any change in what's been a stalemate between pro and anti Iranian parties?

And China's property credit crunch reaches another crucial payment point - as another property giant joins Evergrande on the rack.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3jwkx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpjyyln)
A former North Korean spy chief speaks

We get rare insight into the operations of the secretive regime - including drug deals, arms deals and plans to assassinate political opponents.

Elections in Iraq, held early in bid to quell further violence - but is there any prospect of real change?

And ahead of the upcoming COP climate conference in Glasgow – we hear from the heir to the British throne, Prince Charles, about his hopes for the talks.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3k0b1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpjz2bs)
NK defector: 'Kim Jong Un won't give up nuclear weapons'

A former insider in the North Korean regime talks to the BBC about its nuclear weapons programme and secret recreational drug programme.

We'll head to Iraq to hear why the majority of Iraqis appear to have given up hope that today's elections will improve their security, economy or democracy.

And fears are growing that the Taliban are targeting women who served in the Afghan army and police services. We speak to the former head of the British forces in Afghanistan.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3k425)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6c)
Richard Deverell: The battle to save the planet

Do we understand the urgency of the global biodiversity and climate change crisis? Stephen Sackur speaks to the director of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, Richard Deverell. Kew Gardens in London is a UNESCO world heritage site and home to one of the largest collections of living plants in the world and an unrivalled repository of preserved specimen plants collected by scientific pioneers such as Charles Darwin. Richard Deverell has big ambitions to put Kew at the centre of the fight to avert environmental catastrophe by helping the public to grasp the scale of the challenges caused by biodiversity loss and a warming planet.


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q7hbk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5c)
The economics of donkeys

There are an estimated ten million donkeys in sub Saharan Africa, many providing crucial roles supporting the livelihoods of low income families. We explore why these beasts of burden are so important to the economics of the region, and how demand from China for the skins of donkeys is worrying many across Africa. We visit a donkey sanctuary in Lamu, Kenya, and speak to one campaigner trying to stop the slaughter of donkeys for the export of their skins. We also hear how donkeys support economic freedom for women, from Emmanuel Sarr, regional director for the charity Brooke, based in Senegal. Image: A donkey. Credit: BBC

Presenter: Vivienne Nunis
Producer: Sarah Treanor


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1g)
Winning the Arabic Booker prize

Saudi author Raja Alem was a voracious reader from an early age and thanks to her liberal-minded father, grew up immersed in books. She was in her early teens when she began to write novellas and then articles in the cultural supplements of newspapers in her native Saudi Arabia. In 2011, she became the first woman to win the prestigious international Booker prize for Arabic fiction for her novel The Dove's Necklace - a murder mystery set in modern-day Mecca. Mike Lanchin has been speaking to Raja about her writing and the influences that have made her unique among Saudi authors.

Photo by Leonardo Cendamo/Getty Images


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3k7t9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q7m2p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr1)
Does the planet need snails?

Snails are a major enemy of gardeners around the world, invading vegetable patches and gobbling prize plants. CrowdScience listener Alexandre reckons he’s removed thousands of them from his garden, which got him wondering: apart from eating his garden to the core, what’s their wider role in nature? Would anyone or anything miss them if they suddenly disappeared?

And for that matter, what about other creatures? We all know how complex biodiversity is, but it seems that some animals are more important than others in maintaining the balance of life on earth. Is there anything that could go extinct without having knock-on effects?

CrowdScience heads to the Hawaiian mountains, a snail diversity hotspot, to discover the deep value of snails to native ecosystems there. Researchers and conservationists are working together to protect these highly endangered snails, and their natural habitats, from multiple threats.

We hear why all snails – even the ones munching Alexandre’s petunias – have their role to play in the natural world, and get to grips with cascading extinctions: how the loss of a single species can trigger unpredictable effects on a whole ecosystem.

With contributions from Imogen Cavadino, Dr Norine Yeung, Dr Kenneth Hayes, Dr David Sischo, Jan Kealoha, and Professor Ian Donohue.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton
Produced by Cathy Edwards for the BBC World Service

[Image credit: Getty Images]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3kckf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q7qtt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kp9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3kh9k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47n38t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q7vky)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3km1p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtp)
The Somali prisoner, the secret language and the life-saving book

Mohamed Barud was losing hope in a Somali prison, when an inmate in a neighbouring cell devised a secret language and tapped out the Russian novel Anna Karenina through his wall... for Mohamed, the book was transformative. He tells his story to Emily Webb.

If you're affected by issues raised in the programme, you can find information about support available at bbc.co.uk/actionline or befrienders.org

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Mohamed Barud and a copy of Anna Karenina
Credit: Courtesy of Mohamed Barud, JannHuizenga via Getty Images


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3kqst)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47nbs2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q8326)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3kvjy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswc1tvk)
A high-profile North Korean defector speaks

Kim Kuk-song rose to the top ranks of North Korea's powerful spy agencies, and he's now spoken to the BBC about his life before he defected. Also on the programme: the trial has started in Burkina Faso of 14 men accused of involvement in the murder of the former leader, Thomas Sankara; and Maori leaders in New Zealand warn that lifting the long Covid lockdown too soon could have devastating consequences.

(Picture: In a 30-year career, Kim Kuk-song rose to the top ranks of North Korea's powerful spy agencies Credit: BBC)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3kz92)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q8bkg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y485j6246dx)
Nobel economics prize awarded for real-life studies

This year's Nobel prize for economics has been shared by three recipients. David Card, Joshua Angrist and Guido Imbens were awarded the prize for their use of "natural experiments" to understand how economic policy and other events connect. Professor Card, of UC Berkeley, tells us about his work. Also in the programme, with high energy prices leading to the suspension of steel production in parts of Europe, we ask Portuguese Member of the European Parliament, Pedro Marques, what governments can do to help deal with the situation. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on the economic importance of donkeys to sub-Saharan Africa. Plus, we hear from Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, about whether business is doing enough to tackle climate change.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Nisha Patel and Benjie Guy.

(Picture: The Nobel economics prize is announced. Picture credit: Reuters.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3l316)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxr9s712zn)
Fire extinguished at oil facility in Lebanon

On today’s programme, we'll hear how people in Lebanon are coping with the ongoing energy crisis, after a nationwide power blackout over the weekend and a fire that erupted today at an oil storage facility in the south of the country.

We'll also explain why people in Poland have been marching in support of European Union membership.

And our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Eleanor Murray, assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health, will explain the day's coronavirus stories.

(Photo: The Zahrani Oil Installation is close to one of Lebanon's two biggest power plants. Credit: Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3l6sb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxr9s716qs)
COP26: Activism through the generations

On OS, in the run up to the UN climate conference, COP26, we'll be playing a series of conversations with people affected by climate change. Our first conversation brings together two well-known campaigners who for years have been raising awareness of the issue. Professor David Suzuki and his daughter Severn Cullis-Suzuki from Canada discuss their activism and what they want from COP26. And a climate expert on impact and policy in Singapore will answer some of your questions.

Also, we hear how people in Lebanon are coping with the ongoing energy crisis, after a nationwide power blackout over the weekend and a fire that erupted today at an oil storage facility in the south of the country.

And Professor Manfred Green, a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel will answer your questions on the latest coronavirus stories

(Photo: David Suzuki during the Sustainable Living Festival on February 18, 2011 in Melbourne, Australia. Credit: Marianna Massey/Getty Images)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3lbjg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3lg8l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47p27v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q8tjz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nk912pb2y)
2021/10/11 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3ll0q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q8y93)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2ymx)
Earthshot 2 – Tackling our energy crisis

Just how do we balance the growing demand for electricity worldwide with the need to reduce fossil fuel emissions to address climate change?

In our second programme on the Earthshot prize Chhavi Sachdev looks at some of the solutions. From projects looking at providing green hydrogen to industry worldwide and remote communities, to village scale solar electricity networks in Bangladesh and a portable pay as you go powerpack in Nigeria.

Also how to provide a livelihood for people who live in areas where conservation concerns mean they are no longer able to follow their traditional hunting practices .
And we feature solutions for dealing with our wastes in their many forms from cleaning up polluted water to recycling human and agricultural organic waste – including an innovative city based system for collecting and redistributing food that would otherwise be destroyed.

The Earthshot Prize is an initiative from the Royal Foundation designed to highlight and reward inspiring solutions to some of the world’s greatest challenges. There are 5 categories with a million pound prize available in each.

Protect and restore nature.
Clean our air.
Revive our oceans.
Build a waste-free world.
Fix our climate.

Image: Earth at night, Credit: Roydee/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3lprv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswc2p2g)
IS 'finance chief' captured by Iraq

Iraq's security forces say they have captured a very senior figure in the Islamic State group. Sami Jasim al-Jaburi was allegedly the jihadists' finance chief

Sami Jasim al-Jaburi was arrested in a "complex external operation", Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi tweeted, without specifying a location.

Also in the programme, our recently expelled Moscow correspondent on repression in Russia, one of this year's Nobel Prize winners for economics tells us how to read real life, and how ancient Israel didn't just export religion, but wine too.

(Picture shows Sami Jasim al-Jaburi after his arrest. Credit: Iraqi Army Joint Operations Command)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3lthz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q95sc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3ly83)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywwfdn07t2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0snhp349fq)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q99jh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48zyxnvgt7)
Nobel economics prize awarded for real-life studies

This year's Nobel prize for economics has been shared by three recipients. David Card, Joshua Angrist and Guido Imbens were awarded the prize for their use of "natural experiments" to understand how economic policy and other events connect. Professor Card, of UC Berkeley, tells us about his work. Also in the programme, with energy prices rising across the US and Europe, we ask David Shepherd, energy editor at the Financial Times to explain what's been happening. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on the economic importance of donkeys to sub-Saharan Africa. Plus, we hear from Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, about whether business is doing enough to tackle climate change. (Picture: The Nobel economics prize is announced. Picture credit: Reuters.)



TUESDAY 12 OCTOBER 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3m5rc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvql360jk22)
Nobel economics prize awarded for real-life studies

This year's Nobel prize for economics has been shared by three recipients. David Card, Joshua Angrist and Guido Imbens were awarded the prize for their use of "natural experiments" to understand how economic policy and other events connect. Professor Card, of UC Berkeley, tells us about his work on the minimum wage. Also in the programme, with energy prices rising across the US and Europe, we ask David Shepherd, energy editor at the Financial Times to explain what's been happening. And the President of the Environmental Defense Fund, Fred Krupp talks us through methane emission cuts and the difference they can make to climate change . We're joined throughout the programme by Karen Lema, Reuters Bureau Chief for the Philippines and Andy Uhler, Marketplace reporter in Austin Texas. (Picture: The Nobel economics prize is announced. Picture credit: Reuters.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3m9hh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47pxgr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q9nrw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2wpc)
Somalia’s forgotten hostages

The sailors held captive for years, and the man who managed to free them.

Somali pirates made millions of dollars hijacking ships and holding their crews hostage, if no ransom was paid though, sailors could spend years languishing in captivity.

When retired British Army Colonel John Steed set out to try to free what he called ‘Somalia’s forgotten hostages’ he had no money and no hostage-negotiation experience, so how did he do it?

Colin Freeman, who was himself taken hostage in Somalia, hears the remarkable stories of the sailors and their saviours.

Producer: Joe Kent
Sound: Rob Farquhar and Neil Churchill

(Image: Armed Somali pirate standing on the coast looking to sea. Credit: Mohamed Dahir/AFP/Getty Images)

Archive: Captain Phillips (Columbia Pictures) directed by Paul Greengrass


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3mf7m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3mjzr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47q4z0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5q9x84)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdm)
Little Amal: The Walk

Meet Little Amal, a 3.5 metre-tall puppet of a young nine-year-old refugee girl, created to represent all displaced children. She is travelling over 8000km, from Turkey, through Europe, ending in the UK.

The Walk is an unique and ambitious travelling art festival organised by Good Chance Theatre in collaboration with Handspring Puppet Company, that brings artists, cultural institutions and community groups together in the countries Little Amal visits. Her message is “Don’t forget about us”. But at a time when the world is still fighting the Covid-19 pandemic and when anti-immigrant sentiment is present in certain countries, The Walk does not come without its challenges.

Join Cagil Kasapoglu as she meets the people involved, including artistic director Amir Nizar Zuabi and general manager Sarah Loader, who travel with Little Amal across borders and seas.

Presenter: Cagil Kasapoglu
Producer: Rebecca Armstrong


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3mnqw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpk1qrm)
UN Secretary-General: Afghanistan economy risks total collapse

Antonio Guterres says sending aid now is the only way to avert collapse. So how bad have things got since the Taliban takeover?

We hear the extraordinary story of the US judge who illegally sent children to prison for crimes such as watching a playground fight in school and not intervening.

And how an abandoned super-tanker in the Red Sea threatens environmental disaster should it release it's cargo of oil.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3msh0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpk1vhr)
Afghanistan: calls for economic lifeline

The UN Secretary General says the country faces financial collapse.

We'll take you to Syria where battles still rage in the east and hundreds are still missing from the region's largest city Deir ez-Zor.

And why the Colombian city of Quibdó has become one of the most violent places on the planet, as rival factions battle one another for access to lucrative drug routes.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3mx74)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpk1z7w)
Afghanistan: Should the West inject funds?

Amid warnings that Afghanistan is on the verge of economic collapse, could the world's richest nations end up propping up the Taliban?

MPs in Britain release a damning report of the government's initial handling of Covid, suggesting it needed to lockdown much faster.

And the leading American football coach who's had to resign because he wrote a string of racist, misogynistic and homophobic emails.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3n0z8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plh)
Can computer games improve mental health?

Apart of Me is a computer game that has been designed to help young people process grief.

It’s part of a movement that’s bringing together psychology and gaming.

Whilst many parents worry about the distraction of games consoles and smart phones, some psychologists believe they can be used as a force for good.

We meet the therapist who sets their clients computer games as homework and see how one specially-designed game brings real benefits for mental health.

Produced and presented by Daniel Gordon.

Image: A young person playing a video game (Getty Images)


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qbd7n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgd)
The economics of older mums

Why many women are delaying motherhood, how is technology helping, and what does the law say about all things fertility and the workplace. Zoe Kleinman speaks to lawyer Louisa Ghevaert, to Dame Cathy Warwick, chair of the British Pregnancy Advisory service, and others.
(Picture credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5z)
Colin Jordan and the British Nazi rally

In 1960s Britain extreme right-wing groups were on the rise. A schoolteacher called Colin Jordan led a Nazi rally in Trafalgar Square in central London. He openly praised Hitler and called for Britain to be freed from what he called 'Jewish control'. He was also a white supremacist who called for the repatriation of black people. Claire Bowes has been speaking to Gerry Gable, a Jewish anti-fascist activist who helped infiltrate Jordan's National Socialist Movement as well as helping secure the arrest of his former wife, Francoise Dior, for inciting arson attacks on two London synagogues.

(Photo: British neo-Nazi politician Colin Jordan and French socialite Francoise Dior, UK, 7 October 1963; she is wearing a swastika shaped pendant and behind them, a portrait of Adolf Hitler. Credit: Felkin/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3n4qd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2wpc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qbhzs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2ymx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3n8gj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3nd6n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47r05x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qbrh1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3nhys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwy)
Agent Orange: A Vietnamese grandmother's last battle

When Tran To Nga was growing up in Vietnam during the 1950s, she had a close relationship with her mother - an important figure in the resistance movement against the regime of South Vietnam. During the Vietnam war, mother and daughter grew even closer, both fighting for the resistance in the depths of the jungle. It was at this time that Nga was sprayed with Agent Orange - a toxic defoliant used by the US military to strip away the leafy canopy of the trees and expose their enemies hiding beneath it. Two years later, her first daughter was born with severe health issues and died, and Nga is battling serious illnesses herself, which she believes are a result of her contact with Agent Orange. She tells Emily Webb about her fight to get compensation for the survivors of Agent Orange, and about her decades-long search for her mother who disappeared in 1966. Nga's story is featured in a documentary called The People vs Agent Orange.

25 years ago a group of musicians in their 60s, 70s, and 80s came together to create an album that would become a sensation. The Buena Vista Social Club was a collection of decades-old Cuban songs and was named after a long-defunct club in Havana where musicians once gathered. It became an unexpected triumph, leading to concerts around the world. Outlook's Clayton Conn has been to meet Eduardo Llerenas - a Mexican musicologist without whom it might never have happened. This story was first broadcast in November 2017.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Tran To Nga
Credit: Thomas Samson/AFP via Getty Images


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3nmpx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47r7p5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qbzz9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2ymx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3nrg1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswc4qrn)
'Make or break' moment for Afghan economy

The European Commission president, Ursula Von der Leyen, is urging world leaders to do all they can to prevent a humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan. At a virtual summit of G20 leaders, she promised a support package of more than a billion dollars, including three hundred million dollars in humanitarian aid.

Also today: the link between flooding in China and Christmas presents; and in the UK, members of Parliament call the government's early Covid response a failure.

(Photo: People buy fruit at a market in Kabul. Credit: Reuters/Jorge Silva)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3nw65)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qc7gk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bmvcw90lw)
UN warning on Afghanistan economy

The UN Secretary General has urged the world to inject money directly to Afghanistan. Leaders of the G20 nations are meeting virtually on Tuesday to discuss a worsening economic situation in the country, and Jan Egeland, Secretary General of the Norwegian Refugee Council, explains the work his organisation is doing there. And Mohib Iqbal, who worked for the World Bank in Afghanistan until earlier this year tells us what the G20 nations could do to get money where it's needed. Also in the programme, the International Monetary Fund has released its latest World Economic Outlook, and the BBC's Michelle Fleury talks us through what it reveals. Plus, a recent referendum in Berlin approved a plan to allow the city to seize properties owned by large-scale private landlords, in a bid to make the German capital a more affordable place to live. Joanna Kusiak helped organise the referendum, and says an influx of financial companies in Berlin's property sector has exacerbated an affordability problem. Heimstaden is a Swedish company which owns 20,000 apartments in Berlin, and its chief investment officer Christian Fladeland makes the case for allowing more home construction instead of allowing property to be seized. And Professor Edward Glaeser of Harvard University, who specialises in the economics of urban spaces, argues that if the referendum result is turned into law, it will disincentivise developers from building new property.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Nisha Patel and Susan Karanja.

(Picture: Afghan protesters seek release of central bank funds. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3nzy9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxr9s73zwr)
The global energy crisis

On the programme today we'll focus in on the global energy crisis, and with the help of our reporters around the world hear how different parts of the world are being impacted. We'll connect to colleagues in India, Russia and China.

On OS in the run up to the UN climate conference, COP26, we'll be playing a series of conversations with people affected by climate change. Today we hear from people who have made big lifestyle decisions and this includes deciding to not have children.

And our regular medical expert, Dr Isaac Bogoch, an Infectious diseases physician and scientist at the university of Toronto in Canada, will answer your questions on the latest coronavirus stories.

(Photo: UK fuel prices hit eight-year high as petrol crisis continues. Credit: Andy Rain/EPA)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3p3pf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxr9s743mw)
COP26: Making big lifestyle changes

On OS in the run up to the UN climate conference, COP26, we'll be playing a series of conversations with people affected by climate change. Today we hear from people who have made big lifestyle decisions and this includes deciding to not have children.

We go to Ethiopia's northern Tigray region and hear how the crisis there is unfolding. Rebels say the army has launched co-ordinated attacks on all fronts. Our reporter tells us what we know so far.

And our regular medical expert, Dr Swapneil Parikh, an infectious disease researcher at the Kasturba Hospital of infectious diseases in Mumbai answers questions on the latest coronavirus stories.

(Photo: Global march for climate justice in Milan. Credit: Guglielmo Mangiapane/Reuters)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3p7fk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3pc5p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47rz4y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qcqg2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nk912s701)
2021/10/12 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3pgxt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2wpc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qcv66)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsp)
Economic cost of the digital gender gap

Research by the World Wide Web Foundation has found that the gender gap for internet accessibility has cost countries billions of USD in lost GDP. In the 32 countries studied a third of women were connected to the internet compared to almost half of men. This digital gender gap, their report says, has cost low and lower middle income countries USD $1 trillion over a decade. Director of Research, Catherine Adeya, joins us live from Nairobi and we also hear from Ian Mangenga who set up the Digital Girl Africa project to get more women online.

Counting people with WiFi
Researchers have developed a method of counting crowds that doesn’t require complex AI or expensive camera surveillance but rather simple WiFi signals. Yasamin Mostofi from the University of California Santa Barbara tells us more about how this method measures fidgeting behaviours to figure out the size of a crowd and how it could be put to use.

The BFI London Film Festival Expanded
The BFI London Film Festival is going immersive. Reporter Hannah Fisher has had a preview of this year’s hybrid programme which is full of tech - interactive VR, 360 films, augmented reality, mixed reality and live immersive performance.


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Nigel Dix
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Majority World / Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3plny)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswc5kzk)
Macron outlines green energy plan

President Macron wants France to become a world leader in new energy sources. But are what are these hydrogen boosters and can green hydrogen help Mr Macron's chances of re-election?

Also in the programme, we hear about the Afghan Refugees heading for Turkey. the Colombian city which has become one of the most violent in the world, and the UN environment summit on biodiversity taking place in China.

(Picture shows President Emmanuel Macron with a white facemask on. Credit: EPA)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3pqf2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qd2pg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3pv56)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywwfdn34q5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0snhp376bt)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qd6fl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48zyxnycqb)
Shipping container logjam at UK's Felixstowe port

The UK's largest commercial port says the supply chain crisis has caused a logjam of shipping containers. The Port of Felixstowe, which handles 36% of the UK's freight container traffic, blamed the busy pre-Christmas period and haulage shortages. In Shenzhen, China, two tropical storms in quick succession and covid lockdowns have caused a bottleneck. In Longbeach, California, the harbour has some 87 ships idle offshore waiting to dock. We hear from shipping giant Maersk, which is re-routing some of its biggest ships away from the Felixstowe. Maritime trade expert Lori Ann LaRocco explains why this is all happening in so many places at the same time.

Members of the G20 group of major economies have pledged millions of dollars to avert an economic catastrophe in Afghanistan. Mohib Iqbal, who worked for the World Bank in Afghanistan until earlier this year, tells us what the G20 nations could do to get the money where it's needed. Plus, a recent referendum in Berlin approved a plan to allow the city to seize properties owned by large-scale private landlords, in a bid to make the German capital a more affordable place to live. Joanna Kusiak helped organise the referendum, and says an influx of financial companies in Berlin's property sector has exacerbated an affordability problem. Heimstaden is a Swedish company which owns 20,000 apartments in Berlin, and its chief investment officer Christian Fladeland makes the case for allowing more home construction instead of allowing property to be seized. And Professor Edward Glaeser of Harvard University, who specialises in the economics of urban spaces, argues that if the referendum result is turned into law, it will disincentivise developers from building new property. (Picture: Felixstowe port. Credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 13 OCTOBER 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3q2ng)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvql360mfz5)
More supply chain disruption

UK, US and Chinese ports are all suffering from congestion for a number of reasons, compounding the disruption to global supply chains that started with the pandemic. LoriAnn LaRocco, maritime trade analyst and author explains why so many different parts of the world are suffering all at the same time. The IMF has lowered its projections for global economic growth and warns on inflation, meanwhile G20 countries pledge billions to support Afghanistan's economy, a former World Bank employee, Mohib Iqbal gives us his opinion. The world's cement producers aim to drastically reduce their CO2 emissions, Thomas Guillot, CEO of the Global Cement and Concrete Association tells us how, and we hear about measures to control rising rents in Berlin.
Our guests are Alexis Goldstein, financial reform advocate in Washington DC and Dimuthu Attanayake, journalist and researcher from Colombo, Sri Lanka.

(Photo: Credit Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3q6dl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47stcv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qdknz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2wpd)
The Public Misunderstanding Of Science

Trust: What is the best way to communicate public health messages?

Anti-vaxxers, flat Earthers, 5G arsonists and climate change deniers – why have so many people given up on science and where are governments, scientists and the media going wrong?

As Covid-19 continues to affect us all, what is the best way to communicate public health messages, when the bottom line is saving lives? Umaru Fofana reports from Sierra Leone on the Ebola prevention and vaccine campaigns and former BBC science correspondent, Sue Nelson, speaks to public health experts and fact checkers about efforts to combat misinformation.

(Photo: Pupils look at an Ebola prevention poster during a sensibilisation campaign provided by United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), in Abidjan. Credit: Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3qb4q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3qfwv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47t1w3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qdt57)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnf)
7. The doctor

Living with the Taliban - the female doctor who celebrated the Taliban takeover in Kabul. Gynaecologist, ex MP, former refugee, Dr Roshanak Wardak welcomes the end of years of war which she says the Taliban's return to power has brought. War is the worst thing, she tells Lyse Doucet. But there is one important issue where she says the Taliban can’t be trusted – their assurances over the education of girls. She warns that uneducated women have uneducated children and Afghanistan will have no future without education for everyone.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3qkmz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpk4mnq)
Stark warning on climate change targets

The world says it is uniting to fight climate change - but a new report says coal and gas use has dramatically increased in the last year. We'll head to China, one of the worst offenders, where they have serious problems in one of the main coal-producing areas.

Kenya has rejected a United Nations court ruling on its maritime dispute with Somalia.

And we talk to a couple of would-be NFL American football players from Nigeria invited to a recruitment fair in the UK.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3qpd3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpk4rdv)
Worrying increase in global warming gas

Coal and oil use have increased dramatically over the past year, pushing CO2 levels to their second highest level since records began. What's behind it and how can that particular tide be turned?

For years doctors have recommended a daily low-doses of aspirin to combat the risk of heart attacks or strokes, now a new report says the potential side effects outweigh the benefits.

And the people willing to rent homes close to Chernobyl - the site of the world’s worst nuclear disaster – they’re super cheap.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3qt47)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpk4w4z)
Four trillion dollars to fix climate change

Coal and oil use has seen a dramatic increase over the past year - pushing CO2 levels to their second highest level since records began - according to a new report out by International Energy Agency.

Kurdish authorities looking after thousands of wives and children of so-called Islamic State foreign fighters in camps in northern Syria say enough is enough and urge countries like the UK to take back their citizens.

And alleged Neo Nazis in the German army as soldiers are suspended over far-right links.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3qxwc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbw)
Sergei Ryabkov: Russia and energy security

Stephen Sackur speaks to Russia’s Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov. Moscow is set to be a major beneficiary of the extraordinary spike in fossil fuel energy prices - does that mean Moscow will flex its muscle more aggressively on the world stage?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qf94r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jp5)
China's gaming crackdown

Why the government doesn't like video games, and what's next for China's gaming culture. Ed Butler speaks to Josh Ye, who covers gaming for the South China Morning Post, and Professor Steve Tsang, director of the SOAS China Institute. German professional League of Legends player Maurice 'Amazing' Stückenschneider describes China's current dominance in the world of eSports, and the damage that restricting playing hours could do, and Chinese games investor Charlie Moseley describes how the increasing pressure from authorities is affecting games developers in the country today.

(Photo: League of Legends players at a tournament in Shanghai, Credit: Riot Games Inc via Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x87)
The story of 'Baby Jessica'

Eighteen-month-old Jessica McClure fell down a well-shaft while playing with other children in Texas in October 1987. It took almost three days to free her, and as the rescue effort got underway the American media became transfixed by her story. Susan Hulme has been talking Joe Faulkner, a neighbour who watched the drama unfold.

Photo: a policeman carries Jessica away from the well shaft. Credit: Barbara Laing/Liaison Agency/Getty Images.


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3r1mh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2wpd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qfdww)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3r5cm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Story of Aids (w3ct2wp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3r93r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47tx30)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qfnd4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3rdvw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz6)
Thai cave doctor: 'I feared I'd killed them'

Richard ‘Harry’ Harris is a medic, anaesthetist and experienced cave diver. When he read about the 12 Thai boys and their soccer coach trapped in the Tham Luang cave system in Thailand, he knew he was uniquely placed to help.

Richard arrived to the caves in northern Thailand with the rescue operation underway. On the ninth day after the group’s disappearance, British divers John Volanthen and Rick Stanton reached the boys and their coach in a part of the cave known as ‘Chamber 9’. Miraculously they were still alive.
This was when the rescue operation began. The group were 2.4 kilometres (1.5 miles) from the cave entrance, over half of which was completely underwater. Visibility in the caves was almost zero; Richard describes it as like swimming through coffee.

Richard and the other divers floated various ways of rescuing the group – teaching them to dive, or leaving them for months until the monsoon season ended – but nothing seemed plausible. Then Rick Stanton had an idea – if they anaesthetised the boys, the divers could swim them to safety.

Richard decided to support Rick’s idea, but it was an agonising decision. He didn’t believe the boys would make it out alive: for him, they would either die anesthetised on the passage out, or be left to starve at the back of the cave. Whatever happened, Richard felt, ‘this rescue had my name written on it.’
Richard spoke to Outlook’s Emily Webb in 2020.

Picture: Richard 'Harry' Harris
Credit: Kristoffer Paulsen


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3rjm0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47v4l8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qfwwd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3rnc4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswc7mnr)
Is transition to renewable energy happening fast enough?

The International Energy Agency issues a stark warning that the world's transition to clean forms of energy - principally wind, solar and hydroelectric power - isn't happening quickly enough to meet climate targets.

Also in the programme: a new accord led by China aims to safeguard 30 per cent of the world's ecosystems; and the WHO honours an African-American woman, Henrietta Lacks, who died in 1951 of cervical cancer. Samples of her cells were then collected by doctors without her or her family's knowledge or consent. These became the first living human cells ever to survive and multiply outside the human body and they led to a series of crucial medical breakthroughs over the past 70 years.

(Photo: Royd Moor wind farm at twilight. Credit: Science Photo Library)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3rs38)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qg4cn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cw0gsdw4x)
IEA: Larger clean energy investment needed

The International Energy Agency has called for trillions of investment in clean energy. It argues that it is the only way that the world's climate targets can be met. Tim Gould is chief energy economist at the IEA and talks us through its latest World Energy Outlook, and we get reaction from Simon Harrison, head of strategy at consultancy Mott MacDonald, which advises governments and businesses on how to move to cleaner energy sources. Also in the programme, the BBC's Frey Lindsay reports on what's being called a housing affordability crisis in Australia, where the cost of buying a home has risen sharply relative to what people earn. Plus, our regular commentator Stephanie Hare makes the case for actively using our senses to transform our experience of the world of work.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Nisha Patel and Sara Parry.

(Picture: A solar farm in China. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3rwvd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxr9s76wsv)
Energy prices: EU unveils plan to ease gas crisis

We'll look again at the impact of the global energy crisis and hear about the plan by the European Union to protect its members against surging prices.

We'll explain what is known about Havana syndrome, the mysterious illness which causes a painful sound in the ears, fatigue, and dizziness. The latest possible case has been reported at the US Embassy in Colombia.

We also continue our climate conversations and hear from three activists in Uganda, Kenya and South Africa. They share their concerns over Africa's vulnerability to the effects of climate change and explain what inspired them to become campaigners.

And we'll answer questions about the coronavirus pandemic with the help of Dr Maria Sundaram, an infectious disease epidemiologist at Marshfield Clinic Research Institute in Wisconsin.

We'll go to Texas to hear about the debate on vaccine mandates.

Netflix has confirmed that the South Korean hit, Squid Game is its biggest original series launch ever. We'll ask people why they're fans of the show.

(Photo: European Commissioner for Energy Kadri Simson gives a press conference on Energy price crisis following the college meeting of the European Commission in Brussels, Belgium, 13 October 2021. Credit: OLIVIER HOSLET/EPA)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3s0lj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxr9s770jz)
COP26: Activists in Africa

We continue our climate conversations and hear from three activists in Uganda, Kenya and South Africa. They share their concerns over Africa's vulnerability to the effects of climate change and explain what's inspired them to become campaigners.

We'll look again at the impact of the global energy crisis and answer audience question with the help of our business reporter.

We'll also discuss "blackfishing" after former member of the British girl group Little Mix, Jesy Nelson, was forced to defend herself against claims of blackfishing in her latest music video, Boyz.

And, we'll answer questions about the coronavirus pandemic with one of our regular expert guests, Dr Pedro Hallal from the University of California.

Netflix has confirmed that the South Korean hit, Squid Game, is its biggest original series launch ever. We'll ask people around the world why they're fans of the show.

(Photo: Kevin Mtai Credit: Kevin Mtai)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3s4bn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3s82s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47vw21)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qgmc5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nk912w3x4)
2021/10/13 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3sctx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2wpd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qgr39)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvx)
Henrietta Lacks Legacy

Henrietta Lacks died in 1951 from a virulent cervical cancer. A sample of those cancer cells was taken at the time and the way they behave has changed medical science forever – contributing to everything from the polio vaccine to drugs for Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease. As the WHO give a posthumous award Claudia discusses how the Henrietta Lacks legacy raises issues of global health equity.

Plus with a Malaria Vaccine given a historic green light by the WHO to protect children in Africa, what are the distribution difficulties in countries which carry the greatest burden of disease?

And what’s behind the low rate of Covid-19 vaccinations in Taiwan? We hear from one resident about why she’s chosen to have a home-grown Medigen vaccine which hasn’t yet completed all its clinical trials – and another who wants to wait for an alternative. Scientists say that trials about to start in Paraguay should show whether it stimulates enough immunity to protect people in the way the AstraZeneca vaccine does.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Henrietta Lacks, after whom HeLa cells are named, standing outside her home in Baltimore, USA. Photo credit: Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3shl1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswc8gwn)
Putin blames Europe for high gas prices

Russian President Vladimir Putin has denied allegations that Russia is using its control of gas supplies to Europe as a bargaining tool. During a wide-ranging television interview, Putin said it was Europe’s failure to plan that was to blame for soaring gas prices. We get the reaction of a European MEP.

Also in the programme: why France is reducing its military presence in Mali; and the huge, rusting oil tanker off Yemen which could blow up, or sink, at any moment and cause a catastrophe.


Photo: Russian President Vladimir Putin is seen on a screen as he delivers a speech at the Russian Energy Week International Forum in Moscow
Credit: REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3smb5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qgzlk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3sr29)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywwfdn61m8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0snhp3b37x)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qh3bp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48zyxp18mf)
IEA: larger clean energy investment needed

The International Energy Agency has called for trillions of investment in clean energy. The organisation says that agreed targets are otherwise in danger of not being met. Their chief energy economist Tim Gould explains what's going wrong and we get reaction from Simon Harrison, head of strategy at consultancy Mott MacDonald, which advises governments and businesses on how to move to cleaner energy sources. Also in the programme, China's banning of Bitcoin mining has prompted what some have called the great mining migration. Alex De Vries, who runs the Digieconomist blog, explains where the miners are going and how much energy are they consuming. Plus, the BBC's Frey Lindsay reports on what's being called a housing affordability crisis in Australia, where the cost of buying a home has risen sharply relative to what people earn. And our regular commentator Stephanie Hare makes the case for actively using our senses to transform our experience of the world of work.

(Picture: A solar farm in China. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 14 OCTOBER 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3szkk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvql360qbw8)
Putin denies Russia is using gas prices as a political weapon

Claims that Russia is using the high gas price as a political weapon are "drivel", according to President Vladimir Putin. His comments come as there is intense focus on the energy markets. Energy prices in the UK, Europe and Asia have hit record highs in recent weeks triggering inflation concerns. The International Energy Agency says that targets to limit global warming are in very real danger of not being met. Their chief energy economist Tim Gould explains what's going wrong and we get reaction from Simon Harrison, head of strategy at consultancy Mott MacDonald, which advises governments and businesses on how to move to cleaner energy sources. Also in the programme, China's banning of Bitcoin mining has prompted what some have called the great mining migration. Alex De Vries, who runs the Digieconomist blog, explains where the miners are going and how much energy are they consuming. Plus, the BBC's Frey Lindsay reports on what's being called a housing affordability crisis in Australia, where the cost of buying a home has risen sharply relative to what people earn. And our regular commentator Stephanie Hare makes the case for actively using our senses to transform our experience of the world of work.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: in Taiwan, Samson Ellis, Taipei bureau chief for Bloomberg News and Takara Small, technology reporter for CBC News in Toronto, Canada.

(Picture: Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Russian Energy Week plenary meeting in Moscow on October 13, 2021. Credit: Getty Images.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3t39p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47wq8y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qhgl2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxz)
Russia: The limits of freedom

In August, the BBC’s Moscow correspondent, Sarah Rainsford, was expelled from Russia – a country she’s reported on from the start of Vladimir Putin’s presidency over 2 decades ago. Now she’s been designated a ‘national security threat’ and barred indefinitely. The move against the BBC comes at a time of unprecedented pressure on critical voices in Russia – from opposition activists to independent Russian journalists, who are now blacklisted as ‘agents’ of foreign states. For Assignment, Sarah Rainsford explores what happened to her and what this says about the country she’s been forced to leave.

Producer / Presenter: Sarah Rainsford
Producer: Will Vernon

(Image: Sarah Rainsford. Credit: Jonathan Ford)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3t71t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3tbsy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47wys6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qhq2b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg9)
Last orders: Why I quit hospitality

The hospitality industry is facing a staffing crisis, but why have thousands of chefs and waiters quit, and why now?

Tamasin Ford speaks to three former restaurant and bar workers to find out why the coronavirus pandemic prompted them to leave, and what they're doing instead.

We find out what, if anything, might tempt them back - higher pay, more sociable hours, or better work culture, maybe kinder customers? And we ask whether Covid-19 might really be the moment for industry reform.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:
Adam Reiner, New York;
Melissa Sosa, Miami;
Renée Harper, Phoenix.

(Picture: Upset waitress leaning on a bar. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3tgk2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpk7jkt)
President Biden tries to save shoppers’ holiday season

Is the American Christmas time shopping bonanza under threat? US President Joe Biden has announced that the port of Los Angeles will be working extra hours to try to overcome supply chain problems in the run up to the festive season.

Hurricane Pamela has hit the west coast of Mexico. We'll have the latest on its impact

And William Shatner - who's 90 and most famous as the Star Trek character Captain Kirk - reflects on the experience of a real life journey into space.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3tl96)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpk7n9y)
Norway shocked by killing spree by man armed with a bow and arrow

A shocking attack by a man with a bow and arrow has left 5 people dead and 2 injured in the town of Kongsberg in Norway. The prime minister says the nation has been shaken by the killings.

Could custom checks between Northern Ireland and Great Britain be reduced? The EU is proposing changes to the Northern Ireland protocol a source of much tension with Britain.

And the airline Alitalia is gone succumbing to financial pressures, but another flag carrier for Italy has risen from the ashes.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3tq1b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpk7s22)
‘Gruesome’ mass killing in Norway

Norway is in shock as it tries to understand why a man with a bow and arrow went on a rampage, killing 5 people and injuring two. The prime minister says the nation has been shaken by the incident.

Amidst a financial crisis and massive food shortages, we get a look at what life is like for Afghans in the Taliban heartland.

The UK and the EU have an ongoing disagreement about post-Brexit trade with Northern Ireland, but will it be dragged into a row over British licences for French fishing boats.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3ttsg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2m)
Is Britain paying the price for its green energy push?

Energy prices are spiking in the UK, as gas prices soar and wind turbines stop spinning. The UK's shift to green energy is the envy of the world, but Tanya Beckett asks if there is a lesson for other countries in how to go about it.


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qj61v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9w)
The supply chain's weak link

How disruption in a single port, factory or freight centre can cause global chaos. Ed Butler speaks with Stavros Karamperidis, an expert in maritime economics at the University of Plymouth, and Kent Jones, professor of economics at Babson College in the US. Meanwhile, chief economist at Enodo Economics, Diana Choyleva, explains how China's energy crisis will impact exports and the price we pay for goods, and Professor Marc Busch from Georgetown University explains why he thinks governments should leave big businesses to solve supply issues themselves.

(Photo: a container ship is unloaded at a dock in the US. Credit: Reuters)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3q)
The Pakistani law that jailed rape survivors

Under legislation known as the Hudood Ordinances introduced in 1979, a nearly blind teenage girl who'd been raped by two men and then became pregnant, was jailed herself for having sex outside marriage. In 1983 Safia Bibi was sentenced to three years imprisonment, 15 lashes and a fine. There was public outrage and anger from Pakistani women against the verdict and draconian punishment. Farhana Haider has been speaking to leading Pakistani lawyer and human rights advocate, Hina Jilani, who helped overturn the verdict.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3tyjl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qj9sz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3v28q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlt)
A dirty history of diamonds

We seem to have an almost insatiable appetite for the glitter and sparkle of diamonds. Yet transforming these stones into jewels fit for princesses and film stars involves a long chain of production and distribution. And the diamond industry has long been bound up with a much darker side: the exploitation of workers, environmental damage, all-powerful monopolies and violent mafias, not to mention the so-called Blood Diamonds used to finance armed conflict. So how is the industry trying to clean up its image and regulate the trade?

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss the history of the diamond trade are:

Dr. Lansana Gberie, former coordinator for the UN Security Council Panel of Experts on Liberia. He is the author of A Dirty War in West Africa: The RUF and the Destruction of Sierra Leone. He’s also Sierra Leone’s current Permanent Representative to the UN in Geneva and the Sierra Leonean Ambassador to Switzerland - though his contributions to this programme are in a personal capacity.

Ian Smillie, founder of the Diamond Development Initiative, now DDI at Resolve, an organisation which works to improve conditions for small-scale miners. He is the author of several books, including Blood on the Stone: Greed, Corruption and War in the Global Diamond Trade. He is based in Canada.

Dr. Tijl Vanneste, researcher at the Portuguese Institute of International Relations at Nova University in Lisbon. He is the author of Blood, Sweat and Earth: The Struggle for Control over the World's Diamonds Throughout History.

[Image: Examining a gem diamond in Antwerp, Belgium; Credit: Paul O'Driscoll/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8v)
Born to Run: Mexico's Tarahumara Indians

In 2006, Scott Jurek, one of the world's best ultramarathon runners, travelled to the remote canyons of Northern Mexico to race the best athletes from an ancient Mexican tribe. The Tarahumara have a tradition of running huge distances and they gave Jurek one of his toughest races, inspiring the best-selling book, Born To Run. Scott Jurek talked to Simon Watts in 2014.

(Photo: Scott Jurek with Tarahumara runner, Arnulfo Quimare. Credit: Luis Escobar)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3v60v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47xt03)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qjk97)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3v9rz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3q)
The man who (re)painted the Mona Lisa

When some film producers asked artist Adebanji Alade if he'd like to take up a challenge to repaint Leonardo Da Vinci's Mona Lisa in just a month, he thought it sounded like a bad idea - but he said yes anyway, despite the fact the original (which Adebanji had never seen) took four years to paint.

He tells Emily Webb about his belief in saying yes, his life as a "compulsive sketcher", and the family tragedy that made him determined never to run away from problems.

Polish singer Jakub Jozef Orlinski is something of a rarity in the operatic world. Not only is he a countertenor – meaning his range is high compared to other male singers – but he’s also a breakdancer. He's brought his dancing skills to the stage, and most recently to his part in Rinaldo, where he stepped in to take the title role after the leading lady pulled out. Emily Webb met Josef at Glyndebourne, the opera house in the English countryside. This was first broadcast in August 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Adebanji Alade and his Mona Lisa
Credit: Emily Webb for Outlook


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3vfj3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47y1hc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qjssh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3vk87)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswcbjkv)
Fighting erupts in Beirut

Gunmen attacked a protest against the judge investigating last year's port explosion in the Lebanese capital. Also on the programme: police in Norway say the suspect in a deadly bow and arrow attack was a Muslim convert who'd previously showed signs of radicalisation - we'll hear from the mayor of the town where it happened; and Britain's Prince William on why space entrepreneurs should be focussing their energies on solving Earth's problems first.

(Picture: Army soldiers patrol after gunfire erupted in Beirut, Lebanon Credit: REUTERS/Mohamed Azakir)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3vp0c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qk18r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49dp8zfvs4)
Global supply chains under pressure

Pressure on the global supply chain is making plenty of things much harder to get hold of. President Biden has announced one of America's busiest ports will now work round the clock to help clear a backlog of shipping containers. The shipping industry group BIMCO's chief shipping analyst Peter Sand gives us his assessment of how best to tackle the problem. Also in the programme, the BBC's Rahul Tandon reports on a power supply crisis in India, where more than 60% of the country's coal-fired power stations are suffering from fuel shortages. Plus, Italian airline Alitalia's last flight takes off from Rome today. It is being replaced with a new national airline called ITA, with thousands of jobs lost in the process. Giulia Segreti is Rome correspondent for Reuters, and brings us the background to Alitalia's demise.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Russell Padmore and Ivana Davidovic.

(Picture: Lorries and shipping containers at LA Port. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3vsrh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxr9s79spy)
Protests against Beirut port blast judge

Five people have been shot dead at a protest in the Lebanese capital, Beirut, against the judge investigating last year's devastating port explosion. We hear from our reporter in Beirut and people who witnessed the violence.

Our regular medical expert Dr Emma Hodcroft, a molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland, will answer audience questions about the coronavirus pandemic.

And as part of our climate conversations series, we’ll hear how fishermen are affected by climate change, and bring together a fisherman in the US and a fishing industry expert in South Africa.

(Picture: Gunfire breaks out during protests demanding the removal of Judge Tarek Bitar investigating last year's port blast. Credit: Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3vxhm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxr9s79xg2)
COP26: Fishing and climate change

As part of our climate conversations series, we’ll hear how people who work in the fishing industry are affected by climate change, and bring together a fisherman in the US and a fishing industry expert in South Africa.

We hear from Beirut in Lebanon, where protests against the investigation of the port blast last year got violent. There's been a number of deaths and many people injured in exchanges of gunfire between supporters of the Shia group, Hezbollah, and its allies, and the Lebanese army.

And our regular medical expert, Dr Helen Wimalarathna, a Molecular Epidemiologist at the University of Buckingham in the UK, will answer audience questions on the latest coronavirus stories.

We discuss whether the space tourism is the best use of resources after Prince William suggested that entrepreneurs should focus on saving Earth instead.

(Photo: Environmental groups are calling on the fishing industry to take urgent steps to decarbonise the sector. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3w17r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3w4zw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47yrz4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qkj88)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nk912z0t7)
2021/10/14 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3w8r0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qkn0d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4b)
Wetlands under attack

Since its introduction four decades ago, Spartina alterniflora, a salt-water cordgrass from the USA, has been spreading along China’s coasts. Today, it covers nearly half of the country’s salt marshes. As the UN Biodiversity Conference COP 15 kicks off in China, we look at how this invasive plant species threatens native species in protected coastal wetlands. Featuring Yuan Lin, East China Normal University, and Qiang He, Fudan University.

In January 2020, Barney Graham and Jason McLellan teamed up to engineer a coronavirus spike protein that now powers the COVID-19 vaccines for Moderna, Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson and Novavax. They discuss their work, a next-generation vaccine using chicken eggs, and the future of pandemic preparedness.

Also, a recent Nature survey reveals the extent of abuse against scientists who speak about COVID-19 publicly. Deepti Gurdasani, Queen Mary University of London, shares her experiences of trolling and online abuse and discusses the implications for academia and scientific discourse going forward.

And Tom Scott explains how his team uses novel robots and sensors to go into and create 3D digital radiation maps of the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding areas.


(Credit: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Samara Linton


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3wdh4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswcccsr)
Beirut violence exposes deep divisions

Six people have died in the Lebanese capital after violence at a demonstration organised by the Shia group, Hezbollah. They and their allies were protesting against the judicial investigation into the devastating blast last year at Beirut's port. Our correspondent unpicks the complex politics involved; we also hear from Tatiana, who lost her father in the explosion.


Also on the programme: police in Norway say they're treating as an act of terrorism an attack with a bow and arrow by a Muslim convert that left five people dead; and what YOU can do to help reduce the growing mountain of electronic waste.

(Image: people evacuate a casualty after gunfire erupted in Beirut, Lebanon October 14, 2021 / Credit: REUTERS/Aziz Taher)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3wj78)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qkwhn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3wmzd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywwfdn8yjc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0snhp3f050)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5ql07s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48zyxp45jj)
Microsoft shutting down LinkedIn in China

Microsoft is shutting down its social network, LinkedIn, in China, saying having to comply with the Chinese state has become increasingly challenging. It comes after the career-networking site faced questions for blocking the profiles of some journalists.We speak to author Greg Bruno, one of those who had his profile blocked in China.

Pressure on the global supply chain is making plenty of things much harder to get hold of. President Biden has announced one of America's busiest ports will now work round the clock to help clear a backlog of shipping containers. The shipping industry group BIMCO's chief shipping analyst Peter Sand gives us his assessment of how best to tackle the problem. Also in the programme, the BBC's Rahul Tandon reports on a power supply crisis in India, where more than 60% of the country's coal-fired power stations are suffering from fuel shortages.

(Picture: the LinkedIn login page on a tablet. Credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 15 OCTOBER 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3wwgn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvql360t7sc)
Microsoft shutting down LinkedIn in China

Microsoft is shutting down its social network, LinkedIn, in China, saying having to comply with the Chinese state has become increasingly challenging. It comes after the career-networking site faced questions for blocking the profiles of some journalists. We speak to author Greg Bruno, one of those who had his profile blocked in China. The BBC's Rahul Tandon reports on a power supply crisis in India, where more than 60% of the country's coal-fired power stations are suffering from fuel shortages.

Also in the programme, pressure on the global supply chain is making plenty of things much harder to get hold of. The shipping industry group BIMCO's chief shipping analyst Peter Sand gives us his assessment of how best to tackle the problem. The crisis in global supply chains has been pre-occupying finance ministers at a global meeting in Washington DC. The BBC's The crisis in global supply chains is one of the big issues that's been pre-occupying finance ministers at a global meeting in Washington D. We get the latest from the BBC's economics editor, Faisal Islam, who is there. Plus, the band Coldplay have just announced a range of innovations aimed at making their next world tour as environmentally friendly as possible. Lead singer Chris Martin has been speaking to Colin Paterson, the BBC's entertainment correspondent.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Hayley Woodin, a journalist in New York City and Patrick Barta of the Wall Street Journal in Bangkok, Thailand.

(Picture: the LinkedIn login page on a tablet. Credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3x06s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47zm61)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qlch5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tzp)
Welcoming back Mr. Ranieri

Watford defender William Troost-Ekong discusses Claudio Ranieri's Premier League return. We also hear from the Sierra Leone national team coach John Keister as the country looks ahead to competing in its first Africa Cup of Nations since 1996.

Picture on website: William Troost-Ekong of Watford celebrates following a match against Millwall (Photo by Richard Heathcote/Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3x3yx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3x7q1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw47zvp9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qllzf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2yn5)
Activist Sikh

Many Sikhs all over the world have joined together in support of protests by Indian farmers against new laws proposed by the Indian government. Solidarity has come from musicians, singers, sportspeople and many young second and third generation diaspora Sikhs who have joined social media and local drive-thru protests in British, Canadian and American cities.

A culture of protest is embedded in Sikhism through prayer, songs and stories, which inspires this sense of activism.

Modern-day Sikhs, through their poetry or music or through their voluntary work or political campaigns, explain how their religion’s history of protest against persecution and standing up to injustice, inspires their view of the world in 2021. Pavneet is a poet whose work is unapologetic and seeks to stand up for women, against a caste and patriarchal system.

DJ Rekha, based in New York, ran a broadcast through the 2020 US Presidential election night live on Twitch, and linked her music playlists to political campaigns against poverty, racism and sexism.

Sukhdeep Singh stood for the rights of gay people in India by setting up Gaylaxy, an online magazine, at 22 years old. He started a queer collective on Instagram in 2019 and he wore a rainbow turban to the Golden Temple in Amritsar.

The roots and passing down of stories in families from Sikh history, as well as the use of social media to spread campaign messages, are, they say, helping to nurture and grow a shared sense of Sikh activism against inequality and oppression.

Produced by Nina Robinson for BBC World Service. Executive Producer: Rajeev Gupta

(Photo: Farmers shout slogans as they take part in a protest rally against the central government's agricultural reforms in Amritsar on September 28, 2021. Credit: NARINDER NANU/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3xcg5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpkbfgx)
Lebanese army deployed in Beirut after six shot dead

Residents had to run for cover after men - believed to be members of Shia and Christian militias - exchanged fire in the streets, during a protest against the judge leading the probe into the Beirut port blast last year.

The Canadian town where residents have been told to stop drinking the water - which appears to have petrol in it.

And we'll hear about a day of action by students in Australia to protest against climate change - they want the government to increase its commitment to carbon reduction.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3xh69)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpkbk71)
Poland passes anti-migrant border law

The law will allow border guards to force migrants who've entered illegally straight back over the frontier, before they can claim asylum.

The Lebanese army has been deployed in Beirut as factional fighting erupts on the streets.

And as airlines strive to make their industry compatible with a low carbon world - one company that thinks hydrogen fuel cells are the answer.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3xlyf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2wgpkbnz5)
Human rights activists criticise Poland's new border law

Poland has struggled to cope as thousands of migrants cross from Belarus. Neighbouring Belarus is accused of weaponizing migrants in an attempt to destabilise Poland's Eastern frontier.

Funerals will be held today in Lebanon for the victims of deadly clashes in Beirut on Thursday, which have raised new fears that the country is in a downward spiral.

And the hard choices being made by people living in northern Mauritania as climate change affects their livelihood.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3xqpk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1v)
Adela Raz, Afghanistan's Ambassador to the US

Stephen Sackur speaks to Adela Raz, still officially Afghanistan’s Ambassador to the United States, though the Taliban disowns her and the Americans ignore her. In the face of a looming humanitarian catastrophe is it time for the outside world to come to terms with Afghanistan’s new rulers?

(Photo: Adela Raz appears via videolink on Hardtalk)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qm2yy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0v)
Eyes on climate: new ideas to fight global warming

As the world turns its attention to addressing climate change, Business Daily is in Edinburgh. We bring you an inside glimpse of the conversations setting the agenda ahead of the UN climate conference COP 26, which starts in Glasgow in just over two weeks. Here in the Scottish capital, the ideas company TED - famous for Ted Talks - is holding its own climate summit, Countdown. It puts CEOs, government ministers, philanthropists and activists all in the same room. Vivienne Nunis hears from Pacific Islander Selina Leem, who explains how her home country, the Marshall Islands, is already dealing with rising sea levels. Jim Snabbe, the chairman of the world's biggest shipping firm, tells us how Maersk plans to move to a new green fuel, while Denmark's energy minister explains his country's plans to vastly scale-up wind power production.

Producer: Sarah Treanor
Image: Selina Leem. Credit: Skoll.org


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz6)
The doctor killed by an anti-abortion extremist

In America, there are few issues as controversial as abortion. It’s a major fault line that runs through society, dividing families and even influencing elections. In the 1980s and 1990s, some groups within America’s anti-abortion movement became militant. There were hundreds of bombing and arson attacks on clinics. Some groups began to argue that to save the lives of what they called ‘pre-born babies’, it was morally justifiable to murder abortion providers. Journalist Amanda Robb tells Viv Jones how her uncle, Dr Barnett Slepian, was killed in 1998. An anti-abortion extremist shot him through his kitchen window in front of his wife and four young sons. His shooting followed years of harassment and intimidation.

(Photo: Portrait of Doctor Barnett Slepian, his wife and his four sons. Getty/Liaison)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3xvfp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhl)
Bezos rocket blasts Star Trek actor into space

William Shatner makes global headlines by becoming the oldest person to travel to space aboard the Blue Origin craft backed by Jeff Bezos. But has Elon Musk effectively already won the billionaires’ space race? Plus the ambitious plan to carry solar and wind energy from Morocco to the UK. And we take a trip through mobile phone history with the founder of a new virtual handset museum. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qm6q2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3xz5t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1ht2)
Climate Change: Lessons from Denmark

Denmark is at the forefront of the global effort to fight climate change. It has committed to cut emissions by 70% below 1990 levels by 2030. It also wants to be carbon neutral by 2050 and end all fossil fuel exploration. Denmark was an early adopter of climate friendly policies and successive governments have taken a consensus driven approach to putting the green transition into motion. Danish start-ups are among those driving innovation to reduce carbon dependency in the cities and in the country. There is even a plan to build artificial “energy islands” in the sea. As governments grasp for solutions to the growing challenge of climate change, can the success enjoyed by a small, rich, northern European nation be scaled up and applied elsewhere in the world?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts in Copenhagen.
Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3y2xy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw480px6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qmg6b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3y6p2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fl)
Why I became a journalist

For many the decision to become a journalist emerges slowly, but not for Nataliya Zotova. Writing was always a passion, and the killing of Novaya Gazeta's Anna Politkovskaya inspired her to work at the same newspaper. She shares her journey from shy teenager to BBC Russian reporter.

The Chinese workers who live in fear in Pakistan
Chinese workers who move to Pakistan to work on projects connected to China’s Belt and Road initiative are increasingly being targeted by local militant groups. BBC Urdu's Sarah Atiq visited a factory in Balochistan where the Chinese employees have to live on site under armed guard.

Give us back our gold!
The theme of stolen gold is a popular internet meme used by Brazilians against the Portuguese. Brazil had a huge gold rush in the 18th century, and there's a feeling that nearly all that wealth ended up in Portugal. As BBC Brasil's Vitor Tavares explains, the real story is much more complex.

1, 2, 3: counting around the world
Counting on your fingers is as easy as 1, 2, 3 right? But do you start with your thumb, or your pinkie, or even your index finger? Maybe you get clever and use each finger segment to triple up the number? Counting around the world, with Suping of BBC Chinese, Devina Gupta of BBC Hindi, Grigor Atanesian of BBC Russian and Iman Mohammed of BBC Somali.

Vietnam's pets killed for Covid
Vietnam's extended lockdowns have left many people out of work and forced them to return to their home towns. The story of one family’s return sparked outrage when the authorities destroyed their pets – 15 dogs and one cat. BBC Vietnamese journalist Bui Thu spoke to the family.

Image: Nataliya Zotova at work
Credit: Georgy Malets


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3ybf6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw480ydg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qmppl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l4b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3yg5b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswcffgy)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3ykxg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qmy5v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46yc35gvdc)
Italy port workers strike over Covid pass rules

Italy has made it mandatory to prove Covid vaccination, or a negative test, to go to work. Thousands of workers at Trieste port have gone on strike over the mandate, and we get reaction to the new policy from Alessandro Borghese, who is a chef with two restaurants in Milan, and another opening soon in Venice. And with a majority of Italians supporting the measure, we get wider context from Professor Guendalina Graffigna, who is an expert on consumer health psychology at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Piacenza. Also in the programme, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis heads to the TED Countdown climate summit in Edinburgh, to find out about innovative approaches to tackling climate change. Plus, we have a report from India as the country's festival season gets under way, and hear that whilst there seems to be more enthusiasm on the streets compared to last year, it does not necessarily mean more business.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Faarea Masud and Ivana Davidovic.

(Picture: Protesters at the port of Trieste. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3ypnl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxr9s7dpm1)
British MP killed in a stabbing attack

British MP Sir David Amess has died after being stabbed earlier today. A Conservative backbencher for nearly 40 years, the 69-year-old father of five entered Parliament in 1983 as the MP for Basildon. We'll hear more about who he was and what he was known for.

We'll bring you the latest from Afghanistan as reports come in of an explosion at a mosque in the city of Kandahar. More than 30 people have been killed.

We'll also spend some time speaking to our reporter Poonam Taneja who has been reporting on the situation with wives and children of Islamic State's foreign fighters who are being held in camps in Northern Syria.

(Photo: Emergency services at the scene near the Belfairs Methodist Church in Essex, where Conservative MP Sir David Amess was killed. Credit: Press Association)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3ytdq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxr9s7dtc5)
Sir David Amess: British MP stabbed to death

British MP Sir David Amess has died after being stabbed. A Conservative backbencher for nearly 40 years, the 69-year-old father of five entered Parliament in 1983 as the MP for Basildon. We'll hear more about who he was and what he was known for.

Well get the latest from Lebanon where funerals have been held for some of those killed in heavy fighting in the capital Beirut on Thursday.

We'll also hear from Ros Atkins who explains why tensions between China and Taiwan have increased in recent weeks.

(Photo:Forensic specialists work at the scene where MP David Amess was killed in a stabbing. Credit: Reuters/Tony O"Brien)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3yy4v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3z1wz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxpw481nw7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qnf5c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nk9131xqb)
2021/10/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3z5n3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qnjxh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr2)
Can we grow a conscious brain?

Philosophers have long pondered the concept of a brain in a jar, hooked up to a simulated world. Though this has largely remained a thought experiment, CrowdScience listener JP wants to know if it might become reality in the not-too-distant future, with advances in stem cell research.

In the two decades since stem cell research began, scientists have learned how to use these cells to create the myriad of cell types in our bodies, including those in our brains, offering researchers ways to study neurological injuries and neurodegenerative disorders. Some labs have actually started 3D printing stem cells into sections of brain tissue in order to study specific interactions in the brain. Human brain organoids offer another way to study brain development and diseases from autism to the Zika virus.

So, might stem cell research one day lead to a fully-grown human brain, or is that resolutely in the realm of science fiction? If something resembling our brains is on the horizon, is there any chance that it could actually become conscious? And how would we even know if it was?

Host Marnie Chesterton takes a peek inside the human brain and speaks with leading scientists in the field, including a philosopher and ethicist who talks about the benefits – and potential pitfalls – of growing human brain models. Along the way, we'll pull apart the science from what still remains (at least for now) fiction.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton
Produced by Sam Baker for BBC World Service


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3z9d7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bswcg8pv)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3zf4c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qnsdr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tzp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjs7g3zjwh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywwfdncvfg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0snhp3hx23)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzklp5qnx4w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48zyxp72fm)
Italy port workers strike over Covid pass rules

Italy has made it mandatory to prove Covid vaccination, or a negative test, to go to work. Thousands of workers at Trieste port have gone on strike over the mandate, and we get reaction to the new policy from Alessandro Borghese, who is a chef with two restaurants in Milan, and another opening soon in Venice. And with a majority of Italians supporting the measure, we get wider context from Professor Guendalina Graffigna, who is an expert on consumer health psychology at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Piacenza. Also in the programme, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis heads to the TED Countdown climate summit in Edinburgh, to find out about innovative approaches to tackling climate change. Plus, we have a report from India as the country's festival season gets under way, and hear that whilst there seems to be more enthusiasm on the streets compared to last year, it does not necessarily mean more business.

(Picture: Protesters at the port of Trieste. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 05:32 SAT (w3ct2kp9)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 18:32 SAT (w3ct2kp9)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 10:32 MON (w3ct2kp9)

A Geochemical History of Life on Earth 10:06 SUN (w3ct2kym)

A Geochemical History of Life on Earth 22:06 SUN (w3ct2kym)

A Geochemical History of Life on Earth 03:06 MON (w3ct2kym)

A Wish for Afghanistan 04:32 WED (w3ct2jnf)

A Wish for Afghanistan 11:32 WED (w3ct2jnf)

A Wish for Afghanistan 22:32 WED (w3ct2jnf)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gxz)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j5c)

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From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mvg)

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