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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 18 SEPTEMBER 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvw5yd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqjn3rsk83)
France is recalling its ambassadors from the US and Australia

France is recalling its ambassadors from the US and Australia for consultations in protest after Australia abruptly ended a submarine contract in order to sign a new deal with the US and UK. The security deal is widely seen as an effort to counter China's influence in the contested South China Sea. Also the Russian election gets underway Google and Apple have removed a tactical voting app. Opposition activists have accused the tech giants of bowing to pressure from the Kremlin. We get reaction to the move from Leonid Volkov, who ran jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's campaign in 2018. Plus the international traffic light system is being simplified in England, with double-vaccinated travellers no longer forced to take Covid's pre-departure tests from October. But will this help revive a flagrant travel industry in England? Travel writer Simon Calder tells us more. Plus the BBC's Rebecca Kesby finds out how scientists are using genetic material from wild plants to make agricultural crops more resilient to climate change.

Throughout the programme Rahul Tandon is joined by Karen Percy a journalist based in Melbourne.

Produced by Philippa Goodrich


(Picture: US President Joe Biden, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Australia Prime Minister Scott Morrison. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvw9pj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zyxns)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gknyx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbz)
“I’m worried about their security & family life”

On this week’s episode, Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Jim Maxwell hear from Tuba Sangar, who up until just a couple of weeks ago was the women's development manager for the Afghanistan Cricket Board. She tells the team about her fears for the safety of her players, the future of women’s cricket in Afghanistan, and what it was like leaving her home and her job behind.

They also speak with Punjab Kings and Australia bowler Nathan Ellis, whose remarkable two-year journey from playing club cricket continues with the chance to play in the Indian Premier League, which resumes in the UAE, and discuss the fall-out from the fifth Test between England and India. The match was called off just two hours before the scheduled start of play due to Covid concerns in the India camp.

Photo: Members of Afghanistan's first national women's cricket team take part in a training session in Kabul. (Credit: SHAH MARAI/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvwffn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fg)
The Kenyan men campaigning against FGM

Campaigns to end female genital mutilation usually focus on women’s experiences for obvious reasons: women bear the lifelong physical and psychological scars. But in Kenya the Men End FGM Foundation is adding men’s voices to the anti-FGM movement. Esther Ogola is the women’s affairs reporter in Nairobi who covered the story.

Arabic coffee and health
BBC Arabic has been investigating the health risks of the strong dark coffee traditionally drunk in Greece and Turkey and across the Arab world. Omar Abdel-Razek tells us what the experts say, and also shares the pleasures of the culture around coffee.

Taiwan’s pineapple politics
Earlier this year China halted its imports of Taiwanese pineapples overnight. China is Taiwan’s biggest export market, so a huge political effort was launched to promote the island’s pineapples. Benny Lu is a journalist with BBC China in Hong Kong, and explains what pineapples reveal about regional geopolitics.

Thailand's celebrity monks
Two Buddhist monks have attracted a huge social media following among young Thais for their humorous, informal style. But as BBC Thai’s Issariya Praithongyaem tells us, not everyone likes it, and they have been asked to up the religious content and cut down on the giggling.

VR helps Indians and Pakistanis visit their lost homes
India's violent partition in 1947 displaced some 15 million people who were never able to return home. But for some, a new project called Dastaan is providing customised virtual tours around villages they haven't seen for over 70 years, as Bushra Owaisy from BBC Delhi explains.

Image: Kenyan men campaigning against FGM
Credit: Men End FGM Foundation


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz2)
The Peter Principle

In 1969 a satirical book, The Peter Principle, suggested that promotion led to incompetence. Written by a Canadian Professor of Education, Dr Laurence J. Peter and playwright Raymond Hull, the book was a parody of management theory but it's core message struck a chord with many. It became an instant classic, selling millions of copies around the world. We present a rare archive recording of Dr Peter, explaining his theory that “In a hierarchy every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence".
Photo: Dr Laurence J. Peter on the BBC in 1974 (BBC)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvwk5s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsy)
Canada votes: Is Trudeau in trouble?

On Monday Canadians will vote in a snap election called by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau just two years after they last voted. He hopes to turn his minority in parliament into a majority having previously enjoyed favourable reviews for his handling of the pandemic. But since calling the election, a fourth wave of Covid infection has gathered pace in parts of the country prompting claims that he is putting his own political interests ahead of the public’s by going ahead with the vote. Some polls even show the governing Liberal Party slipping behind its main rival the Conservatives, led by Erin O’Toole. The PM also faces a strong challenge from the left in the form of New Democratic Party leader Jagmeet Singh, and Quebec-nationalist party the Bloc Québécois is also polling strongly. So, what are the main issues that will decide the election and are Canadians in the mood for change?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.

Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvwnxx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf1zz8x5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gl169)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kp6)
Squid and self-healing materials

What if a robot could fix itself? It’s the story of the secret of scary squid suckers, with their razor sharp teeth-like structures. They could hold the key to materials which can repair themselves without human intervention. Scientists think this could be useful for repairing hazmat suits and even robots.

To listen to the show online, visit bbcworldservice.com/30animals


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct2dns)
The ethics of Covid booster jabs

The UK joins a growing number of rich countries offering Covid booster vaccines, whilst across Africa only 3% of people have been vaccinated against the virus. Ros Atkins looks into the issue of vaccine inequity.

(Photo: A health official prepares a syringe with the Moderna Covid-19 vaccine during a mass Covid-19 vaccination drive in Nairobi, 17 September 2021. Credit: Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvwsp1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytcn4l75y4)
Afghanistan: US admits Kabul drone strike killed civilians

The head of US Central Command, General Kenneth McKenzie, said an investigation had found that a drone strike targeting a suspected car bomb attack on Kabul airport on the 29th of August killed an aid worker and nine members of his family, seven of them children.

Also today: France has said it is recalling its ambassadors in the US and Australia for consultations, in protest at a security deal which also includes the UK.

Joining us to discuss today's stories are Paul Lowe, reader in documentary photography at the London College of Communication, University of the Arts London.

and

Kadri Liik, senior policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations.

(Photo: The aftermath of the drone strike in the Afghan capital, Kabul)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvwxf5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytcn4l79p8)
France recalls envoys amid security pact row

France has said it is recalling its ambassadors in the US and Australia for consultations, in protest at a security deal which also includes the UK.

Also today; The head of US Central Command General Kenneth McKenzie, said an investigation had found that a drone strike targeting a suspected car bomb attack on Kabul airport on the 29th of August killed an aid worker and nine members of his family, seven of them children.

Joining us to discuss today's stories are Paul Lowe, reader in documentary photography at the London College of Communication, University of the Arts in London and Kadri Liik, a senior policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations.

(Photo: A sign outside the French Embassy is seen after it was announced France decided to recall its ambassadors in the United States and Australia for consultations after Australia struck a deal with the US and Britain which ended a $40 billion French-designed submarine deal. Reuters/Gershon Peaks)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvx159)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytcn4l7ffd)
French Foreign Minister: 'It is a stab in the back'

France says it is recalling its ambassadors in the US and Australia for consultations, in protest at a security deal which also includes the UK.

Also today; the head of US Central Command, General Kenneth McKenzie, said an investigation has found that a drone strike targeting a suspected car bomb attack on Kabul airport on the 29 August killed an aid worker and nine members of his family, seven of them children.

Joining us to discuss today's stories are Paul Lowe, reader in documentary photography at the London College of Communication, University of the Arts in London and Kadri Liik, a senior policy fellow at the European Council on foreign relations.

(Photo:The French Embassy is seen after it was announced France decided to recall its ambassadors in the United States and Australia for consultations after Australia struck a deal with the US and Britain, which ended a $40 billion French-designed submarine deal. Credit: Gershon Peaks/Reuters)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gldfp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p90)
What can we learn from nomadic life?

What's the appeal of a nomadic existence with no settled place to live? The award-winning film, Nomadland shone a light on the sense of community, support and friendship that exists among people in the United States living in their vehicles and moving from place-to-place. How much do these modern-day nomads have in common with traditional communities around the world? Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women from Somalia and US about life on the move.

Shugri Said Salh was sent to live with her grandmother at the age of six and enjoyed an idyllic childhood living as a nomad in Somalia: herding camels, raising goats, and enjoying nightly stories and songs of her ancestors. She fled her country’s brutal civil war living in refugee camps in Kenya before settling in California where she's now a nurse. She's written a book, The Last Nomad, about an almost-forgotten way of life full of beauty, innovation, and tradition as well as danger.

Carol Meeks lives part of the year on the road in a converted van. After seeing the unhealthy food some fellow travellers were eating, she started a YouTube channel posting videos about how to cook tasty meals, cheaply on a small camping stove. She called it Glorious Life on Wheels and now interviews solo women living in their vehicles and travelling the US as they try to get by on meagre incomes.

Produced by Jane Thurlow


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvx4xf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d67)
Coronavirus: Vaccinations and hospitals

The United States continues to record some of the highest infection and death rates in the world due to Covid-19. Host Nuala McGovern brings together two hospital nurses in Florida. They share the heartbreak and exhaustion of treating severely ill and dying patients, often young, who they say could have avoided hospital completely by getting vaccinated.

Earlier this year, India was dealing with its own devastating second wave of the virus, with hospitals unbearably full, a lack of oxygen for treatment, and desperate people dying in queues waiting to see doctors. The situation has markedly improved now, say two doctors working in Delhi and Mumbai, and vaccination numbers are soaring. But they worry that festivals and other celebrations may lead to another surge of the disease. They are also concerned the real legacy of coronavirus in India may be its impact on mental health and the education of children in poorer communities.

We also hear from teachers in India and the Philippines.

(Photo: Amanda Tetlak, a registered nurse, prepares Covid-19 vaccine doses at a Florida Department of Health. Credit: Octavio Jones/Reuters)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73glj5t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdn)
Dreams

Can sticking to our dreams end up holding us back? Diane and her husband promised they would sell their home on retirement and travel the world. Sadly, he passed away before they could do that. Diane wants to carry on with that plan but the pandemic has made her realise the richness of her community and given her a sense that as she gets older she needs to make best use of the time she has. Perhaps she is wrong to turn her back on where she lives and what she has.

Sister Dang Nghiem, a Buddhist Nun, offers gentle counsel and helps Diane towards a resolution. She discusses with the BBC's Sana Safi that the long-long dreams we hold may be found to actually be a distraction from what really matters.

Produced by Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards

Photo: Ladder leading up to cloud
Credit: Getty Images


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1y)
Reporting the rise and fall of a corrupt US police task force

Bad Cops and the true story of the rise and fall of a corrupt US police gun task force - listeners give their verdict and we speak to the programme’s presenter.
Plus listeners reflect on how they first heard about the 9/11 terror attacks in New York 20 years ago.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvx8nk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q4qf1cpp6)
A glimpse into the future of Sport

Athletes Unlimited is a collective promoting a new way of thinking about professional sport, placing the player at the very heart and doing away with team owners. It's currently running leagues in women’s volleyball, lacrosse and softball. Jon Patricof, the CEO at Athletes Unlimited, told us how this revolutionary new concept works.

Could the development of AI help players avoid injury? That’s one of the claims made by technology companies who operate automated video recording system that records the entire field without the need for a camera operator. Victoria Rich is the Director of Operations for the NWSL, where the technology is being used. Meanwhile, the system has also allowed some teams and leagues without any television contracts to stream their matches to fans and raise some revenue. Patrik Olsson, co-founder & CEO at Spiideo, explained how it works.

Two times Paralympic archery gold medallist Danielle Brown explains how she used archery as a coping mechanism to deal with her chronic pain. Now retired, she has become an author and with the aim of inspiring other women, she has gathered 50 stories from different talented sportswomen in her latest book Run Like A Girl: 50 Extraordinary and Inspiring Sportswomen.

Photo: Getty Images


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvxddp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf2000cy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73glrp2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3p)
LGBTQ+: How inclusive are Indian workplaces?

Before India legalised homosexual sex in 2018, the LGBTQ+ community in this country of more than a billion people lived under the shadow of a law dating back nearly 160 years to colonial rule.

As the ruling was handed down, there were celebrations all across the country, but three years on, have social mindsets and attitudes changed? Do professionals from the LGBTQ+ community find it easier to apply for jobs or ask for promotions, or is it still monumental to come out at work? And do corporate India’s inclusive policies tackle real representation, or are they mere tokenism?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how inclusive Indian workplaces are for the LGBTQ+ community.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Ritu Dalmia, chef, restaurateur, LGBTQ+ activist; Harish Iyer, head – Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Axis Bank; Ishaan Sethi, business, marketing and product consultant; Ahmed Faraz, business process outsourcing professional


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvxj4t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2kks)
Afghanistan and me

As Afghanistan reaches a turning point with American troops leaving the country, BBC Pashto presenter Sana Safi tells the story of how her own life has been intertwined with the fate of her country. She tells the story of what it was like for a child to survive in a country caught between the crosshairs of geopolitical conflict, of surviving religious fundamentalism, of growing up in a country without music or books.

She describes how violence and conflict forced her family to move from Kandahar to Helmand, only to find themselves caught in the crossfire of a gun battle. How under Taliban rule she effectively became a prisoner in her own home. How the continuing decades of conflict brought tragedy to her own family – and how she could only find security by moving to the UK, where she suffered the pain of separation from her family and homeland. As she says, for those born in Afghanistan in the 1980s, hers is a far from unusual story.

(Photo: BBC presenter Sana Safi)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvxmwy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt3dm6k)
France recalls envoys in row over defence deal

France says it is recalling its ambassadors in the US and Australia for consultations, in protest at a security deal between the so- called Aukus alliance. The opposition French senator, Nathalie Goulet, says France feels completely betrayed.

Also in the programme: human rights groups say new Greek migrant camp on the island of Samos is like a prison; and boys go back to school in Afghanistan, but their sisters have to stay at home.

Photo: US President Joe Biden delivers remarks about a national security initiative with Australia and Britain on 15th September 2021 Credit: European Pressphoto Agency


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvxrn2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tfhbg4dcw)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Robbie Jay Barratt - AMA/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvy7ml)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf200vlv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gmlwz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kp6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8q)
The Queen of Women's Beach Volleyball

America’s Misty May-Treanor is the winner of three Olympic gold medals and the most successful women’s beach volleyball player of all time. Misty formed an almost unbeatable team with Kerri Walsh-Jennings, but she faced a tough personal battle at the London games in 2012, which she had decided would be her last competition because of persistent knee and Achilles tendon injuries. Misty May-Treanor talks to Jeremy Inson about her challenges on and off the court. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Misty May-Treanor in action at London 2012 (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvyccq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Conversation (w3ct2g9t)
The Conversation with Helen Clark and Michelle Bachelet

What does it take to run a country? Kim Chakanetsa is joined by two international leaders who have championed women’s health, equality and empowerment throughout their careers. They will discuss their personal journeys, the impact Covid-19 has had on the wellbeing of women around the world, and why more women should join the political arena. The guests will also be taking questions from two young female activists and leaders in women’s rights, health and climate change.

Michelle Bachelet became Chile’s first female president in 2006 and served a second term in 2014. In 1973, her father was detained and tortured under General Pinochet’s dictatorial rule. Two years later she was also imprisoned with her mother and then exiled for four years. When she returned to Chile, she became a doctor and worked with victims of torture. She is currently the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Helen Clark was the first woman to be elected as prime minister of New Zealand and the first woman to serve for three consecutive terms. After her premiership, she became the first female head of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and last year she co-chaired an Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response to explore the global response to Covid-19. She’s also board chair of the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health (PMNCH).


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvyh3v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtg)
Actor Jennifer Hudson

Nikki Bedi and guests, novelist Elif Shafak and critic and commentator Bilal Qureshi discuss the cultural highlights of the week.

Oscar winning actor Jennifer Hudson tells us about the impact of playing Aretha Franklin in the movie Respect.

Actor, director, screenwriter and producer Michaela Coel explains her relationship with social media and why she turned down a million dollars.

Artist and film-maker Shirin Neshat reveals why she turned to dreams for her latest project.

Actor and stuntman Simu Liu on his role as Shang-Chi in the latest Marvel movie.

Novelist Elif Shafak tells us why a fig tree is one of the main characters in her latest novel, The Island of Missing Trees.

Film-maker James Ashcroft explains why he was inspired by the sinister side of the New Zealand landscape for his latest movie

And music from pop sensation Camila Cabello.

(Photo: Jennifer Hudson. Credit: Noam Galai/GettyImages)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvylvz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt3fl5l)
Afghan girls excluded as boys return to secondary schools

Schoolgirls told the BBC they were devastated not to be returning to class. The Taliban have only allowed boys and male teachers back into classrooms.

Also in the programme: After 16 years in power, we ask what Angela Merkel’s legacy will be for women in Germany.

And more reactions from both France and the US as France recalls it’s ambassadors in the US and Australia following a new security pact between the US, the UK and Australia.

Photo: Afghan boys sat in classroom with a male teacher. Credit: Getty Images.


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvyqm3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcd)
I'm not hyperpop with Mallrat, Ninajirachi, Daine and Donatachi

Young Australians Mallrat, Ninajirachi, Daine and Donatachi look into the epicentre of the media term ‘hyperpop’. It’s bubble-gum sweet, with chaotic synth sounds mixed with pop and autotuned vocals, and the volume turned up to 11. Together, they discuss feeling old in the hyperpop genre (they’re all in their teens, or early 20s), not having any musical training, why face-to-face sessions are tough, how Daine’s autism feeds into her music, and how they feel when their music gets put in a playlist called Chill BBQ Music.

Ninajirachi is a songwriter, producer and DJ who’s been tagged as “one of Australia’s first notable hyperpop artists”. She got into music production after hearing the ‘hyperkinetic’ pop producer Sophie. Earlier this year, she released the True North EP with musical prodigy Kota Banks. Donatachi is a musician from Brisbane, described as one of “Australia’s best-known Hyperpop producers”. Their 2019 underground hit Crush on U, in collaboration with Slayyyter, is credited as being the song that set the hyperpop scene in motion. Daine is a Filipino-Australian producer from Melbourne, whose latest track, boy wanna txt, is produced by former Music Life guests 100 Gecs. And hosting the show is Mallrat, from Brisbane. She makes dreamy electronic pop and was recently named as one of the “100 Women Revolutionising Pop”. Mark Ronson is also a fan.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvyvc7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtzbdc4x6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sm1lvh6jv)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gn6mm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt4)
Architecture: Yinka Ilori and Murat Tabanlioglu

Meet the global designers and architects changing the cities that surround us. First up, British Nigerian designer Yinka Ilori explains how turning a city crossing into a colourful work of art sparks joy and brings people together during difficult times.

Mexican architect Luciana Renner talks about why she always works with local communities to design public spaces, and how involving marginalised people can make our cities more inclusive.

The Tersane, a historic shipyard in Istanbul’s Golden Horn district, is being transformed into a cultural quarter. Architect Murat Tabanlioglu is aiming to preserve the area’s unique history and heritage while creating new spaces.

Finally, Japanese architect Kengo Kuma, who designed the Tokyo Olympic stadium, explains why he thinks about buildings and cities from a cat’s perspective.

Presenter: Chi Chi Izundu
Producer: Olivia Skinner

(Photo: Yinka Ilori)



SUNDAY 19 SEPTEMBER 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvz2vh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yvq)
Ebola can remain dormant for five years

An international team of researchers has discovered that an outbreak of Ebola in Guinea in February this year was the result of re-activated Ebola virus in someone who’d been infected at least five years ago during the earlier large Ebola epidemic that swept through Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. This means the virus can remain dormant in some Ebola survivors for five years or more.

Virologists Alpha Kabinet Keita and Robert Garry talk to Roland Pease about the research and its implications. Also in the programme: The eruption of lavas from Iceland’s newest volcano Fagradalsfjall continues six months on. Geochemist Ed Marshall tells us how he gets up close to sample the molten rock with a long scoop and a bucket of water, and what he’s learning about this remarkable eruption. NASA’s Katie Stack Morgan updates Science in Action on the Perseverance rover’s successful sampling of rocks from Jezero crater on the planet Mars. When the specimens are eventually returned to Earth, she says they may turn out to contain tiny samples of Mars’ water and atmosphere from early in the Red Planet’s history.

Also...Look into my eyes. What do you see? Pupil, lens, retina… an intricate set of special tissues and mechanisms all working seamlessly together, so that I can see the world around me. Charles Darwin called the eye an ‘organ of extreme perfection’ and he’s not wrong!

But if the eye is so complex and intricate, how did it evolve? One listener, Aloyce from Tanzania, got in touch to pose this difficult question. It’s a question that taxed Darwin himself, but CrowdScience is always up for a challenge!

The problem is that eyes weren’t ever designed - they were cobbled together over millions and millions of years, formed gradually by the tweaks and adaptations of evolution. How do you get from the basic detection of light to the wonderful complexity - and diversity – of visual systems we find throughout the animal kingdom?

CrowdScience sent Marnie Chesterton on an 800 million year journey to trace how the different elements that make up the human eye gradually came into being; from the emergence of the first light-sensitive proteins to crude eye-cups, from deep sea creatures with simple pinhole eyes to the first light-focusing lenses, all the way to the technicolour detail of the present day.


(Image credit: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvz6lm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf201tkw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gnkw0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvs)
Covid in Vietnam

In 2020 Vietnam ran a successful track and trace system, with very few coronavirus infections and for a long time no deaths at all, while other countries had thousands. In 2021 things haven’t gone so well and since July strict stay at home orders have been in place in some cities. Nga Pham, a journalist from BBC World News, and software engineer Kevin Vu talk about what life is like in Hanoi and Ho Chi Min City.

Dr Monica Lakhanpaul, Professor of Integrated Community Child Health at University College London, talks to Claudia Hammond about a mystery disease outbreak in the state of Uttar Pradesh in India. The symptoms are fever, joint pains, headaches and nausea.

People born premature can have an increased risk of developing heart problems later in life. For the first time researchers have shown that breast milk can improve heart performance in premature babies. The new study was done by Afif El-Khuffash who looks after premature babies and is Clinical Professor of Paediatrics at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland.

And Monica and Claudia discuss the latest research into long Covid in children.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Pam Rutherford

(Picture: A resident rides her bicycle near a make-shift barricade in Hanoi during the lockdown to stop the spread of Covid-19. Photo credit: Nhac Nguyen/AFP/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvzbbr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2kks)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvzg2w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvc)
A new life in Iraq

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

This week, the search for a new life in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The region is more stable and prosperous than the rest of the country. It is increasingly an attraction for people fleeing from neighbouring Iran. Iranians are now coming in greater numbers since the election of a hard-line president. They are searching for work and hoping to escape rocketing food prices and shortages at home, as Lizzie Porter reports.

On Monday Canadians go to the polls after a short campaign. The snap election was called by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, hoping to secure a majority in the House of Commons. Mr Trudeau was counting on an electoral boost from his handling of the Covid-19 pandemic. But as Jatinder Sidhu in Vancouver has heard, other issues are also on the agenda.

Inclusion and fraternity were the messages spread by Pope Francis on his visit to Hungary this week. While visiting, the Pope met Hungary’s Prime Minister, Viktor Orban – known for his populist politics and anti-immigration stance. It had been rumoured earlier in the summer that the meeting might not happen at all, as some leading journalists close to the Hungarian Prime Minister accused the Pope of “anti-Christian behaviour”. As Nick Thorpe reports from Budapest, the meeting with Viktor Orban was brief and there wasn’t much talking.

The Central American country of Costa Rica gets a lot of good press – and name recognition – for its efforts to preserve nature. It’s also a hotspot for eco-tourists; from bird spotters to those who want to wander into a rain forest. But not everything about Costa Rica’s government is green – and not all its life forms are friendly. Michelle Jana Chan went for a night walk which shed light on all sorts of wonders and horrors too.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head

(Image: A mural of apparently armed fighters known as ‘Peshmerga’ at a training camp belonging to the Kurdistan Democratic Party Iran, an Iranian Kurdish opposition group, outside the town of Koya, Iraqi Kurdistan, August 2021. Credit: Lizzie Porter)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gntc8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvzkv0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf2025t8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gny3d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz3)
5. Court

A criminal case is brought against the so-called fake Paralympians and the team’s organisers. The prosecutor gives the inside take on the legal process and an outcome that left many frustrated.

And Dan hears about the man accused of being the mastermind behind the scam and his surprising back story. Will he explain himself and apologise to the victims?

Presenter: Dan Pepper
Series Producer: Simon Maybin

(Photo credit: EPA)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvzpl4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytcn4lb2v7)
AUSUK row: France ups the ante

The French foreign minister, Jean-Yves Le Drain, has accused the United States and Australia of 'lies', 'duplicity', 'contempt' and a 'major rupture of trust" in the row over Canberra's cancellation of a multi-billion dollar order for French submarines, which it has now replaced with American nuclear-powered ones.

Also in the programme: the Kenyan government declares a national emergency as a drought leaves two million Kenyans facing starvation as crops fail; and Alev Scott reflects on the rights and wrongs of a foreign holiday. This weeks panellists are Isabel Hilton, founder of the London-based 'China Dialogue', a bilingual website, and Manu Lekunze, lecturer in international relations at the University of Aberdeen.

(Photo: French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian delivers remarks at the unveiling of a model of the Statue of Liberty at the French Ambassador's residence in Washington, 14 July 2021. Credit: Reuters/Evelyn Hockstein)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvztb8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytcn4lb6lc)
Australian PM defends cancelling French submarines

The Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, says France would have known his government had "grave and deep concerns" about French submarines, which Canberra has decided to ditch in favour of a nuclear-powered American model. His comments come as France has withdrawn its ambassadors to Canberra and Washington for consultations.

Also in the programme: With the COP26 Climate Summit just a couple of months away, we hear from Huiyao Wang, a Counsellor on the China State Council, on Beijing's attitude to the talks; and should rich nations be giving third doses of the coronavirus vaccine, when so much of the developing world is unvaccinated? This weeks panellists are Isabel Hilton, founder of the London-based 'China Dialogue', a bilingual website, and Manu Lekunze, lecturer in international relations at the University of Aberdeen.

(Photo: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks to the media during a press conference at Kirribilli House in Sydney, Australia, 19 September 2021. Morrison made remarks following France's decision to recall its ambassadors in Australia and the United States after Canberra walked out of a submarine deal with Paris to acquire nuclear propelled ones from Washington. Credit: EPA/Joel Carrett)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscvzy2d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytcn4lbbbh)
AUSUK pact: a deliberate snub to France

Sylvie Bermann, a former French ambassador to the UK, China, and Russia, says AUSUK defence pact is a deliberate snub to France. The Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, says France would have known his government had "grave and deep concerns" about French submarines, which Canberra has decided to ditch in favour of a nuclear-powered American model. His comments come as France has withdrawn its ambassadors to Canberra and Washington for consultations.

Also in the programme: The third and final day of parliamentary elections in Russia, as opponents of President Putin have been stepping up their complaints that they're being silenced on digital platforms; and Uga Carlini, on her new film - a comedy about a formerly homeless parking attendant who decides to make her lifelong dream of travelling the world a reality when she's diagnosed with a life-threatening disease. This weeks panellists are Isabel Hilton, founder of the London-based 'China Dialogue', a bilingual website, and Manu Lekunze, lecturer in international relations at the University of Aberdeen.

(Photo: Sylvie Bermann, former French ambassador to the UK, China, and Russia. Credit: BBC)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gp9bs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg5)
OCD, the kitchen, and me

Hot stoves, perishable food, and potentially dirty surfaces can make the kitchen a difficult place for someone with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.

People with OCD will frequently experience unwanted thoughts, images or urges - which may include worries about contamination or harming themselves and others. They will often use repetitive behaviours to relieve their anxiety - including washing and cleaning, or repeatedly checking their actions. All this means that both cooking and eating food prepared by others can become very distressing.

In this episode, Emily Thomas meets three people who have suffered from the disorder. They explain how debilitating the condition can be by describing just one aspect of daily life - the way they eat.

Contributors: Chrissie Fadipe, Shai Friedland, Patricia Grisafi

If you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this programme, please see the related links section at the bottom of this page.


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscw01tj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mvc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gpf2x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxf)
The first beauty queen in a free South Africa

Basetsana Kumalo is easily one of South Africa’s most recognisable celebrity figures. She shot to fame as Miss South Africa in 1994, just months after Nelson Mandela was elected president. Basetsana was the first black contestant to win the contest in the country's new "freedom era" and, by default, became the face of South Africa’s new democracy. After this Basetsana hosted one of the country's top lifestyle programmes and today she's a successful media entrepreneur. Her book is called: Bassie, My Journey of Hope. This programme was first broadcast on 11th January 2020.

Presenter: Andile Masuku
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

Picture: Basetsana Kumalo at the SA Style Awards in Johannesburg.
Credit: Gallo Images / Contributor

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscw05kn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2ghs)
6. The fallout

A shocking tragedy occurs. Conspiracy theories spread. The trial of the Task Force officers begins, but who will speak out?


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gpjv1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2ptx)
The Pope's astronomer

Br. Guy Consolmagno calls himself a 'Sputnik Kid'. He started school the year the Russians launched the world's first satellite. Growing up in Detroit during the space race he remembers the excitement he felt watching Nasa launch rockets into space, "I grew up at a time when anything was possible." He was always fascinated with astronomy. In fact, his father always wanted to be an astronomer but could never turn it into a career. He would show Guy the stars at night and point out the different constellations. Little did he know back then that his son would not only go on to be an astronomer, lecturing at the prestigious colleges of Havard and MIT, but he would go on to become the director of one of the oldest observatories in the world - The Vatican Observatory.

The Vatican Observatory has been gazing at the stars since 1582. The church started the observatory to study the heavens in order to make changes to the church calendar. Over the years it became a way for the church to marry science and faith and explore the points where they intersect. The first telescopes were placed right on top of the Vatican, but as Rome grew bigger and brighter, the view of the stars started to fade and so in the 1930s the Vatican built a new large telescope at the Pope's summer residence at Castel Gandolfo 25km south of Rome, and also one in Arizona in the US!

There are twelve astronomers working at the Vatican observatory, but Br. Guy, the director, is unique as he is the only one who was appointed by a pope and saint, Saint Pope John Paul II. He worked under JPII, Pope Benedict, and now Pope Francis. He still wears his MIT ring, as well as his white priest's collar.

For this Heart and Soul special on the BBC World Service, we will visit the Vatican Observatory to hear about its fascinating history and meet the 'Sputnik Kid' who is passionate about showing the world that science and faith are not as opposed as you might think.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscw099s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf202x91)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gpnl5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2hh1)
Libya's Revolution

Building a state

A decade after the end of dictatorship, Libya is gearing up for planned elections at the end of this year that many hope will finally bring a peaceful and democratic future. The country is slightly more stable since the end of civil war two years ago. But despite a peace agreement, it is still effectively split in two, politically and militarily. Separate forces control the two halves of the country, backed by different foreign powers. And some think war will break out again.

BBC reporter Tim Whewell, travels around Libya to find out what progress is being made towards building a state. He visits a spectacular horse-racing event - a sign of increasing prosperity. Travel around Libya is easier now. Some armed groups have been integrated into official police and army structures. Tim visits a new government checkpoint. But he discovers many people are still terrified of militias that appear to have been "regularised" in name only.

Activists and journalists who voice opinions that armed groups dislike can be threatened, and even abducted - with courts often powerless to intervene. One radio station which sprang up as a lively forum for debate after the revolution no longer dares to broadcast talk shows. Tim talks to a former presenter who was jailed and tortured by a militia after taking part in a young people's protest against corruption. He also interviews former interior minister Fathi Bashagha, who hopes to lead Libya after the elections. What is his plan to achieve security and justice? And what can be done to stem the rising numbers of Libyans attempting the perilous crossing of the Mediterranean, seeking a new life in Europe?

Presenter: Tim Whewell
Producer: Bob Howard

(Photo: Traditional Libyan horseman in Misrata, Libya Credit: BBC)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscw0f1x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Conversation (w3ct2g9t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscw0jt1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt3hj3n)
Australia defends new deal with US and UK

Australia has defended its decision to scrap a multi-billion dollar deal to buy submarines from France in favour of a new security project with the US and the UK. Australian deputy prime minister, Barnaby Joyce, says his country needs the nuclear-powered submarines agreed by the new alliance as a deterrent in an increasingly unstable region.

Also in the programme: trying to reduce the huge carbon emissions of gas and air when it's used for pain relief in medicine and as a new memorial opens in the Netherlands to remember the victims of the Nazi Holocaust, we hear about the Roma who are often overlooked.

Photo: Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison defends his country's decision to abandon a submarine deal with Paris to acquire nuclear-powered ones from Washington. Credit: EPA/JOEL CARRETT


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscw0nk5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlp)
Algorithms: From the ancients to the internet

Hidden from view, complex to understand and often controversial, algorithms are at the heart of computer coding that underpins modern society. Every time we search the internet, every time we pay by credit card, even the romantic partners suggested to us by online dating sites – they’re all powered by algorithms. And their reach is growing all the time, as some societies use them to automate decisions regarding criminal justice, mortgage applications and job recruitment.

The history of algorithms is surprisingly ancient, stretching back to the Babylonian empire where large societies required a systematic way to count and order different aspects of citizens’ lives. Today some people are questioning their use, as some algorithms have been shown to replicate bias and there are fears that algorithms have the potential to undermine democracy.

Bridget Kendall is joined by Ramesh Srinivasan, Professor in the Department of Information Studies at the University of California Los Angeles and the author of Beyond the Valley: How Innovators around the World are Overcoming Inequality and Creating the Technologies of Tomorrow; the French computational scientist, consultant and entrepreneur Aurélie Jean, who’s published From the Other Side of the Machine: A scientist’s journey in the land of algorithms; and Ian Stewart, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at Warwick University who’s written more than 120 books on aspects of mathematics and science.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service

[Image: Digital data and binary code. Credit: Yuichiro Chino/Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkj)
How many holes are there in a drinking straw?

Tim Harford talks to Jordan Ellenberg, professor of mathematics at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, about the pandemic, geometry and drinking straws.


(multi-coloured straws/Getty images)


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscw0s99)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscw0x1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tfhbg7js7)
Live Sporting Action

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.

(Photo by Clive Howes - Chelsea FC/Chelsea FC via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscw188t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnf203w82)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gqmk6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2ptx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscw1d0y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh8)
Social media and self image

On Business Weekly, we hear how internal research at Facebook found that social media was harming the mental health of teenage girls. In the UK, the Royal Society of Public Health is calling for social media companies to identify which pictures have been digitally altered. Also, green investing or green washing? We hear from a former Blackrock investment officer who says corporate social responsibility policies are not helping to create a carbon-zero economy. Plus, our correspondent in Kenya goes stargazing to learn how African tourism operators are trying to attract domestic customers and diversify their businesses. And, as Broadway theatres reopen, we find out how the first night went - and what the future may hold. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Instagram logos on a smartphone, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscw1hs2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59bt3jh2p)
Australia defends scrapping submarine deal

Prime Minister Scott Morrison rejects accusations that Australia lied, saying France should have been aware it was prepared to break the deal.

Also in the programme: as voting ends in Russia’s parliamentary elections, opposition activists voice allegations of violations at polling stations.

And we hear how Israel assassinated Iran's leading nuclear scientist with a robot machine gun.

Photo: Australian submarine in water, riding a wave. Military officers can be seen standing on the vessel. Credit: AFP


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscw1mj6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2ghs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gqzsl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqscw1r8b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtzbdg1t9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sm1lvl3fy)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkk73gr3jq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 20 SEPTEMBER 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n55v0r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzld13ckg60)
Energy crisis continues across the world

The wholesale price of gas has soared in the UK, Europe and Asia because of a squeeze on supplies. Ellen Fraser, energy expert at Barringa Partners, explains how a perfect storm of problems has created the energy crisis, while independent economist Michael Hughes weighs in on how the resultant inflation effects might weight on central bankers' minds. Also in the programme, Canadians go to the polls on 20 September after a short 35-day election campaign sprint. Mark Agnew of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce explains what businesses are hoping for once the results are in. A new report shows how China continues to dominate the e-commerce market. And entertainment reporter KJ Matthews gives some tips on what to watch out for at the 73rd Primetime Emmy Awards.

(Image credit: Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrw694)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct1m88)
Covid origins: The science

Presenter: Roland Pease

Picture: Wuhan Residents Told Not To Leave As Coronavirus Pneumonia Spreads, Credit: Stringer/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n55yrw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb98kr4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrwb18)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr1)
What role has the media played in the climate crisis?

For decades, around the world, climate change coverage has been thin. Guests discuss why the media in petrol states, in particular, have struggled to tell that story. Science illiteracy in newsrooms has led to a mixture of climate silence and false balance in print and on air. But, even when the science has not been contested, the way the crisis has been reported may have caused audiences to turn away. Can climate coverage learn lessons from how that other hugely consequential science story of our time – the pandemic - has been told?
Contributors :
Mark Herstsgaard, co-founder Covering Climate Now
Marianna Poberezhskaya, associate professor Nottingham Trent University
Kris De Meyer, neuroscientist Kings College London
Wolfgang Blau, The Reuters Institute

Presenter: Graihagh Jackson
Producer: Rosamund Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n562j0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2ghs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrwfsd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 World of Wisdom (w3ct2hdn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n56684)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb98t7d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrwkjj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p91)
Musical theatre stars

Dazzling lights, fancy costumes, thrilling dance routines and the nightly applause of an adoring audience - what's it like to sing on the world's biggest stages? Kim Chakanetsa talks to two musical theatre stars about life on stage - and the challenges that Covid-19 restrictions have brought.

Australian actress Jemma Rix is starring as Elsa in Disney’s Frozen the Musical. With no formal training she moved to Japan to start her career singing and dancing at the Universal Studios theme park in Osaka. This is where she was first cast at everyone's favourite green witch, Elphaba in Wicked - a role she went on to play on stage to great acclaim for eight years.

Filipino actress Christine Allado has returned to the stage in London's West End after a break of 15 months when theatres were closed because of Covid-19 restrictions. She’s currently starring as Tzipporah, the wife of Moses, in The Prince of Egypt. She took a year out after university to work at Hong Kong Disneyland, singing some roles in Cantonese despite not knowing the language, and she’s never looked back.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE
(L) Christine Allado, credit Roberto Vivancos Studio
(R) Jemma Rix, courtesy Jemma Rix


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n56b08)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwlmd10)
Russia elections: Putin's party claims victory

The ruling United Russia party looks set for a majority in the country's parliamentary election, after a vote dogged by allegations of fraud.

Haitian migrants are being flown back to the country en masse - against international law according to campaigners.

And the new Taliban ministry responsible for women's affairs - run by a man. We hear what he's been saying about his job.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n56frd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwlmhs4)
Kremlin critics say Russian election a 'sham'

Putin's ruling party claims it has won a 'free and fair' election after two thirds of the vote is counted. We hear from the opposition.

Just one opposition-leaning candidate has been successful in Hong Kong's elections held under strict new rules imposed by Beijing.

And President Biden starts the deportation of thousands of Haitians who've gathered beneath a motorway underpass in a border town before their asylum claims are heard.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n56khj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwlmmj8)
Hong Kong: 'Patriots' election' sees single opposition win

The vote is for the powerful Election Committee which will appoint the city's next leader.

Initial results from Russia's controversial elections suggest the pro-Kremlin party will retain a majority but has lost ground to its opponents.

And the new Taliban ministry responsible for women's affairs - run by a man. We hear what he's been saying about his job.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n56p7n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n68)
Carlos Fernando Chamorro: Exiled from Nicaragua

Stephen Sackur speaks to Nicaraguan journalist and former revolutionary Carlos Fernando Chamorro. He is currently in exile as President Daniel Ortega intensifies his crackdown on dissent. Why has the country slumped back into authoritarianism?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrx1j1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j58)
Lebanon in dire need

The new Lebanese government has been in place for a week, but with the economy still spiraling, Lebanese people lack confidence anything will be done in the short term to relieve the extreme economic crisis. Mohamed El Aassar, Middle East journalist with Fortune Magazine, tells the BBC's Rebecca Kesby how the country’s economy got to be in such a dire state. Reporter Houshig Kaymakamian outlines exactly who makes up the new Lebanese government, and why Lebanese people don’t trust them to enact any meaningful reforms. Beirut restaurateur Aline Kamakian describes daily life trying to run a business in the country, and economist Diana Menhem explains just how dangerous the present moment is, and what needs to change.

Producer: Frey Lindsay.

(Picture: The first batch of Iranian fuel oil arrives in the city of Baalbek in eastern Lebanon on September 16, 2021. Picture credit: Sleiman Amhaz/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1c)
Jackie Kennedy and Aristotle Onassis

In the late 1960s, the widow of President Kennedy had a secret romance with Aristotle Onassis, who was then the richest man in the world. Simon Watts spoke to Nico Mastorakis, a Greek journalist who visited Onassis’s yacht in disguise to confirm the relationship and secure a sensational scoop. Jackie Kennedy and Aristotle Onassis would go on to marry in October 1968 in a spectacular ceremony on the private island of Skorpios.

PHOTO:Jackie Kennedy with Aristotle Onassis in 1968. Credit: David Cairns/Getty Images.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n56szs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrx585)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqy)
How did eyes evolve?

Look into my eyes. What do you see? Pupil, lens, retina… an intricate set of special tissues and mechanisms all working seamlessly together, so that I can see the world around me. Charles Darwin called the eye an ‘organ of extreme perfection’ and he’s not wrong!

But if the eye is so complex and intricate, how did it evolve? One listener, Aloyce from Tanzania, got in touch to pose this difficult question. It’s a question that taxed Darwin himself, but CrowdScience is always up for a challenge!

The problem is that eyes weren’t ever designed - they were cobbled together over millions and millions of years, formed gradually by the tweaks and adaptations of evolution. How do you get from the basic detection of light to the wonderful complexity - and diversity – of visual systems we find throughout the animal kingdom?

CrowdScience sent Marnie Chesterton on an 800 million year journey to trace how the different elements that make up the human eye gradually came into being; from the emergence of the first light-sensitive proteins to crude eye-cups, from deep sea creatures with simple pinhole eyes to the first light-focusing lenses, all the way to the technicolour detail of the present day.

Produced by Ilan Goodman for the BBC World Service.

With contributions from: Dr Adam Rutherford, Dr Megan Porter, Professor Dan Nilsson, Dr Samantha Strong

(Photo Credit: Getty Images)


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n56xqx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrx909)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter (w3ct2kp6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n571h1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb99ng9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrxdrf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p91)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n57575)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtl)
I stole a safe, and faced the dilemma of my life

Matthew Hahn used to burgle houses in the San Francisco Bay Area to pay for a drug habit. One fateful night in 2005 he stole a safe from someone’s home, hoping that its contents would fund his next high. But he was horrified to discover that the safe contained evidence of a very young girl being sexually abused. Matthew felt he had to do something to help the child, but due to his past criminal record he knew he faced life in prison if he admitted to stealing the safe. His decision would have profound consequences for both himself and the girl’s abuser.

This programme contains details that some listeners may find distressing.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Matthew Hahn
Credit: Courtesy of Matthew Hahn


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n578z9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb99wyk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrxn7p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n57dqf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2dqd11)
Hotel Rwanda’s Paul Rusesabagina convicted of terrorism

Fromer hotel manager, Paul Rusesabagina, who saved hundreds of people during the 1994 genocide was found guilty of backing a rebel group from exile by a court in Rwanda. His daughter, Carine Kanimba, told Newshour that president Paul Kagame had targeted her father.

Also in the programme: A gunman has killed at least six people at a university in the Russian city of Perm before being stopped by police a day after the Duma election; and COP26 garden at the Chelsea Flower Show.

(Photo: Paul Rusesabagina escorted in handcuffs from the courtroom in Kigali. Clement Uwiringiyimana/Credit: Reuters)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n57jgk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n68)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrxwqy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y484fd3srld)
Russian election: Kremlin rejects vote-rigging accusations

President Putin's United Russia won two thirds of seats in the lower house of parliament. The party's vote share was down four points on five years ago, and we hear about the new Russian parliament's main economic challenges from Chris Weafer, chief executive of the Moscow-based consultancy Macro Advisory. Also in the programme, ahead of elections this weekend, the BBC's Theo Leggett reports from Munich in Germany on what businesses hope for from the next Chancellor. A month after seizing power in Afghanistan, the Taliban have effectively banned women from working. We get reaction to the latest developments from Pashtana Durrani, who is a women's rights activist in the country. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare explores the art of storytelling in the workplace.

Today's edition is presented by Rahul Tandon, and produced by Clare Williamson and Russell Padmore.

(Picture: A Russian electoral official at a vote count. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n57n6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxq6z8pn54)
Afghanistan: Girls excluded from school

The Taliban have excluded girls from Afghan secondary schools, with only boys and male teachers allowed back into classrooms. Many fear a return of the regime of the 1990s when the Taliban severely restricted girls' and women's rights. We hear from one teenage girl who is devastated she can't continue her education.

We go to Russia where a gunman has killed at least six people at Perm University. Many others were injured during the shooting. We hear the latest from our correspondent and an eyewitness.

Our regular health expert, Dr Eleanor Murray assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health, discusses the day’s stories on the coronavirus pandemic.

(Photo: Boys at a secondary school. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n57ryt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxq6z8prx8)
Coronavirus conversations: Vietnam's Covid restrictions

Vietnam was one of the world's most successful in controlling the coronavirus, and the people there spent the first 12 months of the pandemic in relative normality. But that all changed, when the country reported a cluster of over a 100 cases in May tied to a church in Ho Chi Minh City. Then cases started to surge. We hear from two journalists covering the story.

The Taliban have excluded girls from Afghan secondary schools, with only boys and male teachers allowed back into classrooms. Many fear a return of the regime of the 1990s when the Taliban severely restricted girls' and women's rights. We hear from one teenage girl who is devastated she can't continue her education.

And our regular health expert, Professor Manfred Green at the University of Haifa in Israel, discusses the day’s stories on the coronavirus pandemic.

(Photo: Vietnam ramps up vaccination drive in Hanoi. 10 September 2021 Credit: EPA)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n57wpy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n580g2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9bmfb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrycqg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nj674bw8f)
2021/09/20 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n58466)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dr1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcryhgl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2lcn)
China's great science leap

President Xi Jinping is investing seriously into his strategic vision of turning China into a nation of scientific pace-setters. China’s past contributions to modern science have been proportionally lacklustre, but with a reinvigorated focus over the past two decades, China is fast turning from imitator to innovator. What might this increasing scientific prowess mean for the future of China’s development, as well as for the international scientific community?

Whereas once many Chinese scientists chose to go abroad to further their careers, presenter Dr Kevin Fong hears how the government has sought to lure its brightest researchers back. He asks what that means for both scientific collaborations and the culture of science in China and the UK. As scientific research relies on transparent information sharing, what are the challenges of collaborating with an authoritarian regime?

In this first episode, Kevin Fong hears how Chinese science has advanced over recent decades following a low point during the Chinese cultural revolution. He speaks to a Chinese bio-chemist about his career in the US and finds out why he decided to move back to China to start a biotech business. At Loughborough University, Kevin meets a team of researchers working on Artificial Intelligence tools with Chinese counterparts, to help monitor and predict air pollution.

But are Western countries equal partners and beneficiaries of these academic partnerships? As China is set to become the UK’s most significant research partner, at a time of rising geopolitical tensions, we examine how the UK might navigate these choppy waters and what the risks and benefits of scientific collaboration might be.

(Photo: Chinese scientist at work, Credit: Guang Niu/Getty Images)


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n587yb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2dr77y)
Rich countries urged to help fund climate change action

The UN Secretary-General. Antonio Guterres, says there are encouraging signs from rich nations about creating an annual fund for developing countries to tackle climate change, but no firm commitments yet. The Costa Rican President tells Newshour of his frustration at the slow pace of change.

Also in the programme: lava from an erupting volcano in the Canary Islands has destroyed more than a hundred homes as it flows towards the sea. And we hear from the new WHO ambassador for Global Health Financing, former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, on the need to share Covid vaccine doses across the world before they expire.

(Photo: Antonio Guterres, Secretary General of the United Nations, speaks to reporters after a meeting with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson for climate change discussions. Credit: John Minchillo/Pool via REUTERS)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n58cpg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n68)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcryqyv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p91)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n58hfl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvblpnszk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0smdw4svm6)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcryvpz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48yw3qj0zq)
US stocks fall on Chinese finance fears

The Dow Jones index fell 1.7% on Monday over fears that the Chinese property developer Evergrande is struggling to repay its debts, which could impact big banks. Our correspondent Michelle Fleury explains the story.
President Putin's United Russia party has won two thirds of seats in the lower house of parliament. We hear about the new Russian parliament's main economic challenges from Chris Weafer, chief executive of the Moscow-based consultancy Macro Advisory.
Also in the programme, ahead of elections this weekend, the BBC's Theo Leggett reports from Munich in Germany on what businesses hope for from the next chancellor.
And a month after seizing power in Afghanistan, the Taliban have effectively banned women from working. We get reaction to the latest developments from Pashtana Durrani, who is a women's rights activist in the country.
Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare explores the art of storytelling in the workplace.

(Picture: A sign for Wall Street subway station. Picture credit: Getty Images)



TUESDAY 21 SEPTEMBER 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n58qxv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqk0d2637k)
US lifts Covid travel ban for vaccinated passengers from the UK and EU

Travellers will be admitted into the US from November, subject to testing and contact tracing. The announcement comes after a year of tough restrictions. We speak to Todd Knoop, professor of business and economics at Cornell College in Iowa, about the significance of the change.
The Dow Jones index fell 1.7% on Monday over fears that the Chinese property developer Evergrande is struggling to repay its debts, which could impact big banks. Our correspondent Michelle Fleury explains the story.
More and more countries are abolishing the death penalty. In the US, President Biden has promised to pass legislation at a federal level to eliminate it. Those campaigning for its abolition have found an ally in the business community. We speak to Celia Ouellette, CEO of the Responsible Business Initiative for Justice, and Jason Flom, CEO of Lava Records, who has long campaigned for the wrongfully convicted.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Michelle Jamrisko, senior Asia economy reporter at Bloomberg in Singapore, and by Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland, who's in Washington DC.

(Picture: Passengers walk past a picture of Mickey Mouse. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n58vnz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9cgn7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrz6yc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz4)
6. Fallout

After years in the wilderness, athletes with a learning disability are back at the London 2012 Paralympics - and Dan is among them. There are new tests designed to stop cheating. Do they work? And why, 21 years on from the basketball scandal, are there still fewer medals for intellectual impairment athletes than there were at Sydney 2000?

Plus Dan catches up one last time with Ray, the genuinely disabled captain of the infamous Spanish basketball team. The scandal has taken a big toll on his life.

Presenter: Dan Pepper
Series Producer: Simon Maybin
Editor: Emma Rippon

(Photo credit: EPA)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n58zf3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x1c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n59357)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9cq4h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrzgfm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdj)
Peter Dundas: Dressing the world’s powerful women

With the autumn fashion season in full swing, we meet the Norwegian designer who’s creating new collections and a gown for this year's Met Gala in New York.

Peter Dundas is renowned for his catwalk couture and for dressing some of the world’s most powerful women including Beyoncé and Michelle Obama.

Join Anna Bailey, who follows Peter as he makes a bespoke gown for the Grammy award-winning singer-songwriter Ciara, while also preparing a new collection for the catwalk with his team at Dundas in London.

Presented and Produced by Anna Bailey

Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n596xc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwlq8y3)
Canada: PM Trudeau set to win snap election

Projections suggest Mr Trudeau will fall short of gaining a parliamentary majority

Stock markets in Japan have fallen sharply over fears of a possible debt crisis in China, but other Asian markets have remained flat.

And there's more fighting in Afghanistan with the so-called Islamic State group taking on the Taliban in the city of Jalalabad.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n59bnh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwlqdp7)
Trudeau projected to win Canadian election

Results in so far suggest the Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is unlikely to win the majority he wanted.

Poland sends troop reinforcements to its eastern border - accusing Russia of encouraging migrants to travel there.

And British Prime Minister Boris Johnson meets US President Joe Biden in New York to talk climate change. So how do you get countries to cut emissions?


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n59gdm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwlqjfc)
Trudeau: Election result means 'brighter days ahead'

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wins election, but falls short of a majority. Lava destroys homes as a volcano erupts in the Canary Islands.
And are hands and footprints made by children more than 220,000 years ago in Tibet the oldest known works of art in the world?


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n59l4r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing The World (w3cszv27)
Saving mums and their unborn babies

Women in a village in Northern Nigeria have come up with an emergency transport scheme that is saving lives.

They decided to act when they saw mums-to-be and their unborn babies dying in childbirth because they couldn’t get to hospital in time.

Their solution also inspired the state government to help thousands of other women.

Produced and presented by Bara’atu Ibrahim


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcrzyf4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jg9)
World gas prices surge

Today small energy firms among those struggling to stay afloat as world gas prices spiral. Ed Butler hears from Peter McGirr, who runs Green energy, a UK gas and electricity firm supplying about a quarter of a million households. Higher energy prices could lead to all types of additional business challenges. Sven Holester is the Norwegian President and CEO of Yara, Europe's second largest producer of commercial fertiliser. He says the spike in energy prices has already affected his firm's production. The cost of higher gas is affecting food prices, fertiliser, even abattoirs. But is it all Russia's fault? We ask Dieter Helm, professor of economic policy at the University of Oxford.

Producer: Benjie Guy

(Picture: The Slavyanskaya compressor station, the starting point of the Nord Stream 2 offshore natural gas pipeline.)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5w)
Mexico's miracle water

Thousands of people flocked to the village of Tlacote in central Mexico in 1991. They hoped to be cured by 'magical' water after rumours spread about its healing powers.Maria Elena Navas spoke to Edmundo Gonzalez Llaca who was an official in the local environment ministry in 1991 and who was sent to Tlacote to check out what all the fuss was about.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Hands under a stream of water (Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n59pww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs0258)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2lcn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n59tn0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n59yd4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9dkcd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs09nj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5b248)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwv)
Shipwrecks and Cardi B: Stories from behind the piano

Antimo Magnotta was the pianist on board the Costa Concordia cruise ship when it hit a reef and sank in 2012. He was traumatised, but he rediscovered his love for the piano after a chance encounter. This interview was first broadcast in January 2017.

After growing up in Singapore, Margaret Leng Tan became the first woman to earn a doctorate from the Julliard School of Music in New York. Her career took a turn when she discovered an instrument that she found truly captivating and she became the world's first professional toy piano virtuoso. Outlook's Tara Gadomski met her in New York. First aired in May 2019.

Pianist Chloe Flower went from playing Bach to performing with Cardi B. She told Outlook's Nawal Al-Maghafi about their show-stopping performance at the 2019 Grammy Awards. This interview was first broadcast in April 2019.

Featuring music by Antimo Magnotta.

Picture: Cardi B sits on the silver piano played by Chloe Flower
Credit: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5b5wd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9dsvn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs0k4s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2lcn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5b9mj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2dt8y4)
Imran Khan: Afghanistan's soil should not be used for terrorism

Pakistan's prime minister, Imran Khan, has told the BBC that his country will only recognise Afghanistan's Taliban government if it is inclusive, respects human rights and makes sure Afghanistan isn't used as a base for terrorism. Mr Khan said the idea that girls shouldn't be educated was not an Islamic one.

Also, Canada's Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, retains office in a snap election but fails in his bid to win an absolute majority.

And a third Russian faces charges over his alleged involvement in the 2018 Salisbury poisonings, which left three people critically ill and one dead.

(Photo: Imran Khan. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5bfcn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing The World (w3cszv27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs0sn1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4blrkxyksc)
Canada: Narrow win for Justin Trudeau

Canada's leader Justin Trudeau has secured another term, but without an overall majority. Mr Trudeau had hoped Canadians would reward his handling of the pandemic and relatively smooth vaccine rollout by returning his Liberal Party with a strong majority, but journalist Jatinder Sidhu in Vancouver explains why that didn't happen, and discusses the economic implications of the result. Also in the programme, there's been widespread fallout across Europe from rapidly rising energy prices. The BBC's Ed Butler considers the consequences for business, and explores the role of Russia in the whole affair. Plus, shares in Universal Music Group soared by as much as a third as they were spun off from French media giant Vivendi with a listing on the Amsterdam stock exchange. We find out why from Dr Matt Grimes, who is an expert on the music business at Birmingham City University.

Presenter: Mike Johnson
Producers: Matthew Davies and Russell Padmore

(Photo: Justin Trudeau delivers his victory speech. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5bk3s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxq6z8sk27)
Your questions on climate change

The BBC has it's first climate change editor, Justin Rowlatt. He joins us to answer your questions and tell us more about his role.

We continue to focus on education in Afghanistan following the Taliban takeover. Teachers tell us how their jobs are changing under the new regime, with girls so far excluded from high school classes.

And we answer your questions and talk through the latest news on Covid-19 with one of our regular experts, Dr Isaac Bogoch.

(Picture: A boy plays under a fountain on a summer day during a heatwave in central Brussels, Belgium, July 2, 2015. Credit: Yves Herman/File Photo)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5bnvx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxq6z8sntc)
Afghanistan: Educating high school girls

We continue to focus on education in Afghanistan following the Taliban takeover. Teachers tell us how their jobs are changing under the new regime, with girls so far excluded from high school classes.

We answer your questions and talk through the latest news on Covid-19 with one of our regular experts, Dr Swapneil Parikh.

And a reporter tells us more about the case of blogger Gabby Petito, who embarked on a road trip this July with her fiancé, Brian Laundrie. In the last few weeks, both have been reported missing, and Ms Petito is now believed to be dead.

(Photo:Afghan girls sit in a classroom at a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, September 18, 2021. Credit: WANA (West Asia News Agency) via Reuters)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5bsm1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5bxc5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9fjbf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs18mk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nj674fs5j)
2021/09/21 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5c139)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs1dcp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsl)
Can AI predict Arctic ice loss?

Arctic AI
Have you checked the ice-cap forecast? Melting sea ice might be a well-known symptom of global warming, but how do scientists predict how quickly ice will recede? A new Artificial Intelligence tool does a better job than traditional prediction methods to forecast whether sea ice in the arctic will be present two months in advance. We hear from Tom Andresson, Data Scientist at the BAS AI Lab, who developed the algorithm.

VR Cystoscopy
Cystoscopy is vital for managing bladder cancer and something that those affected will need to undergo regularly for the rest of their life when their cancer has gone into remission. However the process can be very unpleasant which means some people choose not to keep up with their life saving visits. Dr Wojciech Krajewski has been studying how using VR goggles to create a more relaxed environment can help patients manage the pain cystoscopy causes. Immersing patients in an Icelandic waterfall meant patients reported lower pain scores and they tolerated the procedure better.

5G festival
Working remotely has been a difficulty for many of us over the past year - but musicians have found it particularly hard, as slow connections make playing together almost impossible. Over the past two years Digital Catapult have been developing a way of using 5G networks to solve this problem. They will be running a virtual festival next year to highlight the technology. Claire Jordan visited the trials and reports for Digital Planet.


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.

Studio Manager:
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image credit: British Antarctic Survey)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5c4vf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2dv451)
President Biden tells the UN that America is 'back at the table'

President Biden stresses multilateralism in his first address to the UN General Assembly. So what can the world expect from Biden's pledge to work with other countries to tackle humanity's most pressing problems? We discuss his speech with American political scientist Ian Bremmer and former French ambassador Syvie Bermann.

Also in the programme: we look at Pakistan's relationship with the Taliban and its role in Afghanistan, and ask whether the British government's public identification of a third Russian man involved in the notorious 2018 Salisbury poisonings will make any difference to Russian undercover operations. And a glimpse of ancient history, as the United States returns a looted stone tablet to Iraq.

(Photo: US President Joe Biden addresses the 76th Session of the UN General Assembly in New York City. Credit: EPA/EDUARDO MUNOZ / POOL)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5c8lk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing The World (w3cszv27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs1mvy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5cdbp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvblprpwn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0smdw4wrj9)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs1rm2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48yw3qlxwt)
DraftKings makes bid for UK gambling firm Entain

The US sports betting company has made an offer reportedly worth $20 billion. We examine the significance of the offer with Alice Hancock, leisure industries reporter with the Financial Times.
Also in the programme, there's been widespread fallout across Europe from rapidly rising energy prices. The BBC's Ed Butler considers the consequences for business, and explores Russia's role in the whole affair.
Plus, shares in Universal Music Group soared by as much as a third as they were spun off from French media giant Vivendi with a listing on the Amsterdam stock exchange. We find out why from Dr Matt Grimes, who is an expert on the music business at Birmingham City University.

(Picture: The DraftKings logo. Picture credit: Getty Images)



WEDNESDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5cmty)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqk0d2904n)
President Biden calls for unity in United Nations address

At the 76th General Assembly in New York, President Biden urged global cooperation to tackle the pandemic and climate change. He pledged to double US climate finance for developing countries by 2024, while China says it will stop financing coal plants abroad. But are these gestures, or real steps towards climate change? We ask Michael McFaul, professor of political science at Stanford University.
There's been widespread fallout across Europe from rapidly rising energy prices. The BBC's Ed Butler considers the consequences for business and the food industry, and examines Russia's role in the whole affair.
The US sports betting company DraftKings has made an offer reportedly worth $20 billion for the UK-based betting group Entain. We examine the significance of the offer with Alice Hancock, leisure industries reporter with the Financial Times.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Jyoti Malhotra, senior consulting editor at The Print website in Delhi, and by Sarah Birke, the Economist’s bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean, who's in Mexico City.

(Picture: Joe Biden addresses the UN. Credit: Getty)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5crl2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9gckb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs23vg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2vq6)
Sugar-coated World

Getting granular

Humans have always been delighted by sweetness. In this three part series Lainy Malkani explores how sugar forged the modern world, from its role in the slave trade and the European colonisation of the Americas, to the consequences of our dependency on it today. For some countries, their past is built on it; for others, their futures depend on it. Across Britain, the USA and Thailand, Lainy digs into the past, present and future of sugar.

Beginning in London, Lainy samples sweet treats in Brick Lane with the food writer Ruby Tandoh, examines sugar cane in the tropical Palm House at Kew Gardens with botanist Dr Maria Vorontsova, and traces sugar’s journey from luxury to necessity centuries ago with the historian James Walvin. She visits the West India Docks on the River Thames where sugar - harvested by slaves in the Caribbean – arrived for refining in the early 1800s, and considers how sugar has shaped the city today.

(Photo: Spoonful of sugar added to coffee)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5cwb6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5d02b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9gm1l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs2cbq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnb)
4. The negotiator

The woman face to face with the Taliban: peacemaker, women’s rights advocate and negotiator, Fatima Gailani is the nearest Afghanistan has to aristocracy. Now in her late 60s, she was the female face of Afghan resistance to the Soviet occupation of the 1980s, the Mujahideen. She returned to Afghanistan after 24 years in exile following the US-led invasion of 2001. And in 2020 she became one of four female peace negotiators to sit down with the Taliban. She tells Lyse Doucet, talking is the only way and she and all Afghans deserve peace.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5d3tg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwlt5v6)
President Biden urges unity in first UN speech

The American President Joe Biden makes his first address to the United Nations General Assembly amidst warnings from the Secretary-General of a new cold war between superpowers, at a moment when cooperation is needed more than ever.

Fears grow of the imminent collapse of one of China's biggest property companies under hundreds of billions of dollars of debt.

And the Nigerians rebelling against the cultural pressure to pay to bury their dead relatives.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5d7kl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwlt9lb)
Climate crisis: China pledge welcomed by US

China has promised to stop building coal power plants abroad - without making a similar commitment within its borders.

Lava flowing from a crack in a volcano is destroying all in its path forcing thousands of homes to be evacuated, as we hear from our reporter on the Spanish island of La Palma.

And as the world hunts for more sources of renewable energy, we'll meet the man championing turning grass into gas.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5dc9q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwltfbg)
China makes big environmental pledge

China commits to end support for new coal plants abroad ahead of a major climate conference in Scotland next month, as our climate editor meets one of England's most prolific composters.

Also a rare earthquake in the state of Victoria in Australia - probably the worst the state has seen in 200 years. We'll speak to a radio show host who was on air when the quake happened.

And as Europe faces record breaking Gas prices - a meeting of major gas traders and producers takes place in Dubai today.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5dh1v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbs)
Bryan Hughes: Abortion in Texas

Republicans in Texas have managed to ban abortion in almost all cases in their state. Anyone performing, aiding or abetting the termination of a pregnancy after roughly six weeks can be sued in court. The implications are enormous, not just in Texas but across the US. And it points to a wider phenomenon. Ideological conservatives are using state activism to confront federal power. Stephen Sackur spoke to Texas Republican State Senator Bryan Hughes just hours before the first law suit was filed against a doctor under the new law.


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs2vb7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jp2)
US war on e-cigarettes

The Federal Drugs Administration has withdrawn nearly a million e-cigarettes from the US market. Does this signal a turning point for the vaping industry? Small manufacturers like Amanda Wheeler, owner of Jvapes in Arizona and president of the American Vapor Manufacturers Association, are concerned about heavier regulation, as she tells Joshua Thorpe. Tim Phillips, managing director of ECigIntelligence, explains the impact of heavier regulation on the wider e-cigarette industry. In the UK, Public Health England promotes vaping as a method to stop smoking, as we hear from Jamie Hartmann-Boyce, associate professor at the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, at the University of Oxford. But Desmond Jenson, a lawyer at the Public Health Law Center at the Mitchell Hamline School of Law in Minnesota argues that regulators need to do more to tackle a youth vaping epidemic.

(Picture: a woman vaping. Credit: Getty Images.)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x84)
The poisoning of Alexander Litvinenko

Alexander Litvinenko was a former colonel in the Russian secret service and a critic of Vladimir Putin's government. He fled to London seeking political asylum in 2000. In November 2006 he was poisoned with the highly radioactive substance Polonium-210. Rebecca Kesby spoke to his wife Marina, about his life and excruciating death.

This programme is a rebroadcast

(PHOTO: Alexander Litvinenko in a London hospital a couple of days before his death in November 2006. Credit Getty Images.)

Show less


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5dlsz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2vq6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs2z2c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5dqk3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2kks)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5dv97)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9hg8h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs36km)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5dz1c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz3)
I hit puberty, then burned down my family home

When Nikki Owen was 18, she set fire to the family home while her mother was still inside. Her mother escaped but Nikki found herself in court, accused of intending to kill her.

This was the culmination of years of self-loathing, self-harm and suicide attempts that, Nikki says, turned her into a monster. In her younger years, Nikki had worked as a child model; she was shy and well-behaved and couldn't understand why her personality had transformed so quickly and so severely. It wasn’t until she was facing up to 15 years in prison that, thanks to her family's persistence, she was diagnosed with severe premenstrual syndrome, or PMS as it’s more commonly known. Nikki was then able to use this diagnosis in her defence in court.

Nikki’s case made legal history in England as the first time in which premenstrual syndrome was used as a mitigating factor in a criminal case. Since then a plea of PMS has been used in court in cases of murder, infanticide, manslaughter and many other crimes.

For Nikki it meant she was given a second chance at life and one she has used to help other people by setting up her own organisation, the Healing Hub through which she supports people to deal with stress and anxiety.

If you've been affected by any of subjects in this programme you can find support and additional information below:

BBC Action Line: https://www.bbc.co.uk/actionline/
Befrienders Worldwide: https://www.befrienders.org/
The International Association for Premenstrual Disorders: https://iapmd.org/
National Association for Premenstrual Syndromes https://www.pms.org.uk

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Modelling headshot of Nikki Owen in 1975
Credit: Courtesy of Nikki Owen


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x84)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5f2sh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9hprr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs3g1w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5f6jm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2dx5v7)
President Biden to host Covid vaccine summit

President Biden is to host a virtual summit aimed at increasing the availability of vaccinations all over the world. The African Union say that if developed nations don't act quickly, Africa will quickly become the Covid epicentre. Also in the programme: China pledges to stop building coal-fired power plants abroad; and Arctic sea ice is declining at an alarming pace, contributing to a rise in sea levels.

( Picture: President Joe Biden addresses the UN General Assembly) Credit: China News Service


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5fb8r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs3pk4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4ctxnv2fbd)
China to end overseas coal power plant construction

Environmentalists have welcomed China pledging to stop building coal power plants abroad. We hear about the likely impact from Byford Tsang, a China expert at the climate campaign group e3g. And we get reaction from South Africa, where Chinese money was due to be funding new coal fired power, from energy analyst Chris Yelland in Johannesburg. Also in the programme, a multi-billion dollar project to build a new electric train line to link Egypt's Red Sea and Mediterranean coasts, due for completion in 2027, is being described as the Suez Canal on rails. Mohamed El Assar is an Egyptian journalist at Fortune magazine, and explains the background to the project. Siemens is one of the contractors on the rail line, and its chief executive, Roland Busch discusses the potential economic benefits it might bring to Egypt. And Professor Wei Liang, who specialises in international trade at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey in California considers whether the line is likely to become a genuine alternative to the Suez Canal. Plus, the east African nation of Kenya has become the first market in which video streaming platform Netflix has launched a free service, in a bid to persuade people to sign up to a full subscription. Kenyan technology blogger Kaluka Wanjala tells us how significant a move this is.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson, and produced by Matthew Davies, Russell Newlove and Russell Padmore.

(Picture: A coal fired power plant. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5fg0w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxq6z8wfzb)
President Biden's Covid summit

We'll cover President Biden's global Covid vaccine summit and discuss calls to vaccinate 70% of the world by next September with rich countries still holding surpluses of vaccines. In Africa only three percent of the population is fully vaccinated.

The BBC has spent a year following one would-be migrant from Iran who is among thousands of people trying to cross the English Channel in a small boat, to enter the UK to seek asylum. We'll hear from people who made the documentary about his year-long attempt to make the journey.

We'll answer your questions about the latest news on the coronavirus pandemic with one of our regular expert guests. Dr Maria Sundaram, an infectious disease epidemiologist at Marshfield Clinic Research Institute in Wisconsin.

And the Indian ocean island nation of Mauritius has been experiencing a surge in Covid infections. Tourism is the main pillar of its economy. We speak to two people who work in the tourism industry about how they are preparing for peak season.

(Photo: A woman receives a dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine during the national intensive vaccination days against Covid-19, at a school in Tunis, Tunisia, 11 September 2021 Credit: MOHAMED MESSARA/EPA)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5fks0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxq6z8wkqg)
Coronavirus conversations: Mauritius

The Indian Ocean island nation of Mauritius is preparing to open up to tourists while it's also dealing with its biggest spike so far in Covid cases. We've spoken to two people in Mauritius who work in tourism industry to find out how they are feeling about reopening.

We'll cover President Biden's global Covid vaccine summit and discuss calls to vaccinate 70% of the world by next September with rich countries still holding surpluses of vaccines.

And we'll answer your questions about the latest news on the coronavirus pandemic with one of our regular expert guests. Dr Pedro Hallal is an epidemiologist from Brazil, but currently the Fulbright Chair in Public Health at the University of California in San Diego.

The BBC has spent a year following one would-be migrant from Iran who is among thousands of people trying to cross the English Channel in a small boat, to enter the UK to seek asylum. We'll hear from people who made the documentary about his year-long attempt to make the journey.

(Photo: Ile aux Cerfs (Deer Island) and the coral reef lagoon, east coast, Mauritius. Credit: DeAgostini/Getty Images)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5fpj4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x84)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5ft88)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9jf7j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs45jn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nj674jp2m)
2021/09/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5fy0d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2vq6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs498s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvt)
Reducing mental health stigma

Many people have struggled with their mental health during the pandemic, but still don’t always feel free to discuss it, especially at work. Stigma remains a problem and discussing your difficulties at all is off-limits. For many years in England a campaign called Time To Change tried to change attitudes and the evidence from that and other initiatives was used to launch campaigns in India, Ghana, Nigeria, Kenya and Uganda in 2019. Sue Baker, Mind’s International Health Advisor, and Rosemary Gathara, Director of Basic Needs, Basic Rights in Kenya discuss the findings of the campaigns with Claudia Hammond.

Matt Fox, Professor of Global Epidemiology at Boston University in the US, joins Claudia to talk about the latest global picture of Covid, mask wearing at basketball games in the US and the Kindness Test. And they look at research that suggests too much free time is bad for us.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A woman sitting in a room. Photo credit: Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5g1rj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2dy124)
Biden promises an "arsenal of vaccines"

The US is to donate 500 million more doses of the Pfizer vaccine to developing nations, bringing the total US commitment on vaccine sharing to more than one billion jabs. Experts say some 11 billion doses are required to vaccinate at least 70% of the global population.

Also in the programme: Ukraine's President has promised a strong response after one of his top aides survived an apparent assassination attempt and; Netflix buys up the entire works of British Children's author Roald Dahl.

(Image: U.S. President Joe Biden hosts a virtual coronavirus disease Summit as part of the United Nations General Assembly in Washington. Credit: Reuters/Hockstein)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5g5hn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs4js1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jnb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5g97s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvblpvlsr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0smdw4znfd)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs4nj5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48yw3qptsx)
Lebanon’s inflation rate the highest in the world

Lebanon’s inflation rate has become the highest in the world, according to the latest figures from the Lebanon Central Administration of Statistics. Tala Ramadan, a journalist in Beirut, explains how ordinary people in Lebanon are trying to get by, as fuel, food and internet connection become ever more scarce. Also in the programme, a multi-billion dollar project to build a new electric train line to link Egypt's Red Sea and Mediterranean coasts, due for completion in 2027, is being described as the Suez Canal on rails. Mohamed El Assar is an Egyptian journalist at Fortune magazine, and explains the background to the project. Siemens is one of the contractors on the rail line, and its chief executive, Roland Busch discusses the potential economic benefits it might bring to Egypt. And Professor Wei Liang, who specialises in international trade at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey in California considers whether the line is likely to become a genuine alternative to the Suez Canal. Plus, the east African nation of Kenya has become the first market in which video streaming platform Netflix has launched a free service, in a bid to persuade people to sign up to a full subscription. Kenyan technology blogger Kaluka Wanjala tells us how significant a move this is.

(Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 23 SEPTEMBER 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5gjr1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqk0d2cx1r)
President Biden pledges 500m more vaccines to developing world

President Joe Biden made the pledge at a virtual Covid-19 summit on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly, promising an "arsenal of vaccines". The additional jabs will see the total US commitment on vaccine sharing exceed one billion jabs. We'll hear from Lily Caprani, head of Advocacy for Health at UNICEF, Peter Maybarduk at the not-for-profit consumer advocacy organisation Public Citizen, as well as Thomas Cueni, Director General at the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations. Also in the programme: after Canada's most expensive federal election in history, the electoral map is largely unchanged. Guest Takara Small with CBC talks us through the agenda of the new government. Lebanon’s inflation rate has become the highest in the world, according to the latest figures from the Lebanon Central Administration of Statistics. Tala Ramadan, a journalist in Beirut, explains how ordinary people in Lebanon are trying to get by, as fuel, food and internet connection become ever more scarce. A multi-billion dollar project to build a new electric train line to link Egypt's Red Sea and Mediterranean coasts, due for completion in 2027, is being described as the Suez Canal on rails. Plus, the east African nation of Kenya has become the first market in which video streaming platform Netflix has launched a free service, in a bid to persuade people to sign up to a full subscription.

All through the show we'll be joined by Takara Small with CBC in Toronto, and Lien Hoang with Nikkei Asia in Saigon.

(Picture credit: Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5gnh5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9k8gf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs50rk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxw)
A long way from Vietnam

Vietnamese migration to the UK is the second highest after Albania and each year the numbers are rising. Not even the tragedy of the Essex lorry disaster in 2019 has been enough to put people off. Then 39 Vietnamese migrants suffocated in a container lorry as they came over the English channel. BBC journalist Nga Pham talks to people in Vietnam about their desperation to leave their country. Coming from some of the most economically deprived provinces, families pay between $30-45,000 to people smugglers to send hundreds of their children out each year in the hope of a better future. She meets people who are now working in the shadow economy in the UK, in nail bars, cannabis farms and restaurants, hiding in plain sight. She also talks to those who were caught up in trafficking networks, discovered by the police and deported back to Vietnam with nothing to show for their years of slave labour.

Reporter: Nga Pham
Producer: Anna Horsbrugh-Porter
A Just Radio production for the BBC World Service

(Image: A group of women harvest rice, Vietnam. Credit: BBC)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5gs79)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x84)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5gwzf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9khyp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs587t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg6)
Cooking by computer

From bread making to Thai cuisine, cookery classes have become a popular way for people to learn new culinary skills and meet people. But coronavirus lockdowns suddenly brought these businesses to a standstill. Rory Cellan-Jones hears from three cooks, who quickly pivoted to virtual cooking classes to survive. Could they get over the technical challenges, and can you really teach someone to cook through a computer?

(Picture: mother and child on a virtual cooking course. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


Contributors:

Fayruza Abrahams, Taste Malay
Rawan Al Waada, Rebels in the Kitchen
Sue Hudson, Bread Workshops


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5h0qk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwlx2r9)
UK PM calls for radical action on climate change

The UK prime minister Boris Johnson warns that the world needs to pledge to achieve carbon neutrality by the middle of the century, and that the forthcoming COP 26 climate conference is a turning point for humanity.

Some 47 pro-democracy activists go on trial in Hong Kong facing charges of conspiracy to commit subversion.

And the European Union wants tech companies to agree to use a common phone charging cable.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5h4gp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwlx6hf)
Boris Johnson: Humanity is reaching a turning point on climate change

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is on his way home from the United States where he urged the world to tackle the climate crisis at the upcoming environmental summit in Scotland.

Boeing has made a major announcement for the aerospace industry - a new manufacturing plant in Australia - the first site of its kind outside of the United States.

Russia's top military chief has been meeting with his American counterpart, but could they reach an accord on Afghanistan?


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5h86t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwlxb7k)
Boris Johnson issues climate warning at UN

At the United Nations the UK Prime Minister has been setting the agenda for the world to tackle climate change ahead of Britain hosting the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow.

Pakistan has been home to thousands of Afghans fleeing conflict - some have been there for decades and more have tried to join since the Taliban takeover - but what is it like for those already there.

An assassination attempt on a senior government official in Ukraine - are political or criminal forces threatening President Zelensky's administration?


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5hcyy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2j)
Will America ban abortion?

A restriction on abortion from as early as six weeks into pregnancy is now law in Texas. The state has also outsourced enforcing it to private citizens who can get up to $10,000 if they sue those who perform or assist an abortion that breaks the ban.

As lawmakers in other American states intend to follow Texas Charmaine Cozier finds out what it means for the political hotspot that is abortion provision in the US.

Presenter and producer: Charmaine Cozier
Researched by: Christopher Blake
Editor: Richard Vadon

(abortion rights activists rally at the Texas State Capitol on Sept 11 2021. Credit: Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs5r7b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9s)
Can Ethiopia be brought back from the brink?

The country is embroiled in an internal war which has taken a huge humanitarian toll with thousands killed and millions displaced. But that's not the only damage being done to Africa's second most populous nation. The war has incurred a huge economic cost too. As the US threatens further sanctions, Vivienne Nunis asks if Ethiopia can be brought back from the brink. She speaks to Yemane Nagish from the BBC’s Tigrinya service in Nairobi, Will Davison, aformer correspondent based in the country and now an Ethiopia analyst at the International Crisis Group, Irmgard Erasmus Irmgard, the senior financial economist at Oxford Economics Africa in Cape Town and Faisal Roble, a US-based analyst who specialises in the Horn of Africa.
(Picture credit: AFP)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3m)
James Bond on screen

As the 25th James Bond film hits cinema screens we look at the lasting appeal of the franchise. The original author, Ian Fleming, died in the 1960s but other writers took on the challenge of keeping Britain's most famous secret agent alive.

Photo:Daniel Craig as James Bond in No Time To Die. Credit: Nicola Dove/PA Wire.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5hhq2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs5vzg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5hmg6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlq)
Toni Morrison: The legacy of a literary legend

The American writer Toni Morrison once said, “If there’s a book that you want to read, but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” It was an urge which in her case yielded a rich array of novels, children’s books, plays and essays. Toni Morrison stands tall, as the first black woman of any nationality to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. Celebrated for her masterpiece Beloved, she remains a towering figure, one of the most well-known and oft-taught authors of our age. Since her death in August 2019, many have been reassessing her multiple legacies: as a novelist, cultural critic, and editor.

Joining Bridget Kendall to explore the life, work and impact of Toni Morrison are Dana Williams, Professor of African American Literature at Howard University in Washington DC and current President of the Toni Morrison Society; Janis A. Mayes, Emerita professor of African American Studies at Syracuse University, US; and Aretha Phiri, Associate Professor at Rhodes University in Grahamstown / Makhanda, South Africa.

Produced by Jo Impey for BBC World Service
Additional research by Tessa Roynon

[Photo: Toni Morrison in Chicago, Illinois in 2010. Credit: Getty Images / Daniel Boczarski / FilmMagic]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8r)
Golf's 'war by the shore'

In 1991 the best golfers from the USA and Europe went head-to-head in one of the most bitter confrontations in the history of the Ryder Cup. Played shortly after the First Gulf War, some of the European team objected to the militaristic and fiercely partisan atmosphere encouraged by their American hosts at Kiawah Island, South Carolina. The tension at the so-called “War By The Shore” spilled over into the tournament itself, which was decided on the last hole. Will Yates speaks to golfers Hale Irwin and Paul Broadhurst. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

(Photo: The American team celebrate. Credit: Getty Images)
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THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5hr6b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9lc5l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs63gq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5hvyg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3m)
The sinking of a pirate radio ship

Nick Richards was a DJ for Radio Caroline, an unlicensed offshore radio station operating off the coast of the UK. This was the late 1970s, and millions of people were tuning in, but there were problems with the ship. Because of its illegal status, it couldn’t go to shore for repairs, and it was rotting below the waterline. The DJs did their best to keep the ship afloat, until they faced one storm too many. Nick spoke to Outlook’s Harry Graham.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Image: The pirate radio ship Mi Amigo, home to Radio Caroline
Credit: Getty Images/Evening Standard


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5hzpl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9llnv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs6byz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5j3fq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2f02rb)
UK Prime Minister: Humanity is reaching a "turning point" on climate change

A climate summit of world leaders in 40 days will be the "turning point for humanity", PM Boris Johnson has said in a speech to the United Nations. So what would a successful summit in November look like?

Also today; We've been speaking to the newly-appointed head of Kabul University in Afghanistan, who has announced plans to appoint more pro-Islamic staff; and the Gilgamesh Dream Tablet - looted during the first Gulf War- is being handed back to Iraq by the US today.

(Photo: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson addresses the 76th Session of the UN General Assembly in New York City. Credit: Reuters)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5j75v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs6lg7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49clh13dym)
EU to standardise mobile phone chargers

Mobile phone manufacturers will all have to use the same charging plug under EU proposals. We find out what's behind the move from Louise Guillot, sustainability reporter at Politico. Also in the programme, the US aerospace giant Boeing has selected Australia for its first overseas manufacturing facility. Andrew Greene is defence correspondent for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in Canberra, and tells us why. Global stock markets have been spooked in recent days by whether the Chinese conglomerate Evergrande would be able to meet interest payments due today. Iris Pang is chief economist for Greater China at the bank ING in Hong Kong, and brings us up to date. Plus, the UN Food Systems Summit today, attended by more than 85 heads of state and government, aims to find ways to make food production more efficient. Ismahane Elouafi is chief scientist at the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation, and explains what they are trying to achieve.

Today's edition is presented by Mike Johnson and produced by Nisha Patel and Susan Karanja.

(Picture: Two different mobile phone charging plugs. Picture credit: BBC.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5jbxz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxq6z8zbwf)
Coronavirus: Regretting not getting vaccinated

We speak to two people who have been hospitalised with Covid after not having had the vaccine. Do they now regret their decision?

The new head of Kabul University in Afghanistan has announced plans to appoint more pro-Islamic staff. We’ll get reaction from Afghan students and find out what it has been like for female students since the Taliban takeover in August.

Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland, will answer questions about the coronavirus pandemic.

Our Berlin correspondent Jenny Hill will join the programme to answer audience questions about German parliamentary elections that mark the end of Angela Merkel's 16 years in office as chancellor.

(Photo: Blake Bargatze Credit: Blake Bargatze)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5jgp3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxq6z8zgmk)
US Haiti envoy quits over 'inhumane' deportations

The US special envoy for Haiti has resigned in protest over the deportation of Haitian migrants. The decision to return migrants fleeing an earthquake and political instability was "inhumane", senior diplomat Daniel Foote said in a letter. Last weekend, the US started deportation flights from a Texas border town where about 13,000 migrants had gathered under a bridge. We'll bring you the latest developments with our correspondent in the region.

Also, our Berlin correspondent Jenny Hill will join the programme to answer audience questions about the German parliamentary elections. The vote will mark the end of Angela Merkel's 16 years in office as chancellor of Germany.

And, every day we're joined by a health expert to answer your questions about coronavirus. Today our guest is Dr Helen Wimalarathna is a Molecular Epidemiologist at the University of Buckingham in the UK.

(Photo: A man carrying a child on his shoulders wades across the Rio Grande river from the United States to Mexico, as thousands of migrants, many of them Haitian, remain camped under a bridge in Del Rio, Texas, USA, 20 September 2021. Credit: EPA/ALLISON DINNER)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5jlf7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5jq5c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9mb4m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs72fr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nj674mkzq)
2021/09/23 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5jtxh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs765w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l47)
New evidence for Sars-CoV-2’s origin in bats

Researchers studying bats in Northern Laos have found evidence that brings us closer than ever to understanding the origin of Covid-19. Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic scientists have tried to pin-point the exact origin of Sars-CoV-2. But recent evidence from the Institut Pasteur has identified several novel coronaviruses with similarities to the current coronavirus in bats. Professor Marc Eliot spoke to Roland Pease about how this research could give us a better idea where Covid-19 came from.

Could an oral Covid-19 treatment be available soon?
Daria Hazuda, responsible for infectious disease and bacteria research at MSD tells us about their clinical trials for an oral antiviral drug that could combat Covid-19: Molnupiravir.

Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's
Roland Pease travels to Bath to meet scientists who may have developed a way to diagnose Alzheimer's in the earlier stages of the disease. Dr George Stothart, has led the team from Bath university in the development of this simple 2 minute test.

Inducing Earthquakes
Scientists are experimenting with artificially managing earthquakes by injecting fluid into fault lines. Professor Derek Elsworth at Pennsylvania State University explains his research into how these induced earthquakes can be more tightly controlled.

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Photo: Bats hanging in a cave. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5jynm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2f0xz7)
A month away from UN Climate Summit

Laurence Tubiana, one of the architects of the Paris climate accords about her expectations of November's summit in Glasgow.

Also in the programme: the US Special Envoy to Haiti, Daniel Foote, resigns saying the Biden administration's approach was to Haitian migrants attempting to cross to Texas was inhumane, and that Haiti couldn't cope with an influx of people needing food and shelter; and in an attempt to standardise and limit waste, the European Commission has come up with a proposal to ensure that all mobile phones, tablets and headphones will use the same charger.

(Picture: Logo for COP26, the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference. It is due to be held in Glasgow in November 2021, under the presidency of the UK)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5k2dr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs7fp4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5k64w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvblpyhpv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0smdw52kbh)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs7kf8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48yw3qsqq0)
EU to standardise mobile phone chargers

Mobile phone manufacturers will all have to use the same charging plug under EU proposals. We find out what's behind the move from Louise Guillot, sustainability reporter at Politico. Also in the programme, the US aerospace giant Boeing has selected Australia for its first overseas manufacturing facility. Andrew Greene is defence correspondent for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in Canberra, and tells us why. Global stock markets have been spooked in recent days by whether the Chinese conglomerate Evergrande would be able to meet interest payments due today. Iris Pang is chief economist for Greater China at the bank ING in Hong Kong, and brings us up to date. Plus, the UN Food Systems Summit today, attended by more than 85 heads of state and government, aims to find ways to make food production more efficient. Ismahane Elouafi is chief scientist at the UN's Food and Agriculture Organisation, and explains what they are trying to achieve.

(Picture: Two different mobile phone charging plugs. Picture credit: BBC.)



FRIDAY 24 SEPTEMBER 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5kfn4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqk0d2gsyv)
Evergrande debt crisis continues

The embattled Chinese real estate firm Evergrande reaches the deadline for interest payments on its bonds – will Beijing step in to shore up the company? We speak to Sara Hsu, Associate Professor of Economics at the State University of New York. Erin Delmore is in Berlin to take us through the last days of campaigning in Germany’s general election, the vote will decide who replaces Angela Merkel after 16 years as Chancellor. Speakers at the UN General Assembly address the inequalities of Covid vaccine distribution around the world, America’s FDA withdraws nearly a million e-cigarettes from the market, and the European Commission wants all smart phones to have the same type of charging socket to cut down on waste, but will manufacturers go for it? Throughout the programme we’re joined by Robin Harding of the Financial Times and Hayley Woodin, editor of Business in Vancouver.

(Photo: The Evergrande Centre in Shanghai. Credit: EPA)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5kkd8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9n5cj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs7xnn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tzl)
Thalea Smidt’s Champions League dream

South African midfielder Thalea Smidt tells us about her excitement ahead of playing for Mamelodi Sundowns Ladies in the inaugural African Women’s Champions League and how she feels the new tournament represents a great opportunity to improve the game on the continent.

We also reflect on the career of Jimmy Greaves after the former England, Chelsea, AC Milan and Tottenham Hotspur forward died at the age of 81.

(Credit: Mamelodi Sundowns Ladies)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5kp4d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5kswj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9ndvs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs854x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2lcq)
Rebuilding Ise

Ise Jingu is a Shinto shrine in Japan that is full of paradoxes. Every 20 years, for the past 1300 years, Ise Jingu has been rebuilt from scratch. It involves constructing identical copies of 125 structures that cover an area the size of the centre of Paris, using ancient techniques passed down through generations of craftsmen.

It is one of the most sacred Shinto shrines in Japan. Every year, over 10 million visitors and pilgrims journey through the depths of the ancient forest that surrounds the shrine, to pay homage to the deities of the Shinto faith.

Poet and professor Jordan Smith journeys to the heart of the Jingu in search of the rituals, customs, and spirituality that has kept it as alive today as it was over 1000 years ago. But as Jordan finds out, the essence of Ise Jingu cannot be discovered quite so easily. To get close to what Ise Jingu means to the Shinto faith and Japanese society, Jordan must travel into the depths of the forests of Ise to listen to the inaudible and feel the intangible. On his way he meets priests and professors, who help him discover new ways of interpreting Shinto divinity and what Ise Jingu means to those who journey there.


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5kxmn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwlzznd)
US Haiti envoy quits over 'inhumane' deportations

We head to Panama to hear about the struggles of Haitian migrants, making their way north through the Americas.

The horrendous case of a woman raped and tortured in Morocco has led to eleven convictions, but has justice been delivered for the victim?

And archaeologists have discovered the remains of a devastated biblical city in Jordan - with evidence pointing to a massive comet strike as the cause of its destruction.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5l1cs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwm03dj)
Capitol riot committee to investigate Trump allies

The committee investigating the Capitol riot has issued its first subpoenas to four of President Trump's allies - including Mark Meadows and Steve Bannon.

We look at the crisis evolving for migrants who reach Belarus's border with Poland as they try to get into Europe.

And human footprints dating from more than 20,000 years ago have been discovered by a lakeside in New Mexico. The new evidence suggests humans crossed to the Americas more the 5,000 years earlier than previously thought.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5l53x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2vcwm074n)
German elections: Merkel era draws to a close

On Sunday Germans vote for a successor to Chancellor Angela Merkel after 16 years in office.

We speak to a young Afghan woman athlete who, after weeks of fearing for her life under the Taliban, has managed to leave the country

And less than a third of US firms are on track to meet their climate targets by 2050 - while others may even increase their emissions.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5l8w1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1r)
Roger Deakins: How is technology changing cinema?

Stephen Sackur speaks to one of the world's most celebrated cinematographers, Roger Deakins. He has won Oscars for his work on 1917 and Blade Runner 2049, and also shaped the look of modern classics such as O Brother, Where Art Thou?, Skyfall, The Big Lebowski and The Shawshank Redemption. But is technology, from CGI to the ubiquitous camera phone, changing everything we thought we knew about making films?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs8n4f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0r)
After Merkel: What German companies want

Small and medium-sized companies in Germany, the famous "Mittelstand", are fundamental to the German economy, employing more than 60% of the country's workers, according to official figures. Chancellor Angela Merkel is stepping down after sixteen years at the helm, so whichever party gets the biggest share of the votes this weekend, the election heralds a change of the country's leadership. What do the Mittelstand companies want from a new leader and his or her government? In Stuttgart Victoria Craig speaks to Jona Christians, CEO of electric vehicle company, Sono motors, about the measures he thinks are vital to support innovation and new technology. For Michael Goepfarth, whose company, Scio automation, designs automated systems to help customers from bakeries to car companies, the biggest bugbear is over-regulation. While Dr Peter Weigmann, boss of Wafios, which has been making springs since 1893, fears that potential tax rises might have an adverse effect on business and force his company to relocate some of its production. The business climate at this pivotal moment is put in context by Professor Winfried Weber of Mannheim University of Applied Sciences, who still lives in the former watchmaking factory once owned by his family.

Presenter: Victoria Craig
Producers: Stephen Ryan and Philippa Goodrich

Image: Wafios spring and metal bending factory. Copyright: BBC


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz3)
Kenya: Westgate Mall attack

Gunmen from the Somali Islamist group Al-Shabab attacked a shopping centre in Nairobi taking hundreds hostage. The group claimed it was in retaliation for Kenyan military action against them in southern Somalia. The siege lasted four days in September 2013 and more than 60 people were killed, but hundreds more were injured and traumatised. Daniel Ouma was a paramedic on duty at the scene and explains to Rebecca Kesby how his team tried to help people affected.

PHOTO: A police officer during a rescue operation at the site of the terrorist attack, Westgate Mall, on September 21, 2013 in Nairobi, Kenya. Gunmen from the extremist group Al-Shabab entered the mall and opened fire at random on shoppers; 68 deaths have been confirmed. (Photo by Jeff Angote/Nation Media/Gallo Images/Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5ldm5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhh)
A turning point for Facebook?

Will US press reports about Facebook bring tighter regulation or a breakup a step closer? Plus, the British startup that wants to power the metaverse. And the plan to connect the UK’s museum and gallery collections to online visitors and researchers. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs8rwk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5ljc9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsz)
How powerful is China's navy?

China has reacted angrily following this month's announcement of an alliance that will enable Australia to possess and deploy nuclear powered submarines in the region. Australia says the partnership with the USA and the UK, or Aukus, is not aimed at China. But most analysts agree that the initiative is hoping to counter Beijing's rapidly expanding naval capabilities. Chinese patrol boats have clashed with neighbouring vessels in disputed waters, home to billions of barrels of untapped oil and gas. The country has created artificial islands in the South China Sea and there are concerns it may use its growing amphibious capabilities to invade Taiwan. So how important is the Chinese navy to the country's overall strategic and economic plan? How does its expansion affect maritime disputes in East Asia and the safe passage of trillions of dollars worth of commodities each year? And is China right to accuse the West of a 'Cold War mentality' when it criticises the country's military investments?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.

Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5ln3f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9p82p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs90ct)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5lrvk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fh)
What's behind Guinea's coup?

The military coup earlier this month in the West African state of Guinea has been a huge story for BBC reporter Alhassan Sillah, based in the capital Conakry. He tells us about the main players - coup leader Colonel Mamady Doumbouya, and the man he ousted, President Alpha Condé.

The swimming camels of Kutch
The Kharai are a rare breed of camel found in the Indian state of Gujarat. They swim up to three kilometres in shallow seas to reach the mangroves where they graze. But as salt companies block tidal water, the mangroves are dying, and there's less grazing. BBC Gujarati's Prashant Gupta met the herdsmen and their swimming camels.

Cairo's belly dancing school
Egypt is known for belly dancing, but recently this art has been dominated by belly dancers from Eastern Europe and Latin America. Reem Fattelbab of BBC Arabic has visited a belly dancing school in Cairo to find out why more Egyptian women don't follow this tradition.

Ukraine's toxic mines
BBC Ukrainian recently reported from the frontline in the Donbas region about the impact the conflict is having on the environment. During the Soviet era, Donbas was a mining hub, but now many old mines are flooding, leading to contamination of local water supplies. Reporter Zhanna Bezpiatchuk went down one of the mines to see for herself.

Capybaras and class war in Argentina
The exclusive Nordelta gated community north of Buenos Aires were recently invaded by capybaras, the world's largest rodent. Gardens were tunneled, plants eaten, but with half of Argentinians living in poverty, many were siding with the animals, as BBC Mundo contributor Macarena Gagliardi reports.

Image: Special forces commander Mamady Doumbouya in September 2021
Credit: Reuters/Saliou Samb


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5lwlp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9phky)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs97w2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5m0bt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2f2znf)
Climate change and the German election

German voters are to elect a new government on Sunday as Chancellor Angela Merkel steps down after 16 years. Newshour's Tim Franks looks at how climate change is featuring in the campaign.

Also on the programme: a fifth migrant has died on the Poland-Belarus border - we'll hear from those trying to cross the freezing frontier and being pushed back; and new evidence has emerged that humans populated the Americas thousands of years earlier than we thought.

(Photo: Reichstag in Berlin - seat of German government; Credit:EPA/CLEMENS BILAN)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5m42y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs9hcb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46x8974dkv)
Germany heads to the polls

Ahead of this weekend's elections in Germany, we take the temperature of its economy. The BBC's Victoria Craig has been travelling around Germany, speaking with businesses to find out what they want from the new government. We hear from the founder of Sono Motors, Jona Christians, and Dr Peter Weigmann of Wafios, which manufactures metal-bending machines, discusses concerns about possible tax rises. And as Chancellor Angela Merkel prepares to step down, we get a sense of her economic legacy from Stefanie Bolzen of Die Welt. Plus, China has declared all cryptocurrency transactions illegal. We find out what's behind the move from Glen Goodman, author of The Crypto Trader.

Today's edition is presented by Sasha Twining, and produced by Nisha Patel, Susan Karanja and Stephen Ryan.

(Picture: Billboards of German party leaders. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5m7v2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxq6z927sj)
German elections 2021: Young voters

We go to Germany, where parliamentary elections marking the end of Angela Merkel's 16 years in power are taking place over the weekend. Protests have been happening across the country, with young people calling for action from politicians on climate change. We connect to two first-time voters, to hear what's at stake for them, and the issues that will determine who they choose.

Our correspondent Nick Beake has been investigating the issue of migration on the Belarus-Poland border, finding people hiding in the forests who are cold, hungry and ill. The migrants from countries including Nigeria, Sri Lanka and Iraq say they're being pushed back and forth over the border by security forces. We'll explain the context.

And our coronavirus expert of the day, Dr Rick Malley from Boston Children's Hospital, answers questions about the pandemic. If you have a question you would like to ask, send us a message on WhatsApp +447730 751925.

(Photo: A protester holds cardboard reading "smells like air pollution" during the Fridays For Future global climate action day in Berlin, German. Credit: EPA/Clemens Bilan)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5mcl6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxq6z92cjn)
Migrants being deported across borders

We'll cover two stories of migration and hear direct from the people involved. Our correspondent Nick Beake has been investigating what's happening on the Belarus-Poland border, finding people hiding in forests there who are cold, hungry and ill. They say they're being pushed back and forth over the border by security forces. Meanwhile the US has been deporting people from a Texas town on the border with Mexico, where about 13,000 migrants - most of them Haitians - have gathered in makeshift camps under a bridge. Yesterday, the US special envoy for Haiti resigned in protest over the deportations.

We go to Germany, where parliamentary elections marking the end of Angela Merkel's 16 years in power are taking place over the weekend. Protests have been taking place across the country, with young people calling for action from politicians on climate change. We connect to two first-time voters, to hear what's at stake for them, and the issues that will determine who they choose.

And we'll talk through the latest news on the coronavirus pandemic with one of our regular experts, Professor Marc Mendelson from the University of Cape Town.

(Photo: A Haitian migrant who was flown out of Texas by US authorities reacts outside of Toussaint Louverture International Airport while waiting for processing by Haitian authorities, in Port-au-Prince, Hait. Credit: Reuters/Ralph Tedy Erol)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5mhbb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5mm2g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxnsb9q71q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcs9zbv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nj674qgwt)
2021/09/24 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5mqtl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsb32z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqz)
How do flowers know when to bloom?

This year has been a weird one for UK gardeners – unpredictable spring temperatures meant flowers failed to bloom and throughout the rainy summer, slugs have been savaging salad crops. But why and when plants blossom is about more than just early cold spells and wet weather, and a listener in California has asked Crowdscience to investigate.

Flowering is vital to both plants and us. Without it, they wouldn’t be able to evolve and survive (and we wouldn’t have anything to eat). Anand Jagatia hears that different species have developed different strategies for doing this based on all sorts of things, from where they’re located to how big they are to what kind of insects are around to pollinate them. The famously stinky Titan Arum, or corpse flower, for example, blooms for a single day once every decade or so before collapsing on itself and becoming dormant again.


This gives it the best chance of attracting carrion beetles in the steamy Sumatran jungle. But other plants open their petals much more regularly, which is a process regulated by a clever internal clock that can sense daylight and night. It’s even possible to trick some of them into producing flowers out of season. Cold is also a vital step for some brassicas and trees, and scientists are starting to understand the genes involved. But as climate change makes winters in parts of the world warmer and shorter, there are worrying knock on effects for our food supply.

Produced by Marijke Peters for BBC World Service.



Featuring:

Guy Barter, RHS
Professor Judy Jernstedt, UC Davis
Professor Dame Caroline Dean, John Innes Centre
Professor Ove Nilsson, Umea Plant Science Centre

(Photo credit: Getty Images)


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5mvkq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv59q2f3twb)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5mz9v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsbbl7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tzl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjr4n5n31z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywvblq1dly)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0smdw55g7l)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkklcsbgbc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48yw3qwmm3)
Germany heads to the polls

Ahead of this weekend's elections in Germany, we take the temperature of its economy. The BBC's Victoria Craig has been travelling around Germany, speaking with businesses to find out what they want from the new government. We hear from the founder of Sono Motors, Jona Christians, and Dr Peter Weigmann of Wafios, which manufactures metal-bending machines, discusses concerns about possible tax rises. And as Chancellor Angela Merkel prepares to step down, we get a sense of her economic legacy from Stefanie Bolzen of Die Welt. Plus, China has declared all cryptocurrency transactions illegal. We find out what's behind the move from Glen Goodman, author of The Crypto Trader.

(Picture: Billboards of German party leaders. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 05:32 SAT (w3ct2kp6)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 18:32 SAT (w3ct2kp6)

30 Animals That Made Us Smarter 10:32 MON (w3ct2kp6)

A Wish for Afghanistan 04:32 WED (w3ct2jnb)

A Wish for Afghanistan 11:32 WED (w3ct2jnb)

A Wish for Afghanistan 22:32 WED (w3ct2jnb)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gxw)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxw)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gxw)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkk73gknyx)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkk73gl169)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkk73gldfp)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkk73glj5t)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkk73glrp2)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkk73gmlwz)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkk73gn6mm)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkk73gnkw0)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkklcryqyv)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkklcryvpz)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkklcrz6yc)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzkklcs1mvy)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkklcs1rm2)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkklcs23vg)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkklcs2cbq)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkklcs7kf8)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkklcs7xnn)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkklcs90ct)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkklcsbgbc)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjqscvw5yd)

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BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjqscvz2vh)

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BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172xzjqscw1r8b)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjr4n55v0r)

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BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjr4n571h1)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172xzjr4n57575)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172xzjr4n578z9)

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BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzjr4n57ryt)

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BBC News 21:00 MON (w172xzjr4n587yb)

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BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjr4n58hfl)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n58qxv)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n58vnz)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n58zf3)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n59357)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n596xc)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n59bnh)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n59gdm)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n59l4r)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n59pww)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n59tn0)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n59yd4)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n5b248)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n5b5wd)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n5b9mj)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n5bfcn)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n5bk3s)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n5bnvx)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n5bsm1)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n5bxc5)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n5c139)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n5c4vf)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n5c8lk)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjr4n5cdbp)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5cmty)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5crl2)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5cwb6)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5d02b)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5d3tg)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5d7kl)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5dc9q)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5dh1v)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5dlsz)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5dqk3)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5dv97)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5dz1c)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5f2sh)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5f6jm)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5fb8r)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5fg0w)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5fks0)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5fpj4)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5ft88)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5fy0d)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5g1rj)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5g5hn)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjr4n5g97s)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5gjr1)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5gnh5)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5gs79)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5gwzf)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5h0qk)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5h4gp)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5h86t)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5hcyy)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5hhq2)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5hmg6)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5hr6b)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5hvyg)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5hzpl)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5j3fq)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5j75v)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5jbxz)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5jgp3)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5jlf7)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5jq5c)

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BBC News 21:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5jynm)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5k2dr)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjr4n5k64w)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjr4n5kfn4)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172xzjr4n5kkd8)

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BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzjr4n5ln3f)

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BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjr4n5m7v2)

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BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172xzjr4n5mhbb)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172xzjr4n5mm2g)

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BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172xzjr4n5mvkq)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzjr4n5mz9v)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjr4n5n31z)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d67)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxq6z8pn54)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxq6z8prx8)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxq6z8sk27)

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BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxq6z92cjn)

Bad Cops 10:06 SUN (w3ct2ghs)

Bad Cops 22:06 SUN (w3ct2ghs)

Bad Cops 03:06 MON (w3ct2ghs)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j58)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jg9)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jp2)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1j9s)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j0r)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqjn3rsk83)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqk0d2637k)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqk0d2904n)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqk0d2cx1r)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqk0d2gsyv)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dh8)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqy)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pqy)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pqz)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lsl)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lsl)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lsl)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct1m88)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2lcn)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct2lcn)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2lcn)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mvc)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mvc)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n68)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n68)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3ct1n68)

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HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n1r)

HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3ct1n1r)

Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nvs)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nvt)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nvt)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvt)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2ptx)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2ptx)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2lcq)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tdj)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tdj)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1tdj)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dkj)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2dkj)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dkj)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hcd)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hcd)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2vcwlmd10)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv2vcwlmhs4)

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Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172xv59q2f2znf)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172xv59q2f3twb)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1y)

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