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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 25 SEPTEMBER 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5nbk7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqk0d2kpvy)
Huawei's Meng Wanzhou released from house arrest

Huawei’s Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou is released after nearly three years under house arrest in Canada, the BBC’s Gordon Correra has the details. China’s central bank bans all cryptocurrency activity in the country, sending the price of Bitcoin tumbling – cryptocurrency author Glen Goodman tells us more. Marketplace’s Kai Rysdell talks toothpaste, deodorant and supply chain woes, and Victoria Craig is in Germany for the Bundestagwahl – the country’s general election. We discuss New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Adern’s climate change policies and it’s twentyfive years since Spice – the Spice Girl’s debut album put Girl Power on the pop podium; we talk to Safiya Lambie-Knight at Spotify. Throughout the programme we’re joined by Sharon Brett-Kelly, host of The Detail podcast on Radio New Zealand in Auckland.

(Picture: Meng Wanzhou speaks to reporters outside court Credit: EPA)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5ng9c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9r28m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsbtkr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lc0)
England's Pakistan tour: The fallout

We discuss the fallout from England withdrawing their men and women from their October tour to Pakistan and what consequences it could have for international cricket.
We talk about Virat Kohli's decision to step down as Captain of India's T20 side and Royal Challengers Bangalore in the Indian Premier League.
We also hear why boycotting Afghanistan cricket might not be the best option for women's cricket in the country in the second part of our interview with Tuba Sangar, the former women's development manager at the Afghanistan Cricket Board.
Plus we’re joined by cricket historian and blogger Bill Ricquier to discuss his England men’s all-time greatest XI, as featured in his new book, The Immortals of English Cricket.

Photo credit: Newly-elected Pakistan's Cricket Board (PCB) chairman and former team captain Ramiz Raja speaks during a press conference at the cricket academy in Lahore on September 13, 2021. (Photo by Arif ALI / AFP) (Photo by ARIF ALI/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5nl1h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fh)
What's behind Guinea's coup?

The military coup earlier this month in the West African state of Guinea has been a huge story for BBC reporter Alhassan Sillah, based in the capital Conakry. He tells us about the main players - coup leader Colonel Mamady Doumbouya, and the man he ousted, President Alpha Condé.

The swimming camels of Kutch
The Kharai are a rare breed of camel found in the Indian state of Gujarat. They swim up to three kilometres in shallow seas to reach the mangroves where they graze. But as salt companies block tidal water, the mangroves are dying, and there's less grazing. BBC Gujarati's Prashant Gupta met the herdsmen and their swimming camels.

Cairo's belly dancing school
Egypt is known for belly dancing, but recently this art has been dominated by belly dancers from Eastern Europe and Latin America. Reem Fattelbab of BBC Arabic has visited a belly dancing school in Cairo to find out why more Egyptian women don't follow this tradition.

Ukraine's toxic mines
BBC Ukrainian recently reported from the frontline in the Donbas region about the impact the conflict is having on the environment. During the Soviet era, Donbas was a mining hub, but now many old mines are flooding, leading to contamination of local water supplies. Reporter Zhanna Bezpiatchuk went down one of the mines to see for herself.

Capybaras and class war in Argentina
The exclusive Nordelta gated community north of Buenos Aires were recently invaded by capybaras, the world's largest rodent. Gardens were tunneled, plants eaten, but with half of Argentinians living in poverty, many were siding with the animals, as BBC Mundo contributor Macarena Gagliardi reports.

Image: Special forces commander Mamady Doumbouya in September 2021
Credit: Reuters/Saliou Samb


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz3)
Kenya: Westgate Mall attack

Gunmen from the Somali Islamist group Al-Shabab attacked a shopping centre in Nairobi taking hundreds hostage. The group claimed it was in retaliation for Kenyan military action against them in southern Somalia. The siege lasted four days in September 2013 and more than 60 people were killed, but hundreds more were injured and traumatised. Daniel Ouma was a paramedic on duty at the scene and explains to Rebecca Kesby how his team tried to help people affected.

PHOTO: A police officer during a rescue operation at the site of the terrorist attack, Westgate Mall, on September 21, 2013 in Nairobi, Kenya. Gunmen from the extremist group Al-Shabab entered the mall and opened fire at random on shoppers; 68 deaths have been confirmed. (Photo by Jeff Angote/Nation Media/Gallo Images/Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5npsm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsz)
How powerful is China's navy?

China has reacted angrily following this month's announcement of an alliance that will enable Australia to possess and deploy nuclear powered submarines in the region. Australia says the partnership with the USA and the UK, or Aukus, is not aimed at China. But most analysts agree that the initiative is hoping to counter Beijing's rapidly expanding naval capabilities. Chinese patrol boats have clashed with neighbouring vessels in disputed waters, home to billions of barrels of untapped oil and gas. The country has created artificial islands in the South China Sea and there are concerns it may use its growing amphibious capabilities to invade Taiwan. So how important is the Chinese navy to the country's overall strategic and economic plan? How does its expansion affect maritime disputes in East Asia and the safe passage of trillions of dollars worth of commodities each year? And is China right to accuse the West of a 'Cold War mentality' when it criticises the country's military investments?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.

Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5ntjr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9rfj0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsc5t4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kp7)
Camels are cool. They cope with intense desert heat, inspiring a gel for storing medicines. It could extend the life of medicines, making it easier to transport them across the globe. To listen online, visit www.bbcworldservice.com/30animals


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dnt)
Germany’s election

Germany’s first female chancellor, Angela Merkel, is standing down after 16 years in office. This matters because a major figure is exiting the global stage. She has worked with four US presidents and been at the centre of European and global politics. As Germans head to the polls, Ros Atkins looks at the race to succeed one of Europe’s most influential leaders.

(Photo: Election campaign billboards showing Annalena Baerbock, chancellor candidate of the German Greens Party, Olaf Scholz, chancellor candidate of the German Social Democrats (SPD), and Armin Laschet, chancellor candidate of the Christian Democrats (CDU/CSU), Credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5ny8w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytd0dx0bjz)
Two Canadians tried for spying in China are on their way back to Canada

Ex diplomat Michael Kovrig and businessman Michael Spavor were accused of espionage in 2018, after Canadian police arrested Huawei executive, Meng Wanzhou on a US warrant. She left Canada earlier today after a deal with US prosecutors. The detentions sparked years of diplomatic tensions.

Also on the programme, we ask can anything be done to even up the global disparities in covid vaccination rates? And could the global shortage of natural gas have been predicted, or prevented? This week's panellists are Azadeh Moaveni, the International Crisis Group’s Gender Project Director and Shashank Joshi, defence editor at the Economist magazine.

(Picture Michael Kovrig on the left and Michael Spavor on the right. Credit: AFP)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5p210)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytd0dx0g93)
German elections: How Angela Merkel changed her country

What is the legacy of the outgoing German Chancellor after sixteen years in office?

Also on the programme, two Canadians tried for spying in China are on their way back to Canada. And on Sunday Switzerland is to hold a vote on legalising same-sex marriage. This week's panellists are Azadeh Moaveni, the International Crisis Group’s Gender Project Director and Shashank Joshi, defence editor at the Economist magazine.

(Picture: German Chancellor Angela Merkel attends a rally in Munich. Credit: Reuters / Rehle)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5p5s4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytd0dx0l17)
Afghan girls will return to their classrooms as soon as possible say Taliban

Secondary schools in Afghanistan reopened this week for boys, but not for girls. The delay has created more uncertainty about the prospects for girls. We will also be hearing from an Afghan artist known for painting murals on the streets of Kabul, many of which have now been painted over by the Taliban. And we go to Rouen in France where efforts are being made to replace a prominent statue of Napoleon with one of the late French Tunisian feminist Gisele Halimi.

This week's panellists are Azadeh Moaveni, the International Crisis Group’s Gender Project Director and Shashank Joshi, defence editor at the Economist magazine.

(Picture: Afghan girls at a school in Kabul. Credit: WANA)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsck1j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p91)
Musical theatre stars

Dazzling lights, fancy costumes, thrilling dance routines and the nightly applause of an adoring audience - what's it like to sing on the world's biggest stages? Kim Chakanetsa talks to two musical theatre stars about life on stage - and the challenges that Covid-19 restrictions have brought.

Australian actress Jemma Rix is starring as Elsa in Disney’s Frozen the Musical. With no formal training she moved to Japan to start her career singing and dancing at the Universal Studios theme park in Osaka. This is where she was first cast at everyone's favourite green witch, Elphaba in Wicked - a role she went on to play on stage to great acclaim for eight years.

Filipino actress Christine Allado has returned to the stage in London's West End after a break of 15 months when theatres were closed because of Covid-19 restrictions. She’s currently starring as Tzipporah, the wife of Moses, in The Prince of Egypt. She took a year out after university to work at Hong Kong Disneyland, singing some roles in Cantonese despite not knowing the language, and she’s never looked back.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE
(L) Christine Allado, credit Roberto Vivancos Studio
(R) Jemma Rix, courtesy Jemma Rix


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5p9j8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d68)
Coronavirus: Vietnam and the Philippines

Vietnam was, until recently, one of the world’s Covid success stories. Its policy of early border closures, lockdowns and track and tracing ensured that fewer than 40 people had died from the disease since the start of the pandemic. This all changed in May and host Karnie Sharp talks to two journalists in Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi about what happened and what went wrong.

As some countries see people returning to work and students going back to school after the summer break, there are others where strict restrictions are still in place. Children in the Philippines, for instance, are still at home and have not been inside a classroom since the official start of the pandemic. We hear from three parents and their children in Manila on the effect of remote learning for over 18 months, with most children also unable to leave their homes.

(Photo: Floyd and his son JD with kind permission)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcscnsn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdp)
Successful relationships

To have a beautiful, strong, lasting, successful relationship at the core of our lives is an ideal that takes root at an early age. But do we always know what a successful relationship looks like? And can we sometimes hope and expect too much?
Ferzeen is originally from India, now in the USA, and has had trouble building relationships. She thinks there might be something from her past that is standing in her way. Dr Shefali advises her on the most important step to take first.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1z)
The story behind making Afghanistan and me

Listeners' reactions to the documentary Afghanistan and Me. BBC Pashto presenter Sana Safi tells us about the challenges of telling her unique personal story and also why global reporting of her country is flawed. Plus, what was your last selfless act? Health Check needs listeners’ to take part in its Kindness Test. We explain how you can help

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5pf8d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q52pc4v91)
'If not me, then who?' Tiara Brown sues the police

Tiara Brown is one of the leading names in women's boxing and until a year ago was an award-winning police officer in Washington DC. Back in December, she told Sportshour she left the department feeling they were unwilling to instigate change following the murder of George Floyd. Now, in the first case of its kind, Tiara, and nine other black female officers, have filed a lawsuit against the capitols Police Department citing allegations of sexual harassment and marginalisation. We hear from lawyer Pamela Keith and Tiara.

We find out what it's like to sink the winning putt for Europe in the Ryder Cup played in the USA. That's what Irish golfer Phillip Walton did in 1995. He tells us about that experience and why it was bittersweet.

It is the AFL Grand Final between Melbourne and the Western Bulldogs. Despite this year's final being between two teams based in Melbourne, the game is being played in Western Australia because Melbourne is in a Covid lockdown and Perth is not. We are joined by Cheryl Critchley who runs the AFL fans Association.

(Photo: Tiara Brown between rounds against Vanessa Bradford at Generoso Pope Athletic Complex on October 24, 2019, in New York City. Credit: Edward Diller/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5pk0j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9s4zs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcscx8x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3q)
What’s the future of digital art?

Traditional canvas paintings on easels or walls dominate the popular perception about how art is created and consumed. But technology is revolutionising the way we perceive art.

Digital tools are letting artists bring still pictures to life, and blockchain technology is letting them sell their artworks as a non-fungible-token (NFT), which creates a unique digital certificate of authentic ownership. The trend has become so lucrative that a digital-only artwork fetched $69mn at Christie’s auction house earlier this year.

But is this a bubble in the making or is NFT art here to stay? Can digital art help younger artists monetize their work easily?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the future of digital art.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Aparajita Jain, co-director, Nature Morte Art, and founder, Terrain.art; Ishita Banerjee, artist, creator, Soul Curry Art; Amrita Sethi, NFT artist


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5pnrn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdr)
The mixed beat

The voices of those from mixed race communities are more frequently heard today and are playing a more central role in shaping discussion around race, identity and what it means to straddle different cultures and experiences. The BBC's Nora Fakim takes this opportunity to reflect on what is happening across the globe and to reflect on what the changes mean across the generations.

Nora's mum is from Morocco and her dad was Mauritian-Indian and she was born and raised in a leafy suburb outside London but struggled to fit in. She thinks things today are changing, as immigration, globalisation and global protests following the death of George Floyd take effect. The voicelessness she and others felt is being replaced by open discussions and even a celebration of what it means to be mixed race.

Her investigation starts with mixed race parents who are creating ever more diversity as they start their own families. As they embark on parenting their own mixed race babies she asks what advice they would have given their younger selves. And speaking to children growing up in this fast changing world she finds a bravery, which she lacked, in the choices being made.

(Photo: Emma and her son. Credit: Emma Nathan)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5pshs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2f5rtd)
China & Canada Prisoner Swap

In a sudden conclusion to a tense diplomatic and legal standoff between the United States, China and Canada, the Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou is flying back home after three years under house arrest in Canada. In return, China has released Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor -- two Canadians it had imprisoned on espionage charges.

Also on the programme, Newshour's Tim Franks joins us live from Germany on the eve of elections for a new parliament and new chancellor; and will Switzerland become one of the last countries in Europe to approve same sex marriage?

(Photo: Meng Wanzhou speaks to the press before leaving Canada; EPA/BOB FRID)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5px7x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tfvlrxjzq)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Gareth Copley/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5qd7f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9t06p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsdrht)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8r)
Golf's 'war by the shore'

In 1991 the best golfers from the USA and Europe went head-to-head in one of the most bitter confrontations in the history of the Ryder Cup. Played shortly after the First Gulf War, some of the European team objected to the militaristic and fiercely partisan atmosphere encouraged by their American hosts at Kiawah Island, South Carolina. The tension at the so-called “War By The Shore” spilled over into the tournament itself, which was decided on the last hole. Will Yates speaks to golfers Hale Irwin and Paul Broadhurst. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

(Photo: The American team celebrate. Credit: Getty Images)
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SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5qhzk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z7g)
Kenya: Westgate mall attack

Eyewitnesses remember the Westgate mall attack in Kenya, the 1990s 'miracle water' craze in Mexico, and the poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko. Plus the amazing story of how a journalist revealed the secret romance between Aristotle Onassis and Jackie Kennedy, and we look back at the changing nature of James Bond.

Photo: A police officer at the site of the terrorist attack, Westgate Mall, on September 21, 2013 in Nairobi, Kenya.. (Photo by Jeff Angote/Nation Media/Gallo Images/Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5qmqp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rth)
Actor Elijah Wood

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined by Syrian actor Yahya Mahayni and cineaste Jake Cunningham to discuss the cultural highlights of the week.

Actor Elijah Wood on his film No Man of God, where he plays the real life FBI analyst, Bill Hagmaier, who got to know serial killer Ted Bundy at the end of his life.

Nigerian American Comedian Ziwe choses her favourite ever music tracks.

Australian director Trent O’Donnell on casting Susan Sarandon for his movie Ride The Eagle.

Scottish actor and Guardians Of The Galaxy star Karen Gillan reveals what she does during the pauses between shots on the sets of big action movies.

Syrian Actor Yahya Mahayni talks about his starring role as a living artwork in director Kaouther Ben Hania’s film, The Man Who Sold His Skin, which this year became the first ever Tunisian film to be nominated for an Oscar.

J Wildgoose Esq from the band Public Service Broadcasting explains the pull of Berlin for musicians.

And composer Ben MacDougall describes the process of creating music for the video game Godfall.

(Photo: Elijah Wood. Credit: Gilbert Carrasquillo/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5qrgt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2f6qsf)
'Hostage diplomacy' as China and Canada swap prisoners

Two Canadians accused of espionage, Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, have been released by China, on the same day as the Canadian authorities released Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou. We ask what this means for relations between the countries, and hear from Michael Spavor's friend Chad O'Carroll about his arrest and detention.

Also in the programme: the latest from the ongoing volcanic eruption in La Palma, and a look ahead at the German elections.

(Photo: Huawei Technologies Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou at Shenzhen airport. Credit: Jin Liwang/Xinhua via REUTERS)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5qw6y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcf)
The cost of being honest with Cola Boyy, Faye Webster, Cherry Glazerr and Juan Wauters

Cola Boyy, Faye Webster, Juan Wauters and Cherry Glazerr's Clementine Creevy discuss why it takes leaving a town or city to appreciate it, not writing any lyrics down, how to make songs catchy, using movies for inspiration, and why songwriters have no privacy anymore.

Cola Boyy is a self-taught musician and singer from Los Angeles. He released his debut album, Prosthetic Boombox, in June this year. The lyrics are inspired by his real life experiences, including being a person of colour with a disability, as he was born with spina bifida and scoliosis. Joining him is Faye Webster, an artist from Atlanta whose songwriting brings together honest and emotional lyrics with rap influences and pedal steel guitar. Her latest album is I Know I’m Funny Haha. Clementine Creevy is the lead singer and guitarist in LA-based rock band Cherry Glazerr. Her music blends punk, grunge and new wave with witty lyrics, and she’s collaborated with Tyler the Creator and Death Grips. Finally, Juan Wauters is a Uruguayan-born singer-songwriter. He released the album Real Life Situations, in which he reflects on all aspects of the human experience, weaving in samples of television shows, and real conversations from voice notes he recorded on his phone. The album’s impressive list of collaborators includes Mac Demarco, former Music Life guest Nick Hakim, and today’s host, Cola Boyy.

Together the group discuss why it takes leaving a town or city to appreciate it, not writing any lyrics down, how to make songs catchy, using movies for inspiration, and why songwriters have no privacy anymore.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5qzz2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvblq49j1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0smdw58c4p)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsfc7g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt5)
Poetry: The power and the beauty of spoken word

This week on The Cultural Frontline, Anu Anand hears from the young poets expressing the hopes and fears of their generation.

American film director Carlos López Estrada explains how a spoken word showcase affected him so deeply that he wanted to share his new love of poetry with the world. It inspired him to work with young poets in Los Angeles to create his latest film, Summertime. Carlos Lopez Estrada and one of the poets in Summertime, Raul Herrera, discuss how they collaborated to make a film entirely in verse.

Young poets from Lebanon and the UK have come together to write new work, inspired by their home cities of Beirut and Coventry. The finished pieces will be performed as part of the BBC’s Contains Strong Language Festival. Two of the writers, Kelvin Ampong and Nour Annan explain what they learned from each other and how they found common ground.

Zambian writer Musenga L Katonga has been working with a British illustrator to create an animated online poem, exploring the theme of beauty and chaos. He explains how he wrote about escaping the noise of social media to find solace in the written word and discusses performing a TED Talk about Zambian identity, in spoken word.

(Photo: Carlos López Estrada. Credit: Good Deed Entertainment, LLC)



SUNDAY 26 SEPTEMBER 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5r7gb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yvr)
New evidence for SARS-CoV-2’s origin in bats

Researchers studying bats in Northern Laos have found evidence that brings us closer than ever to understanding the origin of Covid-19. Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic scientists have tried to pin-point the exact origin of SARS-CoV-2. But recent evidence from the Institut Pasteur has identified several novel coronaviruses with similarities to the current coronavirus in bats. Professor Marc Eliot spoke to Roland Pease about how this research could give us a better idea where Covid-19 came from.

Could an oral COVID treatment be available soon?
Daria Hazuda, responsible for infectious disease and bacteria research at MSD tells us about their clinical trials for an oral antiviral drug that could combat Covid-19: Molnupiravir.

Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's
Roland Pease travels to Bath to meet scientists who may have developed a way to diagnose Alzheimer's in the earlier stages of the disease. Dr George Stothart, has led the team from Bath university in the development of this simple 2 minute test.

Inducing Earthquakes
Scientists are experimenting with artificially managing earthquakes by injecting fluid into fault lines. Professor Derek Elsworth at Pennsylvania state university explains his research into how these induced earthquakes can be more tightly controlled.

This year has been a weird one for UK gardeners – unpredictable spring temperatures meant flowers failed to bloom and throughout the rainy summer, slugs have been savaging salad crops. But why and when plants blossom is about more than just early cold spells and wet weather, and a listener in California has asked Crowdscience to investigate.

Flowering is vital to both plants and us. Without it, they wouldn’t be able to evolve and survive (and we wouldn’t have anything to eat). Anand Jagatia hears that different species have developed different strategies for doing this based on all sorts of things, from where they’re located to how big they are to what kind of insects are around to pollinate them. The famously stinky Titan Arum, or corpse flower, for example, blooms for a single day once every decade or so before collapsing on itself and becoming dormant again.

This gives it the best chance of attracting carrion beetles in the steamy Sumatran jungle. But other plants open their petals much more regularly, which is a process regulated by a clever internal clock that can sense daylight and night. It’s even possible to trick some of them into producing flowers out of season. Cold is also a vital step for some brassicas and trees, and scientists are starting to understand the genes involved. But as climate change makes winters in parts of the world warmer and shorter, there are worrying knock on effects for our food supply.

(Image credit: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5rc6g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9tz5q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsfqgv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvt)
Reducing mental health stigma

Many people have struggled with their mental health during the pandemic, but still don’t always feel free to discuss it, especially at work. Stigma remains a problem and discussing your difficulties at all is off-limits. For many years in England a campaign called Time To Change tried to change attitudes and the evidence from that and other initiatives was used to launch campaigns in India, Ghana, Nigeria, Kenya and Uganda in 2019. Sue Baker, Mind’s International Health Advisor, and Rosemary Gathara, Director of Basic Needs, Basic Rights in Kenya discuss the findings of the campaigns with Claudia Hammond.

Matt Fox, Professor of Global Epidemiology at Boston University in the US, joins Claudia to talk about the latest global picture of Covid, mask wearing at basketball games in the US and the Kindness Test. And they look at research that suggests too much free time is bad for us.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A woman sitting in a room. Photo credit: Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5rgyl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5rlpq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvd)
The human cost of prescription drug abuse

Stories from the US, China, Lithuania and Georgia.

It is a drug epidemic which has cost around half a million lives, yet the people behind it were not dodgy individuals pushing pills and powders on the street. It was major pharmaceutical companies which sold opioids as painkillers, despite being aware these could be highly addictive. OxyContin was the drug implicated in many cases, and now the company which made it has been told that it will not be prosecuted. Indeed, its owners will remain one of the wealthiest families in America. Daniel Thomas has followed the story of OxyContin, and met some of those who fell victim to it.

The Chinese government has recently made rules about what songs can be sung in karaoke bars, and warned film makers not to produce work which is “vulgar.” Now, the authorities there have said that “sissy boys” should not appear on television. They want programmes to promote what they consider to be a more masculine image, and certainly not men in make-up. These are just the latest developments in a more general trend, which critics say shows that the Communist Party is seeking to control ever more areas of life in China. But why now, and what does it mean? Stephen McDonell in Beijing has been unravelling the various factors at work.

There was a time when Lithuania played host to nuclear-armed missiles which could have destroyed any number of cities around the world. Back then, Lithuania was part of the Soviet Union, and with a location which gave it great strategic importance, close to Western Europe, and facing Scandinavia across the sea. But in 1991, Lithuania became fully independent, and suddenly found itself a rather small nation, with only about three and a half million people. Yet Lithuania has been decidedly feisty lately, refusing to back down in a row with China, and standing up for dissidents in neighbouring Belarus. On a recent visit to a small Lithuanian village, Sadakat Kadri, found relics of the country’s past, with important lessons for the present.

September is not normally a month to focus on Christmas, but for some in Georgia, it is precisely the time of year when the festive season is on their minds. That’s because this is the harvest season for Georgian pine-seeds, and every year, people climb the country’s giant fir trees, to get hold of them. The seeds are then exported to Europe, and planted to grow Christmas trees for people’s homes. It is a huge business, but also a dangerous one, as Amelia Stewart found when she spent a day in the forest with one pine-hunting expert.

(Image: Bottles of OxyContin. Credit: Reuters/George Frey)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsfyz3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5rqfv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9vbf3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsg2q7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz4)
6. Fallout

After years in the wilderness, athletes with a learning disability are back at the London 2012 Paralympics - and Dan is among them. There are new tests designed to stop cheating. Do they work? And why, 21 years on from the basketball scandal, are there still fewer medals for intellectual impairment athletes than there were at Sydney 2000?

Plus Dan catches up one last time with Ray, the genuinely disabled captain of the infamous Spanish basketball team. The scandal has taken a big toll on his life.

Presenter: Dan Pepper
Series Producer: Simon Maybin
Editor: Emma Rippon

(Photo credit: EPA)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5rv5z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytd0dx37g2)
China - Canada prisoner swap completed

Huawei exec Meng Wanzhou arrived in China after leaving Canada following a deal with US prosecutors. Her release was coordinated with the transfer of two Canadians held in China.

Also on the programme, today Switzerland votes on legalising same sex marriage. And twenty years after it took place, we look at the shocking, still unsolved murder of an African boy who police named "Adam." His dismembered remains were found in the River Thames in London.

Our panellists this week are Cornelius Pollmer, journalist for the German daily, the Sueddeutsche Zeitung - one of Germany's biggest daily papers and Shachi Kurl, President of Angus Reid Institute, a Canadian public opinion research organization.

(Picture: Huawei exec Meng Wanzhou arriving in Shenzhen. Credit: AFP)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5ryy3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytd0dx3c66)
Polls open in German elections

The election which will end Angela Merkel's sixteen years in power takes place today. We discuss her foreign policy legacy.

Also on the programme, how should the west conduct diplomacy with China? And novelist Colm Toibin discusses his latest book, The Magician, a fiction about the great German writer Thomas Mann.

Our panellists this week are Cornelius Pollmer, journalist for the German daily, the Sueddeutsche Zeitung - one of Germany's biggest daily papers and Shachi Kurl, President of Angus Reid Institute, a Canadian public opinion research organization.

(Picture: Outgoing German Chancellor Angela Merkel and CDU candidate Armin Lachet. Credit: Reuters / Rattay)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5s2p7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytd0dx3gyb)
Angela Merkel's legacy

As her sixteen years as Chancellor draws to a close we speak to Angela Merkel's most recent biographer while voting kicks off in Germany's election, as well as reporting from Berlin.

Also on the programme, before the imminent release of No Time To Die, Daniel Craig's final outing as James Bond, we take a look at the real life inspirations for the fictional spy.

Our panellists this week are Cornelius Pollmer, journalist for the German daily, the Sueddeutsche Zeitung - one of Germany's biggest daily papers and Shachi Kurl, President of Angus Reid Institute, a Canadian public opinion research organization.

(Picture: Workmen remove a poster of Angela Merkel from a German train station. Credit: Reuters / Bimmer)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsgfym)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg6)
Cooking by computer

From bread making to Thai cuisine, cookery classes have become a popular way for people to learn new culinary skills and meet people. But coronavirus lockdowns suddenly brought these businesses to a standstill. Rory Cellan-Jones hears from three cooks, who quickly pivoted to virtual cooking classes to survive. Could they get over the technical challenges, and can you really teach someone to cook through a computer?

(Picture: mother and child on a virtual cooking course. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


Contributors:

Fayruza Abrahams, Taste Malay
Rawan Al Waada, Rebels in the Kitchen
Sue Hudson, Bread Workshops


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5s6fc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsgkpr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxg)
The heavy metal boys from the dump

Cambodia's biggest rubbish dump was home to thousands of children, picking through rubbish to sell. From this bleak wasteland emerged a band, Doch Chkae - young musicians who grew up in extreme poverty, turning their anger into heavy metal music. Harry Graham speaks to two of the band members, Sok Vichey and Ouch Theara. We also hear from one of the charity workers who spotted their talent for metal music, Timon Seibel, from Moms Against Poverty. This programme was first broadcast on 23rd November 2019.

Presenter: Harry Graham
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

Picture: Doch Chkae
Credit: Florian Gleich

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5sb5h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2gyy)
7. The golden boy

Wayne Jenkins, now serving 25 years in prison, tells his side of the story. What do the crimes of the Gun Trace Task Force reveal about the city of Baltimore?


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsgpfw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2lcq)
Rebuilding Ise

Ise Jingu is a Shinto shrine in Japan that is full of paradoxes. Every 20 years, for the past 1300 years, Ise Jingu has been rebuilt from scratch. It involves constructing identical copies of 125 structures that cover an area the size of the centre of Paris, using ancient techniques passed down through generations of craftsmen.

It is one of the most sacred Shinto shrines in Japan. Every year, over 10 million visitors and pilgrims journey through the depths of the ancient forest that surrounds the shrine, to pay homage to the deities of the Shinto faith.

Poet and professor Jordan Smith journeys to the heart of the Jingu in search of the rituals, customs, and spirituality that has kept it as alive today as it was over 1000 years ago. But as Jordan finds out, the essence of Ise Jingu cannot be discovered quite so easily. To get close to what Ise Jingu means to the Shinto faith and Japanese society, Jordan must travel into the depths of the forests of Ise to listen to the inaudible and feel the intangible. On his way he meets priests and professors, who help him discover new ways of interpreting Shinto divinity and what Ise Jingu means to those who journey there.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5sfxm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9w1ww)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsgt60)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2vq6)
Sugar-coated World

Getting granular

Humans have always been delighted by sweetness. In this three part series Lainy Malkani explores how sugar forged the modern world, from its role in the slave trade and the European colonisation of the Americas, to the consequences of our dependency on it today. For some countries, their past is built on it; for others, their futures depend on it. Across Britain, the USA and Thailand, Lainy digs into the past, present and future of sugar.

Beginning in London, Lainy samples sweet treats in Brick Lane with the food writer Ruby Tandoh, examines sugar cane in the tropical Palm House at Kew Gardens with botanist Dr Maria Vorontsova, and traces sugar’s journey from luxury to necessity centuries ago with the historian James Walvin. She visits the West India Docks on the River Thames where sugar - harvested by slaves in the Caribbean – arrived for refining in the early 1800s, and considers how sugar has shaped the city today.

(Photo: Spoonful of sugar added to coffee)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5sknr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2j)
Will America ban abortion?

A restriction on abortion from as early as six weeks into pregnancy is now law in Texas. The state has also outsourced enforcing it to private citizens who can get up to $10,000 if they sue those who perform or assist an abortion that breaks the ban.

As lawmakers in other American states intend to follow Texas Charmaine Cozier finds out what it means for the political hotspot that is abortion provision in the US.

Presenter and producer: Charmaine Cozier
Researched by: Christopher Blake
Editor: Richard Vadon

(abortion rights activists rally at the Texas State Capitol on Sept 11 2021. Credit: Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsgxy4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxw)
A long way from Vietnam

Vietnamese migration to the UK is the second highest after Albania and each year the numbers are rising. Not even the tragedy of the Essex lorry disaster in 2019 has been enough to put people off. Then 39 Vietnamese migrants suffocated in a container lorry as they came over the English channel. BBC journalist Nga Pham talks to people in Vietnam about their desperation to leave their country. Coming from some of the most economically deprived provinces, families pay between $30-45,000 to people smugglers to send hundreds of their children out each year in the hope of a better future. She meets people who are now working in the shadow economy in the UK, in nail bars, cannabis farms and restaurants, hiding in plain sight. She also talks to those who were caught up in trafficking networks, discovered by the police and deported back to Vietnam with nothing to show for their years of slave labour.

Reporter: Nga Pham
Producer: Anna Horsbrugh-Porter
A Just Radio production for the BBC World Service

(Image: A group of women harvest rice, Vietnam. Credit: BBC)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5spdw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2f8nqh)
Germany votes on who will replace Merkel

The future direction of Germany without Angela Merkel at the helm after sixteen years in power is being determined, as millions of voters go to the polls in a general election. We hear from our correspondent in Berlin.

Also in the programme: A Hong Kong pro-democracy group known for organising vigils commemorating the victims of the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre has officially disbanded, and we hear from a foreign born Australian who managed to leave the country during lockdown and is now trying to return.

(Photo: German Chancellor Angela Merkel at a rally in Aachen 25/9/21. Credit: Reuters/Wolfgang Rattay)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5st50)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlq)
Toni Morrison: The legacy of a literary legend

The American writer Toni Morrison once said, “If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” It was an urge which in her case yielded a rich array of novels, children’s books, plays and essays. Toni Morrison stands tall, as the first black woman of any nationality to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Celebrated for her masterpiece Beloved, she remains a towering figure, one of the most well-known and oft-taught authors of our age. Since her death in August 2019, many have been reassessing her multiple legacies: as a novelist, cultural critic, and editor.

Joining Bridget Kendall to explore the life, work and impact of Toni Morrison are Dana Williams, Professor of African American Literature at Howard University in Washington DC and current President of the Toni Morrison Society; Janis A. Mayes, Emerita professor of African American Studies at Syracuse University, US; and Aretha Phiri, Associate Professor at Rhodes University in Grahamstown / Makhanda, South Africa.

Produced by Jo Impey for BBC World Service
Additional research by Tessa Roynon

[Photo: Toni Morrison in Chicago, Illinois in 2010. Credit: Getty Images / Daniel Boczarski / FilmMagic]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkk)
Has the number of periods a woman has in her lifetime quadrupled?

Has the number of periods a woman has, on average, in her lifetime quadrupled since the industrial revolution?

A recent article estimated that 129 billion single-use face masks are used every day around the world. It sounds wrong, but how wrong is it? And how did it get so wrong?


(Image credit: Isabel Pavia/Getty images)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5sxx4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5t1n8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcshdxn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:32 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SUN 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5t5dd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 17:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5t94j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 18:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2f98g4)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5tdwn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9x0vx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcshs51)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2lcq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5tjms)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh9)
COP 26: Should we rethink our economic priorities?

In just over a month world leaders will meet for a decisive climate change summit - we’ll ask if politicians are willing to accept the end of exponential economic growth in order to protect the planets resources. We’ll hear why gas prices are spiralling and ask why small energy firms weren’t better prepared to withstand rising prices. As a new high speed train line is planned for Egypt we’ll take a close look at this new infrastructure project and ask if it will help deliver new prosperity to a country dogged by economic troubles. And, we’ll hear from the song writers campaigning for clear credits on streaming platforms. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Gareth Barlow.

(Image: Smoke billows from a power station. Reuters)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5tncx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2f9mpj)
Close result in German election

With polls closed in the German general election, the centre-left Social Democrats are on course for a narrow victory, but they will need to build a coalition to form a government. We have a special election episode coming live from Berlin with Tim Franks, with interviews with politicians from the main parties, analysts and our own correspondents. We hear from Social Democratic Party MEP Katarina Barley and Günter Krings of Angela Merkel's Christian Democratic Union, and get a European view from former French Europe Minister Natalie Loiseau.

(Photo: Supporters react after the first election forecast during the CDU election event in Berlin 26/09/2021. Credit: Getty Images/Clemens Bilan)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5ts41)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2gyy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsj4df)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5tww5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvblq76f4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0smdw5c81s)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsj84k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 27 SEPTEMBER 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxgyzml)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlddcpblsv)
Green Party likely kingmakers after German election

Projected results from the German parliamentary elections show the centre-left Social Democrats are ahead of the conservative Christian Democrats (the party of outgoing Chancellor Angela Merkel) by about two per cent of the vote. The Green Party secured 15 percent of the votes and along with the fourth-placed FDP they are likely to be the kingmakers in coalition talks. It could take weeks or months for one to be formed. German political scientist Knut Roder tells Russell Padmore he believes it will be challenging getting a consensus. We get analysis on the implications for Europe’s biggest economy’s climate change policies from Stefan Kooths, director of research for business cycles and growth, at the Kiel Institut and from Sophie Pornschlegel, senior analyst at the European Policy Centre in Brussels.

Also in the programme, from next month, people from South Sudan will no longer need a visa to enter Uganda, which could boost trade between both nations in East Africa. Nebert Rugadya reports from Kampala. And Daniel Frankel, managing editor of Next TV in Los Angeles, on the every-growing battle between the streaming giants in the US.

Producer: Benjie Guy

(Photo: German Green Party members dance at their election party in Berlin.)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2nbwz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2lcn)
China's great science leap

President Xi Jinping is investing seriously into his strategic vision of turning China into a nation of scientific pace-setters. China’s past contributions to modern science have been proportionally lacklustre, but with a reinvigorated focus over the past two decades, China is fast turning from imitator to innovator. What might this increasing scientific prowess mean for the future of China’s development, as well as for the international scientific community?

Whereas once many Chinese scientists chose to go abroad to further their careers, presenter Dr Kevin Fong hears how the government has sought to lure its brightest researchers back. He asks what that means for both scientific collaborations and the culture of science in China and the UK. As scientific research relies on transparent information sharing, what are the challenges of collaborating with an authoritarian regime?

In this first episode, Kevin Fong hears how Chinese science has advanced over recent decades following a low point during the Chinese cultural revolution. He speaks to a Chinese bio-chemist about his career in the US and finds out why he decided to move back to China to start a biotech business. At Loughborough University, Kevin meets a team of researchers working on Artificial Intelligence tools with Chinese counterparts, to help monitor and predict air pollution.

But are Western countries equal partners and beneficiaries of these academic partnerships? As China is set to become the UK’s most significant research partner, at a time of rising geopolitical tensions, we examine how the UK might navigate these choppy waters and what the risks and benefits of scientific collaboration might be.

(Photo: Chinese scientist at work, Credit: Guang Niu/Getty Images)


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxgz3cq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm1qbz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2ngn3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr2)
What homes to build in a climate-changed world?

Heatwaves and floods are becoming more frequent around the world. But are the homes being built today taking that into account?

The Climate Question considers the impact that living in a building threatened by rising water or constructed so that you bake in the heat has. And it asks why planners and developers in many countries have been so reluctant to adapt. Where are lessons being learnt and will other places follow their lead?


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxgz73v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2gyy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2nld7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxgzbvz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm1yv7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2nq4c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p92)
Message in a mural

Street artists from Switzerland and Uganda talk to Kim Chakanetsa about creating public art to enrich lives and bring about change.

The Swiss artist Mona Caron is best known for her multi-story murals celebrating the rebellious resilience of weeds. She first became a muralist in her adoptive hometown of San Francisco, and creates images on a massive scale in public spaces. She blends her artivism with social movements, and enjoys working in collaboration with kindred-spirited artists and activists.

Fatuma Hassan is a painter, graffiti artist and muralist who lives and works in Jinja, Uganda. She says she's never met another female street artist in the country and people are sometimes shocked that she's climbing ladders to paint her murals on buildings. She likes projects that raise community awareness and celebrate the African woman. She's part of the Afri-cans festival and has created murals in Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania and Kenya.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE
(L) Mona Caron, credit Chris Carlsson
(R) Fatuma Hassan, courtesy Fatuma Hassan


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxgzgm3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xdjmv)
German elections: Centre-left narrowly wins against Merkel's party

Lengthy coalition talks will now take place - perhaps establishing a government by Christmas.

We hear from the UN ambassador for Myanmar - the target of an assassination attempt in August, and now prevented from speaking at the general assembly.

And the Albanian Prime minister making a stand for Afghan refugees and hosting thousands of them.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxgzlc7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xdncz)
Coalition talks start after German elections

The centre-left Social Democrats narrowly win against the party of outgoing Chancellor Angela Merkel.

The trial gets underway of the suspected killers of Nizar Banat - a well-known critic of the Palestinian Authority.

And a national strike is taking place today in India - with farmers continuing their long protest against agricultural reforms.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxgzq3c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xds43)
Germany's Social Democrats narrowly win election

It's hoped a new government will be in place by Christmas after lengthy coalition talks.

Britain prepares to suspend competition law after two days of panic fuel buying, allowing oil firms to work together.

And we hear from the Albanian Prime minister making a stand for Afghan refugees and hosting thousands of them.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxgztvh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n69)
Nitin Sawhney, Musician and Composer

Stephen Sackur speaks to renowned British Indian musician and composer Nitin Sawhney. From a childhood disfigured by racism to the embrace of the UK’s cultural elite, what are the common threads in his remarkable career?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2p63w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j59)
Climate weighs on German elections

The fight to succeed popular German chancellor Angela Merkel could not be tighter. In late July the country’s climate policies shot to the top of the political agenda in the wake of devastating, and deadly, floods across western Germany. The BBC’s Victoria Craig and Stephen Ryan travelled to one of the hardest-hit towns, Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler, to see how the locals are trying to recover. Local shop-owner Martina Kleinow says she and many others are still waiting for financial support to rebuild, while Anne Gluck of the regional chamber of commerce, explains the myriad challenges businesses face. Elsewhere in the country, we’ll hear about projects to build better resilience against climate events. Ulrich Lemke leads a port revitalization project at Offenbach am Main, and explains how public works can better account for neighbouring waterways, while Gerhard Hauber of the engineering consultancy Ramboll, explains how coordination is the key to building true resilience.

Producers: Stephen Ryan, Philippa Goodrich.

(Photo: The bank of the river Ahr, in Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. Credit: Victoria Craig /BBC)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1d)
The rise of the Taliban

The Taliban first started to gather support in the south of Afghanistan in the early 1990s. By September 27th 1996 they had taken control of the country's capital Kabul. Journalist and writer Ahmed Rashid watched their rise, from the religious schools in refugee camps on the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan, to their ultimate victory over the American-led coalition forces. He's been speaking to Zak Brophy.

Photo:Taliban fighters on the back of a vehicle in Kabul, Afghanistan, August 2021. Credit: EPA/STRINGER


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxgzylm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2p9w0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqz)
How do flowers know when to bloom?

This year has been a weird one for UK gardeners – unpredictable spring temperatures meant flowers failed to bloom and throughout the rainy summer, slugs have been savaging salad crops. But why and when plants blossom is about more than just early cold spells and wet weather, and a listener in California has asked Crowdscience to investigate.

Flowering is vital to both plants and us. Without it, they wouldn’t be able to evolve and survive (and we wouldn’t have anything to eat). Anand Jagatia hears that different species have developed different strategies for doing this based on all sorts of things, from where they’re located to how big they are to what kind of insects are around to pollinate them. The famously stinky Titan Arum, or corpse flower, for example, blooms for a single day once every decade or so before collapsing on itself and becoming dormant again.


This gives it the best chance of attracting carrion beetles in the steamy Sumatran jungle. But other plants open their petals much more regularly, which is a process regulated by a clever internal clock that can sense daylight and night. It’s even possible to trick some of them into producing flowers out of season. Cold is also a vital step for some brassicas and trees, and scientists are starting to understand the genes involved. But as climate change makes winters in parts of the world warmer and shorter, there are worrying knock on effects for our food supply.

Produced by Marijke Peters for BBC World Service.



Featuring:

Guy Barter, RHS
Professor Judy Jernstedt, UC Davis
Professor Dame Caroline Dean, John Innes Centre
Professor Ove Nilsson, Umea Plant Science Centre

(Photo credit: Getty Images)


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh02br)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2pfm4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh062w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm2t24)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2pkc8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh09v0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtm)
Finding healing in the sea that took my family

Geraldine Mullan lived with her husband John and their two children Tomás and Amelia in a town on the beautiful Irish coastline of County Donegal – a salty inlet of the Atlantic Ocean. They all loved the water, which during lockdown became a welcome escape for the whole family. But in August 2020, the car they were travelling in plunged into the sea during a dreadful storm – in a split second Geraldine lost her husband and both of her children. She tells Jo Fidgen how she found the strength to get back into the water two months after it stole the people she loved most in the world, and why she feels closer to them when she's swimming. Geraldine has opened a centre for her local community called the Mullan Hope Centre, in memory of her family.

There's been a long history of violence in Colombia and 50 years of armed conflict have done terrible damage, physically and psychologically to the people living there. Since the war ended five years ago with a peace deal between the governnent and leftwing guerillas, the Colombian Truth Commission has been set up to get to the root of what happened. Marta Hinestroza was a lawyer in Colombia and had to flee the country after she received death threats. Now living in the UK she's been appointed one of the interviewers for the Colombian Truth Commission. She tells our reporter Grace Livingstone why it's important to hear from both victims and perpetrators of the war, and why lessons must be learned so that the mistakes of the past can be avoided in future.


If you've been affected by any of subjects in this programme you can find support and additional information below:

BBC Action Line: https://www.bbc.co.uk/actionline/

Befrienders Worldwide: https://www.befrienders.org/


Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Geraldine Mullan in the sea
Credit: David Conachy


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh0fl4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm31kd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2psvj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh0kb8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2bqhjmw)
German centre-left claim narrow election victory

This edition of Newshour comes to you, in part from just above the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, with key players and analysis from across Germany's political spectrum. SPD leader Olaf Scholz says he has a clear mandate to form a government, while his conservative rival Armin Laschet remains determined to fight on. Preliminary results gave his party a narrow election win over the conservatives who suffered their worst-ever performance. The Greens and pro-business FDP attracted the most support from the under-30s in an election dominated by climate change. The Greens made history with almost 15% of the vote.

Also on the programme: A rebuke from the Prime Minister of Albania as he outlines “a moral problem” with Europe’s response to the plight of many Afghan refugees. Albania is one of Europe’s poorest countries and has already received around 1,000 Afghans; and we take a look at the reasons behind the UK's fuel supply problems.

(Picture: Top candidate of the German Social Democratic Party (SPD) Olaf Scholz Credit: EPA/JOERG CARSTENSEN)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh0p2d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2q1bs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y484snfkx67)
German election: Centre-left claim narrow win

Germany's centre-left SPD party has claimed victory in the federal election. Parties will now try to form a coalition government, and the BBC's Victoria Craig in Frankfurt assesses what the outcome of the vote means for the German economy. Also in the programme, our workplace commentator Peter Morgan asks whether it's time for greater transparency in the workplace about how much money people are paid. Plus, it's reported that the British government is considering bringing troops in to drive fuel tankers to restock the country's petrol stations, following panic buying amidst a lorry driver shortage which led to many retailers selling out. Ministers have also launched an emergency visa scheme, to allow foreign lorry drivers to come to the UK for three months. Edwin Atema of the Federation of Dutch Trade Unions in Utrecht tells us whether many European drivers are likely to take up such an offer.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Vishala Sri-Pathma, Ivana Davidovic and Stephen Ryan.

(Picture: Ballots being counted in Germany. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh0stj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxql7lgsrz)
UK's fuel supply problems

British motorists have been panic-buying fuel, with long queues at petrol pumps across the UK. A shortage of lorry drivers sparked fears of a disruption to fuel deliveries. Thousands of petrol stations have run dry. We'll explain the background to the crisis and speak to current and aspiring lorry drivers about their job.

We'll go to Germany to explain the election results and what happens next.

Our reporter in the BBC Delhi bureau will explain why farmers are back in the streets protesting against new agriculture laws.

And our regular health expert, Professor Manfred Green at the University of Haifa in Israel, discusses the day’s stories on the coronavirus pandemic.

(Photo: Out of use signs are displayed on fuel pumps in a Shell garage in Muswell Hill in London, Britain, 27 September 2021. Credit NEIL HALL/EPA)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh0xkn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxql7lgxj3)
What next for Germany?

German voters have delivered a narrow victory to the Social Democrats in yesterday's parliamentary elections but what does it mean for the future of Germany? We speak to our correspondent in Berlin and hear from voters.

British motorists have been panic-buying fuel, with long queues at petrol pumps across the UK. A shortage of lorry drivers sparked fears of a disruption to fuel deliveries. Thousands of petrol stations have run dry. We'll explain the background to the crisis and speak to lorry drivers about their job.

Our reporter in the BBC Delhi bureau will explain why farmers are back in the streets protesting against new agriculture laws.

And our regular health expert, Professor Manfred Green at the University of Haifa in Israel, discusses the day’s stories on the coronavirus pandemic.

(Photo: Social Democratic Party (SPD) top candidate for chancellor Olaf Scholz and SPD member Franziska Giffey carry flower bouquets as they walk with Rhineland-Palatinate State Premier Malu Dreyer at their party leadership meeting, one day after the general elections, in Berlin, Germany, September 27, 2021. Credit: Hannibal Hanschke/Reuters)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh119s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh151x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm3s15)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2qjb9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0njkhg40w8)
2021/09/27 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh18t1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2qn2f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2lcp)
China's great science leap

President Xi Jinping is investing seriously into his strategic vision of turning China into a nation of scientific pace-setters. China’s past contributions to modern-science have been proportionally lacklustre, but with a reinvigorated focus over the past two decades, China is fast turning from imitator to innovator. What might this increasing scientific prowess mean for the future of China’s development as well for the international scientific community?

Whereas once many Chinese scientists chose to go abroad to further their careers, presenter Dr Kevin Fong hears how the government has sought to lure its brightest researchers back and what that means for both scientific collaborations and the culture of science in China and the UK. As scientific research relies on transparent information sharing, what are the challenges of collaborating with an authoritarian regime?

In this second episode Kevin explores China’s booming space programme and quantum advancements; from a newly built space station to the launch of the world's first quantum satellite.

Kevin speaks to Professor Jian-Wei Pan, a scientist whose illustrious career is a list of quantum firsts and hears how China is fast making inroads into quantum computing and communications. We imagine what a quantum future - with China at the forefront - might look like and whether this potentially game-changing technology will be developed in a collaborative or competitive spirit.

Image: Wenchang Space Launch Centre in China's Hainan province, Credit: Photo by STR/AFP/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh1dk5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2bqjcvs)
Germany: Centre-left claim narrow win over Merkel's party

Germany's centre-left Social Democrats (SPD) have claimed victory in the federal election, telling the party of outgoing Chancellor Angela Merkel it should no longer be in power.

Also today: the Afghans who have been given a temporary home in Albania; and silence please- why visitors to some ancient monasteries in England are being encouraged not to speak.

(Photo: Social Democratic Party top candidate for chancellor Olaf Scholz receives flowers, one day after the general election. Credit: Reuters/Hannibal Hanschke)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh1j99)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2qwkp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh1n1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvpw0fyld)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sms4gl071)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2r09t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48z7d195lk)
German election: Centre-left claim narrow win

Germany's centre-left SPD party has claimed victory in the federal election. Parties will now try to form a coalition government, and the BBC's Victoria Craig in Frankfurt assesses what the outcome of the vote means for the German economy. Also in the programme, our workplace commentator Peter Morgan asks whether it's time for greater transparency in the workplace about how much money people are paid. Plus, it's reported that the British government is considering bringing troops in to drive fuel tankers to restock the country's petrol stations, following panic buying amidst a lorry driver shortage which led to many retailers selling out. Ministers have also launched an emergency visa scheme, to allow foreign lorry drivers to come to the UK for three months. Edwin Atema of the Federation of Dutch Trade Unions in Utrecht tells us whether many European drivers are likely to take up such an offer.

(Picture: Ballots being counted in Germany. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 28 SEPTEMBER 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh1wjp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqkcncz7vd)
Power cuts hit north-east China

Residents in north-east China are experiencing unannounced power cuts, as an electricity shortage which initially hit factories spreads to homes. Philippe Benoit at the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University, explains why this is significant. Also in the programme, Germany's centre-left SPD party has claimed victory in the federal election. Parties will now try to form a coalition government, the BBC's Victoria Craig in Frankfurt assesses what the outcome of the vote means for the German economy. We discuss urban reforestation across the globe and the impact of latest wildfires in California. Plus, regular contributor Peter Morgan asks whether it's time for greater transparency in the workplace about how much money people are paid.

All through the show we're joined by Alison van Diggelen of Fresh Dialogues in Silicon Valley.

(Picture: power pylons. Credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh208t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm4m82)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2rck6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 Who We Are (w3ct2lcr)
Buy me love: Inside the world of love coaching

Love coaching is a multi-billion dollar global industry, and one of the fastest growing in the world.

More single people than ever are looking for advice to find a lasting romantic partnership. The result has been an explosion of coaches who claim to guide you to love through viral videos and costly in-person seminars.

The BBC attends one such seminar in Kenya, with one of East Africa’s most famous love and lifestyle coaches, Robert Burale. He says he can show women all the secrets and tricks to find love in days. But does it work? Is this really a route to buy love, or simply a way to sell a dream?

(Photo: Robert Burale image displayed on multiple television sets courtesy of Robert Burale Productions)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh240y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh27s2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm4vrb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2rm1g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdk)
Cameron Menzies: La Boheme in Belfast

Australian director, writer and designer, Cameron Menzies, flew into Belfast from Australia in the midst of the pandemic to start his new tenure as Artistic Director and relaunch Northern Ireland Opera.

Puccini's La Boheme is one of the most famous operas ever written, and tells the story of a group of Bohemians who are all desperately trying to find their way in life and love, alongside the difficulties a life of poverty and illness throws at them.

This is the opera that Cameron Menzies has chosen to make his debut. It will be staged in the iconic and derelict Carlisle Memorial Church in Belfast in an area of the city which was once the flashpoint for much of the Troubles. Due to Covid, he has flipped this most classic of operas and is presenting it in a way it has never been seen before.

The set will be built from scratch, and there will only be a few short weeks between first entering the church to the live performances in September.

Join Marie-Louise Muir as she discovers what it takes to stage an opera in less than six weeks, and talks to the other creative voices involved, including the conductor, Rebecca Lang and the production manager, Pádraig Ó Duinnín.


Presented by Marie-Louise Muir
Produced by Marie-Louise Muir and Rebecca Armstrong
Executive Produced by Rebecca Armstrong for the BBC World Service


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh2cj6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xhfjy)
The American singer, R. Kelly found guilty in sex trafficking trial

US singer R Kelly has been found guilty of exploiting his superstar status to run a scheme to sexually abuse women and children over two decades.

We hear about the impact of the Texas abortion ban, with services in neighbouring states flooded with calls for help.

And the president of South Korea wants dog meat taken OFF the menu - kicking off a national conversation on the subject.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh2h8b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xhk92)
US singer R. Kelly convicted of sex abuse

Eleven accusers took the stand during the six-week trial to describe sexual humiliation and violence at his hands.

The British army is on standby to tackle a shortage of petrol in the UK. We hear from one of the thousands of European petrol tanker drivers who left the UK after Brexit.

And we hear about an investigation into an alleged plot to kidnap or potentially assassinate WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh2m0g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xhp16)
R. Kelly victims speak out after guilty verdict

The American singer, R Kelly, has been convicted of recruiting children and women for sex, and then abusing them.

A senior humanitarian official tells us that aid must be sent to Afghanistan if people there are to survive the winter.

And in the aftermath of the Texas abortion ban services in neighbouring states are flooded with calls for help.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh2qrl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pkm)
Helping animals cross the road and other obstacles

Irrigation pipes have been designed to double as mid-air walkways to help slow lorises cross open farmland in Indonesia; and a footbridge has been built for a rare breed of monkey in Brazil - the golden lion tamarin. These are just two examples of new infrastructure designed to help wild animals cope with human obstacles.

Picture credit: Little Fireface Project


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2s30z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jgb)
Decentralised Finance on the rise

Regulators are taking a close look at new crypto-trading environments, known collectively as Decentralised Finance, or DeFi. advocates say the technologies underlying DeFi offer an inclusive and democratic approach to finance, while critics say it is a potential hotbed for money laundering, terrorist financing and other criminal activity. The BBC's Ed Butler dives into the world of DeFi, speaking with Laura Shin, crypto journalist and host of the Unchained podcast, to hear about DeFi, and the kinds of entrepreneurs attracted to it. We also hear from Miller Whitehouse-Levine from the DeFi Education Fund, who argues the potential benefits of DeFi, and digital forensics expert Paul Sibenik of CipherBlade explains what tools are out there for tracking criminal activity across dentralised finance platforms. And veteran crypto investor Jamie Burke of Outlier Ventures explains why he has got so much of his own portfolio in DeFi.

(Picture credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5x)
Photographing Brazil's Yanomami

In 1971 photographer Claudia Andujar began documenting the lives of a remote indigenous tribe in the Brazilian Amazon jungle. Claudia went on to take thousands of unique images of Yanomami men, women and children. Her photographs helped the campaign for recognition of the Yanomami's rights over their own land. Mike Lanchin has been hearing from Claudia, now in her 90s, about how she was received by the indigenous group when she first arrived in the Amazon, and how she won them over with her smile, and her camera.

Photo:Antônio Korihana thëri, a young man under the effect of the hallucinogenic powder yãkoana, Catrimani, 1972-1976. © Claudia Andujar


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh2vhq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 Who We Are (w3ct2lcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2s6s3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2lcp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh2z7v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rth)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh32zz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm5pz7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2sg8c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh36r3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jww)
The secret mission to rescue women kidnapped by IS

For five years, a young Yazidi woman called Leila was held captive by the Islamic State group. She ended up in Al-Hol, a large and volatile internment camp in northern Syria holding thousands of IS supporters. But unknown to Leila, a group of Yazidi volunteers – some who had escaped IS – had returned to the camp as infiltrators, determined to rescue her and other enslaved women. Among them was the Kurdish filmmaker Hogir Hirori, who went along undercover with his camera to document the mission.

With thanks to Hanna Valenta for the translation.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Women in a niqab in Al-Hol camp
Credit: Courtesy of Hogir Hirori


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh3bh7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm5ygh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2sprm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2lcp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh3g7c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2bqlfjz)
Afghanistan: Female judges in hiding

Many of those judges fear retribution from men they convicted who have since been released from jail by the Taliban. We speak to a former judge in touch with many former colleagues on the run.

Also on the programme: the conviction of US musician R Kelly who is found guilty on nine counts including grooming and sex trafficking; and What lies behind the UK fuel shortage?

(Photo: Thousands of Afghans sought to leave through Kabul airport, which was guarded by US troops Credit: EPA)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh3kzh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pkm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2sy7w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bm3v7qqd6)
China faces electricity shortages

There have been widespread power outages across China as the country lacks coal. James Mayger is China economy editor for Bloomberg in Beijing, and explains the background to the problems. Also in the programme, the BBC's Victoria Craig reports on how climate change became one of the key issues in the recent German federal election, and meets some of those recovering from this summer's devastating floods. Plus, after several pandemic-related delays, the 25th James Bond film, No Time to Die, will get its world premiere at the Royal Albert Hall in London today. Laura Houlgatte is chief executive of the International Union of Cinemas in Brussels, and tells us how much cinemas are banking on the tuxedo-clad spy to spearhead a renaissance in business.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Vishala Sri-Pathma and Sara Parry.

(Picture: Power pylons in Beijing. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh3pqm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxql7lkpp2)
Afghanistan's female judges

We continue to look at life under the Taliban in Afghanistan, today focusing on judges and banks. We hear about the female former judges who are now in fear of the men they once convicted. And we talk about warnings the banking system is close to collapse.

Our regular medical expert Dr Isaac Bogoch in Toronto discusses the latest news on the coronavirus pandemic.

And we play you an interview with a Nigerian pastor who has been helping to negotiate with kidnappers who took more than 100 students from the local school. His own son managed to escape.

(Photo: Afghan women"s rights defenders and civil activists protest to call on the Taliban for the preservation of their achievements and education, in front of the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan. Credit: Reuters/Stringer)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh3tgr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxql7lktf6)
R. Kelly verdict: The music world reacts

Music reporters join us to reflect the strands of conversation after the conviction of R. Kelly in his trial for sex trafficking.

We continue to look at life under the Taliban in Afghanistan, today focusing on judges and banks. We hear about the female former judges who are now in fear of the men they once convicted.

And we talk through the latest news on the coronavirus pandemic with one of our regular experts, Dr Swapneil Parikh in Mumbai.

(Photo: R. Kelly sits as the jury foreman reads the guilty verdict in Kelly"s sex abuse trial at Brooklyn"s Federal District Court in a courtroom sketch in New York, U.S., September 27, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Jane Rosenberg)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh3y6w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jww)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh41z0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm6ny8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2tf7d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0njkhg6xsc)
2021/09/28 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh45q4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 Who We Are (w3ct2lcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2tjzj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsm)
Spyware threatening independent media

Spyware threatening independent media
Samuel Woodhams, the author of a report entitled “Spyware: An unregulated and escalating threat to independent media”, is live on the show. His research shows that the current unchecked growth of the commercial spyware industry is allowing repressive governments to monitor, harass and attack independent journalists and their sources as part of the battle against the free flow of information. We ask about the tech that is involved and if it’s possible to control it.

Eating out with an app
So COVID has brought about significant changes in how we order our food – not only have takeaway apps increased significantly in popularity but food ordering in restaurants in a number of countries was only possible thanks to our smart phones. As restrictions in some parts of the world ease, many restaurants are reluctant to go back to the traditional way of running their businesses. Gareth and Bill meet Dominic Jones, CEO of JPRestaurants in Jersey, who explains how ordering on an app has streamlined his business, allowed them to open earlier than they thought they could during the pandemic and how customers have taken to it. Gareth and Bill even sneak into the kitchens to see how the tech allows the food to be prepared incredibly quickly.

TikTok promotes COVID vaccine misinformation within minutes of signing up
Newsguard, who provides a browser extension that flags up untrustworthy information, has found that the incredibly popular app TikTok (which has a huge following amongst under 18’s) posts COVID vaccine misinformation videos to children within minutes of them signing up to the service. Alex Cadier, Managing Director of NewsGuard in the UK, is on the show to explain how they discovered that children were being targeted.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Unidentifiable hacker cracking a computer code in the dark
Credit: PeopleImages/Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh49g8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2bqm8rw)
Top US general: reputation damaged by Afghan withdrawal

America’s top general, Mark Milley, has told a Senate committee investigating last month’s chaotic exit from Afghanistan that “damaged" is one word that could describe US credibility following its withdrawal. He testified that he'd not anticipated the speed of the Taliban takeover.

Also in the programme: youth climate activists accuse world leaders of being full of hot air; and will a shortage of truck drivers in Europe and the United States lead to queues at petrol stations like in the UK?

(Photo: Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Mark Milley testifies during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on the conclusion of military operations in Afghanistan. Credit: Reuters/Elizabeth Frantz)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh4f6d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing The World (w3ct1pkm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2tsgs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh4jyj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvpw0jvhh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sms4gnx44)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2tx6x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48z7d1d2hn)
China faces electricity shortages

There have been widespread power outages across China as the country lacks coal. James Mayger is China economy editor for Bloomberg in Beijing, and explains the background to the problems. Also in the programme, the BBC's Victoria Craig reports on how climate change became one of the key issues in the recent German federal election, and meets some of those recovering from this summer's devastating floods. Plus, after several pandemic-related delays, the 25th James Bond film, No Time to Die, will get its world premiere at the Royal Albert Hall in London today. We speak to BBC entertainment correspondent Colin Paterson, who is on the red carpet.

(Picture: Power pylons in Beijing. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 29 SEPTEMBER 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh4sfs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqkcnd24rh)
China faces electricity shortages

There have been widespread power outages across China as the country lacks coal. James Mayger, China economy editor for Bloomberg in Beijing, explains the background to the problems. Veterinarian Dr Karen Emerson in Mississippi tells us how covid misinformation has her left and many other vets short of the animal de-wormer drug ivermectin, thought mistakenly by some to treat the coronavirus. Also in the programme, according to Anthony Wheeler, author of the book HR Without People, Human Resources professionals need to prepare for a future where jobs and careers are displaced by technology. He explains how to survive the oncoming fourth industrial revolution. Plus, after several pandemic-related delays, the 25th James Bond film, No Time to Die, will get its world premiere at the Royal Albert Hall in London today. We speak to BBC entertainment correspondent Colin Paterson, who is on the red carpet.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Ainslie Chandler, Bloomberg bureau chief in Sydney. And Alexander Kaufman, senior reporter at the Huffington Post, in New York.


(Picture: Power pylons in Beijing Credit: Getty Images.)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh4x5x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm7j55)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2v8g9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2vq7)
Sugar-coated World

USA: Plantations and plains

Lainy Malkani focuses on the story of sugar in the USA. From one of the oldest confectionery shops in New Orleans where the local delicacy of pecan nut pralines are made every day, to a former sugar plantation along the Mississippi river, she hears about the role of sugar in the history of Louisiana.

She speaks to Khalil Gibran Mohammed about the legacy of sugar and slavery in the region, and hears from the manager of the Whitney plantation about what remains there today. From there to the sugar beet plains of the mid-West, Lainy looks at how sugar has influenced government policy over time, and how the commodity has become central to American culture, its diet and economy today.


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh50y1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jww)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh54p5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm7rnf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2vhyk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnc)
5. The advocate

Forced to flee the Taliban - human rights advocate, former government advisor, feminist, Shaharzad Akbar, who knows the transformative power of education, now a refugee again. Shaharzad Akbar was the first Afghan woman to do post graduate studies at Oxford University in Britain, a student of Smith College in the US, a schoolgirl whose studies were stopped the last time the Taliban were in power, forcing her family to leave Afghanistan when she was a teeanger. Now she's had to leave again, abandoning the life she'd built in Kabul. But Shaharzad Akbar tells Lyse Doucet she won’t give up pushing for what she believes in.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh58f9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xlbg1)
US Generals recommended staying in Afghanistan

President Biden's assurances on Afghan policy are undercut by some of America's most senior generals - they say they wanted troops to stay.

Afghan's are dealing with the fallout of Biden's decision to withdraw, so Newsday hears from an Afghan woman desperate to leave the country.

Also on the way, we hear how much China's belt and road initiative is costing other countries in interest. Also in Asia, Japan's ruling party prepares to elect a leader - and new Prime Minister.

And Presidents Putin and Erdogan meet in Sochi - what will they be talking about?


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh5d5f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xlg65)
Biden told US troops should have stayed in Afghanistan

Two Senior US General's tell a Congressional committee they recommended some US troops should stay in Afghanistan even before the US withdrawal.

A major research project reveals just how much China is financing major infrastructure projects across the world.

North Korea says it has successfully tested a new hypersonic missile called Hwasong-8 - we'll go to Seoul for the latest.

And Newsday discusses the importance of building up a pond in your garden.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh5hxk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xlky9)
Afghanistan: Biden advised to keep 2,500 troops

President Biden's assurances on Afghan policy are undercut by some of America's most senior generals who argued that they wanted troops to stay.

Newsday hears from an Afghan woman desperate to leave the country, mirroring other Afghans trying to escape.

Research highlights China hands out twice as much international development money every year as the US and other major powers, this according to new evidence - Newsday asks why this is the case.

Also, Japan's ruling party has elected a leader and new Prime Minister.

As well as Britney Spears who is back in court - Will her father relinquish the control?


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh5mnp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbt)
Rafael Grossi - Nuclear fallout

Zeinab Badawi speaks to Rafael Grossi, Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, amid concern about renewed tensions over Iran’s nuclear programme. Tehran insists that it is only developing nuclear power for civilian purposes but now Israel has warned that it crosses all “red lines” and that it won’t allow Iran to acquire nuclear weapons. This follows warnings by Washington and the EU that Iran must allow international weapons inspectors full access to its workshops. Has the IAEA’s inspection programme failed and dashed all hopes of a diplomatic solution to this crisis?

(Photo: Rafael Grossi appears via video link on Hardtalk)


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2vzy2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jp3)
Inside an influencer house

We’re off to an influencer house, a luxurious mansion where social media personalities are temporarily living together to create content on behalf of a plant-based food brand. It’s a new way of advertising with big budgets and big personalities, but is it money well spent? Elizabeth Hotson hangs out by the ridiculously photogenic lily pond with content creators Jessica Hickey and Ella Blake; Ashley Morton and Oli Paterson explain how and why social media content succeeds - or fails - on Tik Tok and Instagram, and Morgan M-James nearly burns down the kitchen with his innovative plant based creation. Plus, we hear how Tik Tok comedy duo Ylwsqr, aka Bec Horsley and Sam Bartrop, are already planning their next move into the media industry and James Brooks from social media marketing company, Team Brooks explains how the content created by the housemates will be used. And Simon Day, co-creator of the Squeaky Bean brand, explains why he's taking the plunge on the project.

Produced and presented by Elizabeth Hotson

Photo of Morgan M-James in the Squeaky House kitchen. Photo by Elizabeth Hotson


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x85)
'Mad cow disease' and CJD

In 1996 the UK government said there was a link between BSE in cattle and Variant CJD in humans. It's believed that more than 100 people contracted the debilitating and ultimately fatal disease after eating infected beef during an outbreak in the 1980s and 1990s. Initially scientists had no idea what was causing their strange symptoms, until a link was found that traced CJD back to BSE or 'mad cow disease', as it became known, in cattle. Millions of cows were destroyed and feeding practices were changed to contain the outbreak. Roger Tomkins and Sarah Shadbolt both lost family members to Variant CJD and share their stories with Rebecca Kesby.

Photo: Cows. BBC.


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh5rdt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2vq7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2w3p6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh5w4y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh5zx2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm8lwb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2wc5g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh63n6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz4)
Flipper’s trainer turned dolphin saviour

Ric O'Barry was a star dolphin trainer in the 1960s and worked on the TV show Flipper. But after Flipper herself died in his arms, Ric made a dramatic U-turn and became an activist, determined that no dolphin should live in captivity. Ric now runs an organisation called Dolphin Project. This interview was first broadcast in 2019.

After Daniel Tyler dropped out of school and fell in with the wrong crowd, he decided to go backpacking to escape it all. The Englishman ended up on a tiny Malaysian island and was living a relaxed life until he was secretly filmed speaking fluently in the local dialect. The video went viral and as a result Daniel would end up finding a new name, a new religion and a new course in life.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Dolphin trainer Ric O'Barry with Flipper
Credit: David Higgs


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x85)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh67db)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm8vcl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2wlnq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh6c4g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2bqpbg2)
China’s international funding double that of US

A new study finds China's providing twice as much international development money as the US, but much of it's in the form of expensive loans that countries struggle to repay.

Also in the programme: North Korea claims it's successfully tested a hypersonic missile; and could Vitamin A help long Covid sufferers recover their sense of smell?

(Photo: A Chinese worker standing next to containers. Credit: EPA/ALEX PLAVEVSKI)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh6gwl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2wv4z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cv8y4vky7)
Warning over Chinese lending

A study reveals that 42 countries have potentially unsustainable debt exposure to China. Author and columnist Gordon Chang tells us about the research from the AidData lab at the College of William & Mary in Virginia. Also in the programme, US banking giant Citigroup is in court in New York to argue for the return of more than half a billion dollars accidentally transferred to the beauty firm Revlon's lenders. Katherine Doherty has been covering the story for Bloomberg, and explains the background. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the growing trend of influencer-based marketing, by spending time in an influencer house, where social media personalities are temporarily living together to create content on behalf of a plant-based food brand.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll and produced by Vishala Sri-Pathma and Sara Parry.

(Picture: Chinese workers on a Belt and Road initiative production line. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh6lmq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxql7lnll5)
Coronavirus pandemic: Unruly airline passengers

During the pandemic airlines have reported thousands of cases of unruly passengers, who often protest Covid rules like mask mandate. We hear experiences of three flight attendants in the US, Nigeria and Spain who are dealing with passengers onboard.

At least 30 inmates have been killed and dozens injured in a fight between rival gangs at a prison in the Ecuadorean port city of Guayaquil. We'll get more details from our reporter.

One of the most successful boxers of all time, Manny Pacquiao, has confirmed that he's retiring from the sport to focus on an effort to win next year's presidential election in his native Philippines. We've spoken to people in Manila about his legacy and political aspirations.

We'll also answer your questions about the latest news on the coronavirus pandemic with one of our regular expert guests. Dr Maria Sundaram, an infectious disease epidemiologist at Marshfield Clinic Research Institute in Wisconsin.

(Photo: Chinyere Uwaoma Credit: Chinyere Uwaoma)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh6qcv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxql7lnqb9)
Ethiopia: UN warns of aid crisis in Tigray

The United Nations says a de facto blockade means that only ten percent of the aid needed for the Ethiopian region of Tigray is getting through. Hundreds of thousands of people are at risk of famine. Our reporter in Ethiopia explains what's been happening.

During the pandemic airlines have reported thousands of cases of unruly passengers, who often protest Covid rules like mask mandate. We hear experiences of three flight attendants in the US, Nigeria and Spain who are dealing with passengers onboard.

Chile has taken first steps towards decriminalizing abortion. We'll look at the reaction and abortion rights across Latin America.

And in football, FC Sheriff Tiraspol in Moldova has pulled off one of the biggest Champions League shocks of all time, beating 13-time European champions Real Madrid. We'll speak to a Moldovan fan.

(Photo: A woman carries an infant as she queues in line for food, at the Tsehaye primary school, which was turned into a temporary shelter for people displaced by conflict, in the town of Shire, Tigray region, Ethiopia, March 15, 2021. Credit: Baz Ratner/File Photo/Reuters)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh6v3z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x85)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh6yw3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lm9kvc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2xb4h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0njkhg9tpg)
2021/09/29 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh72m7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2vq7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2xfwm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcd0)
How children think about maths and time

Claudia Hammond explores how children think with two psychologists; Dr Victoria Simms from Ulster University who researches how children’s understanding of maths develops and Professor Teresa McCormack from Queens University Belfast who researches how children understand time.

The discussion was recorded in front of an audience at the Northern Ireland Science Festival in February 2020.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Caroline Steel

(Picture: A group of preschool students sitting on the floor with their legs crossed and their arms raised in the air. Photo credit: FatCamera/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh76cc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2bqq5nz)
Italian climate minister accepts activists' criticism

The Italian climate minister, Roberto Cingolani, tells us that world leaders are listening to the young activists who accuse them of doing too little to reduce carbon emissions. 400 campaigners from around the world are taking part in a three-day summit as part of the last consultations before the major UN climate gathering - known as COP26 - in Glasgow in November.

Also in the programme: how an indigenous community in Mexico is struggling to cope as the Colorado River dries up.

And as red-hot lava hits the cold sea off the Spanish island of La Palma, toxic gases are released.

(Picture shows Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg in front of a sign for the pre-COP26 conference in Milan, Italy, Credit: Reuters)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh7b3h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2xpcw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh7fvm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvpw0mrdl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sms4grt17)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2xt40)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48z7d1gzdr)
Warning over Chinese lending

A study reveals that 42 countries have potentially unsustainable debt exposure to China. Author and columnist Gordon Chang tells us about the research from the AidData lab at the College of William & Mary in Virginia. Also in the programme, US banking giant Citigroup is in court in New York to argue for the return of more than half a billion dollars accidentally transferred to the beauty firm Revlon's lenders. Katherine Doherty has been covering the story for Bloomberg, and explains the background. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the growing trend of influencer-based marketing, by spending time in an influencer house, where social media personalities are temporarily living together to create content on behalf of a plant-based food brand.

(Picture: Chinese workers on a Belt and Road initiative production line. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 30 SEPTEMBER 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh7pbw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqkcnd51nl)
YouTube to remove vaccine misinformation videos

YouTube has said it will remove content that spreads misinformation about all approved vaccines, expanding a ban on false claims about Covid-19 jabs. Some people are looking for legal exemption from the vaccine, on religious grounds, for example, as we hear from Professor Dorit Reiss at Hastings College of Law, University of California. Also in the programme, US banking giant Citigroup is in court in New York to argue for the return of more than half a billion dollars accidentally transferred to the beauty firm Revlon's lenders. Bloomberg's Katherine Doherty explains the background. A court in Los Angeles has suspended Britney Spears' father as her 'conservator' - the controller of the American pop star's business affairs. We get the latest from Variety's Elizabeth Wagmeister. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the growing trend of influencer-based marketing, by spending time in an influencer house, where social media personalities are temporarily living together to create content on behalf of a plant-based food brand.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: David Kuo of The Smart Investor, in Singapore and Kimberly Adams of Marketplace, in Washington DC.


(Picture: A YouTube logo on a cellphone being held in a hand. Credit: Getty Images.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh7t30)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmbf28)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2y5cd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxx)
Northern Ireland’s Ceasefire Babies

In the UK’s most disputed region, Northern Ireland, the Unionist community has long been known for tenacity and even, say its critics, inflexibility in its determination to maintain links with Britain. Yet a new generation now seem less interested in the sectarian politics of their parents and grandparents. Born after the 1998 ‘Good Friday’ peace agreement that ended the IRA’s armed insurrection against British rule, many so-called Ceasefire Babies say they have different priorities, including jobs, mental health, LGBT+ rights and tackling climate change. Some refuse to be defined by either British or Irish identity and simply describe themselves as ‘Northern Irish.’ However, sectarian flags and threatening murals on ‘peace walls’ still define the urban landscape in some parts of Northern Ireland. And now, following Brexit, the Westminster government has agreed to a protocol which effectively puts a customs border in the Irish Sea – angering other Unionists who say it means they are being separated from mainland Britain. For Assignment, Lucy Ash travels to Northern Ireland to find out if Unionism’s Ceasefire Babies can really escape the past.

Producer: Mike Gallagher
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Young female loyalist band prepares to take part in the annual Relief of Derry march on August 14, 2021. Credit: Charles McQuillan/Getty Images)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh7xv4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x85)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh81l8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmbnkj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2ydvn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg7)
The bug business

Insects are cheap, packed full of nutrients, and farming them for food could help save the planet. Convincing more people to eat them, though, remains a big challenge.

Tamasin Ford speaks to three insect entrepreneurs trying to persuade the squeamish, especially in Europe and North America, to overcome their fears of crickets, worms, and spiders, and instead see them as a tasty, sustainable, alternative source of protein.

We also hear that it’s not just the ‘yuck factor’ holding this fledgling industry back - should governments, chefs, and climate campaigners be doing more to support it?

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:

Joseph Yoon, chef and executive director of Brooklyn Bugs;
Marjolaine Blouzard, former co-owner of Bugs Cafe;
Andy Holcroft, founding director of Grub Kitchen and Bug Farm Foods.

(Picture: A dish of peas, carrots and worms prepared by chef David Faure. Credit: Didier Baverel/Getty Images/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh85bd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xp7c4)
Britney Spears' father suspended as conservator

A judge has suspended Britney Spears' father from the legal arrangement that gave him control of her life after Spears accused him of years of abuse.

YouTube has said it will remove content that spreads misinformation about all approved vaccines, expanding a ban on false claims about Covid-19 jabs.

And would you keep one of the world's most dangerous birds as a pet? Research suggests that's exactly what our ancestors did.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh892j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xpc38)
Britney 'on cloud nine' over end of conservatorship

A judge suspends the pop star's father as her conservator. For years, he's controlled every aspect of her life including her finances and personal decisions.

YouTube bans the accounts of some of the world's biggest anti-vaxxers including Robert F K Jnr. and takes down videos peddling false information about COVID and other vaccines

And we hear from the outraged Danish museum curators who say they were duped by an artist who took their money and ran.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh8dtn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xpgvd)
'Free Britney' fans celebrate court ruling

A judge has suspended Britney Spears' father from the conservatorship which gave him control of her affairs.

Over one hundred inmates have been killed after fighting broke out in a prison in Ecuador. It's the latest incident of it's kind and the President has declared a state of emergency.

And we go live to Warsaw and look at the plight of migrants living in woodlands on the border between Poland and Belarus. The Polish authorities have been accused of systematically forcing them back into Belarus.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh8jks)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2k)
Is Brazil heading for a constitutional crisis?

The President of Brazil is reluctant to play by the rules. Elections are due next year and Bolsonaro is increasingly at loggerheads with his country’s democratic system. Between battles with the Supreme Court and a push to change the voting system, he is willing to go to great lengths to secure a second term.

Tanya Beckett takes a closer look at Brazil’s politics and whether the country’s constitution is being tested.

Researcher: Natasha Fernandes

Editor: Richard Vadon

(Bolsonaro waves to supporters during a demonstration on Brazil's Independence Day, 7th Sept 2021 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Credit: Alexandre Schneider /Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2ywv5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9t)
Evergrande and China's property woes

China's second largest property developer, Evergrande, is at risk of financial collapse, saddled with billions of dollars of debt. It's already defaulted on some bond repayments and has been forced to sell off assets; both Chinese and international investors are worried and Beijing is weighing the risk of spreading contagion. The BBC's Stephen McDonnell tells us about the property boom in China while Sara Hsu, a Visiting Scholar at Fudan University, tells us that the sheer size of the company is a worry. China watcher George Magnus, Research associate at Oxford University's China Centre, and at SOAS appraises the wider ramifications of the Chinese property bubble being deflated for both China and the rest of the world.
(Image: Evergrande's HQ; Image credit: Reuters)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3n)
Petra Kelly and the German Greens

In the early 1980s in West Germany, a radical new political party was on the rise. Die Grünen - the Greens - championed protecting the environment, scrapping nuclear power plants and nuclear missiles, and stopping pollution. A movement as well as a party, the Greens brought together disparate groups of environmentalists, conservative farmers and youthful anti-nuclear activists. Petra Kelly, the party’s most prominent spokesperson, was a charismatic speaker who became an international name. Her life was cut short when she was killed by her partner in 1992. Sara Parkin, friend and biographer of Petra Kelly, shares her memories of the Greens’ early successes and reflects on Kelly’s legacy today.
Image: Petra Kelly. Credit: Mehner/ullstein bild via Getty Images


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh8n9x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2z0l9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3cszcd0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh8s21)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlr)
Sushi: The Japanese dish with an ancient tradition

It’s one of the most popular dishes in the world today, but the story of sushi can be traced back more than 2,000 years. The earliest records document a preserved fish dish in ancient China and it later became a medieval luxury in Japan, before evolving into a variety of different regional styles and recipes. Today, thanks to waves of migration from Japan, there is a veritable smorgasbord of international varieties… California roll, anyone?  

Joining Rajan Datar to discuss the history of sushi are James Farrer, Professor of Sociology and Director of the Graduate Programme in Global Studies at Sophia University in Tokyo. He is the author of Globalisation and Asian Cuisines; Eric C. Rath is Professor of Premodern Japanese History at the University of Kansas in the US. He’s the author of Oishii: The History of Sushi; and Michelin-starred Japanese sushi master, Endo Kazutoshi, who is head chef at The Rotunda in London.

Presenter: Rajan Datar

[Image: Young woman eating sushi; Credit: Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8s)
Cameroon's Triple Jump Queen

In 2004, the Cameroonian triple-jumper Francoise Mbango made headlines around the world when she competed in the Athens Olympics with her head shaved. Mbango wanted to show solidarity with her mother, who was undergoing chemotherapy treatment for cancer. Mbango won a gold medal and went on to retain her title at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. She talks to Ian Williams about how motherhood inspired her journey to the very top of world sport.

PHOTO: Francoise Mbango after her Olympic victory in 2004 (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh8wt5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmchsf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2z82k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh90k9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3n)
A footballing legend's gambling secret

Footballer Peter Shilton stood in goal for England 125 times and faced Diego Maradona's infamous 'Hand of God' goal - but off the pitch he battled a secret gambling addiction for 45 years. Then a chance meeting in a hotel lift with the woman who'd become his wife changed everything.

Shekhinah is an R&B singer from South Africa whose first album went platinum, producing three number one singles. She’s won an MTV Africa Award, two All Africa Music Awards and many more. Her success is all the more striking when you hear about her start in life: she was abandoned by her biological mother and adopted into a white family. She told Outlook's Mpho Lakaje her remarkable story.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: English footballer Peter Shilton playing at Wembley Stadium in 1970
Credit: Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh949f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmcr8p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2zhkt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3cszcd0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh981k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2bqs7c5)
Young activists lobby on climate change

World leaders at a key climate meeting in Italy have praised young activists, despite being repeatedly criticised by them for inaction. Italy's international climate negotiator Federica Fricano tells us what she hopes will come out of today's talks in Milan. We also hear from Kenya's representative at the Youth Summit.

Also on the programme: jailed Belarusian opposition activist Maria Kolesnikova tells our correspondent she has no regrets; and Ecuador’s president promises action after more than a hundred inmates are killed in a prison riot.

(Photo: Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi fist-bumps Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg; Credit: Filippo Attili/Palazzo Chigi Press Office/Handout via REUTERS)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh9csp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn2zr22)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49cyrbwkkg)
US government shutdown deadline looms

The US Congress has til midnight to approve spending plans to avoid a government shutdown. At the same time, Democratic lawmakers are trying to expand the national debt limit ahead of a mid-October deadline, as well as approve a multi-trillion dollar spending programme. Lauren Fedor talks us through the complex legislative process. And the BBC's Rob Young examines the background to the current impasse. Also in the programme, at the start of the coronavirus pandemic, German company CureVac was thought by many to be one of the best prospects to develop a Covid-19 vaccine. The company's chief executive Franz Haas explains why their vaccine candidate was not as effective as had been hoped, and how the firm hopes to move forward with a second generation vaccine for the disease.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Russell Newlove.

(Picture: The US Capitol building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh9hjt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxql7lrhh8)
Covid in Russia

Coronavirus cases in Russia continue to rise and the vaccine uptake rate is relatively low. We've brought together two people who have lost a family member to the virus. We'll also speak to our reporter about how the authorities have handled the pandemic.

We’ll find out more about the gang war in a prison in Ecuador that is now known to have killed over 100 people.

A judge in Los Angeles has ruled that Britney Spears's father can no longer control over her life. We’ll hear from the fans who are hoping that a temporary suspension is the first step towards the pop star’s freedom.

We will be joined by Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland who will answer audience questions about the coronavirus pandemic.

Environment ministers are meeting in Italy for the final UN talks before the key climate conference in just over a month. Our climate editor Justin Rowlatt will answer audience questions about the key issues on agenda.

(Photo: A woman receives a dose of Sputnik V (Gam-COVID-Vac) vaccine against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at a vaccination centre in Gostiny Dvor in Moscow, Russia July 6, 2021. Credit: Tatyana Makeyeva/File Photo/Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh9m8y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxql7lrm7d)
Ecuador prison riot

Four hundred police officers have entered a prison in the Ecuadorean city of Guayaquil where at least 116 inmates were killed in an uprising. We'll speak to a journalist covering the story and to our Latin America regional expert.

We'll go to Germany where a court has issued an arrest warrant for a ninety-six-year-old woman who worked as a secretary at a Nazi concentration camp during the Second World War.

In the US, President Biden has cancelled his scheduled trip attempting to get his own Democratic party to support his long-term infrastructure plan. He needs unity to get the bill approved in the House of Representatives. We’ll find out more from our correspondent in Washington.

And Dr Helen Wimalarathna, a Molecular Epidemiologist at the University of Buckingham in the UK, will answer audience questions on the latest coronavirus stories.

Coronavirus cases in Russia continue to rise and the vaccine uptake rate is relatively low. We've brought together two people who have lost a family member to the virus.

(Photo: Relatives await for information on the inmates, outside the Guayaquil jail, in Guayaquil, Ecuador, 29 September 2021. Credit: Marcos Pin/EPA)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh9r12)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh9vs6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmdgrg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn3071l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0njkhgdqlk)
2021/09/30 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxh9zjb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn30bsq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l48)
Drug resistant malaria found in East Africa

Since their discovery in the 1970s, artemisinin-based drugs have become the mainstay of treatment for malaria caused by the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. Researchers have identified artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites in Southeast Asia since the early 2000s, but now, there is evidence of resistance in Rwanda and Uganda. Dr Betty Balikagala of Juntendo University tells us how this resistance developed and what it means for managing malaria in Africa, which carries the greatest burden of malaria cases and deaths worldwide.

We hear from some of the scientists from COVID Moonshot, a non-profit, open-science consortium which has just received key funding to develop affordable antivirals to stop SARS-CoV-2 in its tracks.

Also on the programme, Dr Rakesh Ghosh from the University of California, San Francisco tells us how air pollution is contributing to 6 million preterm births globally each year, and Dr Catherine Nakalembe of the University of Maryland and Africa Lead for NASA Harvest returns to the programme as NASA/USGS launches Landsat 9.

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Samara Linton

Image: Mosquito net demonstration in a community outreach centre in Kenya
Credit: Wendy Stone/Corbis via Getty Images


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhb38g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2bqt2l2)
UK police officer convicted of Sarah Everard murder sentenced to life in prison

A London policeman who raped and murdered a woman he falsely arrested on the street has been sentenced to spend the rest of his life in prison.
The case has caused an outcry in Britain over male violence towards women and led to calls for London's police chief, Cressida Dick, to resign.
Opposition MP Jess Phillips says this underscores “systemic problems” within the police force, especially when it comes to tackling violence against women.

Also in the programme: the president of Ecuador has declared a state of emergency in the prison system following the deadliest prison riot in the country's history. We hear from an expert on the Latin American criminal gangs responsible for the bloodshed.

And the world of boxing takes a hit, with an independent investigation finding a history of cheating and manipulation.

(Photo: Court sketch of Wayne Couzens in the dock at the Old Bailey ahead of his sentencing for the murder of Sarah Everard, London, September 30, 2021. Credit: Julia Quenzler)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhb70l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn30l8z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhbbrq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvpw0qn9p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sms4gvpyb)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn30q13)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48z7d1kw9v)
Senate votes to keep US government open

The US Senate has approved spending plans to avoid a government shutdown. We get an update from the BBC's Michelle Fleury in New York. At the same time, Democratic leaders are also trying to reach an agreement over a multi-trillion dollar spending programme. The BBC's Rob Young examines the background to the current impasse.
Also in the programme, at the start of the coronavirus pandemic, German company CureVac was thought by many to be one of the best prospects to develop a Covid-19 vaccine. The company's chief executive Franz Haas explains why their vaccine candidate was not as effective as had been hoped, and how the firm hopes to move forward with a second generation vaccine for the disease.

(Picture: The US Capitol building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 01 OCTOBER 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhbl7z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqkcnd7ykp)
US Senate approves bill to avoid government shutdown

The US Senate has approved spending plans to avoid a government shutdown. We get an update from the BBC's Michelle Fleury in New York. At the same time, Democratic leaders are also trying to reach an agreement over a multi-trillion dollar spending programme. The BBC's Rob Young examines the background to the current impasse.
Also in the programme, at the start of the coronavirus pandemic, German company CureVac was thought by many to be one of the best prospects to develop a Covid-19 vaccine. The company's chief executive Franz Haas explains why their vaccine candidate was not as effective as had been hoped, and how the firm hopes to move forward with a second generation vaccine for the disease.
And as Thailand eases Covid-related restrictions for visitors, we hear from our correspondent Jonathan Head in Bangkok how the country needs to revive its tourism industry.

Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Tribune columnist Sushma Ramachandran in Delhi and by Paddy Hirsch, contributing editor at NPR in LA.

(Picture: The US Capitol building. Picture credit: Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhbq03)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmf9zc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn3128h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tzm)
A famous night for FC Sheriff

FC Sheriff's Sebastien Thill talks about his winning goal against Real Madrid in the UEFA Champions League, which created one of the biggest upsets in the competition's history. And Freiburg goalkeeper Mark Flekken remembers an emotional night, as the club bid farewell to their iconic stadium in the Black Forest.

Picture: The players of FC Sheriff Tiraspol in a group huddle during their UEFA Champions League match against Real Madrid. (David S. Bustamante/Soccrates/Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhbtr7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhbyhc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmfkgm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn319rr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2hdv)
The Myanmar mission

David Eubank, who is originally from Texas, lives in the jungles of the Karen state near the Thai-Myanmar border, along with his wife and children. The Karen people have been fighting the Myanmar military for decades, in the world’s longest civil war.

Since the military coup on 1 February, the Karen Nation Union has sided with a people’s uprising demanding democracy is restored, and has launched attacks on the military. The army has responded with bombings that have displaced tens of thousands of people. David has seen first-hand what has happened.

Hundreds of young protesters have fled to ethnic areas, including into the area David is working in. His group, The Free Burma Rangers, has provided survival and medical training to some of these young people who want to continue fighting to restore democracy.
He is also part of an underground railway helping to smuggle out politicians, artists and activists who are on the military’s wanted list.
David takes us on a mission through the jungle to get aid to civilians caught up in the conflict.

(Photo: Sahale walks by a burning shack and opium field on a mission. Credit: Free Burma Rangers)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhc27h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xs487)
Covid-19: Australia to reopen border from November

From November fully vaccinated Australians will be able to leave and enter the country freely.

US politicians have been grilling social media giants about whether their apps have a negative impact on young people's mental health.

And Police in Ecuador say they have regained control of a prison in Guayaquil after three days of rioting in which 118 people were killed.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhc5zm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xs80c)
Australia: Fully vaccinated allowed to travel

The Prime Minister announces that the country will reopen its borders to vaccinated citizens from November.

A national debate about the safety of women resumes in the UK after a police officer is given a life sentence for abducting, raping and killing a woman after faking her arrest.

And residents of Rome take part in a Mayoral election this weekend to decide who should take charge of the city which has fallen to wrack and ruin.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhc9qr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2vr4xscrh)
Covid-19: 'It's time to give Australians their lives back'

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison announces that borders will be reopened for double vaccinated citizens.

A 96-year-old woman who worked as a secretary for a Nazi concentration camp commandant has been caught several hours after she absconded from her care home in Germany. Her trial for complicity in murder had just started.

And in Malawi, a prominent politician has killed himself inside the country's parliament building - leaving the nation in shock.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhcfgw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1s)
Michel Barnier on Brexit fallout

The crisis over a lack of supplies in the UK triggered by a shortage of truck drivers has reignited the debate about the consequences of Brexit. This comes on top of concerns about the impact on trade between Great Britain and Northern Ireland and what it means for the historic peace agreement there. Zeinab Badawi speaks to Michel Barnier, who was the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator and has declared himself a centre-right candidate for the presidential elections in France next year. How does he see the fallout from Brexit and why does he think he’s fit to be the next president of France?

(Photo: Michel Barnier in the Hardtalk studio)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn31sr8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0s)
Smart cities and broken dreams

Do smart cities live up to the hype? Urban centres from New York to South Korea’s Busan are rebranding themselves as ‘smart’. From real-time crime mapping to lower energy use, smart cities promise a shortcut to a better future. But what is a smart city? The BBC’s Technology desk editor Jane Wakefield explains. Meanwhile, brand new metropolises are being planned across Africa, often envisioned as shiny tech hubs. Will they ever get off the ground? And why are global consultancy firms often a key part of the story? We visit Kenya’s Konza Technopolis, still a construction site 13 years after it was first promised. Konza CEO John Tanui says the project is on track but Kenyan writer Carey Baraka isn’t convinced. Picture: An artist’s impression of the planned Akon City in Senegal. Credit: Akoncity.com

Presenter: Vivienne Nunis
Producer: Sarah Treanor
Reporter: Michael Kaloki


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz4)
The Tanker War

In November 1987, the Romanian cargo ship, the Fundulea, was attacked by an Iranian gunboat in the Persian Gulf. It was just one of hundreds of merchant ships hit by missiles or mines in the Gulf during the Iran-Iraq war, as both sides sought to damage each other's oil exports and trade. The conflict at sea became known as the Tanker War. Major naval powers deployed to the Gulf to protect their shipping, but many ships, like the Fundulea, ran the gauntlet unescorted. Alex Last has been speaking to Florentin Dacian Botta, who was on board the Fundulea when it was attacked.

Photo: Tug boats spray water to extinguish fires onboard the stricken Romanian freighter, the Fundulea, after it was attacked by an Iranian gunboat, 23rd November 1987 ( NORBERT SCHILLER/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhck70)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhj)
A ‘practical’ quantum computer

Are quantum computers ready to make the leap from the lab to the business? We visit two companies trying to make that a reality. Plus, we hear about Intel’s advances in neuromorphic computing, which mimics the workings of the brain. And will Amazon’s new home robot succeed where a long line of others have failed? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn31xhd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l48)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhcnz4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1ht0)
How green is nuclear energy?

Is nuclear energy ‘sustainable’ and deserving of tax breaks? It’s a question dividing member states of the European Union which is considering what role nuclear should play in efforts to wean the continent off fossil fuels. Germany announced it would phase out its existing nuclear power plants after the disaster at Fukushima in Japan in 2011. But others are pushing ahead with plans to extend the life of existing power stations and even build new ones. But with the cost of renewable energy plummeting, critics say money invested in nuclear could be better spent upgrading power grids and improving the resiliency of cleaner forms of energy. Nuclear enthusiasts say new, smaller nuclear reactors will soon become available and could help keep the lights on when the wind doesn’t blow and the sun doesn’t shine. There’s increasing private sector money going towards the development of the next generation of nuclear reactors, plus Russia and China continue to invest heavily in a sector which provides export opportunities - particularly in the developing world. So, what role will nuclear play in the future and will the technology help or hinder attempts to avert catastrophic climate change?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.
Producers: Paul Schuster and Junaid Ahmed.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhcsq8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmgdpj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn324zn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhcxgd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fj)
Meet Kenya's Guru of Love

The BBC's gender and identity correspondent, Megha Mohan, meets Robert Burale, an East African guru of love, whose seminars promise the hopeful they can “Get a boyfriend for Christmas". So what's the advice, and who's buying?

Giant African snails in Kerala
Giant African snails have become a pest in Kerala, so one area came up with a creative snail hunting idea: a chance to win over a million dollars for catching the most. Too good to be true? Over to the BBC's Jaltson Akkanath Chummar.

China's Hainan island surf boom
Covid restrictions on travel, plus surfing's debut at the Tokyo Olympics, have led to a boom in the China's home grown surf scene. Hainan island is proving a popular destination as Howard Zhang of BBC Chinese reports.

Why car registration plates have blocked the Serbian Kosovo border
A recent row over registration plates caused a blockade at the border and harsh words between Belgrade and Pristina. BBC Serbian's Marija Jankovic explains why registration plates are so contentious between Serbia and Kosovo.

Vietnam's Spring Roll King
BBC Vietnamese has been sharing the extraordinary story of Trinh Vinh Binh, nicknamed ‘the spring roll king’, famous as the only businessman to have won a case against the Vietnamese government, as the BBC’s Thu Phan explains.

Image: Robert Burale
Credit: BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhd16j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmgn5s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn32dgx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l48)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhd4yn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2bqw488)
Australia set to reopen borders

Australia will reopen its international borders from November after an 18-month-Covid-travel ban, giving long-awaited freedoms to vaccinated citizens, residents and their relatives.

Also in the programme: the White House threatens further sanctions against Ethiopia after it expels UN officials in a row over aid to the war-torn Tigray region; and the real-life rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla in a new opera.

(Photo: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison. Credit: EPA/LUKAS COCH AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND OUT.)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhd8ps)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn32mz5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46xmkjxk5p)
Australia to end strict Covid travel ban

Vaccinated Australians can start travelling abroad from November, ending an 18-month ban. Anthony Dennis is travel editor for the Sydney Morning Herald, Melbourne Age and several other publications, and tells us why the government of Australia has made this move now. Also in the programme, Thailand is also easing restrictions from today, halving the length of time required for vaccinated foreign visitors to quarantine to seven days. The BBC's Jonathan Head reports on the potential impact on the country's tourism sector. A global coalition of transport organisations, representing more than 65 million transport workers, is calling on the world's governments to end what they call a "humanitarian and supply chain crisis". Lori Ann Larocco of CNBC in New York follows the global container shipping industry closely, and brings us up to speed on the latest developments in the sector. Plus, Disney has settled a claim the Hollywood star Scarlett Johansson brought with the firm over alleged breach of contract, after it streamed her superhero film at the same time as its cinema release. Disney originally said the case was without merit, and Anna Nicolaou, US media correspondent at the Financial Times, explains what brought about a change of heart.

Today's edition is presented by Fergus Nicoll, and produced by Philippa Goodrich and Russell Newlove.

(Picture: An empty Sydney airport departures forecourt. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhddfx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxql7lvddc)
Australia to end strict Covid travel ban

During the pandemic, Australia has had some of the world's strictest border rules - even banning its own people from leaving the country. It will reopen its international border from November. We’ll explain how the rules are changing and hear the stories of Australians who have been affected.

Our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University, answers your latest questions about the pandemic. We'll also discuss
a new antiviral pill that has shown promising results of protecting people from being hospitalised from Covid-19.

Our Middle East Editor Jeremy Bowen has just finished a trip to Afghanistan to report on life after the Taliban takeover. We’ll hear his reflections on the people he met.

We’ll speak to campaigners unhappy at another James Bond villain depicted with a scarred face. We’ll hear how people with facial differences say it has an impact on their own lives.

(Photo: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks to the media during a press conference at the Lodge in Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia, 01 October 2021. Credit: LUKAS COCH AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND OUT/EPA)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhdj61)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxql7lvj4h)
The Amazon: Scientists warn of extreme heat

Scientists have warned that excessive logging risks turning the Amazon into savannah-like terrain, with deadly consequences for people in northern Brazil. They say 12 million people will be at high risk of heat-related illnesses within the next century. We'll speak to our reporter in Sao Paulo.

Australia is to reopen its border in November, with certain limitations, after more than 18 months of strict Covid travel restrictions. We’ll explain how the rules are changing and hear the stories of Australians who have been affected.

Our Middle East Editor Jeremy Bowen has just finished a trip to Afghanistan to report on life after the Taliban takeover. We’ll hear his reflections on the people he met.

We’ll explain the warnings about pressure on global supply chain and the potential implications for us all. It’s the latest subject that the BBC’s Ros Atkins has been looking at in depth.

(Photo: General view of a tract of the Amazon jungle which burns as it is cleared by loggers and farmers near Apui, Amazonas State, Brazil August 11, 2020. Picture taken with a drone. Credit: Ueslei Marcelino/File Photo/Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhdmy5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhdrp9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxp4lmhcnk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn333yp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0njkhghmhn)
2021/10/01 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhdwff)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn337pt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pr0)
Do plants have immune systems?

In the past 18 months we have heard lots about the human immune system, as we all learn about how our bodies fight off Covid-19 and how the vaccine helps protect us. But this got listener John, in Alberta, Canada, thinking about how trees and plants respond to diseases and threats. Do they have immune systems and if so, how do they work? Do they have memories that mean they can remember diseases or stressful events 5 months, or 5 years down the line, to be better prepared if they encounter the same threats again?

Presenter Marnie Chesterton sets out to investigate the inner workings of plants and trees, discovering that plants not only have a sophisticated immune system, but that they can use that immune system to warn their neighbours of an attack. Some researchers are also investigating how we can help plants, especially crops, have better immune systems – whether that’s by vaccination or by editing their genes to make their immune systems more efficient.

But some plants, like trees, live for a really long time. How long can they remember any attacks for? Can they pass any of those memories on to their offspring? Crowdscience visits one experimental forest where they are simulating the future CO2 levels of 2050 to understand how trees will react to climate change.

Featuring:
Professor Jurriaan Ton, University of Sheffield
Professor Xinnian Dong, Duke University
Dr Estrella Luna-Diez, University of Birmingham
Peter Miles, F.A.C.E. Facility Technician, University of Birmingham

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Produced by Hannah Fisher for the BBC World Service.

Photo credit: Getty Images


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhf05k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5b2bqwzh5)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhf3xp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn33h62)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tzm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjrhxhf7nt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvpw0tk6s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sms4gylvf)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkkyn33ly6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48z7d1ns6y)
Australia to end strict Covid travel ban

Vaccinated Australians can start travelling abroad from November, ending an 18-month ban. Anthony Dennis is travel editor for the Sydney Morning Herald, Melbourne Age and several other publications, and tells us why the government of Australia has made this move now. Also in the programme, Thailand is also easing restrictions from today, halving the length of time required for vaccinated foreign visitors to quarantine to seven days. The BBC's Jonathan Head reports on the potential impact on the country's tourism sector. A global coalition of transport organisations, representing more than 65 million transport workers, is calling on the world's governments to end what they call a "humanitarian and supply chain crisis". Lori Ann Larocco of CNBC in New York follows the global container shipping industry closely, and brings us up to speed on the latest developments in the sector. Plus, Disney has settled a claim the Hollywood star Scarlett Johansson brought with the firm over alleged breach of contract, after it streamed her superhero film at the same time as its cinema release. Disney originally said the case was without merit, and Anna Nicolaou, US media correspondent at the Financial Times, explains what brought about a change of heart.

(Picture: An empty Sydney airport departures forecourt. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 05:32 SAT (w3ct2kp7)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 18:32 SAT (w3ct2kp7)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 10:32 MON (w3ct2kp7)

A Wish for Afghanistan 04:32 WED (w3ct2jnc)

A Wish for Afghanistan 11:32 WED (w3ct2jnc)

A Wish for Afghanistan 22:32 WED (w3ct2jnc)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3ct1gxw)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gxx)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxx)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gxx)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkklcsbtkr)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkklcsc5t4)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkklcsck1j)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkklcscnsn)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkklcscx8x)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkklcsdrht)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkklcsfc7g)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkklcsfqgv)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkklcsfyz3)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkklcsg2q7)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkklcsgfym)

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BBC News Summary 16:30 SUN (w172xzkklcshdxn)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkklcshs51)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkklcsj4df)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkklcsj84k)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkkyn2nbwz)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkkyn2ngn3)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkkyn2nld7)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172xzkkyn2nq4c)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkkyn2pkc8)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkkyn2psvj)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkkyn2q1bs)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkkyn2qjb9)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkkyn2qn2f)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkkyn2qwkp)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkkyn2r09t)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkkyn2rck6)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkkyn2rm1g)

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BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkkyn2s6s3)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkkyn2sg8c)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkkyn2sprm)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkkyn2wc5g)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkkyn2wlnq)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkkyn2wv4z)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkkyn2xb4h)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkkyn2xpcw)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkkyn2xt40)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkkyn2y5cd)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkkyn2z82k)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkkyn3071l)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkkyn30q13)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkkyn3128h)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkkyn319rr)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkkyn324zn)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzkkyn32dgx)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzkkyn32mz5)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzkkyn333yp)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172xzkkyn337pt)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkkyn33ly6)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjr4n5nbk7)

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BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172xzjr4n5pk0j)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172xzjr4n5pnrn)

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BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172xzjr4n5qd7f)

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BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172xzjr4n5qrgt)

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BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172xzjr4n5qzz2)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjr4n5r7gb)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172xzjr4n5rc6g)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172xzjr4n5rgyl)

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BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172xzjr4n5sfxm)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172xzjr4n5sknr)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172xzjr4n5spdw)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172xzjr4n5st50)

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BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172xzjr4n5tww5)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjrhxgyzml)

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BBC News 04:00 MON (w172xzjrhxgzbvz)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172xzjrhxgzgm3)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172xzjrhxgzlc7)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172xzjrhxgzq3c)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172xzjrhxgztvh)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172xzjrhxgzylm)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172xzjrhxh02br)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjrhxh062w)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172xzjrhxh09v0)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172xzjrhxh0fl4)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172xzjrhxh0kb8)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172xzjrhxh0p2d)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172xzjrhxh0stj)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzjrhxh0xkn)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172xzjrhxh119s)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172xzjrhxh151x)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172xzjrhxh18t1)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172xzjrhxh1dk5)

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BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjrhxh1n1f)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh1wjp)

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BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh27s2)

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BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh2vhq)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh2z7v)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh32zz)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh36r3)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh3bh7)

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BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh3pqm)

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BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh3y6w)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh41z0)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh45q4)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh49g8)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh4f6d)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjrhxh4jyj)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjrhxh4sfs)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172xzjrhxh4x5x)

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BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjrhxh54p5)

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BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjrhxh5w4y)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjrhxh5zx2)

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BBC News 14:00 WED (w172xzjrhxh6c4g)

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BBC News 18:00 WED (w172xzjrhxh6v3z)

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BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjrhxh76cc)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjrhxh7b3h)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjrhxh7fvm)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjrhxh7pbw)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjrhxh7t30)

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BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjrhxh8wt5)

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BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjrhxh9hjt)

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BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjrhxhbbrq)

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BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjrhxhf7nt)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d68)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxql7lgsrz)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxql7lgxj3)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxql7lkpp2)

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BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxxql7lrm7d)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172xxxql7lvddc)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxql7lvj4h)

Bad Cops 10:06 SUN (w3ct2gyy)

Bad Cops 22:06 SUN (w3ct2gyy)

Bad Cops 03:06 MON (w3ct2gyy)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j59)

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Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jp3)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1j9t)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqk0d2kpvy)

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Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqkcnd24rh)

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Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqkcnd7ykp)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dh9)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqz)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pqz)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pr0)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lsm)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lsm)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lsm)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2lcn)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2lcp)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct2lcp)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2lcp)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mvd)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mvd)

From Our Own Correspondent 16:06 SUN (w3ct1mvd)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n69)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n69)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3ct1n69)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1nbt)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1nbt)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3ct1nbt)

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Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nvt)

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Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2lcq)

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In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tdk)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tdk)

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More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dkk)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2dkk)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dkk)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hcf)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2vr4xdjmv)

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Newshour 18:06 SUN (w172xv59q2f98g4)

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Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kxg)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3ct1kxg)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jtm)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct1jtm)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1z)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l1z)

People Fixing The World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pkm)

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Ros Atkins on ... 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dnt)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l48)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0njkhg40w8)

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Sports News 23:20 SAT (w172y0smdw58c4p)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0q52pc4v91)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tfvlrxjzq)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lc0)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1nhj)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rth)

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The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2dr2)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct2vq6)

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The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p91)

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The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p92)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3ct1p92)

The Cultural Frontline 23:32 SAT (w3ct1pt5)

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The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2gdr)

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The Fake Paralympians 05:32 SUN (w3ct2gz4)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rg6)

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The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rlq)

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The History Hour 19:06 SAT (w3ct1z7g)

The Inquiry 12:06 SUN (w3ct1z2j)

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The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172xyxnsb9r28m)

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The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1hsz)

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Who We Are 02:32 TUE (w3ct2lcr)

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Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wz3)

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WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f3q)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzlddcpblsv)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y484snfkx67)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1tzm)

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World of Wisdom 09:32 SAT (w3ct2hdp)

World of Wisdom 22:32 SUN (w3ct2hdp)

World of Wisdom 03:32 MON (w3ct2hdp)