Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 28 AUGUST 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxjr3w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqhk9tg3fl)
Hurricane Ida heads for the US

Two days ahead of Ida's expected arrival, President Biden has approved a request from the Governor of Louisiana, John Bel Edwards, to declare a state of emergency; we get analysis from Johnston Von Springer at WBRZ in Baton Rouge and Dakota Smith, a meteorologist and satellite data analyst at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere at Colorado State University. The head of the US Federal Reserve, Jerome Powell, has addressed the virtual meeting of central bankers at Jackson Hole. We hear reaction from Chris Low at FHN Financial. And it's easy to get demoralised by the constant stream of bad news about climate change and teenagers have been particularly hard hit by this environmental anxiety; we hear from Kosi Amayo who's behind a new publishing company, Onwe Press, and the author of one of their forthcoming books, aimed at the young adult, market, Rab Ferguson, author of Landfill Mountains. And we're joined throughout the programme by Colin Peacock from Radio New Zealand. (Photo: storm over the sea via Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxjvw0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81mgv8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j774d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbw)
The future of The Hundred and the origins of the Pataudi Trophy

We're joined by the head of The Hundred women's competition, Beth Barrett-Wild to discuss its success and what's next for the tournament.

With all eyes on the third Test between England and India, we find out more about the Pataudi trophy they're competing for, named after one of the biggest stars in the history of Indian cricket.

And we look at the latest situation for Afghanistan's cricketers.

PHOTO: The Oval Invincibles celebrate victory with the trophy after The Hundred Final match between Southern Brave Women and Oval Invincibles Women at Lord's Cricket Ground on August 21, 2021 in London, England. (Photo by Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxjzm4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fc)
The valley of Afghan resistance

In Afghanistan one province is still resisting the Taliban takeover of the country, the Panjshir Valley. The valley also held out during the 80s and 90s against both the Soviet and the Taliban forces. Ismael Sadaat is a journalist with BBC Afghan in London, and has visited the valley several times. He explains why this place has repeatedly been the centre of Afghanistan's armed resistance movements.

India's beleaguered Sunderbans
The Sunderbans in the Bay of Bengal are the world's largest mangrove forest, and they are particularly vulnerable to climate change. More frequent cyclones are displacing families for months at a time. BBC Hindi's Debalin Roy has been there to report on the impact of the most recent one.

Myanmar's radio habit
Radios sold out in Yangon last week following news of a new radio programme, made by the National Unity Government in exile. For many in Myanmar, it’s a return to an old habit formed under previous regimes, as BBC Burmese's Soe Win Than remembers.

Mozambique's missing millions
Mozambicans are gripped by a huge trial which got underway this week, centred on a multi-million dollar corruption scandal which led the economy to collapse. Jose Tembe, who reports for the BBC from Maputo, has been following events.

Let’s talk straight
A video in which two people shout racist remarks at each other seems an unlikely route to dialogue. But ‘Let’s talk straight’ is a staged rap confrontation between two Israelis, Jew and Arab, with a message of co-existence. BBC Arabic’s Murad Shishani explains.

The puppet walking from Turkey to the UK
Little Amal is a 9-year-old refugee girl. She's from the Syrian town of Aleppo, walking 8,000 kilometres from Turkey to the UK in search of her mother. Amal is no ordinary girl, but a puppet, part of a project to raise awareness of the plight of refugees, as BBC Monitoring journalist Beril Akman explains.

Image: Guard post in Afghanistan's Panjshir valley
Credit: Ahmad Sahel Arman/AFP via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyz)
Nigeria's 'War Against Indiscipline'

Muhammadu Buhari's military government launched an unusual campaign to clean up Nigeria in August 1984. Under the policy, Nigerians were forced to queue in an orderly manner, to be punctual and to obey traffic laws. The punishments for infractions could be brutal. Veteran Nigerian journalist Sola Odunfa spoke to Alex Last about the reaction in Lagos to the War Against Indiscipline.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: The Oshodi district of Lagos, 2008 (AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxk3c8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsv)
The challenges facing the Taliban

The World Bank this week halted funding for projects in Afghanistan, following the lead of the IMF and US government which also froze payments and accounts. The increased financial pressure on the Taliban is just one of the many challenges they’ll face now they've taken control of the country. Thousands of professionals who’ve worked with foreigners are fleeing, prompting increasingly urgent calls from the Taliban for them to stay. Internal disagreements within the movement are also likely to make forming a stable government difficult, as will attacks from the Islamic State militant group and rebel forces amassing in the Panjshir Valley. So, does the Taliban have what it takes to preside over a relatively orderly transition? Is the group capable of keeping the lights on and the water flowing in cities that now have much more complex infrastructure than they did back in 2001? And when it comes to the potential for a humanitarian disaster to emerge, should Western powers help the new administration in Kabul or work against it?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests. Producers: Paul Schuster and Ellen Otzen.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxk73d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81mv2n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j7lcs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct1xzw)
The cops weaponising copyright

Could your favourite song be used to cover up the misdeeds of the police?

Officers across the US have been filmed playing music - out loud - on their phones in public.
They weren’t hoping this unusual display would make them go viral on social media. In fact, the aim was quite the opposite.

Some officers believe that by blasting music while being filmed, the videos would get blocked by automatic copyright protection software and activists wouldn’t be able to post them online.

Should we be concerned by these attempts to evade scrutiny by gaming technology, and do they even work?

Presenter: Sam Judah

Editor: Ed Main

Image: A graphic of a police officer with a mobile phone in his breast pocket blaring out music.

Image copyright: BBC


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkf)
Reason, numbers and Mr Spock

Writer Julia Galef talks to Tim Harford about the role of numbers in helping us think more rationally, and what Star Trek’s Mr Spock can teach us about making predictions.

Julia is author of The Scout Mindset, a book about how our attempts to be rational are often clouded or derailed by our human impulses, and the ways we can avoid these traps.

Producer: Nathan Gower

(Image: Leonard Nimoy as Mr Spock. Credit: Bettmann/Contributor via Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxkbvj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytbkbmwr3m)
US drone strike in eastern Afghanistan

The US military says it has killed a member of the Islamic State group in Afghanistan, in a drone strike in Nangarhar Province. American officials say their target was a planner for the group, which carried out a major attack at Kabul airport on Thursday, reportedly killing one-hundred-and-seventy people.

Also in the programme: US intelligence agencies publish their report on the origins of Covid-19; and we hear about Billy the Kid after the gun used to kill him sells for $6m.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Margaret O'Mara, a professor of history at the University of Washington; and Miguel-Anxo Murado, a Spanish journalist and author based in Madrid.

(Photo: US President Joe Biden delivers remarks on Afghanistan. Credit: Reuters/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxkgln)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytbkbmwvvr)
US airstrike against ISIS-K

The United States has carried out drone strikes, aimed at killing a member of the militant group IS-K. The militants had claimed responsibility for an attack at Kabul airport on Thursday, which killed 13 American troops. The US military claim the drone strikes killed a planner for the Afghan branch of Islamic State.

Also in the programme: we learn how climate change has affected bees; and we discuss the increasing number of South African dancers on Strictly Come Dancing.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Margaret O'Mara, a professor of history at the University of Washington; and Miguel-Anxo Murado, a Spanish journalist and author based in Madrid.

(Photo: US service members assist with security at an Evacuation Control Check Point (ECC). Credit: US Marine Corps/Staff Sgt Victor Mancilla//Reuters)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxklbs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytbkbmwzlw)
US drone strike on Islamic State in Afghanistan

The US military says it has killed a member of the Islamic State group in Afghanistan, in a drone strike in Nangarhar Province. American officials say their target was a planner for the group, which carried out a major attack at Kabul airport on Thursday, reportedly killing one-hundred-and-seventy people.

Also in the programme: the Chinese authorities have strongly rejected accusations by President Biden that they withheld key information on the origins of the coronavirus; and the American songwriter Diane Warren finally takes centre stage.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Margaret O'Mara, a professor of history at the University of Washington; and Miguel-Anxo Murado, a Spanish journalist and author based in Madrid.

(Photo: Taliban member stands guard at a checkpoint near Kabul airport on August 27th. Credit: Haroon Sabawoon/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j7ym5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8x)
A love for my language

Around the world, languages are disappearing. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women who are helping to keep their endangered languages alive – how has learning the words of their ancestors shaped their identities?

Mshkogaabwid Kwe from Turtle Island, an indigenous name for Canada, learned her clan’s language, Anishinaabemowin, as an adult. She is now raising her children in an English-free home. She has a deep gratitude to those who walked before her and kept the words alive, knowing the persecution that they faced.

Tsamaxa Toroxa spoke English and Afrikaans growing up in South Africa, and often faced prejudice from other Black South Africans who expected her to speak an indigenous language. Learning the language of her ancestors, Khoe, has shaped how she sees herself and she is now helping to keep the language alive by sharing it with others through the arts.

Produced by Caitlin Sneddon

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Mshkogaabwid Kwe (credit Mshkogaabwid Kwe)
R: Tsamaxa Toroxa (credit Tsamaxa Toroxa)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxkq2x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d64)
Chaos in Afghanistan

Despite terror warnings, Afghans continued to gather at Kabul’s airport, desperate to get onto a plane. What was feared, and what is sadly familiar in Afghanistan, happened: bomb blasts brought further devastation.

Around 100,000 people have been flown out of the country though since the Taliban takeover. We hear stories from two women who have been at the airport and managed to get a flight. They relate the mixed feelings of saying farewell to family.

Many Afghans have been left behind: two students in Kabul and Herat share their fears about being unable to continue their education at present. For one, an encounter with a member of the Taliban on the streets brought both physical and mental pain.

Host Nuala McGovern also considers the potential impact on society with the Taliban in power as she connects two sportswomen, who have represented their country. They share their concerns about the future of female footballers and athletes in Afghanistan.

(Photo: Afghans struggle to reach the foreign forces to show their credentials to flee the country outside the Hamid Karzai International Airport, in Kabul, Afghanistan, 26 August 2021. Credit: Akhter Gulfam/EPA)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j82c9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 World Of Wisdom (w3ct2hdk)
Peace of mind

Keeping some peace of mind when the world around you is in turmoil is a great challenge. Mohammed finds it hard to maintain concentration, he sleeps 12 hours a night but awakes exhausted. He lives in Afghanistan, which is in a state of conflict, and spends a lot of time on social media. Sister Dang Nghiem offers advice on how to make your mind a beautiful refuge from the chaos and insecurity in the outside world. She discusses the North Korean communists taking over Saigon when she was a child and the BBC’s Sana Safi compares her own experience of life in Afghanistan under the Taliban.

Produced by Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1v)
Holding religion to account

We ask what the World Service’s flagship religious programme Heart & Soul sees as its purpose. Holding religion to account? Educating a global audience on the world’s many faiths? The show’s series producer joins us to answer your questions.

Plus, another delving into the everyday listening habits of listeners; This week How I Hear comes from Australia.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxktv1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q3mm317vp)
Paralympian Desirée Vila: ‘The only incurable thing is the desire to live’

We’re live in Tokyo on Day 5 of the Paralympics, hearing from Spanish Paralympian Desirée Vila. An elite gymnast, she thought her sporting career was over after an injury that ultimately resulted in her losing her leg… but not only did she find Paralympic sport and is competing at her first Games, she’s also a powerful voice advocating positive body image in the Spanish-speaking world.

Swimmer Abbas Karimi, who is competing under the IPC’s refugee team, tells us why he had to flee Afghanistan when the Taliban first rose to power. We also hear from the man who won Japan’s first gold of the Games, swimmer Takayuki Suzuki, who tells us what life's like for the disabled community in Japan.

Mina Ahmadi, a member of the current Afghan women’s national team, tells us about her fears for those players who have not been able to leave the country.

Plus, reaction to the Netball Grand Final, the biggest prize in club netball in Australia.

Photo: Bartlomiej Zborowski


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxkyl5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81nkkf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j89vk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3l)
How has the pandemic changed Bollywood?

India’s mega film industry - the world's largest in terms of the number of productions - has suffered losses worth billions of dollars due to the pandemic. Since last year, the country’s 9,500 theatres were shut because of the coronavirus outbreak. This led to massive job losses. Film production was hit too, and has only recently started picking up, as theatrical releases make a comeback.

But has big-screen movie watching taken a backseat with Covid norms in place? Do on-demand platforms offer more versatile content than multiplexes? And how are actors shooting for movies with so many safety restrictions in place?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how the coronavirus pandemic has changed Bollywood.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Rahul Mittra, filmmaker; Shubhra Gupta, film critic and columnist; Alok Tandon, CEO, INOX Leisure Limited; Siddharth Malhotra, actor; Kiara Advani, actor


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxl2b9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2hcw)
The world according to search

What can we learn about a culture from what they search online? From xenophobia in Nigeria, shut-in teenagers in Japan, India’s biometric identity card, and the creation of viral TikTok slang, we look at the search trends that have come to define us. Ben Arogundade investigates what the most popular searches reveal about our approach to death, dating, and digital identity.

Tech journalist Nilesh Christopher tell us that India’s pandemic searches may be more complicated than they first appear, and Peruvian writer María José Osorio muses on a strangely nostalgic query that was among one of Peru’s most frequently probed questions online.

Internet searches are often surprisingly intimate, leading to broader questions about cultural beliefs, political attitudes, and algorithmic bias. We hear from Safiya Noble, a scholar looking at Google’s search engine and whether it might be replicating racial stereotypes online.

We hear from black bookshop owner Carolynn Bain about Black Lives Matter search queries, speak to a German botanist about disinformation, and learn about a cancelled Chinese TV show that has been crowned the most Googled TV program in the world. Does search data reveal a globalised, homogenous view of online culture, or a more fragmented and localised picture of the world around us?

(Photo: A woman in New Delhi, looking at her smartphone. Credit: Ibrahim Rifath)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxl62f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5880525d1)
Afghanistan: US hit IS-K targets in drone attack

The US military says it killed a member of the Islamic State group in Nangarhar province in a drone strike after the militants killed an estimated one hundred and seventy people in a suicide bomb and gun attack on Kabul airport on Thursday. We hear from security analysts on the militant threat and a report on the ground from Kabul.

Also in the programme: A new study has found patients with the Delta variant of Covid 19 are twice as likely to need hospital admission as people who caught earlier strains of the disease; and Sirhan Sirhan the man who assassinated Robert F Kennedy is granted parole.

(Photo: US soldiers guarding Kabul airport. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxl9tk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tddjhsykc)
Live Sporting Action

Live Sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis including the English Premier League and the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.

(Photo by Alex Morton/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxlst2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81pdsb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j952g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct1xzw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8m)
Brazil's blind sprinting legend

Brazil’s Terezinha Guilhermina is one of the world’s fastest blind sprinters, with three Paralympic gold medals in the 100m and 200m T11 sprints. Growing up in grinding poverty, Guilhermina always dreamed of taking part in athletics but had no shoes to wear until her sister – who worked as a maid – lent her a pair. Guilhermina shares her life story with Dan Hardoon. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Terezinha Guilhermina with her guide at the 2012 London Olympics (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxlxk6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct2gdg)
Sowande's African suite and Price's piano concerto

The BBC Proms are back in the Royal Albert Hall in London with a six-week season of concerts featuring leading British orchestras as well as international soloists and conductors.

Broadcast programme:
Fela Sowande - African Suite
Florence Price - Piano Concerto in One Movement

Jeneba Kanneh-Mason (piano)
Chineke! Orchestra
Kalena Bovell (conductor)

Musicians of Chineke!, UK’s first professional orchestra with a majority of ethnically-diverse players, are joined by the young pianist Jeneba Kanneh-Mason for the Proms premiere of the Piano Concerto in One Movement by Florence Price. The first female African-American composer to earn a national reputation, Price was the soloist in the 1934 first performance of the Concerto but it is only in recent years that the work has found a new popularity.

The Nigerian composer Fela Sowande came to London at about the same time as Price's Concerto was first performed. He earned his living by accompanying pop musicians and choirs on the piano and organ in concerts, churches and on BBC radio but he also wrote music that combined European forms and orchestration with West African rhythms and melodies. His African Suite is a good example of this and an early version of the work had its first broadcast on the World - then Overseas - Service in 1944.

Presenter Andrew McGregor is joined by vibraphone player, musicologist and broadcaster Corey Mwamba.

[Image: Pianist Jeneba Kanneh-Mason at the 2021 BBC Proms. Credit: Mark Allan/BBC]


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxm19b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtc)
The Arts Hour Edinburgh Festivals Special

This week’s The Arts Hour is dedicated to some of the global artists taking part in this year’s Edinburgh Festivals.

Scotland’s capital city hosts the biggest arts festival in the world. It was cancelled for the first time in its history in 2020 due to the pandemic but now it’s back, albeit as a smaller affair, with only a few tourists and none of the young hopefuls thrusting flyers into your hands along the Royal Mile trying to persuade you to see their show.

However there were still over a thousand events happening live and online and organisers have had to be inventive when it comes to the venues, which this year include the top of a car park, a beach and inside a football stadium.

Nikki Bedi talks to film and photographic artist Isaac Julien about his work Lessons of the Hour, about the great African American writer, orator, abolitionist and freed slave Frederick Douglass.

Malian musician Fatoumata Diawara tells us why she’s giving voice to the voiceless in her songs.

US performer and playwright Apphia Campbell remembers her first experience of performing at the Edinburgh Fringe.

Fatma Said explains why it’s a responsibility being an Egyptian opera singer.

Choreographers Alice Ripoll from Brazil and Omar Rajeh from Lebanon tell us about the dance films they’ve made for the Edinburgh International Festival.

Nigerian sound artist Emeka Ogboh on why the song Auld Lang Syne and the UK leaving the European Union were the inspirations behind his latest work, Song of the Union

And music from the Orkney based Scottish folk group Fara.

Producer: Andrea Kidd

(Image: Isaac Julien. Credit: Duncan McGlynn)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxm51g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5880534c2)
Afghanistan: final UK flight for Afghan civilians departs

As the final UK evacuation flight purely for civilians took off from the capital of Kabul, hundreds of eligible Afghan refugees were left behind. We hear from one of them: an Afghan interpreter who has been unable to get into the airport.

Also in the programme: Hurricane Ida is set to make a disastrous landfall Sunday, on the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the storm that flooded 80 percent of New Orleans and left 1800 people dead. We speak to a disaster management expert from New Orleans -- from her car as she evacuates the area.

(Photo: evacuees arrive at Royal Air Force Brize Norton escorted by UK Armed Forces personnel, Britain, UK, 26 Aug 2021. Credit: MoD / Crown)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxm8sl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc9)
Notting Hill Carnival with General Levy, Lady Banton, Mikey Dread and Alicai Harley

As the world famous Notting Hill Carnival isn’t taking place this year, we thought we’d have a party of our own, Caribbean style.

Ragga artist and MC General Levy leads the charge. His parents were Trinidadian, and from an early age he started to write lyrics and form sound systems. If you don’t recognise the name, then you’ll definitely know the voice; Incredible, his ’94 track with M-Beat, changed the changed the sound of jungle and drum & bass forever.

Joining him is carnival royalty, the selector Lady Banton. She set up the first all-female soundsystem in the UK, the Mellotone Sound System, in 1989, and became a Carnival favourite soon after.

Mikey Dread is a founding member and chief selector of one of the UK’s best known and most loved sound systems, the Channel One Soundsystem, who have played at the Carnival every year since 1983. Named after the famous studio in Kingston, Jamaica, they bring the reggae, the dubplates, and the “hot steppas”.

And finally, breathing new life into the festival is Alicai Harley. Born in Jamaica, she caused a stir releasing a string of singles and EPs, before working with the likes of Stefflon Don, Kamille, Stonebwoy, Aluna, and Kojo Funds. She released her debut album The Red Room Intro earlier this year and is the self-proclaimed “yard gyal inna Britain”.

Together the group discuss all things Carnival: the cost of those costumes, when and how they got started, why you need the rain to cool you down, you parents not letting you go, and the importance of talent over hype.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxmdjq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywswjg0q2p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skysx4rqb)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j9rt3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt1)
Art and disability: Actor Madison Ferris

As the Paralympic Games take off in Tokyo, presenter and former Team GB sitting volleyball player Kat Hawkins, hears from some of the most exciting artists with disabilities globally.

Madison Ferris, star of New York’s Broadway, made headlines when she became the first leading actor to take the stage in her wheelchair. She talks about the extent to which theatre is evolving to become more diverse.

American author and teacher Rebekah Taussig discusses writing characters with visible disabilities into stories on the page and screen, and her own book Sitting Pretty: The View from My Ordinary Resilient Disabled Body.

British dance group Atypical with Attitude, whose members are neuro-diverse or live with a disability, talk to BBC reporter and former dancer Anna Bailey about breaking down barriers in the dance world.

And Pakistani-Qatari comedian and disability rights activist Nawaal Akram, who has muscular dystrophy, on finding material for her comedy in frustrating moments and using her performances to change attitudes.

Presenter: Kat Hawkins
Producers: Paul Waters, Kirsty McQuire, Olivia Skinner and Lucy Wai
Reporter: Anna Bailey

(Photo: Madison Ferris. Credit: Jimi Celeste/Patrick McMullan/Getty Images)



SUNDAY 29 AUGUST 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxmn0z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yvm)
World’s first DNA Covid-Vaccine

Indian authorities have approved the world’s first DNA-based Covid vaccine for emergency use. Not all the data that has led to the opening of the phase 3 trials is yet publicly available, but as public health policy expert Chandrakant Lahariya explains to presenter Roland Pease, it could be a real help in India’s, and the world’s, fight to get things under control.

WHO Wuhan expedition
The origins of the Covid virus were investigated last winter by a WHO team sent to Wuhan – where the first cases were discovered – earlier this year. Their work has since become the subject of intense political scrutiny and some criticism. This week, members of the team including Marian Koopmans have written a rebuttal, setting out the original terms of the investigation and urging the continuation of the process, as she explains to Victoria Gill.

Decolonise Science
Most of the science written by people from or about the African continent is written in English. Many local African languages do not currently have a meaningful vocabulary for many of the scientific terms and concepts researchers use. This week a team of scientists, journalists, and translators are completing the launch of a project called Decolonise Science, which will take 180 nominated papers posted on the website AfricaArxiv, translate them into 6 African languages including isiZulu, Sothu, and Hausa, and then use Machine Learning methods to build resources for science communication and education in people’s home languages. Project partner Sibusiso Byela explains the thinking.

Royal Society Africa Prize winner
This week the UK’s Royal Society announced its annual awards. Kenya’s George Warimwe has taken the Africa Award for his work creating vaccines for a virus that creates disease in livestock and humans – Rift Valley Fever. His promising approach stems from years of working with adenovirus technology akin to the AstraZeneca Covid virus. But as he explains, his One Health approach is to learn from the immune response in humans and apply it to animals, and vice-versa. The grant associated with the award should also help him and his team pick- up on research left-off before the coronavirus pandemic.

How did our ancestors sleep?
How we sleep is a topic of endless fascination and for some can, ironically be quite exhausting. Modern life has allowed us to invade the night, and those pesky late night work emails, social media and TV all conspire to limit our sleep or simply prevent us from a truly restful night. But if we travel back in time, did our ancestors master sleep any better? No air-con or electric fan for them on hot humid nights, and only smoky fires to keep them warm on cold, snowy nights. What if we go way back into our pre-history, to our ancient human ancestors? No interruption for them from an unwanted work email, however perhaps a ravenous lion gave them more reason for those night time worries. CrowdScience listener Tom asks our sleep deprived presenter Datshiane Navanayagam to investigate how our sleep has changed over history and pre-history. She talks to Professor Russell Foster, Head of the Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute at the University of Oxford and Neanderthal expert Dr Rebecca Wragg Sykes about slumber habits in days of yore, and in doing so, she uncovers some top tips from our ancestors that may give us all a better nights rest.


(Image: Getty Images)

Presenters: Roland Pease and Datshiane Navanayagam
Producers: Alex Mansfield and Alexandra Feachem


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxmrs3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81qcrc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49jb41h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvp)
Antibody cocktails against Covid

Trials have shown that cocktails of antibodies are effective against Covid, and one called Ronapreve has just been approved for use in the UK, following in the footsteps of Japan and the US. Claudia Hammond talks to Penny Ward, Professor of Pharmaceutical Medicine at Kings College, London, about how these monoclonal antibodies work and where they are best used, given that they are very expensive.

The UN Refugee Agency and the International Organisation for Migration have called on governments to ensure that everyone is included in vaccination plans, including refugees and internally displaced people. Samara Linton reports on how undocumented migrants, in South East Asia and in the UK, are getting vaccinated against Covid.

The increased heat we are experiencing with climate change is causing deaths in people with underlying health conditions. Professor Kristie Ebi of the University of Washington tells Claudia about what we can do to keep cool, in particular in places without air conditioning.

And family doctor Graham Easton comments on these stories and discusses the relationship between Covid and heat.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Deborah Cohen

(Picture: Computer illustration of the release of monoclonal antibodies. Credit: Nanoclustering/Science Photo Library/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxmwj7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2hcw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxn08c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv8)
Western military intervention after Afghanistan: When can it work?

There was widespread joy in Sierra Leone, when British troops helped overthrow its murderous regime back in the year 2000. American forces in Somalia, however, saw some of their number killed and dragged through the streets. Western military intervention has had mixed results in Africa, as elsewhere in the world. The BBC’s Andrew Harding, has seen it first hand in many countries on the continent. He reflects on when it works, when it fails, and when it can make a bad situation even worse.

The pull-out of American troops from Afghanistan has prompted fear among some of the country’s allies: if such a prominent mission can be abandoned, they ask, would the US really come to the rescue should they find themselves under attack? It is China which presents the greatest fear to many, with the country increasingly asserting its maritime influence by building landing strips and taking control of remote rocky outcrops. Howard Johnson took a ride with one of the Filipino fishing boats playing cat and mouse with Chinese naval forces.

When people talk about violence against Palestinians, this is usually a reference to their conflict with Israel. But for the Palestinians who have Israeli citizenship, there is another, growing threat: organised crime. Extortion, drug dealing, and other forms of gangsterism are endemic in some communities, with Israel’s police accused of standing by. Yolande Knell has been speaking to some of the innocent people caught up in the bloodshed.

It is certainly not easy to find Seychelles’ highly endangered “jelly fish” tree. Named for its unusual shape, the tree is now found only in the most remote spots. More than that, its sites are kept secret by locals, anxious that visitors might cause further damage to the last remaining specimens. Patrick Muirhead was sworn to secrecy when he was guided up a mountain to find one.

(Image: Soldiers at a military training camp in Mahera, Sierra Leone. Credit: Leon Neal/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49jbcjr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxn40h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81qqzr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49jbh8w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz0)
2. Caught

A basketball journalist in Spain recognises three of the players in the gold-medal-winning intellectual disability basketball team - and they are not disabled. He has even played on the same team as one of them. But when he publishes his story in a national basketball magazine, the team’s organisers show certificates supposedly proving the players’ disability status.

The denials continue until another of the players - who turns out to have been a journalist - publishes his own article exposing the fraud. It causes a media storm in Spain and around the world. The Spanish Paralympic Committee begins an investigation and the consequences for the genuinely-disabled captain Ray are devastating.

Presenter: Dan Pepper
Series Producer: Simon Maybin

(Photo credit: EPA)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxn7rm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytbkbmzn0q)
US warns of militant attack in Afghanistan

US President Joe Biden has promised to "hunt down" anyone involved in Thursday's bombing by the Islamic State group. The attack killed 13 American troops at Kabul airport. We hear about what life is now like in Afghanistan, two weeks into the return of Taliban rule.

Also in the programme: we hear how Louisiana is preparing for Hurricane Ida; and we look ahead to upcoming German elections as the country prepares to elect a new chancellor.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Afghan journalist Bilal Sarwary and Eunice Goes, a Portuguese-born professor of politics at Richmond University.

(Photo: US Marines and a German service member watch an entry gate during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport, Kabul. Credit: US Marine Corps/Cpl. Davis Harris/Handout via Reuters)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxnchr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytbkbmzrrv)
UN warns of medical shortages in Afghanistan

The WHO say they are "exploring all options to bring more medicines" into Afghanistan, to help combat the growing humanitarian crisis in the country. Thursday's bomb attack further complicated the aid mission. We speak to Acting Health Minister Dr Wahid Majrooh.

Also in the programme: the United Nations refugee agency is warning that up to half a million more Afghan refugees could leave their country by the end of the year.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Afghan journalist Bilal Sarwary and Eunice Goes, a Portuguese-born professor of politics at Richmond University.

(Photo: US Marines process evacuees as they go through the Evacuation Control Center. Credit: U.S. Marine Corps/Staff Sgt. Victor Mancilla/Handout via Reuters)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxnh7w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytbkbmzwhz)
World Food Programme warns of Afghan shortages

We speak to a World Food Programme official in Afghanistan about the warning that the country could run out of food by September.

Also in the programme: We hear the tale of a woman mayor's dramatic escape from Kabul; and what a US airman learnt by eavesdropping on the Taleban for hundreds of hours:

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are the Afghan journalist Bilal Sarwary and Eunice Goes, a Portuguese-born professor of politics at Richmond University in the UK.

(Picture: UK military personnel board an aircraft departing from Kabul. Photo by Jonathan Gifford/MoD Crown Copyright via Getty Images)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49jbvj8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg2)
The unstoppable rise of starch

Starches are among the most important and versatile additives in processed food, but most of us know little about them and there are some we should be wary of.

Emily Thomas hears why starch is a food manufacturer’s best friend - making pies crispier, cakes airier, and yoghurts creamier. It’s even used to mimic and replace ingredients some of us want to limit, like sugar and fat.

But although starch is a vital source of energy for all of us, some highly processed starches have been linked with negative health outcomes, and it can be hard for the consumer to find out which type they’re eating.

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Producers: Simon Tulett and Siobhan O'Connell.

Contributors:

Peter Hendrikx, Ingredion;
Marty Jopkin, author of 'The Science of Food';
Fred Warren, The Quadram Institute

(Picture: Bread 'flying' in mid-air. Credit: Getty/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxnm00)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49jbz8d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxb)
The 80s song that brought back my memories

In the aftermath of a car accident at 19 years old, Thomas Leeds was left with no memories of his childhood, of his family and friends, even cultural references were all wiped away. As Thomas began to rebuild his life he struggled with thoughts about his future because, he says, he didn't know where he'd come from. He became obsessed with the popular culture of the 80s and 90s — the era of his childhood — hoping something would trigger his memory. Then, aged 30 while planning the perfect playlist for his 80s-themed birthday party, a song suddenly unlocked memories that had been lost for 10 years. A longer version of this story was first broadcast on 28th July 2021. You can find it here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3ct1jyv

You can follow Thomas' story on Twitter @thomasleeds

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Collage of pictures of Thomas Leeds' brain scans, as a child and recently in hospital getting tests
Credit: All photos courtesy of Thomas Leeds

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Mariana des Forges


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxnqr4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g76)
3. The warning signs

How many red flags were missed? Years of complaints come to light. Victims of Task Force members share their stories.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49jc30j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyf)
Abused online for my faith

Sophia Smith Galer, reporter and TikTok creator, speaks to users who have faced discrimination and suppression online based on their religion. We speak to YouTuber Nada Majdy, who regularly faces abuse from Islamophobes whose sexualised comments do not get taken down; the Jewish TikTok creators who try to challenge anti-Semitism, only to have their own videos taken down in the process; and we ask why and how Instagram managed to censor #sikh for nearly three months.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxnvh8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81rggj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49jc6rn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct064t)
Changing World, Changing Bodies

What is the secret to a longer life?

Why do people who live in five communities around the world – known as Blue Zones- consistently outlive the rest of us on the planet? Professor Cregan-Reid goes in search of the secret of a long life. He visits Sardinia home to one of those long lived communities where several villages boast dozens of people aged 100 or more.

What used to kill us routinely no longer does so - at least not in such numbers. By rights many, many more of us should be emulating the residents of the Blue Zones and living well beyond 100. Instead we are succumbing to lifestyle diseases and longevity could even be about to fall for future generations. The good news is researchers in the Blue Zones have identified seven easily adapted rules for a longer life!

(Photo: Ushi Okushima, a 105-year-old woman from the village of Ogimi, Okinawa, Japan. The village is known as "longevity village" due to the long life span of residents there. Credit: Mie Kohiyama/AFP/Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxnz7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct2gdg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxp2zj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv588055294)
Afghanistan: Another Kabul airport attack likely

Two weeks after the Taliban entered the Afghan capital, Kabul, and took control of the country, the group says talks are still underway on forming a new government. Meanwhile, US President Joe Biden has warned another attack on Kabul airport is highly likely.

Also in the programme: weather forecasters in the United States have upgraded Hurricane Ida to a category four storm; and an apparent missile and drone attack by Houthi rebels has killed at least thirty pro-government soldiers in southern Yemen.

(Photo: U.S. Marines with the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) process evacuees as they go through the Evacuation Control Center (ECC) during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport, in Kabul, Afghanistan. Credit: Reuters).


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxp6qn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rll)
Mars: A history of the Red Planet

With three separate missions exploring the Red Planet in 2021, Mars is once again under the spotlight. But to tell the truth, it’s never been away. Mars has fascinated people for centuries with its seemingly curious motion in the night sky, its red colour and the eternal question as to whether it may or may not harbour life, past or present.

Since the 1960s, robotic exploration of Mars has provided us with evidence that it may have had periods where it was once a warm and wet planet. That’s in contrast to the arid, cold celestial object we know today. The harsh Martian atmosphere presents challenges for anyone hoping to land humans on the planet. But nevertheless, the next few decades could potentially see either a private commercial operator, a national space agency or an international partnership make history with the planet’s first human exploration. Some have even argued that’s a first step to ‘terraforming’ or populating Mars in the future.

Bridget Kendall is joined by Michael Meyer, the lead scientist for NASA’s Mars Exploration Programme; Sarah Stewart Johnson, Associate Professor of Planetary Science at Georgetown University and author of The Sirens of Mars; Jorge Vago, the Scientist for Mars Missions at the European Space Agency, and curator Matthew Shindell from the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service.

[Image: Creative image of the space station orbiting Mars. Credit: Cokada via Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxpbgs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxpg6x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tddjhx2yq)
Live Sporting Action

Live Sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis including the English Premier League and the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.
(Photo by Jack Thomas - WWFC/Wolves via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxptg9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81sffk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49jd5qp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxpy6f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh5)
Kamala Harris’ South East Asia charm tour

While the eyes of the world are on Afghanistan and the US withdrawal, the American vice president is trying to generate some headlines of her own during a charm offensive in South East Asia. We hear what she has been saying and what she hopes to achieve.

Zambia has a new president and he has made some big promises. Can he afford to keep them? And do you feel like time is just running away from you? Or perhaps it has slowed down to an unrelenting crawl? We hear how our brains interpret time - and what we can do to make it work better for us.

Producer: Clare Williamson
Presenter: Lucy Burton

(Photo: Kamala Harris speaking in Vietnam. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxq1yk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv588056185)
Hurricane Ida makes landfall in the United States

On the sixteenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which devastated New Orleans, Ida may be the worst storm to hit Louisiana for 150 years. We speak to Collin Arnold, a local official responsible for emergency preparedness.

Also in the programme, the latest news from the Afghan capital Kabul - and we look at the dilemma facing Western nations on whether to recognise the Taliban, and ask what a Taliban government might look like. And we remember the life and career of legendary Jamaican record producer Lee 'Scratch' Perry.

(Photo: A woman walks in the rain as Hurricane Ida makes landfall in Louisiana, in New Orleans. Credit: REUTERS/Marco Bello)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxq5pp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g76)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49jdjz2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 World Of Wisdom (w3ct2hdk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxq9ft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywswjg3lzs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skysx7nmf)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49jdnq6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kxb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 30 AUGUST 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6vd67)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlby9f70ch)
What now for Afghanistan's economy?

Billions have been pumped into Afghanistan over two decades, but fears are growing that the country is on the brink of a humanitarian and financial crisis. We ask Gul Masood Sabit, who served two terms as deputy finance minister of the country, what happened to the funds? And General Motors has recalled every Chevrolet Bolt ever made after the batteries of the electric car were linked to fires. We talk to Michelle Krebs, an analyst at Cox Automotive in Detroit, about the challenge of designing electric cars. The independent economist Michael Hughes tells us why India's economy is rebounding. And we talk to James Lamond, from the Center for European Policy and Analysis in Washington DC, about the agenda for a meeting between Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky and US President Joe Biden.

(Picture: Boy in book store in Kabul / Getty images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktjrgm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2h26)
The Life Scientific: Professor Martin Sweeting

When Martin Sweeting was a student, he thought it would be fun to try to build a satellite using electronic components found in some of the earliest personal computers. An amateur radio ham and space enthusiast, he wanted to create a communications satellite that could be used to talk to people on the other side of the world. It was a team effort, he insists, with friends and family pitching in and a lot of the work being done on his kitchen table. Somehow he managed to persuade NASA to let his microsatellite hitch a ride into space and, after the first message was received, spent more than a decade trying to get a good picture of planet earth. The technology that Martin pioneered underpins modern life with thousands of reprogrammable microsatellites now in orbit around the earth and thousands more due to launch in the next few years to bring internet connections to remote parts of the world. The university spin-off company, Surrey Satellite Technologies Limited (SSTL) that Martin set up in the 1980s with an initial investment of £100 sold for £50 million, a quarter of a century later. If his company had been bought by venture capitalists, he says he would probably have ended up making TVs. Instead he developed the satellite technology on which so much of modern life depends.

Produce: Anna Buckley

Photo Credit: SSTL


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6vhyc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjby3xm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktjw6r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqy)
Will carbon labelling change what we buy?

Another chance to listen to an episode about how we might shop greener. More companies are rolling out carbon dioxide emission labels on products. Unilever, the global consumer goods giant, recently made a commitment to put carbon footprint information on 70,000 products. Multi-national companies, Oatly and Quorn, are also adding similar labels to their packaging.
But this is not the first time companies have tried this. In the 2000s, for example, one international supermarket put carbon labels on hundreds of products, only to cancel the project a few years later.
Why are carbon labels coming back now, and what will the information on them really tell us? How do you measure the carbon footprint of a product? Can carbon labelling change what we buy and reduce emissions?

Presenters: Neal Razzell and Graihagh Jackson
Producer: Darin Graham
Reporter: Julie Sogaard
Researchers: Zoe Gelber and Olivia Noon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6vmph)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g76)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktjzyw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 World Of Wisdom (w3ct2hdk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6vrfm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjbycdw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktk3q0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8y)
Natural-born contortionists

Kim Chakanetsa explores the rich and long history of body-bending work and hears about the complex skills that you need to succeed.

Sosina Wogayehu is a contortionist and juggler from Ethiopia. She started performing at the age of six in the streets of Addis Ababa. After a long career travelling around the world, she has moved back to Ethiopia where she’s now training new performers and planning on opening the first circus venue in the country.

Leilani Franco is a British-Filipina professional contortionist. She holds three Guinness World Records: the fastest backbend walk, the fastest contortion roll and the most full-body revolutions in a chest-stand position. She made it to the semi-finals of both Britain’s Got Talent and Germany’s Got Talent, and she’s currently based in Hamburg, Germany.

Producer: Alice Gioia

(Image: Sosina Wogayehu (L) Credit: Ponch Hawkes; Leilani Franco (R) Credit: David Waldman/Barcroft Media)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6vw5r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92n8y6h)
Hurricane Ida batters Louisiana

The US city of New Orleans has lost power, with only generators working. We'll have an update on how people have been bracing themselves for the storm.

Huge tension in Kabul as the US withdrawal deadline approaches with fears of attacks - we'll get the story of one family split between the UK and Herat.

And we try to sum up what made the Jamaican producer Lee ''Scratch'' Perry quite so remarkable - The Upsetter has died at the age of 85.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6vzxw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92n91ym)
New Orleans loses power as Hurricane Ida hammers Louisiana

Hurricane Ida hits Louisiana...we will bring you the latest from the state.

In Afghanistan, the Taliban set out what the future of the country will look like, as more rockets are fired and queues grow outside Kabul Airport.

North Korea appears to have restarted a plutonium producing reactor. The UN nuclear agency says it's a "deeply troubling " development.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6w3p0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92n95pr)
Hurricane Ida lashes Louisiana

The city of New Orleans has lost power as Hurricane Ida batters the state of Louisiana. It's sixteen years since Hurricane Katrina killed hundreds of people.

As the American withdrawal from Afghanistan is due to be completed by Tuesday, we look at what might happen next for the country.

And the United Nations atomic watchdog says North Korea appears to have reinstated a nuclear reactor. We get the latest from our correspondent in Seoul.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6w7f4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n65)
Maggi Hambling: An evolving creative vision

Stephen Sackur speaks to the artist Maggi Hambling. Her works have won international acclaim, but some have also stirred controversy, including a sculpture unveiled in London last year for 18th century feminist Mary Wollstonecraft. How has her creative vision evolved over the last six decades?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktklpj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j55)
Is office wear dead?

Many of us are preparing go back into the office but after more than a year of working from home for a lot of people, have we forgotten how to dress professionally? Or are we chomping at the bit to put on the armour that is traditional office wear? Or it time to entirely rethink the whole concept of office dress codes? Presenter, Elizabeth Hotson strolls down London's Saville Row to meet tailor Richard Anderson and stylist Lizzie Edwards gives some us tips on how to dress to impress. Deirdre Clemente, a historian who specializes in clothing and fashion at the University of Nevada tells us why March 2020 marked a huge shift in sartorial expectations and photographer Victoria Rose describes how her approach to fashion shifted during the pandemic. Plus Vivienne Nunis and Anastasia Wanjiru in Nairobi, Kenya explore shifting norms in workplace clothing. (Picture of a suit fitting via Getty Images)
Producer: Elizabeth Hotson


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x18)
The strike that changed Poland

Poland’s communist economy was in crisis in 1980. When the price of everyday essentials went up, workers at the Lenin Shipyard in the Baltic city of Gdańsk went on strike. Led by Lech Wałęsa, the strike committee issued 21 demands on 17 August 1980. The demands were painted on sheets of plywood and hung up at the entrance to the shipyard for all to see. At the end of August a social contract was drawn up in which the communist authorities essentially caved in to the shipyard workers' demands. It marked the beginning of the Solidarity workers’ movement. Maciej Grzywaczewski was a student at the time who joined the strikers and who painted the demands on the plywood boards.

A Free Range/Overcoat Media production for BBC World Service

Photo: Strikers on the wall of the Lenin Shipyard in Gdansk in 1980. Credit: Getty Images.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6wc58)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktkqfn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqv)
How did our ancestors sleep?

How we sleep is a topic of endless fascination and for some can, ironically be quite exhausting. Modern life has allowed us to invade the night, and those pesky late night work emails, social media and TV all conspire to limit our sleep or simply prevent us from a truly restful night. But if we travel back in time, did our ancestors master sleep any better? No air-con or electric fan for them on hot humid nights, and only smoky fires to keep them warm on cold, snowy nights. What if we go way back into our pre-history, to our ancient human ancestors? No interruption for them from an unwanted work email, however perhaps a ravenous lion gave them more reason for those night time worries.

CrowdScience listener Tom asks our sleep deprived presenter Datshiane Navanayagam to investigate how our sleep has changed over history and pre-history. She talks to Professor Russell Foster, Head of the Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute at the University of Oxford and Neanderthal expert Dr Rebecca Wragg Sykes about slumber habits in days of yore, and in doing so, she uncovers some top tips from our ancestors that may give us all a better nights rest.

Presented by Datshiane Navanayagam and Produced by Alexandra Feachem

(Woman sitting in bed and yawning. Credit: JGI/Jamie Grill/Getty Images)


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6wgxd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Evidence (w3ct2jnk)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

How will the pandemic end?

When all restrictions are lifted in a highly vaccinated country, how manageable is the coronavirus? Both Israel and UK’s experiments to do just that, have raised new worries about raising the risk of new vaccine resistant variants. Claudia Hammond and her panel of global experts consider our ability to predict how and when variants of concern are most likely to arise and how long our repertoire of vaccines can remain effective in riding out increasingly infectious waves of the virus.

Also in the programme - does anyone need a third “booster” dose or is it more important to make sure the whole world gets their first two doses instead? And as more people in the world get vaccinated every day, can we get to a situation where the virus is kept in check, without the huge surges in cases that overwhelm hospitals?

Listeners put their questions about coronavirus and the pandemic directly to Claudia and her panel of specialists which includes Professor Salim Abdool Karim - a clinical infectious disease epidemiologist and a Member of the African Task Force on Coronavirus; Dr Natalia Freund a leading immunologist at Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University; Adam Finn, professor of paediatrics at the Bristol Children's Vaccine Centre, University of Bristol, and a member of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation that advises UK health departments on immunisation, and Dr Muge Cevik, who’s a medical doctor and clinical lecturer in infectious diseases and medical virology at the University of St Andrew’s in Scotland.

Producer: Adrian Washbourne
Editor: Deborah Cohen
Technical supervision: Steve Greenwood

Picture: Sinopharm vaccine at a vaccination center in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Credit: Tharaka Basnayaka/NurPhoto/Getty Images


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6wlnj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjbz6ms)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktkyxx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6wqdn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tk40blj9d)
Sportsworld

Live action from the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.

(Photo by Yuri Smityuk\TASS via Getty Images)


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6wv4s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjbzg41)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktl6f5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6wywx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8gcy6j)
Afghanistan: 10 civilians die in US strike

More details are emerging about civilian casualties of a US drone strike on Sunday that Washington said had targeted suspected Islamic State suicide bombers. Reports suggest that ten civilians were killed, all members of the same family. The United States says it's investigating the reports.

After Hurricane Ida hit New Orleans and leaves a million people without power, we will get the latest from Louisiana.

And Denmark's climate minister tells us why he is trying to persuade other nations to stop producing oil and gas.

(Photo: The aftermath of the drone strike in the Afghan capital, Kabul)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6x2n1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n65)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktlfxf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y483bl5g9rw)
China to limit children’s online gaming time

The Chinese authorities will limit children’s access to online video games to just three hours a week on Fridays, weekends, and holidays. The BBC’s Stephen McDonell in Beijing and Professor Cheng Chen at SUNY-Albany in New York State discuss the reaction from parents as well as the demographic crisis that has China’s leaders worrying more about the country’s youth. Also in the programme, Vietnam’s coffee exports are under threat due to a coronavirus lockdown. Kona Haque, commodities analyst at ED&F Man, explains what this means for the world’s coffee supply and prices. And we take a look back at the life of Jamaican reggae star Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry who has died at the age of 85. Biographer David Katz explains why he has had such an enormous influence on the music industry. (Photo: Boy playing video games, Credit: Os Tartarouchos/Getty)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6x6d5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxp45bc6bm)
Afghanistan drone strike

Details continue to emerge after a US drone strike in the Afghan capital, Kabul. Targeting a suicide bomber, the US strike ended up killing 10 members of one family, including six children, surviving relatives have told the BBC. We get the latest from our colleagues at BBC Afghan.

We'll have an update from Louisiana where more than a million homes are without power as Hurricane Ida churns slowly inland towards Mississippi.

And our BBC Hindi reporter in Tokyo will be telling us about Avani Lekhara, the first Indian woman ever to win a gold medal at the Paralympics games. She made history in the women's ten-meter air rifle event.

(Photo: Afghan men take pictures of a vehicle from which rockets were fired, as Taliban forces stand guard, in Kabul, Afghanistan August 30, 2021. Credit: REUTERS)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6xb49)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxp45bcb2r)
Kabul drone strike

We continue to hear the latest developments after Sunday's US drone strike in the Afghan capital, Kabul. Targeting a suicide bomber, the US strike ended up killing 10 members of one family, including six children, surviving relatives have told the BBC. We get the latest from our colleagues at BBC Afghan.

We'll go to Shenzen in China to hear about new regulations being brought in to restrict the hours of gaming done by under 18s.

And we'll have an update from Louisiana where more than a million homes are without power as Hurricane Ida churns slowly inland towards Mississippi.

(Photo: A view of the damaged caused at the scene of a rocket attack near the Hamid Karzai International airport, in Kabul, Afghanistan, 29 August 2021. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6xfwf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jth)
The many lives of chef Erin French

A decade ago Erin French's life was in tatters. She was in rehab having lost her restaurant, her home and even custody of her son. Today, she runs one of the hardest to book restaurants in the US. She opens up to Emily Webb about her remarkable turnaround.

Erin has written a book about her journey, it's called Finding Freedom in The Lost Kitchen.

If you have been affected by the issues raised in this programme and would like to access help, support is available internationally at https://www.befrienders.org and in the UK at bbc.co.uk/actionline.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Erin French
Credit: Stacey Cramp


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x18)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6xkmk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc05lt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktlxwy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nh3f60ffx)
2021/08/30 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6xpcp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktm1n2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2h27)
Tamsin Edwards on the uncertainty in climate science

Certainty is comforting. Certainty is quick. But science is uncertain. And this is particularly true for people who are trying to understand climate change.

Climate scientist, Tamsin Edwards tackles this uncertainty head on. She quantifies the uncertainty inherent in all climate change predictions to try and understand which of many possible storylines about the future of our planet are most likely to come true. How likely is it that the ice cliffs in Antarctica will collapse into the sea causing a terrifying amount of sea level rise? Even the best supercomputers in the world aren’t fast enough to do all the calculations we need to understand what might be going on, so Tamsin uses statistical tools to fill in the gaps.

She joined the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2018 and is currently working on the 6th Assessment Report which will inform the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP26. She tells Jim Al-Khalili about her life and work and why she wishes more people would have the humility (and confidence) to consider the possibility that they might be wrong.


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6xt3t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8gdsff)
Kabul drone strike: 'Why did they kill our family?'

The Pentagon says it is investigating claims that Afghan civilians were killed by a drone strike carried out by the US in response to the threat of another terrorist attack at Kabul airport. We hear from a man who says ten of his family members died.

Also today, rescue workers in the US state of Louisiana -- where Hurricane Ida came ashore on Sunday -- are using hundreds of boats and aircraft to find people trapped by floods; and Madagascar is facing what could be the first famine caused by climate change.

(Photo: The aftermath of the drone strike in the Afghan capital, Kabul. Credit: EPA/stringer)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6xxvy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n65)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktm94b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6y1m2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywt7srbc51)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slb26gdsp)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktmdwg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48xs9s5l56)
China to limit children’s online gaming time

The Chinese authorities will limit children’s access to online video games to just three hours a week on Fridays, weekends, and holidays. The BBC’s Stephen McDonell in Beijing and Professor Cheng Chen at SUNY-Albany in New York State discuss the reaction from parents as well as the demographic crisis that has China’s leaders worrying more about the country’s youth. Also in the programme, Vietnam’s coffee exports are under threat due to a coronavirus lockdown. Kona Haque, commodities analyst at ED&F Man, explains what this means for the world’s coffee supply and prices. And we take a look back at the life of Jamaican reggae star Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry who has died at the age of 85. Biographer David Katz explains why he has had such an enormous influence on the music industry. (Photo: Boy playing video games, Credit: Os Tartarouchos/Getty)



TUESDAY 31 AUGUST 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6y93b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqhxl3vnf1)
US military completes withdrawal from Afghanistan

The US military completed its withdrawal from Afghanistan after two decades of war, leaving the Taliban in charge. We hear from BBC Chief International correspondent Lyse Doucet, who watched the last US military planes leave Kabul's airport. We also hear from Jonathan Schroden, Director of the CNA's Countering Threats and Challenges Program, about what this means for the US and its legacy. And the last country in the world to use leaded petrol has stopped selling the highly toxic fuel, putting an end to its use in cars. We speak to Rob De Jong, the head of the Sustainable Mobility Group at the United Nations, who led the efforts against the fuel. We will discuss this and more with our guests; Simon Littlewood, president of ACG Global in Singapore, business editor Hayley Woodin and the economist Peter Morici from the US.

(Photo: US planes in Kabul, Credit: Getty)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6ydvg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc10tq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktms3v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz1)
3. Lost

The cheating is now out in the open and the players - including genuinely-disabled captain Ray - have to hand back their gold medals. But how and when did the cheating start? An ex-coach of the team, who was in charge until just two years before the scandal, says he began to suspect something was wrong way before Sydney 2000.

Plus Dan tries to find an answer to one of the biggest questions of all - why did the cheats do it?

Presenter: Dan Pepper
Series producer: Simon Maybin

(Photo credit: EPA)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6yjll)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jth)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x18)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6ynbq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc189z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktn0m3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdf)
Start your engines: Williams Racing with Jodie Kidd

With new leadership in full swing at Williams Racing, model and racing driver Jodie Kidd gets exclusive access to explore the factory of the once-great British F1 team.

Nestled in the Oxfordshire countryside, the Williams Racing factory is a hub of activity as engineers and mechanics work around the clock to produce the best car they can. In this programme, we’ll follow the various changes to the barge board, an integral part of an F1 car, through the first half of the 2021 season.

Operations director James Colgate gives us a guided tour of the factory floor, while Dave Robson, head of vehicle performance, talks us through the intricacies of the racing car.

Jodie also meets Williams driver George Russell, who will take us into the simulator and explain how the smallest of changes can make or break a race.

Williams Racing was founded in 1977 by Frank Williams who, until last year, still ran the team, with the help of his daughter, Claire Williams. Through the 1980s and 1990s, Williams was a tour de force, with the best cars and best drivers in Formula 1 and an enviable winning streak. In recent times, though, Williams have found themselves at the bottom of the grid and the league tables on an almost weekly basis.

We’ll learn about the intricacies of the car and get a sense of the teamwork involved in building and maintaining one of the world's fastest cars.


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6ys2v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92ncv3l)
US completes withdrawal from Afghanistan

Thousands who wanted to leave have been left behind - those at risk fear the worse with reports of manhunts and executions.

We hear more about the huge rescue operation in Louisiana to find people trapped by floods in the wake of the hurricane Ida.

And why is child marriage such a huge subject of controversy in Zimbabwe right now?


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6ywtz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92ncyvq)
US forces leave Afghanistan after 20 years -- what happens next?

We hear from someone still trying to get 600 students out of the country.

Hurricane Ida has been described as the 'poster child' for a climate change driven disaster. So how can we stop similar events from happening in future?

And the latest on day 7 of the Paralympics - including a chat with a South African gold medallist at the the games.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6z0l3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92nd2lv)
Afghanistan: US announces its mission is over

We go live to Kabul to find out what the mood is like, with thousands still wanting to leave.

As the football transfer window comes to a close, we hear all the latest rumour and gossip.

And Elizabeth Holmes - who became one of the world's youngest self-made female billionaires - goes on trial today. Her start-up Theranos promised it could detect conditions such as cancer and diabetes with a few drops of blood.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6z4b7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl9)
Ways to save the planet: Fridge detectives

Two sources of greenhouse gas could be lurking in your kitchen: rice and fridges. We meet a biologist breeding climate-friendly rice, and a team of detectives whose job is to stop fearsomely potent fridge gases escaping into the atmosphere.

Produced and presented by Jo Mathys and Tom Heap.


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktnhlm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jg6)
Child marriage is getting worse in India

Closed schools and economic hardship due to Coronavirus are seeing more young girls married off. We’ll hear from a young girl who managed to resist her family’s attempts to marry her to an older man. But many other young girls are not so lucky. Anindit Roy Chowdhury of Save The Children India estimates tens of thousands of such marriages may have already taken place during the pandemic, often with illegal dowries being exchanged for the young girls. Dr. Kriti Bharti, a leading activist for children’s rights, the peculiar economics of Indian marriages, along with some surprise consequences of the pandemic, gives parents a strong incentive to marry their girls off young, even in secret. And economist Dr. Monika Chaudhary reflects how this crisis highlights the longer-running tragedy of how the economic system India denies girls the chance of proper schooling.

(Image credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5s)
The first modern electric car

This electric car revolution is finally on the horizon: many car manufacturers have promised to make only electric vehicles in the near future, in response to the climate emergency. But the first mass-produced modern electric car, the General Motors EV1, was launched back in 1996. Within a few short years it was scrapped: almost every vehicle was recalled and crushed, and the car of the future disappeared in history’s rear-view mirror. Viv Jones hears the story from one of the car’s creators, research engineer Wally Rippel.

Photo: The GM EV1 (Kim Kulish/Sygma via Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6z82c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktnmbr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2h27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6zcth)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6zhkm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc23jw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktnvv0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6zm9r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tk40bpf6h)
Sportsworld

Live action from the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.

(Photo by Yuri Smityuk\TASS via Getty Images)


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6zr1w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc2c14)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktp3b8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2h27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6zvt0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8ggv3m)
Afghans face uncertainty as Taliban celebrate victory

Taliban fighters have declared victory at Kabul airport after the final withdrawal of US troops. We speak to an Afghan man who tells us how daily life is in Kabul now, and to Fawzia Koofi, the first woman to be appointed vice president of the Afghan Parliament, who has recently left the country.

Also in the programme: We ask former US and NATO personnel about the mission in Afghanistan; and as China imposes restrictions on online video gaming, we ask what Beijing hopes to achieve.

(Photo:Taliban forces stand guard a day after the U.S. troops withdrawal from Hamid Karzai international airport in Kabul, Afghanistan August 31. Credit: Reuters.)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v6zzk4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktpbtj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bknrzm3yv)
Economic challenges facing Afghanistan after US withdrawal

To get an overview of the economic challenge now facing the one of the world's poorest countries and how the Taliban are going to tackle it, we speak to Vanda Felbab Brown, an expert on Afghanistan from the Brookings Institute. The BBC's Rahul Tandon explores an increase in underaged girls in India being married off, which is linked to the pandemic and school closures. And Kanye West's new album finally came out on Sunday after a number of delays - but the artist isn't happy about it. The BBC's Steve Holden tells us why. (Image: Women shop in Kabul market, Credit: Hoshang Hashimi/Getty)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v70398)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxp45bg37q)
Welcoming Afghanistan's refugees

We're live at a community centre with some of London's Afghans to reflect on the end of the US presence in Afghanistan. The final American troops left overnight, with celebratory gunfire from Taliban forces in Kabul shortly afterwards.

We'll find out how Afghans are supporting the many new arrivals who managed to get out of the country in the past couple of weeks. The group hosting us, the Afghanistan and Central Asian Association, was started by a man who himself left Afghanistan when the Taliban were last in power in the 1990s.

We'll also hear from two sisters who remain in Kabul, despite wanting to get out for their own safety.

(Photo: A refugee from Afghanistan who arrived on a evacuation flight at London's Heathrow Airport. Credit: Dominic Lipinski/Pool via REUTERS)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7071d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxp45bg6zv)
Welcoming Afghanistan's refugees

We're live at a community centre with some of London's Afghans to reflect on the end of the US presence in Afghanistan. The final American troops left overnight, with celebratory gunfire from Taliban forces in Kabul shortly afterwards.

We'll find out how Afghans are supporting the many new arrivals who managed to get out of the country in the past couple of weeks. The group hosting us, the Afghanistan and Central Asian Association, was started by a man who himself left Afghanistan when the Taliban were last in power in the 1990s.

We'll also hear from two sisters who remain in Kabul, despite wanting to get out for their own safety. And we'll speak to people who served with international forces in Afghanistan to find out how they feel now about the mission of the past two decades.

(Photo: A refugee from Afghanistan who arrived on a evacuation flight at London's Heathrow Airport Credit: Dominic Lipinski/Pool via REUTERS)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v70bsj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwr)
Trapped in a 'metal coffin' on the ocean floor

In 1988, after colliding with a fishing trawler at the surface, the Peruvian submarine Pacocha began to sink. Some of the sailors started to abandon ship and First Lieutenant Roger Cotrina Alvarado had to make a choice - jump overboard and live, or go back inside the submarine for the rest of the crew. The sinking submarine dragged him and 21 others down 42 metres to the ocean floor. With oxygen running out, it would become Roger's job to find a way to escape. This story originally aired in two parts on 10 and 17 July 2021.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Clayton Conn
Producers: Clayton Conn and Mariana Des Forges
Interpreter: Martin Esposito

(Image: Collage of photographs of the Pacocha, crew, the submarine and Roger Cotrina Alvarado. Credit: All courtesy of Roger Cotrina Alvarado)


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v70gjn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc32hx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktptt1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nh3f63bc0)
2021/08/31 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v70l8s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktpyk5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsh)
Digital us

This week’s Digital Planet is something of a celebration, it's 20 years since the BBC World Service launched the programme. Originally entitled ‘Go Digital’, the programme has always been innovative. It was the first radio programme to generate digital video, and also launched podcasting. We look back over two decades at how technological innovation has changed global society. The programme began in an era where smartphones didn’t exist and the social media we know today had yet to be invented.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Tracey Logan, Alfred Hermida, Ghislaine Boddington, and the programme’s longest-serving contributor Bill Thompson.

Producer: Julian Siddle

(Image: Bill and Gareth meet bloggers in Delhi. Credit: Julian Siddle/BBC)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v70q0x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8ghpbj)
Biden defends troop pull-out from Afghanistan

US President Joe Biden has defended the US troop pull-out, addressing the nation as the Taliban declare victory in Afghanistan.

Also in the programme: Former Liberian President and Nobel Peace Prize winner Ellen Johnson Sirleaf on vaccine poverty.

And our correspondent Sarah Rainsford sends her final report from Russia, expelled after being designated a threat to national security.

(Photo: US President Biden speaks about Afghanistan at the White House in Washington. Credit: Reuters/Carlos Barria)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v70ts1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktq61f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v70yj5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywt7srf824)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slb26k9ps)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktq9sk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48xs9s8h29)
Economic challenges facing Afghanistan after US withdrawal

President Joe Biden has defended his decision to withdraw US troops from Afghanistan - a move which led to Taliban militants returning to power. We'll hear from Vanda Felbab Brown, an expert on Afghanistan from the Brookings Institute, on the economic challenges lying ahead for the country, now that the US are fully gone. Also in the programme, Dan Cooper of tech site Engadget explains the significance of a new South Korean law requiring app stores such as those of Google and Apple to allow alternative payment methods. We get a look on the day's trading in New York from Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading. And the BBC's Rahul Tandon explores an increase in underaged girls in India being married off, which is linked to the pandemic and school closures. (Image: Women shop in Kabul market, Credit: Hoshang Hashimi/Getty)



WEDNESDAY 01 SEPTEMBER 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7160f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqhxl3ykb4)
Joe Biden defends US pull-out as Taliban claim victory

President Joe Biden has defended his decision to withdraw US troops from Afghanistan - a move which led to Taliban militants returning to power. Also in the programme, Dan Cooper of tech site Engadget explains the significance of a new South Korean law requiring app stores such as those of Google and Apple to allow alternative payment methods. US climate envoy John Kerry flies to China for high-level talks ahead of COP26.The BBC's Rahul Tandon explores an increase in underaged girls in India being married off, which is linked to the pandemic and school closures. And Variety entertainment reporter Gene Maudaus explains why Tom Cruise and his Mission Impossible producers, are taking on the insurance industry.

All through the show we'll be joined by Samson Ellis, Bloomberg's Taipei bureau chief, and Ann Dwyer, editor of Crain’s Chicago Business.


(Image: Women shop in Kabul market, Credit: Hoshang Hashimi/Getty)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v719rk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc3xqt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktqp0y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2hgz)
Libya's Revolution

Libya's Revolution: A dream of freedom

In February 2011, the arrest of a human rights lawyer in Libya sparked an uprising against the 42-year dictatorship of Col Muammar Gaddafi. The Revolution spread - supported by foreign airstrikes - and within eight months Gaddafi was killed, his regime overthrown. It was one of the climactic moments of the 'Arab Uprisings’. But what happened afterwards to Libya's Revolution? Ten years on, it is still unfinished. It has brought thousands of deaths, civil war, a strategically vital and oil-rich country still effectively divided in two. BBC reporter Tim Whewell, who covered the 2011 uprising, returns to Libya to find out what went wrong.

Tim meets the lawyer Fathi Terbil - the "spark of the revolution", and Iman Bugaighis, spokesperson of the rebel government. Former British foreign secretary William Hague discusses the calculations that led to foreign intervention. Does he still believe the West was right to get involved?

(Photo: Libyan rebels and Benghazi residents celebrate the passing of a UN resolution on 18 March, 2011 in Bengazi, Libya.Credit: Benjamin Lowy/Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v71fhp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v71k7t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc4572)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktqxj6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jn7)
1. The envoy

Talking to the Taliban – the US diplomat who negotiated the American pull-out. Zalmay Khalilzad has been the Afghanistan point man for three American presidents. Born in Afghanistan, for the last 20 years he’s played a pivotal role in US policy toward the country of his birth. He tells Lyse Doucet that it is now time for Afghans to shape their own future.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v71nzy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92ngr0p)
Biden defends Afghan exit

Joe Biden defends the airlift from Kabul as an "extraordinary success" and said it should have been done earlier. Is he right that America is safer now it was than 20 years ago?

We find out about one of the only ways out of Afghanistan, the border with Pakistan, with our correspondent who's been there.

And how will German people remember Angela Merkel who will soon bid farewell to politics after 16 years as Chancellor.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v71sr2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92ngvrt)
Biden defends US pull-out from Afghanistan

US President Joe Biden robustly defends his decision to pull out US troops abruptly from Afghanistan, praising the evacuation.

We go to Italy where protests against vaccine passports will start in a few hours time.

And what can be done to save the North Atlantic Right Whale? New fishing regulations have been put in place in the US, but do they go far enough ?


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v71xh6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92ngzhy)
Joe Biden defends his decision on Afghanistan

Faced with a barrage of criticism, Joe Biden defends the airlift from Kabul as an "extraordinary success" and said it should have been done earlier.

We head to Italy where protests against vaccine passports will start in a few hours time.

And we have the final thoughts of our Moscow correspondent as she is expelled from the country on national security grounds.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7217b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbp)
Omar Zakhilwal: What ideology will prevail in Afghanistan?

Will pragmatism or zealotry prevail in Afghanistan, as the Taliban grapple with the reality of ruling a broken country? Stephen Sackur speaks to former finance minister Omar Zakhilwal, who has been involved in talks with the Taliban.


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktrdhq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnz)
Life after Messi: FC Barcelona's financial mess

How did one of the world's biggest sporting brands end up in such a financial mess? FC Barcelona's collapse, from European Champions League winning juggernaut, to unable to register its players under salary cap rules took less than a decade. So how did it take so little time for one of football's giants to fall so hard? We explore that with club members and supporters, as well as the Financial Times journalist Simon Kuper, the author of a new book about Barcelona; Barca, the Inside story of the world's greatest football club.


Picture credit: Getty Images


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x81)
Surviving the fall of Saigon

When South Vietnam fell in 1975, most could not escape. In the last days, the US airlifted its remaining personnel and some high ranking Vietnamese officials - but millions were left behind to await their fate. This is the account of one South Vietnamese veteran who remained in Saigon as North Vietnamese forces took the city. Dr Tran Xuan Dung served as a doctor in the South Vietnamese Marines. He would spend three years imprisoned in a "re-education" camp before fleeing with his family in 1978.

Photo: A South Vietnamese soldier helps his wounded friend during fighting with communist forces in Saigon, 28th April 1975 (Bettmann/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v724zg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2hgz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktrj7v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v728ql)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2hcw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v72dgq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc50fz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktrrr3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jn7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v72j6v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tk40bsb3l)
Sportsworld

Live action from the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.

(Photo by FRANCK FIFE / AFP) (Photo by FRANCK FIFE/AFP via Getty Images)


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v72myz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc57y7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkts07c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v72rq3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8gkr0q)
Afghanistan: Biden declares end of US wars to remake countries

President Biden has defended his decision to withdraw US troops from Afghanistan, saying he was ending the era of major military operations to remake other countries. We’ll look at what this means in practice.

Also on the programme: We will look at the international aid agencies having to work alongside the Taliban in order to operate; and the threat facing the world’s trees.

(Picture: US President Joe Biden delivers remarks on the end of the war in Afghanistan, Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v72wg7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkts7qm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cstvwqzhw)
Weather-related disasters more frequent and costlier than 50 years ago

Scientists at the UN's World Meteorological Organization say the number of weather-related disasters around the globe has increased five-fold over the past 50 years. James Douris from the WMO's Disaster Risk Reduction team explains why, despite this, far fewer people are dying due to these events, thanks to improved early warning systems. The newly elected president of Zambia, Hakainde Hichilema, says that his government will prioritise fixing the country's defaulted debt with the IMF as part of his government plan. And at the end of football’s summer transfer window in Europe, it’s been revealed that clubs in the English Premier League spent over $1.5billion. (Image: Hurricane Irma hits Miami in 2017, Credit: Warren Faidley/Getty)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7306c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxp45bk04t)
Afghanistan: Taliban prepare to announce a government

A day after the final withdrawal of international troops from Afghanistan, the Taliban have said that they are preparing to announce a government. The deputy head of the Taliban’s political office told the BBC that a Taliban government could be announced in the next two days and would be inclusive - with a role for women at lower levels but not in high positions. We'll get the latest and speak to Afghans who have left the country to hear whether they will return.

Also, in the past few weeks the city of Marseille in France has seen a number of murders related to turf wars over drugs, with the youngest victim being just 14. Violence and gangs have long been an issue in the city, and now President Emmanuel Macron is in Marseille to announce plans tackling the problems. We'll hear the thoughts of people who live there.

And, every day we are joined by a health expert to answer listener questions about Covid-19. Today our guest is Dr Maria Sundaram - infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto.

(Photo: Taliban forces rally to celebrate the withdrawal of US forces in Kandahar, Afghanistan, 01 September 2021. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v733yh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxp45bk3wy)
Texas passes law banning abortion after six weeks

A law banning abortion from as early as six weeks into pregnancy has come into effect in the US state of Texas. It bans abortions after the detection of what anti-abortion campaigners call a foetal heartbeat, something medical authorities say is misleading. We'll hear about the debate around the new law, and what it means for women in Texas.

Also, a day after the final withdrawal of international troops from Afghanistan, the Taliban have said that they are preparing to announce a government. The deputy head of the Taliban’s political office told the BBC that a Taliban government could be announced in the next two days and would be inclusive - with a role for women at lower levels but not in high positions. We'll get the latest and speak to Afghans who have left the country to hear whether they will return.

And, every day we are joined by a health expert to answer listener questions about Covid-19. Today our guest is Dr Maria Sundaram - infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto.

(Photo: A protest outside the Texas state capitol on May 29, 2021 in Austin, Texas. Credit: Sergio Flores/Getty Images)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v737pm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz0)
From Gaza to Nasa: A space odyssey

Engineer Loay Elbasyouni was part of the team that created an innovative type of helicopter that flew over the surface of Mars in April 2021. The helicopter, named Ingenuity, performed the first ever controlled flight by an aircraft on another planet. But Loay grew up a long way from NASA and the US. He is from the Gaza Strip, part of the Palestinian Territories, and lived through the first Intifada as a child. He tells Emily Webb about the many obstacles he had to overcome to be part of that historic moment in space exploration.

Tessa Fontaine had always been a little overawed by her adventurous mother, Teresa. Growing up in North California Tessa was a shy child, and she and Teresa struggled to understand each other. But when Teresa had a major stroke that left her in a coma in hospital, Tessa discovered a taste for adventure she never knew she had.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Picture: Loay Elbasyouni with a test model of the Mars Ingenuity helicopter. Credit: Erric Wright)


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x81)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v73cfr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc5zf0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktsqq4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nh3f66783)
2021/09/01 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v73h5w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2hgz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktsvg8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvq)
The Kindness Test

When was the last time you did something really kind for someone or someone else did something really kind for you?

Claudia Hammond and guests are looking at the place of kindness in today’s world, asking what it really means, what happens in our brains when we act kindly and whether there can ever be a role for it in the cut-throat worlds of business and politics. She hears what kindness means to people in Kenya, Chile and in the UK. And with many aspects of kindness remaining under-researched, with your help Claudia and Robin Banerjee, Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Sussex, are asking you to fill in the gaps by taking part in the Kindness Test.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v73ly0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8gll7m)
Taliban say government formation is in final stages

The Taliban say they will announce a new government for Afghanistan in the next few days. A senior Taliban official, Shir Mohammad Abas Stanakzai, told the BBC the administration would be inclusive but there would not be top positions for women.

Also in the programme: The double challenge of Hurricane Ida and rising Covid cases facing hospitals in the US state of Louisiana; and after 16 years in power, what does Angela Merkel mean to Germans?

(Image: Taliban forces rally to celebrate the withdrawal of US forces in Kandahar. Credit: Epa/Stringer)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v73qp4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktt2yj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 A Wish for Afghanistan (w3ct2jn7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v73vf8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywt7srj4z7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slb26n6lw)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktt6pn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48xs9scczd)
Weather-related disasters more frequent and costlier than 50 years ago

Scientists at the UN's World Meteorological Organization say the number of weather-related disasters around the globe has increased five-fold over the past 50 years. We hear from the WMO's secretary-general, Professor Petteri Taalas. The newly elected president of Zambia, Hakainde Hichilema, says that he will prioritise fixing the country's defaulted debt with the IMF as part of his government plan. And at the end of football’s summer transfer window in Europe, it’s been revealed that clubs in the English Premier League spent over $1.5billion. (Image: Hurricane Irma hits Miami in 2017, Credit: Warren Faidley/Getty)



THURSDAY 02 SEPTEMBER 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v742xj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqhxl41g77)
Purdue Pharma Is Dissolved

A judge in America has approved a bankruptcy plan that effectively dissolves Purdue Pharma, maker of the highly addictive painkiller, OxyContin. The company owners, the wealthy Sackler family, will have to turn over billions of dollars to help combat the deadly opioid epidemic. But the agreement will absolve the Sacklers of any liability or future lawsuits, allowing them to remain one of the richest families in America. We hear from Patrick Radden Keefe who writes for the New Yorker and has published a book this year on the Sackler family. Scientists at the UN's World Meteorological Organization say the number of weather-related disasters around the globe has increased five-fold over the past 50 years. We hear from the WMO's secretary-general, Professor Petteri Taalas. And we're joined throughout the programme by Sushma Ramachandran a columnist with the tribune who is based in Delhi and Dante Disparte from the Risk Co-operative who is based in Washington DC (Image: prescription bottle via Getty Images).


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v746nn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc6tmx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkttky1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxs)
Moria: After the fire

The fire that destroyed the sprawling Moria asylum seekers’ camp on the Greek island of Lesvos last September made headlines around the world. For the asylum seekers who lost their makeshift home and most of their possessions, it was a devastating setback. For Greece, still hosting thousands of migrants Europe won’t take in, the fire intensified a determination to move them on elsewhere. What has happened to some of Moria’s former residents since then? Working with Athens-based journalists Katy Fallon and Stavros Malichudis, Maria Margaronis follows a few of them - all Afghans - as they negotiate the search for safety and stability some migrants call “the game.” After the fall of Kabul to the Taliban, tens of thousands of Afghans are trying to leave their country. These are the stories of some who had already made the journey.

Presenter/producer: Maria Margaronis
Special thanks to Lighthouse Reports for their support in gathering this material

(Photo: Refugee girl playing in the ashes of the ruined Moria camp. Credit: Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto/Getty Images)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v74bds)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jz0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x81)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v74g4x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc7245)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktttf9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfq)
Raymond Blanc: My life in five dishes

The celebrated French chef Raymond Blanc tells Emily Thomas about his life through five dishes.

From a childhood roaming magical forests in Eastern France, to the rather less enticing restaurant scene of 1970s England, Raymond describes how with little grasp of the language and no formal training, he quickly became one of the UK’s best known chefs. His restaurant, Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons, has been thriving for almost 40 years and during that time he has added a string of cookbooks, TV shows and brasseries to his name. Raymond explains how he balances being a gastronome and perfectionist with running a large business.

But we also hear another side to the exuberant chef. The past year has been perhaps one the most difficult of Raymond’s life - closing his restaurants, the isolation of lockdown, the death of his mother and being hospitalised with coronavirus for a month. He tells us why he thinks it will make him a better man.


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v74kx1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92nkmxs)
New Texas law restricts access to abortion

Texas has introduced the strictest anti-abortion laws in the US, but President Biden calls them unconstitutional.

The new Zambian president tells us about his plans for the country and how he is going to revive its flagging economy.

And we look at the impeachment of Denmark’s former immigration minister accused of unlawfully ordering the separation of asylum-seeking couples.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v74pn5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92nkrnx)
Texas passes law banning abortion after six weeks

The US Supreme Court has voted not to block a new law in Texas severely restricting access to abortion, which President Biden has described as unconstitutional.

A top US general describes the Taliban as a 'ruthless group', but says it's possible the US would co-ordinate with them in future operations against terrorism.

And President Biden has reassured his Ukrainian counterpart of his ironclad commitment to resist Russian aggression - so what's the reaction been back in Ukraine?


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v74td9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92nkwf1)
Texas limits access to abortion

The US Supreme Court has voted not to block a new law in Texas severely restricting access to abortion, which President Biden has described as unconstitutional.

We head to Afghanistan to hear from a woman who could have left the country but decided to stay.

Also how would you like living in a city where there are no cars ? That's going to be a reality in a part of Vienna.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v74y4f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2f)
Which President is most responsible for the failure in Afghanistan?

As US-led troops withdraw after 20 years, the Taliban have made a swift return to power.

Four Presidents have overseen the war in Afghanistan - with four different approaches.

Charmaine Cozier asks which of them is most responsible for how events have unfolded and ultimately setting the path to failure.

Produced by Ben Cooper
Researched by Sally Abrahams

(Image: A US marine walks past an American flag attached to concertina wire at Camp Rhino in Southern Afghanistan. Credit: Rick Loomis/Los Angeles Times/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktv9dt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9p)
OnlyFans flip flops on porn

Why did one of the world's best-known porn provider platforms, OnlyFans, decide to ban porn? The controversial site has become a global phenomenon over the last five years, but its decision to outlaw adult content got everyone talking. It appeared to bow to pressure from financial services companies and anti-porn groups. Then it changed its mind. We look at the pressures the company is under and also at the business logic of internet porn. We speak to content creators Jessica Starling and Alana Evans, President of APAG; Mike Stabile, Director of Public Affairs at the Free Speech Coalition and Alexander Konrad from Forbes. BBC reporter Noel Titherage talks us through his investigation of the site.
(Image: OnlyFans logo; Image credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3j)
The businessman who defied the Mafia

Palermo businessman Libero Grassi published an open letter in Sicily’s main newspaper denouncing the Mafia for constantly demanding extortion payments. Grassi was hailed as a hero, but his public refusal to pay was intolerable to the Mafia and a few months later, in the summer of 1991, he was executed in person by one of Cosa Nostra’s top bosses. Libero Grassi’s defiance is credited with inspiring a new grass-roots movement among businesses in Sicily that stands up to the Mafia. Simon Watts spoke to his daughter, Alice Grassi.

This programme is a rebroadcast


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v751wk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktvf4y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v755mp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlm)
Luigi Pirandello: Italian dramatist who brought chaos to the stage

It’s a hundred years since the infamous premiere of Luigi Pirandello’s experimental play Six Characters in Search of an Author, when an enraged Rome theatre audience yelled abuse at the Italian playwright and chased him out of the theatre. Since then, the play has gained iconic status as a piece of theatre which helped move Western culture into modernity. But what of the author of this play? He was a complex figure who found inspiration from his wife’s madness as well as the actors he worked with, and he formed an unlikely association with the Italian Fascist Prime Minister Benito Mussolini which still intrigues theatre critics and academics to this day.

Joining Rajan Datar to discuss Luigi Pirandello and his work are Guido Bonsaver, Professor in Italian Cultural history at the University of Oxford; Dr Enza de Francisci, lecturer in Translation studies at the University of Glasgow, who specialises in Pirandello’s Sicilian identity and his portrayal of women, and is the author of A 'New' Woman in Verga and Pirandello: From Page to Stage; and Patricia Gaborik, who teaches theatre history at the University of Calabria in Italy, and has studied Pirandello’s relationship with the Italian Fascist leader Mussolini and is the author of Mussolini’s Theatre: Fascist Experiments in Art and Politics.

The readings were by Marco Gambino.

Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service.

(Image: A scene from a production of Pirandello's play, Six Characters in Search of an Author, staged by French theatre director Emmanuel Demarcy-Mota at the Moscow Pushkin Drama Theatre. Credit: Artyom Geodakyan\TASS via Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8n)
India's first Paralympic champion

In 1972, war veteran Murlikant Petkar won India's first ever Paralympic gold medal at the Heidelberg Games. Petkar had been shot and paralysed seven years earlier in a battle during the war with Pakistan, but then took up sprint swimming. He spoke to Adrian Moorhead in 2016. The programme is a Sparklab Production for BBC World Service.

(Photo: Murlikant Petkar with his medals)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v759ct)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc7xc2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktvnn6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v75f3y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tk40bw70p)
Sportsworld

Live action from the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.

(CHRISTOPHE SIMON/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v75jw2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc84vb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktvx4g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v75nm6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8gnmxt)
Supreme Court refuses to block Texas abortion law

The US Supreme Court has refused to block a law in Texas that prohibits most abortions. By five votes to four, the justices denied an emergency request for an injunction from abortion providers. The Texas law bans abortion after six weeks of pregnancy.

Also in the programme: at least nine people have died as a result of flash floods in New York City and surrounding areas; and Sweden's Abba to release first new music in 39 years.

(Picture: pro-choice protesters perform outside the Texas State Capitol on 1st September. Credit: Sergio Flores for The Washington Post via Getty Images)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v75scb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktw4mq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49bhp2rz43)
Australian coronavirus lockdowns extended

Lockdowns in the Australian cities of Melbourne and Sydney – which were due to end - have been extended, as the country recorded its 1000th death from the pandemic. We find out how lockdown is affecting business owners in those areas and how the wider economy is faring. We also hear how the Communist Party in China is helping gig economy workers get unionised. And the concerns of saffron farmers in Afghanistan – as harvest time approaches will the current insecurity affect the export of this coveted spice?

(Photo: Man crosses bridge in Melbourne. Credit: William West/AFP/Getty Images)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v75x3g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxp45bmx1x)
Afghanistan's Panjshir Valley

We speak to people from the Panjshir Valley which is the focus of resistance against the Taliban. Several thousand fighters are thought to be holding out there against the militant group. We'll hear what the place is like, what the people are like, what they're proud of in their history and how they feel about the current situation in Afghanistan.

After the US Supreme Court refused to block the law that effectively bans abortion in Texas, we’ll hear how the ban will affect women.

And we'll be joined by Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland, who will answer audience questions about the coronavirus pandemic.

Picture: Men prepare for defence against the Taliban in Panjshir, Afghanistan, on August 22nd (Aamaj News Agency via REUTERS)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v760vl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxp45bn0t1)
Texas abortion law: Supreme Court votes not to block ban

The US Supreme Court has refused to block a new law in Texas that bans abortions for most women. The so-called Heartbeat Act bans terminations after the detection of what anti-abortion campaigners call a foetal heartbeat, which is a point when many women do not know they are pregnant. We get reaction to the law.

Also, we go to Afghanistan where the Taliban are fighting with opposition groups and Afghan army remnants in the Panjshir Valley. We speak to people who are from there to learn more about the Panjshir Valley.

And at least 14 people are dead after flash flooding and tornadoes hit the north-east US. We hear from people who have been affected in New York.

(Photo: The US supreme court in Washington DC. Credit: EPA/Michael Reynolds)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v764lq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3j)
Helping refugees saved my life

Kon Karapanagiotidis has always felt like an outsider. Growing up as the child of poor Greek migrants in rural Australia, he was bullied and subjected to racist taunts that left deep scars. But as a teenager he discovered a book by Dr Martin Luther King that changed his life. Spurred by the words he read, he decided to try and help others to heal himself. He volunteered at charities every day of the week - working at a homeless shelter one day and a suicide helpline the next. In his late twenties, he started a little food bank for asylum seekers and refugees living in Melbourne. The organisation grew in response to huge demand and eventually became a lifeline for thousands of people. The Asylum Seeker Resource Centre is now one of Australia's largest and best-known charities helping refugees and after 20 years Kon remains its outspoken leader.

Iris Apfel became a fashion icon in her mid-eighties after an exhibition of her clothing and accessories at New York's Metropolitian Museum of Art sparked a storm of interest in her unique style. She has just turned 100. Outlook's Saskia Edwards met her in 2018.

Gerardo Weiss is known as the Beatles' barber of Buenos Aires. Colm Flynn talked to - and sang with - him at his shrine to the Fab Four in 2019.

Picture: Kon Karapanagiotidis
Credit: Asylum Seeker Resource Centre


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v768bv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc8wb3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktwmm7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nh3f69456)
2021/09/02 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v76d2z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktwrcc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l44)
Hurricane season intensifies

When hurricane Ida struck the coast of Louisiana last weekend, almost to the day that Katrina did 16 years ago, comparisons between the two events were soon to follow. As the latest storm continues to wreak havoc and death further north in the US, Suzana Camargo of Columbia university talks to Roland Pease about the similarities and differences, the better forecasting available now, and the grim reality that climate change suggests for this and future hurricane seasons.

A couple of weeks ago, Science in Action looked at the carbon accounting of Blue Hydrogen (hydrogen manufactured from fossil fuels). Listener Nick Arndt got in touch to say we were wrong when we stated that hydrogen can’t be piped out of the ground from natural sources. His company, Sisprobe, plans to use its passive seismic prospecting technology to work with an international consortium that aims to unlock a new “hydrogen Rush” – commercialising what they suspect to be a near-ubiquitous source of genuinely carbon-free fuel - to supply the world economy of the near future. Viacheslav Zgonnik - CEO of start-up Natural Hydrogen Energy LLC - has been working on hydrogen for 10 years, has written a recent review of the science, and tells Roland about current and future studies into finding the best way to tap this simplest of molecules before it escapes into space.

In Chile, the recent megadrought has led to fears that hydroelectric damns may become so drained that power-outs may occur in the coming months. This will not help Chile to achieve its target of carbon-neutrality by 2050. Apt, then, that a new Concentrated Solar Power plant (CSP) is now up and running in the north of the country. Reporter Jane Chambers has been to visit Cerro Dominador – the spectacular new array of 10,600 mirrors that focus sunshine onto a molten salt target, heating it up to 560C, and generating up to 210 MW electricity.

Meanwhile archaeologists have been doing a molecular analysis of a protein found to survive in the bones of unfortunate victims of the mount Vesuvius eruption that destroyed Pompeii. Despite the searing heat that killed inhabitants of nearby Herculaneum, Oliver Criag of York University has been able to examine the different isotopes in amino acids still recoverable from their bones to help identify what sorts of things these people ate during their tragically foreshortened lifetimes. A whole lot of cereals generally, but more interestingly, the men tended to eat more fish while the women seem to have consumed more meat and dairy.


(Image credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v76hv3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8gph4q)
Afghanistan: Can the West hold the Taliban to account for the way they govern?

We examine what leverage countries such as Britain might hold over the Taliban and hear from a former Afghan interior minister.

Also on the programme, President Biden blames global warming for the deadly floods in New York State. And the Marxist rebel who became a giant of Greek music - we pay tribute to Mikis Theodorakis who has died at the age of 96.

(Picture: Taliban forces stand guard in front of Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul. Credit: Reuters)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v76ml7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktwzvm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v76rbc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywt7srm1wb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slb26r3hz)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktx3lr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48xs9sg8wh)
Australian coronavirus lockdowns extended

Lockdowns in the Australian cities of Melbourne and Sydney – which were due to end - have been extended, as the country recorded its 1000th death from the pandemic. We find out how lockdown is affecting business owners in those areas and how the wider economy is faring. We also hear how the Communist Party in China is helping gig economy workers get unionised. And the concerns of saffron farmers in Afghanistan – as harvest time approaches will the current insecurity affect the export of this coveted spice? (Image: Man crosses bridge in Melbourne, Credit: William West/AFP/Getty)



FRIDAY 03 SEPTEMBER 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v76ztm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqhxl44c4b)
Western Union to resume money transfer services to Afghanistan

The money transfer firm Western Union is resuming services in Afghanistan - a rare piece of good news as the country's economy faces collapse. We speak to former Afghan finance minister Omar Zakhilwal on the current situation there.
Ireland has imposed a record fine of $225 million on the messaging app Whatsapp for violating European data protection rules. We get more details and context from Ireland-based business journalist Iain Guider.
Lockdowns in the Australian cities of Melbourne and Sydney – which had been due to end - have now been extended, as the country recorded its 1000th death from the pandemic. We find out how lockdowns are affecting business owners in those areas, and how the wider economy is faring.

Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Alison Van Diggelen, host of the 'Fresh Dialogues' interview series, from Silicon Valley and by Jasper Kim of Ewha University in Seoul and author of the book '24 Hours with 24 Lawyers: Profiles of Traditional and Non-Traditional Careers’.

(Image: Afghans queuing outside a bank. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v773kr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc9qk0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktxgv4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tzh)
South American frustrations and J-League dreams

Peru's assistant coach Nolberto Solano assesses the latest club v country row. And we hear from the Spanish coach of Urawa Reds, Ricardo Rodriguez, about life in the J-League.

Picture on website: Brazil and Paraguay get ready for their South American qualifier (Photo by NORBERTO DUARTE/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7779w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v77c20)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjc9z18)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktxqbd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyg)
The Taliban wanted me dead

Marzia Babakarkhail knows what it's like to have the Taliban break her door down intent on killing her. In 1997 they did just that because of her work promoting education and progress for women. She was forced to flee and now lives in the UK. That work continues and has never been more important.

As the last of the US military presence leaves Afghanistan Marzia tells her story to Matt O’Donoghue, how she rose to become a judge at 26 and was forced to flee and live under threat of death.

But she says her faith never faltered and she carries its strength in the UK where her humanitarian work continues in Manchester. Her fear now is that the progress she has fought for will be ripped away as the Taliban violently grab more and more control of her troubled homeland.


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v77gt4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92nnjtw)
Storm Ida: dozens killed in US north-east

An historic amount of rainfall over two hours causes flash floods in New York

In Kabul, an e-commerce business set up to sell Afghan jewellery and ceramics abroad turns its focus to humanitarian work

And Japan's prime minister will reportedly not seek re-election - meaning he would leave power after only a year in office.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v77lk8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92nnnl0)
"Sheets of water" engulf New York in minutes

At least 45 people have died in floods across the US north east coast caused by Storm Ida. President Biden calls for historic investment in adapting to climate change.

Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga of Japan has announced he will step down a year after he came in office.

And a restaurant chain in Russia stands up to a far right group known as 'the Male State'. Is this group widely supported?


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v77q9d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2t92nnsb4)
Afghanistan: latest on fighting in Panjshir province

Thousands of Taliban fighters launch attacks against resistance positions in the region.

In Japan, Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga is effectively stepping down after just a year in charge. It's mainly down to his handling of the pandemic.

And in New Zealand, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says the stabbing of six people in a supermarket was a 'terrorist attack'.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v77v1j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n10)
Silvia Foti: When truth trumps family loyalty

Stephen Sackur interviews Silvia Foti, an American writer whose grandfather was a Lithuanian man hailed as heroic patriot who paid with his life resisting the Soviets. But according to his granddaughter, Jonas Noreika was no hero - he had the blood of thousands of Jews on his hands. She’s chosen to speak out, angering many in Lithuania. What happens when truth trumps family loyalty?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkty69x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0n)
Should you trust reviews?

When are reviews real and when are they fake? We'll be asking a range of guests whether it's ok to be paid to do a review and how online sites can detect fraudulent write ups. We’ll also hear why negative feedback can be good for a business in the long run. Elizabeth Hotson speaks to James Kay, head of corporate communications at Tripadvisor, Carolyn Jameson, chief trust officer at Trustpilot and Michael Hanney, founder of Review Solicitors. We also hear from restaurant pr Hugh Richard Wright and Alison Edgar, author of 'The art of getting what you want.' Plus, Cynthia Giles from Cut Throat Marketing explains why negative reviews aren't necessarily bad for business.

Presenter: Elizabeth Hotson
Producer: Sarah Treanor

(Picture: A mouth and comment symbols. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz0)
North Korea's founding father

When World War Two ended and the Korean peninsula was divided, Soviet soldiers occupied the North, and US soldiers occupied the South. So how did one man, Kim Il-sung, take control of communist North Korea and create the long-lasting dynasty that still runs the country today? Kevin Kim has been hearing from Professor Kim Hyung-suk about his meeting with Kim Il-sung, and about the mystery behind his rise to power.

Photo: North Korean illustration of Kim Il-sung surrounded by happy citizens.


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v77ysn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhd)
China's video games ban

China announces plans to restrict children to just three hours of video games a week. How will gamers cope and what does it mean for China's booming video games industry? We speak to Rui Ma, China tech watcher and host of the Tech Buzz China podcast, and to games industry analyst Lisa Cosmas Hanson from Niko Partners. Plus the battle over the video game streaming market hots up, with major streaming stars switching from Twitch to YouTube. Can YouTube ever challenge Twitch's dominance? Louise Shorthouse from Ampere Analysis explains. And the BBC's cyber security correspondent Joe Tidy tells us about the strange case of a fake Banksy NFT, and why one collector paid hundreds of thousands of dollars for it. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC technology reporter Jane Wakefield.

(Photo: A gamer yawns during an esports tournament in Shanghai, China. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktyb21)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l44)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v782js)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsw)
Methane: The other greenhouse gas

The latest UN climate report concludes that while carbon dioxide (CO2) is the main driver of global warming, another gas - methane - is likely responsible for between 30-50% of the current rise in temperatures. Methane is much more effective at trapping heat in Earth’s atmosphere than CO2 is, but it also breaks down much faster, raising hopes that quick action to curb emissions could aid efforts to keep global warming below 1.5 C. Methane is the largest component found in natural gas and is also emitted during the process of fracking and coal production. It’s produced in large quantities by farmed animals but also leaks into the atmosphere when organic matter decomposes in landfills. A report published earlier this year claimed that if existing measures and technologies were used more widely, human-caused methane emissions could be cut by as much as 180 million tonnes a year by 2030. But others argue that until CO2 emissions are dealt with, methane will remain 'a sideshow' and that attention paid to the problem must not distract from the bigger threat. So, is enough being done to prevent the leakage of methane?

Paul Henley is joined by a panel of expert guests. Producers: Paul Schuster and Zak Brophy.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7868x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjcbt85)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktykk9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v78b11)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tk40bz3xs)
Sportsworld

Live action from the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.

(Photo by PHILIP FONG/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v78fs5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjcc1rf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktyt1k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l44)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v78kj9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8grjtx)
Mullah Baradar tipped as Taliban leader

Taliban sources say co-founder Mullah Baradar will lead a new Afghan government. Meanwhile heavy fighting has been taking place in Panjshir as the Taliban seek to crush resistance.

Also in the programme: Bangladesh's foreign minister; and life as a disabled person in Japan.

(Image: A still image taken from video shows Mullah Baradar Akhund, a senior official of the Taliban, making a video statement Credit: Reuters)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v78p8f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktz1jt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46w5h8syrb)
Japanese PM announces resignation

The governing Liberal Democratic Party in Japan is heading for another internal election - following the sudden resignation of its party leader and incumbent Prime Minister, Yoshihide Suga. Mr Suga's handling of the Covid pandemic has caused his approval rating to plummet. Harding of the Financial Times in Tokyo discusses what’s next for Japan. The BBC’s Elizabeth Hotson investigates the world of online reviews, and how to tell a genuine rating from a fake. The Dutch Grand Prix returns this weekend after 36 years. The BBC’s Matthew Kenyon goes to Zandvoort to see why the F1 race is restarting after all these years. (Image: Yoshihide Suga at a press conference. Credit: Kimimasa Mayama/AFP/Getty)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v78t0k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxp45bqsz0)
Your questions to Sarah Rainsford

One of the BBC's most experienced foreign correspondents, Sarah Rainsford, who first started reporting from Russia some 20 years ago has been expelled from the country. She is considered by the authorities to be a threat to national security. Sarah has returned to the UK this week and joins the programme to answer listeners' questions and to reflect on her years in Russia.

We'll have the latest from Afghanistan where thousands of Taliban fighters are taking on resistance forces in the Panjshir Valley. We are also expecting the Taliban to announce who will be in the government. Our BBC Afghan colleague will be explaining what is known about the new leadership.

We'll discuss today's coronavirus stories with our regular expert, Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University.

(Photo: Undated photo of Sarah Rainsford, the BBC bureau journalist and correspondent in Moscow. Credit: Jonathan Ford / courtesy of Sarah Rainsford / Handout)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v78xrp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxp45bqxq4)
Taliban prepares to announce new government

We'll have the latest from Afghanistan where thousands of Taliban fighters are taking on resistance forces in the Panjshir Valley. We are also expecting the Taliban to announce who will be in the government. Our BBC Afghan colleague will be explaining what is known about the new leadership.

We speak to a woman who had an abortion in the US state of Texas just before the new law that that bans abortions for most women came into effect.

We'll discuss today's coronavirus stories with our regular expert, Dr Rick Malley, who specialises in vaccines at the Boston Children’s Hospital.

One of the BBC's most experienced foreign correspondents, Sarah Rainsford, who first started reporting from Russia some 20 years ago has been expelled from the country. She is considered by the authorities to be a threat to national security. Sarah has returned to the UK this week and has answered listeners' questions about her years in Russia.

(Photo: Afghan women"s rights defenders and civil activists protest to call on the Taliban for the preservation of their achievements and education, in front of the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan September 3, 2021. Credit: Stringer/Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v791ht)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fd)
Afghanistan: The view from nextdoor

Events in Afghanistan are being closely followed in neighbouring Uzbekistan. Rustam Qobil of BBC Uzbek tells us about the strong cultural and economic ties between the two countries, and what the main concerns are for Uzbekistan and for the Afghan Uzbek population.

Afghan Hazaras face persecution by the Taliban and have been fleeing over the Pakistani border in Balochistan. BBC Urdu's Saher Baloch went to Quetta to meet some of the refugees who've been welcomed by the local Hazara community, who also experience persecution.

Dariush Rajabian tells us how events in Afghanistan are being reported by BBC Persian, and how they reverberate in his home country, Tajikistan, where BBC Persian also has an audience.

For decades, India has hosted Afghans fleeing war or seeking education and business opportunities. BBC Hindi's Piyush Nagpal has spoken to Afghans in Delhi, some long-standing residents, and some just visiting but overtaken by events.

Russian shamans seek recognition
Shamans in Russia are demanding official recognition for their beliefs from the Russian state. Oleg Boldyrev of BBC Russian has been hearing their concerns, and he tells us about the heartlands of shamanism, in regions east of the Urals.

Our Ancestors: Hemalata Lavanam
The BBC Indian languages series Our Ancestors has been celebrating the achievements of trailblazing women from marginalised communities. BBC Telegu's Padma Meenakshi tells the story of social reformer Hemalata Lavanam from Andhra Pradesh.

Image: Afghans arrive at the Pakistan-Afghanistan border in Chaman
Credit: AFP via Getty Images


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wz0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v7957y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmpjccs76)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktzjjb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nh3f6d129)
2021/09/03 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v79902)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktzn8g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqw)
Can we save our night skies?

Our connection to the night sky spans cultures and millennia: observing the stars and planets helped our ancestors navigate the world, tell stories about the constellations, and understand our place in the universe. But these days, for the vast majority of us, seeing the stars is getting harder. 80% of people live under light polluted skies, and in many cities you’re lucky to see a handful of stars at night.

This state of affairs is bothering CrowdScience listener and keen stargazer Mo from Salt Lake City in the USA, who wonders if there’s anything we can do about light pollution. Of course, we could simply turn out all the lights, but that’s unrealistic. So what are smarter ways of lighting our communities to preserve our view of the cosmos?

Increasingly worried by the effect of artificial lighting on the ability to observe stars, astronomer Dr Jason Pun set up a series of monitoring stations to continuously measure ‘sky glow’. By comparing sky glow across the world, he wants to figure out which approaches work best.

One community taking an active approach is the South Downs National Park in South East England, one of a number of Dark Sky Reserves around the word. We visit the park and speak to the Dark Skies Officer there, to find out how people are coming together to turn down their lights and keep the night dark.

And it’s not just stargazing that’s threatened by light pollution. Artificial light at night disrupts the circadian rhythms of wildlife. We visit a project in rural Germany looking into the benefits of dark-sky-friendly lighting on insect populations there.

With contributions from Dr Jason Pun, Paulina Villalobos, Dan Oakley, Doug Jones, Dr Sibylle Schroer and Sophia Dehn.

Presented by Anand Jagatia with additional reporting by Felix Franz

Produced by Cathy Edwards


[Image credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v79dr6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58m8gsd1t)
A valley some 100 km northwest of Kabul is the last piece remaining before the Taliban can claim total control over Afghanistan. Resistance fighters have been ramping up their campaign against Taliban forces, but what chance do they really stand?

Also in the programme: how does the US plan to engage with a new Taliban government? We ask Obama White House staffer Brett Bruen. And a hedge fund in the US is slammed with a $7 billion tax settlement – possibly the largest in US history.

Image: An anti-Taliban machine-gunner in Panjshir on Thursday. Credit: AFP.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v79jhb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhktzwrq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tzh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjq1v79n7g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywt7srpysf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0slb26v0f2)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkjhkv00hv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48xs9sk5sl)
Japanese PM announces resignation

The governing Liberal Democratic Party in Japan is heading for another internal election - following the sudden resignation of its party leader and incumbent Prime Minister, Yoshihide Suga. Mr Suga's handling of the Covid pandemic has caused his approval rating to plummet. Harding of the Financial Times in Tokyo discusses what’s next for Japan. The BBC’s Elizabeth Hotson investigates the world of online reviews, and how to tell a genuine rating from a fake. The Dutch Grand Prix returns this weekend after 36 years. The BBC’s Matthew Kenyon goes to Zandvoort to see why the F1 race is restarting after all these years. (Image: Yoshihide Suga at a press conference. Credit: Kimimasa Mayama/AFP/Getty)l




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Wish for Afghanistan 04:32 WED (w3ct2jn7)

A Wish for Afghanistan 11:32 WED (w3ct2jn7)

A Wish for Afghanistan 22:32 WED (w3ct2jn7)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gxs)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxs)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gxs)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkj49j774d)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkj49j7lcs)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkj49j7ym5)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkj49j89vk)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkj49j952g)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkj49j9rt3)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkj49jb41h)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkj49jbcjr)

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BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjq1v759ct)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d64)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxp45bc6bm)

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BBC Proms on the World Service 19:06 SAT (w3ct2gdg)

BBC Proms on the World Service 12:06 SUN (w3ct2gdg)

Bad Cops 10:06 SUN (w3ct2g76)

Bad Cops 22:06 SUN (w3ct2g76)

Bad Cops 03:06 MON (w3ct2g76)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j55)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqhk9tg3fl)

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Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dh5)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqv)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pqv)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pqw)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lsh)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lsh)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lsh)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2h26)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2h27)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct2h27)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2h27)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mv8)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mv8)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n65)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n65)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3ct1n65)

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HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3ct1n10)

Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nvp)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nvq)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nvq)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvq)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2kyf)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2kyf)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2kyg)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tdf)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tdf)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1tdf)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dkf)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dkf)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2dkf)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hc9)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hc9)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2t92n8y6h)

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Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kxb)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1v)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l1v)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pl9)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pl9)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3ct1pl9)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l44)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nh3f60ffx)

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Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tddjhsykc)

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Sportsworld 12:06 MON (w172y0tk40blj9d)

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The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p8x)

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The Cultural Frontline 23:32 SAT (w3ct1pt1)

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The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2hcw)

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The Evidence 10:06 MON (w3ct2jnk)

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