Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 14 AUGUST 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18zfx6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqgts5wt6x)
Taliban advance in Afghanistan

In Afghanistan, the Taliban have seized half of the country's provincial capitals, and with the capital Kabul now in its grasp, we hear from Zuhal, a student who fears that women's rights will be at stake if the Taliban return to power. Also in the programme, China's third busiest port, Ningbo-Zhoushan has been partially shut down, due to a worker being infected with coronavirus. Nick Sevidies is editor of the shipping magazine Loadstar, and tells us how it might impact the global shipping industry. And in Scotland, Edinburgh officials tackling antisocial behaviour and housing shortages have taken the first step towards a crackdown on Airbnbs and other short-term rentals. Plus, the BBC's Frey Lindsay reports on how tensions are rising, as the European Union and Turkey try to negotiate renewed funding for a migration deal made at the height of the migrant crisis in 2016, which limited the number of asylum seekers arriving on EU shores. We talk to football finance expert Kieran Maguire about the financial difficulties faced by football leagues since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic. And TV critic Scott Bryan explains Amazon's decision to move the filming of the upcoming Lord of the Rings TV series from New Zealand to the UK.

Throughout the show, we will be joined by Peter Ryan ABC's Senior Business Correspondent in Sydney.

(Image: Makeshift camps have now sprung up in the capital Kabul. Credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18zknb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv6)
On the frontline in Afghanistan, as one city after another falls to the Taliban

Stories from Afghanistan, Greece, Cuba and Norway.

The speed at which the Taliban have overrun towns and cities in Afghanistan has shocked even the most pessimistic observers, with US officials warning that the government in Kabul may not hold out for long. Just before the Taliban attacked the provincial capital of Kandahar, Shelly Kittleson flew down to see troops and civilians prepare for the coming onslaught.

The fires ravaging Greece have been described by some as among the worst natural disasters visited upon the country. The Greek prime minister described them as an ‘ecological catastrophe’. But not all Greeks agree, arguing that the government failed adequately to prepare for them. Hundreds of thousands of hectares of land have been destroyed and more than 60,000 people have had to flee their homes. Our reporter, Bethany Bell has been to one Greek island which was particularly damaged.



They have not really seen much in the way of anti-government demonstrations in Cuba – not on the scale of those which took place recently, and not in so many cities and towns across the island. Yet conditions in Cuba are far from normal, with severe economic troubles aggravated by the Coronavirus outbreak. Our resident correspondent in Havana, Will Grant, has just returned to his post, and found things had changed in the brief time he had been away.

Norwegians are often proud of the stories from World War Two, when the country came under German occupation. There are tales of legendary figures carrying out heroic acts of resistance. Yet less is spoken about the fact that Norway had a homegrown Nazi leader during the occupation, Vidkun Quisling. Indeed, the writer and novelist, Ben Macpherson was surprised to find he could rent Quisling’s holiday home in the fjords, and suspects this might say something about Norway, and its attitude to the past.


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwnxxq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbt)
Olympic cricket and a congested calendar

Ian Watmore, ECB Chair and head of the International Cricket Council's Olympic working group, joins us to talk about the bid for the sport to be included at Los Angeles 2028 and the beginning of the Hundred.

Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Jim Maxwell discuss the injuries affecting England's bowling options heading into the second Test against India

And we'll hear how the inaugural British Gorkhali League is promoting cricket amongst British Nepalese players.

Photo: The torch is lit at the Los Angeles Coliseum as the city was officially named as host of the 2028 Summer Olympics.
Credit: Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18zpdg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f9)
Russian mercenaries in Libya

We hear how BBC Russian and BBC Arabic collaborated in a joint investigation into the role of mercenaries from Russia's secretive Wagner Group in the conflict in Libya. Kateryna Khinkulova and Nader Ibrahim explain how they identified Russian fighters and uncovered evidence of suspected war crimes.

China's wandering elephants
A herd of elephants have finally returned to their nature reserve in southern China after leaving it 17 months ago to trek over 500 kilometres. It is still unclear why the elephants embarked on the journey. BBC Chinese editor Howard Zhang tells us about reactions to the wayward elephants.

Why are South Korean women reclaiming short hair?
When South Korean archer An San won three gold medals at the Tokyo Olympics, many online comments focussed on her short hair, not her sporting success. An was labelled a feminist, a loaded term in South Korea. Julie Yoonnyung Lee of BBC Korean explains the background to the controversy.

Goodbye Lionel Messi
After 21 years, the great Argentinian footballer Lionel Messi has left Barcelona to start a new career with Paris Saint Germain, amid tears from himself and his fans. Among those mourning his departure is BBC Mundo’s Enric Botella, who’s from Barcelona.

Image: Russian mercenaries in Libya
Credit: Wagner telegram group


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyx)
Inside an East German jail

Vera Lengsfeld was a prominent human rights activist in East Germany who was arrested and jailed for taking part in a peaceful protest. She was sent to Hohenschönhausen, the main political prison of the former East German Communist Ministry of State Security, the Stasi. There she was kept in solitary confinement until shortly before the Berlin Wall came down. Vera Lengsfeld spoke to Lucy Williamson about her time in jail.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: A cell inside Hohenschönhausen Prison which has now been made into a museum. Credit: Flickr Commons.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18zt4l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hss)
Silencing dissidents

A year on from the disputed election in Belarus, the country’s president has denied claims his security services were involved in the death of dissident Vitaly Shishov, who was found hanged in neighbouring Ukraine last week. The death follows EU accusations that Minsk effectively “hijacked” a plane en route to Lithuania earlier this year, forcing it to land in Belarus where a journalist on board who was a critic of the president was arrested. Technology allows many dissidents to continue impacting events whether they live at home or abroad. But reports suggest spyware developed in Israel and sold to multiple governments may have been used to target rights activists, journalists and lawyers. The company behind the software denies any wrongdoing and says it’s intended for use against criminals and terrorists. But with surveillance systems proliferating and activists increasingly voicing fears over their safety, is the role that dissidents play under threat?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests. Producers: Paul Schuster and Zak Brophy.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18zxwq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1psz)
Literature in lockdown: Meron Hadero and Emilia Clarke

On this week’s Cultural Frontline we consider the pleasure and the pain of literature in lockdown from the perspective of both writers and readers.

Meron Hadero, the first Ethiopian writer to win The Caine Prize for African Writing, tells presenter Datshiane Navanayagam how she found refuge on the page in the pandemic and why she is drawn to write about displacement.

The award-winning Australian novelist Tara June Winch reveals the impact of the coronavirus on her writing routine.

The British actor and Game of Thrones star Emilia Clarke discovered the essays of the late British author Jenny Diski during lockdown. Emilia speaks to poet and academic Dr Ian Patterson, who was married to Jenny, to discuss the power of cultural escapism in isolation.

And, after revisiting her own early work during the pandemic, the renowned Russian author Ludmila Ulitskaya looks back on the radical reading that made her a writer in the Soviet Union.

Presenter: Datshiane Navanayagam
Producers: Kirsty McQuire, Olivia Skinner, Paul Waters

(Photo: Meron Hadero Credit: Meron Hadero)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwp953)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct1xzt)
Who is TikTok’s masked vigilante?

Think you’re safe being an anonymous TikTok troll or cyber bully? Think again.

The Great Londini could be your worst nightmare come true.

You might think you’re anonymous - but if you leave a threatening, racist or homophobic comment on someone’s video, Londini will find out who you are. If you’re a kid, he’ll contact your parents or your school. If you’re an adult, he'll really tell on you.

In just a few months, the mysterious online vigilante has gained a huge following for his efforts to clean up TikTok. Londini says he’s doing the job that the platform should be.

But does social media need moderation vigilantes - or are they a problem in themselves?

Presenter: Sophia Smith Galer

Editor: Ed Main
Photo: The Great Londini
Photo credit: BBC


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkc)
How good were the performances at the Tokyo Olympics?

A year later than planned, The Tokyo Olympics, have now finished. Thousands of athletes have competed in events that few thought might go ahead and there’s been record success.

This week we take a look at Olympic numbers – how many records were broken in Tokyo, what factors might have influenced the races and what else can the data tell us?

Tim Harford speaks to Dr Joel Mason, who runs the blog, Trackademic.

Producer: Olivia Noon
Editor: Richard Vadon


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz1901mv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt9tt0bfwy)
United States plans evacuation of Kabul

As Taliban forces close in on the Afghan capital, Kabul, the US prepares to airlift out its diplomatic staff and others.

US government scientists confirm that July was the world’s hottest month on record.

And a look at how the Covid-19 pandemic has changed the cultural sector.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Jacquelin Magnay, the European correspondent of The Australian, and William Jordan, Middle East and North Africa expert and former US State Department official.

(Photo: Taliban militants gather around a provincial government office after taking control of Herat, Afghanistan. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz1905cz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt9tt0bkn2)
United States plans evacuation of Kabul

As Taliban forces close in on the Afghan capital, Kabul, the US prepares to airlift out its diplomatic staff and others. Former US ambassador to Afghanistan James Cunningham gives us his reflections on the latest developments.

Also: Are Covid-19 booster vaccines necessary? As some countries start to roll out booster programmes, we get an expert opinion from Danny Altmann, Professor of Immunology at Imperial College London.

And a look at the benefits of talking to strangers with author Joe Keohane, author of ‘The Power of Strangers’.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Jacquelin Magnay, the European correspondent of The Australian, and William Jordan, Middle East and North Africa expert and former US State Department official.

(Photo: Taliban militants gather around a provincial government office after taking control of Herat, Afghanistan. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz190943)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt9tt0bpd6)
United States plans evacuation of Kabul

As Taliban forces close in on the Afghan capital, Kabul, the US prepares to airlift out its diplomatic staff and others. We talk to a journalist with family in Kandahar, one of the Afghan cities that has already fallen to the Islamists.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss this and other issues are Jacquelin Magnay, the European correspondent of The Australian, and William Jordan, Middle East and North Africa expert and former US State Department official.

(Photo: Taliban militants gather around a provincial government office after taking control of Herat, Afghanistan. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwpndh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8v)
My baby triggered a terrifying breakdown

For many women having a newborn baby is one of the happiest times of their lives - but for a tiny proportion that new arrival begins a terrifying nightmare. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women who experienced extreme psychosis after the birth of their child.

When Catherine Cho’s first child was three months old she and her husband embarked on an extended trip to visit family and friends back home in the US. Their Korean relatives warned that they shouldn’t be travelling so far before the baby was 100 days old. Stressed and exhausted Catherine started seeing frightening things that weren’t there. That trip ended with her admission to an involuntary psychiatric ward, separated from her husband and child and not able to understand who she was or how she got there. She’s written a book about her journey back to reality called Inferno: A Memoir.

Lobeh Osagie-Asiah was born in Gambia and grew up in London. After a psychotic episode when she was a student, she was diagnosed as bipolar and knew she might be at risk of a recurrence in pregnancy or birth. But it wasn't until after her fourth child was born that she experienced postpartum psychosis: she became convinced she was on a mission and that people were trying to kill her to take her baby. She says the getting through the experience has made relationships with her husband, family and friends, so much stronger.

If you are feeling emotionally distressed, or worried about a friend or relative there are links to support organisations on the programme website.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Lobeh Osagie-Asiah [courtesy Lobeh Osagie-Asiah]
R: Catherine Cho [credit Alastair Levy]


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz190dw7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d62)
Afghanistan

The Taliban is advancing towards Afghanistan’s capital, Kabul, as foreign forces prepare to fully withdraw from the country. Thousands of people are being displaced and many more are fearful about what lies ahead.

Reporting the news in the country can result in death threats and loss of life, and host Nuala McGovern hears from Afghan journalists who are determined to continue working despite the dangers, including losing colleagues.

Two women also share their fears for the future, concerned that their rights will go back two decades to a time, when women were not allowed to work or leave the house without an escort. “Every night I have personally nightmares,” one said. “Nightmares of the Taliban coming or killing you and the next morning, when you get up, you feel like you’re so exhausted.”

(Photo: People stranded at the Pakistani-Afghan border wait to cross the border after it was reopened at Chaman, Pakistan, 13 August 2021. Credit: AKHTER GULFAM/EPA)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwps4m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 World Of Wisdom (w3ct2hdh)
Self-help for the spirit

Life presents many personal challenges. Three spiritual advisors – Sister Dang Nghiem, Dr Shefali Tsabary and Eckhart Tolle offer guidance to members of the public from across the world on coping with anxiety, the pressures of parenting and how to learn life-lessons from the pandemic.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1s)
Striking the right note for the Proms

The Proms are back, but what are the challenges of broadcasting classical music globally? We hear from the Proms producer. Plus, listeners give us their thoughts on series two of 30 Animals That Made Us Smarter, a show that bills itself as “amazing things humans have learnt from the animal kingdom”.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz190jmc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q2x2ggyn0)
Life after the Olympic flame goes out

Swimmer Markus Rogan was a double Olympic silver medallist in 2004 in Athens and a world record holder, before it all fell apart. He learnt the hard way about what can happen when the Olympic flame is extinguished. For some like him, when their sporting careers end a new unexpected challenge arises. Markus tells us about his struggle for a new identity and purpose away from the sporting arena, and his advice to other athletes facing that same challenge

Kaleigh Gilchrist was badly injured in an accident when the balcony she was standing on collapsed. That almost cost her her place at the Games, and much more. Thankfully she made a full recovery and with the additional year delay to the Olympics, she was ready to take her part in what would eventually turn out to be a gold medal for her and the rest of the USA Women's water polo team. Her second Olympic gold

Plus we preview the new Premier League season

Photo: Markus Rogan in action in 2006 (Credit: Friedemann Vogel/Bongarts/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz190nch)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqf38br)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwq0mw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3j)
India-Pakistan love stories

Ever since partition in 1947, India and Pakistan have been locked in conflict. Often, the two nations are in the news for increasing hostilities along the Line of Control, the de facto border that divides disputed Kashmir. The two countries have a shared history and similar cultures, but despite many attempts at resolving their disputes, lasting peace and good neighbourly relations have eluded them.

As both countries prepare to mark their 75th year of independence, we hear from those who dared to love and marry across the borders. What has life been like for them? What is it that they yearn for the most? Would love beyond borders conquer collective prejudices?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we bring you love stories from India and Pakistan that are filled with hope, even in the face of grave challenges.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Sarita Singh Sodha, ex-royal, Ghanerao; Zoya Fatima Rizvi and Mir Irfan Hussain Najafi, India-Pak couple; Shazman Mansoor and Mansoor Ali, India-Pak couple


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz190s3m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfj)
World Questions: Disability

More than a billion people are disabled - that’s 15 percent of the world’s population. With a panel of leading disabled academics, campaigners and politicians, World Questions examines the challenges and opportunities facing disabled people across the globe right now.

Presenter: Scout Bassett, US Paralympic athlete

Panel:
Ambassador Catalina Devandas: Costa Rican ambassador to the United Nations (Geneva)
Yetnebersh Nigussie: Ethiopian disability rights campaigner (Kenya)
Baroness (Tanni) Grey-Thompson: Former Paralympic athlete (UK)
Judy Heumann: Campaigner and former advisor to President Obama (USA)

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Image: Disability rights protesters at a rally outside a New York courthouse, Credit: Erik McGregor/Getty Images)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz190wvr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgjhw5c)
Taliban advance on Kabul

The Taliban offensive is getting closer to Kabul, displacing hundreds and thousands of people as it sweeps across Afghanistan. What can other countries do to help avoid more suffering?

Also in the programme: Russia expels the BBC's Moscow Correspondent Sarah Rainsford as part of its media clampdown; and as global records show July was the hottest month ever recorded, we hear from US firefighters and from Sicily, where agriculture and tourism are threatened by the heat.

(Image: Taliban fighters in Herat, Afghanistan's third largest city, in the northwest of the country / Credit: AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz1910lw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tcnzw7nbp)
Live Sporting Action

Live Sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis including the English Premier League.

(Photo by Sebastian Frej/MB Media/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz191hld)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqf43kn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwqvvs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct1xzt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8k)
Kenya's Paralympic Record-Breaker

In 1995, promising Kenyan runner Henry Wanyoike suffered a stroke and lost his sight. After initially feeling depressed, Henry learnt how to run tethered to a guide and went on to a set a series of long-distance running records for the blind. Henry Wanyoike talks to Alex Last.

(Photo: Henry Wanyoike, right, with his guide on a run in 2013. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz191mbj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct2gdd)
Pergolesi's Stabat Mater

Broadcast programme:
Pergolesi - Stabat Mater

Carolyn Sampson (soprano)
Tim Mead (counter-tenor)
BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra
Martyn Brabbins (conductor)

The BBC Proms are back in the Royal Albert Hall in London with a six-week season of concerts featuring leading British orchestras as well as international soloists and conductors.

The works of Giovanni Battista Pergolesi became so popular in the later 18th century that music publishers sometimes printed compositions by other people under Pergolesi's name to increase sales. Sadly, the composer didn't live to enjoy his Europe-wide popularity, having succumbed to illness at the age of just 26. His Stabat Mater, composed towards the end of his life but only published a dozen years later, became widely praised – and imitated - for the strikingly beautiful yet harmonically daring lines that the two vocal soloists sing. Over the centuries, many composers have set the medieval Latin text about the suffering of the Virgin Mary but Pergolesi's 1736 version remains the benchmark to this day.

Presenter Andrew McGregor is joined by professor Suzanne Aspden from Oxford University.

[Photo: Soprano Carolyn Sampson performs Pergolesi with BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall. Credit: Chris Christodoulou/BBC]


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz191r2n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt9)
Musician Jon Batiste

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined by composer Shiva Feshareki and broadcaster and musician Jess Gillam, to discuss the cultural highlights of the week.

The pianist, activist and Oscar winner Jon Batiste talks about his new album ‘We Are’ and tells us why he wants to make social music.

Australian actor Hugh Jackman takes us behind the scenes of his new film Reminiscence and reveals the iconic role he (maybe) could have played.

Syrian instrumentalist Maya Youssef shares her personal perspective on the healing power of music.

The American writer Jean Hanff Korelitz discusses her new book ‘The Plot’.

Shiva Feshareki and Jess Gillam talk about their careers in music and look forward to one of the world’s biggest classical music festivals, the BBC Proms.

British Jazz star Nubya Garcia explains how her Caribbean roots shape her.

Plus the Australian singer-songwriter Courtney Barnett reveals how her dreams inspire her writing.

(Photo: Jon Batiste. Credit: Bennett Raglin/Stringer)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz191vts)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgjjv4d)
Afghan conflict: Taliban take Mazar-e-Sharif

Taliban fighters have captured Mazar-e-Sharif, the last major city in northern Afghanistan which was still under government control. The Taliban are now in control of more than half of the provincial capitals in the country. The only major cities to remain under government control are Kabul and Jalalabad.

Also in the programme: We hear from Haiti where more than two-hundred people have been killed in a strong earthquake, and the annual Edinburgh arts festival returns a year after it was cancelled due to the global pandemic.

(Photo: More than a quarter of a million people have been displaced in Afghanistan. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz191zkx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc7)
School first, music second with Vagabon and Vieux Farka Touré

Vagabon, Vieux Farka Touré, Mary Lattimore and Mereba discuss the impact family can have on musical journeys, the perks and perils of collaborating with other musicians, and how cultural origins can mean that a musical life is looked down upon.

This week’s host is Laetitia Tamko, better known as Vagabon. Born in Cameroon and growing up in New York City, Vagabon’s music fuses pop, indie and punk. Her debut album Infinite Worlds was released in 2017, taking influence from a huge span of genres, everything from post-punk to dream pop. She performs in both English and French, and recently released a track with Courtney Barnett.

She’s joined by Ethiopian-American singer, songwriter and producer Mereba. She released her debut record The Jungle is the Only Way Out in 2019, and has since collaborated with 6lack, J.I.D and other breakout artists from America’s exciting hip-hop and R&B scenes. Vieux Farka Touré is the son of legendary Malian guitarist Ali Farka Touré, and has carved out his own legacy as a musician, taking influence from West African rhythms, blues, and rock. Finally, Mary Lattimore is a harpist from Los Angeles who has played alongside Thurston Moore, Jarvis Cocker, and Kurt Vile. Her music takes simple components, often just a harp and loop pedal, and creates vast, experimental soundscapes.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz1923b1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyws4ztgdw0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sk788lghn)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwrglf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Documentary (w3ct2hdt)
Hiroshima successors

When photographer Haruka Sakaguchi set out to Hiroshima document atomic bomb survivors' stories, she discovered they were far more difficult to find than she expected. Stigmatisation and survivor’s guilt discourage many from disclosing their past, and with dwindling survivors left to tell their story, memories of the atomic bomb are fading.

But a new generation has developed an unusual method of keeping those memories alive. Denshosha are the designated guardians of survivors’ memories. They act as storytellers, working with survivors to record their story and pass it down to future generations, embodying the survivor in a deeply personal way, so they do not permanently disappear.

To understand the importance of remembering, Haruka speaks with Hiroshima survivor Setsuko Thurlow and Nagasaki survivor Yasuaki Yamashita, hearing what happened that day and how it stayed with them, along with Keiko Okinishi, a denshosha who now passes on her mother’s story - despite it being a secret for much of her life.

(Photo: Setsuko Thurlow, of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), and survivor of the nuclear attack on Hiroshima, poses with medal of Nobel Prize. Credit: David Benito/Getty Images)



SUNDAY 15 AUGUST 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz192bt9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1psz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwrq2p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 Trending (w3ct1xzt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz192gkf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d62)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwrttt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 World Of Wisdom (w3ct2hdh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz192l9k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz192q1p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh3)
Climate change: a time to act

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has given a bleak assessment of the crisis facing the planet and urges drastic action by government and business to curb emissions to slow global warming. Nick Molho, executive director of the climate-minded business alliance, the Aldersgate Group, gives his assessment of the challenges ahead and outlines his vision for a low carbon, greener world. We go to Sierra Leone in West Africa to hear from a young student, Jeremiah Thoronka, who has found a way to bring electricity to his rural community using kinetic energy.
Have you ever wondered how some technology companies rack up huge valuations despite never turning a profit? Investigative journalist and author Elliot Brown tells us that the lessons of WeWork have not been learnt, and we hear how neurodiverse staff can be an asset to the workplace and why a global timber shortage could scupper your plans to build a garden shed.
Business Weekly is presented by Vishala Sri-Pathma and produced by Clare Williamson
(Image: Firefighter silhouetted against orange flames of the Bootleg fire, Oregon, Image credit: NWCG / US Forest Service)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz192tst)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrws626)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz192yjy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt9tt0fbt1)
Taliban close in on Afghan capital

The Taliban set their sights on Kabul as they take another major city, Mazar-i-Sharif. We hear the latest from Kabul, and speak to a specialist in girls' education who had to flee a Taliban assault on the city of Kandahar.

Also, the aftermath of the strong earthquake that struck Haiti on Friday.

Plus, controversy over a Polish media bill that tightens rules on broadcasters. Local journalist Wojciech Przybylski and historian Timothy Garton Ash give us their views.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Azerbaijani columnist Arzu Geybulla and American journalist Joshua Hammer.

(Photo: Families staying at makeshift camps in Kabul after fleeing the violence. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz193292)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt9tt0fgk5)
Taliban close in on Afghan capital

The Taliban set their sights on Kabul as they take another major city, Mazar-i-Sharif. After 20 years of American-led military efforts to stabilise Afghanistan, how has the country fallen into Taliban hands so quickly? We hear from retired American general Wesley Clarke and Tom Tugendhat, chair of the British parliament’s Foreign Affairs Committee.

Also, the shattering emotional impact of the wildfires that have been ravaging Greece.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Azerbaijani columnist Arzu Geybulla and American journalist Joshua Hammer.

(Photo: Families staying at makeshift camps in Kabul after fleeing the violence. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz193616)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt9tt0fl99)
Taliban close in on Afghan capital

The Taliban set their sights on Kabul as they take another major city, Mazar-i-Sharif. We hear the latest from Kabul, and speak to an Afghan MP, Farzana Kochai.

Also: the strange tale of a piece of chewing gum that once belonged to the American musician and civil rights activist Nina Simone.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Azerbaijani columnist Arzu Geybulla and American journalist Joshua Hammer.

(Photo: Families staying at makeshift camps in Kabul after fleeing the violence. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwsk9l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr2)
Yotam Ottolenghi: My life in five dishes

The influential Israeli-born, UK-based chef tells his life story through some of his most memorable dishes.

Often credited with bringing Middle Eastern food into the mainstream in the UK, he now has a string of restaurants and delicatessens behind him, along with several best-selling cookbooks, but he was a late starter in the kitchen - almost pursuing a career in philosophy instead.

He tells Emily Thomas about his youth in the vibrant and diverse Jerusalem of the 1970s, coming out as gay in Tel Aviv, and the huge impact of his younger brother’s death.

Usually reluctant to delve into politics, Yotam also explains why he’s decided to speak out in support of his industry during the coronavirus pandemic.

Producers: Simon Tulett, Siobhan O'Connell and Sarah Stolarz

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Yotam Ottolenghi. Credit: David Loftus/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz1939sb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwsp1q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx8)
The mountain between us

In the 1990s, Alex Lowe and Conrad Anker were earning reputations as some of the best mountain climbers in the world. Jenni, Alex's wife, was a constant support. But after a fateful expedition on a mountain in Tibet, these three lives would become connected in a way they couldn't even imagine. This story was first broadcast on 5th May 2018.

A new documentary about the family's story, directed by Alex's son Max Lowe, is called Torn.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Photo: Ice climber scaler a glacier
Credit: Sandra Behne / Bongarts / Getty Images


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz193fjg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g74)
1. The tracker

Civil unrest spreads across Baltimore after 25-year-old Freddie Gray dies in police custody. Meanwhile, a detective makes a troubling discovery when he arrests a major heroin dealer. It’s time to call in the FBI.

Presenter: Jessica Lussenhop
Producer: Ben Crighton


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwsssv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2gj4)
The Druze

The Druze are a religious minority, living mainly between Syria, Lebanon, and Israel. The religious movement was founded in the 11th Century by Hamza ibn Ali ibn Ahmad, an Ismaili leader, mixing aspects of Shia Islam and Esoterism, among other western philosophies. Because they are an insular community - conversions are forbidden either out of or into the faith - the Druze face a number of existential challenges, in a region where unrest is the norm.

Tamara Rasamny meets young Druze men and women to what pressures young people in the community face, and how they reconcile loyalty to their faith and their country.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz193k8l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqf657v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwsxjz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3csz4bf)
Changing World, Changing Bodies

How modern life is changing our backs

Dr Vybarr Cregan-Reid investigates what the last 250 years has done to our backs. What is it about modern life that has promoted back pain, especially lower back pain, from a rarity to the number one cause of pain and disability in the world?

In the remote Kenyan Village of Pemja, Dr Cregan-Reid meets people with such excellent backs that they are the subject of international study. He hears from pain-wracked workers in Nairobi whose backs today are a pale version of those of their grandparents' and at the London Design museum he comes face-to-face with the artefact that has done most to weaken our backs - the chair.

Chairs with backs are now so ubiquitous it is reckoned there are around 10 for each of us but as recently as 1800 they were a rarity. Not that we have much choice but to sit down today. At the start of the 19th Century fractions of one per cent of people sat down for a living but today three quarters work in offices or drive for a living. We put our spines into positions they were not designed to sustain for hours on end.

He discusses with Australian academics their research which claims that half of back pain is in the mind and why simple movement is probably more effective than surgery, manipulation and powerful painkillers in getting to the bottom of back pain.

(Photo: A woman rubs her lower back. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz193p0q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct2gdd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz193srv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgjls2g)
Taliban reach Kabul

Taliban militants have reached the Afghan capital, Kabul; the Interior Minister and the Taliban both say there will now be a peaceful transfer of power. But is this possible, and what future are ordinary Afghans now facing?

We devote the whole programme to the latest dramatic developments and hear from a government minister and a Taliban spokesman as well as aid workers, refugees and analysts.

(Image: Afghan acting Interior Minister Abdul Sattar Mirzakwal speaks to camera, in Kabul, Afghanistan August 15, 2021 in this still image taken from social media video / Credit: via REUTERS THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz193xhz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlj)
Sailing by the stars: The pioneering voyages of David Lewis

David Lewis was of one of the most remarkable nautical explorers of modern times. In the mid-1960s, he took his wife and two small daughters - who were less than five years old - on a sailing trip around the world in a small catamaran. What is more, for one part of the journey, he rejected standard 20th-Century navigational equipment and relied on much older methods of finding his way across the Pacific. In fact, it was his lifelong goal to prove that ancient seafaring methods were still valuable and his research helped revive ancient Polynesian navigation methods. In his more than eventful life, he also wrote a dozen books, practised as a GP in London’s East End and tackled many unclimbed peaks as a mountaineer. And he undertook hazardous trips to the Antarctic including one in which he was presumed dead.

Rajan Datar is joined by David’s son Barry, who is also an accomplished sailor and who accompanied David on some of his seminal voyages; Dr. Christina Thompson, the editor of Harvard Review and the author of Sea People: The Puzzle of Polynesia; and Ben Lowings, a yachtsman, BBC journalist and the author of David Lewis's biography entitled The Dolphin.

[Photo: David Lewis sets out on his 1972 trip to the Antarctic in his 32-foot sloop Ice Bird. Credit: George Lipman; Stuart William MacGladrie/Fairfax Media/Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz194183)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz194507)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tcnzwbsr1)
Sportsworld

Live Sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis including the English Premier League.

(Photo by Catherine Ivill/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz194j7m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqf746w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwtwj0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2gj4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz194mzr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz194rqw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgjmr1h)
Taliban enter Kabul as Afghan government collapses

On this special edition of Newshour, the Afghan government has collapsed and the president has fled the country - as the Taliban are poised to regain power in Kabul for the first time in twenty years. There's chaos at the airport as people scramble to leave the country.

We will from Kabul and concerned Afghans - and get reaction from Washington and the United Nations.

(Photo: The US has sent military helicopters to evacuate embassy staff. Credit: AFP)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz194wh0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d62)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwv7rd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 World Of Wisdom (w3ct2hdh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz195074)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyws4ztk9s3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sk788pcdr)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwvchj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 16 AUGUST 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9l92zk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzlb6rsnq4t)
Taliban claim control of Afghanistan

Taliban fighters are in the process of taking over the capital Kabul and have seized the presidential palace. We examine the economic impact of the Taliban taking back control with Dr Wali Aslam, an associate professor at the University of Bath, in the UK. David Macdonald, senior economist at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives in Ottawa analyses the health of Canada's economy as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau calls a snap election. And a keynote speech by Germany's foreign minister could signal a reshaped relationship with China, as we hear from Friedolin Strack from the Federation of German Industries and Professor Susan Perry, who follows China's relations with the European Union, at the American University in Paris.

(Picture: Taliban fighters in Laghman province on August 15, 2021. Credit: Getty Images.)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs15zg7y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct1m83)
Lost for words

Struggling to find words might be one of the first things we notice when someone develops dementia, while more advanced speech loss can make it really challenging to communicate with loved ones. And understanding what’s behind these changes may help us overcome communication barriers when caring for someone living with the condition.

When Ebrahim developed Alzheimer’s Disease, for example, he’d been living in the UK for many years. Gradually his fluent English faded and he reverted to his mother tongue, Farsi - which made things tricky for his English-speaking family who were caring for him. Two decades on, his son, the journalist and author David Shariatmadari, seeks answers to his father’s experience of language loss. What can neuroscience reveal about dementia, ageing, and language changes? Why are some aspects of language more vulnerable than others - and, importantly, what are the best approaches to communicating with someone living with dementia?

David reflects on archive recordings of his dad, and speaks to a family in a similar situation to theirs, to compare the ways they tried to keep communication alive. And he discovers there are actually clear benefits to bilingualism when it comes to dementia: juggling two or more languages can delay the onset of symptoms by around four years. So while losing one of his languages posed practical difficulties for Ebrahim, it’s possible that by speaking two languages in the first place, he was able to spend more valuable lucid years with his family.

Presented by David Shariatmadari and produced by Cathy Edwards


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9l96qp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqctpy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs15zl02)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqw)
“Code red for humanity”

A diplomatic deadline looms as new science urges faster action. Can nations respond? So far, the answer has been ‘no.’ Three decades of international talks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions has left them higher than ever and set to rise further. We provide a brief history of climate talks, with an eye on what can be learned ahead of the next round, called COP26, in Glasgow.

Contributors:
Mark Maslin, Professor of Earth System Science, University College London and author of How to Save Our Planet.
Navin Singh Khadka, Environment Correspondent, BBC World Service
Laurence Tubiana, CEO of the European Climate Foundation
Ambassador Tosi Mpanu-Mpanu, lead climate negotiator for the Democratic Republic of Congo

Presenters: Graihagh Jackson and Neal Razzell
Producer: Josephine Casserly
Series producer: Ros Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9l9bgt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Bad Cops (w3ct2g74)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs15zpr6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 World Of Wisdom (w3ct2hdh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9l9g6y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqd266)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs15zthb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8w)
Beauty and the skin

Kim Chakanetsa in joined by two pioneering dermatologists to talk about the challenges and satisfaction that come with working with one of the body’s most fascinating organs.

Dr Margaret Yaa Lartey is a Professor of Medicine and Dermatology at the University of Ghana, and the first woman to lead the Ghana Society of Dermatology. She had very personal reasons to become a skin specialist, and she is committed to fighting misinformation and myths around skin care and disease.

Dr Rashmi Sarkar is a Senior Professor in Dermatology at Delhi University and president elect of the Indian Association of Dermatologists, Venereologists and Leprologists (IADVL). When she started out, there was stigma surrounding the profession. Now it’s a very popular choice, especially among women.

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Dr Rashmi Sarkar (credit Rama Studio)
R: Dr Margaret Yaa Lartey (credit courtesy of Margaret Yaa Lartey)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9l9kz2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk0qmzt)
Afghanistan: President flees as government collapses

The Taliban take over Kabul twenty years after they were forced out by western forces. We'll hear from a women's rights activist in Kabul who has no intention of fleeing, and from a US negotiator who says it is up to the Afghans to sort out their future.

In Haiti rescuers continue to search for survivors after a massive earthquake, as the death toll climbs to more than a thousand.

And Australia enters its harshest Covid lockdown yet, enforced by the police.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9l9pq6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk0qrqy)
Afghanistan: Taliban takes control of Kabul

President Ashraf Ghani flees, while westerners including the US Ambassador, gather at the airport to leave.

More than 12,000 people are now known to have been killed in Saturday's devastating earthquake in Haiti. What's needed to help people - and what lessons have been learned from the last quake?

And a teenage human rights campaigner, whose father was imprisoned in China, calls for urgent help for Uyghur Muslims.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9l9tgb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk0qwh2)
Afghanistan: Taliban takes Kabul with no shots fired

The insurgents have urged calm and say they're working to form a new government.

Rescuers continue to search for survivors in Haiti as the death toll climbs to nearly 1,300 after the weekend's earthquake.

And Israel was the first country to offer a vaccine to every resident but now Covid cases have hit a five month high.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9l9y6g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n63)
Aly Raisman: Are gold medals put above athletes' wellbeing?

The athletic excellence seen at the Tokyo Olympics will live long in the memory, but so will the moment the brilliant US gymnast Simone Biles chose not to compete to safeguard her mental and physical health. US gymnastics is still reeling from the repercussions of a sex abuse scandal - what can go wrong when results are put above care of individual athletes? Stephen Sackur speaks to Aly Raisman, a multiple Olympic gold medallist who testified about being abused by the team's former doctor. Is there a wider lesson for elite sport in the shame of American gymnastics?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs1609gv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j53)
Sexism in the alcohol industry

Women in the drinks industry share their stories to try to change the way women are treated in pubs, clubs and bars. After many shared stories of harassment in craft breweries, the consensus is: enough is enough. Charlotte Cook, an experienced brewer, says the most important thing is to believe the stories, as some are being silenced by UK libel laws. Professor Chris Land from Anglia Ruskin University explains how certain workplaces can create unhealthy cultures, while bartender Nichola Bottomley says she was inspired to speak out after years of abuse working in pubs and bars. In the US, Victoria James, who was named the country's youngest sommelier at 21, has inspired other women working in wine to come together to speak out - and her book led to many responsible to resign. Becky Paskin, journalist and co-founder of Our Whisky, talks about the repercussions she faced after calling out sexism in the whisky industry. While Brad Cummings, co-founder of craft beer company Tiny Rebel tells us why it's no longer business as usual after the firm was called out by former employees online.

(Images: Alcohol being poured. Art159 / Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x16)
The man who coined the term genocide

Genocide has a long and grim history, but until the 1950s, the mass extermination of a people or a group was an atrocity without a name, a definition or an international law against it. One man did more than anyone else to change that: the Polish Jewish lawyer, Raphael Lemkin. He coined the term genocide and fought for decades to stop it. He also survived it, but lost his whole family in the Holocaust. Viv Jones hears his story from Israeli journalist Lili Eylon, who met him at the United Nations and witnessed his one-man lobbying campaign.

Photo: Raphael Lemkin in 1950 Credit: Bettmann / Getty Images.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lb1yl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs160f6z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqs)
How can smart tech tackle climate change?

Humans are responsible for emitting over 40 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year – and we all know that we need to reduce that figure to prevent devastating climate change. Listener Saugat wonders whether smart technology and artificial intelligence can help us do this more quickly?

Green energy will go a long way to tackling the problem, but integrating wind and solar into our current electricity grid is complicated. CrowdScience hears how AI is being used at a wind farm on the island of Orkney to predict periods of high winds, so that excess energy can be turned into hydrogen and stored, then converted back to electricity when there’s greater demand.

Digital mirrors are also playing a major role in optimising performance, and scientists say cloud-based “twins” of physical assets like turbines can improve yield by up to 20%, allowing engineers to identify problems via computer without ever having to be on site.

Marnie visits an intelligent building in London’s financial district where sensors control everything from air-conditioning to lighting, and machine learning means the building knows which staff will be on which floor at any given time, switching off lifts that are not in use and adjusting ventilation to save on power. Its designer says incorporating this kind of digital technology will help companies achieve net zero more quickly.

And in India, more than half the population are involved in agriculture, but the sector is plagued by inefficiency and waste. Tech start-ups have realised there’s potential for growth, and are using drones to monitor crop production and spraying, giving farmers apps which help them decide when and where to fertilise their fields.

Produced by Marijke Peters for BBC World Service.

Featuring:

Professor Srinivasan Keshav, University of Cambridge

Matthew Marson, Arcadis Group


[Image Credit: Getty Images]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lb5pq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1psz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs160jz3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct1xzt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lb9fv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqdxf3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs160nq7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lbf5z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtf)
Josephine Baker: My mother, the superstar singer and spy - part one

In the 1920s a young dancer from the US took Paris by storm. Her name was Josephine Baker and she was known for her risqué performances, most famously when she danced while wearing a skirt made of bananas. She became a singer, actress and a superstar. As a black woman born in the early 20th century in the United States, Josephine lived through racial segregation. France allowed her more opportunities and freedoms, so Josephine took French citizenship. Her allegiance to her new country was so strong she even worked as a spy during the Second World War for the French Resistance. Throughout her life she fought for civil rights, insisting on performing to integrated audiences, protesting against venues with racist policies and speaking at the historic March on Washington. By the 1950s she had taken on another role: as a mother. Josephine Baker adopted 12 children from around the world. Jari Hannu Bouillon was born in Finland, but grew up with his adoptive siblings in the French countryside in Josephine's 15th-century castle. He had extraordinary experiences as a child: meeting presidents, royalty and revolutionaries. He tells Outlook what it was like to be the son of a megastar.

Professor Matthew Pratt Guterl's book is called 'Josephine Baker and the Rainbow Tribe'.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Picture: Singer Josephine Baker with her husband Joe Bouillon and some of their adopted children, including Jari (third from right)
Credit: Bettmann via Getty Images


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x16)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lbjy3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqf4xc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs160x6h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lbnp7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqttmzv)
Chaos at Kabul airport as Afghans try to flee Taliban

Scenes of panic at Kabul international airport as crowds scramble to flee the Afghan capital in the face of a Taliban takeover. We hear from former Afghan MP Elay Ershad on what is left for those, especially women, who stay in the country and to get a sense of the situation in the streets of Kabul.

Also in the programme: we ask the US Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Zalmay Khalilzad if Washington could have prevented the consequences of the American troops withdrawing; and we hear from Haiti as the death toll from the earthquake that struck the country on Saturday has risen to 1,297.

(Photo: Members of Taliban stand in a checkpoint in Kabul, Afghanistan. Credit: EPA.)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lbsfc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n63)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs1614pr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y482m1jx0k6)
Chaos at Kabul airport as Afghans try to flee

Afghanistan is now effectively controlled by the Taliban, 20 years after they were ousted. We get the latest picture from the BBC's South Asia editor, Anbarasan Ethirajan. And Dr Waheed Arian is an Afghan doctor working in the UK, who also founded the charity Arian Teleheal, which connects doctors in developing countries with counterparts elsewhere in the world. He tells us what he is hearing from friends and family in Afghanistan about how the situation is evolving. Also in the programme, extra countries have been added to the service expected to be provided by the new 2Africa undersea internet cable being laid between Europe and two dozen African nations. The BBC's Zoe Kleinman explains why the new cable is needed. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan examines the lessons learned from an experiment in Iceland to offer thousands of workers shorter hours, without any reduction in pay.

(Picture: Afghans sit on top of a plane at Kabul airport. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lbx5h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxndmpsx3y)
Afghanistan: Chaos at Kabul airport

We get the latest from Afghanistan, where there has been chaos at Kabul airport as people try to flee the capital following the Taliban's takeover. We hear from people in Kabul and get an update from our reporter who has been speaking to a Taliban representative in Doha. We will also speak to Afghans outside the country, who are staying in contact with their family members in Afghanistan, to find out how they are seeing the situation.

Also, in Haiti more than 1,200 people have died after Saturday's earthquake and an unknown number of people are missing. We get the latest on what is happening on the ground.

And Dr Eleanor Murray, from Boston University, will talk us through some of the latest developments with Covid-19 and answer questions sent in by listeners.

(Photo: A man pulls a girl to get inside Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan. Credit: Reuters/Stringer)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lc0xm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxndmpt0w2)
Afghanistan: Afghans outside the country

We get the latest from Afghanistan, where there has been chaos at Kabul airport as people try to flee the capital following the Taliban's takeover. We hear from people in Kabul and speak to our reporters in the US, China and Russia for more reaction to the situation. We will also speak to Afghans outside the country, who are staying in contact with their family members in Afghanistan, to find out how they are seeing the situation.

Also, in Haiti more than 1,200 people have died after Saturday's earthquake and an unknown number of people are missing. We get the latest on what is happening on the ground.

And Professor Manfred Green from the University of Haifa in Israel will talk us through some of the latest developments with Covid-19 and answer questions sent in by listeners.

(Photo: Men try to get inside Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan. Credit: Reuters/Stringer)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lc4nr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x16)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lc8dw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqfwd4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs161mp8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ngcwkg477)
2021/08/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lcd50)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs161rfd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2h25)
The Life Scientific: Dr Nira Chamberlain

When does a crowd of people become unsafe? How well will the football team Aston Villa do next season? When is it cost-effective to replace a kitchen? The answers may seem arbitrary but, to Nira Chamberlain, they lie in mathematics. You can use maths to model virtually anything.

Dr Nira Chamberlain is President of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications, and Principal Mathematical Modeller for the multinational engineering company SNC-Lavalin Atkins.

He specialises in complex engineering and industrial problems, creating mathematical models to describe a particular feature or process, and then running simulations to better understand it, and predict its behaviour. Nira is one of just a handful of esteemed mathematicians, and the first black mathematician. to be featured in ‘Who’s Who’, Britain’s book of prominent people.

Since 2018, he’s made the Black Power List, which celebrates the UK’s top 100 most influential people of African or African-Caribbean heritage, ranking higher than Stormzy and Lewis Hamilton when he was first listed. Proof, he says, that maths really is for everyone.


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lchx4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqtvh6r)
Afghanistan: President Biden addresses the nation

We hear from the head of an independent TV station in Kabul visited today by the Taliban and from the US about the foreign policy mistakes made over a twenty year period.

Also on the programme: a warning to those countries vaccinating most - an unexpected fourth wave of Covid in Israel

(Photo: People try to get into Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul Credit: REUTERS/Stringer)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lcmn8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n63)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs161zxn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lcrdd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywsj83s1yc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skljkx3l0)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs1623ns)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48x1s4m8yj)
Chaos at Kabul airport as Afghans try to flee

Afghanistan is now effectively controlled by the Taliban, 20 years after they were ousted. We get the latest picture from the BBC's South Asia editor, Anbarasan Ethirajan. And Dr Waheed Arian is an Afghan doctor working in the UK, who also founded the charity Arian Teleheal, which connects doctors in developing countries with counterparts elsewhere in the world. He tells us what he is hearing from friends and family in Afghanistan about how the situation is evolving. Also in the programme, extra countries have been added to the service expected to be provided by the new 2Africa undersea internet cable being laid between Europe and two dozen African nations. The BBC's Zoe Kleinman explains why the new cable is needed. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan examines the lessons learned from an experiment in Iceland to offer thousands of workers shorter hours, without any reduction in pay.

(Picture: Afghans sit on top of a plane at Kabul airport. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 17 AUGUST 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lczwn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqh61h9c6c)
President Biden defends US withdrawal from Afghanistan

Biden said there was never a good time to withdraw US forces from Afghanistan, but the situation has "unfolded quicker than expected". Dr Kamran Bokhari, director of analytical development at the Newlines Institute in Washington DC tells us that a lack of effective political and economic governance led the Afghan National Army to melt away and let the Taliban re-take the country. Plus, Daniel Arango, Disaster Management Coordinator at International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, gives us the latest on the situation in Haiti, where tropical storm Grace is making landfall, only days after a deadly earthquake hit the country.

Also in the show, extra countries have been added to the service expected to be provided by the new 2Africa undersea internet cable being laid between Europe and two dozen African nations. The BBC's Zoe Kleinman explains why the new cable is needed. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan examines the lessons learned from an experiment in Iceland to offer thousands of workers shorter hours, without any reduction in pay.

All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the world: Alexis Goldstein, an activist and financial reform advocate in Washington DC. And Lien Hoang, a reporter with Nikkei Asia, in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.


(Picture: US President Joe Biden gestures as he gives remarks on the worsening crisis in Afghanistan from the White House August 16, 2021. Credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ld3ms)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqgqm1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs162gx5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gyz)
1. Gold

Ex-Paralympic swimmer Dan Pepper investigates the cheats who won gold and left a devastating legacy for learning disability sport.

Ray Torres used to get beaten up every day at school. He stood out because he had a learning disability. But when his dad gave him a basketball, he found an escape and a kind of friend that didn’t hit him or call him names. He took the ball everywhere - even using it as a pillow.

When Spain started an intellectual disability basketball team, Ray was picked as one of the best players in the country and within a few years he was made captain. And when he found out the team had qualified to take part in the 2000 Paralympics in Sydney, it was beyond his wildest dreams…

Presenter: Dan Pepper
Series Producer: Simon Maybin

(Photo credit: EPA)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ld7cx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x16)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ldc41)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqgz39)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs162qdf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdc)
El Far3i: Palestinian music sensation

Palestinian and Jordanian songwriter and producer, Tareq Abu Kwaik - known by the stage name El Far3i – may be most famous as a rapper yet it is his acoustic song, Tghayarti (You’ve Changed) which has gained over 17 million views on his YouTube channel.

The multi-instrumentalist continues to fuse Arab acoustic folk with hip hop and electronica - a genre he has coined “El Far3i Flux” – but what exactly is that?

Reporter Miriam Walker-Khan finds out, as she trails the creation of a new studio album, Nas Min Khashab (Wooden People). It is the final instalment in El Far3i’s ‘wooden’ trilogy and an album he plans to launch on social media, one track at a time.

Miriam also discovers how Tareq finds inspiration living in the UK, many miles from the high mountains of Palestine and Jordan, and why love, land and self-destiny define this trilogy.

Presented by: Miriam Walker-Khan
Produced by: Emma Betteridge for the BBC World Service


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ldgw5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk0tjwx)
Biden defends Afghan policy

US President admits that events developed quicker than expected and blames Afghan leaders for the collapse of the government. We'll speak to a former UN ambassador.

We get the latest from Haiti as a tropical storm makes landfall on the Caribbean country lashing it with wind and rain, amid efforts to rescue trapped survivors from the rubble of Saturday's powerful earthquake.

And we hear about bundles of counterfeit coronavirus vaccine cards discovered in Memphis.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ldlm9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk0tnn1)
Afghanistan: Biden gives robust defence of US withdrawal

We speak to a woman in Kabul who says they are 'locked at home' in fear and shock. We also hear about the Afghans trying to flee into neighbouring central Asian countries.

Our correspondent reports from Haiti as a tropical storm makes landfall on the Caribbean country lashing it with wind and rain, complicating efforts to rescue trapped survivors from the rubble of Saturday's powerful earthquake.

And a team of researchers reproduces the sound of a choir just as it would have rang out in a Scottish palace 500 years ago.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ldqcf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk0tsd5)
Afghanistan Biden defends 'messy' US pullout

We get reaction from someone's who known the President for more than four decades - as well as hearing from Nobel peace prize winner Malala Yousafzai.

Haitians are expecting a deluge of 10 inches of rain as Tropical Storm Grace makes landfall - just as they're trying to deal with the devastating aftermath of the weekend's earthquake.

And a peaceful handover of power in Zambia as former President Edgar Lungu congratulations his successor Hakainde Hichilema. So what happens next?


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ldv3k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl7)
The seaweed farmers adapting to warming seas

Seaweed - we have been using it for centuries in food and toiletries. It can help to keep toothpaste and ice cream soft, as well as being a tasty snack. It is a billion-dollar industry. But in some parts of the world, supply of the crop has decreased dramatically due to climate change. Now people in Zanzibar are fighting back. They are learning new methods of farming seaweed in deeper, cooler waters. It is boosting the amount of seaweed they can grow and improving their livelihoods as a result.

Produced and presented by Celestina Olulode. Additional production by Esther Namuhisa and Nicholaus Mtenga


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs1636cy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jg4)
Killer robots

Are these the future of modern warfare and how concerned should we be? There are efforts to limit the development of these weapons. More than 50 nations met at the UN in Geneva this month to discuss a possible treaty. But neither Russia nor the United States have expressed any willingness to support the treaty. Ed Butler speaks to Professor Noel Sharkey who's been campaigning against the development of these weapons for 14 years and asked him how close any type of agreement was. Evanna Hu, CEO of AI firm, Omelas, and a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council in Washington, says this technology is now at the forefront of many countries' weapons development. And George Rey is a retired Lieutenant Commander in the US navy. He now works with private sector defence contractors supporting the development of autonomous weapons systems for the department of defence.

(Picture credit: CARL COURT/AFP via Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5q)
US withdrawal: The fall of Saigon

The last remaining US forces pulled out of Vietnam on April 30th 1975 as communist North Vietnamese troops took control of the country. There was a desperate scramble to evacuate US personnel and some Vietnamese colleagues who feared brutal reprisals at the hands of the communists for having helped the Americans. With the airport destroyed, they had to use helicopter airlifts from inside the US embassy compound to transport people to the USS Midway, an aircraft carrier waiting offshore. Rebecca Kesby speaks to two former US servicemen, Stu Herrington and Vern Jumper, who were involved in the mission.

(Photo: A CIA employee helps Vietnamese evacuees onto an Air America helicopter from the top of 22 Gia Long Street, a half mile from the U.S. Embassy. April 1975. Getty Images.)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ldyvp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs163b42)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2h25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lf2lt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lf6by)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqhtb6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs163kmb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lfb32)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwp)
Josephine Baker: My mother, the superstar singer and spy - part two

When Jari Hannu Bouillon was growing up, his mother was one of the most famous women in the world. Josephine Baker had shot to fame in the 1920s in Paris as a dancer, singer and actress. She also worked as a spy during World War Two and was a fierce civil rights activist. By the 1950s she was living in a 15th-Century castle in France with her 12 adopted children. They were from all over the world and meant to be a symbol of racial harmony and 'true brotherhood'. But, eventually, Josephine Baker couldn't sustain her expenses and she was evicted from the chateau. Luckily a friend, Princess Grace of Monaco, helped her find a new place to live. Jari didn't stay there for long. When Josephine found out he was gay, she held a family vote and it was decided that he should be sent to Argentina to live with his father. Jari was able to reconcile with his mother before her death in 1975. Many years later he was contacted by a journalist who said his Finnish birth family was looking for him.

Professor Matthew Pratt Guterl wrote a book called Josephine Baker and the Rainbow Tribe about the family. He was interested in the story because he is an academic who teaches Africana Studies and American Studies, but also because he has a personal connection to the story. Matthew grew up in a large multiracial adoptive family too.

Chiu Chiao-chi is a massage therapist in Taiwan. She performs an ancient kind of massage that is done with knives. Outlook's Cindy Sui was brave enough to give it a go. This report was first broadcast in 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

(Photo: Josephine Baker with some of her adopted children in France in the 1950s, including Jari (front row, second from right. Credit: A. Schorr/Ullstein Bild/Getty Images)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lffv6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqj1tg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs163t3l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2h25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lfklb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqtxjwy)
Afghanistan: Taliban assert authority as US defends pull-out

The Taliban say they've ordered their fighters not to enter anyone's home and to avoid interfering with embassy vehicles, especially in Kabul. The insurgents have also announced a general amnesty for government officials, urging them to return to work. Some women anchors have presented the news aired in the country today and

Also in the programme: We ask former Afghan Ambassador to the United States Roya Rahmani what’s her take on President Biden speech last night; and we hear how some American war veterans see the US withdrawal from Afghanistan.

(Photo: Taliban fighter raises their flag on a vehicle as they patrol in Kandahar, Afghanistan, 17 August 2021. Credit: EPA).


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lfpbg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs1641lv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bjy7c1tr5)
Social media in Afghanistan

As Facebook continues to block Taliban content we look at the role of social media in Afghanistan. Alex Wood is with Forbes magazine and offers an assessment. And we hear from Lynne O'Donnell, a journalist who lived in the country til last weekend, how she made it out on one of the last commercial flights to leave Kabul. Also in the programme, the London Stock Exchange is set to lose its biggest company, BHP Billiton, as the Australian miner has decided to move its primary listing from the UK to Australia. Russ Mould of stockbrokers A J Bell tells us what's behind the move. Plus, the BBC's Jamie Robertson reports on how the music teaching business has not only survived the pandemic, but in some cases has thrived.

(Picture: A now suspended Taliban Twitter account. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lft2l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxndmpwt11)
Afghanistan: Taliban's first press conference

We'll cross live to Kabul where the Taliban is holding the first news conference since taking control of Afghanistan.

Our colleagues in India and Pakistan explain the reaction from the region and our expert will answer listener questions about the situation in Afghanistan.

Also, after US President Joe Biden defended his decision to withdraw troops from Afghanistan, we speak to journalists there to hear the reaction in the US.

(Photo: Zabihullah Mujahid, Taliban spokesman talks with journalists during a press conference in Kabul, Afghanistan, 17 August 2021. Credit: STRINGER/EPA)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lfxtq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxndmpwxs5)
Afghanistan: Reaction as Biden defends US withdrawal

We get the latest from Afghanistan as the Taliban asserts their authority in the country. We hear a conversation between journalists in the US reacting to President Joe Biden defending his decision to withdraw troops from Afghanistan.

Also, our colleagues in the region explain the reaction to the situation in Afghanistan from their countries.

And Dr Swapneil Parikh, an infectious disease researcher at the Kasturba Hospital of infectious diseases in Mumbai, explains the latest Covid-19 stories and answers listener questions.

(Photo: US President Joe Biden delivers remarks on Afghanistan in the East Room of The White House. Credit: Reuters/Leah Millis)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lg1kv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lg59z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqjs97)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs164jlc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ngcwkk14b)
2021/08/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lg923)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Fake Paralympians (w3ct2gyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs164nbh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsf)
Uganda, too much surveillance?

Uganda introduced an extensive CCTV network ostensibly to cut down on crime. Now there are plans to place trackers on every vehicle for similar reasons. However, critics see both measures as ineffective and open to abuse. They are particularly concerned over the use of such surveillance to spy on opponents of the government says Dorothy Mukasa from Unwanted Witness.

And schoolchildren in Uganda have been enrolled to pilot a new device for rapid Malaria testing. Developed with local partners and the University of Glasgow it uses locally made 3d printed test materials married to a mobile phone both to power the test and collect the results. There’s potential for its use in detecting and analysing many diseases say Jonathan Cooper and Julien Reboud.

And can’t get to school? No problem you can now take your lessons and exams via WhatsApp. That is if you’re enrolled in Zimbabwe’s Dr. Maxx WhatsApp school - run with considerable success by Maxwell Chimedza


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson
Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Julian Siddle

(Image credit: Julian Siddle/BBC)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lgdt7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqtyd3v)
Afghanistan: the Taliban gives its first press conference

We hear reaction from an activist in Kabul, and there's been a cautious response to Afghanistan's new rulers but the European Union takes a pragmatic approach and plans on talking to the Taliban.

Also on the programme: We hear from Haiti where the United Nations Children's Fund estimates that around 1.2 million people have been affected by Saturday's powerful earthquake which killed 1,400 people. Raoul Junior Lorfils is the editor of the Loop Haiti, an online news service about Haiti and the region, he gives us an update from Port-au-Prince.

(Photo: Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid at a press conference in Kabul Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lgjkc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs164wtr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lgn9h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywsj83vyvg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skljl00h3)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs1650kw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48x1s4q5vm)
Islamic values at core of Afghan government

Not much more than 24 hours after the Taliban gained control of Afghanistan's capital Kabul, they held their first press conference. In front of the world's media they claimed they did not want revenge, that the country would not be used as a base for terrorism and that women would enjoy rights according to sharia [Islamic law]. BBC's Sana Safi from the Afghan Service gives us her reaction.

We also hear from the head of Afghanistan's central bank Ajmal Ahmady, who fled the capital on Sunday evening as the Taliban took control.

Plus, the BBC's Jamie Robertson reports on how the music teaching business has not only survived the pandemic, but in some cases has thrived.

Picture: Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid gave the group's first news conference/Reuters



WEDNESDAY 18 AUGUST 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lgwsr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqh61hd83g)
Exiled Taliban leaders return to take charge

Taliban co-founder Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar has returned to Afghanistan from Qatar, where he has spent months leading negotiations about the US troop withdrawal.

Not much more than 24 hours after the Taliban gained control of Afghanistan's capital Kabul, they held their first press conference. In front of the world's media they claimed they did not want revenge, that the country would not be used as a base for terrorism and that women would enjoy rights according to sharia [Islamic law]. BBC's Sana Safi from the Afghan Service gives us her reaction.

We also hear from the head of Afghanistan's central bank Ajmal Ahmady, who fled the capital on Sunday evening as the Taliban took control.

Also in the programme, nearly 6,500 workers at the General Motors plant in Mexico are taking part in a vote that could change the way they bargain over pay, and also affect trade relations with the US. The vote is whether to reject the existing collective bargaining agreement implemented by the Miguel Trujillo Lopez union

Plus, the BBC's Jamie Robertson reports on how the music teaching business has not only survived the pandemic, but in some cases has thrived.

PHOTO: Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar (C) is one of the four men who founded the Taliban in Afghanistan/Getty Images


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lh0jw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqkmj4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs165ct8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct064s)
Changing World, Changing Bodies

Is height all in the mind?

Professor Cregan-Reid explores why we have all grown so fast recently. For four millennia we barely grew an extra inch but in the 20th Century pretty much every nation in the world shot up by between three and six inches.

But it is not a uniform story; the Dutch have carried on growing and today their men and women tower over the world but in the US and the UK, height plateaued decades ago. And is being tall good for you? Yes, it seems, if you are a politician or industrialist; less so if you hanker after a career in entertainment.

The orthodox thinking says nutrition is the key but Professor Cregan-Reid hears about new thinking which claims height is determined by how optimistic society feels about the future- is it really all in the mind?

(Photo: A tall and small businessman look at each other. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lh490)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lh814)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqkw0d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs165m9j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Documentary (w3ct2hgk)
Three Pounds In My Pocket

Three pounds in my pocket

Since 2014 Kavita Puri has been charting the social history of British South Asians in post-war Britain. Many came with as little as three pounds due to strict currency controls.

This series looks at critical decade for British South Asians - the 1990s. We begin with Norman Tebbit and his so-called 'cricket test', which questioned the loyalty of those who supported India over England in international cricket. It was a far cry from the multicultural Britain that would be ushered in by Tony Blair's New Labour in 1997.

Amidst this changing political landscape, the children of the three pound generation were finding mainstream cultural success. Goodness Gracious Me was a hit on national television, films like East is East found success, and there were hit records from acts like Apache Indian, Bally Sagoo and Panjabi MC. Regular British Asian music nights at commercial venues began, such as Bombay Jungle at Soho's Wag Club, and soon hundreds were queuing up in central London to get in. British South Asians reflect on the 1990s.

(Photo: DJ Ritu and her band Sister India. Credit DJ Ritu)


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lhcs8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk0xft0)
Taliban start unveiling new plans for Afghanistan

The top story is Afghanistan where the Taliban is unpacking their plans for the country and their plans for human rights, women's rights and Sharia law.

With tens of thousands trying to flee and western countries saying they're planning refugee programmes, we hear the thoughts of one young businesswoman about the dramatic events...she can't and won't leave.

We hear from Haiti in the aftermath of the earthquake and how the network of church assistance so important to so many Haitians has been wrecked by the quake.

There are alarm bells sounding over the future of that Australian icon the Koala as well as a public health warning from Canada about a major outbreak of Syphilis.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lhhjd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk0xkk4)
Reaction to Taliban's pledges on human rights

As the Taliban attempt a charm offensive with a press conference in Kabul, the co-founder of the group now in charge of Afghanistan returns from exile in Qatar with other senior leaders to form a new government.

We'll speak to a lecturer at the American University of Afghanistan about life under the Taliban.

The authorities in Haiti have sharply revised the numbers of the dead in Saturday's powerful earthquake -- almost two thousand people are now believed to have lost their lives.

And in Texas, Governor Gregg Abbott has tested positive for Covid-19 and is isolating in his mansion. The announcement came just hours after he issued an executive order banning mask mandates.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lhm8j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk0xp98)
Afghanistan's looming refugee crisis

Filippo Grandi the UN High Commissioner for Refugees on what could be a looming refugee crisis in Afghanistan as the Taliban take power.

We're hearing from the man who was in charge of Afghanistan's central bank before fleeing the country and in Texas where the governor tests positive for Covid-19, after weeks spent banning local mask requirements.

In sport we're looking at who'll be playing who after the draw for the delayed African cup of nations.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lhr0n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbm)
Tobias Ellwood: Britain's Afghanistan exit

HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to British Conservative MP and former soldier Tobias Ellwood. Two decades after they were expelled from Kabul the hard-line Islamists are back. US and British troops are scrambling to complete a humiliating evacuation. It looks like an historic defeat for western powers. How damaging could the consequences be?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs166391)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnx)
Should our photos and messages always be private?

Apple is to scan users' iPhones for images of child abuse. Privacy advocates are dismayed. They say it's a slippery slope to monitoring a wider range of content. Andy Burrows from the UK's NSPCC tells us why Apple's move is an important step in protecting children online, while India McKinney from the Electronic Frontier Foundation explains why privacy activists like her are so worried. Namrata Maheshwari from the campaign group Access Now describes the battle between WhatsApp and the Indian governmentment over access to encrypted messages - an example of the wider battle between governments and tech firms over access to data. And Andersen Cheng, CEO of the tech company Post-Quantum, tells us about the time he invented a messaging app so secure it became the app of choice for a terrorist organisation.

(Photo: Messaging apps on an iPhone screen. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7z)
India's secret freedom radio

When Indian independence leaders, including Gandhi, were jailed in 1942, activists set up a secret radio station to carry the message of rebellion against British rule. Among the campaigners who worked at the station was Usha Metta, who was later imprisoned for broadcasting anti-British news and playing patriotic music. Claire Bowes has been listening to archive material of Usha Mehta and speaking to her nephew, Indian film-maker Ketan Mehta.

Image: Usha Mehta Credit:Mani Bhavan Gandhi Sangrahalaya, Mumbai


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lhvrs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct064s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs166715)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lhzhx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lj381)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqlq79)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs166gjf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct2hgk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lj705)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyy)
Danny Trejo: The ex-con who cracked Hollywood

Die, go insane or go to jail: these were the options Danny Trejo saw for himself as a young man growing up in the Los Angeles neighbourhood of Pacoima. Under the wing of his career-criminal uncle, Danny became addicted to heroin and spent most of his twenties in and out of high-security prisons across California.

A decade after being released from prison for the last time and whilst working as a drug counsellor he had a chance encounter that set him on a path to the highly-successful Hollywood movie career he now has.

Danny Trejo has over 400 on-screen credits, the record for the most on-screen deaths and has starred alongside some of the biggest actors in the business. He still lives in Pacoima and now gives back to the community he once terrorised.

He's written a book about his life and career called Trejo: My Life of Crime, Redemption, and Hollywood.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Danny Trejo in 2006
Credit: Estevan Oriol/Getty Images


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ljbr9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqlyqk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs166q0p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ljghf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqv0ft1)
Afghan teacher: "I'm like a prisoner"

As the Taliban intensify efforts to form a government, we hear from a teacher in Kabul too scared to leave home.

What will Sharia law mean in the new Afghanistan? Also today, our reporter in Haiti speaks to people struggling in the aftermath of the country's earthquake.

Photo: Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar (C) is one of the four men who founded the Taliban in Afghanistan. Credit: Getty Images


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ljl7k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs166yhy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cs3b85p96)
Zambia's economic challenges

We examine Zambia's economic challenges ahead of president-elect Hichilema's inauguration. Anthony Bwalya is spokesman for Mr Hichilema, and discusses the new administration's priorities. And we get analysis from Jonah Buyoya, of Diamond TV Zambia. Also in the programme, we examine the prospects for women under the new Taliban regime in Afghanistan, with Yasmeen Khan, global executive director of EqualityNow, which campaigns to promote and protect the legal rights of women and girls around the world. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on how whilst it's still only August, many retailers and hospitality venues are already planning ahead for the Christmas season.

(Picture: Zambia's president-elect Hakainde Hichilema. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ljpzp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxndmpzpy4)
Afghanistan: People who fled

As the Taliban continues its takeover of Afghanistan, we speak to those who managed to flee the country, and those who are trying. We also hear what Iran, one of the countries bordering Afghanistan, is doing to help Afghan refugees.

Also, we answer your questions about the coronavirus pandemic and go through some of the main headlines of the day. Today's expert is Dr Maria Sundaram, infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto. If you want to send us a question, you can WhatsApp the team on +447730751925.

And we get the latest from Haiti, where at least 1,941 people are known to have died in a powerful earthquake. Rescue workers are continuing to pull people alive from rubble but many are still missing.

(Photo: Spanish soldiers helping people board an Airbus A400M at the airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, 18 August 2021. EPA/Spanish Ministry of Defense)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ljtqt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxndmpztp8)
Afghanistan: War veterans

We speak to three veterans who served in the war in Afghanistan, and find out how they are reflecting on their service as they witness the Taliban takeover of the country. We also hear from Afghans who have fled the country in recent days, and those who are trying to get out.

Also, we answer your questions about the coronavirus pandemic and go through some of the main headlines of the day. Today's expert is Dr Maria Sundaram, infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto. If you want to send us a question, you can WhatsApp the team on +447730751925.

And we get the latest from Haiti, where at least 1,941 people are known to have died in a powerful earthquake. Rescue workers are continuing to pull people alive from rubble but many are still missing.

(Photo: British Soldier leaves the security of the camp walls to conduct a dawn foot patrol in the Nahr-e Saraj district, Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Credit: Ben Birchall/PA Wire)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ljygy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lk272)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqmp6b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs167fhg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ngcwkmy1f)
2021/08/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lk5z6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct064s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs167k7l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvn)
The psychology of courage and bravery

The adventurer and ultra-runner Alex Staniforth talks about his survival on Everest following the devastating Nepalese earthquake in 2015. Rachel Manning from Buckingham University considers why we do or don’t intervene in risky situations and in everyday life. And Patrick Tissington from Warwick University draws on the stories behind those awarded the Victoria or George Cross for bravery to suggest some of the best ways to manage our fear in allowing us to be more courageous. The programme is presented by Claudia Hammond and recorded at the Cheltenham Science Festival in June 2021.

Image: Rock climber clinging to a cliff
Credit: gregepperson/Getty Images

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Adrian Washbourne


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lk9qb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqv190y)
Afghanistan: Taliban crack down on protest

Three people have been killed after Taliban militants opened fire during protests against the group in the Afghan city of Jalalabad. Witnesses said the shooting followed an attempt by local residents to install Afghanistan's national flag.

Also on the programme: Reaction to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani speaking for the first time since fleeing the country; and the latest on rescue efforts underway in Haiti following a devastating earthquake

(Picture: Anti-Taliban protest in Jalalabad, Credit: Reuters)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lkfgg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs167sqv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct2hgk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lkk6l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywsj83yvrk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skljl2xd6)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs167xgz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48x1s4t2rq)
IMF suspends payments to Afghanistan

The International Monetary Fund has said it will withhold funds to Afghanistan, which were due to be handed over within days. The decision was made due to the lack of "clarity within the international community regarding recognition of a government in Afghanistan."

Also in the programme, in a bid to clamp down on nationwide protests -- Cuba introduces a new law restricting use of social media.

Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on how whilst it's still only August, many retailers and hospitality venues are already planning ahead for the Christmas season.

PHOTO: Afghan currency dealers/Getty Images



THURSDAY 19 AUGUST 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lkspv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqh61hh50k)
IMF suspends payments to Afghanistan

The International Monetary Fund has said it will withhold funds to Afghanistan, which were due to be handed over within days. The decision was made due to the lack of "clarity within the international community regarding recognition of a government in Afghanistan."
We also hear from Aisha Wahab, council member in Haywood City in California. She was the 1st Afghan American Woman Elected to Public Office in the United States.

Also in the programme, in a bid to clamp down on nationwide protests Cuba introduces a new law restricting use of social media.

Canadian court hearings to determine whether the senior executive of the Chinese tech giant, Huawei, Meng Wanzhou, should be extradited to the United States have ended after two and half years.

The Canadian government prosecutor said the court should have no difficulty in finding Ms Wanzhou guilty of commiting fraud, and so should be handed over to the Americans.

Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on how whilst it's still only August, many retailers and hospitality venues are already planning ahead for the Christmas season.

PHOTO: Afghan currency dealers/Getty Images


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lkxfz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqnjf7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs1688qc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxq)
India's living dead

What would it be like if everyone believed you were dead? Lal Bihari knows exactly what that feels like. When he was 22 years old the Indian farmer was told by his local government office that he was dead and no protestations that he was standing before them would persuade the bureaucrats otherwise – after all, his death certificate was there as proof. Whether the victim of a scam or a clerical error, the end result for Bihari was to lose his business and all the land he was hoping to inherit. It took him more than two decades to reinstate himself among the living during which time he tried everything from going on hunger strike to kidnapping someone in the hopes that the police would be forced to concede that a dead man could not be arrested. Today, more than a quarter of a century later, Bihari runs the Association for the Living Dead of India through which he says he has helped thousands of people who have fallen victim to the same thing. He tells his extraordinary story to Chloe Hadjimatheou for Assignment.

Production Team in India: Ajit Sarathi; Kinjal Pandya; Piyush Nagpal and Praveen Mudholkar
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Lal Bihari holding a banner for the Association of the Living Dead. Credit: Piyush Nagpal/BBC)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ll163)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ll4y7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqnrxh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs168j6m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr9)
Alice Waters: My life in five dishes

Alice Waters is one of America’s most influential chefs and food writers. In the 1970s she led a food revolution that sparked a movement towards local, sustainable, organic food. Alice tells Emily Thomas about her life, from a suburban childhood in New Jersey to the radical politics of the University of California, Berkeley. She explains how she was inspired to set up a small French restaurant called Chez Panisse, after a trip to France as a student, and how it became a mecca for writers, chefs, musicians and artists.

After almost half a century of food activism, Alice tells us that she still has plenty of work to do. She talks about her mission to educate children through her Edible School Yard project, how lockdown has focused her mind on climate change, and what it has felt like to see her beloved restaurant forced to close its doors over the past year.

(Photo: Alice Waters. Credit: Amanda Marsalis/ BBC).


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ll8pc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk10bq3)
US troops could stay longer in Afghanistan

President Biden has doubled down on his defence of his strategy in Afghanistan. But do his claims hold up? And what lessons can be learnt from America's long military engagement in the country? We'll speak to a journalist who has written a book on Afghanistan.

Haiti's double misfortune - being hit by a deadly earthquake and then a tropical storm - has left many desperate for aid, but unable to get it. Our correspondent reports from near the epicentre of the quake.

We'll hear why Algeria's government is blaming internal saboteurs - and two foreign powers - for the deadly forest fires.

And we'll hear about a scientific breakthrough which could make cleaning up oil spills much easier.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lldfh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk10gg7)
Protests erupt as Afghans fight to leave the country

US President Joe Biden has doubled down on his decision to pull troops out of Afghanistan.

In an interview with ABC News he said no-one could have anticipated the speed of the Taliban takeover, adding that "chaos was inevitable".

We hear the views of a former marine who served in the country.

Hundreds of firefighters are tackling a wildfire which is blazing through one of the last remaining pine forests near Athens.

Also the discovery of a marine bacteria discovered off the coast of Canada which can break down oil and diesel fuel - the lead author of a study tells us more.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9llj5m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk10l6c)
Afghan diaspora fearful for the future

President Biden has called the chaos in Afghanistan unavoidable after the withdrawal of US troops - we get a first hand account about scenes at Kabul's airport and talk to a refugee in the UK about her fears over the Taliban taking over.

We have a powerful report from Haiti hearing about those hit hard by Saturday's earthquake - at least two thousand people have lost their lives.

Wildfires are raging in various parts of the world right now - from the Mediterranean to the US - these happen every year but what's behind their fierce nature this time round?


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9llmxr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2c)
Are our phones spying on us?

A leaked list of thousands of phone numbers - including Presidents and activists - has drawn attention to spyware. It’s supposed to stop terrorists but are our devices safe anymore?

Charmaine Cozier looks into the ever-growing world of high level spyware and explores what its use could mean for citizens and democracies around the globe.

Producer: Olivia Noon and Soila Apparicio


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs169064)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9m)
Controversial new Alzheimer's drug in the spotlight

After decades without progress, this June a new treatment was approved by the US Food and Drugs Administration - Biogen's Aduhelm. Ivana Davidovic looks into why this process has been so controversial that is now under investigation by a federal watchdog.

Aaron Kesselheim, a Harvard Medical School professor, served on the FDA’s advisory committee that considered Aduhelm and voted against its approval. He explains why he decided to resign from his post and what consequences there could be for future research and also for Medicare and Medicaid for covering such an expensive drug.

Geri Taylor has participated in the Aduhelm trial since 2015 and both her and her husband Jim believe that the drug has slowed her decline.

Jason Karlawish - a practising physician, co-director of the Penn Memory Centre and the author of The Problem of Alzheimer’s book - says that more money should be spent on providing carers for the vast majority of Alzheimer's patients and that people should not be forced to choose between cure and care.

PHOTO: 3d illustration of the human brain with Alzheimer’s disease/Getty Images


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3g)
Saddam Hussein's foreign hostages

In August 1990 following the Iraqi dictator, Saddam Hussein’s invasion of neighbouring Kuwait hundreds of foreign nationals were held hostage by the Iraqi government. Among them were the Rahims, a British Muslim family who had been in Iraq on a religious pilgrimage. Sameer Rahim has been speaking to Farhana Haider about his time as Saddam's prisoner.


Image: Saddam Hussein with western hostages, Iraq 1990 Credit: Shutterstock


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9llrnw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs1693y8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9llwf0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlk)
A radiant light: The Indonesian poet Amir Hamzah

The writer Amir Hamza is a national hero in Indonesia celebrated for both his poetry and his role in the development of the country’s national language. Hamza was an emotional man who struggled with thwarted love and inner conflict and created a beguilingly intense body of work. His poetry paid homage to Malay literary tradition infused with Islamic mysticism but also reflected new ideas springing up in the artistic circles in Java where he worked in the 1930s. Towards the end of that decade events conspired to enforce his return to the family home in Sumatra and ultimately led to his becoming a tragic victim of brutal retribution during Indonesia’s transition to independence.

Rajan Datar is joined by Ayu Utami, an award-winning Indonesian novelist, playwright and broadcaster; Ben Murtagh, Reader in Indonesian and Malay at SOAS, University of London, and managing editor of the journal Indonesia and the Malay World; and Taufiq Hanafi, an Indonesian literary scholar currently at the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies in Leiden. The reader is Sallehuddin Abdullah-Sani.

[Photo: Amir Hamzah]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8l)
Hou Bin wows the world

At the opening ceremony of the 2008 Paralympics in Beijing, Chinese athlete Hou Bin stunned the huge global audience with an amazing feat of strength. As the world held its breath, he used a rope to haul himself, his wheelchair and the Olympic flame 39 metres into the air to light the cauldron. Hou Bin talks to Ashley Byrne. A Made In Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Hou Bin climbing to the top of the Olympic stadium (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lm054)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqpm4d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs169cfj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lm3x8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3g)
Why I gave my sister my womb

Lolita Wästerlund had always wanted to be a mother but was born without a womb (also known as uterus). Her sister Linda, on the other hand, never imagined that she would become a parent. So when Linda fell pregnant she was afraid of telling Lolita. Lolita decided that she had to be there for her sister despite her jealousy. But when Lolita heard about pioneering uterus transplants happening in Sweden, everything changed. Linda had a uterus transplant so Lolita could carry a child of her own. This interview was first broadcast on 18th September 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Saskia Edwards

Picture: Lolita (R) and Linda (L) Wästerlund
Credit: Courtesy of Lolita Wästerlund


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lm7nd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqpvmn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs169lxs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lmcdj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqv3bq4)
Taliban blames foreigners for 'chaos' at airport

The scramble to escape the Taliban in Afghanistan continues with the militants blaming foreigners for the deaths at Kabul airport. We hear from the city and from a former Afghan politician who tells us of the danger now of civil war.

Also, the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah says it has arranged shipments of fuel from Iran as shortages paralyse the country; and a new UK study of the effectiveness of the Pfizer and AstraZeneca vaccines against the Delta variant of Covid.

(Photo: People react to tear gas fired by U.S. military members trying to disperse crowds from breaching the wall at Kabul airport, Afghanistan August 18, 2021. Credit: Rise to Peace/Reuters)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lmh4n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs169vf1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y499s4g6nxf)
IMF suspends Afghanistan's access to funds

The International Monetary Fund says Afghanistan no longer has access to its resources. We examine how any new Taliban-led government will be able to raise money it needs, given the country's official financial holdings in the United States have also been frozen. Graeme Smith worked in Afghanistan for a decade, and is a consultant researcher at the UK think tank, the Overseas Development Institute. And we consider Afghanistan's future economic relations with major trading parter Pakistan, with Adil Shahzeb, who is host of a primetime TV programme on the Dawn News channel in Islamabad. Also in the programme, car maker Toyota says it is going to have to drastically cut production owing to a shortage of semiconductors and a recent rise in coronavirus cases in Japan. David Leggett is an automotive analyst at GlobalData, and tells us how long production issues are likely to continue. Plus, the BBC's Ivana Davidovic investigates the controversy around the recent approval of Biogen's Aduhelm treatment for Alzheimer's disease by the US Food and Drug Administration, which is now under investigation by a federal watchdog.

(Picture: Afghans queue outside a bank to withdraw funds. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lmlws)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxndmq2lv7)
Taliban block Afghans from entering airport

As we continue to cover the situation in Afghanistan - thousands of people are still trying to leave the country following the Taliban's takeover. There have been chaotic scenes at embassies in the capital Kabul and at the city's airport where people are trying to find a way out of the country. We hear from our regional specialists to get the latest.

We’ll also get your coronavirus questions answered by our regular medical expert, Dr Emma Hodcroft in Switzerland.

And we go to Haiti. It's been five days since the devastating earthquake hit the Caribbean island. We hear from the decimated village of Marceline where people have been left to fend for themselves and the injured people have no medical help.

(Photo:Evacuees from Afghanistan boarding a Lufthansa airplane to Frankfurt, Germany, after arriving from Kabul at Tashkent airport, Uzbekistan, 19 August 2021. Credit: EPA)
19/08/2021 European Pressphoto Agency


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lmqmx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxndmq2qlc)
Afghan interpreters

As we continue to cover the situation in Afghanistan - thousands of people are still trying to leave the country following the Taliban's takeover. Western countries are continuing to evacuate Afghans who worked for them over the years. But not everyone can leave quickly. We hear from two Afghan interpreters who are still in the capital Kabul, in fear for their lives and desperate to leave the country.

We’ll also get your coronavirus questions answered by our regular medical expert, Dr Helen Wimalarathna, a Molecular Epidemiologist at the University of Buckingham in the UK.

And we go to Haiti. It's been five days since the devastating earthquake hit the Caribbean island. We hear from the decimated village of Marceline where people have been left to fend for themselves and the injured people have no medical help.

(Photo: Former Afghan interpreters and veterans hold a demonstration in London. Credit: Photo credit should read: Isobel Frodsham/PA Wire)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lmvd1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lmz45)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqql3f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16bbdk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ngcwkqtyj)
2021/08/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ln2w9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16bg4p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l42)
Seismic citizen science in Hispaniola

The epicentre of the tragic earthquake in Haiti last week was just 100km from that of the even more deadly 2010 one. Unlike then, a network of small cheap seismic detectors run by volunteers is currently monitoring the aftershocks. As Eric Calais says, the suspicion is that this could be the latest in a sequence of quakes, echoing previous clusters over the last few hundred years.

Hydrogen is being much touted as an alternative to natural gas as a source of fuel for homes in a low-carbon world. In particular, “blue” hydrogen – hydrogen made from fossil fuels but with the carbon dioxide being captured at the point of production – is said to be some sort of transitional fuel that could be introduced into current infrastructure with little stress. But Robert Howarth is less optimistic. He is co-author on a paper published last week analysing the net carbon impact of blue hydrogen production. He argues that not only are there hidden greenhouse gas emissions in production, but that in fact burning blue Hydrogen at home could have a worse impact than burning the natural gas from which it is made.

Meanwhile, physicists at the US National Ignition Facility are rumoured to have made a huge stride in the quest for controlled, sustained nuclear fusion. Using a barrage of powerful lasers to heat indirectly a tiny hydrogen isotope target, on the 8th of august, they briefly got 70% of the energy back from one of their runs. It is a huge leap in returns, and tantalisingly suggests some sort of runaway fusion reaction occurred. Around the world, hopes of laser-driven fusion energy generation are soaring, but as an ecstatic Kate Lancaster of the University of York cautions, even if it does represent ignition, we are still a long way from “plug socket efficiency” or net energy gain.

Meanwhile, scientists of the Leibniz Institute evolution and Biodiversity have been eavesdropping on bats in Panama. Human babies babble when they are learning how to talk. It’s been shown before that songbirds do something similar, but according to Ahana Fernandez, it now it seems another mammal joins the babbling ranks – the younglings of the Greater Sac-Winged bat of South America. Ahana tells Roland about her analysis.




(Photo by Reginald Loiussaint/JR/AFP via Getty Images)


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9ln6mf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqv45y1)
Taliban intensifying hunt for collaborators

A UN document, seen by the BBC, has suggested that the Taliban has intensified its hunt for people who previously collaborated with US and NATO forces. The intelligence paper suggests the Taliban have lists of individuals they are threatening to kill.

Also in the programme: the latest from Haiti after an earthquake hit the Caribbean island; and the world’s largest car manufacturer cuts its global production by 40%.

(Photo: Taliban patrol as nation celebrate the 102nd Independence Day in Kandahar, Afghanistan, 19 August 2021. CREDIT: EPA/STRINGER)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lnbck)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16bpmy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lng3p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywsj841rnn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skljl5t99)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16btd2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48x1s4wznt)
IMF suspends Afghanistan's access to funds

The International Monetary Fund says Afghanistan no longer has access to its resources. We examine how any new Taliban-led government will be able to raise money it needs, given the country's official financial holdings in the United States have also been frozen. Graeme Smith worked in Afghanistan for a decade, and is a consultant researcher at the UK think tank, the Overseas Development Institute. And we consider Afghanistan's future economic relations with major trading parter Pakistan, with Adil Shahzeb, who is host of a primetime TV programme on the Dawn News channel in Islamabad. Also in the programme, car maker Toyota says it is going to have to drastically cut production owing to a shortage of semiconductors and a recent rise in coronavirus cases in Japan. David Leggett is an automotive analyst at GlobalData, and tells us how long production issues are likely to continue. Plus, the BBC's Ivana Davidovic investigates the controversy around the recent approval of Biogen's Aduhelm treatment for Alzheimer's disease by the US Food and Drug Administration, which is now under investigation by a federal watchdog.

(Picture: Afghans queue outside a bank to withdraw funds. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 20 AUGUST 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lnply)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqh61hl1xn)
Afghanistan's finances in disarray

Afghanistan's finances are in a disastrous state, with assets abroad frozen and international payments suspended. The Taliban has already been raising millions in taxes - we'll hear how effective they've been at it, with an update from our correspondent in Kabul. Plus, we speak with Ian Fritz, who spent hundreds of hours eavesdropping on Taliban fighters. The website and app OnlyFans has banned sexual content; for stars on the site, it presents a serious dent to their lucrative incomes - we speak with Monica Huldt, who says she makes about $60,000 a month on the site. Plus, we discuss a controversial news Alzheimer's drug in an extended report from the BBC's Ivana Davidovic. We discuss all this live with guests Dimuthu Attanayake in Colombo and Lori Ann Larocco in New York.


(Image: A Taliban fighter on the road in Afghanistan. Credit: EPA)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lntc2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqrfbb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16c5mg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tzf)
The Psychology of goalkeepers with Australia's Maty Ryan

Real Sociedad goalkeeper Maty Ryan looks back on the last 10 months of his career and tells us why he suddenly fell out of favour at Brighton. We also hear from blind footballer Gael Riviere ahead of the Paralympics in Tokyo.


Picture: Mathew Ryan of Brighton and Hove Albion during the Premier League match between Aston Villa (Matthew Ashton - AMA/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lny36)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lp1vb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqrntl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16cf3q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2fnq)
Black Jewish Lives Matter

The death of George Floyd Jr in May 2020 started a wave of unforeseen protests. As these protests consumed the United States, groups of people from various beliefs, backgrounds and origins came out in support of the Black Lives Matter movement, which started in 2014. A year later, under a new US president, the US still faces the same challenges even though police officer Derek Chauvin has been found guilty with murder, many still believe that they are still fighting against institutionalised racism in the US.

Monitoring the news in the US, journalist Amie Liebowitz has repeatedly seen images of groups of Jewish people stand side by side, holding placards and wearing t-shirts that said “Tzedek Tzedek Tirdof” (Deuteronomy 16:20) – a passage from the Torah meaning “Justice, Justice you shall pursue”. This message has been adopted by the Jews for Black Lives Matter movement which has always been associated with the act of social justice. This made her reflect on her own context as a white, Ashkenazi Jew from Australia and what this movement meant for her religious community.

In this episode of Heart and Soul, Amie Liebowitz reconciles with her lack of knowledge about the black Jewish experience and reflects upon the need for further understanding of both privilege and antisemitism. She speaks to four black Jewish community members in the United States who speak frankly about identity dynamics and misconceptions, racism, activism and the support needed to help resolve the issues they face.

Presenter and producer: Amie Liebowitz
Executive Producer: Rajeev Gupta

Audio clip contributions: Hannah Roodman, Jews for Racial and Economic Justice (JFREJ), Nissim Black, Westside Gravy, Drake and CBS

(Picture: April N. Baskin at the Women's March in Washington DC in January 2019 representing Jewish Women of Color / Courtesy of April N. Baskin)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lp5lg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk137m6)
Afghans report Taliban retribution

The United States says it's stepping up its evacuation efforts from Afghanistan, with thousands of people due to leave overnight. But what about those trying to leave by land? We'll speak to our reporter who has been to a Afghanistan's border with Pakistan.

We'll speak to a senator in Pakistan about a case of mass sexual assault which has created huge anger in the country.

Our correspondent in Havana tells us about Cuba's recent nationwide demonstrations amid the economic crisis there.

And is it out with the new and in with the old? We'll hear about a surprising about turn in politics in Malaysia.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lp9bl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk13ccb)
Afghanistan faces humanitarian crisis

We're continuing our coverage of Afghanistan here on Newsday. As Western governments continue the evacuation of foreign nationals and Afghans who worked for them, the country faces a humanitarian crisis after an 800 million dollar shortfall in pledged aid funding. We'll look at the situation and hear from a senior UN Envoy in Kabul.

We're also in New Zealand - bringing you an update of the Covid situation there after the country imposed a strict lock down when a single person tested positive for the Delta variant.

And to Israel too - where we've witnessed a rise in Coronavirus cases despite it being one of the most vaccinated countries in the world.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lpf2q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2skk13h3g)
The desperate scramble to leave Afghanistan

The US says it's intensified its evacuation efforts from Afghanistan flying thousands more people out of Kabul... We'll go there live.

We also ask if Russia is planning to have a role in Afghanistan more than thirty years after Soviet troops withdrew from the country.

We're also in New Zealand - bringing you an update of the covid situation there after the country imposed a strict lock down when a single person tested positive for the Delta variant.

And a story from Sweden where a legal error sees millions of dollars returned to convicted drug dealers.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lpjtv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1l)
Kamila Sidiqi: What future do Afghanistan's women face?

HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to Kamila Sidiqi, a leading Afghan women's rights campaigner, entrepreneur and government adviser under President Ghani. She escaped from Kabul as the Taliban took over. Is her cause now lost and who is to blame?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16cx37)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0l)
Rethinking time

All our lives are ruled by time and it's a fundamental part of our daily routines but what if we could make time go more slowly - or quickly? Adrian Bejan, a professor in thermodynamics at Duke University says that this is possible if we just open our minds to how we perceive change. And if we could make time last longer, what would be the most efficient way of using it? We get some tips from Laura Vanderkam a writer and speaker on time management. Plus, research scientist Christian Clot tells us about an experiment where all markers of time were taken away, including clocks, watches and sunlight - and what that could mean for how we live in the future. And casino designer and consultant, Bill Friedman explains how the idea of timelessness is put to practical use in casinos where professional gamblers want to feel that they're always in the moment.

Picture: antique clocks, Picture credit: Getty Images

Presenter: Elizabeth Hotson
Producer: Sarah Treanor


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyy)
When The Queen met Ceaușescu

Nicolae Ceaușescu was the first communist leader to be given a full state visit to the UK, but it was controversial from the outset. The Romanian president was a known dictator who ran a brutal regime, but Britain was still cash-strapped after World War Two and was desperate to build new trading partners. Dorian Galbinski was one of the main translators for the visit and he explains to Rebecca Kesby some of the background to the event.

(Photo: June 1978: Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceaușescu rides in the state carriage with Queen Elizabeth II on his official visit to Britain. Credit: Central Press/Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lpnkz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhb)
Fears over Afghan biometric data

Human rights activists say that the Taliban could use databases compiled by the previous government and coalition forces to target citizens. Plus, why is there a flurry of investment in undersea internet cables. And the amazing stories behind some emoji characters. Presented by Zoe Kleinman, with BBC tech reporter Chris Vallance. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Representation of a fingerprint scan, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16d0vc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lpsb3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hst)
America after Afghanistan

The speed with which the Taliban took control of Afghanistan surprised not just the world but even its own members. The group's rapid rise coincided with an equally fast withdrawal of US-led international forces. In a major speech this week President Biden rejected criticism that the manner of the American withdrawal contributed to the sudden collapse of the Afghan government. He also said that the mission was never about nation building. But critics argue that the events in Afghanistan have not just tarnished Washington’s reputation but they have also exposed the limits of its willingness to invest time and resources to achieve foreign policy objectives. So what does America's departure from Afghanistan tell us about its future engagement on global security issues? Is it an effort to concentrate on more pressing challenges from rivals like China and Russia? Or is it a continuation of Donald Trump's isolationist ‘America First’ policy? How will it affect Washington's international credibility and its desire to promote human rights and democratic values around the world?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests. Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lpx27)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqsj1h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16d8bm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lq0tc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fb)
Afghanistan after the Taliban takeover

There is fear and uncertainty in Afghanistan as people wonder what their lives will be like under Taliban rule. Sana Safi from BBC Pashto shares her insights from listening to and interviewing the Taliban, and talking to contacts in Afghanistan.

Delhi and Kashmir: two lives in letters
In 2017, BBC journalist Divya Arya brought together schoolgirls Saumya and Duaa, from Delhi and Indian-administered Kashmir, to become penfriends. She tells us how their growing understanding and friendship overcame political divides. Divya's book about their correspondence is called Postbox Kashmir: Two lives in letters.

The rise of plastic surgery in China
Plastic surgery has become a booming industry in China, but this has led to a rise in unlicensed clinics and many high profile botched operations. Waiyee Yip from BBC Singapore has been following the trend.

A Russian bike odyssey
BBC Russian's Oleg Boldyrev is a keen cyclist, and as Covid restrictions prevent more exotic routes, he's taken his bike along the backroads of Russia, revisiting childhood haunts and gauging opinions about next month's parliamentary elections.

Image: Members of Taliban forces sit at a checkpost in Kabul, Afghanistan in August 2021
Credit: Reuters/Stringer


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lq4kh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqsrjr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16dhtw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lq89m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqv67m7)
US "speeding up evacuations" from Kabul

The US says it's speeding up its evacuation efforts at Kabul airport; we hear how large crowds of Afghans desperate to escape the Taliban, are still trying to push their way in.

Also in the programme: details emerge of a deadly attack on civilians and soldiers in the Sahel region of West Africa; and as the UN and Fridays for Future say a billion children are severely threatened by climate change, we hear from a young activist in the Philippines.

(Picture: people run from gunfire at Kabul airport, Afghanistan, August 19, 2021 in this still image taken from a video / Credit: AAMAJ NEWS/via REUTERS)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lqd1r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16drb4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46vfyn7njn)
What now for Afghanistan's media?

In the wake of the Taliban's takeover of Afghanistan we consider the future of its media. Jodie Ginsberg is chief executive of InterNews Europe, a non-profit organisation that supports independent media and trains journalists in more than 100 countries. And we get the perspective of Saad Mohseni, chairman of Moby Media Group, which owns the most-watched network in Afghanistan, Tolo TV. Also in the programme, the subscription platform OnlyFans is banning sexually explicit content. The site has become famous in large part because it allows adult content creators to share videos with relatively few restrictions. We get reaction from Monica Huldt, who creates content on the platform, and the BBC's Chris Fox tells us what's behind the move. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the impact of time on our work lives, and gets tips on making better use of it.

(Picture: A female Afghan news presenter. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lqhsw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxndmq5hrb)
Afghanistan: Ethnic groups

We'll hear about the concerns over the Taliban takeover among ethnic minorities in Afghanistan, after reports of an attack by the Taliban on members of the Hazara community.

We'll also bring the latest on reports of the Taliban searching for people who worked for foreign forces. We'll get more testimonies from those who are trying to flee.

And we'll hear how Afghan sportswomen are reflecting on the events in their country. Two footballers, a former captain and the current captain of the women's football team discuss the future of women's sport in Afghanistan.

And we continue to look at the impact of the pandemic around the world and speak to people who work in tourism on the islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe ---both hit hard by Covid-19.

(Photo: A Taliban holds a rifle behind the speaker as he stands guard as Shi"ite Muslims attend the mourning procession during Ashura, in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan, 19 August 2021. Credit: STRINGER/EPA)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lqmk0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxndmq5mhg)
Afghanistan: Female football players

We speak to Afghan sportswomen as they reflect on the Taliban's takeover of their country. Two footballers, a former captain and the current captain of the women's national football team, discuss the future of women's sport in Afghanistan.

Also, we hear about the concerns among ethnic minorities in Afghanistan, after reports of an attack by the Taliban on members of the Hazara community. We also bring the latest on reports of the Taliban searching for people who worked for foreign forces.

And we continue to look at the impact of the pandemic around the world and speak to people who work in tourism on the islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe -both hit hard by Covid-19.

(Photo: Afghan female football players compete in Kabul. Credit: Aref Karimi/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lqr94)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20fb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lqw18)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxlyzqth0j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16f79n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ngcwktqvm)
2021/08/20 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lqzsd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nhb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16fc1s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqt)
Why is human skin so rubbish?

If you’ve ever fallen over and grazed your skin, maybe you wished it were made of stronger stuff. The tough hide of a rhinoceros or the protective armour of a stag beetle would do a better job. It’s a thought that’s been bothering CrowdScience listener Paul, who points out that our skin also suffers from acne, eczema and hives; it dries out; it bruises. In fact, human hide is so vulnerable that we cover our feet in other animals’ skin and our bodies in clothes just to make life more comfortable. Is this really the pinnacle of evolution?

Marnie Chesterton makes the case for the largest, fastest-growing organ, hiding in plain site on our body. Tissue Engineer Professor Sheila MacNeil from Sheffield University explains how skin manages to be breathable yet waterproof; flexible yet stronger than steel; sensitive to touch but protective against pollution and damaging UV. Skin biologist Dr Christina Philippeos from King’s College London explains how our bodies make a scar.

Professor Muzlifah Haniffa has developed an atlas of the human skin – a tool to help researchers unravel the mysteries of how different skin cells interact. This atlas should help treat skin diseases in the future. Over in Tanzania’s Regional Dermatology Training Centre in Moshi, Dr Daudi Mavura talks us through a rare but devastating skin disorder called Xeroderma Pigmentosum, or XP. For children with XP, sunlight is dangerous because a mutation in the skin’s DNA repair mechanism means that UV rays can cause lesions and tumours.

Our epidermis is already multifunctional but over at Ben May Department of Cancer Research at the University of Chicago, Professor Xaioyang Wu and colleagues are looking at how much more skin could do. Personalised skin grafts may provide living drug patches to help people manage their disease, addiction or even weight.

With thanks to Dr Lynne MacTavish from Mankwe Wildlife Reserve in South Africa for describing a rhino’s skin.

Produced and presented by Marnie Chesterton.

[Image: Young and Old, dry skin
Credit: Eric A. Nelson/Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lr3jj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57wqv72v4)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lr78n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16flk1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tzf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjpb9lrc0s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywsj844nkr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0skljl8q6d)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhs16fq95)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48x1s4zwkx)
What now for Afghanistan's media?

In the wake of the Taliban's takeover of Afghanistan we consider the future of its media. Jodie Ginsberg is chief executive of InterNews Europe, a non-profit organisation that supports independent media and trains journalists in more than 100 countries. And we get the perspective of Saad Mohseni, chairman of Moby Media Group, which owns the most-watched network in Afghanistan, Tolo TV. Also in the programme, the subscription platform OnlyFans is banning sexually explicit content. The site has become famous in large part because it allows adult content creators to share videos with relatively few restrictions. We get reaction from Monica Huldt, who creates content on the platform, and the BBC's Chris Fox tells us what's behind the move. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the impact of time on our work lives, and gets tips on making better use of it.

(Picture: A female Afghan news presenter. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gxq)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxq)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gxq)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkhdrwnxxq)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkhdrwq0mw)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkhdrwqvvs)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkhdrwrglf)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172xzkhdrwrq2p)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkhdrwrttt)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkhdrws626)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkhdrwsk9l)

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BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjnz18zfx6)

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BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjpb9l92zk)

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BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjpb9lcrdd)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjpb9lczwn)

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BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjpb9lf6by)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzjpb9lfb32)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjpb9lffv6)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172xzjpb9lfklb)

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BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjpb9lft2l)

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BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjpb9lgdt7)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjpb9lgjkc)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjpb9lgn9h)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjpb9lgwsr)

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BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjpb9lh814)

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BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjpb9lhvrs)

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BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjpb9lj381)

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BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjpb9ljbr9)

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BBC News 19:00 WED (w172xzjpb9lk272)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172xzjpb9lk5z6)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjpb9lk9qb)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjpb9lkfgg)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjpb9lkk6l)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lkspv)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lkxfz)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjpb9ll163)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjpb9ll4y7)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjpb9ll8pc)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lldfh)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjpb9llj5m)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjpb9llmxr)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjpb9llrnw)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjpb9llwf0)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lm054)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lm3x8)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lm7nd)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lmcdj)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lmh4n)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lmlws)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lmqmx)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lmvd1)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lmz45)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172xzjpb9ln2w9)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172xzjpb9ln6mf)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lnbck)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjpb9lng3p)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lnply)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lntc2)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lny36)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lp1vb)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lp5lg)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lp9bl)

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BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lpjtv)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lpnkz)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lpsb3)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lpx27)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lq0tc)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lq4kh)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lq89m)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lqd1r)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lqhsw)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lqmk0)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lqr94)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lqw18)

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BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lr3jj)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lr78n)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjpb9lrc0s)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d62)

BBC OS Conversations 02:06 SUN (w3ct2d62)

BBC OS Conversations 22:06 SUN (w3ct2d62)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxndmpsx3y)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxndmpt0w2)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxndmpwt11)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172xxxndmpwxs5)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172xxxndmpzpy4)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172xxxndmpztp8)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172xxxndmq2lv7)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxxndmq2qlc)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172xxxndmq5hrb)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxndmq5mhg)

BBC Proms on the World Service 19:06 SAT (w3ct2gdd)

BBC Proms on the World Service 12:06 SUN (w3ct2gdd)

Bad Cops 10:06 SUN (w3ct2g74)

Bad Cops 03:06 MON (w3ct2g74)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j53)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jg4)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jnx)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1j9m)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j0l)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqgts5wt6x)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqh61h9c6c)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqh61hd83g)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqh61hh50k)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqh61hl1xn)

Business Weekly 04:06 SUN (w3ct2dh3)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dh3)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqs)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pqs)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pqt)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lsf)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lsf)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lsf)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct1m83)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2h25)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct2h25)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2h25)

From Our Own Correspondent 02:06 SAT (w3ct1mv6)

From Our Own Correspondent 05:06 SUN (w3ct1mv6)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mv6)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n63)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n63)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3ct1n63)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1nbm)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1nbm)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3ct1nbm)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n1l)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n1l)

HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3ct1n1l)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nvn)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nvn)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvn)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2gj4)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2gj4)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2fnq)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tdc)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tdc)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1tdc)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dkc)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dkc)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2dkc)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dkc)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hc7)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hc7)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2skk0qmzt)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv2skk0qrqy)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172xv2skk0qwh2)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172xv2skk0tjwx)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172xv2skk0tnn1)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172xv2skk0tsd5)

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Newsday 06:06 WED (w172xv2skk0xkk4)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172xv2skk0xp98)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172xv2skk10bq3)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172xv2skk10gg7)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172xv2skk10l6c)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172xv2skk137m6)

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Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172xv2skk13h3g)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172xv57jgjhw5c)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172xv57jgjjv4d)

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Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172xv57wqv67m7)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172xv57wqv72v4)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kx8)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3ct1kx8)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jtf)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k3g)

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Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k3g)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1s)

Over to You 01:50 SUN (w3ct1l1s)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l1s)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pl7)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pl7)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3ct1pl7)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l42)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l42)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3ct1l42)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0ngcwkg477)

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Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172y0ngcwkqtyj)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172y0ngcwktqvm)

Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct1l8k)

Sporting Witness 02:50 SUN (w3ct1l8k)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3ct1l8l)

Sports News 23:20 SAT (w172y0sk788lghn)

Sports News 23:20 SUN (w172y0sk788pcdr)

Sports News 23:20 MON (w172y0skljkx3l0)

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Sports News 23:20 THU (w172y0skljl5t99)

Sports News 23:20 FRI (w172y0skljl8q6d)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0q2x2ggyn0)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tcnzw7nbp)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0tcnzwbsr1)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lbt)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1nhb)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3ct1nhb)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rt9)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3ct1rt9)

The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2dqw)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2dqw)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2dqw)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3csz4bf)

The Compass 02:32 WED (w3ct064s)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct064s)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct064s)

The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p8v)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p8w)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p8w)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3ct1p8w)

The Cultural Frontline 05:06 SAT (w3ct1psz)

The Cultural Frontline 01:06 SUN (w3ct1psz)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1psz)

The Documentary 23:32 SAT (w3ct2hdt)

The Documentary 04:32 WED (w3ct2hgk)

The Documentary 11:32 WED (w3ct2hgk)

The Documentary 22:32 WED (w3ct2hgk)

The Fake Paralympians 02:32 TUE (w3ct2gyz)

The Fake Paralympians 09:06 TUE (w3ct2gyz)

The Fake Paralympians 20:06 TUE (w3ct2gyz)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20f9)

The Fifth Floor 12:06 FRI (w3ct20fb)

The Fifth Floor 18:06 FRI (w3ct20fb)

The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjr2)

The Food Chain 04:32 THU (w3cszjr9)

The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3cszjr9)

The Food Chain 22:32 THU (w3cszjr9)

The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rlj)

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