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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 02 OCTOBER 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhfh52)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqkcndbvgs)
Stalemate in US Congress over $1 trillion infrastructure bill

The Democrats can't agree on the size of a separate social spending plan, which is holding up the vote. We get the latest from Nancy Marshall-Genzer, senior reporter at Marketplace, our sister programme on American public radio.
Actor Scarlett Johansson has reached an agreement with Disney after she filed a lawsuit against the company in July over the way it released her film Black Widow - simultaneously in cinemas and on its own streaming platform. We get analysis from entertainment journalist Caroline Frost.
And as chess's governing body Fide announces a sponsorship deal for the women's game with breast enlargement company Motiva, we ask Shelia Stanford, a Norwegian who used to play for her national team, what she thinks of the tie-up.

Sasha Twining is joined throughout the programme by Colin Peacock of Radio New Zealand.

(Picture: The US Capitol building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhflx6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmj6wg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn33z5l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lc1)
MCC's first female president on breaking barriers and the Pakistan decision

Alison Mitchell, Sunil Gupta and Jim Maxwell speak with incoming Marylebone Cricket Club president Clare Connor about becoming the first woman to take up the role in the 233-year history of the club. She discusses her hopes of using her one-year term to modernise the club to ensure better gender parity. Connor also remains the managing director of women’s cricket at the ECB, and discusses the “unbelievably disappointing” cancellation of England joint men’s & women’s tour of Pakistan which she says was “absolutely the right decision at that time”.

The team also hear from one of the busiest women in cricket - Emily Windsor - who juggles a full time job working for the National Health Service in the UK, cricket commentary for the BBC and playing for the Southern Vipers in the South of England. Last week she was named player of the match in the Rachael Heyhoe Flint trophy final and reflects on the Vipers win.

And we reflect on England all-rounder Moeen Ali’s decision to retire from red-ball cricket, and in the aftermath of India women ending Australia’s 26-match unbeaten ODI run, the team analyse whether the time is right for a women’s IPL-style tournament in the country.

(Photo: Former England women's cricketer Claire Connor rings the five-minute bell ahead of day four of the 2nd Ashes Test match between England and Australia at Lord's Cricket Ground. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhfqnb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fj)
Meet Kenya's Guru of Love

The BBC's gender and identity correspondent, Megha Mohan, meets Robert Burale, an East African guru of love, whose seminars promise the hopeful they can “Get a boyfriend for Christmas". So what's the advice, and who's buying?

Giant African snails in Kerala
Giant African snails have become a pest in Kerala, so one area came up with a creative snail hunting idea: a chance to win over a million dollars for catching the most. Too good to be true? Over to the BBC's Jaltson Akkanath Chummar.

China's Hainan island surf boom
Covid restrictions on travel, plus surfing's debut at the Tokyo Olympics, have led to a boom in the China's home grown surf scene. Hainan island is proving a popular destination as Howard Zhang of BBC Chinese reports.

Why car registration plates have blocked the Serbian Kosovo border
A recent row over registration plates caused a blockade at the border and harsh words between Belgrade and Pristina. BBC Serbian's Marija Jankovic explains why registration plates are so contentious between Serbia and Kosovo.

Vietnam's Spring Roll King
BBC Vietnamese has been sharing the extraordinary story of Trinh Vinh Binh, nicknamed ‘the spring roll king’, famous as the only businessman to have won a case against the Vietnamese government, as the BBC’s Thu Phan explains.

Image: Robert Burale
Credit: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz4)
The Tanker War

In November 1987, the Romanian cargo ship, the Fundulea, was attacked by an Iranian gunboat in the Persian Gulf. It was just one of hundreds of merchant ships hit by missiles or mines in the Gulf during the Iran-Iraq war, as both sides sought to damage each other's oil exports and trade. The conflict at sea became known as the Tanker War. Major naval powers deployed to the Gulf to protect their shipping, but many ships, like the Fundulea, ran the gauntlet unescorted. Alex Last has been speaking to Florentin Dacian Botta, who was on board the Fundulea when it was attacked.

Photo: Tug boats spray water to extinguish fires onboard the stricken Romanian freighter, the Fundulea, after it was attacked by an Iranian gunboat, 23rd November 1987 ( NORBERT SCHILLER/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhfvdg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1ht0)
How green is nuclear energy?

Is nuclear energy ‘sustainable’ and deserving of tax breaks? It’s a question dividing member states of the European Union which is considering what role nuclear should play in efforts to wean the continent off fossil fuels. Germany announced it would phase out its existing nuclear power plants after the disaster at Fukushima in Japan in 2011. But others are pushing ahead with plans to extend the life of existing power stations and even build new ones. But with the cost of renewable energy plummeting, critics say money invested in nuclear could be better spent upgrading power grids and improving the resiliency of cleaner forms of energy. Nuclear enthusiasts say new, smaller nuclear reactors will soon become available and could help keep the lights on when the wind doesn’t blow and the sun doesn’t shine. There’s increasing private sector money going towards the development of the next generation of nuclear reactors, plus Russia and China continue to invest heavily in a sector which provides export opportunities - particularly in the developing world. So, what role will nuclear play in the future and will the technology help or hinder attempts to avert catastrophic climate change?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.
Producers: Paul Schuster and Junaid Ahmed.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhfz4l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmjl3v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn34bdz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kp8)
Wasp and keyhole surgery

Scared of wasps? They could help keep you alive, perhaps transforming life-saving keyhole surgery. Parasitic wasps possess a long tube which can reach inside the body of their host where they lay their eggs. To listen online, visit www.bbcworldservice.com/30animals


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dnv)
Global supply chain disruption

The UK and the US have been experiencing supply shortages across a number of industries. There are many factors involved, including the Covid-19 pandemic which has had a knock-on effect on the global supply chain. Ros Atkins examines how policies, politics and uncertainties impact our daily lives.

(Photo: A foreign trade container ship navigates the Jiaozhou Bay in Qingdao, East China's Shandong Province on 7 August, 2021. Credit: Costfoto/Barcroft Media/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhg2wq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytdcp6sh4t)
Biden makes a surprise visit to Congress amid House deadlock

In a 40-minute meeting with House Democrats, President Biden tried to bridge the divide between centrists and progressives, and sell the merits of his Build Back Better plan. We hear from New Republic's Matt Ford on why Democrats are in such a deadlock.

Also in the programme: a shortage of lorry drivers in the UK has led to a worsening fuel shortage. And after eighteen months of isolation, Australia cautiously opens its borders. We speak to Australia's former deputy medical officer, who played a key role in the country's COVID-19 response last year.

Our panelists this week are Latika Bourke, UK correspondent for the Sydney Morning Herald and George Parker, Political Editor of the Financial Times.

(Picture: Mr Biden flashed a thumbs up as he arrived for budget talks. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhg6mv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytdcp6slwy)
Pre-COP26 climate talks wrap up in Milan

With less than a month to go before the much-anticipated COP26 climate summit in Glasgow, climate and energy ministers from around the world are opening a final day of pre-COP talks in Milan. We ask the BBC Environment Correspondent Matt Macgrath what, if anything, has been accomplished?

Also in the programme: we speak to Awet Tesfaiesus, Germany's first-ever black female MP. And a tropical rainforest in Australia has officially been handed over to its traditional owners - the Eastern Kuku Yalanji people. We hear from a woman of that tribe.

Our panellists this week are Latika Bourke, UK correspondent for the Sydney Morning Herald and George Parker, political editor of the Financial Times.

(Photo: Young activists Greta Thunberg, Vanessa Nakate and Martina Comparelli meeting Italian prime minister Mario Draghi. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhgbcz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytdcp6sqn2)
Climate activists take to the streets in Milan

Thousands of young climate activists from around the world have converged on Milan, site of the pre-COP climate talks. We speak to a climate campaigner from the Dominican Republic.

Also in the programme: we hear from a former prisoner who has been chosen for the 2021 MacArthur Fellow for his work bringing "micro-libraries" to prisons across the US. He tells us what it was like serving an eight-year sentence for car-jacking as a teenager and how reading books in jail changed his life.

Our panellists this week are Latika Bourke, UK correspondent for the Sydney Morning Herald and George Parker, Political Editor of the Financial Times.

(Picture: There were some clashes between police and climate justice activists. Credit: Andrea Fasani)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn34pnc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p92)
Message in a mural

Street artists from Switzerland and Uganda talk to Kim Chakanetsa about creating public art to enrich lives and bring about change.

The Swiss artist Mona Caron is best known for her multi-story murals celebrating the rebellious resilience of weeds. She first became a muralist in her adoptive hometown of San Francisco, and creates images on a massive scale in public spaces. She blends her artivism with social movements, and enjoys working in collaboration with kindred-spirited artists and activists.

Fatuma Hassan is a painter, graffiti artist and muralist who lives and works in Jinja, Uganda. She says she's never met another female street artist in the country and people are sometimes shocked that she's climbing ladders to paint her murals on buildings. She likes projects that raise community awareness and celebrate the African woman. She's part of the Afri-cans festival and has created murals in Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania and Kenya.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE
(L) Mona Caron, credit Chris Carlsson
(R) Fatuma Hassan, courtesy Fatuma Hassan


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhgg43)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d69)
Coronavirus: Vaccine regret

Despite the life saving properties of vaccination against Covid-19, not everyone has chosen to get the jab - even in countries where vaccines are readily available. Karnie Sharp and James Reynolds hear from two Americans who regret their decisions - including the man who almost died and ended up with a double lung transplant after catching the disease.

We also hear from flight attendants in Nigeria, Spain and the US about dealing with unruly passengers during a pandemic - especially when asked to wear a mask. Plus a scientist in Uganda explains the vaccine situation there during the country’s second wave, and three people share their experiences of getting vaccinated when doses are in short supply.

(Photo: Blake Bargatze Credit: Blake Bargatze)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn34tdh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdq)
Making decisions

Decisions about the course of our lives can seem overwhelming. When we come to a junction in our life it can be hard to decide which way to turn. Is there a process to make those choices easier, and increase the chance of success? Sister Dang Nghiem offers insights to Pae from Thailand as she tries to make a confident decision about her future career.

Producer: Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l20)
One on one conversations with spiritual advisers

World of Wisdom and its spiritual advisers offer advice to listeners grappling with personal dilemmas. We ask the show’s producer how topics are chosen and how it meets BBC editorial guidelines. Plus, did Business Daily show undue bias ahead of the German elections? One listener feels it lacked impartiality. And an update on the latest situation with Digital Radio Mondiale.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhgkw7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q5fynxzww)
"Golf saved me, twice"

Ken Green had a good career as a professional golfer, he was a five time winner of the US Tour and reached 15 in the world. For Ken however it was much more than a sport, because his life off the course had seen so much trauma. Here in his own words he explains what he as been through and how golf "saved me... Twice!"

The final race of the Triathlon Super League season took place last weekend in Malibu California. We thought it would be a good opportunity to catch up with Taylor Spivey who was racing in front of her family in her home race. And we did talk about that, and about her recovery from a serious bike crash in 2014 which still to this day affects her, but that's the most compelling part of the conversation was when talking about the Olympics and the emotional cost of just missing out on a dream.

Football, She Wrote is a new book where women have written a chapter on the game they love. It's a fascinating collection of memoirs and interviews covering all sorts of topics. Fudumo Olow is one of the contributing authors having penned a chapter on former England international Rachael Yankey.

Who is the most important person at any sporting event? The athlete, right? Well apart from them you can list a whole load of people who can make or break your enjoyment... perhaps the most crucial person is the commentator? I mean if you aren't at the stadium the commentator can transport you there... and the art of commentary is the subject of a new book by broadcaster Michael Schiavello

Credit: (Photo by Marc Serota/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhgpmc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmk9lm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn351wr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3r)
How to trend on social media

Humour, fashion, music or memes: social media stars have a big influence on today’s digital audience, and India, with more than 500 million people using social media platforms, is a buzzing base for all things trending.

But is there a method to the frenzy of new content being created and consumed by the hour? What are the pressures of dealing with internet fame? And how do brands collaborate with trending stars of the internet world to monetize their fame?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we find out how to trend on social media.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Yohani Diloka de Silva, singer, songwriter; Bhuvan Bam, digital star, BB Ki Vines; Yashraj Mukhate, music producer, YouTuber; Neha Puri, CEO, co-founder, Vavo Digital


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhgtch)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9s)
Wole Soyinka

This month, to kick off a mini-season to celebrate a very special centenary World Book Club talks, for a second time, to the Nobel Prize-winning giant of world literature, Professor Wole Soyinka, about one hundred years of the writers’ organisation English PEN. PEN is the influential pressure group which helps support and campaign for the release of writers held unlawfully in jail around the globe and which helped to secure Soyinka’s release in 1969, after 26 months of detention without trial by the military regime in Nigeria.

Guest presenter Ritula Shah also discusses Wole Soyinka’s first new novel in half a century with the author and his readers around the world: Chronicles from the Land of the Happiest People on Earth is a bitingly witty whodunit, a scathing indictment of Nigeria’s ruling elite, and a powerful call to arms from one of the country’s most relentless political activists and world-famous writer.

(Picture: Wole Soyinka. Photo credit: Simone Padovani/Awakening/Getty Images.)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhgy3m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2bqyxf7)
Philippines president says he will retire

The controversial president of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte, says he would not seek another term in office, but his daughter Sara is waiting in the wings, so is this really the end of his influence?

Also on the programme: Taiwan has reported the biggest ever incursion of Chinese military planes into its air defence zone, accusing Beijing of wanton aggression; and we hear about Europe’s first mission to Mercury, BepiColombo, which has flown within 200 kilometres of the planet's surface.

(Photo: Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte; Credit: Lisa Marie David/EPA)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhh1vr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tg6w2pplk)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhhjv8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lml4tj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn35x3n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kp8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8s)
Cameroon's Triple Jump Queen

In 2004, the Cameroonian triple-jumper Francoise Mbango made headlines around the world when she competed in the Athens Olympics with her head shaved. Mbango wanted to show solidarity with her mother, who was undergoing chemotherapy treatment for cancer. Mbango won a gold medal and went on to retain her title at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. She talks to Ian Williams about how motherhood inspired her journey to the very top of world sport.

PHOTO: Francoise Mbango after her Olympic victory in 2004 (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhhnld)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Evidence (w3ct2yqg)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

To boost or not to boost?

The divide between the Covid vaccine haves and have-nots has been described as “criminal”, with only 20% of people in low and middle income countries having had one dose, compared with 80% in higher income countries. Countries with high vaccination rates have been called on to give up their place in the vaccine queue.

The dual-track global vaccination programme has led to real anger, made worse by announcements of booster programmes in richer countries (despite the World Health Organisation calling for such plans to be put on hold).

Claudia Hammond and her panel of global experts discuss the scale of vaccine inequity and consider whether evidence of waning vaccine immunity justifies the rollout of booster jabs, or if the soundest scientific case dictates everybody in the world should be vaccinated first.

Claudia’s guests include Dr Yodi Alakija, co-chair of the African Union’s Delivery Alliance for Covid-19 in Abuja, Nigeria, Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, the World Health Organisation’s Technical Lead for Covid in Geneva, Switzerland and two world leading immunologists, Dr Peter Openshaw, Professor of Experimental Medicine at Imperial College, London, UK and Dr Akiko Iwasaki, Professor of Immunobiology and Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology at Yale University in the US.

Produced by: Fiona Hill, Paula McGrath and Maria Simons
Studio Engineers: Jackie Marjoram

Picture: Employees unload boxes of Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccines against the Covid-19 after their delivery as a part of the UN-led Covax initiative, Credit: TINA SMOLE/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhhsbj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtj)
Writer Colson Whitehead

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined by two-time Pulitzer Prize winning writer Colson Whitehead, who talks about his latest novel the 1960s heist caper, Harlem Shuffle.

We hear from James Bond star, Lashana Lynch on her history making role in No Time to Die.

Actor Michael Gandolfini reflects on living up to his late father, James’ portrayal of Tony Soprano, in the prequel film The Many Saints of Newark.

Plus Nikki and film critic Leila Latif discuss the films to look forward to in the months ahead.

Photo: Colson Whitehead. Credit: Odd Andersen/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhhx2n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2bqzwd8)
What next for President Duterte?

Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte says he's retiring from politics, only a month after saying he'd run in elections next year. The International Criminal Court is investigating Mr Duterte for alleged crimes against humanity but he has sworn that he will never appear before an international court. We ask what his next step is likely to be.

Also in the programme: thousands turn out across the US to show their support for abortion rights; and how Brazilians are suffering from the effects of drought.


Photo: Philippine Senator Christopher "Bong" Go, accompanied by President Rodrigo Duterte, files his candidacy to join the vice presidential race Credit: REUTERS/Lisa Marie David


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhj0ts)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcg)
All my instruments have names with Esperanza Spalding, Marcos Valle, Patrick Paige II and Tom Misch

Esperanza Spalding, Marcos Valle, Patrick Paige II and Tom Misch discuss why playing music is dangerous, the sound of your first love, why drinking on stage is a bad idea, first takes v lots of practice, and recording an orchestra in one take.

Grammy-winning bassist, singer and composer Esperanza Spalding has performed at the White House for Barack and Michelle Obama’s Stevie Wonder tribute, and after a jam session with Prince, was invited to perform for his BET Lifetime Achievement Award tribute in 2010. She’s since released six studio albums, and worked with the likes of Janelle Monae, Bruno Mars and Tony Visconti. Joining her is Marcos Valle, who has spent the last 50 years fusing classical, Brazilian popular music and jazz, and is regarded as one of the most influential musicians in Brazil’s history. Tom Misch is a London-based producer, songwriter and guitarist who has become one of the most distinctive voices in the UK contemporary jazz scene, and one of its most in demand producers. Patrick Paige II is best known for his funky basslines in LA funk/R&B band The Internet. They have released four critically acclaimed albums, including the Grammy-nominated Ego Death in 2015, and collaborated with the likes of Tyler the Creator, Janelle Monáe and Kaytranada.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhj4kx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvpw0xg3w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sms4h1hrj)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn36hv9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt6)
Faïza Guène and Omar El Akkad

This week on The Cultural Frontline, Anu Anand looks at how migration and the journeys we take have inspired writers and theatre makers.

French author Faïza Guène made a global impact with her first novel Kiffe Kiffe Demain, which was translated into English as Just Like Tomorrow. It shook up the literary scene in France with its humorous portrayal of the lives of immigrants in the deprived suburbs of Paris. Faïza Guène talks about her novel Men Don’t Cry and how the French establishment reacted to her ground-breaking debut.

Writer Nina Mingya Powles grew up in New Zealand, in a Malaysian-Chinese family, and she now lives in London. Her essay collection, Small Bodies of Water, takes the reader on a personal journey to the places across the globe which have given Nina a sense of belonging and home. In a piece written especially for The Cultural Frontline, Nina reflects on migration and the impact of the journeys we take.

After the 2010 earthquake that devastated large parts of Haiti, many Haitians migrated to Chile to build a new life. But Haitians in Chile have faced racism and discrimination, and many have struggled to find work. LETTM, a theatre project in Cartagena, is working with Chilean locals and Haitian migrants. Assistant Director Ramona Suarez explains how they are finding common ground between the communities.

Award winning author and journalist Omar El Akkad’s new novel tells a harrowing tale of enforced migration. What Strange Paradise focuses on the journey a nine year old Syrian refugee. Omar El Akkad tells The Cultural Frontline how the classic children’s story, Peter Pan by JM Barrie, influenced and inspired his writing.

Photo: Faïza Guène. Credit: Faïza Guène)



SUNDAY 03 OCTOBER 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhjd25)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yvs)
Drug resistant malaria found in East Africa

Since their discovery in the 1970s, artemisinin-based drugs have become the mainstay of treatment for malaria caused by the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. Researchers have identified artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites in Southeast Asia since the early 2000s, but now, there is evidence of resistance in Rwanda and Uganda. Dr Betty Balikagala of Juntendo University tells us how this resistance developed and what it means for managing malaria in Africa, which carries the greatest burden of malaria cases and deaths worldwide.

We hear from some of the scientists from COVID Moonshot, a non-profit, open-science consortium which has just received key funding to develop affordable antivirals to stop SARS-CoV-2 in its tracks.

Also on the programme, Dr Rakesh Ghosh from the University of California, San Francisco tells us how air pollution is contributing to 6 million preterm births globally each year, and Dr Catherine Nakalembe of the University of Maryland and Africa Lead for NASA Harvest returns to the programme as NASA/USGS launches Landsat 9.

Also In the past 18 months we have heard lots about the human immune system, as we all learn about how our bodies fight off Covid-19 and how the vaccine helps protect us. But this got listener John, in Alberta, Canada, thinking about how trees and plants respond to diseases and threats. Do they have immune systems and if so, how do they work? Do they have memories that mean they can remember diseases or stressful events 5 months, or 5 years down the line, to be better prepared if they encounter the same threats again?

Presenter Marnie Chesterton sets out to investigate the inner workings of plants and trees, discovering that plants not only have a sophisticated immune system, but that they can use that immune system to warn their neighbours of an attack. Some researchers are also investigating how we can help plants, especially crops, have better immune systems – whether that’s by vaccination or by editing their genes to make their immune systems more efficient.

But some plants, like trees, live for a really long time. How long can they remember any attacks for? Can they pass any of those memories on to their offspring? Crowdscience visits one experimental forest where they are simulating the future CO2 levels of 2050 to understand how trees will react to climate change.


Image: Mosquito net demonstration in a community outreach centre in Kenya
Credit: Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhjht9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmm3sk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn36w2p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3cszcd0)
How children think about maths and time

Claudia Hammond explores how children think with two psychologists; Dr Victoria Simms from Ulster University who researches how children’s understanding of maths develops and Professor Teresa McCormack from Queens University Belfast who researches how children understand time.

The discussion was recorded in front of an audience at the Northern Ireland Science Festival in February 2020.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Caroline Steel

(Picture: A group of preschool students sitting on the floor with their legs crossed and their arms raised in the air. Photo credit: FatCamera/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhjmkf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhjr9k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvf)
Flight MH17: Victims’ families share their stories

Stories from the Netherlands, Palestinian Territories, Libya and India.

What is the point of having a criminal trial when the defendants are not in the dock? That is what is happening at a court close to Amsterdam’s Schipol Airport, from where flight MH17 took off in July 2014, bound for Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The plane crashed, apparently brought down by a ground-to-air missile over Ukraine. The four people accused of murder in this case are alleged to have been pro-Russian fighters, and Russia has refused to extradite them. Yet Anna Holligan found that for relatives of those killed, the proceedings in court have a very real purpose.

A court in the Palestinian Territories currently has a dock that’s rather packed. Fourteen members of the security services are on trial, accused in connection with the death of a local political activist, Nizar Banat. He had repeatedly alleged corruption and mismanagement by members of the Palestinian Authority, and found himself under arrest. That same day, he was taken to hospital, and declared dead – from natural causes the arresting officers insisted. Yolande Knell has met Banat’s family, and talked to Palestinian officials about the case.

What can a journalist do when people won’t speak to them? That was the problem which faced our reporter, Tim Whewell when he returned to Libya recently. It was 10 years since he had covered the overthrow of Colonel Ghaddafi, and he tried to contact the people he had met back then. Many did not respond at all, and those who did said they were too scared to talk to a reporter. So what does that say about the state of Libya today?

The COP26 summit has been described as a last ditch effort to save the planet, with countries under severe pressure to curb their fossil fuel emissions. There is particular pressure on India, with its vast population and fast-growing economy. More than that, India still relies on coal for energy, which produces more CO2 than other fuels. So can the country kick its coal habit? Rajini Vaidyanathan has been meeting people there who have their doubts.

(Image: Flowers and a teddy bear sit on part of Malaysia Airlines plane MH17. Credit: Bukent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn373ky)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhjw1p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmmh0y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn377b2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Who We Are (w3ct2lcr)
Buy me love: Inside the world of love coaching

Love coaching is a multi-billion dollar global industry, and one of the fastest growing in the world.

More single people than ever are looking for advice to find a lasting romantic partnership. The result has been an explosion of coaches who claim to guide you to love through viral videos and costly in-person seminars.

The BBC attends one such seminar in Kenya, with one of East Africa’s most famous love and lifestyle coaches, Robert Burale. He says he can show women all the secrets and tricks to find love in days. But does it work? Is this really a route to buy love, or simply a way to sell a dream?

(Photo: Robert Burale image displayed on multiple television sets courtesy of Robert Burale Productions)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhjzst)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytdcp6wd1x)
Thousands march for abortion rights across US

Tens of thousands of people have been holding rallies across all 50 US states in support of abortion rights. We hear from one of the march organisers

Also in the programme: Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte says he is retiring from politics and will not stand in elections next year; and we have a special report on the women caught up in the war in Yemen

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Jonathan Steele, an author, journalist and former chief foreign correspondent for the Guardian; and Patricia Cumper, an award-winning playwright, producer, critic, and commentator.

(Image: Participants in the Women's March for Abortion Justice in Washington, DC. Credit: Allison Bailey/REX/Shutterstock)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhk3jy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytdcp6wht1)
The women caught up in Yemen's civil war

A BBC special report on the women who have been caught up in the civil war in Yemen and imprisoned by Houthi rebels.

Plus, a British police officer who abducted, raped and killed a young woman has been given a life sentence. We discuss the impact of his crime.

Also, we hear from Milan where arguments between rich and developing countries marked an international climate meeting.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Jonathan Steele, an author, journalist and former chief foreign correspondent for the Guardian; and Patricia Cumper, an award-winning playwright, producer, critic, and commentator.

(Image: Houthi fighters in Sana'a. Credit: EPA/Yahya Arhab)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhk792)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytdcp6wmk5)
Shakespeare redefined

Falling in love with Shakespeare by creating the UK's first all-black, all-female company.

Plus, reflections on the 20-year anniversary of the US invasion of Afghanistan.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Jonathan Steele, an author, journalist and former chief foreign correspondent for the Guardian; and Patricia Cumper, an award-winning playwright, producer, critic, and commentator.

(Image: William Shakespeare. Credit: AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn37lkg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg7)
The bug business

Insects are cheap, packed full of nutrients, and farming them for food could help save the planet. Convincing more people to eat them, though, remains a big challenge.

Tamasin Ford speaks to three insect entrepreneurs trying to persuade the squeamish, especially in Europe and North America, to overcome their fears of crickets, worms, and spiders, and instead see them as a tasty, sustainable, alternative source of protein.

We also hear that it’s not just the ‘yuck factor’ holding this fledgling industry back - should governments, chefs, and climate campaigners be doing more to support it?

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:

Joseph Yoon, chef and executive director of Brooklyn Bugs;
Marjolaine Blouzard, former co-owner of Bugs Cafe;
Andy Holcroft, founding director of Grub Kitchen and Bug Farm Foods.

(Picture: A dish of peas, carrots and worms prepared by chef David Faure. Credit: Didier Baverel/Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhkc16)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn37q9l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxh)
Addicted to my son's addiction

When US journalist David Sheff realised that his beloved teenage son Nic was addicted to the highly-dangerous drug crystal meth, he tried to do everything to help him. Could this family break free from the destructive cycle of addiction? (This programme was first broadcast on 6th January 2019 and since then Nic has celebrated his 11-year anniversary of sobriety.)

Presenter: Saskia Edwards
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Image: Nic and David Sheff
Credit: Bas Bogaerts

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhkgsb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 A Geochemical History of Life on Earth (w3ct2kyl)
1. In the beginning

Justin Rowlatt tells the story of our planet's chemistry - starting at the very beginning. How did this continuous chemical reaction that we call "life" first begin? And why did the hellish conditions of the early Earth provide the perfect birthplace?

Justin speaks to two scientists with rival theories about the origin of life, both trying to recreate it in their labs - John Sutherland of Cambridge University, and Nick Lane of University College London. Plus the Natural History Museum's Sara Russell shows Justin a rock that is older than the Earth itself - the Winchcombe meteorite.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Primordial Earth; Mark Garlick/Science Photo Library)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn37v1q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2hdv)
The Myanmar mission

David Eubank, who is originally from Texas, lives in the jungles of the Karen state near the Thai-Myanmar border, along with his wife and children. The Karen people have been fighting the Myanmar military for decades, in the world’s longest civil war.

Since the military coup on 1 February, the Karen Nation Union has sided with a people’s uprising demanding democracy is restored, and has launched attacks on the military. The army has responded with bombings that have displaced tens of thousands of people. David has seen first-hand what has happened.

Hundreds of young protesters have fled to ethnic areas, including into the area David is working in. His group, The Free Burma Rangers, has provided survival and medical training to some of these young people who want to continue fighting to restore democracy.
He is also part of an underground railway helping to smuggle out politicians, artists and activists who are on the military’s wanted list.
David takes us on a mission through the jungle to get aid to civilians caught up in the conflict.

(Photo: Sahale walks by a burning shack and opium field on a mission. Credit: Free Burma Rangers)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhkljg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmn6hq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn37ysv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2vq7)
Sugar-coated World

USA: Plantations and plains

Lainy Malkani focuses on the story of sugar in the USA. From one of the oldest confectionery shops in New Orleans where the local delicacy of pecan nut pralines are made every day, to a former sugar plantation along the Mississippi river, she hears about the role of sugar in the history of Louisiana.

She speaks to Khalil Gibran Mohammed about the legacy of sugar and slavery in the region, and hears from the manager of the Whitney plantation about what remains there today. From there to the sugar beet plains of the mid-West, Lainy looks at how sugar has influenced government policy over time, and how the commodity has become central to American culture, its diet and economy today.


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhkq8l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Evidence (w3ct2yqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhkv0q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2br1tbb)
Yemen: heavy fighting in Marib

Government forces and Houthi rebels clash in Western Yemen. We also hear about the women detained by the rebels.

Also on the programme: the father of a three-year-old girl killed in the port explosion in Beirut last year tells us that he's disgusted with the latest halt to the investigation; and the head of a French commission investigating the Roman Catholic church says it's found evidence of about 3000 abusers since 1950.

(Picture: A checkpoint in Aden, Yemen. Credit Reuters / Salman)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhkyrv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlr)
Sushi: The Japanese dish with an ancient tradition

It’s one of the most popular dishes in the world today, but the story of sushi can be traced back more than 2,000 years. The earliest records document a preserved fish dish in ancient China and it later became a medieval luxury in Japan, before evolving into a variety of different regional styles and recipes. Today, thanks to waves of migration from Japan, there is a veritable smorgasbord of international varieties… California roll, anyone?  

Joining Rajan Datar to discuss the history of sushi are James Farrer, Professor of Sociology and Director of the Graduate Programme in Global Studies at Sophia University in Tokyo. He is the author of Globalisation and Asian Cuisines; Eric C. Rath is Professor of Premodern Japanese History at the University of Kansas in the US. He’s the author of Oishii: The History of Sushi; and Michelin-starred Japanese sushi master, Endo Kazutoshi, who is head chef at The Rotunda in London.

Presenter: Rajan Datar

[Image: Young woman eating sushi; Credit: Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkl)
The Gender Pay Gap

Tim Harford talks to Planet Money’s Stacey Vanek Smith about the gender pay gap in the US and the UK – and how Renaissance writer, Machiavelli might be an unlikely source of inspiration for women in the workplace.


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhl2hz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhl683)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tg6w2stzx)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Matt McNulty - Manchester City/Manchester City FC via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhlkhh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmp5gr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn38xrw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2hdv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhlp7m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dhb)
Energy crisis hits China

As China suffers its worst blackouts in over a decade, on Business Weekly we ask what’s causing the power shortages and what they mean for the rest of the world. We also hear from Germany, where political wrangling over who will be the next Chancellor continues. The Green Party will play kingmaker - and there are hopes from people in flood-hit areas that environmental policies will take centre stage. Plus, have you ever wondered how valuable influencers can be for a brand? We spend the day in a luxurious mansion full of social media personalities to find out if they represent value for money. And as James Bond takes to the silver screen once more, we ask whether the studios can afford to retire 007. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Woman and a boy sit along the Huangpu river across the Wujing Coal-Electricity Power Station in Shanghai, AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhlszr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2br2s9c)
Pandora Papers expose world leaders' secret wealth

The secret wealth and dealings of some world leaders, politicians and billionaires have been exposed in one of the biggest leaks of financial documents.

Some 35 current and former leaders, including King of Jordan and the Azeri president Ilham Aliyev, are featured in the files from offshore companies, dubbed the Pandora Papers.

Also in the programme, we hear from Afghanistan, after a bombing at a funeral in a Kabul mosque targets the Taliban

And an eyewitness account from the current frontline in Yemen's long civil war.

(Picture shows a composite image of property in London. Credit: BBC)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhlxqw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 A Geochemical History of Life on Earth (w3ct2kyl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn39908)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhm1h0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvpw10c0z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sms4h4dnm)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn39drd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 04 OCTOBER 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sr47f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzldrn03rdp)
Leaked Pandora Papers reveal secret wealth of leaders

The documents expose the offshore dealings of presidents, royalty and prime ministers. Our reporter Andy Verity, who's been combing through the thousands of papers, tells us more about what they contain.
Ahead of a key Opec meeting on Monday, members are under pressure to address the rapidly growing oil price. Our regular commentator - economist Michael Hughes - tells us what the likely outcomes and effects might be.
And it's ten years since Steve Jobs, the co-founder of Apple, died. He transformed the firm into a trillion dollar company and devised a string of iconic products. We discuss his legacy with Karlin Lillington, technology columnist with the Irish Times.

This edition is presented by Will Bain and produced by Sara Parry.

(Picture: The port of Monaco. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdfhht)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2lcp)
China's great science leap

President Xi Jinping is investing seriously into his strategic vision of turning China into a nation of scientific pace-setters. China’s past contributions to modern-science have been proportionally lacklustre, but with a reinvigorated focus over the past two decades, China is fast turning from imitator to innovator. What might this increasing scientific prowess mean for the future of China’s development as well for the international scientific community?

Whereas once many Chinese scientists chose to go abroad to further their careers, presenter Dr Kevin Fong hears how the government has sought to lure its brightest researchers back and what that means for both scientific collaborations and the culture of science in China and the UK. As scientific research relies on transparent information sharing, what are the challenges of collaborating with an authoritarian regime?

In this second episode Kevin explores China’s booming space programme and quantum advancements; from a newly built space station to the launch of the world's first quantum satellite.

Kevin speaks to Professor Jian-Wei Pan, a scientist whose illustrious career is a list of quantum firsts and hears how China is fast making inroads into quantum computing and communications. We imagine what a quantum future - with China at the forefront - might look like and whether this potentially game-changing technology will be developed in a collaborative or competitive spirit.

Image: Wenchang Space Launch Centre in China's Hainan province, Credit: Photo by STR/AFP/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sr7zk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvxtvyt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdfm7y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr3)
What made us doubt climate change?

Recent research has shown that oil companies knew about the threat of climate change decades ago. Yet over forty years, it has been revealed that they contributed millions of dollars to think tanks and campaigns to spread doubt and misinformation about climate change – its existence, the extent of the problem, and its cause.

Across the US, these revelations have sparked a wave of lawsuits against the fossil fuel industry, demanding accountability for climate change – and now a US congressional committee has started to investigate. Executives from the world’s biggest oil companies and trade groups have been called to testify before US lawmakers in October this year, in an inquiry modelled on the tobacco hearings of the 1990s, which paved the way for far tougher nicotine regulations.

This week, The Climate Question looks over the evidence behind these allegations – and asks whether Big Oil might finally be facing a reckoning for its role in the climate crisis.

Presenters: Neal Razzell and Phoebe Keane
Producer: Zoe Gelber
Series Editor: Ros Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5srcqp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 A Geochemical History of Life on Earth (w3ct2kyl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdfr02)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l20)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5srhgt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvxv3g2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdfvr6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p93)
Taking a leap into single motherhood

There are many different routes to parenthood. For a growing number of women that route does not involve waiting for a partner to start a family. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two mothers by choice about the joys and challenges of single parenthood.

Marie Stern Olsson is from Sweden, where single mothers have only recently been given the same right as couples to access state-funded fertility treatments. She had her son through insemination in 2017. She believes that having a strong support network and a single parent-friendly welfare system made her choice possible.

Supriya Deverkonda is based in India, where single people are allowed to adopt children, but there is still a strong stigma around single mothers. In 2013 Supriya decided to adopt a 5-month-old baby, defying cultural stereotypes around traditional family and marriage. Eight years on, she is still having to deal with bureaucratic hurdles and scepticism, but she says she wouldn’t have it any other way.

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE
(L) Marie Stern Olsson, courtesy of Marie Stern Olsson
(R) Supriya Deverkonda, credit Arti Anand


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5srm6y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f75p7p)
Secret wealth of world leaders exposed

Massive leak of financial documents reveals business dealings of politicians and billionaires.

The US says it's "very concerned" about "provocative military activity" by China near Taiwan.

And demonstrators call for the Brazilian president to be impeached during big anti-government protests over the weekend.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5srqz2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f75szt)
Pandora Papers: Secret wealth of leaders revealed

The business dealings of hundreds of world leaders, politicians and billionaires have been exposed in one of the biggest leaks of financial documents ever.

We talk about the big anti-government protests in Brazil over the weekend - with demonstrators calling for the president to be impeached.

And trading in shares in the indebted Chinese property company Evergrande has been suspended in Hong Kong.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5srvq6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f75xqy)
The secret wealth of the world's most powerful people

Anti-corruption campaigners say the Pandora papers document how those who make the rules surrounding wealth management also benefit from it.

We ask why India is opening coal mines in the face of opposition from local communities.

And the 94 year-old American man fulfilling his dream of building a Gothic building in the heart of the French countryside.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5srzgb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (p050gzz7)
Son of Hans Frank, Governor General of Nazi Occupied Poland - Niklas Frank

Stephen Sackur is in Germany to speak to Niklas Frank. His father was Hans Frank, the Governor General of Nazi Occupied Poland during the World War Two. He was convicted of war crimes and crimes against humanity at the Nuremberg trials and executed in 1946. Niklas Frank tells Stephen Sackur he 'despises' his father and does not want Germany to forget the crimes of his father and the legacy of the Nazi era.

(Photo: Niklas Frank)


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdgbqq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j5b)
Can technology transform emergency services?

Getting to hospital in a medical emergency, in countries without a centralised ambulance service, can be critically slow. In rapidly urbanising Kenya, Vivienne Nunis meets Caitlin Dolkart – cofounder of Flare; a company which created a technology platform to dispatch ambulances anywhere across the country. But how do you direct an ambulance without accurate maps? We hear from Humanitarian Open Street Map’s Ivan Gayton how open source data is improving heathcare outcomes. Image: Ambulance operator Paul Ochieng disinfects a stretcher at Kenyatta National Hospital in Nairobi, on April 17, 2020. Credit: Getty


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1f)
London's first black policeman

Norwell Roberts joined the Metropolitan police in 1967. He was put forward as a symbol of progressive policing amid ongoing tensions between the police and ethnic minorities in the capital. But behind the scenes, Norwell endured years of racist abuse from colleagues within the force. Norwell Roberts spoke to Alex Last about growing up in Britain and his determination to be a pioneer in the police.

(Photo: London's first black policeman PC Norwell Roberts beginning his training with colleagues at Hendon Police College, London, 5 April 1967. Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5ss36g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdgggv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr0)
Do plants have immune systems?

In the past 18 months we have heard lots about the human immune system, as we all learn about how our bodies fight off Covid-19 and how the vaccine helps protect us. But this got listener John, in Alberta, Canada, thinking about how trees and plants respond to diseases and threats. Do they have immune systems and if so, how do they work? Do they have memories that mean they can remember diseases or stressful events 5 months, or 5 years down the line, to be better prepared if they encounter the same threats again?

Presenter Marnie Chesterton sets out to investigate the inner workings of plants and trees, discovering that plants not only have a sophisticated immune system, but that they can use that immune system to warn their neighbours of an attack. Some researchers are also investigating how we can help plants, especially crops, have better immune systems – whether that’s by vaccination or by editing their genes to make their immune systems more efficient.

But some plants, like trees, live for a really long time. How long can they remember any attacks for? Can they pass any of those memories on to their offspring? Crowdscience visits one experimental forest where they are simulating the future CO2 levels of 2050 to understand how trees will react to climate change.

Featuring:
Professor Jurriaan Ton, University of Sheffield
Professor Xinnian Dong, Duke University
Dr Estrella Luna-Diez, University of Birmingham
Peter Miles, F.A.C.E. Facility Technician, University of Birmingham

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Produced by Hannah Fisher for the BBC World Service.

Photo credit: Getty Images


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5ss6yl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdgl6z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kp8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5ssbpq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvxvynz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdgpz3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p93)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5ssgfv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtn)
The immigration lawyer who hid her undocumented past

Qian Julie Wang arrived in the United States from China at the age of 7. Her family didn’t have permission to be in the country and so she always told people she’d been born there. But after fulfilling her ambition to become a lawyer, her secret became harder to bear. She was often working on immigration and deportation cases, and found it painful and conflicting to make judgements when she’d been in a similar situation. She then faced an agonising dilemma: to keep her secret or come clean. She knew that either decision could potentially mean the end of her career. Beautiful Country is by Qian Julie Wang.

Shaku Myoshin isn't your average Buddhist monk. For a start he has long hair, tied in a ponytail. But that's not the reason he's called the 'Funky Monk'. He goes by the name of Tatsumi and is known as Japan's beatboxing monk. He lives in a temple in Kumamoto in southern Japan and Outlook's Alessia Cerantola went to meet him in 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Qian Julie Wang
Credit: Ryan Muir


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5ssl5z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvxw657)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdgygc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sspy3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm18p7q)
Pandora Papers leak

A number of world leaders have denied allegations of impropriety raised by a huge leak of financial documents on hidden offshore wealth, but will their people believe them?

Also in the programme: the Archbishop of Canterbury tells us why politicians need to do more on climate change; and the UK Conservative Party conference begins amid protests, price rises, and a petrol crisis.

(Image: Jordan's King Abdullah II. Credit: REUTERS)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sstp7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (p050gzz7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdh5ym)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4854xrc1t2)
Facebook whistleblower reveals identity

A former Facebook employee behind a series of bombshell leaks has revealed her identity. We hear from Frances Haugen, who was interviewed on Sunday by CBS. We also get an assessment of whether Facebook prioritises profits over safety from Dr Victoria Baines, visiting fellow in cybersecurity at Bournemouth University, who previously worked at the social media giant. Also in the programme, a data leak, named the Pandora Papers, has shone a light on the previously secret financial affairs of the world's rich and powerful. Simon Bowers from the website Finance Uncovered is part of the global investigation into the data, and tells us what has been revealed about the family finances of Kenya's president, Uhuru Kenyatta. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on software company Flare which spotted a gap in the market in Kenya, where there is no centralised ambulance service number like 911 or 999. Plus, as people around the world gradually return to workplaces, our regular commentator Pilita Clarke considers how easy it is to get distracted in the office, and what can be done about it.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Benjie Guy and Russell Newlove.

(Picture: A Facebook logo on a smartphone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5ssyfc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxqyhx7yct)
The Pandora Papers reveal secret wealth

The Pandora papers - the millions of documents leaked - reveal how secret wealth moves around the world to avoid tax. We'll explain the main findings and do a question-and-answer session to include audience comments and questions.

World leaders from countries like Jordan, Russia, Pakistan, and Kenya have been linked to the revelations. We'll connect with our language service reporters around the world to hear more details and about the reaction.

Our regular coronavirus expert ---Dr Eleanor Murray - assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health will explain today's Covid stories.

And in the run-up to the UN climate conference, we'll be joined by experts answering audience questions to help us understand how climate change is relevant to our lives. Today our guest expert is Dr Rachel Cleetus, policy director with the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists.

(Photo: Some 35 current and former leaders are featured in the files from offshore companies, dubbed the Pandora Papers. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5st25h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxqyhx823y)
Pandora leaks: The world reacts

We look at the reaction after the Pandora Papers revealed how secret wealth moves around the world. to avoid tax.

World leaders from countries like Jordan, Russia, Pakistan, and Kenya have been linked to the revelations. We'll connect with our language service reporters around the world to hear more details and about the reaction.

Professor Manfred Green, a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel will be explaining the latest coronavirus stories.

And in the run-up to the UN climate conference, we'll be joined by experts answering audience questions to help us understand how climate change is relevant to our lives. Today our guest expert is Dr Rachel Cleetus, policy director with the Climate and Energy program at the Union of Concerned Scientists.

(Photo: Some 35 current and former leaders are featured in the files from offshore companies, dubbed the Pandora Papers. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5st5xm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5st9nr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvxwxn0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdhny4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0njxrrx5h3)
2021/10/04 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5stfdw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdhsp8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2ymw)
Earthshot 1

While international meetings to discuss climate change and polices that affect the world can seem rather distant to us as individuals, on a local level there are many exciting and creative initiatives all over the world where people are developing practical solutions to the environmental problems they see. The Earthshot prize highlights many of these projects, ideas and initiatives which have the potential to make a difference locally and globally.

In this three part series Chhavi Sachdev looks at the practical work of the prize nominees, and profiles their solutions on a range of subjects; protecting nature, cleaning the air, ocean revival, climate change and waste.

Picture: Earth floating in space, Credit: Chris Clor/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5stk50)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm19jgm)
Pandora Papers prompt a string of denials

The Pandora Papers, the largest ever leak of global financial data, have prompted mix reactions over the allegations they contain about a number of prominent world figures. Newshour looks into the potential consequences for two of them, the family of Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta, and Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis.

Also on the program: one of the winners of the Nobel prize for medicine, Ardem Patapoutian, tells us about his revolutionary findings on pain; and American pharmaceutical companies are on trial in Ohio.

Photo: Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta. CREDIT: Tolga Akmen/Pool via REUTERS


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5stnx4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (p050gzz7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdj15j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p93)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5stsn8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyww24b7367)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sn4dsc4tw)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdj4xn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48zlnc2b6d)
Facebook, Whatsapp and Instagram suffer outage

Social media services Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram appear to be recovering after an outage that lasted almost six hours. All three services are owned by Facebook and could not be accessed over the web or on smartphone apps; we get details from the BBC's James Clayton. A former Facebook employee behind a series of bombshell leaks has revealed her identity. We hear from Frances Haugen, who was interviewed on Sunday by CBS. We also get an assessment of whether Facebook prioritises profits over safety from Dr Victoria Baines, visiting fellow in cybersecurity at Bournemouth University, who previously worked at the social media giant. Also in the programme, a data leak, named the Pandora Papers, has shone a light on the previously secret financial affairs of the world's rich and powerful. Simon Bowers from the website Finance Uncovered is part of the global investigation into the data, and tells us what has been revealed about the family finances of Kenya's president, Uhuru Kenyatta. Plus, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports on software company Flare which spotted a gap in the market in Kenya, where there is no centralised ambulance service number like 911 or 999.

(Picture: A Facebook logo on a smartphone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 05 OCTOBER 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sv14j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqkqxprdg7)
Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp hit by global outage

Social media services Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram appear to be recovering after an outage that lasted almost six hours. All three services are owned by Facebook and could not be accessed over the web or on smartphone apps; we get details from the BBC's James Clayton. Also in the programme, a data leak, named the Pandora Papers, has shone a light on the previously secret financial affairs of the world's rich and powerful; we get global reaction to the revelations. Plus, the head of Airbus has told the BBC that the aerospace business is now also experiencing significant problems with its supply chains, which will inevitably lead to higher prices. We get the details from the BBC's Michelle Fleury. And workers in Hollywood could go on strike, bringing movie production to a halt. Members of the International Association of Theatrical Stage Employees voted overwhelmingly to approve a strike over pay and conditions, as we hear from Gene Maddaus, a senior writer for Variety. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Peter Morici, Professor Emeritus of International Business at the University of Maryland and in Delhi, Jyoti Malhotra, National & Strategic Affairs Editor at The Print newspaper.


(Picture: A Facebook logo on a smartphone. Picture credit: Reuters.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sv4wn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvxxrvx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdjj51)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2pn5)
Smart women, male genius

Think of a genius. If that person is a man - be it Albert Einstein, Stephen Hawking or Isaac Newton, for instance - you are not alone. Five hundreds years ago a Spanish physiologist declared that genius was stored in the testicles. Even today, studies have shown that people associate men with genius more than women. Award-winning science writer and broadcaster Angela Saini wants to know why.

Saini examines why people are so reluctant to credit intellectual brilliance to women - now and throughout history. Einstein, for instance, needed a woman’s help. She hears about a proposal for making the concept of genius more inclusive and discusses the impact on girls in school when teachers take gender out of classrooms.

Guests include Sarah-Jane Leslie, professor of philosophy at Princeton University, in the United States; psychology professor Christia Spears Brown from Kentucky University; and Australian feminist and writer Clementine Ford.

Saini is also joined by people who have been labelled a genius - including scientist and writer Dr Camilla Pang, who was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder aged eight; writer, mathematician and concert pianist Dr Eugenia Cheng; teenager Monty Lord - who wrote a best seller when he was seven and holds five world records for memory; and eight-year-old Lillyan Lord Lancaster, who took a Mensa test when she was just five and achieved an IQ score of 158.

(Photo: Lillyan. Credit: Marya Lord Lancaster)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sv8ms)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5svdcx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvxy0c5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdjrn9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdl)
George Condo: Painting a new world

George Condo, whose work blends pop culture with art history and regularly sells for millions of dollars, is breaking out of his home, his canvases and the style of painting he is best known for. Now he is exploring a new phase and In the Studio has a front row seat.

Reporter, actor and filmmaker Tara Gadomski is spending time with the New York artist - who has worked with the likes of Kanye West and Andy Warhol - as he prepares for his biggest show since the world was changed by the Covid-19 pandemic.

We discover how George has also been transformed, both by his time in isolation and the tentative steps he has taken back into the crowded city. What is emerging? A cosmos of living, breathing organisms created in paint, ink and crayon.

Join George Condo in the studio for a whirlwind ride, as he climbs high ladders to paint the top edges of huge canvases and explains his technique and his thoughts.

Prepare to see the world in a new way.

Reporter and Producer: Tara Gadomski
Executive Producer: Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

George Condo: Ideals for the Unfound Truth, Hauser & Wirth London, 13 October – 23 December 2021


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5svj41)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f78l4s)
Coral reefs: 15% destroyed in last decade

Largest analysis of coral ever finds the world lost an equivalent of more than all the living coral in Australia in the last decade.

Facebook, Whatsapp and Instagram are back after an outage which lasted for about six hours.

And we'll hear from Haiti -- where there are concerns that thousands of returning migrants might add to the country's crisis.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5svmw5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f78pwx)
Coral reefs decline 14% worldwide over the last decade

Report author says reefs can recover, but 'window of opportunity' to save them is closing.

Mark Zuckerberg has apologised to users of Facebook, Instagram and Whatsapp after a massive outage shut down the services for seven hours.

And in France a commission has revealed that thousands of paedophiles have operated within the Catholic Church since 1950.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5svrm9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f78tn1)
"Window of opportunity closing" to save world's coral

Reefs declined by 14% worldwide over the last decade but scientists say they could come back.

Facebook boss Mark Zuckerberg has apologised for a technical failure that left users worldwide unable to access his his company's social media platforms.

And a team of French and British physicists has devised an ‘invisibility cloak’ - so why are they doing it and what can it be used for?


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5svwcf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plg)
Robots on the beat

Police forces in the US are turning to futuristic technology to tackle a rise in violent crime and murder across the country.

In one area of California, they are even using robots to patrol the streets. There, the police are claiming it's led to a reduction in crime and an increase in arrests. In New York they even experimented with a robot police dog, but with mixed results.

This and other cutting-edge technologies are helping the police – and the public - stay one step ahead, but they are often controversial.

In this programme we look at the some of the best ways that technology can make the streets safer.

Presented and produced by Ben Wyatt

Image: The Robocop K5


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdk7mt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgc)
Living in the metaverse

Are virtual online worlds the future of the internet? Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg thinks so. He is among the tech leaders who say we'll increasingly live, socialise, play and shop in the metaverse. Is he right, and what is the metaverse anyway? Ed Butler speaks to venture capitalist and metaverse big-thinker Matthew Ball, and to Manuel Bronstein from Roblox - the hugely successful gaming platform where gamers already live out virtual lives through their avatars. Janine Yorio tells us why her 'virtual real estate' company Republic Realm is buying up land and property in metaverse worlds, and why the metaverse will be the future of shopping.

(Photo: Roblox avatars, Credit: Roblox)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5y)
Britain's World War Two 'Brown Babies'

During World War Two, tens of thousands of African-American US servicemen passed through the UK as part of the war effort. The black GIs stationed in Britain were forced by the American military to abide by the racial segregation laws that applied in the deep south of the US. But that didn't stop relationships developing between British women and the black soldiers, some of whom went on to have children. Babs Gibson-Ward was one those children. She spoke to Farhana Haider about the stigma of growing up as mixed raced child in post-war Britain.

(Photo: Hoinicote House children, c.1948. Boys and girls whose parents of mixed ancestry met during WWII. Credit: Lesley York)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sw03k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2pn5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdkccy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2ymw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sw3vp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sw7lt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvxyvl2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdklw6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5swcby)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwx)
My teacher became my torturer

Mirsad Solakovic grew up in a Bosnian Muslim family during the 1980s, in a country where people from a range of different ethnic groups and religions lived side by side. This harmony was shattered for Mirsad at the age of 13, when his Serbian teacher turned up at school one day in military uniform and pointed a gun at him. As war descended on his town, he and his family were rounded up and Mirsad was singled out and tortured by that very same teacher. They were then sent to a concentration camp on the school grounds as part of a wave of ethnic cleansing. They escaped to England as refugees, but Mirsad was by now experiencing severe PTSD – Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. He found it hard to adjust, suffered bullying and wouldn't speak, until two of his new teachers asked if he would talk about his life in the school assembly. It would be a life-changing moment for Mirsad. He’s written a book about his experiences called The Boy Who Said Nothing.

Romy McCloskey is an American costume designer and butterfly enthusiast whose embroidery skills came in handy when one of her beloved butterflies suffered a broken wing. This story was first broadcast in January 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Mirsad Solakovic (left) with his family
Credit: Mirsad Solakovic


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5swh32)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvxz32b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdkvcg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2ymw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5swlv6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm1cl4t)
Report criticises clerical paedophilia in France

Victims of child sexual abuse at the hands of priests in France criticise the church following the publication of a damning independent report into paedophilia.

Also in the programme: Facebook's global outage; and a warning from Taiwan's president.

(Image: A statue of the Virgin Mary is seen inside the Saint-Sulpice church in Paris. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5swqlb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdl2vq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bmh3khw01)
Businesses hit by Facebook outage

Following an extended outage of Facebook services we hear about the impact on businesses. And we examine the wider implications of the problems faced by WhatsApp, Instagram and Facebook, with Dan Cooper, senior editor at Engadget. Also in the programme, for four days in a row, Chinese warplanes have flown close to Taiwan. The island's president Tsai Ing-wen has warned in an article for Foreign Affairs magazine that there would be "catastrophic" consequences for peace and democracy in Asia if it were to fall to China. We get the background to the dispute from the BBC's Taiwan correspondent, Cindy Sui. Sales of electric cars rose significantly in the UK in September, though still make up just 15% of the overall figure. We hear about the global market for such vehicles from Professor Jillian Anable at the Institute for Transport Studies at the University of Leeds. Plus, the BBC's Dougal Shaw reports on a new dating app that uses people's music tastes to try and make a match.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Benjie Guy and Russell Newlove.

(Picture: A phone with Facebook apps on the screen. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5swvbg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxqyhxbv8x)
Coronavirus pandemic: New York vaccine mandate

We’ll reflect some of the conversation in the state of New York about the vaccine mandate which means all health and care home workers must now be vaccinated against Covid, or lose their jobs. We speak to a doctor and a nurse.

We’re following a hearing at the US Senate where a former Facebook employee turned whistleblower is testifying about her experiences at the company. Frances Haugen has alleged that Facebook prioritised “growth over safety”, although Facebook has rejected her claims.

And we’ll continue our coverage of the Pandora Papers data leak, exposing the wealth hidden in tax havens by prominent people around the world. We’ll talk about the latest news lines involving Qatar and Ukraine.

(Photo: Protest Against Vaccine Mandates in New York City 4/10/21. Credit: EPA)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5swz2l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxqyhxbz11)
Whistleblower says Facebook harms children

We’re following a hearing at the US Senate where a former Facebook employee turned whistleblower is testifying about her experiences at the company. Frances Haugen has alleged that Facebook prioritised “growth over safety”, and its products harm children and stoke division although Facebook has rejected her claims.

Also we’ll reflect some of the conversation in the state of New York about the vaccine mandate which means all health and care home workers must now be vaccinated against Covid, or lose their jobs. We speak to a doctor and a nurse.

We’ll also answer your coronavirus questions with one of our regular experts, Dr Swapneil Parikh in Mumbai.

(Photo: Frances Haugen. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sx2tq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sx6kv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvxztk3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdlkv7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0njxrs02d6)
2021/10/05 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sxb9z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2pn5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdlplc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsn)
Census goes digital in India

This decade’s Indian national census will be the first to be carried out digitally. However, COVID-related delays have slowed progress and there are growing concerns about its accuracy. Dean of the Fletcher School at Tufts University, Bhaskar Chakravorti explains how data will be collected and why the census is likely to miss essential parts of the population.

Getting mums coding and encouraging girls into tech in Nigeria
June Angelides set up the UK’s first child-friendly coding school for mums, Mums in Tech, while on maternity leave. She’s now asking children to take part in the Institution of Engineering and Technology’s “Super Realoes” competition to design a superhero gadget that can make a positive impact in the world around them or a piece of assistive tech to help improve someone’s life.

Unfinished symphony finished by AI
Beethoven’s 10th unfinished symphony has now been completed by AI and will be performed for audiences in Bonn later this week. Dr. Ahmed Elgammal, Professor at Rutgers University and Director of the Art and AI Lab who developed Beethoven’s AI, tells us more about the process. Credit for music: Deutsche Telekom.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.

Studio Manager: Nigel Dix
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sxg23)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm1dfcq)
More than 200,000 children abused by French Catholic priests

A damning report on sexual abuse in the French Catholic Church says more than two hundred thousand children were preyed upon by the clergy. We'll hear from the chairman of the inquiry.

Also in the programme: a Facebook whistleblower testifies before the US Congress; and the Vietnamese-American activists trying to get Afghan refugees in to the US.

(Picture: a confessional on which is written: "M. the Priest" is pictured in the Catholic church in Reze near Nantes, France, October 5, 2021 / Credit: REUTERS/Stephane Mahe)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sxkt7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1plg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdly2m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sxpkc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyww24bb03b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sn4dsg1qz)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdm1tr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48zlnc573h)
Facebook whistleblower testifies before US Senate

Frances Haugen, who worked at Facebook, told a US Senate committee that she believed the company had put its profits first when executives knew what harm its platform could do to children and democracy. Facebook has pushed back against claims. We get details from Kari Paul, technology reporter, Guardian US. Also in the programme, the electric car giant Tesla has been ordered to pay nearly $137 million to a former Black worker who said he suffered racial abuse at the electric carmaker’s factory. Plus, the BBC's Dougal Shaw reports on a new dating app that uses people's music tastes to try and make a match.

(Picture: Frances Haugen, former Facebook employee. Picture credit: Getty.)



WEDNESDAY 06 OCTOBER 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sxy1m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqkqxpv9cb)
Facebook hits back at whistleblower's claims

Frances Haugen, who worked at Facebook, told a US Senate committee that she believed the company had put its profits first when executives knew what harm its platform could do to children and democracy. Facebook has pushed back against claims. We get details from Kari Paul, technology reporter, Guardian US. Also in the programme, the electric car giant Tesla has been ordered to pay nearly $137 million to a former Black worker who said he suffered racial abuse at the electric carmaker’s factory. Plus, Snapchat is rolling out a new “Run for Office” in-app tool to encourage young people to run for local office. And the BBC's Dougal Shaw reports on a new dating app that uses people's music tastes to try and make a match. We're joined throughout the programme by Simon Littlewood of ACG Global in Singapore and Ann Dwyer, Editor of Crain's Chicago Business.

(Picture: Frances Haugen, former Facebook employee. Picture credit: Getty.)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sy1sr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy0ns0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdmf24)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2vq8)
Sugar-coated World

Thailand: Asia’s sugar bowl

Lainy Malkani looks into the story of sugar in Thailand, now the second biggest exporter of sugar in the world. We hear how farmers there are coping with climate change, what sustainable production might look like and what sugar cane can be used for once the sweet juice has been removed, from fuel to water bottles. Lainy looks at the future of sugar, talking to those experimenting with sugar to try to make it healthier, like the company Douxmatok, who are hacking sugar crystals at a structural level in an effort to help us eat less of it without compromising on taste.

Presenter: Lainy Malkani
Producer: Megan Jones


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sy5jw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sy990)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy0x88)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdmnkd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnd)
6. The journalist

Holding the Taliban to account - Afghanistan’s top TV journalist was offered an interview with Taliban leaders within hours of them taking Kabul. But the editor of Afghanistan’s most popular private TV network, TOLO News, was already out of the country. Aged 33, Lotfullah Najfizada now hopes to return to carry on his work as the most successful interviewer and journalist of his generation.


A vibrant media is one of the great successes of the 20 years since the Taliban were last in power. But Lotfullah Najafizada tells Lyse Doucet the challenge now will be to maintain media freedoms and independence under Afghanistan’s new government.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5syf14)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f7ch1w)
Facebook under fire in US hearing

Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen tells US lawmakers the social media giant knew about the harm that its platform could do to children and democracy, but that it chose to prioritise growth instead. We'll hear how Facebook responds.

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam has been delivering a speech pointing to further integration with mainland China.

And where's the $100 bn a year in climate money promised by the rich countries in the Paris Agreement they agreed to stump up… small farmers in the global south are asking why they've not seen the aid.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5syjs8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f7clt0)
‘Facebook harms children and weakens democracy’ - whistleblower

Facebook's boss Mark Zuckerberg insists his tech giant doesn't put profits before safety in response to testimony by a whistleblower before Congress.

We'll hear about a new gas pipeline from Russia to Germany which is at the testing phase but is already extremely controversial.

And Chad's interim parliament has finally been set up, but are the military rulers any nearer to handing power over to civilians?


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5synjd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f7cqk4)
Australia agrees to close Manus detention centre

The Australian government says it will close a controversial migrant detention centre in Papua New Guinea - conditions at the Manus island facility has been criticised by the United Nations.

Czechs are getting ready to choose their next leader this week-end - and with a current Prime Minister, whose name came up in the Pandora Papers this week standing again, there are concerns for the direction of the country.

Half a century after they were first unearthed from a quarry in Wales, scientists have finally identified four small fossils as coming from the same, new species of dinosaur.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sys8j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbv)
Ben Ferencz, prosecutor at the Nuremberg Nazi Trials

Seventy-five years after the Nuremberg Military Tribunals convicted some of the most senior Nazis of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the last surviving prosecutor from the trials, Ben Ferencz talks to Zeinab Badawi. Does he believe the Nuremberg trials have made genocide and crimes against humanity less likely to be committed in the world today? This programme was first broadcast in 2017.

(Photo: Ben Ferencz Hardtalk interview in 2017))


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdn4jx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jp4)
Big tech and carbon

Google pledges to be carbon free by 2030. Ahead of next month's UN Climate Summit, the company has come out with new targets to become greener than ever. But what does that mean? Is Google supporting the energy transition away from fossil fuels or just fuelling ever greater consumption? Ed Butler speaks to the company's Chief Sustainability Officer Kate Brandt, about how this is just the latest step in her company's aim to be a world leader in sustainability. Ian Bitterlin, a Consulting Engineer & Visiting Professor at the University of Leeds in the UK tries to quantify the amount of carbon pollution that could reasonably be attributed to data centers worldwide. And Sonya Bhonsle, the Global Head of Value Chains at CDP, the world's leading climate NGO that helps companies and cities disclose their environmental impact, tells Ed that Google scores very highly in their ratings and that the company is sending out good messages to others in the industry.

(Photo: Google's logo adorns their office in New York, Credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x86)
A Somali sailor in 1920s Britain

In the early 20th century, many Somali seafarers made their way to Britain on merchant ships, establishing communities in cities such as Cardiff. One of them, Ibrahim Ismaa'il, made his way to the UK from the port of Aden. He then struck up an unlikely friendship with an eminent anthropologist who lived in an alternative community in the Cotswolds. The anthropologist later recorded Ismaa'il's remarkable life-story. Chloe Hadjimatheou reports.

PHOTO: A British liner in the port of Aden in the 1920s (Getty Images).


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5syx0n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2vq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdn891)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sz0rs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sz4hx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy1rh5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdnhs9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5sz881)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz5)
Protests, prison and the day I met Assad

When anti-government protests started in Syria in 2011, amateur filmmaker Hassan Akkad decided to document the violence. It was dangerous work, and the regime was violently clamping down on the uprising. After 6 months of protesting, Hassan's luck ran out, and he was arrested and detained. He claims he was tortured in prison. Then, after his release, he received an extraordinary offer. Hassan was invited to meet Syria's autocratic President Bashar al Assad.

Hassan spoke to Outlook's Sahar Zand.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Composite with Hassan Akkad and an anti-Assad protest sign
Credit: (left to right) Manuel Vazquez, Jay Shaw Baker/NurPhoto via Getty Images, Ozan Kose/AFP via Getty Images


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x86)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5szd05)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy1zzf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdnr8k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5szhr9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm1gh1x)
UK Prime Minister outlines UK change in direction

Boris Johnson outlined a plan for the UK that faces the challenges brought on by the pandemic and Brexit. We'll hear feedback and analysis from the conference.

Also in the programme: We hear from one of the winners of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry; and Norwegian archeologists discover the second of two 1,300-year-old pre-Viking skis.

(Picture: Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson gestures as he delivers a speech during the annual Conservative Party Conference, in Manchester, Britain, October 6, 2021. REUTERS/Phil Noble)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5szmhf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdnzrt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cvn6gmqk2)
Johnson seeks higher UK wages

Addressing his party conference, UK leader Boris Johnson called for higher worker wages. The speech came against a backdrop of widespread fuel shortages in recent weeks, and concerns about a lack of workers to pick crops and slaughter animals. We assess the prospects for Mr Johnson's vision with the independent economist Julian Jessop, and Kate Bell of the Trades Union Congress. Also in the programme, Google's chief sustainability officer Kate Brandt explains how the search engine hopes to become carbon free by 2030. Plus, amid concerns about students submitting work they didn’t write, England is to make it illegal to offer essay-writing services to students for a fee. Gareth Crossman is the head of policy for the Quality Assurance Agency, which is responsible for safeguarding standards in UK higher education, and tells us how widespread the use of so-called essay mills actually is.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Benjie Guy and Elizabeth Hotson.

(Picture: Boris Johnson gives his conference speech. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5szr7k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxqyhxfr60)
China-Taiwan military tensions at their 'worst in 40 years'

Taiwan's defence minister has said that tensions with China are at their worst in 40 years, warning of the risk of an accidental strike between the two. His comments came after China sent a record number of military jets into Taiwan's air defence zone for four consecutive days. Taiwan considers itself a sovereign state, but China views it as a breakaway province. We'll speak to people in Taiwan to hear how they feel about the rising tensions and whether it affects their daily life.

Also, a new study has shown that climate change academics from some of the regions worst hit by global warming are struggling to be published. The research looked at 100 of the most highly cited climate research papers over the past five years and found that less than 1% of the authors were based in Africa, while only 12 of the papers had a female lead researcher. We'll speak to our environment correspondent to find out more.

And every day we're joined by a health expert to answer your questions about Covid-19. Today our guest is Dr Maria Sundaram - infectious disease epidemiologist at the Marshfield Clinic Research Institute in Wisconsin.

(Photo: People drive past Taiwan flags installation ahead of National Day celebrations in Taipei, Taiwan, 06 October 2021. Credit: EPA/RITCHIE B. TONGO)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5szvzp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxqyhxfvy4)
Afghanistan: Taliban systematically forcing Hazara minority from their homes

A BBC investigation has revealed that the Afghan Taliban are systematically driving hundreds of people from the Hazara minority community from their homes. More than 1,200 families have been evicted from villages in Daikundi province in central Afghanistan since the start of last month. The Taliban claim they were living there illegally but local people say the families had the right documentation. We'll speak to our correspondent to find out more.

Also, Taiwan's defence minister has said that tensions with China are at their worst in 40 years, warning of the risk of an accidental strike between the two. His comments came after China sent a record number of military jets into Taiwan's air defence zone for four consecutive days. Taiwan considers itself a sovereign state, but China views it as a breakaway province. We'll speak to people in Taiwan to hear how they feel about the rising tensions and whether it affects their daily life.

And every day we're joined by a health expert to answer your questions about Covid-19. Today our guest is Dr Pedro Hallal - Fulbright Chair in Public Health at the University of California in San Diego.

(Photo: A Taliban patrol is seen in Kabul, Afghanistan, October 4, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Jorge Silva)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5szzqt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x86)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t03gy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy2qg6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdpgrb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0njxrs2z99)
2021/10/06 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t0772)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2vq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdplhg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvw)
New antiviral Covid pill

Trials stopped early of a new Covid antiviral pill, Molnupiravir, as it may cut numbers of people in hospital by about a half. Claudia Hammond discusses the ethical questions of who should be given it. Plus Unicef report on findings about childhood mental health before and during the pandemic. And a new exhibition on the researchers and trial participants outwitting cancer.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Photo: An experimental Covid-19 treatment pill called Molnupiravir. Photo credit: Merck/Reuters)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t0bz6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm1hb8t)
Malaria vaccine approved

In what the World Health Organisation calls a historic moment in the fight against malaria, officials are authorising the broad use of the first vaccine proven to be adequately effective against the disease, which claims hundreds of thousands of lives in Africa each year.

Also on the programme: a court in London says Sheikh Mohammed of Dubai ordered the phones of his ex-wife and her lawyers to be hacked; and we hear about some of the effects of climate change on India and Mali.

(Photo: Mosquito feeding on a human; Credit: Science Photo Library )


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t0gqb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdptzq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t0lgg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyww24bdx0f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sn4dsjyn2)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdpyqv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48zlnc840l)
Johnson seeks higher UK wages

Addressing his party conference, UK leader Boris Johnson called for higher worker wages. The speech came against a backdrop of widespread fuel shortages in recent weeks, and concerns about a lack of workers to pick crops and slaughter animals. We assess the prospects for Mr Johnson's vision with the independent economist Julian Jessop, and Kate Bell of the Trades Union Congress. Also in the programme, Google's chief sustainability officer Kate Brandt explains how the search engine hopes to become carbon free by 2030. Plus, amid concerns about students submitting work they didn’t write, England is to make it illegal to offer essay-writing services to students for a fee. Gareth Crossman is the head of policy for the Quality Assurance Agency, which is responsible for safeguarding standards in UK higher education, and tells us how widespread the use of so-called essay mills actually is.

(Picture: Boris Johnson gives his conference speech. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 07 OCTOBER 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t0tyq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqkqxpy68f)
Twitch hacked

Streaming platform Twitch has had its source code and payout details leaked online after a security breach - we talk to Mikael Thalen of the Daily Dot and to an agent representing one of the streamers whose details were included in the leak. Chip-maker Intel has opened a new factory in Arizone and the BBC's Samira Hussain was given a guided tour. In the UK, Amazon's first non-food, bricks-and-mortar store has opened - Neil Saunders of GlobalData Retail tells us more. The WHO approves a new malaria vaccine to be rolled out across most of Africa, and in attempt to crack down on plagiarism in universities, England is to make it illegal to offer essay-writing services to students for a fee. Throughout the programme we're joined by Ralph Silva of the Silva Research Network in Toronto, and Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus at Hitotsubashi University in Tokyo.

(Picture: A Twitch log in screen Credit: Reuters)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t0ypv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy3kp3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdq9z7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxy)
Pandora Papers: On the trail of dirty money

Amongst the millions of documents released in the ‘Pandora Papers’ leak of offshore financial information are a number of documents that one British Iranian family business would rather have remained hidden. In this investigation Assignment follows the trail of millions of dollars tainted by bribery and corruption. Piecing together key documents from the leak reveals how earnings from Unaoil – a company involved in winning oil and gas contracts through bribery in the Middle East - were invested into UK property.

Why does the UK remain a go-to destination for some of the world’s most tainted money? And why does it take a leak for the truth to be revealed about who’s really invested in some of the country’s prime property?


Reporter: Felicity Hannah
Producer: Anna Meisel and Kate West
Editor: Gail Champion

(Image: Pandora Papers illustration. Credit: BBC)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t12fz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x86)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t1663)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy3t5c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdqkgh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg8)
The drinking experiment

Alcohol is part of the fabric of life in many cultures. It’s associated with socialising, dating, networking, even commiserating . But what happens if you take it away? Tamasin Ford brings together three people who decided to give up alcohol in a drinking culture. We ask them why and how they did it. What effect did it have on their lives professionally, socially, physically and emotionally? And would they ever want to drink again?

If you Would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

If you have found any of the issues raised in this programme upsetting and are looking for further information or support - please visit
BBC Action Line by clicking on the link below.

Contributors:
Annie Grace - Author and founder This Naked Mind Colorado, USA
Andy Ramage - Performance coach, Essex, UK
Kate Gunn - Author 'The Accidental Soberista' Whitlow, Ireland

(Picture: Hand on empty bottle. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t19y7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f7gcyz)
New malaria vaccine 'a historic development'

News of a vaccine against malaria is celebrated around the world - and particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, the worst-affected area. We'll hear what sort of difference it will make - and whether it will be affordable enough to roll out widely

A judge in the US has halted Texas's controversial near-total ban on abortion - so what happens next?

And our correspondent looks into allegations of abuses carried out by the Taliban against members of the Hazara ethnic group in Afghanistan.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t1fpc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f7ghq3)
Malaria vaccine - new hope for better child health in Africa

A federal judge in the United States has temporarily blocked the near total ban on abortion in Texas which came into effect on September 1st and even prohibits abortions for rape and incest victims.

The first widely tested vaccine for malaria has been unveiled and given the green light to be rolled out by the World Health organisation which can save hundreds of thousands of lives particularly in sub-Saharan Africa.

Plus following the West's military withdrawal from Afghanistan and to mark 20 years since the start of Operation Enduring Freedom we hear from the family of a British soldier killed in Helmand province.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t1kfh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f7gmg7)
US abortion: state of Texas ban blocked

A controversial near total ban on abortions -- that came into place in Texas last month -- has been temporarily blocked by a federal judge. For those advocating against the ban it's a moment of triumph but for how long?

A new Malaria vaccine gets the go ahead - it's an historic moment that will lead to the protection of children around the world, particularly in the worst-hit continent of Africa.

We'll look at how artificially induced lightening can wipe out pollutants from animal manure and reduce the production of methane gas that's so damaging for our planet.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t1p5m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2l)
Is China’s economy in trouble?

For decades China's economic growth has been the envy of the western world. But current signs suggest all is not well.
Regulations brought in by government to curb businesses reliance on debt have badly hit the its second largest real estate developer, Evergrande and manufacturing output has been hit by power shortages.
So is China’s economy in trouble?

Experts:
Sara Hsu, visiting scholar at Fudan University in Shanghai
Michael Pettis, Finance Professor at Peking University and a Fellow at the Carnegie Endowment
Iris Pang, ING's Chief Economist for Greater China
Travis Lundy, independent research analyst in Hong Kong

Presenter: Charmaine Cozier
Researcher: Chris Blake
Production Co-ordinator: Jacqui Johnson
Sound Engineer: Neil Churchill
Producer: Ben Carter
Editor: Richard Vadon

(Image: People commute in front of the under-construction Guangzhou Evergrande football stadium in Guangzhou, China's southern Guangdong province on September 17, 2021. (Photo by NOEL CELIS/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdr1g0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9v)
Life at Kenya's Dandora rubbish dump

We go to Dandora, one of Africa’s largest rubbish tips. A court in Nairobi has ordered the dumpsite to come up with a concrete plan to close by February next year. But what will that mean for the community relying on the waste to survive? We hear about life at Dandora through the eyes of Liz Oteng’o, who grew up relying on airline meals dumped at the site. Vivienne Nunis hears how she and her husband Remco Pronk, are fighting to change the lives of those growing up there today. Image credit:Getty

Producers: Sarah Treanor, Lulu Luo


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3p)
The unlawful death of Christopher Alder

In 1998, Christopher Alder, a black former soldier, choked to death in handcuffs on the floor of a British police station. CCTV footage showed the 37-year-old father-of-two gasping for air as officers chatted and joked around him. It took 11 minutes for him to stop breathing. An inquest found Christopher Alder was unlawfully killed but no-one has ever been held accountable for his death. Farhana Haider spoke to Janet Alder about her long fight to get justice for her brother.

Photo:Christopher Alder (Alder family handout)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t1sxr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdr564)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t1xnw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rls)
The story of Evita

Eva Peron rose from a childhood of poverty to become one of the most powerful figures in Latin America. An illegitimate small town girl, she smashed class and gender barriers to become Argentina’s controversial First Lady. Loved and loathed, Rajan Datar discusses her life, work and remarkable afterlife with biographer Jill Hedges, historian Ranaan Rein, and cultural theorist Claudia Soria.

[Photo: Eva Peron in 1951. Credit: Keystone/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8t)
Japan's Keirin cycling phenomenon

In the year 2000, the Japanese track cycling sport of Keirin made its Olympic debut at the Sydney Games. Wildly popular in Japan, Keirin races begin with the cyclists following a motorized pacer, who gradually cranks up the speed until the riders are released into a final frenetic sprint. Ashley Byrne talks to former Japanese cyclist, Shinichi Ota, about trying to win the first gold medal in the sport his country invented. The programme is a Made-In-Manchester Production.

PHOTO: A Keirin race at the 2016 Olympics (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t21f0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy4nd8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdrdpd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t2554)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3p)
'The camera was my shield' - a refugee films his journey

Hassan Akkad was an amateur film-maker forced to flee Syria, having been detained twice by regime forces. His destination was the UK, and on the way he used his camera to document the toughest chapters.In the Calais migrant camp, he met two documentary-makers who would use his footage in a high-profile film, kick-starting Hassan's career in documentary film-making.

Hassan spoke to Sahar Zand.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Hassan Akkad. Credit: Hassan Akkad)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t28x8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy4wwj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdrn5n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t2dnd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm1kcz0)
Tanzanian novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah wins 2021 Nobel Prize for Literature

The Tanzanian writer, Abdulrazak Gurnah, has won this year's Nobel Prize for literature. He is best known for his novels 'Paradise' and 'By the Sea'. We spoke to him minutes after he had heard the news from the Swedish Academy. He is the first black African writer to win the prize since 1986; we will look at the significance of this accolade.

Gas markets continue to rise, but there is a shift after Russia offers to stabilise energy prices.

And the veteran anti-apartheid activist, archbishop Desmond Tutu celebrates his 90th birthday.

(Photo: Abdulrazak Gurnah. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t2jdj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdrwnx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49db0nnq59)
Europe gas prices fall after Russia intervention

An intervention by Russia led to falls in the price of European gas, after steep hikes. Chris Weafer is chief executive of the Moscow-based consultancy Macro Advisory, and tells us what Russia is seeking in return. And we look at the wider global energy situation with Ellen Fraser of Baringa Partners. Also in the programme, an announcement that Premier League football club Newcastle United is to be taken over by Saudi Arabia is thought to be imminent. We hear what has unblocked the process from Kieran Maguire, lecturer in football finance at Liverpool University. Amid widespread computer chip shortages, the BBC's Samira Hussain gets a tour of Intel's newest chipmaking facility in Arizona from the firm's chief executive, Pat Gelsinger. Plus, coronavirus vaccines have reached every continent now that a shipment has arrived in Antarctica. John Eager is head of Polar operations for the British Antarctic Survey, and discusses the logistical challenges involved in transporting the AstraZeneca vaccines there.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Elizabeth Hotson.

(Picture: NordStream 2 gas pipeline's German landfall area. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t2n4n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxqyhxjn33)
India farmers' protests

In India, the son of a governing party minister has been summoned by police, days after eight people died at a farmers' protest. Some farmers accuse Ashish Mishra, whose father is junior home minister, Ajay Mishra, of driving a vehicle that ran over four farmers. The Mishras deny the charge. We get the latest from BBC Hindi.

Also, after the announcement of a historic malaria vaccine, we hear reaction from Africa and get our health expert to explain the plan to get children across the continent vaccinated.

And we go to New Zealand, which since the start of the coronavirus pandemic has been using the “zero cases” approach to fight the spread of the disease. But the government now appears to be moving away from the policy. Some experts say the decision will lead to a spike in cases that will overwhelm the healthcare system. We get the thoughts of three experts in the country.

(Photo: Indian farmer shouts slogans during a protest against the central government's agriculture laws, in Bangalore, India, 05 October 2021. Credit: EPA/JAGADEESH NV)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t2rws)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxqyhxjrv7)
Coronavirus in New Zealand

We go to New Zealand, which since the start of the coronavirus pandemic has been using the “zero cases” approach to fight the spread of the disease. But the government now appears to be moving away from the policy. Some experts say the decision will lead to a spike in cases that will overwhelm the healthcare system. We get the thoughts of three experts in the country.

Also, we hear about the ongoing protests by indigenous Peruvians who have taken over the facilities of a pipeline station of a state-owned company, demanding better economic and social support.

And after the announcement of a historic malaria vaccine, we hear reaction from Africa and get our health expert to explain the plan to get children across the continent vaccinated.

(Photo: A medical worker administers a COVID-19 test at a testing clinic during a lockdown to curb the spread of a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Auckland, New Zealand. Credit: REUTERS/Fiona Goodall)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t2wmx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t30d1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy5mc9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdscnf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0njxrs5w6d)
2021/10/07 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t3445)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdshdk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l49)
Youngest rock samples from the moon

In December 2020, China's Chang'e-5 mission returned to earth carrying rock samples collected from the moon – the first lunar samples to be collected since the American Apollo and Luna missions to the moon in the 1970s. Laboratory analysis has revealed that these are the youngest samples of rocks to be collected from the moon. Lunar geologist Katherine Joy explains what this tells us about the moon’s volcanic past.

Also on the programme, a recent study reveals that the hepatitis B virus has been infecting humans for at least 10,000 years. Denise Kühnert from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History shares what the evolution of the virus tells us about human evolution, as well as the rise and fall of civilisations.

In the wake of Cyclone Shaheen, we also speak to Princeton University’s Ning Lin about how climate modelling can help us predict tropical storms in the Arabian Sea, and Fredi Otto joins us to discuss the 2021 Nobel Prizes for Science.



(Image: Getty Images)



Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Samara Linton


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t37w9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm1l75x)
China-US diplomatic dance

The US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan has been speaking to the BBC in an exclusive interview about his meeting with the senior Chinese diplomat Yang Jiechi. The meeting lays the ground work for a planned virtual meeting between President Joe Biden and the Chinese leader Xi Jinping.

Also in the programme: Seventy-six years after the end of World War Two, a former guard in a Nazi concentration camp has gone on trial in a courthouse near Berlin; and an interview with the Tanzanian writer, Abdul Razak Gurnah, who today won the Nobel Prize for Literature.

(Photo: U.S. National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan; Credit: Virginia Mayo/Pool via REUTERS)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t3cmf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdsqwt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t3hck)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyww24bhsxj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sn4dsmvk5)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdsvmy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48zlncc0xp)
Europe gas prices fall after Russia intervention

An intervention by Russia led to falls in the price of European gas, after steep hikes. Chris Weafer is chief executive of the Moscow-based consultancy Macro Advisory, and tells us what Russia is seeking in return. And we look at the wider global energy situation with Ellen Fraser of Baringa Partners. Also in the programme, an announcement that Premier League football club Newcastle United is to be taken over by Saudi Arabia is thought to be imminent. We hear what has unblocked the process from Kieran Maguire, lecturer in football finance at Liverpool University. Amid widespread computer chip shortages, the BBC's Samira Hussain gets a tour of Intel's newest chipmaking facility in Arizona from the firm's chief executive, Pat Gelsinger. Plus, coronavirus vaccines have reached every continent now that a shipment has arrived in Antarctica. John Eager is head of Polar operations for the British Antarctic Survey, and discusses the logistical challenges involved in transporting the AstraZeneca vaccines there.

Today's edition is presented by Rob Young, and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Elizabeth Hotson.

(Picture: NordStream 2 gas pipeline's German landfall area. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 08 OCTOBER 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t3qvt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqkqxq135j)
US Senate to raise debt ceiling again

Leaders in Congress's upper chamber agree to extend the borrowing limit through December - we hear the ins and outs from the Financial Times' Lauren Fedor in Washington, DC. In China, abundant steel manufacturing casts doubt on the country's green commitments, as Robin Brant tells us from Wuzhou. The boss of Kraft Heinz warns of increased food prices due to inflation and Miguel Delaney of the Independent tells us about the purchase of Newcastle United by a consortium backed by Saudi Arabia. Vivienne Nunis visits one of Africa's largest rubbish sites in Kenya, and the story of getting the Covid vaccine to Antarctica. Throughout the programme we're joined from New York by Allison Schrager, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a contributing editor at City Journal and Enda Curran, Chief Asia Economics Correspondent for Bloomberg News in Hong Kong.

(Picture: The US Capitol building. Credit:Reuters)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t3vly)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy6gl6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdt6wb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tzn)
Abuse allegations in the NWSL

Heather O'Reilly reacts to the abuse allegations which have rocked women's football. Heather O'Reilly played under coach Paul Riley at the North Carolina Courage. He faces allegations of sexual harassment and emotional abuse, allegations which he denies.

(Photo: Signage supporting NWSL players on display during a game between the Los Angeles Galaxy and the Los Angeles FC. Credit: Katharine Lotze/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t3zc2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t4336)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy6q2g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdtgcl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2vq9)
Getting married the Nigerian way

Hannah Ajala, a British-Yoruba broadcaster will walk us through the sounds, beats and meanings of a Yoruba engagement ceremony. Speaking to those at the heart of the traditional marriage and exploring its importance on what could be considered the most important day of their lives.

Producer: Tobi Olujinmi

(Photo: Yoruba marriage ceremony. Credit: David Olujinmi)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t46vb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f7k8w2)
Nigeria: 180 people freed from bandits

Police in the state of Zamfara say they have rescued the villagers who were abducted from their homes by criminal gangs.

We hear what life is like working under the Taliban in a radio station run by women.

And one of President Biden's closest aides has told the BBC that America is concerned Russia will take advantage of the current shortage of energy supplies.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t4blg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f7kdm6)
Nigeria security clampdown: is villagers' release first success?

Police in Zamfara state say they have rescued 187 abducted villagers in the midst of a telecommunications black out.

We go to India for the latest on a case that has gripped the country: the son of a government minister has been called to give evidence to police accused of being in a car which ploughed into a protest, killing four farmers.

And as China tries to work out how to hit its pledges on reducing carbon emissions - we ask if the world's most polluting nation can make the drastic changes needed.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t4gbl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2w3f7kjcb)
Nigeria: 187 villagers released 'unconditionally'

The emaciated group, including babies, spent 7 weeks in captivity, scavenging for food.

Google maps offers a new option to drivers: the lowest carbon emitting route for their chosen journey. So how does it work?

And in sport we look at the multi-million dollar Saudi takeover of Newcastle United Football Club - described as a "special day" by fans.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t4l2q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1t)
Richard Thaler: Is a nudge enough to change our behaviour?

From Covid to climate change, governments around the world face challenges which demand modifications of human behaviour. When it comes to getting people to do things differently, what works best: the carrot of persuasion, or the stick of coercion? Stephen Sackur speaks to Richard Thaler, the world renowned economist and behavioural scientist who believes a nudge often works better than a shove when change is needed. Does that hold good when the problems we face become urgent and existential?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdtyc3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0t)
Working in your 80s: The Artist

Geraldine Robarts is a painter based in Kenya who has been exhibiting since 1958 and who still paints everyday, aged 82. Whether it’s a passion for what they do, the social connection, or the simple need to earn a living, a growing number of octogenarians remain in work. Over the coming weeks, Business Daily will hear from several workers putting in a shift, well into their ninth decade. As retirement ages around the world creep higher, we're asking what can these older professionals teach us about the nature of work? And when is the right age to down tools? Presenter: Vivienne Nunis Image: Geraldine Robarts. Credit: BBC


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz5)
Clyde Best - A black footballing pioneer

Bermuda-born Clyde Best came to England as a teenager in 1968 and went on to play for West Ham United alongside the likes of Bobby Moore and Geoff Hurst. Best made a name for himself as a talented goal-scorer in more than 200 appearances for the Hammers, but he faced constant racist abuse from fans, and on occasion, from opposition players. Clyde Best told Mike Lanchin about how he stood up to the racists in English soccer.

(Photo: Clyde Best on the ball, 4 March 1972. Credit: Mirror Group Newspapers/Mirrorpix/Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t4ptv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhk)
Facebook’s punishing week

The social giant suffers one of its worst ever weeks after a tech blunder takes its platforms offline for hours, and a whistleblower gives highly critical testimony to Congress about its attitude to online harm. Plus, the CEO of cryptocurrency exchange Binance tells us why he’s convinced digital currencies are the future of finance. And why is China clamping down on cryptocurrencies? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdv237)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t4tkz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1ht1)
Empty shelves and clogged ports

The world has emerged from pandemic lockdowns more optimistic about the direction of Covid, but the sudden surge in demand for goods is creating new economic shocks from London to Los Angeles. Factories and ports are not functioning as they once did due to the pent-up demand for goods and broken supply chains. Energy prices are surging and some shelves are empty. So is this a temporary blip or a new normal? Who will be the winners and losers of the post-pandemic global economy and what opportunities do new economic landscapes provide for fighting the climate crisis?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.
Producers: Paul Schuster and Junaid Ahmed


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t4yb3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy7k9c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdv9lh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t5227)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fk)
Ecuador’s prison battle: The aftermath

The president of Ecuador has declared a state of emergency for the prison system after the country’s worst prison riot, in which 118 inmates died. It’s part of a wave of violence that has swept Ecuador's jails, as rival drug gangs fight for dominance. BBC Mundo’s Ana Maria Roura has been looking into the story.

Squid Game: kids' games and killings
‘Squid Game’ has been topping streaming charts around the world. The South Korean drama sees contestants playing popular children's games to win millions of dollars, but the cost of losing is death. BBC Korean's William Lee explains the appeal of its mix of nostalgia and horror.

Morocco’s cannabis farmers
Despite the huge profits for international dealers, Morocco’s cannabis farmers are poor. Recently the government legalised the growth and sale of cannabis for medical and industrial purposes, so will farmers benefit? BBC Arabic’s Mohamed Ibrahim visited northern Morocco to find out.

Russia's Romanov wedding
A descendant of the Russian royal family was recently married in a lavish ceremony in St Petersburg. Grand Duke George Mikhailovich Romanov is a great-grandnephew of the last tsar, Nicholas II. Olga Ivshina of BBC Russian tells us about reactions among ordinary Russians.

Afghan fruit in Pakistani markets
Pakistan imports plenty of fruit from Afghanistan, but this year there’s been more, and it’s cheaper. Since the Taliban took over, trade between the two countries has become one-sided, with Afghan farmers keen to get their produce out, as BBC Urdu’s Azizullah Khan reports.

Image: Relatives wait with caskets for inmates who died in the Litoral Penitentiary
Credit: Gerardo Menoscal/Agencia Press South/Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t55tc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy7ssm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdvk2r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t59kh)
Journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov win Nobel Peace Prize

This year's Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to two campaigning journalists - Maria Ressa from the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov from Russia. The Norwegian Nobel Committee praised their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which it said was a precondition for democracy and lasting peace. We have an interview with Maria Ressa.

A suicide bomb attack has taken place on a mosque in northern Afghanistan, with dozens of people feared dead or injured.

Also, a report from Saint Petersburg on how Russia is using its natural resources to exert power.

(Photo: Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov jointly won the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm1n8w3)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t5f9m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdvsl0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46xztvppsj)
Global corporate tax deal draws closer

An agreed global minimum 15% corporate tax rate draws closer as Ireland signs up. Dr Brian Keenan is director of public policy at Chartered Accountants Ireland and discusses the background to the latest developments. Also in the programme, the BBC's Thomas Naadi reports on the problem of discarded 'fast fashion' clothing items from western countries ending up in landfill in Africa. Electric car maker Tesla's boss Elon Musk has announced that the firm will move its headquarters from California to Texas. Plus, with a growing number of people choosing to work long past their 60s, we meet Kenya-based artist Geraldine Robarts, who is still picking up her paintbrush at the age of 82.

Today's edition is presented by Lucy Burton, and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Benjie Guy.

(Picture: Ireland's finance minister Paschal Donohoe. Picture credit: Press Association.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t5k1r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxqyhxmk06)
Nobel Peace Prize: Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov share award

Journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov have won the Nobel Peace Prize for their fights to defend freedom of expression in the Philippines and Russia. We'll talk about the two winners and hear from people who have worked with them.

Facebook says it will take action to remove ads for illegal land sales in the Amazon rainforest from its popular Marketplace platform. We speak to one of the journalists who worked on the investigation into the sales.

We'll discuss today's coronavirus stories with our regular expert Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University.

We've also brought together three parents whose children are immunocompromised and have not been able to return to classrooms because their schools have not imposed mask mandates.

(Photo: Rappler CEO Maria Ressa in Hong Kong, China, 16 May 2019 (L) and "Novaya Gazeta" editor-in-chief Dmitry Muratov in Moscow, Russia, 14 June 2012 (R), issued 08 October 2021 Credit: JEROME FAVRE/SERGEI CHIRIKOV/EPA)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t5nsw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxqyhxmnrb)
Coronavirus: Immunocompromised in classrooms

We hear from three parents whose children have a compromised immune system and remain at high risk if they develop Covid-19. They share concerns over their children's return to school.

We'll talk about the work by Maria Ressa from the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov from Russia - the two campaigning journalists who have been awarded this year's Nobel Peace Prize.

We'll talk about an overhaul of the international tax system and its impact on big technology firms.

We'll also hear from north-west Nigeria where police have rescued nearly 200 villagers who were kidnapped from their homes by criminal gangs.

(Photo: A stuffed toy wearing a face mask in an improvised classroom prepared for a primary school class in a recreation hall on February 20, 2021 in Wessling, Germany. Credit: Alexandra Beier/Getty Images)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t5sk0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t5x94)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxphvy8j8d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdw8kj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0njxrs8s3h)
2021/10/08 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t6118)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdwd9n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr1)
Does the planet need snails?

Snails are a major enemy of gardeners around the world, invading vegetable patches and gobbling prize plants. CrowdScience listener Alexandre reckons he’s removed thousands of them from his garden, which got him wondering: apart from eating his garden to the core, what’s their wider role in nature? Would anyone or anything miss them if they suddenly disappeared?

And for that matter, what about other creatures? We all know how complex biodiversity is, but it seems that some animals are more important than others in maintaining the balance of life on earth. Is there anything that could go extinct without having knock-on effects?

CrowdScience heads to the Hawaiian mountains, a snail diversity hotspot, to discover the deep value of snails to native ecosystems there. Researchers and conservationists are working together to protect these highly endangered snails, and their natural habitats, from multiple threats.

We hear why all snails – even the ones munching Alexandre’s petunias – have their role to play in the natural world, and get to grips with cascading extinctions: how the loss of a single species can trigger unpredictable effects on a whole ecosystem.

With contributions from Imogen Cavadino, Dr Norine Yeung, Dr Kenneth Hayes, Dr David Sischo, Jan Kealoha, and Professor Ian Donohue.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton
Produced by Cathy Edwards for the BBC World Service

[Image credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t64sd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5bfm1p430)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t68jj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdwmsx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tzn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrw5t6d8n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyww24blptm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sn4dsqrg8)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkl9xdwrk1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48zlncfxts)
Global corporate tax deal draws closer

An agreed global minimum 15% corporate tax rate draws closer as Ireland signs up. Dr Brian Keenan is director of public policy at Chartered Accountants Ireland and discusses the background to the latest developments. Also in the programme, the BBC's Thomas Naadi reports on the problem of discarded 'fast fashion' clothing items from western countries ending up in landfill in Africa. Electric car maker Tesla's boss Elon Musk has announced that the firm will move its headquarters from California to Texas. Plus, with a growing number of people choosing to work long past their 60s, we meet Kenya-based artist Geraldine Robarts, who is still picking up her paintbrush at the age of 82.

(Picture: Ireland's finance minister Paschal Donohoe. Picture credit: Press Association.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 05:32 SAT (w3ct2kp8)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 18:32 SAT (w3ct2kp8)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 10:32 MON (w3ct2kp8)

A Geochemical History of Life on Earth 10:06 SUN (w3ct2kyl)

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