Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 04 SEPTEMBER 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v79wqq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqhxl4781f)
US job growth starts to slow

The US economy added 235,000 jobs in August, compared with 1.05 million in July. We hear how this is affecting businesses on a local level from Stephen Griffin, CEO of the Finger Lakes Economic Development Centre in upstate New York.
Apple is to postpone the introduction of new software that would have detected pictures of child pornography and sex abuse on iPhones, following criticism by privacy campaigners. Our North America technology reporter James Clayton explains the situation.
The Dutch Grand Prix returns this weekend after 36 years. The BBC’s Matthew Kenyon goes to Zandvoort to see why the F1 race is restarting after all these years.
And US radio station Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal speaks to marketing professor Utpal Dholakia about the damage to brands when they are used by group such as the Taliban.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Sinead Mangan, presenter of the ABC radio programme ‘Australia Wide’, from Perth.

(Image: A 'Now Hiring' sign. Credit: Getty)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7b0gv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjcdmg3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv0cr7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbx)
Will a microchipped cricket ball revolutionise bowling?

Isabelle Westbury, Jim Maxwell and Charu Sharma hear from former Australia bowler Michael Kasprowicz who has been involved in developing the SmartBall, which measures speed, spin and power and is currently being trialled in the Caribbean Premier League. We ask what the players make of it so far and when we could see it being used more widely across international competitions.

We find out more about Brazil's ambitions to qualify for the Women's T20 World Cup in 2023 with their captain Roberta Moretti Avery.

Plus we remember Dale Steyn’s greatest moments as the South African announces his retirement from cricket and discuss the pressure on India’s Virat Kohli both with the bat and his captaincy as the Test series against England continues.

PHOTO: Australian fast bowler Michael Kasprowicz, shows the match ball to spectators after taking five wickets, on day two of the first of three Tests against Pakistan at the WACA ground in Perth, 17 December 2004. (Credit: GREG WOOD/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7b46z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fd)
Afghanistan: The view from nextdoor

Events in Afghanistan are being closely followed in neighbouring Uzbekistan. Rustam Qobil of BBC Uzbek tells us about the strong cultural and economic ties between the two countries, and what the main concerns are for Uzbekistan and for the Afghan Uzbek population.

Afghan Hazaras face persecution by the Taliban and have been fleeing over the Pakistani border in Balochistan. BBC Urdu's Saher Baloch went to Quetta to meet some of the refugees who've been welcomed by the local Hazara community, who also experience persecution.

Dariush Rajabian tells us how events in Afghanistan are being reported by BBC Persian, and how they reverberate in his home country, Tajikistan, where BBC Persian also has an audience.

For decades, India has hosted Afghans fleeing war or seeking education and business opportunities. BBC Hindi's Piyush Nagpal has spoken to Afghans in Delhi, some long-standing residents, and some just visiting but overtaken by events.

Russian shamans seek recognition
Shamans in Russia are demanding official recognition for their beliefs from the Russian state. Oleg Boldyrev of BBC Russian has been hearing their concerns, and he tells us about the heartlands of shamanism, in regions east of the Urals.

Our Ancestors: Hemalata Lavanam
The BBC Indian languages series Our Ancestors has been celebrating the achievements of trailblazing women from marginalised communities. BBC Telegu's Padma Meenakshi tells the story of social reformer Hemalata Lavanam from Andhra Pradesh.

Image: Afghans arrive at the Pakistan-Afghanistan border in Chaman
Credit: AFP via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz0)
North Korea's founding father

When World War Two ended and the Korean peninsula was divided, Soviet soldiers occupied the North, and US soldiers occupied the South. So how did one man, Kim Il-sung, take control of communist North Korea and create the long-lasting dynasty that still runs the country today? Kevin Kim has been hearing from Professor Kim Hyung-suk about his meeting with Kim Il-sung, and about the mystery behind his rise to power.

Photo: North Korean illustration of Kim Il-sung surrounded by happy citizens.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7b7z3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsw)
Methane: The other greenhouse gas

The latest UN climate report concludes that while carbon dioxide (CO2) is the main driver of global warming, another gas - methane - is likely responsible for between 30-50% of the current rise in temperatures. Methane is much more effective at trapping heat in Earth’s atmosphere than CO2 is, but it also breaks down much faster, raising hopes that quick action to curb emissions could aid efforts to keep global warming below 1.5 C. Methane is the largest component found in natural gas and is also emitted during the process of fracking and coal production. It’s produced in large quantities by farmed animals but also leaks into the atmosphere when organic matter decomposes in landfills. A report published earlier this year claimed that if existing measures and technologies were used more widely, human-caused methane emissions could be cut by as much as 180 million tonnes a year by 2030. But others argue that until CO2 emissions are dealt with, methane will remain 'a sideshow' and that attention paid to the problem must not distract from the bigger threat. So, is enough being done to prevent the leakage of methane?

Paul Henley is joined by a panel of expert guests. Producers: Paul Schuster and Zak Brophy.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7bcq7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjcdzph)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv0qzm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct1xzx)
The Kenyans who help the world to cheat

If a lazy student in London or New York goes online to pay somebody to do their essay, the chances are the work will actually end up being done by somebody in Kenya.

So who are the African ghost writers who are paid to help wealthy foreigners fake their way to unearned success, and what do they think about what they do?

Kenya has become a key hub in the international cheating industry, because it is an English-speaking country with a good education system, but where there are often limited economic opportunities, particularly for younger people.

Thousands of people are making a living supplying faked assignments commissioned by unethical students in other countries, through websites mainly based in the US and Eastern Europe. Many of those employed to do this work are students themselves.

Although essay selling offers some a route out of poverty, universities say it is increasingly undermining the integrity of education around the world. And there are calls, even from within Kenya, for action against this booming online industry.

Presenter: Reha Kansara

Producer: Michael Kaloki

Editor: Ed Main
Photo: Graphic of hand writing an essay while another hand takes it and offers cash

Photo credit: BBC


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkg)
The bill for Afghanistan

American President Joe Biden has said the war in Afghanistan cost more than $2 trillion. Todd Harrison, a senior fellow at the Centre for Strategic International Studies helps us unpick what is included in this figure.

Plus, when the Taliban gained territory, they also took control of military equipment which had been left behind. One Republican congressman has said this was worth $85 billion. Jonathan Schroden, the director of their Countering Threats and Challenges Program, at the research organisation CNA explains where this figure comes from.

(Photo: Taliban fighters take a tour of the military vehicles left in Kabul after they seized the airport. 31 Aug, 2021. Credit: Marcus Yam/ Getty images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7bhgc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytbxlynwqg)
Afghanistan: The battle over Panjshir Valley

The fate of Afghanistan's Panjshir Valley - the final holdout against Taliban control - hangs in the balance as heavy fighting continues.

The significance of a new anti-abortion law in the US state of Texas.

And an up-to-date take on life for disabled people in Japan.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Mary Fitzgerald, a writer, researcher and consultant specialising in the Euro-Mediterranean region with a particular focus on Libya, and Afzal Ashraf, terrorism expert and a visiting fellow at the University of Nottingham.

(Image: Anti-Taliban commanders walk on a road in Panjshir Valley, Afghanistan. Credit: REUTERS)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7bm6h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytbxlyp0gl)
UK army officers tell of 'chaotic' Afghan evacuation

The inside story of the Kabul airport evacuation from the British troops that were there in the wake of a suicide bomb attack. The senior British commander on the ground in Kabul has been speaking for the first time about the UK's evacuation operation from Afghanistan.

Women, education and NGOs under the Taleban in Afghanistan. What are the chances of some of the norms established in the past twenty years continuing?

And prescribing museum visits for people's mental health during the pandemic.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Mary Fitzgerald, a writer, researcher and consultant specialising in the Euro-Mediterranean region with a particular focus on Libya, and Afzal Ashraf, terrorism expert and a visiting fellow at the University of Nottingham.

(Photo: Brigadier James Martin. Credit: BBC)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7bqym)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytbxlyp46q)
Thailand: PM survives a vote of no confidence

We discuss the fate of Panjshir and how and if the international community should engage with the Taliban when they form a government

And the prime minister of Thailand, Prayuth Chan-ocha, has survived a vote of no confidence, amid public anger at his handling of coronavirus and the economy.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Mary Fitzgerald, a writer, researcher and consultant specialising in the Euro-Mediterranean region with a particular focus on Libya, and Afzal Ashraf, terrorism expert and a visiting fellow at the University of Nottingham.

(Image: Prayuth Chan-ocha. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv1370)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8y)
Natural-born contortionists

Kim Chakanetsa explores the rich and long history of body-bending work and hears about the complex skills that you need to succeed.

Sosina Wogayehu is a contortionist and juggler from Ethiopia. She started performing at the age of six in the streets of Addis Ababa. After a long career travelling around the world, she has moved back to Ethiopia where she’s now training new performers and planning on opening the first circus venue in the country.

Leilani Franco is a British-Filipina professional contortionist. She holds three Guinness World Records: the fastest backbend walk, the fastest contortion roll and the most full-body revolutions in a chest-stand position. She made it to the semi-finals of both Britain’s Got Talent and Germany’s Got Talent, and she’s currently based in Hamburg, Germany.

Producer: Alice Gioia

(Image: Sosina Wogayehu (L) Credit: Ponch Hawkes; Leilani Franco (R) Credit: David Waldman/Barcroft Media)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7bvpr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d65)
Women of Afghanistan

The last US soldier has left Afghanistan, leaving the Taliban in control of the vast majority of the country. Working women have been told to stay at home for now, for their own safety, and women have also heard that they are unlikely to be offered any top jobs in a new government.

Host Nuala McGovern hears from two sisters, who say they feel trapped in their family home in Afghanistan, unable to set foot outside and terrified of the Taliban. She meets Afghan women, who are volunteering at a community centre in London, helping those who have fled their country. They share their own stories of anguish, while helping hundreds of people a day, who continue to try to get their relatives out of the country.

Nuala also catches up with a young woman who managed to flee the country on one of the last planes out. She's now in the US - but is still feeling pursued by the Taliban, who are sending her threatening messages in the middle of the night.

(Photo: Women walk at a market area in Kabul on 1 September 2021. Credit: Hoshang Hashimi/ AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv16z4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 World Of Wisdom (w3ct2hdl)
Opening up again

When Covid restrictions are lifted, the effort to return to our former lives can present unexpected personal trials. Shops, restaurants and offices have re- opened in Detroit, USA but Alex is finding it very hard to go back into the outside world and start socialising again. Dr Shefali helps him find a way forward and discusses the challenges of leaving home and re-entering the public world in places that have started opening up again, with presenter Sana Safi.

Produced by Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1w)
The risks of reporting the new Taliban regime

How dangerous is it for the BBC to report from Afghanistan with the Taliban targeting journalists? We ask the controller of World Service English, Mary Hockaday, what happens next for its teams on the ground. Plus, we hear about the BBC World Service's first International Podcast competition, which had over 1,000 entries from listeners. Namulanta Kombo from Kenya wowed the judges with her entry To My Daughter.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7bzfw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q3zwdtdgj)
The hope of a Paralympic legacy

As the Paralympics come to a close we hear from Japan’s Deputy Chef de Mission Miki Matheson on whether the games have been a success. Plus the hidden heroes of the Games. Jose Bernardino is one of the official Otto Bock prosthetic technicians offering support for free to athletes. Their work not only helps performance on the track but to change lives off it. Plus proving age is just a number, 60-year-old Carol Cooke picked up a silver in Tokyo to go along with the three golds she won at the last three Games.

Plus, ahead of the American Football season we look at how the NFL have managed to get over 93% of the league's players fully vaccinated without mandating or forcing players to get the jab. But for those refusing to be vaccinated, will it cost them their job? We hear from Tim Elcombe, Associate Professor at the Balsillie School of International Affairs.

Plus we preview the Women’s Super League as the new football season in England kicks off, and find out about the first Dutch Formula One Grand Prix for more than 35 years, and why it was very nearly cancelled.

Photo: Jhoan Vargas of Team Colombia at the Wheelchair Basketball event (Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7c360)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjcfq58)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv1ggd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3m)
Afghan crisis: Should India get a refugee policy?

Thousands of Afghans continue to flee their country since the Taliban seized control last month. Nearly half a million are expected to seek sanctuary in other countries by the end of the year, according to the United Nations.

Many of them will head to India. The country has a long-standing practice of welcoming asylum seekers, but selectively, and still doesn’t have a clearly defined state policy. Is an ad hoc system sufficient to take in more refugees on top of the estimated 245,000 that India currently hosts? And can it ensure uniform treatment of refugees from different communities such as the Rohingyas, the Tibetans or the Sri Lankan Tamils? What measures could help asylum seekers feel more socially included and have the basic rights to jobs and education?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss whether it’s time for India to formulate a national refugee protection framework.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Dilip Sinha, former Indian ambassador; Anas Tanwir, advocate, founder – Indian Civil Liberties Union; Sadaf Habib, Afghan national, Asylum seeker; Ali Johar, refugee, founder - Rohingya Literacy Programme


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7c6y4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9r)
Maylis De Kerangal: Mend the Living

World Book Club this month talks to the award-winning French writer Maylis de Kerangal about her remarkable and haunting novel Mend the Living.

After a horrific car accident on the Normandy coast surfer Simon Limbeau is rushed to hospital where his devastated parents are later told that he is on life-support, but is brain-dead. His heart, however, is still beating perfectly and could be donated to save someone’s life. They are faced with an agonising choice.

‘Mend the Living’ is the story of Simon Limbeau’s heart – and the story of all the lives that are turned upside down in the 24 hours between the accident that cuts short his life and offers hope of new life to another.

(Picture: Maylis de Kerangal. Photo credit: Philippe Quaisse.)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7cbp8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8gv9zw)
Taliban meet resistance in Panjshir Valley

The Taliban is preparing to announce a new government after heavy gunfire overnight in the capital Kabul - thought to be celebratory - left some residents afraid to leave their homes. Meanwhile fighting between the Taliban and opposition fighters in the Panjshir Valley has resulted in reports of hundreds of casualties.

Also in the programme: President Biden has ordered the declassification of some secret documents from the government investigation into the 9/11 terror attacks of 2001; and how an Artificial Intelligence composed music based on sketches from Beethoven's unfinished 10th Symphony.

Photo: Fighters in the Panjshir Valley in Afghanistan. Credit: Getty Images.


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7cgfd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tdrstl356)
Live Sporting Action

As the Women’s Super League in England gets underway we’ll have second half commentary live from Goodison Park as last year’s runners up, Manchester City start their season away against Everton. Stoke City women’s director of Football Chloe Jones and Katie Whyatt, Women’s Football Correspondent for the Athletic, are with us as we look ahead to the rest of season.

From 1500 GMT there’s another chance to hear how Sri Lanka overcame bombings, boycotts and near-bankruptcy at the cricket board to reach the top of world Cricket at the 1996 World Cup.

And at 1600 GMT we’ll be in Tokyo to round up the penultimate day’s action from the Paralympic Games, at Flushing Meadows for day 6 of the US Open Tennis, in Ohio where Europe and USA are battling it out for Golf's Solheim Cup and at The Oval for the third day of the fourth Test between England and India. Plus we'll have the reaction to stage 20 of Cycling's Vuelta a Espana, Dutch Grand Prix qualifying and we'll round up the day's World Cup Qualifiers.


Credit: Lucy Graham of Everton Women and Lucy Bronze of Manchester City Women during a Barclays FA Women's Super League match between Manchester City Women and Everton Women. (Photo: AMA/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7cydx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjcgkd5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv29p9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct1xzx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8n)
India's first Paralympic champion

In 1972, war veteran Murlikant Petkar won India's first ever Paralympic gold medal at the Heidelberg Games. Petkar had been shot and paralysed seven years earlier in a battle during the war with Pakistan, but then took up sprint swimming. He spoke to Adrian Moorhead in 2016. The programme is a Sparklab Production for BBC World Service.

(Photo: Murlikant Petkar with his medals)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7d251)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct2gdh)
Vivaldi's and Piazzolla's Seasons

The BBC Proms are back in the Royal Albert Hall in London with a six-week season of concerts featuring leading British orchestras as well as international soloists and conductors.

Broadcast programme:
Vivaldi - Concerto in E major, ‘La primavera’ (Spring)
Piazzolla, arr. Desyatnikov - Verano porteño (Summer in Buenos Aires)
Vivaldi - Concerto in G minor, ‘L’estate’ (Summer)
Vivaldi - Concerto in F minor, ‘L’inverno’ (Winter)
Piazzolla, arr. Desyatnikov - Primavera porteña (Spring in Buenos Aires)
Gershwin, arr. Bell/Stephenson - Summertime

Academy of St. Martin in the Fields
Joshua Bell (director/violin)

Violinist Joshua Bell leads the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields on a musical journey through the sights and sounds of two continents and two centuries. Vivaldi's 18th-century Seasons are instantly recognisable, not least because they have been used in countless films, TV programmes and advertisements, so it takes a great deal of confidence to write a series of companion pieces. Astor Piazzolla, born a hundred years ago, took up the challenge in the 1960's with his Las cuatro estaciones porteñas (The Four Seasons of Buenos Aires). He originally scored them for his Quintet consisting of a bandoneón, piano, violin, electric guitar and bass but these days they are often heard in an arrangement for a string orchestra and solo violin.

Presenter Andrew McGregor is joined by violinist and a professor at the Royal College of Music in London Madeleine Mitchell.

[Image: Violinist Joshua Bell and the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields at the 2021 BBC Proms. Credit: Chris Christodoulou]


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7d5x5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtd)
Actor Henry Golding

Nikki Bedi and guests, comedian Olga Koch and filmmaker Joseph Adesunloye, discuss the cultural highlights of the week.

British actor Henry Golding gives us an insider’s guide to becoming an action star.

The French singer songwriter Chris from Christine and the Queens reveals her favourite song to fall in love to.

South African actor Hlubi Mboya-Arnold tells us about the challenges of tackling child trafficking in the film I Am All Girls.

Australian actor Murray Bartlett takes us behind the scenes of hit American TV comedy drama The White Lotus.

British comedian Nish Kumar shares his survival tips for one of the world’s most famous comedy festivals - The Edinburgh Fringe.

Nikki Bedi talks to British-Russian comedian Olga Koch about her latest stand-up.

Plus we hear the magical voice of the Ghanaian-American singer Moses Sumney.

(Photo: Henry Golding)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7d9n9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8gw8yx)
Pakistan's intelligence chief in Kabul for talks with Taliban officials

The head of Pakistan's military intelligence agency, General Faiz Hameed, has been visiting Kabul where he's reportedly been holding talks with Taliban officials. Sources in Pakistan said he came to discuss security and the management of the border.

Also on the programme: Following President Biden’s announcement of the declassification of 9/11 government documents, we get reaction from a campaigner who lost her husband in the attacks; and is climate change going to determine the fate of the komodo dragon?

(Picture: Armored vehicles are seen in front of the presidential palace in Kabul Credit: Reuters)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7dfdf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hcb)
Singing is cool again with Sinead Harnett, Grades, Jae Stephens and Monro

Sinead Harnett, Grades, Jae Stephens and Monro discuss why naming songs is the easy part, balancing life and music, the importance of breaking away from music in order to live and gain experiences to write about, and the influence of R&B on their sound.

Born in the UK before moving to Los Angeles, Sinead Harnett's latest record, Ready Is Always Too Late, is about “[embodying] the best version of yourself”. She’s worked with musical heavyweights such as Disclosure, Rudimental, EARTHGANG and Lucky Daye, as well as former Music Life guests Masego and MNEK.

Grammy-winning producer, songwriter and DJ Grades has worked with and remixed artists including Labrinth, Bastille, Becky Hill, Nile Rodgers, Dua Lipa, and Nao. Jae Stephens is an artist, songwriter, producer, and singer originally from Dallas, now based in Los Angeles. She started singing at the age of 12, recently performed with Khalid, and is very much an artist to keep your ears on. And Monro is a Grammy nominated producer, songwriter, and artist. He’s written and produced for the likes of Jhene Aiko, Rico Nasty, and our host today, Sinead Harnett.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7dk4k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywt7srsvpj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slb26xxb5)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv2xdy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt2)
Theatre: What’s next for the performing arts?

How are the performing arts faring more than eighteen months into the COIVID 19 pandemic? The Cultural Frontline brings together four global theatre directors to discuss the impact on their industry.

Having embraced digital innovation whilst their doors have been shut, we hear how it feels to be performing live again, and how the plays being staged reflect the unprecedented times artists around the world have been living through.

Joining Chi Chi Izundu to discuss the state of theatre now are Rwandan theatre director and curator of the Ubumuntu International Arts festival, Hope Azeda, Indian playwright, theatre director and lecturer Abhishek Majumdar, the artistic director of the Kiln theatre in London, Indhu Rubasingham and General Director of the Municipal Theatre in Santiago Chile, Carmen Larenas.

Producer: Lucy Collingwood

(Photo: Audiences return to live performance. Credit: Pedro Fiúza/NurPhoto/Getty)



SUNDAY 05 SEPTEMBER 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7dsmt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yvn)
Hurricane season intensifies

When hurricane Ida struck the coast of Louisiana last weekend, almost to the day that Katrina did 16 years ago, comparisons between the two events were soon to follow. As the latest storm continues to wreak havoc and death further north in the US, Suzana Camargo of Columbia university talks to Roland Pease about the similarities and differences, the better forecasting available now, and the grim reality that climate change suggests for this and future hurricane seasons.

A couple of weeks ago, Science in Action looked at the carbon accounting of Blue Hydrogen (hydrogen manufactured from fossil fuels). Listener Nick Arndt got in touch to say we were wrong when we stated that hydrogen can’t be piped out of the ground from natural sources. His company, Sisprobe, plans to use its passive seismic prospecting technology to work with an international consortium that aims to unlock a new “hydrogen rush” – commercialising what they suspect to be a near-ubiquitous source of genuinely carbon-free fuel - to supply the world economy of the near future. Viacheslav Zgonnik - CEO of start-up Natural Hydrogen Energy LLC - has been working on hydrogen for 10 years, has written a recent review of the science, and tells Roland about current and future studies into finding the best way to tap this simplest of molecules before it escapes into space.

In Chile, the recent megadrought has led to fears that hydroelectric damns may become so drained that power-outs may occur in the coming months. This will not help Chile to achieve its target of carbon-neutrality by 2050. Apt, then, that a new Concentrated Solar Power plant (CSP) is now up and running in the north of the country. Reporter Jane Chambers has been to visit Cerro Dominador – the spectacular new array of 10,600 mirrors that focus sunshine onto a molten salt target, heating it up to 560C, and generating up to 210 MW electricity.

Meanwhile archaeologists have been doing a molecular analysis of a protein found to survive in the bones of unfortunate victims of the mount Vesuvius eruption that destroyed Pompeii. Despite the searing heat that killed inhabitants of nearby Herculaneum, Oliver Criag of York University has been able to examine the different isotopes in amino acids still recoverable from their bones to help identify what sorts of things these people ate during their tragically foreshortened lifetimes. A whole lot of cereals generally, but more interestingly, the men tended to eat more fish while the women seem to have consumed more meat and dairy.

Our connection to the night sky spans cultures and millennia: observing the stars and planets helped our ancestors navigate the world, tell stories about the constellations, and understand our place in the universe. But these days, for the vast majority of us, seeing the stars is getting harder. 80% of people live under light polluted skies, and in many cities you’re lucky to see a handful of stars at night.

This state of affairs is bothering CrowdScience listener and keen stargazer Mo from Salt Lake City in the USA, who wonders if there’s anything we can do about light pollution. Of course, we could simply turn out all the lights, but that’s unrealistic. So what are smarter ways of lighting our communities to preserve our view of the cosmos?

Increasingly worried by the effect of artificial lighting on the ability to observe stars, astronomer Dr Jason Pun set up a series of monitoring stations to continuously measure ‘sky glow’. By comparing sky glow across the world, he wants to figure out which approaches work best.

One community taking an active approach is the South Downs National Park in South East England, one of a number of Dark Sky Reserves around the word. We visit the park and speak to the Dark Skies Officer there, to find out how people are coming together to turn down their lights and keep the night dark.

And it’s not just stargazing that’s threatened by light pollution. Artificial light at night disrupts the circadian rhythms of wildlife. We visit a project in rural Germany looking into the benefits of dark-sky-friendly lighting on insect populations there.


(Image credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7dxcy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjchjc6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv38nb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvq)
The Kindness Test

When was the last time you did something really kind for someone or someone else did something really kind for you?

Claudia Hammond and guests are looking at the place of kindness in today’s world, asking what it really means, what happens in our brains when we act kindly and whether there can ever be a role for it in the cut-throat worlds of business and politics. She hears what kindness means to people in Kenya, Chile and in the UK. And with many aspects of kindness remaining under-researched, with your help Claudia and Robin Banerjee, Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Sussex, are asking you to fill in the gaps by taking part in the Kindness Test.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7f142)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7f4w6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv9)
Hunting for food, water and medicine, as Lebanon runs out

Stories from Lebanon, Azerbaijan, the US and Italy

First came political paralysis, then the economic downfall. Once a relatively prosperous country, Lebanon is running out of food, water, electricity and also medicines. With no functioning government, people who never dreamed they would struggle, now find themselves devoting all their efforts just to stay afloat. And to help people with serious illness, Leila Molana-Allen got on a flight to Istanbul, in search of life-saving drugs.

The fighting may have finished, but deaths still mount up. The disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh was fought over last year by Armenia and Azerbaijan, and both sides seeded the area with landmines - hundreds of thousands of them. Now, civilians returning to their homes have become the victims. Colin Freeman met up with those in charge of clearing the mines, and heard how their efforts have been caught up in a row over prisoners of war.

The anniversary of the September 11th attacks can be a painful time for those who lost friends and family that day. This year’s anniversary is a particularly pointed one: it marks twenty years since the World Trade Centre and Pentagon were hit, and it comes at a time when Afghanistan is once again in the news. The Taliban hosted the instigators of the attacks, Al Qaeda, and are back in power. Laura Trevelyan talked about this with a woman whose husband was killed that day.

What’s in a name? Shakespeare’s famous question has particular resonance in Italy right now, where the issue at hand is what name should be given to streets, parks and town squares. Some recent choices have been simply novel: a Freddy Mercury Road will soon be declared open in one small town. Yet as Dany Mitzman explains, plans to use the names of famous fascists are not surprisingly proving more controversial.


(Image: Shuttered door of a closed pharmacy in Beirut, Lebanon. Credit: Anwar Amro/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv3j4l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7f8mb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjchwll)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv3mwq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz1)
3. Lost

The cheating is now out in the open and the players - including genuinely-disabled captain Ray - have to hand back their gold medals. But how and when did the cheating start? An ex-coach of the team, who was in charge until just two years before the scandal, says he began to suspect something was wrong way before Sydney 2000.

Plus Dan tries to find an answer to one of the biggest questions of all - why did the cheats do it?

Presenter: Dan Pepper
Series producer: Simon Maybin

(Photo credit: EPA)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7fdcg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytbxlyrsmk)
Genocide in Tigray

Ethiopia's former ambassador to the United States tells Weekend that the government is committing acts of genocide in the northern province of Tigray.

Also, fighting continues in the Panjshir Valley in Afghanistan between Taliban forces and the resistance.

Plus, a sharp rise in violence against women in Colombia, blamed on organised crime.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Eric Albert, London correspondent for the French Le Monde newspaper, and Diana Menham, Lebanese economist, public policy expert, and managing director of an organisation campaigning for political reform in Lebanon.

(Image: An Ethiopian carrying a load of food for Internally Displaced Peoples who fled the fighting in the Tigray region. Credit: EPA/STR)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7fj3l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytbxlyrxcp)
Pakistan's spy chief in Kabul

As fighting continues in the Afghan Panjshir Valley between the Taliban and the resistance, Pakistan's intelligence chief visits Kabul.

Plus, Formula One motor racing returns to the Netherlands after 36 years' absence. But environmental campaigners are expected to protest against today's Dutch Grand Prix.

Also, we discuss Abba's new songs which have raced to the top of the streaming charts.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Eric Albert, London correspondent for the French Le Monde newspaper, and Diana Menham, Lebanese economist, public policy expert, and managing director of an organisation campaigning for political reform in Lebanon.

(Image: A general view of daily life after the Taliban took control of Kabul, Afghanistan. Credit: EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock )


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7fmvq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytbxlys13t)
Final day of the 2020 Paralympics

Athletes from over 160 countries have been competing in Tokyo for the past twelve days.

Also, Ethiopia's former ambassador to Washington tells the BBC that genocide is taking place in its northern province of Tigray.

Plus, a story of public rehabilitation and personal redemption in a dramatisation of the Monica Lewinsky - Bill Clinton White House sex scandal.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Eric Albert, London correspondent for the French Le Monde newspaper, and Diana Menham, Lebanese economist, public policy expert, and managing director of an organisation campaigning for political reform in Lebanon.

(Image: Manuela Schaer of Switzerland in action during the Marathon T54 at the 2020 Tokyo Summer Paralympics Games at the Olympic Stadium in Tokyo. Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv4043)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfq)
Raymond Blanc: My life in five dishes

The celebrated French chef Raymond Blanc tells Emily Thomas about his life through five dishes.

From a childhood roaming magical forests in Eastern France, to the rather less enticing restaurant scene of 1970s England, Raymond describes how with little grasp of the language and no formal training, he quickly became one of the UK’s best known chefs. His restaurant, Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons, has been thriving for almost 40 years and during that time he has added a string of cookbooks, TV shows and brasseries to his name. Raymond explains how he balances being a gastronome and perfectionist with running a large business.

But we also hear another side to the exuberant chef. The past year has been perhaps one the most difficult of Raymond’s life - closing his restaurants, the isolation of lockdown, the death of his mother and being hospitalised with coronavirus for a month. He tells us why he thinks it will make him a better man.


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7frlv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv43w7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxc)
Disco and drama: The story of Ride On Time

Daniele Davoli was a DJ playing the clubs of Italy when he produced a song with his band Black Box that would define 1980s house music. Ride On Time became a smash hit in the UK, with its driving beat, catchy piano riff and powerful sample from American soul singer Loleatta Holloway. But that sample would land the band in a whole lot of trouble, especially after they hired a French model to mime along at their live gigs. When word got out, fans were furious. A longer version of this programme was originally broadcast on the 7th of September 2020.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Harry Graham
Producer: Deiniol Buxton

Picture: Black Box performs Ride On Time on Top of the Pops
Credit: BBC


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7fwbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g77)
4. The man behind the curtain

He earned a formidable reputation. But Sgt Wayne Jenkins is leading a double life. Not all the drugs he's seized are making it to the evidence room.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv47mc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyg)
The Taliban wanted me dead

Marzia Babakarkhail knows what it's like to have the Taliban break her door down intent on killing her. In 1997 they did just that because of her work promoting education and progress for women. She was forced to flee and now lives in the UK. That work continues and has never been more important.

As the last of the US military presence leaves Afghanistan Marzia tells her story to Matt O’Donoghue, how she rose to become a judge at 26 and was forced to flee and live under threat of death.

But she says her faith never faltered and she carries its strength in the UK where her humanitarian work continues in Manchester. Her fear now is that the progress she has fought for will be ripped away as the Taliban violently grab more and more control of her troubled homeland.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7g033)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjcjm2c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv4cch)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2hgz)
Libya's Revolution

Libya's Revolution: A dream of freedom

In February 2011, the arrest of a human rights lawyer in Libya sparked an uprising against the 42-year dictatorship of Col Muammar Gaddafi. The Revolution spread - supported by foreign airstrikes - and within eight months Gaddafi was killed, his regime overthrown. It was one of the climactic moments of the 'Arab Uprisings’. But what happened afterwards to Libya's Revolution? Ten years on, it is still unfinished. It has brought thousands of deaths, civil war, a strategically vital and oil-rich country still effectively divided in two. BBC reporter Tim Whewell, who covered the 2011 uprising, returns to Libya to find out what went wrong.

Tim meets the lawyer Fathi Terbil - the "spark of the revolution", and Iman Bugaighis, spokesperson of the rebel government. Former British foreign secretary William Hague discusses the calculations that led to foreign intervention. Does he still believe the West was right to get involved?

(Photo: Libyan rebels and Benghazi residents celebrate the passing of a UN resolution on 18 March, 2011 in Bengazi, Libya.Credit: Benjamin Lowy/Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7g3v7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct2gdh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7g7lc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8gy6wz)
Ethiopian army says 5,600 Tigrayan rebels killed since November

The Ethiopian military says they have killed more than 5,600 Tigrayan rebels since November. A supporter of the rebels tells us that the claim is 'ludicrous'.


Also in the programme: the Tokyo Paralympic Games come to an end; and a prominent civil rights organisation in Hong Kong says it won’t hand over information about their activities to the police.


(Photo: Tigrayan forces have been invading neighbouring regions. Credit: AFP)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7gcbh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlm)
Luigi Pirandello: Italian dramatist who brought chaos to the stage

It’s a hundred years since the infamous premiere of Luigi Pirandello’s experimental play Six Characters in Search of an Author, when an enraged Rome theatre audience yelled abuse at the Italian playwright and chased him out of the theatre. Since then, the play has gained iconic status as a piece of theatre which helped move Western culture into modernity. But what of the author of this play? He was a complex figure who found inspiration from his wife’s madness as well as the actors he worked with, and he formed an unlikely association with the Italian Fascist Prime Minister Benito Mussolini which still intrigues theatre critics and academics to this day.

Joining Rajan Datar to discuss Luigi Pirandello and his work are Guido Bonsaver, Professor in Italian Cultural history at the University of Oxford; Dr Enza de Francisci, lecturer in Translation studies at the University of Glasgow, who specialises in Pirandello’s Sicilian identity and his portrayal of women, and is the author of A 'New' Woman in Verga and Pirandello: From Page to Stage; and Patricia Gaborik, who teaches theatre history at the University of Calabria in Italy, and has studied Pirandello’s relationship with the Italian Fascist leader Mussolini and is the author of Mussolini’s Theatre: Fascist Experiments in Art and Politics.

The readings were by Marco Gambino.

Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service.

(Image: A scene from a production of Pirandello's play, Six Characters in Search of an Author, staged by French theatre director Emmanuel Demarcy-Mota at the Moscow Pushkin Drama Theatre. Credit: Artyom Geodakyan\TASS via Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7gh2m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Documentary (w3ct2pty)
Mikis Theodorakis remembered

Zorba’s theme from the 1964 film is what the composer Mikis Theodorakis will always be known for outside his native Greece, but in his time he was a figure on the world stage, rubbing shoulders with poets, politicians and artists like Pablo Neruda, Olof Palme and Salvador Dali. His most powerful music evokes a spirit of heroic rebellion that resonated with liberation movements from Greece to Latin America. And, far beyond Zorba, he wrote classical symphonies, ballets, operas, and popular songs as light as a sea breeze.

Maria Margaronis recalls this most prolific and energetic composer and political activist, who was arrested, exiled, imprisoned and tortured many times during the most turbulent years of Greece’s 20th Century, but who clung to his belief that art is not a decoration but a necessity.

Maria’s guests include Gail Holst-Warhaft, poet, musician and biographer; film-maker and festival-promoter Asteris Kutulas, actor and politician Lydia Koniordou; and the legendary interpreter of Theodorakis’ work, Maria Farantouri.


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7gltr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tdrstp7kk)
Sportsworld

Our team in Tokyo round up the final day’s action from the Paralympic Games. We’ll look back on the games with 21-time Paralympic Medallist Chantal Petitclerc and reflect on the key moments.

We’ll join the On The Podium team, Paralympian Scout Bassett, Comedian Eliza Skinner and our Athletics Commentator Ed Harry for the best interviews from this series of the podcast as athletes join them to share their personal story about journey's they took to star sport's biggest stage.

And in the last hour we’ll be at Flushing Meadows for day 7 of the US Open Tennis, in Ohio where Europe and USA are battling it out for Golf's Solheim Cup and at The Oval for the third day of the fourth Test between England and India. Plus we'll have the reaction to the final stage of Cycling's Vuelta a Espana, the Dutch Grand Prix and we'll round up the day's World Cup Qualifiers.

Credit: A general view of a firework display during the opening ceremony of the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games at the Olympic Stadium in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo: Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7gz24)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjckl1d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv5bbj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7h2t8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh6)
The Cost of Extreme Weather

On Business Weekly, we hear from the World Meteorological Organisation which has been tracking weather-related disasters for the last 50 years. We look at the economic and human cost of extreme weather and ask if anything can be done to protect ourselves against it. Also Covid has claimed yet more victims in India as the economic hardship brought by the coronavirus sees a rise in the number of children forced into marriage. We hear from a young girl who resisted her family’s attempt to marry her off to an older man. Plus filming for the latest Mission Impossible film has been put on hold multiple times over the last 18 months thanks to coronavirus cases on set as well as covid restrictions. Now Paramount Pictures is suing its insurance company, saying the resulting pay-out doesn’t begin to cover its losses. And as more of us head back to the office, whatever will we wear? Business Weekly is produced by Matthew Davies and presented by Lucy Burton.

(Image: Flooded streets in New Jersey after Hurricane Ida)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7h6kd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8gz5w0)
Guinea: Soldiers claim to have seized power

The United Nations and the African Union have condemned a military coup in Guinea - in which President Alpha Conde was captured and forced from power.

Also on the programme: We hear from the wife of Michael Kovrig, a Canadian jailed in China on espionage charges; and the latest from Afghanistan following the killing of a female police officer after the Taliban takeover

(Picture: Soldiers on TV in Guinea, Credit: Guinea TV)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7hb9j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g77)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv5pkx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 World Of Wisdom (w3ct2hdl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7hg1n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywt7srwrlm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slb270t78)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv5tb1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 06 SEPTEMBER 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jmjt2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlc9kr04zb)
The motor show returns to Munich

Europe's largest motor show, the IAA Mobility, gets underway in Germany this week. The BBC's Theo Leggett takes us through how and why the show has changed and we look at the challenges facing the car industry since the pandemic with Ram Chandrasekaran, Head of Road Transportation, at Wood Mckenzie.
Gavin Kelly, the Chief Executive of South Africa's Road Freight Association, talks to us about why pop- up vaccination centres for truckers are being launched there to persuade more uptake of the Covid jab and we hear from Michael Hughes about the economic health of Japan as the country's leader steps down. We also talk beer and tradition with Rupert Thompson of Hogs Back Brewery in Farnham, Southern England.
(Image: Volkswagen Passenger Cars CEO Ralf Brandstatter with VW ID, Munich Motor Show IAA Mobility; Image Credit: Reuters)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv49x2g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2h27)
Tamsin Edwards on the uncertainty in climate science

Certainty is comforting. Certainty is quick. But science is uncertain. And this is particularly true for people who are trying to understand climate change.

Climate scientist, Tamsin Edwards tackles this uncertainty head on. She quantifies the uncertainty inherent in all climate change predictions to try and understand which of many possible storylines about the future of our planet are most likely to come true. How likely is it that the ice cliffs in Antarctica will collapse into the sea causing a terrifying amount of sea level rise? Even the best supercomputers in the world aren’t fast enough to do all the calculations we need to understand what might be going on, so Tamsin uses statistical tools to fill in the gaps.

She joined the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2018 and is currently working on the 6th Assessment Report which will inform the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP26. She tells Jim Al-Khalili about her life and work and why she wishes more people would have the humility (and confidence) to consider the possibility that they might be wrong.


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jmnk6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snq8jg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4b0tl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqz)
Should rich countries help pay for climate change impacts in poorer ones?

As extreme weather events become more frequent and intense, the developing world says urgent action is needed to avert catastrophe.

Some in the developing world say that as richer countries caused the bulk of global emissions, they should compensate them for the losses and damages caused by the climate crisis.

But will delegates, negotiators and politicians gathering at the international climate conference, COP26, in Glasgow in November take notice?

In previous years rich countries have been reluctant to agree to compensate poorer countries. If that happens again, what will the impact be on reaching a global commitment to reduce emissions?

Joining presenters Graihagh Jackson and Gaia Vince:

Dr Saleemul Huq, director of the International Centre for Climate Change and Development.
Rémy Rioux, chief executive of the French Development Agency.
S.I Ohumu, Lagos reporter
Linnea Nordlander, postdoctoral researcher at the Centre for International Law and Governance, University of Copenhagen.

Producer : Darin Graham
Series Producer: Rosamund Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound Engineer: Tom Brignell


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jms9b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g77)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4b4kq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 World Of Wisdom (w3ct2hdl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jmx1g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snqj0q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4b89v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8z)
Drag kings: The women performing as men

While drag queens sit brightly under the pop culture spotlight, fewer people know about drag kings, the mostly female or non-binary performers who create male characters on stage and poke fun at the patriarchy. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two drag kings who have found a community through performance and are using their characters to explore their own masculinity and femininity.

Mētra Saberova is an artist and drag king from Latvia, who performs as Timmy, and also manages the Latvian Drag King Collective – hosting and performing at live and online drag shows. She wants to create queer-friendly spaces in a country with limited rights and protections for LGBTQ+ people.

Giovana Lago is a drag king who performs as Don Giovanni in Brazil, as part of the Kings of the Night collective. She has a real interest in the history of drag kinging, and is also a burlesque performer, something she would never have tried if she hadn’t discovered drag first.

Produced by Caitlin Sneddon


IMAGE DETAILS
L: Giovana Lago as Don Giovanni (credit André Cardoso)
R: Mētra Saberova as Timmy (credit Mētra Saberova)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jn0sl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbz22tb)
Guinea Coup: who is in control?

Soldiers appear on national TV after hours of heavy gunfire, claiming to have dissolved the government. But the defence ministry says the coup has been thwarted.

The lifetime cost of plastic produced in 2019 has been calculated at more than 3.7 trillion dollars by researchers - more than the GDP of India.

And Brazil and Argentina's World Cup qualifier is suspended minutes after kick-off after the police arrived on the pitch to detain and deport four Argentine players accused of breaching Covid quarantine rules.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jn4jq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbz26kg)
Taliban claim control of the Panjshir valley

The Taliban say they have taken control of the last area in Afghanistan where there's still resistance to them.

An indefinite curfew has been declared by the special forces who seized power in Guinea: coup leaders have ordered government ministers to attend a meeting in a few hours time or be treated as rebels.

And dramatic scenes as the World Cup qualifier between Brazil and Argentina's is suspended just minutes after kick off.... after a pitch invasion by the police.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jn88v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbz2b9l)
Afghanistan: Taliban claims to control Panjshir valley

Resistance fighters dispute the claim, but call for a ceasefire.

Meanwhile, the European Union is preparing a package to pay Afghanistan’s neighbours in a bid to ward off an “uncontrolled large-scale” wave of refugees.

And leaders of a coup in Guinea have ordered government ministers and other prominent national figures to attend a meeting in a few hours time - or be treated as rebels.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jnd0z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n66)
Lindsey Graham: What is the Republican vision for America?

After the US-led withdrawal from Afghanistan, how does America see itself and its place in the world? Stephen Sackur is at the Ambrosetti Forum in northern Italy to speak to one of the Republican Party's most prominent voices, South Carolina Senator Lindsay Graham.


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4br9c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j56)
Kenya and coronavirus

During coronavirus, while case numbers have seemed relatively low, there’s been a huge economic impact on many Kenyans. We hear from the BBC’s Michael Kaloki about the particular challenges of the Kibera slum, from single mother and Kibera resident Josephine, who Business Daily has heard from several times since the start of the pandemic. We also hear how reverse migration has meant that some Kenyans have returned to rural areas.
Chris Macoloo the Africa director for the international development organisation World Neighbors explains.

(Photo: Kibera resident Josephine. Credit: Vivienne Nunis / BBC)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x19)
The warnings before 9/11

Throughout 2001 the US authorities were being given warnings that a terror attack was imminent. A Congressional Commission, FBI officers and the CIA were all worried. There were even specific warnings about planes being flown into buildings. Louise Hidalgo spoke to former Senator Gary Hart who co-chaired the Congressional Commission that tried to convince the government to take action.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Smoke pours from the World Trade Centre after it was hit by two passenger planes on September 11, 2001 in New York City. (Credit: Robert Giroux/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jnhs3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4bw1h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqw)
Can we save our night skies?

Our connection to the night sky spans cultures and millennia: observing the stars and planets helped our ancestors navigate the world, tell stories about the constellations, and understand our place in the universe. But these days, for the vast majority of us, seeing the stars is getting harder. 80% of people live under light polluted skies, and in many cities you’re lucky to see a handful of stars at night.

This state of affairs is bothering CrowdScience listener and keen stargazer Mo from Salt Lake City in the USA, who wonders if there’s anything we can do about light pollution. Of course, we could simply turn out all the lights, but that’s unrealistic. So what are smarter ways of lighting our communities to preserve our view of the cosmos?

Increasingly worried by the effect of artificial lighting on the ability to observe stars, astronomer Dr Jason Pun set up a series of monitoring stations to continuously measure ‘sky glow’. By comparing sky glow across the world, he wants to figure out which approaches work best.

One community taking an active approach is the South Downs National Park in South East England, one of a number of Dark Sky Reserves around the word. We visit the park and speak to the Dark Skies Officer there, to find out how people are coming together to turn down their lights and keep the night dark.

And it’s not just stargazing that’s threatened by light pollution. Artificial light at night disrupts the circadian rhythms of wildlife. We visit a project in rural Germany looking into the benefits of dark-sky-friendly lighting on insect populations there.

With contributions from Dr Jason Pun, Paulina Villalobos, Dan Oakley, Doug Jones, Dr Sibylle Schroer and Sophia Dehn.

Presented by Anand Jagatia with additional reporting by Felix Franz

Produced by Cathy Edwards


[Image credit: Getty Images]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jnmj7)
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MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4bzsm)
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MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct1xzx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jnr8c)
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MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snrc7m)
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MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4c3jr)
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MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8z)
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MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jnw0h)
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MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtj)
'If you cut out part of my brain am I still Jody?'

Jody grew up with many anxieties, especially around death. His father and brother both died while he was still in his teens. Years later he started to have seizures. He was diagnosed with epilepsy and doctors decided the best course of action for him was brain surgery. It cured his seizures but had some other surprising side effects too. Jody's relationship with fear had changed. He's become more outgoing, talkative and able to live his life with more freedom.

*Please note this programme includes repetitive percussive music which in very rare cases can be a trigger for epileptic seizures.*

The search for the lost music of Costa Rica's King of Calypso. Walter Ferguson spent many years serenading people with his songs, and recording individual cassettes for adoring fans, but they were often the only recordings of his work. Much later a music producer realised all those cassettes contained one-off musical treasures and so began an international campaign to find Walter's lost songs. Clayton Conn reports. This feature was first broadcast in December 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Jody Smith
Credit: Courtesy of Jody Smith


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x19)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jnzrm)
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MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snrlqw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4cc10)
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MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jp3hr)
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MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjs52tc)
The Taliban say they now control the Panjshir valley

Photographs of Taliban fighters apparently in the provincial capital Bazarak have appeared online. This was the only part of Afghanistan not in the hands of the Taliban. So what does this mean for regional stability? We hear from Raoof Hasan, the special adviser to Pakistan's Prime Minister, Imran Khan.

Also on the programme, a court in Belarus has sentenced the opposition politician Maria Kolesnikova to eleven years in jail. We hear from her sister. And the Israeli authorities are conducting a huge search for six Palestinian prisoners who escaped from Gilboa prison, one of the country's most secure jails.

(Picture: Zabihullah Mujahid, Taliban spokesperson, talks with journalists in Kabul. Credit: EPA)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jp77w)
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MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n66)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4clj8)
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MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y483pvh7gcq)
Munich International Motor Show to open

Following a torrid year for the car industry, Germany's main auto show opens this week. The BBC's Theo Leggett is at the event in Munich, and has been talking to some of the key players in the German car industry, including senior figures at both Daimler and BMW. Also in the programme, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports from Kenya on how people in the country have coped financially during the coronavirus pandemic. Plus, we hear about a scheme that aims to help get more black people into senior business roles, from Esther Odejimi-Uzokwe, programme director of 10,000 Black Interns.

(Picture: The Mercedes stand at the International Motor Show. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jpc00)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxphfn4byg)
Afghanistan: Taliban claim control of Panjshir Valley

In Afghanistan, the Taliban say they are in complete control of the province of Panjshir. The valley "has been cleared today completely", a spokesman told a news conference in Kabul. Resistance fighters deny this. We get the latest from BBC Afghan.

Also, we speak to two female medical professionals in Afghanistan about their hopes and fears for the future and about their work since the Taliban takeover.

And Professor Manfred Green, a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel explains some of the latest developments with Covid-19.

(Photo: A humvee with National Resistance Front flag is seen in front of a radio mast near Panjshir Valley. Credit: National Resistance Front of Afghanistan handout/Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jpgr4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxphfn4gpl)
Afghanistan: Taliban claim control of Panjshir Valley

In Afghanistan, the Taliban say they are in complete control of the province of Panjshir. The valley "has been cleared today completely", a spokesman told a news conference in Kabul. Resistance fighters deny this. We get the latest from BBC Afghan.

Also, we speak to two female medical professionals in Afghanistan about their hopes and fears for the future and about their work since the Taliban takeover.

And Professor Manfred Green, a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel explains some of the latest developments with Covid-19.

(Photo: A humvee with National Resistance Front flag is seen in front of a radio mast near Panjshir Valley. Credit: National Resistance Front of Afghanistan handout/Reuters)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jplh8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x19)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jpq7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snsb6n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4d2hs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nhgphsl1r)
2021/09/06 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jptzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4d67x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1m87)
Future vaccines

The COVID19 pandemic has revolutionised the way vaccines are made, and underlined the inequalities in access to vaccines. But will it leave a legacy? Roland Pease explores the potential for mRNA and other revolutionary vaccines to make future health protection faster, safer and more flexible, whether 'universal' vaccines will give broader protection, and how access to vaccines can be made more equitable.

Picture: Coronavirus vaccines on the production line, Credit: MikeMareen/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jpyqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjs5y18)
Afghan resistance deny Taliban control Panjshir

The Afghan resistance movement deny Taliban has control of all of the Panjshir valley. A member of the resistance tells Newshour they still control 'strategic valleys'.

Also in the programme: French film star Jean-Paul Belmondo dies; and former British prime minister Gordon Brown on global vaccine hoarding.

(Image: Men prepare for defence against the Taliban in Panjshir, Afghanistan August 22, 2021. Picture taken August 22, 2021. Credit: Aamaj News Agency via REUTERS)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jq2gs)
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MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n66)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4dfr5)
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MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jq66x)
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MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtm223hrw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slpbj7kdj)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4dkh9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48y4l2yqs1)
Munich International Motor Show to open

Following a torrid year for the car industry, Germany's main auto show opens this week. We talk to the BBC's Theo Leggett, who is at the event in Munich, about the show's move from motoring to a more inclusive term: mobility. Also in the programme, the BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports from Kenya on how people in the country have coped financially during the coronavirus pandemic. Plus, we hear about a scheme that aims to help get more black people into senior business roles, from Esther Odejimi-Uzokwe, programme director of 10,000 Black Interns.

(Picture: The Mercedes stand at the International Motor Show. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 07 SEPTEMBER 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jqfq5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqj8vfmt0w)
Mobility at the Munich motor show

Mobility, not just motoring, is the theme of this year's Munich motor show, the IAA. The BBC's Theo Leggett is there and talks to us about the challenges facing the auto industry as it moves away from petrol and diesel. We hear from the EU Tax Observatory as they calculate European banks log $24billion a year in tax havens around the world. China's biggest property company Evergrande's creditors have called for immediate repayment of debts, could this be China's Lehman moment? Vivienne Nunis reports on the impact of Covid 19 on Kenya's economy, and the latest Marvel offering Shang Chi breaks records at the box office. All through the show we're joined by Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland and Rachel Cartland, writer and author who is based in Hong Kong.

(Image: Two people inspect a new concept car at the Munich motor show/Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jqkg9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snt5fk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4dxqp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz2)
4. Probe

There are allegations the cheating went wider within intellectual disability sport, and that it wasn’t just the gold-winning Spanish basketball team. An investigator for the International Paralympic Committee reveals what he found, and discusses specific accusations he heard about another of the basketball teams.

The probe has shocking consequences for intellectual disability sport: a total ban from the Paralympic Games. Dan has a heart-to-heart with his mum and dad about the impact on his budding swimming career.

And Dan speaks to the man who was in charge of the International Paralympic Committee when it took the decision that has overshadowed Dan’s life ever since.

Presenter: Dan Pepper
Series Producer: Simon Maybin

(Photo credit: EPA)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jqp6f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x19)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jqsyk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sntdxt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4f56y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdg)
Phil Tippett: Mad God, 30 years in the making

A bowler hatted, gas mask-wearing figure descends in a diving bell into an apocalyptic landscape of nightmarish creatures. Flames and searchlights puncture the darkness as the ‘Assassin’ begins his wordless quest in a shattered world. Welcome to Mad God.

This is a film that has been 30 years in the making. The dark, disturbing vision of filmmaker and visual FX artist Phil Tippett, Mad God is his tormented love song for the craft and power of stop motion animation. A technique as old as cinema itself but largely abandoned since the coming of digital technology.

Tippett won two Oscars for his work on The Empire Strikes Back and Jurassic Park. That film effectively spelled the end for stop motion in major motion pictures. But Mad God remained an unshakeable vision for Tippett. It was begun and abandoned as too costly and time consuming.

Tippett had his own all digital vfx studio to run with projects like Starship Troopers & Evolution. That was until the new century and a new generation of colleagues who saw the footage and urged him to revive the project.

Tippett mentored these younger animators, all keen to experience the art and craft of stop-motion and volunteering their spare time. Jointly they expanded Mad God from a 6 minute short into a full blown apocalyptic vision.

As Mad God enters its final weeks of completion and unveiling, Mark Burman speaks to Tippett and some of his key collaborators about the art, madness and dreams that have fuelled the project and their collective love for the hand crafted magic of stop motion.

Presenter and producer: Mark Burman
Executive producer: Ella-mai Robey


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jqxpp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbz4zqf)
Afghanistan: latest from Panjshir Valley

We hear from one of the hundreds of women waiting in Mazār-i-Sharīf - with documents and planes waiting - but who still can’t leave the country.

It's independence day in Brazil, with the president calling for huge rallies... but his political opponents are calling foul.

And the citizens taking on the Palestinian Authority.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jr1ft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbz53gk)
Afghanistan: Panshjir resistance 'still fighting'

The Taliban declares victory and takes key parts of Panjshir Valley but resistance fighters vow to continue guerrilla warfare.

El Salvador has bought millions of dollars worth of bitcoin as it prepares to adopt the cryptocurrency as legal tender - the first country to do so.

And a massive manhunt is underway in Israel after six prisoners tunnelled out of one of the country's most secure jails.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jr55y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbz576p)
Afghanistan: Fear at Mazār-i-Sharīf airport

We hear from one of the hundreds of people who have the documents to leave - but still can't get out.

El Salvador has become the first country in the world to adopt the cryptocurrency bitcoin as legal tender.

And a tribute to one of the greats of French cinema: Jean-Paul Belmondo has died at the age of 88.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jr8y2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1plb)
The library where the books are people

At the human library you borrow a person you wouldn’t usually meet for a half-hour frank conversation. The volunteers have various book titles from polyamorous to former prisoner. The aim of these face-to-face chats is to break down our assumptions and prejudices. We explore whether simple discussions can make a difference.

Produced and presented by Claire Bates.

Picture: Ronni Abergel, Human Library


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4fn6g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jg7)
Where next for AI?

AI will be the defining development of the 21st century and in the next two decades it is set to transform our lives. Kai Fu Lee, a former CEO of Google China and AI pioneer tells us that the technology will revolutionise health and education and has the power to create great wealth but it also has a dark side.
AI he says, can pose huge risks like when used in autonomous weapons. Kai Fu Lee believes that we are now at a turning point, and is urging society to wake up to the benefits and the existential threats.
(Image: Kai Fu Lee, Image credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5t)
The killing of Ahmed Shah Massoud

On the 9th of September 2001 the Afghan fighter Ahmed Shah Massoud who led the opposition to Taliban rule, was killed by a suicide bomber. Just two days later, Al Qaeda carried out their attacks in the USA. In 2011 Louise Hidalgo spoke one of Ahmed Shah Massoud's friends who was with him the day he died.

PHOTO: Ahmed Shah Massoud (Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jrdp6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4fryl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct1m87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jrjfb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jrn5g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snv84q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4g0fv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jrrxl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jws)
The schoolgirl fraudster who found redemption in ballroom

Shannon Balenciaga was a fashion-obsessed teen who found herself in prison after cooking up a multi-million dollar fraud scheme. Living behind bars at such a young age, she thought her life was over. But then she discovered ballroom, an underground scene that first emerged in New York City when gay and trans people of colour, fed up of being marginalised in pageants, created their own. They formed alternative families, or ‘houses,’ and competed against each other in balls. Now, as head of the House of Balenciaga, Shannon is a legend in ballroom culture where she mentors a new generation of performers.

Presenter: Mobeen Azhar
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Shannon Balenciaga
Credit: Carieo Crenshaw


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jrwnq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snvhmz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4g7y3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct1m87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3js0dv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjs7zqg)
Myanmar shadow government calls for revolt against military rule

Myanmar shadow government calls for revolt against military rule The spokesperson of the National Unity Government of Myanmar, and former Special Envoy to the United Nations Dr Sasa explains why the people of Myanmar need to defend themselves. Also on the programme, El Salvador becomes the first country in the world to introduce bitcoin as legal tender and New South Wales in Australia announces new measures to tackle animal extinction across the state.


( Pic Demonstrators waved flags of the National League for Democracy (NLD) party in Yangon Credit: EPA)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3js44z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1plb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4ghfc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bl119d8kp)
El Salvador makes Bitcoin legal tender

El Salvador is the first nation to recognise the cryptocurrency Bitcoin as legal tender. Kate Baucherel is a cryptocurrency expert and considers the implications. Also in the programme, there's a new round of protests in India, with farmers concerned about agricultural reforms that change how they sell their produce. We find out more from Devinder Sharma, who is an author and expert on agriculture in India. The price of aluminium has risen sharply in response to a coup in Guinea, where much of the ore bauxite is mined. Caroline Bain is chief commodities economist at Capital Economics and tells us how long the price hike is likely to last. Plus, Kai Fu Lee is a former chief executive of Google China and artificial intelligence pioneer, and discusses the opportunities and threats posed by the technology.

(Picture: A shop in El Salvador accepting Bitcoin. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3js7x3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxphfn77vk)
Afghanistan protests

Hundreds of protesters took to the streets across Afghanistan on Tuesday to denounce Taliban rule and demand women's rights. Videos have emerged of Taliban fighters breaking up a demonstration in the capital, Kabul, by firing warning shots into the air. The protest was the biggest show of defiance since the Taliban took power. We hear from women who took part in the protests, and get the latest developments from our reporter on the ground.

And we hear a conversation between nurses in Florida who are continuing to treat patients suffering from Covid-19 as cases in the state continue to grow at an increasing rate.

Also, we are joined by Dr Isaac Bogosh, an infectious diseases physician and scientist at the University of Toronto who will answer listener's questions about the coronavirus pandemic. Audio questions can be submitted via WhatsApp to +447730 751925.

(Photo: Women hold banners as they attend a demonstration in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan September 6, 2021. Credit: Shamshad News/via Reuters.)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jscn7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxphfn7clp)
OS conversations: Nurses battling Covid-19 surge in Florida

The US state of Florida has seen a surge in COVID-19 cases in recent weeks because of the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus, which has led to a major increase in state hospitalizations. It echoes the situation of many parts of the US. Data from Johns Hopkins University says the US has recorded more than 4 million new Covid-19 cases in the last four weeks. We hear a conversation between nurses in Florida on the hospital frontline.

And hundreds of protesters took to the streets across Afghanistan on Tuesday to denounce Taliban rule and demand women's rights. The protest was the biggest show of defiance since the Taliban took power. We hear from women who took part in the protests, and get the latest developments from our reporter on the ground.

Also we speak to our Africa editor about the risk of starvation facing people in the Ethiopian province of Tigray.

(Photo: A registered nurse, prepares Covid-19 vaccine doses in St. Petersburg, Florida, U.S., August 6, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Octavio Jones)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jshdc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jsm4h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snw73r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4gzdw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nhgphwgyv)
2021/09/07 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jsqwm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4h350)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsj)
The Children’s Code protecting kids online

The so-called Children’s Code has just come into force in the UK. The Age-appropriate design code aims to protect children online by making digital services accessed by children comply with standards that safeguard children from being tracked and profiled. This includes toys, games and edtech but also social media and video sharing platforms. Changes have already been made by the likes of FB, TikTok and Instagram that will be implemented worldwide. Professor Sonia Livingstone from the LSE, a specialist in children’s digital rights, is on live.

The rise of telemedicine in China
China adopted a digital health code earlier this year and has seen a massive increase in the use of tech for healthcare since the start of the COVID pandemic. Reporter Yuan Ren explains how this rise is taking the pressure off the heavily burdened public healthcare system, despite higher costs to the patient but it’s also driving a demand for online doctors and changing the way the Chinese look after their health.

China’s online gaming limits
Our games correspondent Chris Berrow reports on the highly restrictive online gaming clampdown on teenagers announced by the Chinese authorities and how it could bring bigger problems for young people in the future.


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.

Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image credit: Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jsvmr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjs8tyc)
The Taliban have announced a "caretaker" government in Afghanistan

The new prime minister will be Mohammad Hasan Akhund, who is on a UN sanctions list. Anti-Taliban protests have taken place in the cities of Kabul and Herat.

Also on the programme, seven months after the generals seized power in Myanmar in a coup, the country's shadow government, made up of pro-democracy politicians, has called for its supporters to launch a defensive war. A protester in Myanmar tells us what she thinks of this call. And we hear from Peter Singer, the moral philosopher and author of "Animal Liberation" who has won the Berggruen Prize for Philosophy and Culture. Which he plans to give away.

(Picture: Zabhiullah Mujahid, the Taliban spokesperson, announces the interim government during a press conference in Kabul CREDIT: EPA)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jszcw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1plb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4hbn8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jt340)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtm226dnz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slpbjbg9m)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4hgdd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48y4l31mp4)
El Salvador makes Bitcoin legal tender

El Salvador is the first nation to recognise the cryptocurrency Bitcoin as legal tender. John Dennehy is a journalist based in the country and reports on the first day of Bitcoin barter, and Joe Saluzzi at Themis Trading looks at the response on the markets. Also in the programme, there's a new round of protests in India, with farmers concerned about agricultural reforms that change how they sell their produce. We find out more from Devinder Sharma, who is an author and expert on agriculture in India. The price of aluminium has risen sharply in response to a coup in Guinea, where much of the ore bauxite is mined. Caroline Bain is chief commodities economist at Capital Economics and tells us how long the price hike is likely to last. Plus, Kai Fu Lee is a former chief executive of Google China and artificial intelligence pioneer, and discusses the opportunities and threats posed by the technology.

(Picture: A shop in El Salvador accepting Bitcoin. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 08 SEPTEMBER 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jtbm8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqj8vfqpxz)
Bitcoin becomes legal tender in El Salvador

El Salvador becomes the first country in the world to make Bitcoin legal tender - a move that sparked some small protests. We speak to John Dennehy, a journalist based in the capital San Salvador. Protonmail, an email provider which sold itself as a secure, private service, is under fire for handing police the IP address of a French activist - Eva Galperin of the Electronic Frontier Foundation discusses cybersecurity. Canada opens its borders to double-jabbed visitors, and we take a look at artificial intelligence: Kai Fu Lee, former CEO of Google China talks about the future of AI, and Kathryn Dill of the Wall Street Journal explains how one algorithm wasn't up to the job of sorting job applications. There's a bit of K-Pop to lighten the mood and throughout we're joined by Takara Small, technology reporter for the CBC and Timothy Martin of the Wall Street Journal.

(Image: A protester wears a mask with the slogan "no to Bitcoin"/Credit: Reuters)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jtgcd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snx2bn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4htms)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2hh0)
Libya's Revolution

The rule of the gun

BBC reporter Tim Whewell, who covered the 2011 uprising, returns to the country to ask why plans to integrate the militias into a unified national army came to nothing. He talks to past and present militiamen - including the young man Wadah al-Keesh, who later left his group in disgust - and Mohammed al-Durat, truck-driver turned police commander, who has reunited with a band of friends to fight in every major battle over the last ten years - and believes he will in future too. Tim talks to revolutionary politician Abdul-Rahman al-Suwayhli and famous brigade commander Salah Badi about the lead-up to civil war - and hears too about its human cost from a young woman, Rasha Akhdar, who lost her father in fighting around Tripoli. Back in Britain, he learns the inside story of the UK's failed attempt to train a new Libyan fighting force from senior military officer Hugh Blackman - and asks former foreign secretary William Hague whether foreign powers could have adopted different policies to help stabilise Libya.


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jtl3j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jtpvn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snx9tx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4j241)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jn8)
2. The Talib

Founding member, ambassador, prisoner – in the Taliban’s inner circle at the very start. Abdul Salam Zaeef rose to prominence in the Taliban government that ruled Afghanistan until Western forces overthrew it following 9/11. Handed over to the Americans, Mullah Zaeef spent three years as a prisoner in the US detention centre, Guantanamo Bay. He no longer holds an official post in the Taliban, but he despises the democracy that has been built in Afghanistan over the last 20 years. He tells Lyse Doucet that Afghanistan needs a proper Islamic government.

Series music composed by Arson Fahim


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jttls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbz7wmj)
A new government emerges from the Taliban

There have been a few protests and deaths reported in Afghanistan on the first day of a Taliban government. Protests appear to be directed at Pakistani influence in the country - we'll talk about that and the make-up of the new Taliban administration.
.
The trial of 20 accused of being involved in the 2015 Paris attacks starts today. We hear from a father who lost his son.

Also as Texas clamps down on abortion rights, over the border Mexico's Supreme Court moves to decriminalise abortion.

There's also a business update on El Salvador's bitcoin experiment.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jtybx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbz80cn)
Taliban describes new government as diverse

Deaths at a protest of mostly women in Afghanistan on the first day of a Taliban government - we hear from a former Minister of Women's Affairs who has now left the country.

The US Secretary of State is about to talk to more than 20 nations who have a stake in relocating and settling Afghans…. so how much goodwill is there internationally?

We'll look at the impact the aftermath of the coup in Guinea has had on the global bauxite trade and the knock on rise in aluminium prices in our business news.

And a Bitcoin millionaire has built a phone and filled it with software that he promises is the ultimate "free speech" tool, we'll hear from him.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jv231)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbz843s)
Bataclan attack trial starts

Twenty people will go on trial in Paris today, accused of being involved in terror attacks almost six years ago, which killed 130 people and wounded hundreds.

In Afghanistan, the Taliban has declared the country an Islamic Emirate and has unveiled a government that's made up entirely of men.

And we'll head to Indonesia where a fire has raged through an overcrowded prison near the capital where at least 41 inmates have been killed and many injured.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jv5v5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbq)
Nadia Calviño: Is Europe too fragmented to shape the 21st Century?

The covid pandemic and emerging superpower rivalries have presented the EU with troubling questions. Stephen Sackur speaks to Spain's Deputy Prime Minister and Economy minister Nadia Calviño. Is Europe too inward looking and too fragmented to shape the 21st Century?

(Photo: Nadia Calviño, Deputy Prime Minister and Economy minister of Spain. Credit: Reuters)


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4jk3k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jp0)
Reviving Kenya’s ancient trading port

Lamu, once a bustling gateway to the Indian Ocean, has seen its fortunes decline in recent decades, not least because of its position near the border with Somalia, and the threat from militants. But earlier this year a new deep sea port was opened, which, the Kenyan government hopes, will make Lamu a commercial superstar once more. Vivienne Nunis takes a tour of the port with Dolly Okanga from Kenya Ports Authority. We also speak to Famao Shukry about a special kind of sea turtle in the area, and from Atwaa Salim from the Lamu Marine Conservation trust, who explains why the area’s mangroves are so significant to the economy and the environment.

Picture: Dolly Okanga from the Kenyan Ports Authority. Credit: Vivienne Nunis / BBC


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x82)
With the president on 9/11

The al-Qaeda attacks against America took place on the morning of September the 11th 2001. The news was broken to the US President, George W Bush by his Chief of Staff Andrew Card, as he was on a visit to an elementary school. Simon Watts reports. This programme was first broadcast in 2020.

(Photo: President George W. Bush shortly after learning of the 9/11 attacks. Credit: AFP/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jv9l9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2hh0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4jnvp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jvfbf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jvk2k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sny51t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4jxby)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jn8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jvntp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz1)
I ran away from slavery; now I help others escape

Analiza Guevarra made the painful decision to leave her family behind in the Philippines in order to find work abroad. She felt she had little choice: the family was in debt, and despite working several jobs, she and her husband couldn't make ends meet. She believed she would work abroad for a couple of years, secure the family's future, and return home. But it's been six years since she's seen her children. She tells Mobeen Azhar how she was abused by her employer, and made the brave decision to escape. She now helps other women to get away from abusive employers - but doesn't know when she will be able to return home.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Analiza Guevarra
Credit: Andrea Martinez


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jvskt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snydk2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4k4v6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jvx9y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjsbwmk)
More defiant protests by women in Kabul

In defiance of the Taliban there have been further demonstrations by women in the Afghan capital, Kabul; we hear from a leading activist on how the world should react to the interim government.


Also in the programme: the trial begins of the sole surviving suspected gunman and nineteen other men accused of involvement in France's worst terrorist attack, that killed 130 people and injured hundreds more in November 2015; and we visit the shrinking glacier on Africa's highest mountain, Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, which may be gone in ten years because of climate change.

(Picture: Afghan women shout slogans during protest in Kabul, 7 September 2021; Credit: Hoshang Hashimi /AFP)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jw122)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4kdbg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4ct646j43q)
Hopes for Kenya's Lamu port

We hear how the redevelopment of Kenya's Lamu port could impact the country's economy. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis takes a tour of the facility with Dolly Okonga of the Kenya Ports Authority. And we get wider economic context from Edward Kusewa, who is an economist based in Nairobi, and Elizabeth Kivuva, business journalist with Kenyan news site The Nation. Plus, we talk to Famao Shukry about a special kind of sea turtle that can be found in the area.

(Picture: A container ship at Lamu port. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jw4t6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxphfnb4rn)
Paris attacks 2015: Trial of 20 suspects opens

We have the latest on France's biggest ever terrorism trial; 20 men are accused of involvement in a string of coordinated attacks in 2015 in Paris. We hear from some of the people who were in the city when the attacks took place.

Dozens of women have been marching in Afghanistan protesting at the announcement of an interim Taliban government with no female representatives. We hear from some of the protesters and explain who are holding the key posts in the new government.

And, we speak to our regular health expert Dr Maria Sundaram about today's coronavirus stories.

(Photo: French police officers after the arrival of convoys transporting Salah Abdeslam and other members of the commando accused of being involved in the 2015 Paris attacks, outside the Paris courthouse, in Paris, France, 08 September 2021. Credit: CHRISTOPHE PETIT TESSON/EPA)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jw8kb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxphfnb8hs)
More protests in Afghanistan

Dozens of Afghan women have marched through Kabul and in the north- eastern Badakhshan province to protest the announcement of an interim Taliban government with no female representatives. Some of their chants were reportedly targeting Pakistan and its perceived role in supporting the Taliban. We hear from some of the protesters and also get a view from Pakistan.

We have the latest on France's biggest ever terrorism trial, and hear from some of the people who were in Paris when the 2015 attacks took place.

We speak to one of our regular coronavirus experts Dr Pedro Hallal, an epidemiologist from the Federal University of Pelotas in the south of Brazil.

And we go to Mexico, where the Supreme Court has ruled that criminal penalties for terminating pregnancies are unconstitutional.

(Photo: Afghan women hold banners and placards as they take part in an anti-Pakistan protest in Kabul, 8 September 2021. Credit: Hoshang Hashimi/AFP/Getty Images)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jwd9g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jwj1l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snz40v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4kw9z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nhgphzcvy)
2021/09/08 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jwmsq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2hh0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4l023)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvr)
Art, gardening and wellbeing during Covid

How art and gardening has saved some people’s mental health during the pandemic. Claudia visits the most wonderful allotment to find out how one community in the UK has benefited.

Nightmares and how people with psychosis can be plagued and even traumatised by bad dreams, but that there is a way of dealing with them.

Plus, can kindness help you live a long life and evidence on whether dogs feel jealous!

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Close up of women planting salad seedlings. Photo credit: Betsie Van der Meer/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jwrjv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjscqvg)
The trial begins in Paris of those suspected of involvement in the 2015 jihadist attacks.

Fourteen men are accused of being involved in the deaths of 130 people in France. The trial will hear testimony from about 300 witnesses and is expected to last nine months.

Also on the programme we'll hear from Afghanistan about the latest protests against the Taliban and from Mexico where the Supreme Court's ruled that punishing women for having abortions is unconstitutional.

(Picture: Policemen secure the courthouse in Paris Credit: EPA / Petit Tesson)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jww8z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4l7kc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jn8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jx013)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtm2299l2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slpbjfc6q)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4lc9h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48y4l34jl7)
Hopes for Kenya's Lamu port

We hear how the redevelopment of Kenya's Lamu port could impact the country's economy. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis takes a tour of the facility with Dolly Okonga of the Kenya Ports Authority. And we get wider economic context from Edward Kusewa, who is an economist based in Nairobi, and Elizabeth Kivuva, business journalist with Kenyan news site The Nation. Plus, we talk to Famao Shukry about a special kind of sea turtle that can be found in the area.

(Picture: A container ship at Lamu port. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 09 SEPTEMBER 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jx7jc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqj8vftlv2)
Blinken in Kabul evacuation request

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken calls on the Taliban to allow US charter flights to leave Afghanistan. He's speaking in Germany where he met with the Foreign Minister Heiko Maas. The trial of Elizabeth Holmes is under way. She stands accused of fraud and lying to investors about the capabilities of a blood testing device sold by her company Theranos, which was once valued at $9bn - the BBC's James Clayton is at the trial in California. Vivienne Nunis is in Kenya looking at a project to rejuvenate a centuries old port, there's updates on the German elections and the tale of a Chinese woman who went missing for four years, only to turn up when her husband wrote a book about her disappearance. Throughout the programme we're joined by Erin Delmore a political reporter in Berlin and Cathering Yeung, Investment Director at Fidelity International in Hong Kong.

(Image:US Secretary of State Antony Blinken meets German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas/Credit: Reuters)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jxc8h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1snzz7r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4lqjw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxt)
The mystery of Havana syndrome

Gordon Corera investigates the mysterious illness that has struck American diplomats and spies. It began after some reported hearing strange sounds in Havana 2016, but reports have since spread around the world. Doctors, scientists, intelligence agents and government officials have all been trying to find out what exactly causes these sounds and the lingering health effects. Some call it an act of war, others wonder if it is some new and secret form of surveillance while others believe it could even be in the mind. So who or what is responsible?

Producer: Emma Wells
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Illustration of a man sitting in a chair in a laboratory, a device behind him pulsing wavy beams of microwave energy through his head. Credit: BBC/Gerry Fletcher)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jxh0m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jxlrr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp06r0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4lz14)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg4)
The power of a photograph

Food photography is about much more than beautifully presented dishes in cookbooks - it’s also being used to change the way we think about what we eat.

Emily Thomas meets three photographers to discuss some of their most powerful images - from a bloody scene in a Thai slaughterhouse to a display of human resilience in a refugee camp.

They explore why still images of food and food production can be a compelling way to communicate about politics, society, and economics. We also hear about the impact such hard-hitting photography can have on the people behind the lens.

To see the images described on the show, plus a few more, visit our homepage www.bbc.com/foodchain

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Producer: Simon Tulett.

Contributors:

Jo-Anne McArthur;
Dorte Verner;
Li Huaifeng.

(Picture: A Moken spear fisherman diving for his catch. Credit: Dorte Verner)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jxqhw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbzbsjm)
British paratroopers rescue

We hear from an Afghan special forces officer who says British paratroopers took the law into their own hands to rescue their Afghan colleagues from almost certain death at the hands of the Taliban.

We'll go to India to hear about the effects of a deadly virus - and no, it's not Covid.

And in Tunisia a political crisis rumbles on - but many are more concerned about the economy and the lack of jobs.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jxv80)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbzbx8r)
UK to turn back migrant boats

The British Home Secretary gives permission to turn boats carrying migrants back to France.

Pro democracy opposition activists in Myanmar have started a campaign of destroying military targets and infrastructure. At least eleven communications masts have been hit.

And we look at the mysterious Havana syndrome ... have the attacks against US officials spread from Cuba to other parts of the world?


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jxz04)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbzc10w)
UK to send migrants back to France

The British government is preparing to send small boats carrying migrants back to France. The French authorities say this could put lives in danger.

Russia's President Vladimir Putin is set to meet Alexander Lukashenko later today in Moscow. Integrating Russia and Belarus will be a major topic says the Kremlin as Russian fighter jets fly into Belarus to secure its borders.

And Usain Bolt, the fastest man in history, becomes the fastest artist to reach the reggae charts. The Jamaican sprinter has released an album.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jy2r8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2g)
Did America get its response to the attacks of 9/11 right?

In the wake of the attacks of 9/11, the United States took several measures at home and abroad to prevent such atrocities happening on its soil again. Twenty years later and after two bitter wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, did America get its response to the attacks of 9/11 right?

(U.S. Army Staff Sergeant in the Shahi Kot mountains, Afghanistan 2002 . Credit: Jim Hollander/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4mg0n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9q)
Climate policy and the German election

Climate change is one of the biggest issues ahead of Germany's election on 26 September. We examine what the main candidates are pledging to do to tackle rising emissions in one of the world's most industrialised nations. Rob Young speaks to Karen Pittel, professor of economics at the University of Munich who specialises in energy and climate, to understand how the policies might affect Germany's economy, now and in the future. And we hear what German industry thinks of the policies and how it's adapting to greener technology from Dr. Kurt-Christian Scheel of the German Automotive Association.

Presenter: Rob Young
Producer: Sara Parry

(Picture: A climate strike in Berlin. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3k)
America attacks Afghanistan

In October 2001, just a month after the 9/11 attacks, the first airstrikes against Afghanistan began in what the US and its allies called Operation Enduring Freedom. The country was being targeted because it had provided a haven for al-Qaeda. In 2011 Louise Hidalgo spoke to two Afghans who were in Kabul the night the bombing started.

(Photo: The aftermath of a US airstrike on Kandahar. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jy6hd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4mkrs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jyb7j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rln)
Louder! How the electric guitar conquered popular music

Whether it be a kerrang, a chop, a blistering solo, some finger picking or a subtle flange, the electric guitar is one of the defining sounds of the 20th century. Without it – and its constant companion, the amplifier - popular culture would be unrecognisable today: no big gigs, no stadium concerts. And almost certainly no rock music. But why was it needed and how was it created? Who were the pioneers of the technology and who were the early-adopting exponents?

Rajan Datar and his three guest experts delve into the roots of this iconic instrument.
Monica Smith is Head of Exhibitions and Interpretation for the Smithsonian's Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation. Among the many projects she has curated at the museum is From Frying Pan to Flying V: The Rise of the Electric Guitar.
Paul Atkinson is professor of Design and Design History at Sheffield Hallam university and the author of Amplified: A Design History of the Electric Guitar.
HP Newquist is the founder of the National Guitar Museum in the United States. He has written numerous books on the guitar and its history, and was the editor-in-chief of Guitar Magazine.

[Image: electric guitars. Credit: ilbusca/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8p)
The struggle for women's football in Afghanistan

In the early 2000s, Afghan women and girls set up the country's first football teams. Now the Taliban has returned and women's sport has been banned. We speak to Shamila Kohestani, former captain of the Afghan women's team, about why she fought to play and why in Afghanistan, football was more than a game.

Photo: Woman's face painted with flag of Afghanistan (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jyfzn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp11yx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4mt81)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jykqs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3k)
Escaping after an IS massacre

Ali Hussein Kadhim was a new Iraqi army recruit when the Islamic State group first emerged. As the militants approached, he and thousand of other unarmed cadets fled their base in Tikrit, but they were captured and taken for execution. Miraculously, Ali survived, but he was left stuck in enemy territory and needed help. Ali spoke to Outlook's Mobeen Azhar, and his story contains strong descriptions of violence.

When Anoushka Shankar was young, she knew that the legendary Indian sitar player Ravi Shankar was an important figure in her family, but it was only when she was seven that she learned he was her father. The discovery would change Anoushka’s life – with Ravi as her teacher she mastered the instrument and began a career performing both with her father and as a virtuoso sitarist in her own right. Anoushka spoke to Emily Webb about the role her father played in her life, and the musical world he opened up for her. This interview was first broadcast in 2019.

Photo: Ali Hussein Kadhim, taken from the documentary Once Upon a Time in Iraq
Credit: BBC

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jypgx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp19g5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4n1r9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jyt71)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjsfsjn)
Afghanistan: More protests against the Taliban

Reports from northern Afghanistan say the Taliban have arrested more than a dozen protesters who held a rally despite a ban on demonstrations without permission.

Also on this day twenty years ago, the legendary Afghan fighter, Ahmed Shah Massoud was assassinated by al-Qaeda posing as journalists; we speak to his close friend who survived the attack.

We will talk to the White House Press Secretary at the time of 9/11 and hear what might happen to migrants crossing the English Channel.

(Photo: Women took to the streets on Wednesday - more protests have taken place on Thursday. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jyxz5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4n97k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49bvydk3qy)
Facebook accused of allowing sexist job ads

Facebook has been accused of breaking UK equality law in the way it handles job adverts. The campaign group Global Witness said the social network failed to prevent discriminatory targeting of ads, and its algorithm was biased in choosing who would see them, as Naomi Hirst from the organisation explains. And we get wider context from Eddie Hammerman, managing director of marketing agency The 10 Group. Also in the programme, we find out why the issue of climate change has become such a dominant theme in the upcoming German federal elections. Plus, the BBC's Ben King reports on the origins and growing popularity of the latest must have playground craze, Pop-its, which are bright rubber toys covered in little bubbles that you push in and out.

(Picture: A Facebook logo on a smartphone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jz1q9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxphfnf1nr)
Protests against Taliban rule continue in Afghanistan

On today's show we’ll bring you the latest on protests in Afghanistan, which continue to take place despite harassment and violence from Taliban fighters, including attacks on journalists. We’ll also hear the voices of some of the Afghans who are happy that the Taliban have taken charge to understand why they feel life will be better as a result.

Lebanon’s energy crisis continues to worsen, we hear from people living there and how they are trying to deal with the prolonged blackouts.

And our regular health expert, Dr Emma Hodcroft from the University of Bern will answer your latest questions about the coronavirus pandemic.

Photo: Taliban fighters stand in front of protesters during an anti-Pakistan protest in Kabul. Credit: Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jz5gf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxphfnf5dw)
Afghans' stories

Ahead of the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks we hear the voices of Afghans, including a conversation between two people who managed to flee before the US pullout, someone who is organising aid to new refugees and someone who explains why they are happy that the Taliban are now in charge again.

We also hear the story of a New Yorker who experienced the 11 September 2001 terror attacks first hand and went on to serve with US forces on two tours of Afghanistan.

(Photo: Afghan refugees are processed inside Hangar 5 at Ramstein Air Base in Germany, 8 September 2021. Credit: Olivier Douliery/Reuters)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jz96k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jzdyp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp20xy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4ns72)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nhgpj28s1)
2021/09/09 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jzjpt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4nwz6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l45)
Keep most fossil fuel in ground to meet 1.5 degree goal

For the world to have a decent chance of limiting global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees, 90% of remaining coal reserves and 60% of unexploited oil and gas have to stay in the ground. These are the stark findings of carbon budget research by scientists at University College London. Dan Welsby spells out the details to Roland Pease.

Virologist Ravi Gupta of the University of Cambridge describes his latest research that explains why the Delta variant of SARS-CoV-2 is much more infectious and more able to evade our immune systems and covid vaccines than other variants.

When dense fog rises from the Pacific ocean into the foothills of the Andes, oases of floral colour bloom for a few weeks or months. When the fog goes, the plants die and disappear for another year or maybe another decade. The true extent of these unique ecosystems (known as fog oases or Lomas) has now been revealed by researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew in the UK and their colleagues in Peru and Chile. They have discovered that the Lomas are much more extensive than suspected. Ecologist Carolina Tovar explains why the fog oases are threatened and need to be protected.

A species of duck can now be added to the list of birds such as parrots and starlings that mimic human speech and other sounds in their environment. Listen to Ripper, the Australian musk duck who was hand-reared on a nature reserve where he learnt to imitate his keeper say ‘You bloody fool’ and imitate the sound of an aviary door closing. Animal behaviour researcher Carel ten Cate of Leiden University says that Ripper is not the only mimicking musk duck, but why this duck species has evolved this trick remains a mystery.

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

(Image credit: Getty Images)


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jznfy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjsgmrk)
First foreigners fly out of Kabul since US pull-out

The first charter flight leaves Kabul since the troop withdrawal from Afghanistan. But what about the hundreds of people still waiting to leave from Mazar-e-Sharif in the north?

Also today; remembering Ahmed Shah Massoud, the Afghan leader assassinated by al-Qaeda two days before the 9/11 attacks; and the Kenyan President has called it a national disaster- we'll hear what drought is doing to families in the worst-hit parts.

(Photo: The first flight took more than 100 people from Kabul to Doha, the capital of Qatar. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jzs62)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4p4gg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3jzwy6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtm22d6h5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slpbjj83t)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4p86l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48y4l37fhb)
BRICS leaders meet online

As the BRICS leaders meet, is the loose alliance of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa working? We hear from Professor Miles Kahler, a Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington DC. Facebook has been accused of breaking UK equality law in the way it handles job adverts. The campaign group Global Witness said the social network failed to prevent discriminatory targeting of ads, and its algorithm was biased in choosing who would see them, as Naomi Hirst from the organisation explains. Also in the programme, we find out why the issue of climate change has become such a dominant theme in the upcoming German federal elections. And the American car giant, Ford will stop production in India; we get analysis from Nikhil Chawla, a business journalist and proud Ford owner based in Delhi. (Picture: Russia's President Vladimir Putin attends the 13th BRICS Summit via videoconference at the Moscow Kremlin. Photo by Alexei Druzhinin via Getty Images)



FRIDAY 10 SEPTEMBER 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k04fg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqj8vfxhr5)
Vaccine mandates announced

US President, Joe Biden, has announced that all federal workers have to be vaccinated against Covid-19. He's also instructing the Department of Labor to draft a rule mandating that all businesses with 100 or more employees require their workers to get vaccinated or face weekly testing. And as the BRICS leaders meet, is the loose alliance of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa working? We hear from Professor Miles Kahler, a Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington DC. Facebook has been accused of breaking UK equality law in the way it handles job adverts. The campaign group Global Witness said the social network failed to prevent discriminatory targeting of ads, and its algorithm was biased in choosing who would see them, as Naomi Hirst from the organisation explains. Also in the programme, we find out why the issue of climate change has become such a dominant theme in the upcoming German federal elections. And the American car giant, Ford will stop production in India; we get analysis from Nikhil Chawla, a business journalist and proud Ford owner based in Delhi. We're joined throughout the programme by Jyoti Malhotra, National & Strategic Affairs Editor at The Print; she's with us from New Delhi. And Tony Nash, co-founder and Chief Economist at Complete Intelligence, is with us from Houston, Texas. (Photo of President Joe Biden by Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images).


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k085l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp2w4v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4pmfz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tzj)
A World Cup every two years?

Nigeria's Sunday Oliseh discusses the proposal to have a biennial World Cup. South Africa's new national team coach, Hugo Broos, reflects on the recent World Cup qualifiers. We also hear the tragic story of the former French international Jean-Pierre Adams who died this week after 39 years in a coma.

Picture on website: The FIFA World Cup Trophy in the rain after the 2018 final between France and Croatia (Denis Tyrin\TASS via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k0cxq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k0hnv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp33n3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4pvy7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyh)
Ground Zero for God

Jim Giaccone will never forget the day his brother Joe simply vanished – killed in a blast so forceful that not even a trace of his remains was ever recovered.
Joe was one of the 2,977 victims of the terror attacks of 11 September 2001 when members of al-Qaeda – an Islamist extremist group – flew planes into the World Trade Center in New York. They also crashed into the Pentagon on the outskirts of Washington DC and another plane was downed in a field near the town of Shanksville, Pennsylvania.
Jim not only lost his brother that day, he also lost his faith. With grief came anger and a reckoning with God that continues when he revisits New York’s Ground Zero on the 20th anniversary of 9/11.

Jim tells his story to Jane O’Brien who discovers that he is not alone in re-evaluating his beliefs. She also hears from others who say the terrible events served to strengthen their faith and a Muslim American who say’s they still face hostility because of their religious identity.


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k0mdz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbzfpfq)
Biden toughens Covid vaccine rules

Millions of workers will be required to be vaccinated as the president faces pressure to combat a surge in cases.

How some animal species are evolving far more rapidly than expected - and why climate change is the likely reason.

And we hear about the Ig Nobel awards for unusual scientific research that makes us laugh, then think. This year's winners include a team investigating whether having a beard decreases your chance of being punched in the face, and another which asked if countries with overweight politicians are more corrupt.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k0r53)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbzft5v)
Los Angeles tightens vaccine rules for schools

All children over 12 in LA must get the covid-19 vaccine before attending class in person. It comes as President Biden mandates that all federal employees must get the vaccine or face dismissal.

A humanitarian crisis is developing in Panshir valley - the last area where resistance fighters have tried to prevent the Taliban from taking total control.

Plus is there a connection between a person's exposure to constant noise and the chance of them developing dementia?


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k0vx7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2tnbzfxxz)
Biden on vaccines: 'Our patience is wearing thin'

The president sets out measures requiring all federal workers to be vaccinated.

We'll look at the controversy around plans to dump contaminated water from Japan's damaged Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea.

And how a large survey involving two million adults has found links between noise from road and rail traffic, and dementia.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k0znc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1p)
Rudy Giuliani: Reflecting on 9/11

It’s 20 years since the twin towers of New York's World Trade Center were reduced to dust and ash. This week, the US is again immersed in memories of the attack and what came after. In 2011, on the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, Stephen Sackur spoke to the man who was mayor of New York City on that fateful day, Rudy Giuliani. His response back then earned him the title “America’s Mayor”; a decade later, HARDtalk invited him to reflect on how he and his country had been changed by the horrifying events of 9/11.


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4qbxr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0p)
Where have the UK's lorry drivers gone?

The UK's suffering a huge shortage of lorry drivers, but where have 100,000 drivers gone?
The shortage is now having an impact on everything from chicken in restaurants, to mattresses in furniture shops, fuel at pumps and even beer in pubs.
So what's going on? We hear from drivers, driving trainers, retailers and the wholesale industry and what's causing the shortfall and what can be done to solve it.

Picture credit: Getty Images


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz1)
9/11: The backlash against American Muslims

In the Aftermath of the Al Qaeda attacks against America on September 11th 2001, many Muslims living in the US had their allegiance to America questioned. In the days after 9/11 all over America hate crimes against Muslims and anyone perceived to be Muslims soared. In 2001, according to crime statistics by the FBI, hate crimes against Muslims and Arabs in the US increased by 1,700 percent. Stories about Muslim women in hijabs and Muslim men with beards being attacked became commonplace. Farhana Haider has been speaking to Kevin James, a Muslim first responder who was at Ground Zero in New York immediately after the attacks.

Photo: Nadia Nawaz holds a sign remembering the victims of the attack. Credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k13dh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhf)
El Salvador's Bitcoin experiment

El Salvador becomes the first country to adopt Bitcoin as legal tender. Cryptocurrency fans celebrate, but will Salvadorans benefit? Rory Cellan-Jones speaks to Alex Gladstein from the Human Rights Foundation, who says Bitcoin can help give citizens of poorer countries more economic freedom. Also on the programme, Facebook's algorithm is accused of perpetuating gender stereotypes in the way it shows job adverts to men and women. Naomi Hirst from the campaign group Global Witness explains. And what will a world powered by artificial intelligence look like in 20 years' time? AI pioneer Kai-Fu Lee paints a picture of life in 2041.

(Photo: A woman buys in a store that accepts bitcoins in El Zonte, La Libertad, El Salvador. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4qgnw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k174m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsx)
What's ailing Japan?

Japan has received much praise internationally for successfully holding both the Olympic and the Paralympic Games in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic. At home, however, events have failed to generate much enthusiasm for the government. Analysts say a public backlash over the Olympics is one of the reasons prime minister Yoshihide Suga is not going to contest the coming elections. But it is not just the Olympics. The LDP government is also in trouble over its response to Covid vaccines, and its failure to modernise the economy, which remains sluggish. It is accused of having done little to expand employment opportunities for young people and to give greater rights to working women. So why does Japan find it so hard to bring about the changes necessary to end years of economic stagnation? How is its ageing population and its unwillingness to open up to greater immigration affecting its ability to increase growth? Plus, what does all this say about the cultural shifts taking place in the country?

Celia Hatton is joined by a panel of experts. Producers Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k1bwr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp3yw0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4qq54)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k1gmw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20ff)
Afghanistan: History repeats itself

For many in the BBC Afghan service, recent events have brought back traumatic memories. For Shekiba Habib, the first takeover by the Taliban ended her dream of becoming a doctor. 20 years on, she shares similar stories she's hearing of broken dreams and loss of hope.

El Salvador and Bitcoin: the El Zonte mystery
Bitcoin joined the US dollar as legal tender in El Salvador this week. Quite a leap, but it turns out the small tourist surf town of El Zonte had been using the cryptocurrency for a couple of years already. BBC Mundo’s Marcos Gonzalez set out to find out why.

My Hometown: Weifang
Fan Wang of BBC Chinese takes us to her hometown of Weifang in China to fly kites and play with friends.

Algeria cuts ties with Morocco
Algeria’s relationship with Morocco was caught in the fallout from this year's devastating wildfires. It blamed the fires on criminal acts by a separatist group, which it accuses Morocco of backing. Fethi Benaissa has been reporting on the break in diplomatic ties for BBC Arabic.

How Arab tourists fell in love with Ukraine
The number of tourist flights from Saudi Arabia to Ukraine has more than doubled since 2019, so what explains this new found popularity? Diana Kuryshko of BBC Ukrainian visited a tourist village in the Carpathians to speak to both holidaymakers and local businesses to find out more.

Image: Women protest in Kabul, Afghanistan on 8th September 2021
Credit: Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k1ld0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp46c8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4qynd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k1q44)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjsjpfr)
Biden and Xi have their first phone call in seven months

During the 90 minutes conversation, Mr Biden spoke of the need to keep channels of communication open to prevent any misunderstandings that could lead to conflict. Mr Xi talked of the difficulties caused by America's stance towards China.

Also on the programme the head of Britain's security service MI5 says the Taliban's victory in Afghanistan will embolden Islamist extremists and the US prepares to mark the 20th anniversary of the September 11th attacks.

(Picture: President Biden of the US and President Xi of China. Credit: Getty)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k1tw8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4r64n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46wjrll3c5)
Biden orders new US vaccine rules

Workers at large US companies are to be vaccinated, or face regular mandatory testing. That's one of a slew of measures announced by President Biden, which aim to bring the Delta variant of coronavirus back under control in America. We get business reaction to the move from Stephen Lamar, chief executive of the American Apparel and Footwear Association. Also in the programme, there's a shortage of lorry drivers in the UK. It is having an impact on everything from chicken in restaurants to beer in pubs. We hear from drivers, driving instructors, retailers and the wholesale industry what's causing the shortfall, and what can be done to solve it. Plus, as a face-to-face New York Fashion Week draws to a close for the first time since the start of the pandemic, we find out how the fashion houses are planning for a post-pandemic future from Priya Elan, deputy fashion editor of The Guardian newspaper. Fashion historian Dr Kate Strasdin also joins the programme to explain how historically people have used clothing to re-define themselves after a collective trauma.

(Picture: Joe Biden announces the new vaccine rules. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k1ymd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxphfnhykv)
Afghanistan: Life under the Taliban

We return to Afghanistan and find out about daily life now that the Taliban is in charge. People living across the country tell us their experiences of food shortages and a worsening economy. We also check back in with a young woman who has been waiting 11 days for a flight out of Mazar-I-Sharif in the north of Afghanistan. Dozens of international passengers have flown out of Kabul in the first such flight since US forces left the country.

Also, a new government has been announced in Lebanon among amid an ongoing crisis. Electricity, fuel and medicines are all in short supply. Some people are going without power for 20 hours a day. Our correspondent in Beirut tells us more.

And Dr Megan Murray, professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University, will answer your questions about the coronavirus pandemic. If you have something you would like to ask, send us a message on WhatsApp +447730 751925.

(Photo: Taliban forces stand guard at a roadside checkpoint in Kabul, Afghanistan. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k22cj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxphfnj29z)
Two teenagers make US Open final

Two teenagers - Britain's Emma Raducanu and Canada's Leylah Fernandez - have made it to the US Open final. We'll hear reaction to the news from young tennis fans.

Also, we return to Afghanistan and find out about daily life now that the Taliban is in charge. People living across the country tell us their experiences of food shortages and a worsening economy. We also check back in with a young woman who has been waiting 11 days for a flight out of Mazar-I-Sharif in the north of Afghanistan. Dozens of international passengers have flown out of Kabul in the first such flight since US forces left the country.

And today's health expert, professor Marc Mendelson from the University of Cape Town, will answer audience questions about the coronavirus pandemic. If you have something you would like to ask, send us a message on WhatsApp +447730 751925.

(Photo: Emma Raducanu celebrates after match point against Maria Sakkari of Greece (not pictured) on day eleven of the 2021 US Open tennis tournament. Credit: Danielle Parhizkaran/USA Today)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k263n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfk)
Young Afghanistan

Presenter Sana Safi in London brings together a panel of young Afghan academics and campaigners to debate the country’s current crisis – and its future.
The panel answers questions from young Afghans which cover the big issues of the day including how the Taliban will rule, the fate of women and political opponents and the type of international relationships Afghanistan will have with the rest of the world.

The panel includes:
Faiz Zaland: Academic and commentator who lectures in Public Administration and Policy at the University of Kabul
Dr Omar Sadr: Author and academic who lectures in Politics at the American University of Afghanistan
Mariam Wardak: Former security advisor to the Afghan National Security Council and also founder of Her Afghanistan, an organization which promotes women’s rights in the country
Haroun Rahimi: Assistant Professor of Law at the American University of Afghanistan

Producers: Helen Towner and Steven Williams
Sound Engineers: Rob Symington, Chris Weightman and Duncan Hannant

(Photo: Silhouetted man waving Afghanistan flag on top of the mountain peak, Credit: zefart/Getty Images)


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k29vs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxn1sp4xv1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4rp45)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nhgpj55p4)
2021/09/10 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k2flx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4rsw9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqx)
Can we transfer electricity wirelessly?

Pioneering physicist and inventor Nikolas Tesla dreamt of connecting the world up through wireless communication and power. Despite demonstrating he could transfer power short distances his longer distance experiments were considerably less successful. But CrowdScience listener, George from Ghana, wants to know if now - more than one hundred years after Tesla’s demonstrations - his dream of wireless power is closer to becoming a reality.

In countries where rugged landscapes make laying traditional power lines difficult and costly, could wireless electricity help connect those communities who are without mains power?


CrowdScience presenter Melanie Brown beams to reporters around the world who visit scientists now using state of the art technology to reimagine Tesla’s dream.

Alex Lathbridge is in Ghana and after meeting listener George he gently doorsteps a local electrical engineering lecturer to find out how electricity can ‘jump’ between two coils.

Reporter Stacy Knott visits start-up company EMROD in New Zealand who are developing ‘beamable’ electricity. She hears an electric guitar being powered from 36 metres away with no wires and finds out how they are using lasers to make sure they don’t harm any wildlife that might wander into the beam.

We then hear how wireless electricity could help fulfil the power demands of a growing electric vehicle market. Reporter John Ryan visits the town of Wenatchee where it has been electrifying its’ bus fleet and putting wireless chargers into the tarmac at bus-stops so that the busses can trickle charge as passengers get on and off.

Finally, we ask whether one day, the tangled knot of wires spilling out of our electronic devices will be but a thing of the past.
Presented and Produced by Melanie Brown with additional reporting from; Alex Lathbridge, John Ryan and Stacey Knott

With contributions from; Prof. Bernard Carlson, Dr Samuel Afoakwa, Ray Simkin, Greg Kushnier, Andy Daga and Richard DeRock


(Photo credit: Getty Images)


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k2kc1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58zjskjnn)
A new government has been announced in Lebanon - more than a year after the previous one quit following the Beirut port explosion. Newshour speaks to the new Prime Minister Najib Mikati, who is Lebanon's richest man.

Also today: a New York fire chief remembers the events of 9/11; and why the melting ice sheet in Greenland could make devastating earthquakes more likely.

(Photo: Najib Mikati, Lebanon's wealthiest man, had been trying to form a government since July. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k2p35)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4s1ck)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tzj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjqf3k2sv9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywtm22h3d8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slpbjm50x)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjvv4s53p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48y4l3bbdf)
Biden orders new US vaccine rules

Workers at large US companies are to be vaccinated, or face regular mandatory testing. That's one of a slew of measures announced by President Biden, which aim to bring the Delta variant of coronavirus back under control in America. We get business reaction to the move from Stephen Lamar, chief executive of the American Apparel and Footwear Association. Also in the programme, there's a shortage of lorry drivers in the UK. It is having an impact on everything from chicken in restaurants to beer in pubs. We hear from drivers, driving instructors, retailers and the wholesale industry what's causing the shortfall, and what can be done to solve it. Plus, as a face-to-face New York Fashion Week draws to a close for the first time since the start of the pandemic, we find out how the fashion houses are planning for a post-pandemic future from Priya Elan, deputy fashion editor of The Guardian newspaper.

(Picture: Joe Biden announces the new vaccine rules. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Wish for Afghanistan 04:32 WED (w3ct2jn8)

A Wish for Afghanistan 11:32 WED (w3ct2jn8)

A Wish for Afghanistan 22:32 WED (w3ct2jn8)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gxt)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxt)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gxt)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkjhkv0cr7)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkjhkv0qzm)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkjhkv1370)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkjhkv16z4)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkjhkv1ggd)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkjhkv29p9)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkjhkv2xdy)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkjhkv38nb)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkjhkv3j4l)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkjhkv3mwq)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkjhkv5bbj)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkjhkv5pkx)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkjhkv5tb1)

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BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjq1v79wqq)

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BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjqf3jqfq5)

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BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjqf3jrn5g)

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BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjqf3js7x3)

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BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjqf3jsvmr)

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BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjqf3jt340)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjqf3jtbm8)

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BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjqf3jtpvn)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172xzjqf3jttls)

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BBC News 07:00 WED (w172xzjqf3jv231)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzjqf3jv5v5)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjqf3jv9l9)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjqf3jvfbf)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjqf3jvk2k)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjqf3jvntp)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjqf3jvskt)

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BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjqf3jwrjv)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjqf3jww8z)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjqf3jx013)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jx7jc)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jxc8h)

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BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jxlrr)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jxqhw)

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BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jy2r8)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jy6hd)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jyb7j)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jyfzn)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jykqs)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jypgx)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jyt71)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jyxz5)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jz1q9)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jz5gf)

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BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jzdyp)

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BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjqf3jzwy6)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjqf3k04fg)

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BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjqf3k2sv9)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d65)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxphfn4byg)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxphfn4gpl)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxphfn77vk)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172xxxphfn7clp)

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BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxphfnj29z)

BBC Proms on the World Service 19:06 SAT (w3ct2gdh)

BBC Proms on the World Service 12:06 SUN (w3ct2gdh)

Bad Cops 10:06 SUN (w3ct2g77)

Bad Cops 22:06 SUN (w3ct2g77)

Bad Cops 03:06 MON (w3ct2g77)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j56)

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Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jp0)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1j9q)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j0p)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqhxl4781f)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqj8vfmt0w)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqj8vfqpxz)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqj8vftlv2)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqj8vfxhr5)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dh6)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqw)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pqw)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pqx)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lsj)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lsj)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lsj)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2h27)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct1m87)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct1m87)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct1m87)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mv9)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mv9)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n66)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n66)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3ct1n66)

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HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3ct1n1p)

Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nvq)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nvr)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nvr)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvr)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2kyg)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2kyg)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2kyh)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tdg)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tdg)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1tdg)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dkg)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dkg)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2dkg)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dkg)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hcb)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2tnbz22tb)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1w)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l1w)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1plb)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1plb)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3ct1plb)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l45)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nhgphsl1r)

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Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct1l8n)

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