Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 21 AUGUST 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lrlj1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqh61hnytr)
What now for Afghanistan's media?

In the wake of the Taliban's takeover of Afghanistan we consider the future of its media. We get the perspective of Saad Mohseni, chairman of Moby Media Group, which owns the most-watched network in Afghanistan, Tolo TV. Also in the programme, clampdowns on tech companies have investors questioning the prospects for the Chinese market, as around $560bn is wiped in one week. Chris Low of FHN Financial breaks it down for us. Sophie Haigney reports on the black market of pre-publication copies of books by popular authors such as Stephen King, J.K. Rowling and Sally Rooney. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the impact of time on our work lives, and gets tips on making better use of it.

(Picture: A female Afghan news presenter. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lrq85)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqvb7f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16g2jk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbv)
Afghanistan: 'We will rise again'

Afghanistan bowler Naveen-ul-Haq discusses the ongoing political situation in his home country, what the future holds for the national team and whether they will compete at the Twenty20 World Cup in October.

We hear how the Afghan Cricket Association, which normally supports players in the UK, has redirected its efforts to providing emergency aid.

Plus, we reflect on India’s win over England in the second Test, discuss the T20 World Cup draw and look ahead to the final Test between West Indies and Pakistan, after a thrilling first victory for the home side.

Photo: Captain Naveen Ul Haq of Afghanistan and his team mates line up for their national anthem prior to the ICC U19 Cricket World Cup match between New Zealand and Afghanistan at Hagley Oval on January 25, 2018 in Christchurch, New Zealand
Credit: Getty Images


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lrv09)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fb)
Afghanistan after the Taliban takeover

There is fear and uncertainty in Afghanistan as people wonder what their lives will be like under Taliban rule. Sana Safi from BBC Pashto shares her insights from listening to and interviewing the Taliban, and talking to contacts in Afghanistan.

Delhi and Kashmir: two lives in letters
In 2017, BBC journalist Divya Arya brought together schoolgirls Saumya and Duaa, from Delhi and Indian-administered Kashmir, to become penfriends. She tells us how their growing understanding and friendship overcame political divides. Divya's book about their correspondence is called Postbox Kashmir: Two lives in letters.

The rise of plastic surgery in China
Plastic surgery has become a booming industry in China, but this has led to a rise in unlicensed clinics and many high profile botched operations. Waiyee Yip from BBC Singapore has been following the trend.

A Russian bike odyssey
BBC Russian's Oleg Boldyrev is a keen cyclist, and as Covid restrictions prevent more exotic routes, he's taken his bike along the backroads of Russia, revisiting childhood haunts and gauging opinions about next month's parliamentary elections.

Image: Members of Taliban forces sit at a checkpost in Kabul, Afghanistan in August 2021
Credit: Reuters/Stringer


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyy)
When The Queen met Ceaușescu

Nicolae Ceaușescu was the first communist leader to be given a full state visit to the UK, but it was controversial from the outset. The Romanian president was a known dictator who ran a brutal regime, but Britain was still cash-strapped after World War Two and was desperate to build new trading partners. Dorian Galbinski was one of the main translators for the visit and he explains to Rebecca Kesby some of the background to the event.

(Photo: June 1978: Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceaușescu rides in the state carriage with Queen Elizabeth II on his official visit to Britain. Credit: Central Press/Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lryrf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hst)
America after Afghanistan

The speed with which the Taliban took control of Afghanistan surprised not just the world but even its own members. The group's rapid rise coincided with an equally fast withdrawal of US-led international forces. In a major speech this week President Biden rejected criticism that the manner of the American withdrawal contributed to the sudden collapse of the Afghan government. He also said that the mission was never about nation building. But critics argue that the events in Afghanistan have not just tarnished Washington’s reputation but they have also exposed the limits of its willingness to invest time and resources to achieve foreign policy objectives. So what does America's departure from Afghanistan tell us about its future engagement on global security issues? Is it an effort to concentrate on more pressing challenges from rivals like China and Russia? Or is it a continuation of Donald Trump's isolationist ‘America First’ policy? How will it affect Washington's international credibility and its desire to promote human rights and democratic values around the world?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests. Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ls2hk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqvpgt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16gfry)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct1xzv)
Nesara: The financial fantasy ruining lives

Nesara is a decades-old conspiracy theory whose followers believe all their debts will be magically cancelled in a radical reset of the world’s economic system.

It’s a bizarre and baseless idea whose promoters peddle a vision of a financial neverneverland that is always just round the corner.

Many of those who get sucked in, develop an almost cult-like belief in Nesara that inspires them to make horrific financial decisions that they think will make them rich. It’s a fantasy whose real life impact is dividing families and ruining lives.

So why during the Covid-19 pandemic has Nesara become more popular than ever?

Presenters: Jonathan Griffin & Shayan Sardarizadeh
Additional reporting: Olga Robinson
Editor: Ed Main

Photo: A graphic of a banknote with an N at the centre. Photo credit: BBC


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkd)
The extraordinary life of Robert Moses

Dr Robert Moses, a pioneer in African-American civil rights and mathematics education has died at the age of 86. Charmaine Cozier looks at an extraordinary life, from the courthouses of 1960s Mississippi to the classrooms of modern public schools, and traces the philosophy and values that threaded their way through his life.

Presenter: Charmaine Cozier
Producer: Nathan Gower

Portrait of American Civil Rights activist Robert Parris Moses, New York, 1964. (Photo by Robert Elfstrom/Villon Films/Gety Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ls67p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xytb62b3lhs)
Kabul evacuations resume

Many Afghans are still trying to leave Afghanistan, with intense scenes at Kabul airport. We hear from a young Afghan activist in Kabul who has been keeping a diary for Weekend about her experiences.

Also in the programme: we speak to one of the co-authors of a new book about Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny; and we hear about the surprising surge in sales of gin in Scotland.

Joining Anna Holligan to discuss these and other issues are author Misha Glenny and Kate Clark, co-director of the research group Afghanistan Analysts Network.

(Photo: U.S. Soldiers, arrive to provide security in support of Operation Allies Refuge at Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan. CREDIT: Senior Airman Taylor Crul/U.S. Air Force/Handout via REUTERS THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ls9zt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xytb62b3q7x)
UNHCR urges Afghanistan’s neighbours to keep borders open

US President Joe Biden has said he will make sure every American is able to leave Afghanistan but admitted the evacuation process does pose risks. We speak to political scientist Francis Fukuyama about the past week’s events.

Also in the programme: we get the latest from Haiti, which was hit by a devastating earthquake a week ago; and we hear from the author of a new book about the German writer W.G. Sebald.


Joining Anna Holligan to discuss these and other issues are author Misha Glenny and Kate Clark, co-director of the research group Afghanistan Analysts Network.

(Photo: Evacuees assemble before boarding a C-17 Globemaster III during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport, Afghanistan. CREDIT: U.S. Marine Corps/Lance Cpl. Nicholas Guevara/Handout via REUTERS THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY./File Photo)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lsfqy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xytb62b3v01)
Evacuations continue as tension intensifies in Kabul

The UNHCR has called on all neighbouring countries to keep their borders open to Afghan refugees. A few countries have offered to provide temporary shelter for Afghans heading to the United States. One of those countries is Kosovo; we hear from their President Vjosa Osmani.

Also in the programme: we hear from an Afghan journalist about what the future holds for the country; and we speak to a doctor in Kabul working for the International Committee of the Red Cross.

Joining Anna Holligan to discuss these and other issues are author Misha Glenny and Kate Clark, co-director of the research group Afghanistan Analysts Network.

(Photo: A U.S. Air Force security forces raven, maintains a security cordon. CREDIT: Senior Airman Taylor Crul/U.S. Air Force/Handout via REUTERS THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16gt0b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8w)
Beauty and the skin

Kim Chakanetsa in joined by two pioneering dermatologists to talk about the challenges and satisfaction that come with working with one of the body’s most fascinating organs.

Dr Margaret Yaa Lartey is a Professor of Medicine and Dermatology at the University of Ghana, and the first woman to lead the Ghana Society of Dermatology. She had very personal reasons to become a skin specialist, and she is committed to fighting misinformation and myths around skin care and disease.

Dr Rashmi Sarkar is a Senior Professor in Dermatology at Delhi University and president elect of the Indian Association of Dermatologists, Venereologists and Leprologists (IADVL). When she started out, there was stigma surrounding the profession. Now it’s a very popular choice, especially among women.

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Dr Rashmi Sarkar (credit Rama Studio)
R: Dr Margaret Yaa Lartey (credit courtesy of Margaret Yaa Lartey)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lskh2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d63)
Trying to flee Afghanistan

As the Taliban takes control of Afghanistan, there has been much international focus on the thousands who are attempting to leave the country, fearful for their safety. During the 20-year conflict, some Afghans worked as translators, interpreters and support staff with international armies and foreign organisations. Taliban officials have been keen to allay widespread safety fears but reports suggest the militant group are intensifying their hunt for such residents. Some of those who are afraid managed to immediately relocate to other countries, but many who want to leave find themselves stuck in their homes or their access to the airport prevented.

Hosts Karnie Sharp and Nuala McGovern hear from three Afghan interpreters who fear for their lives, as well as military veterans in the US and the UK concerned for the Afghan soldiers and police they once worked alongside.

We also hear from one woman who arrived in the United States just two days before the capital Kabul fell to the Taliban. Her family remains in Afghanistan and she relates the emotional conversations she has over the telephone with her sister.

(Photo: Civilians prepare to board a plane during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport, Kabul, Afghanistan August 18, 2021. Picture taken August 18, 2021. Credit: U.S. Marine Corps/Staff Sgt. Victor Mancilla/Handout via REUTERS/File Photo)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16gxrg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 World Of Wisdom (w3ct2hdj)
Acceptance

Bereavement is a challenging experience. Akinkunmi has lost both his mother and his sister. Dr Shefali helps him come to terms with his loss, and discusses 'acceptance' and how we can learn from brutal realities with the presenter Sana Safi.

In a series of intimate one to one conversations presented by the BBC’s Sana Safi , World of Wisdom explores life-changing insights on happiness, inner peace and self-help for the spirit.

Produced by Charlie Taylor and Ruth Edwards


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1t)
Should the BBC WS have given a voice to the Taliban?

Listeners share their thoughts on the BBC World Service’s coverage of events in Afghanistan. They question whether the Taliban should have been given airtime. Plus: the BBC’s Trauma and Well Being Support Unit explain how it supports correspondents, and how easy is the BBC Africa website to navigate?

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lsp76)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q38bs837v)
'We have players in hiding, it's terrifying'

For many years the players of the Afghanistan women's football team were seen as beacons of hope and empowerment in the country. Now they are in hiding and in fear for their lives. Haley Carter is the former assistant coach of the Afghan women's team and also a US Marine veteran. She is in daily contact with players and desperately trying to help them.

Ahead of the Le Man's 24 hour race, we hear from Amanda Stretton who knows exactly what it takes to be part of one of the most iconic races in motor sport. As it turns out, her journey to the start line took as much endurance as the race itself.

We hear from cricketer Nicole Harvey, who a year ago was hospitalised whilst pregnant. She had contracted sepsis and nearly died. A year on she has been one of the stars of the inaugural season of The Hundred.

Plus ahead of the Paralympics we gather the presenters of BBC World Service podcast On The Podium, Paralympian Scout Basset, comedian Eliza Skinner and BBC athletic commentator Ed Harry to preview the event.

(Photo: Haley Carter coaches the Afghan women's football team, Credit: Haley Carter)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lsszb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqwdyl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16h57q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3k)
Bridging the learning gap

The coronavirus pandemic has had a catastrophic impact on schoolchildren. More than 300 million students in India have been impacted due to school closures as the country battled the health crisis. Many have shifted completely to online classes for more than a year, but millions of others haven’t had access to digital platforms.

So, what’s been the fallout as schools begin to take small steps to resume offline classes? How can students recover the lost learning curve? And what about their social-emotional wellbeing? Is it time to rethink education?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the challenges and the solutions needed to bridge the learning gap.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Arindita Gogoi, experiential educator and teacher; Shantanu Rooj, Founder and CEO, TeamLease Edtech; Vikas Jhunjhunwala, CEO, Sunshine Schools


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lsxqg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2h07)
A bad business

Twenty years ago, the brash Texan energy company Enron collapsed after its massive fraud was finally exposed. Investors and pension funds worldwide lost billions of dollars. The case was meant to signal a sea-change in the way businesses were policed. How difficult would it be to weave a similar web of financial deceit today? Lesley Curwen travels to the dark side of business to find out whether it’s still just as easy to fleece investors – which in the end means us – out of our money.

(Image: Businessman in handcuffs, Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lt1gl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqv90s6)
Taliban co-founder to set up government

Mullah Baradar’s arrives in Kabul after consultations in the southern city of Kandahar. There’s a promise of “inclusive” rule. But there’s never been any suggestion this is any more than an invitation to join an Islamic system dominated by the Taliban.

Also in the programme: People in Afghanistan are scared as banks remain shut for the seventh day and chaos continue in Kabul airport with people trying to flee; and President Joe Biden has again defended the US pull-out, we get a reaction from a former Commander of the NATO Training Mission in Afghanistan.

(Photo: Mullah Baradar Akhund, a senior official of the Taliban, during a video statement released on August 16, 2021. Credit: Reuters.)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lt56q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0td1860syj)
Live Sporting Action

Live Sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis including the English Premier League.

(Photo by DAVE THOMPSON/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ltn67)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqx85h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16j0gm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct1xzv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8l)
Hou Bin wows the world

At the opening ceremony of the 2008 Paralympics in Beijing, Chinese athlete Hou Bin stunned the huge global audience with an amazing feat of strength. As the world held its breath, he used a rope to haul himself, his wheelchair and the Olympic flame 39 metres into the air to light the cauldron. Hou Bin talks to Ashley Byrne. A Made In Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Hou Bin climbing to the top of the Olympic stadium (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ltryc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct2gdf)
Víkingur Ólafsson plays Bach and Mozart

Broadcast programme:
Johann Sebastian Bach - Keyboard Concerto in F minor, BWV 1056
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor, K 491

Víkingur Ólafsson (piano)
Philharmonia Orchestra
Paavo Järvi (conductor)

The BBC Proms are back in the Royal Albert Hall in London with a six-week season of concerts featuring leading British orchestras as well as international soloists and conductors.

The Icelandic pianist Víkingur Ólafsson came to international prominence with his interpretations of Johann Sebastian Bach's works and he is making his Proms debut with Bach's Keyboard Concerto in F minor. This short work, written probably for the piano's elder cousin, the harpsichord, is followed by one of Mozart's finest. Mozart wrote the C-minor Concerto for himself to perform as a soloist. Among his two dozen keyboard concertos only two are in a minor key and they contain some of his most moving music. The composer gave a prominent role to the woodwind in the C-minor Concerto. There are seven of them - a flute plus pairs of oboes, clarinets and bassoons - and they often alternate with the piano in a 'call-and-response' fashion.

Presenter Andrew McGregor is joined by the pianist and broadcaster Keval Shah.

[Image: Víkingur Ólafsson at the 2021 BBC Proms. Credit: Mark Allan/BBC]


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ltwph)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtb)
Musician Billie Eilish

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined by Pakistani author Awais Khan and writer and broadcaster Karen Krizanovich to discuss the cultural highlights of the past week.

The singer songwriter and cultural icon, Billie Eilish, talks about the challenges of changing her public image.

Canadian film director Shawn Levy talks about the existential questions behind his new comedy, Free Guy, starring Ryan Reynolds.

Jamaican author Sara Collins shares the book she read in childhood that made her want to become a writer.

Actor Felicity Jones tells us about the new romantic drama The Last Letter from Your Lover in which she stars.

Lahore-based author Awais Khan reveals the inspiration for his latest novel, No Honour, and how he feels a responsibility to speak up about the injustices endured by women in Pakistan.

British Bangladeshi singer songwriter Joy Crookes shares how the Black Lives Matter movement has influenced her debut album, Skin.

And French-Moroccan author Leila Slimani talks about her latest novel, The Country of Others, and the legacy of shame sometimes felt by those who have been colonised.

Producer: Paul Waters

(Photo: Billie Eilish. Credit: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lv0fm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqv9zr7)
Taliban making "progress" on setting up government

The Taliban say they are making progress in forming a government in Afghanistan.

Its co-founder Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar is in Kabul for talks, which are expected to include militant commanders, former government leaders and religious scholars.

In this edition of Newshour, we speak to a journalist who has met Mullah Baradar several times.

Also on the programme: Scientists in India are celebrating what they say could be a game-changing vaccine in the fight against Covid-19; and gunmen attack a community in the north west of Nigeria.

PICTURE: (In March, Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar and other delegation members attended a peace conference in Moscow. CREDIT: Alexander Zemlianichenko REUTERS)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lv45r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc8)
The importance of space with Cassandra Jenkins, Arooj Aftab and Charlotte Dos Santos

Cassandra Jenkins, Arooj Aftab and Charlotte Dos Santos discuss being inspired by physical spaces that no longer exist, the emotional aspects of releasing music, why you never really complete a piece of work, and why handing music into your label is a bit like running for a flight.

Cassandra Jenkins is an indie-folk musician and songwriter from New York. She’s always been surrounded by music, growing up with musical parents, and her latest album An Overview on Phenomenal Nature was released earlier this year, produced by Josh Kaufman (The National, Taylor Swift).

Charlotte Dos Santos is a Brazilian-Norwegian singer and composer who creates hypnotizing neo-soul sounds. Blending her love of flamenco, samba, and bossa nova with jazz, folk and soul, the Berklee-trained musician explores themes of femininity, power, nature, and personal growth.

And Arooj Aftab is an enigmatic Pakistani composer, based in New York City, who is reimagining traditional South Asian music and poetry. She moved to the US to also study at Berklee, where she began experimenting with jazz and electronic sounds.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lv7xw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywsj847kgv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skljlcm3h)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16jm68)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt0)
Photography: Tyler Mitchell and Russel Wong

American photographer Tyler Mitchell was 23 years old when he photographed Beyoncé for the front cover of American Vogue in 2018, becoming the first black American to do so in the magazine’s history.

He’s gone on to photograph Vice President Kamala Harris for Vogue and to exhibit his work in the United States and internationally. He talks about the images that have made him one of the most exciting photographers of his generation.

Sheetal Mallar started her career as a model in India, Italy and the United States before becoming a full time photographer. She talks about what her time in front of the camera taught her about how to take great photos.

Russel Wong is one of Asia's most famous celebrity photographers and is so well known, he played himself in the movie 'Crazy Rich Asians'. He explains how he gained rare access to photograph the world of Kyoto’s Geishas.

Presenter: Tumi Morake
Producers: Olivia Skinner, Paul Waters, Sharanjit Leyl, Lucy Collingwood, Kirsty McQuire

(Photo: Tyler Mitchell. Credit: Tyler Mitchell and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York)



SUNDAY 22 AUGUST 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lvhf4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yvl)
Seismic citizen science in Hispaniola

The epicentre of the tragic earthquake in Haiti last week was just 100km from that of the even more deadly 2010 one. Unlike then, a network of small cheap seismic detectors run by volunteers is currently monitoring the aftershocks. As Eric Calais says, the suspicion is that this could be the latest in a sequence of quakes, echoing previous clusters over the last few hundred years.

Is ‘Blue Hydrogen’ all that green?
Hydrogen is being much touted as an alternative to natural gas as a source of fuel for homes in a low-carbon world. In particular, “blue” hydrogen – hydrogen made from fossil fuels but with the carbon dioxide being captured at the point of production – is said to be some sort of transitional fuel that could be introduced into current infrastructure with little stress. But Robert Howarth is less optimistic. He is co-author on a paper published last week analysing the net carbon impact of blue hydrogen production. He argues that not only are there hidden greenhouse gas emissions in production, but that in fact burning blue Hydrogen at home could have a worse impact than burning the natural gas from which it is made.

Why do some bat babies babble?
Meanwhile, scientists of the Leibniz Institute evolution and Biodiversity have been eavesdropping on bats in Panama. Human babies babble when they are learning how to talk. It’s been shown before that songbirds do something similar, but according to Ahana Fernandez, it now it seems another mammal joins the babbling ranks – the younglings of the Greater Sac-Winged bat of South America. Ahana tells Roland about her analysis.

Why is human skin so rubbish?
If you’ve ever fallen over and grazed your skin, maybe you wished it were made of stronger stuff. The tough hide of a rhinoceros or the protective armour of a stag beetle would do a better job. It’s a thought that’s been bothering CrowdScience listener Paul, who points out that our skin also suffers from acne, eczema and hives; it dries out; it bruises. In fact, human hide is so vulnerable that we cover our feet in other animals’ skin and our bodies in clothes just to make life more comfortable. Is this really the pinnacle of evolution?

Marnie Chesterton makes the case for the largest, fastest-growing organ, hiding in plain site on our body. Tissue Engineer Professor Sheila MacNeil from Sheffield University explains how skin manages to be breathable yet waterproof; flexible yet stronger than steel; sensitive to touch but protective against pollution and damaging UV. Skin biologist Dr Christina Philippeos from King’s College London explains how our bodies make a scar.

Professor Muzlifah Haniffa has developed an atlas of the human skin – a tool to help researchers unravel the mysteries of how different skin cells interact. This atlas should help treat skin diseases in the future. Over in Tanzania’s Regional Dermatology Training Centre in Moshi, Dr Daudi Mavura talks us through a rare but devastating skin disorder called Xeroderma Pigmentosum, or XP. For children with XP, sunlight is dangerous because a mutation in the skin’s DNA repair mechanism means that UV rays can cause lesions and tumours.

Our epidermis is already multifunctional but over at Ben May Department of Cancer Research at the University of Chicago, Professor Xaioyang Wu and colleagues are looking at how much more skin could do. Personalised skin grafts may provide living drug patches to help people manage their disease, addiction or even weight. With thanks to Dr Lynne MacTavish from Mankwe Wildlife Reserve in South Africa for describing a rhino’s skin. Produced and presented by Marnie Chesterton

(Photo by Reginald Loiussaint/JR/AFP via Getty Images)

Presenters: Roland Pease / Marnie Chesterton
Producers: Alex Mansfield / Marnie Chesterton


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lvm58)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqy74j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16jzfn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvn)
The psychology of courage and bravery

The adventurer and ultra-runner Alex Staniforth talks about his survival on Everest following the devastating Nepalese earthquake in 2015. Rachel Manning from Buckingham University considers why we do or don’t intervene in risky situations and in everyday life. And Patrick Tissington from Warwick University draws on the stories behind those awarded the Victoria or George Cross for bravery to suggest some of the best ways to manage our fear in allowing us to be more courageous. The programme is presented by Claudia Hammond and recorded at the Cheltenham Science Festival in June 2021.

Image: Rock climber clinging to a cliff
Credit: gregepperson/Getty Images

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Adrian Washbourne


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lvqxd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2h07)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lvvnj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv7)
Afghanistan: How did we get here?

After the Taliban’s lightning-fast takeover of Afghanistan, our correspondent searches his memory for clues as to how the US’s twenty-year mission there could have ended like this.

In India, Chloe Hadjimatheou introduces us to some of the thousands of people who’ve been declared dead but are trying to convince the world they are still alive.

In Kenya, there’s dancing and tears as Vivienne Nunis watches members of the Shona community receive their first national ID cards after years of campaigning for citizenship.

And the power of learning a language; LIija Zhang shares her journey from missile factory worker in China to internationally published writer.

(Image: Taliban fighter stands guard outside the Green Zone in Kabul, Afghanistan, 17 August 2021. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16k6xx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lvzdn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqylcx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16kbp1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gyz)
1. Gold

Ex-Paralympic swimmer Dan Pepper investigates the cheats who won gold and left a devastating legacy for learning disability sport.

Ray Torres used to get beaten up every day at school. He stood out because he had a learning disability. But when his dad gave him a basketball, he found an escape and a kind of friend that didn’t hit him or call him names. He took the ball everywhere - even using it as a pillow.

When Spain started an intellectual disability basketball team, Ray was picked as one of the best players in the country and within a few years he was made captain. And when he found out the team had qualified to take part in the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, it was beyond his wildest dreams…

Presenter: Dan Pepper
Series Producer: Simon Maybin

(Photo credit: EPA)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lw34s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xytb62b6hdw)
Former world leaders criticise US withdrawal

Former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair has labelled US President Joe Biden’s decision to withdraw all US troops from Afghanistan as “imbecilic” and claims the withdrawal has been “tragic, dangerous, unnecessary”. President Biden’s predecessor Donald Trump was also critical of the handling of the withdrawal, claiming that "Vietnam looks like a masterclass in strategy compared to Joe Biden's catastrophe.”

Also in the programme: how Greece is preparing for a potential surge of migrants from Afghanistan; and we hear more from Haiti after a deadly earthquake hit the Caribbean island last week.

Joining Anna Holligan to discuss these and other issues are: Alex von Tunzelmann, a British historian, film and TV scriptwriter; and Nelufar Hedayat, a British-Afghan journalist, documentary maker and podcaster.

(PHOTO: The crowd reacts during former U.S. President Donald Trump as he speaks during a rally in Cullman, Alabama, U.S., August 21, 2021. CREDIT: REUTERS/Marvin Gentry)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lw6wx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xytb62b6m50)
Criticism of US withdrawal continues

Former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair and former US President Donald Trump have added their voices to the criticism of the US troop withdrawal from Afghanistan. We speak to former US ambassador Peter Galbraith for his reaction.

Also in the programme: we hear about one Afghan orphan waiting to join his new family in the US.

Joining Anna Holligan to discuss these and other issues are: Alex von Tunzelmann, a British historian, film and TV scriptwriter; and Nelufar Hedayat, a British-Afghan journalist, documentary maker and podcaster.

(Photo: U.S. President Joe Biden delivers remarks on evacuation efforts and the ongoing situation in Afghanistan. CREDIT: REUTERS/Ken Cedeno TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lwbn1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xytb62b6qx4)
US fears risk of Islamic State attack at Kabul airport

A security alert warned US citizens of possible “security threats outside the gates”. US defence officials say they are monitoring developments and considering alternative routes.

Also in the programme: a major summit on the future of Crimea.

Joining Anna Holligan to discuss these and other issues are Alex von Tunzelmann, a British historian, film and TV scriptwriter and Nelufar Hedayat, an British-Afghan journalist, documentary maker and podcaster.

(Photo: A Marine assists evacuees during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport, in Kabul, Afghanistan. CREDIT: Sgt. Isaiah Campbell/U.S. Marine Corps/Handout via REUTERS THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16kpxf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr9)
Alice Waters: My life in five dishes

Alice Waters is one of America’s most influential chefs and food writers. In the 1970s she led a food revolution that sparked a movement towards local, sustainable, organic food. Alice tells Emily Thomas about her life, from a suburban childhood in New Jersey to the radical politics of the University of California, Berkeley. She explains how she was inspired to set up a small French restaurant called Chez Panisse, after a trip to France as a student, and how it became a mecca for writers, chefs, musicians and artists.

After almost half a century of food activism, Alice tells us that she still has plenty of work to do. She talks about her mission to educate children through her Edible School Yard project, how lockdown has focused her mind on climate change, and what it has felt like to see her beloved restaurant forced to close its doors over the past year.

(Photo: Alice Waters. Credit: Amanda Marsalis/ BBC).


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lwgd5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16ktnk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx9)
The painful secret I hid from my twin

When Alex Lewis was 18 he had an accident that caused him to lose his memory. The only person he could remember was Marcus, his identical twin brother. He became the person Alex most relied upon to rebuild his life and memories. But as it turned out, not everything Marcus told him was true.

This programme contains themes of child sexual abuse which may be difficult and triggering to hear.

Their story features in a documentary called Tell Me Who I Am which is available on Netflix.

This interview was first broadcast in October 2019.

Photo: Alex and Marcus Lewis
Credit: Alex and Marcus Lewis


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lwl49)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g75)
2. The wiretap

One name stands out as the FBI gets to work. Why does a member of the Gun Trace Task Force have links to a major heroin ring? A whole new level of criminality is revealed.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16kydp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2fnq)
Black Jewish Lives Matter

The death of George Floyd Jr in May 2020 started a wave of unforeseen protests. As these protests consumed the United States, groups of people from various beliefs, backgrounds and origins came out in support of the Black Lives Matter movement, which started in 2014. A year later, under a new US president, the US still faces the same challenges even though police officer Derek Chauvin has been found guilty with murder, many still believe that they are still fighting against institutionalised racism in the US.

Monitoring the news in the US, journalist Amie Liebowitz has repeatedly seen images of groups of Jewish people stand side by side, holding placards and wearing t-shirts that said “Tzedek Tzedek Tirdof” (Deuteronomy 16:20) – a passage from the Torah meaning “Justice, Justice you shall pursue”. This message has been adopted by the Jews for Black Lives Matter movement which has always been associated with the act of social justice. This made her reflect on her own context as a white, Ashkenazi Jew from Australia and what this movement meant for her religious community.

In this episode of Heart and Soul, Amie Liebowitz reconciles with her lack of knowledge about the black Jewish experience and reflects upon the need for further understanding of both privilege and antisemitism. She speaks to four black Jewish community members in the United States who speak frankly about identity dynamics and misconceptions, racism, activism and the support needed to help resolve the issues they face.

Presenter and producer: Amie Liebowitz
Executive Producer: Rajeev Gupta

Audio clip contributions: Hannah Roodman, Jews for Racial and Economic Justice (JFREJ), Nissim Black, Westside Gravy, Drake and CBS

(Picture: April N. Baskin at the Women's March in Washington DC in January 2019 representing Jewish Women of Color / Courtesy of April N. Baskin)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lwpwf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqz9vp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16l24t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct064s)
Changing World, Changing Bodies

Is height all in the mind?

Professor Cregan-Reid explores why we have all grown so fast recently. For four millennia we barely grew an extra inch but in the 20th Century pretty much every nation in the world shot up by between three and six inches.

But it is not a uniform story; the Dutch have carried on growing and today their men and women tower over the world but in the US and the UK, height plateaued decades ago. And is being tall good for you? Yes, it seems, if you are a politician or industrialist; less so if you hanker after a career in entertainment.

The orthodox thinking says nutrition is the key but Professor Cregan-Reid hears about new thinking which claims height is determined by how optimistic society feels about the future- is it really all in the mind?

(Photo: A tall and small businessman look at each other. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lwtmk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct2gdf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lwycp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqvcxp9)
Afghanistan: Crowds of people are still arriving at Kabul airport

One week on from the Taliban’s takeover of Afghanistan, people still trying to flee the country. The US wants to end evacuation efforts on 31st August, but chaos at the airport has stalled efforts and Washington has been urged to extend their Afghan pull-out.

Also in the programme: what has been Pakistan’s role in the Taliban’s return to power; and as Angela Merkel prepares to step down, what do people in her conservative party think of their new leader?

(Photo: US Marines assist with security at an Evacuation Control Checkpoint during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport, Kabul, Afghanistan. Credit: EPA).


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lx23t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlk)
A radiant light: The Indonesian poet Amir Hamzah

The writer Amir Hamza is a national hero in Indonesia celebrated for both his poetry and his role in the development of the country’s national language. Hamza was an emotional man who struggled with thwarted love and inner conflict and created a beguilingly intense body of work. His poetry paid homage to Malay literary tradition infused with Islamic mysticism but also reflected new ideas springing up in the artistic circles in Java where he worked in the 1930s. Towards the end of that decade events conspired to enforce his return to the family home in Sumatra and ultimately led to his becoming a tragic victim of brutal retribution during Indonesia’s transition to independence.

Rajan Datar is joined by Ayu Utami, an award-winning Indonesian novelist, playwright and broadcaster; Ben Murtagh, Reader in Indonesian and Malay at SOAS, University of London, and managing editor of the journal Indonesia and the Malay World; and Taufiq Hanafi, an Indonesian literary scholar currently at the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies in Leiden. The reader is Sallehuddin Abdullah-Sani.

[Photo: Amir Hamzah]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lx5vy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lx9m2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0td1863ybw)
Sportsworld

Live Sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis including the English Premier League.

(Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lxnvg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzr08tq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16m13v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2fnq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lxsll)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh4)
What next for Afghanistan?

As the Taliban takes control of Afghanistan this week, we ask what the future holds for the country. The central bank governor, Ajmal Ahmady, who fled earlier this week, tells us about the days and weeks leading up to the takeover.
Dr Weeda Mehran from the University of Exeter outlines how the country arrived at this point, and what the future could hold. She argues that unless the Taliban gains legitimacy internationally it will struggle to govern effectively or grow the economy.
Plus, a new Alzheimer's drug has been approved by the FDA in the US, but lawmakers are looking at how and why it was approved so quickly. Apple’s decision to scan users’ phones for images of child abuse has privacy campaigners worried - and we’ll hear from the businesses busy preparing for Christmas 2021.
Business Weekly is produced by Clare Williamson and presented by Lucy Burton.
(Image: Afghans gather outside the Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul to flee the country, Image credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lxxbq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqvdwnb)
Anti-Taliban forces offer talks

The son of former mujahideen leader Ahmad Shah Massoud, and Amrullah Saleh, the man who claims to be the legitimate caretaker president of Afghanistan, say they are prepared to talk to the Taliban, but are prepared to fight.

Also in the programme: a Lebanese taxi driver tells how the fuel price hike is likely to put him out of business; and Don Everly - the last surviving member of The Everly Brothers, who Rolling Stone magazine called the most important vocal duo in rock -- has died at the age of eighty-four.

(Credit: Ahmad Massoud, son of Ahmad Shah Massoud (centre) and Amrullah Saleh (right) in a meeting. Credit: social media)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ly12v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g75)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16mdc7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 World Of Wisdom (w3ct2hdj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ly4tz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywsj84bgcy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skljlgj0l)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16mj3c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 23 AUGUST 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx27ld)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlbl13fvrn)
Commercial planes to help US evacuation from Afghanistan

The US has ordered 18 commercial jets to move people from third countries after they have left Kabul. Six airlines are providing the planes including United Airlines and American Airlines. The BBC's Washington correspondent Barbara Plett-Usher explains how they will be used in the evacuation effort.

This week US Vice President Kamala Harris is visiting Singapore. There's been renewed engagement with the Padific region since President Biden came to power, so how significant will this visit be? We speak to Bhagyashree Garekar, foreign editor for the Straits Times, who is based in Singapore.

And one of the film industry's biggest events, Cinema Con, takes place this week in Las Vegas, giving delegates the chance to discuss how the sector has fared during the pandemic. Tom Nunan, a lecturer at the UCLA School of Theatre, Film and Television in Los Angeles, shares his views on the current state of the international film market.

(Picture: Afghans waiting at Kabul airport. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hrlvs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2h25)
The Life Scientific: Dr Nira Chamberlain

When does a crowd of people become unsafe? How well will the football team Aston Villa do next season? When is it cost-effective to replace a kitchen? The answers may seem arbitrary but, to Nira Chamberlain, they lie in mathematics. You can use maths to model virtually anything.

Dr Nira Chamberlain is President of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications, and Principal Mathematical Modeller for the multinational engineering company SNC-Lavalin Atkins.

He specialises in complex engineering and industrial problems, creating mathematical models to describe a particular feature or process, and then running simulations to better understand it, and predict its behaviour. Nira is one of just a handful of esteemed mathematicians, and the first black mathematician. to be featured in ‘Who’s Who’, Britain’s book of prominent people.

Since 2018, he’s made the Black Power List, which celebrates the UK’s top 100 most influential people of African or African-Caribbean heritage, ranking higher than Stormzy and Lewis Hamilton when he was first listed. Proof, he says, that maths really is for everyone.


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx2cbj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb814z9s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hrqlx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqx)
Can we be ‘nudged’ to act on climate change?

Another chance to listen to an episode that asks whether we can change our ways. Drastic change is needed to limit the increase in global temperature caused by climate change. More than two-thirds of greenhouse gas emissions worldwide result from how we live our lives. But the behaviours that drive these emissions tend to be deeply habitual and hard to shift - the way we heat our homes, what we eat and how we travel to work. And our behavioural good intentions all too often fail to translate into action. So our climate question this week is how we can be nudged, or even shoved, to change?

First broadcast on 1st March 2021

Guests:
Elisabeth Costa, senior director, Behavioural Insights Team
Erik Thulin, behavioural science lead at the Centre for Behaviour and the Environment at Rare
Professor Martine Visser, behavioural economist at the University of Cape Town
Mo Allie, BBC reporter in Cape Town

Presented by Graihagh Jackson and Neal Razzell
Produced by Alex Lewis
Researched by Zoe Gelber
Edited by Emma Rippon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx2h2n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g75)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hrvc1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 World Of Wisdom (w3ct2hdj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx2lts)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb8156t1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hrz35)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8x)
A love for my language

Around the world, languages are disappearing. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women who are helping to keep their endangered languages alive – how has learning the words of their ancestors shaped their identities?

Mshkogaabwid Kwe from Turtle Island, an indigenous name for Canada, learned her clan’s language, Anishinaabemowin, as an adult. She is now raising her children in an English-free home. She has a deep gratitude to those who walked before her and kept the words alive, knowing the persecution that they faced.

Tsamaxa Toroxa spoke English and Afrikaans growing up in South Africa, and often faced prejudice from other Black South Africans who expected her to speak an indigenous language. Learning the language of her ancestors, Khoe, has shaped how she sees herself and she is now helping to keep the language alive by sharing it with others through the arts.

Produced by Caitlin Sneddon

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Mshkogaabwid Kwe (credit Mshkogaabwid Kwe)
R: Tsamaxa Toroxa (credit Tsamaxa Toroxa)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx2qkx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtbhsln)
Biden: US ramping up evacuations

US President Joe Biden has again defended his decision to leave Afghanistan saying he had no alternative but to end the war.

He also pledged to continue the evacuation of vulnerable people from the country, and to bring every American in the country home.

In an effort to reduce carbon emissions, Switzerland is taking advantage of its alpine geography to boost solar power output.

And Taiwan has bypassed problems securing vaccines on the international markets by developing its own jab.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx2vb1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtbhxbs)
Evacuations from Kabul airport

A week after the Taliban seized control of Afghanistan, US President Joe Biden has again been defending his decision to withdraw US forces from the country.

Despite scenes of chaos and fear of human rights abuses the President remains adamant it was the right thing to do.

Storm Henri has dumped record breaking quantities of rain on the US state of Tennessee, causing widespread flooding.

And we find out about the rise in the appeal of the occult among young people in France.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx2z25)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtbj12x)
Calls to extend the Kabul airlift

Panic and disorder surround Kabul airport, but the American president Joe Biden was unrepentant on Sunday evening when he defended his decision to the withdraw US forces from Afghanistan.

After a week of criticism, Biden pledged to help those desperate to leave the country.

Ukraine is hosting representatives from up to 40 nations, as it tries to keep up the diplomatic pressure on Russia to return the Crimean peninsula to Kiev's control.

And the remarkable story of Josephine Baker, the French- American singer and dancer who's now being recognised with one of France's highest honours.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx32t9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n64)
Gedion Timothewos: Ethiopia's civil war

HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to Ethiopia’s Attorney General Gedion Timothewos. The conflict between government forces and Tigrayan rebels has cost thousands of lives and revived the spectre of famine – is there a way to avert catastrophe?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hsg2p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j54)
'Youngism' in the workplace

Age discrimination doesn't just affect the elderly. The BBC's Tamasin Ford speaks with Priscilla and Nadirah about the discrimination they've experienced as young people in the workplace. We'll also hear from Michael North, an assistant professor of management and organisations at New York University’s Stern School of Business, on the research he and his team have done showing the extent of 'youngism' in business. Also in the programme, consultants Lauren Rikleen and Elizabeth Houghton explain how young people can best navigate the workplace, even in the presence of discrimination.

(Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x17)
John Maynard Keynes

The economist John Maynard Keynes transformed 20th century economic policy. Considered one of the great minds of his age, his seminal work The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, sought to diagnose and find solutions to the misery and mass unemployment of the Great Depression. For decades his ideas were central to economic policy adopted across the western world and have made a comeback after the financial crash of 2008. Alex Last presents rare recordings of Keynes from the BBC archive and speaks to Lord Skidelsky, Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at Warwick University and biographer of Keynes.

Photo :John Maynard Keynes, the famous economist pictured at his home in London, 1929 (Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx36kf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hsktt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqt)
Why is human skin so rubbish?

If you’ve ever fallen over and grazed your skin, maybe you wished it were made of stronger stuff. The tough hide of a rhinoceros or the protective armour of a stag beetle would do a better job. It’s a thought that’s been bothering CrowdScience listener Paul, who points out that our skin also suffers from acne, eczema and hives; it dries out; it bruises. In fact, human hide is so vulnerable that we cover our feet in other animals’ skin and our bodies in clothes just to make life more comfortable. Is this really the pinnacle of evolution?

Marnie Chesterton makes the case for the largest, fastest-growing organ, hiding in plain site on our body. Tissue Engineer Professor Sheila MacNeil from Sheffield University explains how skin manages to be breathable yet waterproof; flexible yet stronger than steel; sensitive to touch but protective against pollution and damaging UV. Skin biologist Dr Christina Philippeos from King’s College London explains how our bodies make a scar.

Professor Muzlifah Haniffa has developed an atlas of the human skin – a tool to help researchers unravel the mysteries of how different skin cells interact. This atlas should help treat skin diseases in the future. Over in Tanzania’s Regional Dermatology Training Centre in Moshi, Dr Daudi Mavura talks us through a rare but devastating skin disorder called Xeroderma Pigmentosum, or XP. For children with XP, sunlight is dangerous because a mutation in the skin’s DNA repair mechanism means that UV rays can cause lesions and tumours.

Our epidermis is already multifunctional but over at Ben May Department of Cancer Research at the University of Chicago, Professor Xaioyang Wu and colleagues are looking at how much more skin could do. Personalised skin grafts may provide living drug patches to help people manage their disease, addiction or even weight.

With thanks to Dr Lynne MacTavish from Mankwe Wildlife Reserve in South Africa for describing a rhino’s skin.

Produced and presented by Marnie Chesterton.

[Image: Young and Old, dry skin
Credit: Eric A. Nelson/Getty Images]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx3b9k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pt0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hspky)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct1xzv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx3g1p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81620y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hstb2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx3kst)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tjrr0tcpk)
Sportsworld

A preview of the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games

(Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx3pjy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb8169j6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49ht1tb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx3t92)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58804lslp)
Taliban refuse extension for foreign forces

The Taliban say they won't extend the deadline for western forces to leave Afghanistan, as evacuations continue from Kabul airport. A Taliban spokesman said the end of August was a red line. The British government had said that the US could be persuaded to try to stay for longer.

Also in the programme: Taiwan's new Covid vaccine divides public opinion; and the French government announces that the American entertainer Josephine Baker, who died in France in 1975, is to be the first black woman to have her remains interred in the Pantheon mausoleum.

(Picture: Turkish soldiers on duty at Kabul airport. Credit: Aykut Karadag/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx3y16)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n64)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49ht99l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y482z9vp551)
What might the Afghan economy look like under the Taliban?

The Taliban have insisted they will not extend the deadline for Western forces to leave Afghanistan, saying 31 August is a red line. The situation in the country could potentially have a destabilising economic effect on the whole region. Rahul Tandon discusses the issue with Pakistan's information minister, Fawad Ahmed Chaudry. In response to issues securing Covid vaccines from abroad, places like Taiwan and India are developing their own. Will countries around the world follow suit? We pose that question to the Economist's Health Policy Editor, Natasha Loder. Amazon’s new African HQ in Capetown promises to inject millions of dollars into the local economy – but the site they’ve chosen is hallowed grown for the Khoi and San people, and they don't want Amazon to build there. The BBC's Vumani Mkhize reports.

(Photo: Market in Kabul after Taliban takeover, Anadolu Agency/Getty)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx41sb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxnrx0l1qs)
Afghanistan: US ramping up Kabul evacuation effort

We continue to follow the situation in Afghanistan, where evacuations are still taking place at Kabul International Airport. We'll bring you the latest and hear the voices of people inside the country, a week after the fall of the capital.

Our regular health expert, Dr Eleanor Murray - Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health - will answer your questions on the coronavirus pandemic. If you have a question, send us a WhatsApp message +447730 751925.

And we get the latest on Haiti, where more than 300 people are still missing, and over 2000 dead, following an earthquake.

(Photo: Crowds outside Kabul airport. Credit: Asvaka News via Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx45jg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxnrx0l5gx)
Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games

We go to Japan as the country prepares for the Paralympics. Record numbers of Covid cases means that Tokyo is in a state of emergency, and tight restrictions will be in place. We hear from two Paralympians to find out how they are feeling ahead of the Games.

We continue to follow the situation in Afghanistan, where evacuations are still taking place at Kabul International Airport. We'll bring you the latest and hear the voices of people inside the country, a week after the fall of the capital.

And we are joined by our health expert, Professor Manfred Green from the University of Haifa in Israel, to answer your questions about Covid-19. If you have a question, send us a WhatsApp message +447730 751925.

(Photo: The Agitos outside the Olympic Stadium in Tokyo Japan. Credit Joel Marklund for OIS/PA)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx498l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtg)
The joy of skiing blind

Mike Brace lost his sight after a childhood accident - but he adapted fast and soon discovered the freedom and excitement he craved in the sport of blind skiing. Having represented Great Britain at the first Paralympics - he's since dedicated his life to getting young disabled people into sport. He spoke to Outlook's Jo Fidgen.

Andiswa Gebashe is a well-known face on South African screens, appearing next to the President as a sign language interpreter. Her father is deaf, and sign language was her family's primary way of communicating when she was growing up. She spoke to Mpho Lakaje.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Mike Brace
Credit: Mike Brace


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x17)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx4f0q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb8170zz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hts93)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ngr4w78v2)
2021/08/23 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx4jrv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49htx17)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2h26)
The Life Scientific: Professor Martin Sweeting

When Martin Sweeting was a student, he thought it would be fun to try to build a satellite using electronic components found in some of the earliest personal computers. An amateur radio ham and space enthusiast, he wanted to create a communications satellite that could be used to talk to people on the other side of the world. It was a team effort, he insists, with friends and family pitching in and a lot of the work being done on his kitchen table. Somehow he managed to persuade NASA to let his microsatellite hitch a ride into space and, after the first message was received, spent more than a decade trying to get a good picture of planet earth. The technology that Martin pioneered underpins modern life with thousands of reprogrammable microsatellites now in orbit around the earth and thousands more due to launch in the next few years to bring internet connections to remote parts of the world. The university spin-off company, Surrey Satellite Technologies Limited (SSTL) that Martin set up in the 1980s with an initial investment of £100 sold for £50 million, a quarter of a century later. If his company had been bought by venture capitalists, he says he would probably have ended up making TVs. Instead he developed the satellite technology on which so much of modern life depends.

Produce: Anna Buckley

Photo Credit: SSTL


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx4nhz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58804mmtl)
Taliban say no extension for foreign troops

The Taliban will not extend the 31 August deadline for the current evacuation mission from Afghanistan, a spokesman has said. However, a growing number of US allies want to keep control of the airport for longer to ensure many more vulnerable Afghans can get out.

Also in the programme: Fatal floods in the US state of Tennessee; and we hear from a doctor in a hospital in Haiti following a deadly earthquake.

(Picture: General view of the crowds of people near the airport in Kabul, Afghanistan. Credit: ASVAKA NEWS via REUTERS)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx4s83)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n64)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hv4jh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx4x07)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywswjfk6k6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skyswp85v)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hv88m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48xf1gdfkc)
What might the Afghan economy look like under the Taliban?

The Taliban have insisted they will not extend the deadline for Western forces to leave Afghanistan, saying 31 August is a red line. The situation in the country could potentially have a destabilising economic effect on the whole region. Rahul Tandon discusses the issue with Pakistan's information minister, Fawad Ahmed Chaudry. In response to issues securing Covid vaccines from abroad, places like Taiwan and India are developing their own. Will countries around the world follow suit? We pose that question to the Economist's Health Policy Editor, Natasha Loder. Amazon’s new African HQ in Capetown promises to inject millions of dollars into the local economy – but the site they’ve chosen is hallowed grown for the Khoi and San people, and they don't want Amazon to build there. The BBC's Vumani Mkhize reports. (Photo: Market in Kabul after Taliban takeover, Anadolu Agency/Getty)



TUESDAY 24 AUGUST 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx54hh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqhk9t2ht6)
On the ground in Afghanistan

What does the Taliban rule mean for Afghanistan's economy, and the surrounding region? The group says foreign military - including the US, France and Germany - must complete their evacuations and leave the country by 31 August. We hear from Rahmatullah Amiri, a socio-political analyst based in Kabul. who tells us what conditions are like in the capital.
Authorities in the US have approved Pfizer's two-dose vaccine for over-16s. But some states are now seeing a surge in cases of the Delta variant. Florida has one of the highest rates, and we speak to Mary Mayhew, president and CEO of the Florida Hospital Association.
And John Lydon - better known as Johnny Rotten - has lost a legal battle to stop music by his former band, the Sex Pistols, from being used in a new TV drama. Music journalist Eamonn Forde explains the case.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Jeanette Rodrigues, South Asia managing editor for Bloomberg News in Mumbai, and by Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland in Washington DC.

(Picture: A bazaar in Kabul. Credit: Getty)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx587m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb817w6w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hvmj0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz0)
2. Caught

A basketball journalist in Spain recognises three of the players in the gold-medal-winning intellectual disability basketball team - and they are not disabled. He has even played on the same team as one of them. But when he publishes his story in a national basketball magazine, the team’s organisers show certificates supposedly proving the players’ disability status.

The denials continue until another of the players - who turns out to have been a journalist - publishes his own article exposing the fraud. It causes a media storm in Spain and around the world. The Spanish Paralympic Committee begins an investigation and the consequences for the genuinely-disabled captain Ray are devastating.

Presenter: Dan Pepper
Series Producer: Simon Maybin

(Photo credit: EPA)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx5czr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x17)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx5hqw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb8183q4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hvw08)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdd)
Tom Hunt: Dressage music for the Tokyo Paralympics

As the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games begin, we meet the composer who’s creating music for Para Equestrian dressage competitors, Natasha Baker and Laurentia Tan.

Tom Hunt specialises in composing original music for one of the most exciting parts of competitive dressage, Freestyle.

Join Hilary Dunn as she discovers how Tom works with Natasha and Laurentia to make music which brings out the best from them and their horses, and allows them to remain at the top of their game in this highly competitive performance-led Olympic event.

Presented by Hilary Dunn
Produced by Hilary Dunn and Eliza Lomas
Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx5mh0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtblphr)
Fighters resisting the Taliban

Ahead of a virtual meeting of the G7 nations, the evacuation of vulnerable people from Afghanistan is dominating the agenda with pressure growing on the US to prolong their presence at Kabul airport.

As the Taliban announce that they have encircled opposition forces in the Panjshir Valley, we hear from the Mujahadeen preparing to resist.

Eritrean forces involved in the conflict in Tigray have been accused of a string of human rights abuses, now the US has responded by sanctioning the general in charge.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx5r74)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtblt7w)
Diplomatic efforts to extend US military presence in Afghanistan

America wants out of Afghanistan by the agreed deadline of 31st August. But will that mean leaving vulnerable people behind in the hands of the Taliban?

We speak to a Afghan artist and photographer about why she felt compelled to leave.

And low lying Netherlands has been a pioneer in using dykes and dams for land reclamation, but this has come at a price for the environment.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx5vz8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtbly00)
US deadline to leave Afghanistan

The situation at Kabul airport remains tense, but US president Joe Biden says the evacuation operation is on track and should be completed by the August 31st deadline.

In China the Covid-19 blame game is in full swing, with a campaign to deflect attention away from the city of Wuhan.

10 days ago Haiti suffered its latest natural disaster - a earthquake that forced 30,000 people to leave their homes. But has the international aid response delivered for the people of the Caribbean nation?


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx5zqd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl8)
Ways to save the planet: Swap concrete for wood

Wood is strong enough to build skyscrapers, and bamboo - the fastest growing plant in the world - can also be used for building. Both suck up large amounts of greenhouse gas. We find out what would happen if we used these materials instead of concrete in construction.

Produced and presented by Jo Mathys and Tom Heap.
Picture: Moelven


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hwbzs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jg5)
The economics of the Taliban

The economy of Afghanistan is collapsing as remittances and foreign aid dry up. As the militant Taliban consolidate their control over the country, it's unclear whether they will be capable, or even interested, in propping up the economy to prevent further humanitarian crises. Today on Business Daily, we're looking at how the economics of life under the Taliban. Professor Jonathan Goodhand of SOAS University of London, explains how the Taliban managed to generate revenues over the years since the US invasion, from local taxation on commodities, as well as support from sympathetic parties outside the country. Ian Hannan, a British mining engineer, says the Taliban has also benefitted enormously from mining in recent years. Now, the big question is whether they will be able to manage the country's entire economy, and Vanda Felbab-Brown of the Brookings Institution in Washington D.C. thinks Afghanistan cannot survive without the aid it has relied on for decades.

(Image: Taliban militants in Kabul on August 16th, 2021. Image credit: AFP via Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5r)
My father survived the sinking of the Titanic

When the RMS Titanic sank in 1912, after hitting an iceberg in the North Atlantic, roughly 700 passengers survived by escaping in the ship's lifeboats. Among them were six Chinese sailors travelling in third class. Unlike other survivors, their stories remained untold for decades. They faced racism and a hostile immigration system when they reached America. Viv Jones speaks to Tom Fong, the son of one of the Chinese sailors. He only found out what had happened to his father after his death.

Photo: Tom’s father, Fang Lang. Credit: LP Films.


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx63gj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hwgqx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2h26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx676n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rtb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx6bys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb818yy1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hwq75)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx6gpx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tjrr0x8ln)
Sportsworld

The Opening Ceremony of the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.

Image: The mascots Miraitowa (L) for Olympics and Someity (R) for Paralympics at the Olympic Stadium on July 23, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Lintao Zhang/Getty Images)


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx6lg1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb8196f9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hwyqf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2h26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx6q65)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58804pphs)
G7 leaders' emergency talks on Afghanistan

G7 leaders are meeting virtually to discuss the situation in Afghanistan. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to call on US President Joe Biden to extend the 31st August deadline for withdrawing from the country. We hear from the BBC's Secunder Kermani in Kabul and Fionnuala Ni Aolain, special rapporteur for the UN on counter terrorism and human rights, joins us to explain her hopes for the future of the country.

Also on the programme: the Paralympics get underway in Tokyo against a backdrop of rising coronavirus cases; and a new report says Europe's recent extreme weather is up to nine times more likely to be repeated because of global warming.



( Picture credit: US marine Corps/ Reuters)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx6ty9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hx66p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bk9hntzc0)
VP Harris continues South East Asia tour in Vietnam

US Vice President Kamala Harris is in Vietnam on the second stop of her tour of South East Asia. The trip is largely seen as an effort by the US to reaffirm its economic and trade ties in the region. Correspondent for Nikkei Asia in Ho Chi Minh City, Lien Hoang, tells us how her visit is being received there.

Thirty years ago today, Ukraine declared its independence from the Soviet Union. Soon the country is also due to loose lucrative gas transit fees from Russia when its larger neighbour opens the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, which will bypass Ukraine. We sit down with the CEO of the Ukrainian gas and oil company Naftogaz, Yuri Vitrenko, to reflect on 30 years of economic twists and turns. And the Tokyo 2020 Paralympics kick off today – largely without spectators, like the Olympics. So how can athletes and their sports still capitalise on the event? Conrad Wiacek, sports analyst at GlobalData in London tells us how.

(Photo: Kamala Harris at talks in Singapore. Credit: Evelyn Hockstein/Getty Images)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx6ypf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxnrx0nymw)
What do Afghan Americans think about the withdrawal?

President Joe Biden is meeting with the leaders of the G7 group of countries to discuss the situation in Afghanistan. The other countries are expected to ask President Biden to extend the 31 August deadline for leaving Afghanistan, to allow more rescue flights. But what do Afghan American's living in the US want their President to do? and how do they feel about the decisions so far by the US government? We'll hear what they think.

The opening ceremony of the Paralympic Games is happening Japan. Because of coronavirus restrictions these Paralympics will be very different and nearly all supporters will be unable to attend. We'll explain more about the history of the Games and speak to some athletes who are taking part.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to answer listener questions about Covid-19. Today our guest is Dr Isaac Bogoch, an infectious diseases physician and scientist from the University of Toronto.

(Photo: People rally against the Taliban during a demonstration in Los Angeles 21/08/2021. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx72fk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxnrx0p2d0)
Afghanistan: G7 countries meet

President Joe Biden is meeting with the leaders of the G7 group of countries to discuss the situation in Afghanistan. The other countries are expected to ask President Biden to extend the 31 August deadline for leaving Afghanistan, to allow more rescue flights. We'll bring you the latest from the meeting.

Also, what do Afghan American's living in the US want their President to do? and how do they feel about the decisions so far by the US government? We'll hear what they think.

The opening ceremony of the Paralympic Games is happening Japan. Because of coronavirus restrictions these Paralympics will be very different and nearly all supporters will be unable to attend. We'll explain more about the history of the Games and speak to some athletes who are taking part.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to answer listener questions about Covid-19. Today our guest is Dr Swapneil Parikh, an infectious disease researcher at the Kasturba Hospital of infectious diseases in Mumbai

(Photo: EU press conference after a virtual G7 leaders meeting on Afghanistan 24/08/2021. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx765p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwq)
Undercover in a nursing home at the age of 83

After his wife died, 83-year-old Sergio Chamy was feeling lost and alone, so when he spotted a job advert in a newspaper looking for gentlemen in their 70s to 90s, he answered it. He was more than a little surprised when he found out what the job actually involved: going undercover at a nursing home for the elderly in his native Chile. What he discovered there has inspired a national conversation in Chile about the loneliness and sadness often experienced by the elderly. Sergio's time undercover at the home in 2017 was filmed and released as a documentary called The Mole Agent which was nominated for an Oscar this year - Sergio and his daughter Dalal attended the ceremony in Los Angeles. Outlook's Jane Chambers has been speaking to both of them.

Brad Gudger was first diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukaemia in 2013 when he was just 19. Although he responded well to treatment, he had a relapse a few years later and it was while he was isolating in a hospital ward awaiting a bone marrow transplant in 2018 that he came up with an inspiring idea - an app to bring young people together who have been diagnosed with cancer and are feeling alone. With the help of an app developer, Brad has founded a charity called Alike and it's already helping thousands of young cancer patients in the UK. Brad is hoping it will soon be available more widely. He's received the Diana Award for young people who are creating positive social change, and presented his app to Her Majesty the Queen.

Film clips from The Mole Agent came courtesy of Micromundo Productions.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Sergio Chamy, undercover agent, writes his nightly report
Credit: Micromundo


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx79xt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb819xx2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hxp66)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ngr4wb5r5)
2021/08/24 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx7fny)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gz0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hxsyb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsg)
Why the Taliban love social media

While the stereotype of the Afghan Taliban is that they lack sophistication, that certainly isn’t true for their online presence, which is geared to influence across many languages within Afghanistan and around the world. Adam Rutland co-founder of the Centre for Information Resilience looks at the effectiveness of their campaign and how they have learnt from both ISIS and Hamas.

We also look at computer guided initiatives for understanding the working of the human brain. Alex Frangi and Ali Sarrami Foroushani from Leeds University have a model which can be used to do research which would be dangerous in real people.

And Fern Luham reports on the technology she and other blind people can use around the home from practical devices to those that help with her social life.


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington

Studio Manager: Nigel Dix
Producer: Julian Siddle

(Image: Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx7kf2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58804qjqp)
US : Not extending Afghan withdrawal deadline

The leaders of the G7 nations say the US won't extend their military presence in Afghanistan beyond the August the 31st deadline - but they want certain guarantees from the Taliban. Meanwhile, the Taliban say women who have a job should stay at home for their own safety. And humanitarian work in Afghanistan is on pause.

Also on the programme, we hear about Charlie Watts, the drummer with the Rolling Stones rock band who has died.

(Photo: Evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport; Credit: REUTERS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx7p56)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hy1fl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx7sxb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywswjfn3g9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skysws52y)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hy55q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48xf1ghbgg)
VP Harris continues southeast Asia tour in Vietnam

US Vice President Kamala Harris is in Vietnam on the second stop of her tour of southeast Asia. The trip is largely seen as an effort by the US to reaffirm its economic and trade ties in the region. Correspondent for Nikkei Asia in Ho Chi Minh City, Lien Hoang, tells us how her visit is being received there. 30 years ago today, Ukraine declared its independent from the Soviet Union. Soon the country is also is due to loose lucrative gas transit fees from Russia when its larger neighbour opens the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, which will bypass Ukraine. We sit down with the CEO of the Ukrainian gas and oil company Naftogaz, Yuri Vitrenko, to reflect on 30 years of economic twists and turns. And the Tokyo 2020 Paralympics kick off today – largely without spectators, like the Olympics. So how can athletes and their sports still capitalise on the event? Conrad Wiacek, sports analyst at GlobalData in London tells us how. (Photo: Kamala Harris at talks in Singapore, Evelyn Hockstein/Getty)



WEDNESDAY 25 AUGUST 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx81dl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqhk9t5dq9)
US: 'We will meet Afghanistan withdrawal deadline'

As people look to leave Afghanistan, we speak with the International Refugee Committee about measures to help those still in the country, whilst the chief executive of Airbnb, Brian Chesky, tells us about the firms efforts to house Afghan refugees who do manage to flee the country. In Japan, the Paralympics has its opening ceremony. But the seats are all empty and the pandemic looms large over the city - we'll be asking if the government was right to go ahead with the Games. Shipping giant Maersk announces a move in to green fuel – our expert tells us how the move will change the nature of geopolitical power as we know it. Plus, the new Spiderman film from Marvel has been leaked – we look at the history of lucrative films and how one leak changed everything. We discuss all this with guests Andy Uhler from Texas, and in Tokyo, Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus, at Hitotsubashi University.


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx854q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81bs3z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hyjf3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct064t)
Changing World, Changing Bodies

What is the secret to a longer life?

Why do people who live in five communities around the world – known as Blue Zones- consistently outlive the rest of us on the planet? Professor Cregan-Reid goes in search of the secret of a long life. He visits Sardinia home to one of those long lived communities where several villages boast dozens of people aged 100 or more.

What used to kill us routinely no longer does so - at least not in such numbers. By rights many, many more of us should be emulating the residents of the Blue Zones and living well beyond 100. Instead we are succumbing to lifestyle diseases and longevity could even be about to fall for future generations. The good news is researchers in the Blue Zones have identified seven easily adapted rules for a longer life!

(Photo: Ushi Okushima, a 105-year-old woman from the village of Ogimi, Okinawa, Japan. The village is known as "longevity village" due to the long life span of residents there. Credit: Mie Kohiyama/AFP/Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx88wv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx8dmz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81c0m7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hyrxc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Documentary (w3ct1ck1)
Archiving Black America

"We are our history," said James Baldwin. But how history is remembered depends on what materials survive, and who deems those materials worthy of preserving.

Maya Millett - a writer, editor and founder of Race Women, an archive project dedicated to honouring early Black American feminists - speaks to the archivists who are working to ensure the voices and stories of African-Americans are not forgotten.

As racism and violence against African-Americans continues, collecting, cataloguing, and preserving the truth has never been so vital in preventing the distortion of history. The historical record has the power to preserve legacies and shape identities - but it doesn’t write itself. History is an activity, and what makes it into the archives depends on the actions people take now.

With contributions from musician Rhiannon Giddens; Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture Director, Kevin Young; Julieanna Richardson, founder of The HistoryMakers (the largest collection of African-American first-person video oral history testimonies in the world); contemporary art curator Kimberly Drew (aka museummammy); and Fisk University Special Collections Librarian, DeLisa Minor Harris.

(Photo: Maya Millett. Credit: Laurent Chevalier)


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx8jd3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtbpldv)
Live news, business and sport from around the world.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx8n47)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtbpq4z)
President Biden sticking to evacuation deadline

US President Joe Biden says he expects the US evacuation mission in Afghanistan to be finished by 31st August, but he also stressed the military would be making contingency plans for all scenarios.

But that's less of a concern for France, which evacuated 600 Afghans in May, leaving it less vulnerable to the Taliban's lightening advance.

We'll be in Nepal to look at the impact of climate change on one of the world's poorest countries - including more landslides, droughts and forest fires.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx8rwc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtbptx3)
Joe Biden says US on track to meet airlift deadline

There's still much discussion over the date for America's final departure from Afghanistan, President Joe Biden says the US is on track for the 31st August deadline. The Taliban say they won't be welcome after that date.

Coronavirus cases are increasing in Canada where the government faces accusations that it abandoned control measures too soon.

The beautiful Italian city of Venice epitomises the crowd problems facing the world's great tourist attractions. It has now installed turnstiles in a desperate bid to limit visitors flooding its ancient streets.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx8wmh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbn)
Paula Kahumbu: Saving Africa's wild spaces

Stephen Sackur speaks to Paula Kahumbu, CEO for WildlifeDirect, Kenya. Her campaign to protect elephants and other endangered species asks Kenyans to prioritise protection of the country’s wild spaces – is it working?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hz7ww)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jny)
Sexism, tribalism and housing

Finding a place to live in Nigeria’s big cities. Finding somewhere to live can be stressful wherever you are in the world. But in Lagos, Africa’s fastest growing city, add in sexism, tribalism and stumping up more than a year’s worth of rent in advance. Are these practices making it an impossible place to live and what is being done to try and change the situation? Tamasin Ford speaks to Stephanie Chizoba Odili and Chiamaka Okafor who both, as single women, had problems finding a place to rent. She also speaks to Uchenna Idoko, the Executive Director of the Centre for Gender Economics in Lagos. She says Nigeria's patriarchal structure dictates how marriage is viewed as the single most important social custom, awarding women both respect and status - and that it has to change. And Ugo Okoro is the co-founder of Muster, a housing app that allows people to rent out their rooms in Lagos, Abuja and Kalabah. He says they are working hard to change the narrative by eliminating prejudice, sexism and tribalism so there is no more discrimination.

(Picture credit: Adeyinka Yusuf/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x80)
Campaigning for Mexico's women with disabilities

In the mid 2000s disability campaigners in Mexico were stepping up their efforts to secure changes in laws and attitudes in their country. They faced indifference from politicians and business leaders, and stereotypical portrayals in the media. For the estimated 4.3 million women with disabilities in Mexico, the situation was even more difficult. Maryangel Garcia-Ramos, who has become one of her country's leading disability activists, tells Mike Lanchin about her own personal struggle and the battle for recognition for women with disabilities, who she calls "the forgotten sisters."

Photo:Maryangel Garcia-Ramos at UN headquarters, New York, June 2019 (courtesy of Maryangel Garcia-Ramos)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx90cm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct064t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hzcn0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx943r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2h07)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx97vw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81cvv4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hzm48)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct1ck1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx9cm0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tjrr105hr)
Sportsworld

Live action from the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.

(Photo by CHARLY TRIBALLEAU/AFP via Getty Images)


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx9hc4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81d3bd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49hzvmj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx9m38)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58804sldw)
Race to evacuate most vulnerable Afghans

Taliban leaders have told the BBC that the only Afghans who should be going to Kabul airport are those cleared by the United States and its allies. Also on the programme: British study finds that protection from Pfizer and AstraZeneca decreases after 5-6 months; and why it's now easier for Belgians to retrieve a stray ball or pet from their neighbour's garden.

(Picture: People who have been evacuated from Afghanistan arrive at Melsbroek military airport in Belgium. Credit: Reuters/Johanna Geron)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx9qvd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j033s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4csglkytx1)
How to tackle cyber crime

President Biden has gathered tech leaders at the White House to discuss how to clamp down on rising cyber-crime. David Cole, chief executive of the cyber security firm Open Raven in California tells us why the problem has spiked during lockdown, and how we should try and tackle it. Also on the programme, we hear from Uganda as thousands of truck drivers strike over security fears on a key trade route in South Sudan. We hear how tribalism and sexism is exacerbating Nigeria's housing crisis. And we meet the professional gamer, now coaching others in how to be the next Esports star.
Picture credit: Getty Images


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx9vlj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxnrx0rvjz)
Afghanistan: The evacuation continues

Thousands of people are still currently scrambling to flee Afghanistan after the Taliban seized back control of the country, almost two decades after they were ousted by the US-led coalition. Taliban leaders have told the BBC that the only Afghans who should be going to Kabul airport are those cleared by the United States and its allies. We get the latest on the evacuation efforts at the airport. And we speak to our correspondent, who tells us that some people who were due to leave this morning have abandoned their plans fearing for their safety.

And as well as hearing more voices from inside the country, we hear a conversation with Afghans living in France and the UK who are helping recent refugees from Kabul to resettle.

Also, one of our regular Covid-19 experts, Dr Maria Sundaram from ICES Ontario in Toronto, answers listeners' questions. We also get her thoughts on the new research suggesting that protection from Covid vaccines wanes within six months.

(Photo: Afghan citizens board a Spanish military plane, August 24, 2021. Credit: Ministry of Defence of Spain/Handout via Reuters)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkx9zbn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxnrx0rz93)
OS conversations: Helping Afghan refugees

Thousands of people are still currently scrambling to flee Afghanistan after the Taliban seized back control of the country, almost two decades after they were ousted by the US-led coalition. We hear a conversation with Afghans living in France and the UK who are helping recent refugees from Kabul to resettle.

And Taliban leaders have told the BBC that the only Afghans who should be going to Kabul airport are those cleared by the United States and its allies. We get the latest on the evacuation efforts at the airport. And we speak to our correspondent, who tells us that some people who were due to leave this morning have abandoned their plans fearing for their safety.

Also, one of our regular Covid-19 experts, Dr Pedro Hallal, an epidemiologist from the Federal University of Pelotas in the south of Brazil, answers listeners' questions. We also get his thoughts on the new research suggesting that protection from Covid vaccines wanes within six months.

(Photo: Afghan refugees arriving at Melsbroek, Belgium, August 25, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Johanna Geron)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxb32s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyz)
The secret link between two gymnasts

Dominique Moceanu was part of the so-called Magnificent Seven, the USA women's gymnastics team who took gold at the 1996 Olympic Games. But she had a rough time, and was speaking out during the recent Tokyo Games when the brilliant American gymnast Simone Biles shared that she was struggling with her mental health. Dominique was just 14 when she went to the Olympics and made headlines across the world. Watching her from afar was Jennifer Bricker, a little girl in Illinois who was born without legs and was also a professional acrobat. She would watch Dominique on TV and idolised her. Years later Jennifer made an extraordinary discovery that would change both their lives. They told their story to Matthew Bannister.

This interview was first broadcast in December 2016.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Jennifer Bricker (left) and Dominique Moceanu
Credit: Courtesy of Baker Publishing Group (L), Mike Powell via Getty Images (R)


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x80)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxb6tx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81dtt5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j0l39)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ngr4wf2n8)
2021/08/25 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxbbl1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct064t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j0pvf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvp)
Antibody cocktails against Covid

Trials have shown that cocktails of antibodies are effective against Covid, and one called Ronapreve has just been approved for use in the UK, following in the footsteps of Japan and the US. Claudia Hammond talks to Penny Ward, Professor of Pharmaceutical Medicine at Kings College, London, about how these monoclonal antibodies work and where they are best used, given that they are very expensive.

The UN Refugee Agency and the International Organisation for Migration have called on governments to ensure that everyone is included in vaccination plans, including refugees and internally displaced people. Samara Linton reports on how undocumented migrants, in South East Asia and in the UK, are getting vaccinated against Covid.

The increased heat we are experiencing with climate change is causing deaths in people with underlying health conditions. Professor Kristie Ebi of the University of Washington tells Claudia about what we can do to keep cool, in particular in places without air conditioning.

And family doctor Graham Easton comments on these stories and discusses the relationship between Covid and heat.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Deborah Cohen

(Picture: Computer illustration of the release of monoclonal antibodies. Credit: Nanoclustering/Science Photo Library/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxbgb5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58804tfms)
Exit Afghanistan

The Pentagon says there are still ten thousand people waiting for US flights out of Kabul. Many more are still outside the airport, desperate to get out of Afghanistan before the end of month deadline. We speak to veteran US foreign policy decision-maker, Paul Wolfowitz about this.

Also on the programme, Nepal and Madagascar - at the sharp end of global climate change; And why the Chinese authorities are encouraging the idea Covid came from America.

(Photo: Evacuation from Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul; Credit: Reuters)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxbl29)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j0ybp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct1ck1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxbptf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywswjfr0cd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skysww201)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j122t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48xf1gl7ck)
How to tackle cyber crime

President Biden has gathered tech leaders at the White House to discuss how to clamp down on rising cyber-crime. Stephanie Hare tells us why the problem is serious and how we should try and tackle it. Also on the programme, we hear from Uganda as thousands of truck drivers strike over security fears on a key trade route in South Sudan. We hear how tribalism and sexism is exacerbating Nigeria's housing crisis. And we meet the professional gamer, now coaching others in how to be the next Esports star.
Picture credit: Getty Images



THURSDAY 26 AUGUST 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxby9p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqhk9t89md)
Kamala Harris pledges cooperation with Vietnam

As many around the world ask questions of the USA's foreign policy, the White House looks towards partners in Asia to reaffirm them of America's commitment to the region, and at the same time, to counter China's growing assertion. We'll hear from an employment lawyer as to why US firms will increasingly mandate workers to be vaccinated against Covid-19. Plus, why in Nigeria the search to secure a house isn't just a financial challenge, it's a cultural one too. We'll discuss this and more with our guests Ralph Silva, a broadcaster based in Toronto and Stefanie Yuen Thio a Singapore based lawyer with the firm TSMP.


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxc21t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81fp12)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j1fb6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxr)
Catalonia: Squatters, eviction and extortion

How Catalonia’s housing crisis spawns opportunities for organised crime… Spain has a history of squatting. After the property crash of 2008 many families were forced to occupy homes that did not belong to them because they could not pay their mortgages. Now a darker side to ‘okupacion’ has emerged. Organised crime has seen an opportunity. Some flats in Barcelona have become ‘narcopisos’ - properties used to process or sell drugs. Other empty properties have been ‘sub-let’ by gangs to families who cannot afford a commercial rent. And the pandemic has spawned a new commercial model – extortion. These are cases where squatters occupy a property and demand a ‘ransom’ from the owner of several thousand Euros before they will leave. Enter the controversial ‘desokupa’ companies – firms run by boxers and bouncers who will evict unwanted 'tenants.'

Producer / Presenter: Linda Pressly
Producer / Presenter in Spain: Esperanza Escribano
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Jorge Fe, director of FueraOkupas – a company dedicated to evicting squatters and unwanted tenants. Credit: BBC/Esperanza Escribano)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxc5sy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x80)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxc9k2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81fxjb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j1ntg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg2)
The unstoppable rise of starch

Starches are among the most important and versatile additives in processed food, but most of us know little about them and there are some we should be wary of.

Emily Thomas hears why starch is a food manufacturer’s best friend - making pies crispier, cakes airier, and yoghurts creamier. It’s even used to mimic and replace ingredients some of us want to limit, like sugar and fat.

But although starch is a vital source of energy for all of us, some highly processed starches have been linked with negative health outcomes, and it can be hard for the consumer to find out which type they’re eating.

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Producers: Simon Tulett and Siobhan O'Connell.

Contributors:

Peter Hendrikx, Ingredion;
Marty Jopkin, author of 'The Science of Food';
Fred Warren, The Quadram Institute

(Picture: Bread 'flying' in mid-air. Credit: Getty/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxcf96)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtbsh9y)
Kabul airport terror attack warning

Authorities in the UK and US ask people to avoid Kabul airport due to a terror threat. It comes as the US says it will hold the Taliban to its promise to let people leave after the August 31st deadline.

We’ll bring you the voices of Afghan female film directors. They have been making headlines in Afghanistan and around the world.

And last year was the warmest on record across Europe, say scientists. What does it mean for the continent and the world?


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxck1b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtbsm22)
Terror threat hampers Kabul evacuation

The US says the Taliban has promised to allow foreigners and Afghans to leave Afghanistan beyond 31 August. We get the latest from the situation on the ground.

We hear from an Afghan member of the LGBT community who fears for his life and for those left behind.

And hackers opposing the Belarus government have leaked dozens of images and data belonging to the police and interior ministry databases.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxcnsg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtbsqt6)
Security threat at Kabul airport

As the US and allies warn of a security threat at Kabul Airport, we'll cross to the Afghan capital where the UN's Children's charity says millions of young people are in need of humanitarian assistance.

Last year was the hottest on record in Europe by a large margin according to an annual report. The scientists involved say it's further evidence of climate change.

And we hear about the claims that two oxygen firms intimidated Mexican hospitals during the Covid pandemic.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxcsjl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2d)
Is our fascination with sharks bad for them?

Sharks are mysterious and ancient creatures. They're also a threat. Yet , the once great killers now face what might be their biggest threat – us.

From monster killers of the sea to endangered species, Paul Connolly asks if our fascination with sharks is bad for them.

Produced by Soila Apparicio.
Researched by Olivia Noon.

(Image: Great white shark. Credit: Gerard Soury/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j24sz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9n)
Life under the Taliban

Gaisu fled the Taliban when she was 18. Now she's fleeing again. Speaking to the BBC's Tamasin Ford, Gaisu recounts being engaged to the son of a local warlord at age 6, fleeing to the United States at 18, and then returning as a civil servant after the Taliban were toppled. She recounts her time as the only female journalist at a local radio station as a teenager, how she butted heads with the Taliban and how her mother inspired her to be a feminist from a young age. We'll also hear how in the post-Taliban era Gaisu worked to get more women into public and government roles. And she tells Tamasin how she feels now, seeing the country come fully under Taliban rule once again, and women once again disappearing into the margins of society.

(Image credit: A woman in Afghanistan in 1996. Image credit: Getty Images.)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3h)
Syria's rebel poet

The Syrian poet Nizar Qabbani was one of the most influential and famous Arab cultural figures of the 20th century. His enduring legacy has become contested territory in the conflict that has torn his homeland apart.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxcx8q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j28k3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxd10v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rll)
Mars: A history of the Red Planet

With three separate missions exploring the Red Planet in 2021, Mars is once again under the spotlight. But to tell the truth, it’s never been away. Mars has fascinated people for centuries with its seemingly curious motion in the night sky, its red colour and the eternal question as to whether it may or may not harbour life, past or present.

Since the 1960s, robotic exploration of Mars has provided us with evidence that it may have had periods where it was once a warm and wet planet. That’s in contrast to the arid, cold celestial object we know today. The harsh Martian atmosphere presents challenges for anyone hoping to land humans on the planet. But nevertheless, the next few decades could potentially see either a private commercial operator, a national space agency or an international partnership make history with the planet’s first human exploration. Some have even argued that’s a first step to ‘terraforming’ or populating Mars in the future.

Bridget Kendall is joined by Michael Meyer, the lead scientist for NASA’s Mars Exploration Programme; Sarah Stewart Johnson, Associate Professor of Planetary Science at Georgetown University and author of The Sirens of Mars; Jorge Vago, the Scientist for Mars Missions at the European Space Agency, and curator Matthew Shindell from the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service.

[Image: Creative image of the space station orbiting Mars. Credit: Cokada via Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8m)
Brazil's blind sprinting legend

Brazil’s Terezinha Guilhermina is one of the world’s fastest blind sprinters, with three Paralympic gold medals in the 100m and 200m T11 sprints. Growing up in grinding poverty, Guilhermina always dreamed of taking part in athletics but had no shoes to wear until her sister – who worked as a maid – lent her a pair. Guilhermina shares her life story with Dan Hardoon. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Terezinha Guilhermina with her guide at the 2012 London Olympics (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxd4rz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81grr7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j2j1c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxd8j3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tjrr132dv)
Sportsworld

Live action from the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.

(Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images)


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxdd87)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81h07h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j2rjm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxdj0c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58804wh9z)
Kabul airlifts to end soon

As more western countries wind up their evacuation flights from Kabul airport, we hear from a young Afghan who's on the UK priority list but unable to leave.

Also, the vast wildfires of Siberia, destroying forests and releasing millions of tons of carbon into the atmosphere. Plus the bigger, hotter planets outside our solar system that astronomers say may still support life.

(Photo: There have been warnings of a terrorist attack on Kabul airport in Afghanistan, where thousands of people are gathered. Credit: Reuters)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxdmrh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j300w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49b4drztj8)
The world's central bankers 'gather' in Jackson Hole

Central bankers from around the world are about to meet - virtually - to discuss challenging issues like inflation. They were supposed to be getting together in person at the Jackson Hole resort in Wyoming in the US. But a rise in cases of the Delta variant of coronavirus means the event has been turned into an online affair. We speak to Mohamed el-Erian, former chief executive of bond fund Pimco, about where we are in the global recovery. In Sweden, the BBC's Maddy Savage reports on controversial proposals to abolish rent controls for new apartments built in the country. And the English city of Liverpool lost its UNESCO World Heritage designation after 17 years. The BBC's Victoria Craig explores why.

(Photo: Shopfront in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxdrhm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxnrx0vrg2)
Kabul Airport explosion

We get the latest on an explosion near Kabul Airport as countries continue to try and evacuate people ahead of the Taliban deadline. The explosion has occurred at the Abbey gate entrance where British troops have been stationed in recent days. It was one of three gates that had been closed followings warnings of a terrorist threat.

We’ll also continue to hear the experiences of people in Afghanistan under the new Taliban leadership.

BBC Urdu will give us information on the situation on the Afghan-Pakistan border as people try to leave the country there.

And we will be join by Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland who will answer audience questions about the coronavirus pandemic.

Picture: Paratroopers assigned to the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division conduct a security patrol during evacuations from Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan August 24, 2021. Credit: U.S. Army/Sgt. Jillian G. Hix/Handout via REUTERS


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxdw7r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxnrx0vw66)
Kabul Airport explosion

We get the latest on an explosion near Kabul Airport as countries continue to try and evacuate people ahead of the Taliban deadline. The explosion has occurred at the Abbey gate entrance where British troops have been stationed in recent days. It was one of three gates that had been closed followings warnings of a terrorist threat.

We’ll hear a conversation between young people living in Afghanistan about how their view of the future has changed since The Taliban took control.

BBC Urdu will give us information on the situation on the Afghan-Pakistan border as people try to leave the country there.

And we will be join by Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland who will answer audience questions about the coronavirus pandemic.

Picture: Smoke billows from the airport area after a blast outside the Hamid Karzai International Airport, in Kabul, Afghanistan, 26 August 2021. At least 13 people including children were killed in a blast outside the airport on 26 August. The blast occurred outside the Abbey Gate and follows recent security warnings of attacks ahead of the 31 August deadline for US troops withdrawal. Credit: EPA/AKHTER GULFAM


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxdzzw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3h)
We left as kayakers and came back as dissidents

In the late 1970s, a bunch of fun-loving young Polish guys fed up with living under communism built themselves some kayaks and set off on an adventure. Despite their initial lack of experience, equipment or money, Andrzej Pietowski, Jacek Bogucki and their friends became the first to paddle one of the world's deepest river canyons - the Colca in southern Peru. They were about to return to Poland as heroes when the military imposed a crackdown on the burgeoning Solidarity movement, leaving the kayakers in a risky position. Andrzej and Jacek tell Jo Fidgen their extraordinary story, which is featured in the upcoming documentary Godspeed, Los Polacos!

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: The kayakers
Credit: Canoandes Inc


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxf3r0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81hqq8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j3h0d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ngr4whzkc)
2021/08/26 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxf7h4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j3lrj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l43)
World’s first DNA Covid vaccine

Indian authorities have approved the world’s first DNA-based Covid vaccine for emergency use. Not all the data that has led to the opening of the phase 3 trials is yet publicly available, but as public health policy expert Chandrakant Lahariya explains to Roland, it could be a real help in India’s, and the world’s, fight to get things under control.

The origins of the Covid virus were investigated last winter by a WHO team sent to Wuhan – where the first cases were discovered – earlier this year. Their work has since become the subject of intense political scrutiny and some criticism. This week, members of the team including Marian Koopmans have written a rebuttal, setting out the original terms of the investigation and urging the continuation of the process, as she explains to Victoria Gill.

Most of the science written by people from or about the African continent is written in English. Many local African languages do not currently have a meaningful vocabulary for many of the scientific terms and concepts researchers use. This week a team of scientists, journalists, and translators are completing the launch of a project called Decolonise Science, which will take 180 nominated papers posted on the website AfricaArxiv, translate them into 6 African languages including isiZulu, Sothu, and Hausa, and then use Machine Learning methods to build resources for science communication and education in people’s home languages. Project partner Sibusiso Byela explains the thinking.

This week the UK’s Royal Society announced its annual awards. Kenya’s George Warimwe has taken the Africa Award for his work creating vaccines for a virus that creates disease in livestock and humans – Rift Valley Fever. His promising approach stems from years of working with adenovirus technology akin to the AstraZeneca covid virus. But as he explains, his One Health approach is to learn from the immune response in humans and apply it to animals, and vice-versa. The grant associated with the award should also help him and his team pick- up on research left-off before the coronavirus pandemic.

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield

(Image: Getty Images)


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxfc78)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv58804xbjw)
Kabul airport hit by bomb blasts and gunfire

The US military says twelve of its own personnel also died. We'll hear from our reporter in Kabul and from those trying to treat the wounded. We'll bring you the story of the Afghan female former MP in fear for her life; and a report from the land border with Pakistan, as thousands more attempt to flee.

Also on the programme: the fight over resources beneath public land in the US; and allegations of spying on top government officials in the Czech Republic

(Photo: At least 13 people including children were killed in a blast outside Hamid Karzai International Airport Credit:EPA/AKHTER GULFAM)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxfgzd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j3v7s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rg2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxflqj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywswjftx8h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skyswyyx4)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j3yzx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48xf1gp48n)
Central bankers from around the globe 'gather' in Jackson Hole

Central bankers from around the world are about to meet - virtually - to discuss challenging issues like inflation. They were supposed to be getting together in person at the Jackson Hole resort in Wyoming in the US. But a rise in cases of the Delta variant of coronavirus means the event has been turned into an online affair; we hear from Mohamed el-Erian, former chief executive of bond fund Pimco, about where we are in the global recovery. A new study involving very young children in Mali and Burkina Faso suggests that a new vaccine combination developed by the UK-based pharma company GSK could reduce deaths and illness from malaria by 70% and millions of lives could be saved every year. We hear more from Dr Daniel Chandramohan, Professor of Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; he co-authored the report on the trials. In Sweden, the BBC's Maddy Savage reports on controversial proposals to abolish rent controls for new apartments built in the country. And the English city of Liverpool lost its UNESCO World Heritage designation after 17 years. The BBC's Victoria Craig takes a look at why. (Photo: shopfront in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Credit: AaronP/Bauer-Griffin /Getty)



FRIDAY 27 AUGUST 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxfv6s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqhk9tc6jh)
Central bankers gather virtually in Jackson Hole

Central bankers from around the world are about to meet - virtually - to discuss challenging issues like inflation. We hear from Mohamed el-Erian, former chief executive of bond fund Pimco, about where we are in the global recovery. And a new study involving very young children in Mali and Burkina Faso suggests that a new vaccine combination developed by the UK-based pharma company GSK could reduce deaths and illness from malaria by 70% and millions of lives could be saved every year. We hear more from Dr Daniel Chandramohan, Professor of Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; he co-authored the report on the trials. Plus, Canadians go to the polls soon to give their verdict on the last six years of minority government by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his Liberal Party; we look at the issues at stake. And the English city of Liverpool lost its UNESCO World Heritage designation after 17 years; the BBC's Victoria Craig takes a look at why. And we're joined throughout the programme by Mitchell Hartman of Marketplace - he's in Oregon.
And Rebecca Jones, Bloomberg's Managing Editor for Australia and New Zealand dials in from Melbourne. (Photo: shopfront in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Credit: AaronP/Bauer-Griffin /Getty).


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxfyyx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81jky5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j4b79)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tzg)
Mind games with Malmö's Jon Dahl Tommason

Malmö coach Jon Dahl Tomasson discusses his club's qualification for the UEFA Champions League group stage. And we speak to the former Afghanistan women's captain Shamila Kohestani about the crisis in her home country.

Picture: Jon Dahl Tomasson, head coach of Malmö, looks on prior to a UEFA Europa League match against Wolfsburg (Peter Niedung/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxg2q1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxg6g5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81jtff)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j4kqk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2kyf)
Abused online for my faith

Sophia Smith Galer, reporter and TikTok creator, speaks to users who have faced discrimination and suppression online based on their religion. We speak to YouTuber Nada Majdy, who regularly faces abuse from Islamophobes whose sexualised comments do not get taken down; the Jewish TikTok creators who try to challenge anti-Semitism, only to have their own videos taken down in the process; and we ask why and how Instagram managed to censor #sikh for nearly three months.


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxgb69)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtbwd71)
Kabul airport bomb attack

We take a deep look at the crisis in Afghanistan, as an attack on the crowds gathered at the airport in Kabul kills dozens of people.

We'll put a Democrat congressman on the spot about America's hasty withdrawal, what questions President Biden must answer, and what this all says about America's role in the world.

And we'll follow an Afghan woman - a prominent journalist, former MP and campaigner for women’s rights - as she attempts to leave the country.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxgfyf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtbwhz5)
Kabul airport bombing

The number of people killed in yesterday's twin bomb attacks at Kabul airport has risen to more than 90, with more than 150 others injured.

US President Biden says the evacuations will continue and he vowed to hunt down the militant group - ISIS K - who have claimed responsibility. We get the latest from Kabul.

More aid is being pledged to help victims of Haiti's 7.2 magnitude earthquake which killed more than 2,000 people and has left thousands more homeless. We'll hear from an engineer helping with the structural recovery.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxgkpk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2sxtbwmq9)
US braces for more attacks in Kabul

President Biden has vowed that Islamic State militants responsible for killing thirteen US service personnel will pay for their actions. Ninety people, mostly Afghans, have died in the twin blasts at Kabul airport.

We'll follow an Afghan woman - a prominent journalist, former MP and campaigner for women’s rights - as she attempts to leave the country.

And a verdict is expected in the trial of Heinz-Christian Strache, the former president of the far-right Austrian Freedom Party, who is on trial on corruption charges.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxgpfp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1m)
Andrei Kelin: Russia, Afghanistan and the UK

The chaotic evacuation operation still underway at Kabul airport has put a harsh spotlight on two decades of US and NATO military commitment in Afghanistan. It looks and feels like a strategic defeat, but what does it tell us about the wider geopolitical balance of power? Stephen Sackur speaks to Russia’s ambassador to the UK, Andrei Kelin. Is this reverse for the US and her allies a positive for Russia?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j51q2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0m)
From 'nudge' to 'sludge'

Nobel laureate Richard Thaler talks about why his and Cass Sunstein's 'nudge' theory needs a re-boot.


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyz)
Nigeria's 'War Against Indiscipline'

Muhammadu Buhari's military government launched an unusual campaign to clean up Nigeria in August 1984. Under the policy, Nigerians were forced to queue in an orderly manner, to be punctual and to obey traffic laws. The punishments for infractions could be brutal. Veteran Nigerian journalist Sola Odunfa spoke to Alex Last about the reaction in Lagos to the War Against Indiscipline.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: The Oshodi district of Lagos, 2008 (AFP/Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxgt5t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhc)
AI: Reality and hype

Is language-based artificial intelligence as capable as it seems? We visit a theatre production that places the GPT-3 algorithm at its heart. Plus, why attempts at using AI to help diagnose and treat Covid-19 don’t yet appear to have yielded significant results. And how sensors and AI might help provide better care for vulnerable people in their own homes. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j55g6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxgxxy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsv)
The challenges facing the Taliban

The World Bank this week halted funding for projects in Afghanistan, following the lead of the IMF and US government which also froze payments and accounts. The increased financial pressure on the Taliban is just one of the many challenges they’ll face now they've taken control of the country. Thousands of professionals who’ve worked with foreigners are fleeing, prompting increasingly urgent calls from the Taliban for them to stay. Internal disagreements within the movement are also likely to make forming a stable government difficult, as will attacks from the Islamic State militant group and rebel forces amassing in the Panjshir Valley. So, does the Taliban have what it takes to preside over a relatively orderly transition? Is the group capable of keeping the lights on and the water flowing in cities that now have much more complex infrastructure than they did back in 2001? And when it comes to the potential for a humanitarian disaster to emerge, should Western powers help the new administration in Kabul or work against it?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests. Producers: Paul Schuster and Ellen Otzen.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxh1p2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81knnb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j5dyg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxh5f6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tjrr15z9y)
Sportsworld

Live action from the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games.

(Photo by Alexandre Loureiro/Getty Images)


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxh95b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81kx4l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j5nfq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxhdxg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv58804zd72)
Kabul airlifts resume following airport attack

Final evacuations are under way before a Taliban deadline for foreign troops to leave Afghanistan. Airlifts resumed after a suicide bomb and gun attack left at least 90 people dead at Kabul airport.

Also in the programme: how air pollution increases the risk of mental illness.

Photo: People boarding a British military transport plane at Kabul airport. Credit: UK Ministry of Defence.


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxhjnl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j5wxz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46vt6z0t4h)
Chinese actress fined $46million for tax evasion

China has fined Zheng Shuang, a high-profile actress, $46m for tax evasion and told producers to stop hiring her. It’s part of a crackdown on what Beijing is calling ‘chaotic’ celebrity culture. Rob Young speaks to Casey Hall, Asia correspondent for the Business of Fashion website in Shanghai.
The head of the US Federal Reserve, Jerome Powell, has addressed the virtual meeting of central bankers at Jackson Hole. We’ll hear reaction from Michael Hewson, chief market strategist at CMC Markets, and the BBC’s economics correspondent, Andrew Walker.
And with campaigning in Canada’s election next month well underway, the BBC’s Fergus Nicoll looks at the issues and the candidates.

(Photo: Zheng Shuang in 2019, Credit: VCG/Getty)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxhndq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxnrx0ync5)
Afghanistan: Kabul evacuations in final phase

Evacuation efforts are continuing at Kabul airport following yesterday's bomb attacks that killed at least 90 people and injured more than 150. Hospitals in Kabul, already struggling with fewer staff since the Taliban took power a week ago, have been overwhelmed with patients. We'll bring you the latest from the city and across Afghanistan.

Also, we'll speak to the woman who led a flag protest in defiance of Taliban forces who had just taken over Kabul. The protest raised the Afghan national flag on the country's independence day, pictures of this young woman protesting were shared around the world.

And every day we're joined by a health expert to answer listener questions on Covid-19 and the pandemic. Today our guest is Dr Megan Murray - Professor of global health at Harvard University.

(Photo: Taliban forces block the roads around the airport in Kabul 27/08/2021. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxhs4v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxnrx0ys39)
Afghanistan: Kabul evacuations in final phase

Evacuation efforts are continuing at Kabul airport following yesterday's bomb attacks that killed at least 90 people and injured more than 150. Hospitals in Kabul, already struggling with fewer staff since the Taliban took power a week ago, have been overwhelmed with patients. We'll bring you the latest from the city and across Afghanistan.

Also, we'll speak to the woman who led a flag protest in defiance of Taliban forces who had just taken over Kabul. The protest raised the Afghan national flag on the country's independence day, pictures of this young woman protesting were shared around the world.

And every day we're joined by a health expert to answer listener questions on Covid-19 and the pandemic. Today our guest is Marc Mendelson - Professor of infectious diseases at the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

(Photo: Afghan citizens who have been evacuated from Kabul arrive at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Rota Air Base 27/08/2021. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxhwwz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fc)
The valley of Afghan resistance

In Afghanistan one province is still resisting the Taliban takeover of the country, the Panjshir Valley. The valley also held out during the 80s and 90s against both the Soviet and the Taliban forces. Ismael Sadaat is a journalist with BBC Afghan in London, and has visited the valley several times. He explains why this place has repeatedly been the centre of Afghanistan's armed resistance movements.

India's beleaguered Sunderbans
The Sunderbans in the Bay of Bengal are the world's largest mangrove forest, and they are particularly vulnerable to climate change. More frequent cyclones are displacing families for months at a time. BBC Hindi's Debalin Roy has been there to report on the impact of the most recent one.

Myanmar's radio habit
Radios sold out in Yangon last week following news of a new radio programme, made by the National Unity Government in exile. For many in Myanmar, it’s a return to an old habit formed under previous regimes, as BBC Burmese's Soe Win Than remembers.

Mozambique's missing millions
Mozambicans are gripped by a huge trial which got underway this week, centred on a multi-million dollar corruption scandal which led the economy to collapse. Jose Tembe, who reports for the BBC from Maputo, has been following events.

Let’s talk straight
A video in which two people shout racist remarks at each other seems an unlikely route to dialogue. But ‘Let’s talk straight’ is a staged rap confrontation between two Israelis, Jew and Arab, with a message of co-existence. BBC Arabic’s Murad Shishani explains.

The puppet walking from Turkey to the UK
Little Amal is a 9-year-old refugee girl. She's from the Syrian town of Aleppo, walking 8,000 kilometres from Turkey to the UK in search of her mother. Amal is no ordinary girl, but a puppet, part of a project to raise awareness of the plight of refugees, as BBC Monitoring journalist Beril Akman explains.

Image: Guard post in Afghanistan's Panjshir valley
Credit: Ahmad Sahel Arman/AFP via Getty Images


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxj0n3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxmb81lmmc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j6cxh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ngr4wlwgg)
2021/08/27 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxj4d7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j6hnm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqv)
How did our ancestors sleep?

How we sleep is a topic of endless fascination and for some can, ironically be quite exhausting. Modern life has allowed us to invade the night, and those pesky late night work emails, social media and TV all conspire to limit our sleep or simply prevent us from a truly restful night. But if we travel back in time, did our ancestors master sleep any better? No air-con or electric fan for them on hot humid nights, and only smoky fires to keep them warm on cold, snowy nights. What if we go way back into our pre-history, to our ancient human ancestors? No interruption for them from an unwanted work email, however perhaps a ravenous lion gave them more reason for those night time worries.

CrowdScience listener Tom asks our sleep deprived presenter Datshiane Navanayagam to investigate how our sleep has changed over history and pre-history. She talks to Professor Russell Foster, Head of the Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute at the University of Oxford and Neanderthal expert Dr Rebecca Wragg Sykes about slumber habits in days of yore, and in doing so, she uncovers some top tips from our ancestors that may give us all a better nights rest.

Presented by Datshiane Navanayagam and Produced by Alexandra Feachem

(Woman sitting in bed and yawning. Credit: JGI/Jamie Grill/Getty Images)


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxj84c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5880507fz)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxjcwh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j6r4w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tzg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjppkxjhmm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywswjfxt5l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skysx1vt7)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkj49j6vx0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48xf1gs15r)
Chinese actress fined $46million for tax evasion

China has fined Zheng Shuang, a high-profile actress, $46m for tax evasion and told producers to stop hiring her. It’s part of a crackdown on what Beijing is calling ‘chaotic’ celebrity culture. Rob Young speaks to Casey Hall, Asia correspondent for the Business of Fashion website in Shanghai. The head of the US Federal Reserve, Jerome Powell, has addressed the virtual meeting of central bankers at Jackson Hole. We’ll hear reaction from Michael Hewson, chief market strategist at CMC Markets, and the BBC’s economics correspondent, Andrew Walker. And with campaigning in Canada’s election next month well underway, the BBC’s Fergus Nicol looks at the issues and the candidates. (Photo: Zheng Shuang in 2019, Credit: VCG/Getty)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d63)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxnrx0l1qs)

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BBC Proms on the World Service 19:06 SAT (w3ct2gdf)

BBC Proms on the World Service 12:06 SUN (w3ct2gdf)

Bad Cops 10:06 SUN (w3ct2g75)

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Bad Cops 03:06 MON (w3ct2g75)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j54)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqh61hnytr)

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Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dh4)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqt)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pqt)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lsg)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lsg)

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Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2h25)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2h26)

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Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2h26)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mv7)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mv7)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n64)

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Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nvn)

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Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvp)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2fnq)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2fnq)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2kyf)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tdd)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tdd)

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More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dkd)

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Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hc8)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2sxtbhsln)

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Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kx9)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1t)

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People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pl8)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pl8)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rtb)

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The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2dqx)

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The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p8w)

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The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p8x)

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The Cultural Frontline 23:32 SAT (w3ct1pt0)

The Cultural Frontline 04:32 SUN (w3ct1pt0)

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The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2h07)

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The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20fb)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjr9)

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