Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 07 AUGUST 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz699c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqgghw3nm2)
America adds almost one million jobs in July

The rise in job creation saw the unemployment rate in the United States fall by half a percentage point to 5.4%. We'll hear from the BBC's New York business correspondent, Michelle Fleury, about where the gains were made and how the Federal Reserve might manage America's economic growth. Also on the programme; from the US to Italy, vaccine passports are increasingly becoming part of our daily lives we'll ask how they're affecting businesses. Plus, the creators of the South Park cartoon series have signed a $900m deal with US media giant ViacomCBS, Lucas Shaw an entertainment reporter for Bloomberg explains what's behind the agreement.

Joining us throughout the programme is Sarah Knight from ABC Perth in Australia.

(Picture: A worker supervising a production line. Credit: Science Photo Library.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz6f1h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 Global Questions (w3ct2hfv)
Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkws9w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbs)
Daniel Vettori on mental health, The Hundred and his dream job

We speak to former New Zealand captain Daniel Vettori about his coaching career, including his current role in The Hundred, and about mental health in cricket following Ben Stokes' announcement that he's taking an 'indefinite' break from the sport.

Plus, we hear from the women's team in Barcelona which has run a successful campaign to create the city's first cricket pitch.

PHOTO: Spin Bowling Coach Daniel Vettori takes part in warm ups during game one of the International T20 series between New Zealand and Bangladesh at Seddon Park on March 28, 2021 in Hamilton, New Zealand. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz6jsm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f8)
On the front line: New York, Ukraine

Ukraine has regained its own New York after parliament this week voted to give the name back to a small town near the front line in the conflict with pro-Russian separatists. Svyatoslav Khomenko of BBC Ukrainian has been asking locals what they think of the return to the original name.

Jaffa after the violence
For a few nights in May, the Israeli city of Jaffa was the scene of violent clashes between Jews and Arabs.  Similar outbreaks happened across Israel, after rising tensions triggered by threatened evictions in East Jerusalem, confrontations at al-Aqsa mosque, and fighting between Israel and the militant group Hamas, who control Gaza.  BBC Arabic's Michael Shuval tells us about the impact of the violence in Jaffa.

Before the Olympics:  the Palić Games
Sixteen years before the birth of the modern Olympic Games, a Hungarian nobleman was inspired by the ancient Olympics to start his own version in today's Serbia.  BBC Serbian's Nataša Andjelković tells the remarkable story of the Palić Games and its founder Lajoš Vermeš.

Saving Sierra Leone's chimpanzees
Sierra Leone is losing its forests at an alarming rate, despite laws meant to protect them.  One area that remains almost intact is around the Tacugama Chimpanzee Sanctuary.  The BBC's Umaru Fofana, who recently visited the sanctuary, explains how the fate of the forests is closely linked to that of the chimpanzees.

Peru's new president
In his trademark white hat, Pedro Castillo was sworn in as the new president of Peru last week. From a poor farming background, Castillo is very different to Peru's previous four presidents.  Martin Riepl reports from Lima for BBC Mundo, and he tells us more about this surprising new leader.

Image: Svyatoslav Khomenko next to the sign for New York, Ukraine
Credit: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyw)
Gay activism in 1990s India

In the early 1990s, when homosexuality was still a criminal offense in India, a group of gay men and lesbian women set up the Counsel Club in the city of Kolkata. It was one of the first queer support groups in India. Their first meetings took place in secret at the home of one of the members. Later, the group campaigned for gay rights in India and helped other gay people with family problems or anxieties over coming out. Mike Lanchin has been speaking to Pawan Dhall, one of the club's founding members.

Photo credit: REUTERS/Jayanta Shaw


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz6njr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsr)
How does the Taliban keep going?

The Taliban is advancing in Afghanistan, launching major offensives to retake key cities as the last remaining US and international forces prepare to pull out. The group has taken more territory in the past couple of months than it has at any time since being ousted from power in 2001. Tens of thousands of Taliban fighters have been killed during twenty years of fighting, yet the militants remain a potent threat to the survival of the Afghan government, its military, and other institutions nurtured by global powers. So what’s the secret behind the Taliban’s longevity? The UN says the sale of opium and illegal mining provides them with a steady stream of income, as do local taxes. Officials in Kabul also allege that the organisation is being propped up by foreign governments and that it continues to welcome foreign fighters in its ranks. Global efforts to starve them of funds have failed and Taliban officials now openly speak of victory, insisting that the United States has ‘lost’. Who’s helping to prop up the Taliban and what does the last two decades tell us about their strength and potential after the last Western forces have gone?

Ritula Shah is joined a panel of Afghanistan experts. Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz6s8w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1psy)
Farah Bashir: The art of childhood

Farah Bashir, author of Rumours of Spring: A Girlhood in Kashmir, shares the particular challenges for girls growing up in a conflict zone.

Bjorn Andresen, Swedish teenage star of the 1971 film, Death In Venice, talks about how being dubbed “the most beautiful boy in the world”, blighted his childhood. He’s revisiting his early role and its impact on his life in a new documentary called The Most Beautiful Boy in the World.

Japanese-American artist Ei Arakawa on his new artwork, Mega Please Draw Freely, at the Tate Modern gallery in London. It’s breaking down the boundaries between artists and audience – with children and young people featuring strongly on both sides.

And Turner Prize-winning Colombian artist Oscar Murillo and Argentinian political scientist Clara Dublanc on their collaboration with 100,000 international school children for their Frequencies exhibition in Hackney in London.


Presenter - Chi Chi Izundu
Producer - Paul Waters, Olivia Skinner, Kirsty McQuire

(Photo: Farah Bashir. Credit: Shahbaz Khan)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkx4k8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct1xzs)
Anti-vaxxers only

As the pandemic progresses, some opponents of Covid-19 vaccines are taking things one step further.

An emerging international grassroots movement is seeking to create online and offline communities away from the vaccinated world.

Trending meets the people who are setting up dating sites, house share groups, even blood banks specifically for the unvaccinated only.
Underpinning many of these efforts is the totally unfounded belief in “vaccine shedding” - the false idea that the unvaccinated can be made ill simply by being around people who have had a coronavirus jab.

But will any of these alternatives to mainstream society take root?
Presenters: Marianna Spring & Chris Giles

Producer: Sam Judah

Editor: Ed Main

Photo: Graphic of hand holding mobile phone with dating app onscreen.

Photo credit: BBC


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkb)
Jab fears explained: a base rate fallacy

As some countries rapidly roll out vaccination programmes, there have been concerns that increases in infection rates amongst vaccinated groups mean vaccines are less effective than we hoped, especially in the face of the feared Delta variant.

Epidemiologist Dr Katelyn Jetelina from the University of Texas Health Science Centre School of Public Health explains why this isn’t what the numbers show – rather than decreasing vaccine effectiveness, increasing rates can be explained by a statistical phenomenon known as ‘base rate fallacy’.

Presenter: Charlotte McDonald

Producer: Nathan Gower


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz6x10)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt9gjpk993)
Biden told not to attend memorial events by families of 9/11 victims

President Biden has been asked not to attend memorial events for those who died on 11th September 2001, unless he declassifies files about the attacks.
Families of the victims believe the files implicate officials from Saudi Arabia in the plot.

Also in the programme: we hear from Australia where more than half of the population are currently in lockdown; and a tribute to Jamaican Dub music.

Joining Anna Holligan to discuss these and other issues are Paula Erizanu, a Moldovan-born journalist based in the UK and culture editor of the Calvert Journal, and Henry Chu, deputy news editor for the Los Angeles Times, based in London.

(Photo: U.S. President Joe Biden walks out to depart for Delaware via Marine One from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington. CREDIT: REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz70s4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt9gjpkf17)
Uncontrolled wildfires spread across Greece

Six areas have been put on high alert as wildfires continue to spread across Greece. There are currently 154 wildfires in the country.

Two people have died and a further 20 people have been injured.

Also in the programme; the new sports featuring in the Olympics this year; and the latest from Afghanistan after the assassination of the head of the government’s media centre.

Joining Anna Holligan to discuss these and other issues are Paula Erizanu, Moldovan-born journalist based in the UK and culture editor of the London-based Calvert Journal; and Henry Chu - deputy news editor for the Los Angeles Times, based in London.

(Photo: A man beats the flames using a tree branch as a wildfire burns near Agios Stefanos, north of Athens. CREDIT: REUTERS/Costas Baltas)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz74j8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt9gjpkjsc)
Taliban announce release of prisoners in captured town

The Taliban say that they have captured a prison in the northern province of Jawzjan and freed hundreds of prisoners.

The militants have seized urban areas in the last 24 hours amid increasingly fierce battle with government forces - capturing Zaranj, in Nimroz province.

Also in this half hour: We look into whether Japan is ready to embrace its increasingly multi-ethnic population; and will Scotland’s streets change to accommodate the surge of cyclists?

(Picture: Afghan forces, Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkxhsn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8t)
Travels with my ukulele

Despite its long and rich history, the ukulele has often been snubbed or dismissed as a novelty instrument by the music world. But over the years, rock stars have embraced the guitar’s smaller cousin, from Elvis Presley to the Beatles to Taylor Swift. Kim Chakanetsa meets two women who turned their love for the ukulele into a successful musical career.

When Taimane was gifted a ukulele at 5 years old, it was the start of a musical journey that would take her from busking on the streets to appearing on the world’s biggest stages. She is now considered one of the world’s leading ukulele players and is based in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Zee Avi is a singer-songwriter, ukulele player and guitarist from Malaysia. Zee taught herself to play music when she was a teenager and she got her first record deal at 22, thanks to a video that she posted on the internet back in 2007. Her songs have appeared in numerous TV shows and films.

Produced by Alice Gioia and mixed by Donald MacDonald.

IMAGE DETAILS:

(L) Taimane, credit NPR/Laura Beltrán Villamizar
(R) Zee Avi, credit XENO Entertainment

MUSIC DETAILS:

Taimane: AIR; Water; Beethoven, System of a Down, Led & ACDC Medley, Deh vieni alla finestra (Don Giovanni, Mozart) performed by Taimane and Quinn Kelsey at the Hawaii Opera Theatre.
Zee Avi: Bitter Heart; I am me once more.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz788d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d61)
Olympic golden moments

The Tokyo 2020 Olympics were always going to be different. They took place a year later than planned and were the first to be held during a pandemic, with fans banned. So as the Games come to an end, host James Reynolds hears the experiences of three gold medallists: Australian swimmer Ariarne Titmus; triathlete Flora Duffy, who won Bermuda’s first ever gold medal; and Qatari high jumper Mutaz Essa Barshim. He delighted the world when he shared that coveted top spot with Italian counterpart Gianmarco Tamberi.

Italy enjoyed an incredible few hours in Japan’s National Stadium and Viviana Masini reveals her son’s challenging childhood that ultimately put him on a path to become the fastest man on the planet, Lamont Marcell Jacobs was also the first Italian to claim the men’s 100 metres Olympic gold.

We also hear from residents in Tokyo. Two of them explain their change of heart about holding the Games in the capital. Meanwhile, the pandemic remains an emergency and two doctors in the city discuss the latest rise in Covid rates.

(Photo: Gold medallists, Gianmarco Tamberi of Italy and Mutaz Essa Barshim of Qatar wearing protective face masks celebrate on the podium. Credit: Dylan Martinez/Reuters)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkxmjs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g73)
15: Cyber exploits

The investigation into the WannaCry attack leads to an uncomfortable discovery for the US authorities. And an accidental hero faces up to his past.
#LazarusHeist

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/lazarusheist


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1r)
Did the BBC WS Olympics coverage cross the finishing line?

As the Olympics draw to a close, listeners tell us what they think of the BBC’s coverage. What’s it like broadcasting when there is no live crowd? The World Service’s sports editor answers.

Plus, a listener wonders why a recent panel debate on Cuba failed to have any contributors from Cuba itself.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz7d0j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q2jt4pt15)
Gold Medals and Grandmasters

Athlete's mental welfare has been one of the main topics of the Olympics, and winning a gold medal doesn't always mean peace of mind. The down after the high of becoming a gold medallist, can be real to some athletes... Helen Richardson Walsh won gold in Rio and knows exactly the potential difficulties that comes after the Games have ended

Melanie Smith Taylor, gold medallist in LA in 1984 recalls a unique and funny moment when receiving here gold medal from Prince Phillip on the podium

Away from the Games we meet Abhimanyu Mishra who at the age of 12 has became the world's youngest Grandmaster in chess history. Abhi's love of the game started even earlier - after he was introduced to it by his dad Hemant at just 2 and a half!

and as FA Cup holders Leicester City face Premier League champion Manchester City in the Community Shield, we hear about another team from the city starting their journey to Wembley. Leicester Nirvana face Deeping Rangers as this year's FA Cup competition as the Extra Preliminary Round takes place...
We speak to chair of the club Zac Hajat.

Photo Eleanor Patterson of Team Australia competes in the Women's High Jump at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Credit: Getty Images


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz7hrn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g3b3qx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkxw11)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3h)
What’s behind India’s extreme weather events?

Unusually severe rainfall, flooding, and heatwaves in different parts of India have raised questions about extreme weather becoming more common in the country. According to a recent study, India saw the world's largest displacement in 2020 caused by floods and cyclones. The economic loss was estimated to be over 20 billion dollars.

So, with unpredictable and erratic weather patterns, what's the way out to minimize the damage? Is it too late to reverse the impact? And what lessons can be learnt from similar climate incidents happening across the world?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss what's causing these extreme conditions and whether better planning and preparation can mitigate the impact on human lives.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Bahar Dutt, environment journalist & conservation biologist; Dr Vikram Ghanekar, partner – SGM Hospital, Chiplun; Dr Roxy Mathew Koll, climate scientist, Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz7mhs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9q)
Crime and Punishment: Fyodor Dostoyevsky

To mark the bicentenary of the birth of the great Russian writer Fyodor Dostoyevsky World Book Club revisits Crime and Punishment in an edition recorded at the elegant Pushkin House, London’s Russian cultural hub, in 2016.

To help us explore Dostoyevsky’s haunting classic thriller Harriett Gilbert was joined by acclaimed Russian writer Boris Akunin and Russian scholar Dr Sarah Young.

Consumed by the idea of his own special destiny, Rashkolnikov is drawn to commit a terrible crime. In the aftermath, he is dogged by madness, guilt and a calculating detective, and a feverish cat-and-mouse game unfolds.

(Photo credit: Alexander Aksakov/Getty Images.)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz7r7x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv57566qqkj)
Afghan Taliban claim to have captured a second provincial capital

The Taliban in Afghanistan say they have captured the northern city of Sheberghan. If confirmed it will be the second provincial capital to fall to the insurgents in as many days. A spokesman for the group said most of the government buildings had come under their control. Sheberghan, the capital of Jawzjan province, is the stronghold of the former Afghan vice president, Abdul Rashid Dostum.

Also in the programme: Nicaragua's electoral authorities have disqualified the country's main opposition party ahead of November's elections; and why there has been an uptake of people taking up knitting during lockdown.

(Photo: People displaced due to fighting between the Taliban and Afghan security forces, flee the areas, in Kandahar, Afghanistan, 12 July 2021. Credit: EPA/M Sadiq)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz7w01)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tc9qkghqv)
Sportsworld

Image: Thomas Daley (Photo by Toru Hanai/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz8bzk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g3byyt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkyq7y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct1xzs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8j)
The Golden Couple of the first Tokyo Olympics

At the Tokyo 1964 Olympics, British sweethearts Ann Packer and Robbie Brightwell became household names all over the world when they both competed in the running events. Ann would win a gold medal at her least favourite distance, the 800 metres, while Robbie had to make do with a silver in the 4x400 relay. As this was the amateur era, the couple retired after their first and only Olympic to get married and work as school-teachers. They talk to Ashley Byrne. The programme is a Made In Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Ann Packer and Robbie Brightwell pictured with their Olympic medals in 1964 (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz8gqp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct2gdc)
Dido's Lament and the Fourth Symphony by Brahms

Broadcast programme:
Purcell, arr. Stokowski - Dido’s Lament
Brahms - Symphony No. 4 in E minor

BBC National Orchestra of Wales
Ryan Bancroft (conductor)

The BBC Proms are back in the Royal Albert Hall in London with a six-week season of concerts featuring leading British orchestras as well as international soloists and conductors. The weekly World Service broadcasts from the festival begin with perhaps the best known of Henry Purcell's arias, Dido's Lament from his opera Dido and Aeneas. We’ll hear it in an arrangement for strings only by the 20th-century conductor Leopold Stokowski.

Johannes Brahms wrote his Fourth Symphony two centuries after Purcell but there is a link between the Lament and the Symphony's last movement: they are both built on a single bass line. In fact, Brahms was very keen to use and adapt compositional techniques from the past in his own music and the melody that serves as the main theme of the Symphony's fourth movement is actually a modified bass line from JS Bach's Cantata BWV 150. Brahms was on an editorial committee that was preparing the first modern publication of Bach's cantatas and this may be where his inspiration came from.

Presenter Andrew McGregor is joined by the Australian conductor Natalie Murray-Beale.

[Photo: BBC National Orchestra of Wales with Ryan Bancroft in the Royal Albert Hall. Credit: Chris Christodoulou/BBC]


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz8lgt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt8)
Idris Elba on The Suicide Squad

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined by Turkish novelist Defne Suman and Oscar winning visual effects filmmaker Paul Franklin, to discuss cultural highlights of the week.

Stars of the comic book movie The Suicide Squad, Idris Elba, Margot Robbie and David Dastmalchian, on the most surreal moments of filming on set, with director James Gunn.

Emma Seligman on choosing the single location for her film Shiva Baby, which takes place at a Jewish family funeral.

Author Anuk Arudpragasam on writing about the Sri Lankan civil war in his novel, A Passage North.

Matt Damon talks about his starring role in the film Stillwater, as a father trying to rebuild a relationship with his daughter.

Turkish novelist, Defne Suman discusses her novel, The Silence of Scheherazade, whose story recounts the destruction of the city, Smyrna, in Turkey in 1922, through the intertwining lives of four families, Greek, Turkish, Armenian and Levantine.

David Lan reports from Gaziantep, on the Turkish Syrian border, as a giant puppet of a nine year old Syrian refugee girl, Little Amal, begins her long walk to Britain, with a schedule of arts events planned at every town and village along the route.

Plus we hear from Morris Hayes, long time musical director for Prince, on the release of the artist’s first complete posthumous album, Welcome To America, and whether there might be more Prince music yet to emerge from the Paisley Park studio vaults.

(Photo: Idris Elba. Credit: Alexander Koerner/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz8q6y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57566rpjk)
Afghanistan: Sheberghan falls to the Taliban following US airstrikes

There are also reports of heavy fighting in Kunduz in the north and Lashkar Gah in the south. Violence has escalated across Afghanistan after US and other international forces began to withdraw their troops from the country, following 20 years of military operations. Taliban militants have made rapid advances in recent weeks, capturing large swathes of the countryside, and are now targeting key towns and cities. We get an update from the Afghan Defence Ministry and we hear from US analyst Laurel Miller - former acting Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan at the U.S. Department of State.

Also on the programme: why families of victims of the 9/11 attacks have asked President Biden to stay away from twentieth anniversary memorial events; the Mexican government sues US gun manufacturers for fuelling drugs related violence; and India wins its first ever Olympic gold for athletics.

(Photo: An Afghan security official patrol following an intense battle with Taliban militants, in Herat, Afghanistan Credit: EPA/Jalil Rezayee)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz8tz2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc6)
An instrument of healing with Jenn Wasner and Helado Negro

Jenn Wasner of Wye Oak and Flock of Dimes, Roberto Lange (aka Helado Negro), Hand Habits’ Meg Duffy and saxophonist Joseph Shabason discuss music as a form of healing and the impact it has both on themselves and those who listen to it, not being able to find the right thing to say when they’re approached after a show, and how selfishness can benefit the creative process.

Roberto Lange, aka Helado Negro, is an Ecuadorian-American singer, songwriter and producer. His 2019 album, This Is How You Smile, was critically adored and his newest, Far In, is due later this year. Musician and guitarist Meg Duffy hails from New York, and is the founder, songwriter and sole permanent member of indie rock group Hand Habits, who released their latest album Placeholder in 2019. They have also written and performed with The War on Drugs and Weyes Blood. Canadian saxophonist and ambient electronic artist Joseph Shabason has worked with Destroyer, The War On Drugs, Hannah Georgas, and many more. His latest album, The Fellowship, explores the duality of the Jewish and Muslim household he grew up in.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz8yq6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrsqhp885)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjvzyt9wt)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkz9zl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Documentary (w3ct2gws)
Africa’s vaccine ambitions

Africa is a continent of 1.3 billion people, but only makes 1% of the lifesaving vaccines it needs. The continent’s 54 nations are almost entirely dependent on agencies like Unicef and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, for these essential pharmaceuticals. But the pandemic of 2020 has been a harsh lesson in the dangers of relying on other countries and agencies for such crucial provisions.

Numerous vaccine clinical trials have been conducted in Africa, yet these nations still find themselves at back of the queue for Covid 19 jabs. However, efforts are now underway to change this. At a conference in early April, African leaders pledged to manufacture 60% of the vaccines they need by 2040. But is this an achievable goal? Building a successful vaccine manufacturing sector will need several things to come together at the same time: financial investments amounting to hundreds of millions of dollars; expanding expertise in scientific research and development; long term commitments from governments to purchase a range of vaccines; and globally recognised regulatory bodies. At the moment, Africa is lacking many of these elements. This is a situation which is clearly neither acceptable nor sustainable.

In this documentary Rhoda Odhiambo speaks with the key figures working to harness the intellectual and financial capital of the world’s fastest growing populations to make vaccine manufacturing in Africa a home grown industry, rather than a global charity case.

Guests:
Dr Ama Pokuaa Fenny, Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Statistical, Social and Economics Research, University of Ghana.
Professor Christian Happi, Director -African Centre of Excellence for Genomics of Infectious Diseases at Redeemer’s University
Dr Nicaise Ndembi, Senior Science Advisor, Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention
Patrick Tippo, Executive Director, African Vaccine Manufacturing Initiative

Presenter Rhoda Odhiambo

Producer: Sandra Kanthal

Editor: Richard Vadon



SUNDAY 08 AUGUST 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz966g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1psy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkzkgv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 Trending (w3ct1xzs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz99yl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 Global Questions (w3ct2hfw)
Audiences from around the world question their leaders on global issues.


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkzp6z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g73)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz9fpq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz9kfv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh2)
Repairing Lebanon’s economy

On this edition of Business Weekly, we look into Lebanon’s economy - a country going through the worst economic crisis since its civil war of the 70s and 80s, with severe disruption to basic services and food shortages, exacerbated by the deadly port blast of a year ago that killed more than 200 people. We also hear from Zambia, where the pandemic has meant the usual cash-rich tourists have stayed away and the economy is dominating the general election campaign. Plus we look at another attempt to narrow the gender gap in science and engineering careers by introducing female role models into toy dolls.

Business Weekly is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Mourners at the site of the port blast in Beirut, AFP)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz9p5z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv5)
Kidnappings, ethnic conflict, and Islamist insurgency: Nigeria’s violent problems

Stories from Nigeria, Australia, Singapore and Cyprus

There was a time when the mass kidnapping of Nigeria school children made headlines around the world. These days it has become almost the norm. So too have horrific attacks by the Islamist group which calls itself, Boko Haram. Meanwhile the Biafran secessionist movement has once again become a source of conflict in the country’s south east: the army stands accused of killing civilians there, while the government insists they are putting down an armed insurgency. Mayeni Jones describes what it’s like to live and work amidst such widespread violence.

Australians pride themselves on being a freedom-loving people, not taking kindly to rules and regulations. This goes back to modern Australia’s early years as a penal colony, they will tell you, when cocking a snook at authority was a matter of pride. So how are they taking to some of the toughest Covid lockdown measures in the world, and the idea of troops enforcing a curfew in Sydney? Phil Mercer has been watching what happens when two opposing instincts meet.

The songs sung on Singapore’s National Day of August 9th are not exactly subtle. Urging citizens to stand together, they offer a vision of the nation as one of ethnic harmony: ‘We'll be united, hand in hand, We'll show the world just where we stand, Every creed and every race, Has its role and has its place.’ And yet a video has gone viral in Singapore, which some argue shows the reality behind this myth. It depicts the kind of racism which Sharanjit Leyl says has dogged her throughout her life.

When Charlotte Ashton set off to research the culinary potential of the carob plant, she brought along two very important assistants: her young children. That’s because carob is being touted as a substitute for chocolate, and an economically important one in Cyprus where it is widely grown. You can make it into a sweet syrup; you can serve up meat in a carob sauce. But does it really have the potential to knock chocolate off its perch?


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hl01gc)
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SUN 05:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3h)
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SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz9sy3)
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SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt9gjpn666)
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SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz9xp7)
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SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt9gjpn9yb)
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SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzb1fc)
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SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt9gjpnfpg)
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SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hl0dpr)
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SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfz)
Is there a ‘chefsplainer’ in your kitchen?

Is there someone in your life who needs to have total control in the kitchen? Someone who breathes down your neck, micromanages your every move and can’t resist explaining exactly how to chop a carrot? If so, you may be in the company of what we’re calling ‘a Chefsplainer’. Or perhaps all this rings a bell because you are a chefsplainer? Whoever you are - this episode of The Food Chain is for you.

Emily Thomas meets a married couple, a mother and son, and two friends to unpack their power dynamics in the kitchen. They explore why some people feel the need to take control over the cooking, how this reflects our emotional attachment to food, and whether what happens in the kitchen reflects or changes relationships outside it. Plus - why do some of us think that it’s ok to behave in certain ways in the kitchen - that we wouldn’t dream of elsewhere?

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: couple argue in a kitchen. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Contributors:

Abby Saverino
Russell Newlove
Harriet Gore
Joel Gore
Louis Coiffait
Ali Potter


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzb55h)
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SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv5)
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SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hl0jfw)
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SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx7)
Discovering my sister's inner world

A complicated sisterhood: growing up, Arifa Akbar and her older sister Fauzia had shared everything from a bedroom, to secrets, to favourite movies and books. They'd moved from Lahore, Pakistan to London for a better life but ended up destitute. The change took its toll on Fauzia who developed depression as a teenager. Complex feelings of jealousy and anger took over and the two became estranged. Then in 2016, when Fauzia was 45, she contracted a mysterious illness. The sisters reconciled at Fauzia's bedside before she passed away but Arifa wanted to know more about the sister she'd lost and the illness that had killed her. She tells Anu Anand about an extraordinary journey that began in North London and took her all the way to the Sistine chapel in Rome.

A longer version of this story was first broadcast on Monday 28th of June. You can find the longer version here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3ct1jt6
 
Arifa's memoir is called Consumed.
 
If you've been affected by any of the issues in this programme, you can find resources and help at www.bbc.co.uk/actionline
 
Presenter: Anu Anand
Producer: Mariana Des Forges
 
Get in touch outlook@bbc.com
 
Picture: Fauzia and Arifa Akbar in Lahore
Credit: Courtesy of Arifa Akbar


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzb8xm)
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SUN 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g9c)
Two smiley faces: Episode six

In the future, 10 years from now, will our fingers still reach for a laughing face with crying eyes? Will Unicode and its strict approval process for new emoji be relevant at all? Possibly not. We travel to Zimbabwe to hear how some designers are bypassing Silicon Valley by building their own emoji and sticker sets that reflect life in Africa. And we end the series in Shanghai, where we hear how in some parts of Asia, emoji have already been forgotten.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hl0n60)
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SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2hgm)
Malta: The Island where abortion is a crime

Malta is the last country in Europe to still criminalise abortion. A majority Catholic country, prior to Covid-19 Malta was due a visit from the Pope and similar to the US it is often made an election issue. Doctors for Choice, a group of pro-choice medical professionals, was set up last year and they have received major criticism in the country – with hundreds of doctors writing a letter in response in support of pro-life laws and treatments.

Since coronavirus hit, the number of Maltese women approaching the UK-based Abortion Support Network increased considerably who help women with their abortion fund. They have already had more requests from women than they received from the whole of 2019.

Why the UK? The UK has historic links with Malta – where most people are bilingual with English – as well as offers abortion on request for the longest time period in Europe. Also, Italy has strict abortion laws in comparison and so the Maltese can’t rely on a nearby country to get them. Therefore they need to fly – which is tough if you don’t have much money and would raise eyebrows from your family if you disappeared for a few days. It’s even bigger trouble when the airports close.

In this programme Sophia Smith Galer explore the strength of feeling around abortion in Malta. Why is it the last country to still criminalise abortion and what does the future hold for the relationship between church and state there.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzbdnr)
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SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g3f0n0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hl0ry4)
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SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3csz4bd)
Changing World, Changing Bodies

How modern life is changing our feet

For nearly two million years we evolved in close sync with our environment but 250 years ago the industrial revolution happened and changed everything. The innovation and technology it brought had many benefits but there was a physical cost as progress also designed out movement from our lives.

From spending hours on our feet outdoors, our jobs have moved indoors and largely involve sitting down for most of the day in offices, factories or driver cabs. It has resulted in feet that are getting flatter, backs that are weaker and eyes that cannot see very much without help.

Dr Vybarr Cregan-Reid hears from evolutionary biologists, academics, anatomists and public health professionals in Singapore, Kenya, Australia, the UK and the United States; about the impact of modern life on our physical self and what we can do to return our bodies to the state that nature intended.

The good news is there is no need to spend hours on treadmills or pumping iron, in fact we would injure ourselves a lot less if we were a bit more cautious when exercising. Our bodies are marvellously adaptable and reintroducing small movements into our daily lives in most cases will do the trick!

(Photo: Womens' feets splashing in a pool. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzbjdw)
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SUN 12:06 BBC Proms on the World Service (w3ct2gdc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzbn50)
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SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv57566tmgm)
Taliban claim capture of key city of Kunduz

The Taliban say they've captured the key Afghan city of Kunduz, after fighting with government forces. An official says all but the city's airport has fallen to the militants. We hear from the former governor of Kunduz.

Also in the programme: As the Tokyo Olympics draws to a close, was it a success despite the pandemic? And Greece has been battling wildfires for nine days, as temperatures hit the high 40s Celsius.

Photo: Afghan security forces have faced a major blow with the battle over Kunduz. Credit: Reuters.


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzbrx4)
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SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlh)
Inside the mind of crime writer Patricia Highsmith

Patricia Highsmith was one of the most successful suspense writers of the 20th century. Known especially for her novels The Talented Mr. Ripley, Carol and Strangers on a Train, she created complex and alluring characters, capable of terrible things and at the same time deeply human. Yet for much of her life, Highsmith herself remained an enigmatic figure, often seen as eccentric, troubled and difficult. But she had a circle of close friends who were loyal to the end.

Presenter Bridget Kendall is joined by Andrew Wilson, author of the first biography of Highsmith, and Vivien De Bernardi, a close friend of Highsmith's during her later years in Switzerland.

Produced by Jo Impey for BBC World Service

Image: Patricia Highsmith at her home in France, 1976
Image credit: Derek Hudson, Getty Images


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzbwn8)
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SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzc0dd)
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SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tc9qkkn46)
Sportsworld

(Photo By Alex Nicodim/Sportsfile via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzccms)
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SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g3fzm1)
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SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hl1qx5)
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SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2hgm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzchcx)
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SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzcm41)
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SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57566vlfn)
Afghan cities fall to rapid Taliban advance

The Taliban have captured three regional capitals in Afghanistan as they continue to make sweeping territorial gains in the country. They seized control of the key northern city of Kunduz on Sunday, as well as Sar-e-Pul and Taloqan.

Also in the programme, the Tokyo Olympics conclude with a vibrant ceremony and Iran has recorded its highest official death rate from coronavirus since the pandemic began.

(Picture shows smoke rising as the Taliban attacked parts of the city in Lashkar Gah, the provincial capital of Helmand, Afghanistan on 6 August 2021. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency]


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzcqw5)
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SUN 22:06 Global Questions (w3ct2hfv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hl234k)
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SUN 22:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g73)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrzcvm9)
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SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrsqhs558)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjvzyx6sx)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hl26wp)
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SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 09 AUGUST 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18hycq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl9vhgwkjz)
US infrastructure bill inches through the Senate

The US senate is slowly moving toward passing a $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill. We'll hear from a farmer directly affected, and then the former governor of Pennsylvania, Ed Rendell, on why the bipartisan bill is so important. Also in the programme, an upcoming UN report is expected to give the global community a stark warning about the dangers of accelerating climate change. Harpreet Kaur Paul of the University of Warwick's Law School explains why the report should be a wake-up call to businesses. And as Canada opens up again to international travel, Royce Mendes of CIBC Capital Markets in Toronto outlines the challenges the Canadian economy still faces.

(Picture: a highway in the United States. Picture credit: Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw69n3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td9)
Composer and Pianist Nils Frahm

Packed with warmth, humour and genuine insight, this unmissable edition of In The Studio focusses on All Melody, the 2018 work and tour by contemporary composer and pianist, Nils Frahm. The programme reveals the creative, emotional and physical processes involved when new material is combined with vast stage shows for an international schedule of truly daunting proportions.

Captured during a number of visits to his studio, Nils opens up to his good friend, Sebastian Schipper, director of single-take Berlin heist, Victoria, for which Nils composed the award-winning original score. He also chats to his biggest fan, British TV, film and stage writer, Sam Bain. Not only does the show combine three incredible minds of music, film and TV, the audience is also treated to an immersive binaural experience, recorded at London’s Barbican Centre during a run of sold-out concerts.

Dropping to a thunder of approval from tastemakers and reviewers the world over, All Melody represented thousands of hours of intense work at Nils’ studio, the refurbished East German palace of mid-20th century tech, Funkhaus Berlin. It is here that he spent nearly 2 years deconstructing and reconstructing his studio, Saal 3. From the cabling and electricity to the woodwork, before moving on to other more demanding elements; building a pipe organ and creating a mixing desk from parts sourced from all over the world.

The pianist is renowned for his unconventional approach to scoring and mixing analogue sounds and so it is in true Frahm style that a wholly unique space would be required to realise his ambitions. This work was born out of the freedom this new environment provided. Nils had to relearn it, adapt it and perform it for eager crowds from Manchester to Montreal, Singapore to San Fransisco…Keeping it All about the Melody.


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18j23v)
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MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n62)
Hamid Mir: Is Pakistan a safe place for journalists?

In the last year, there have been a string of attacks on reporters in Pakistan. The perpetrators remain unknown and unpunished. The government insists Pakistan is a bastion of media freedom. Hamid Mir is a high-profile columnist and TV presenter, a survivor of several assassination attempts, and is currently facing accusations of sedition. Is the state out to silence independent journalism?


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw6fd7)
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MON 02:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqr)
Can video games help me or harm me?

Today, up to 3 billion people around the world play video games, from candy based mobile puzzles to virtual battlegrounds filled with weapons. Many people have turned to gaming during the pandemic as a way of staying connected – but what does science really say about the impact of gaming?

Does playing violent video games lead to violence in the real world? Do brain training apps really work? How much gaming is too much – can videogames really be addictive? And how can videogames help us to explore difficult issues like death, grief and loss?

Alex Lathbridge and Anand Jagatia look at the evidence and play some games along the way, speaking to psychologists, doctors and game designers about the power of video games to change us - for better or worse.

With Adrian Hon, Professor Andrew Przybylski, Professor Pete Etchells, Professor Henrietta Bowden-Jones and Dr Sabine Harrer


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18j5vz)
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MON 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g9c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw6k4c)
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MON 03:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2hgm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18j9m3)
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MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqv)
Is green hydrogen the fuel of the future?

Hydrogen gas has long been recognised as a potentially valuable tool for tackling climate change. The most abundant element in the universe, it is also a clean-burning gas and – in theory – could be used to power almost anything, from our cars and homes, to planes and ships, to agriculture and heavy industry.

We already produce millions of tons of hydrogen each year for use in the chemicals industry, by extracting it from natural gas - a process which emits CO2. But hydrogen can also be made by splitting water molecules with electricity – and when that electricity is powered by renewables it comes without a carbon price tag.

It is this so-called ‘green hydrogen’ that is currently generating hype around the world as the ‘fuel of the future’ and the missing piece of the decarbonisation puzzle. Across the world, governments are announcing far-reaching hydrogen strategies. Fossil fuel companies, too, are investing big, hoping to cash in on the ‘hydrogen boom’.

But for all the talk of green hydrogen as a miracle fuel, it has a long list of drawbacks too. It is expensive, difficult to store, inefficient and explosive. Previous hype cycles around hydrogen have ended in failure for a combination of these reasons. So while experts agree that hydrogen does have a role to play in decarbonisation, the question is – how big should it be? And are we about to spend hundreds of billions of dollars on a white elephant?

Contributors:
Mike Strizski, founder of the Hydrogen House Project
Michael Leibreich, founder of Bloomberg NEF
Sonja van Renssen, Managing Editor of Energy Monitor
Nawal Al-Hosany, Permanent Representative of the UAE to the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)

Presenters: Graihagh Jackson and Marnie Chesterton
Producer: Zoe Gelber
Editor: Ros Jones


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw6nwh)
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MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8v)
My baby triggered a terrifying breakdown

For many women having a newborn baby is one of the happiest times of their lives - but for a tiny proportion that new arrival begins a terrifying nightmare. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women who experienced extreme psychosis after the birth of their child.

When Catherine Cho’s first child was three months old she and her husband embarked on an extended trip to visit family and friends back home in the US. Their Korean relatives warned that they shouldn’t be travelling so far before the baby was 100 days old. Stressed and exhausted Catherine started seeing frightening things that weren’t there. That trip ended with her admission to an involuntary psychiatric ward, separated from her husband and child and not able to understand who she was or how she got there. She’s written a book about her journey back to reality called Inferno: A Memoir.

Lobeh Osagie-Asiah was born in Gambia and grew up in London. After a psychotic episode when she was a student, she was diagnosed as bipolar and knew she might be at risk of a recurrence in pregnancy or birth. But it wasn't until after her fourth child was born that she experienced postpartum psychosis: she became convinced she was on a mission and that people were trying to kill her to take her baby. She says the getting through the experience has made relationships with her husband, family and friends, so much stronger.

If you are feeling emotionally distressed, or worried about a friend or relative there are links to support organisations on the programme website.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Lobeh Osagie-Asiah [courtesy Lobeh Osagie-Asiah]
R: Catherine Cho [credit Alastair Levy]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18jfc7)
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MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68pyhcz)
UN climate report will be 'massive wake-up call'

As wildfires burn in Greece, California and Russia, climate scientists are releasing a report on how global warming will change the world in the coming decades.

Also the latest from Afghanistan: - we'll hear from one of the provincial capitals that's fallen to the Taliban's remarkable advance.

And the Tokyo Olympics bow out with a spectacular closing ceremony attended by no audience. So what are we left with after the two weeks of sport?


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18jk3c)
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MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68pym43)
UN climate report will include 'nuggets of optimism'

But the report by scientists will say that the impact of climate change is happening more quickly than expected.

In Afghanistan, the Taliban have captured three regional capitals as they continue to make sweeping territorial gains in the country.

And hundreds more people have been forced to flee their homes in Greece as firefighters struggle to contain huge wildfires.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18jnvh)
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MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68pyqw7)
Climate scientists to release hardest hitting report yet

UN researchers say the impact of climate change is much more widespread and severe than had previously been predicted.

As more key cities fall into the hands of the Taliban, we hear about those Afghans living through and witnessing the intense fighting for the future control of the country.

And Alexander Lukashenko is holding a 'big conversation' with the world's press in Minsk. He will defend himself against widescale accusations of rigged presidential elections - which took place exactly a year ago today.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18jslm)
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MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n62)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw74w0)
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MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j52)
Doping in eSports: the billion-dollar pill

Doping is a growing problem in the multi-billion dollar industry of competitive online gaming – but remains an open secret. As prize money runs in to the millions, are more young people turning to drugs to stay focused to win? With major league eSport athletes admitting to mass doping, we speak with the founder of the world’s first eSport university programme - Dr Glenn Platt at Miami University, Ohio - who tells us the casual attitude to doping for performance enhancement. Varsity eSport players Jared Shapiro and Jennifer Frank tell us that doping using Adderall and Ritalin are engrained within eSports, making it to difficult ban, when so many gamers need them for medical purposes. Doping in eSport regulator Ian Smith from the eSports Integrity Commission says that the major tournament organisers and games publishers should foot the bill for testing – which is severely underfunded. But while the major names – DOTA 2, Overwatch and League of Legends – continue to grow in users during lockdown, Craig Fletcher, an eSports tournament organiser, says the business has less money to spend on regulation, after coronavirus stops people gathering for tournaments.

(Image: Pixelated pills. Credit: non157 / Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x15)
The building of the Berlin Wall

In August 1961, communist East Germany began building the Berlin Wall, which divided the city for nearly three decades and became a symbol of the Cold War. Simon Watts introduces the memories of Germans from both sides of the Wall.

PHOTO: Soldiers at the Berlin Wall in the early 1960s (Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18jxbr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw78m4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18k12w)
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MON 10:06 Global Questions (w3ct2hfw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw7dc8)
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MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct1xzs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dkb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18k4v0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqdmrt8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw7j3d)
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MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18k8l4)
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MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtd)
Tarantulas, Gandalf and my dying brother's bucket list

Royd Tolkien is the great-grandson of JRR Tolkien - writer of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. Growing up, Royd and his younger brother Mike were very close, but also very different - Mike was the adrenaline junkie who loved skydiving and bungee jumping, whereas Royd liked nothing better than a cup of tea in the garden. But that would all change after Mike died of Motor Neurone Disease in 2015. He left a bucket list of 50 daring tasks for Royd to complete after his death, and completing them gave Royd a reason to carry on. Royd has written a book about his experience called There's a Hole in my Bucket: A Journey of Two Brothers. He's also made a documentary, There's a Hole in my Bucket, which will be released later this year.

In the Zongo valley in Bolivia, there live creatures that don't exist anywhere else on earth, and we know about some of them because of Trond Larsen and his 'ecological swat team'. Trond is part of Conservation International’s Rapid Assessment Program which sends small teams of scientists out to remote locations to check on the biodiversity of a place if there's a plan for a new road, say, or a new park. And in Zongo in 2017, Trond and the team discovered 20 previously unknown species. Our reporter Jane Chambers spoke to him about his lifelong fascination with the natural world.

The BBC Inspirations Awards have been running for a few years now where we celebrate unsung heroes. One of our first winners - in 2016 - was Kees Veldboer from the Netherlands who dedicated his life to granting the wishes of people who were dying. When we heard that Kees had passed away a couple of weeks ago at the age of 62, we thought it would be fitting to hear again from this extraordinary man who made a lot of people very happy. He first spoke to Outlook in 2015 when he told Matthew Bannister how the idea for the Ambulance Wish Foundation came to him in 2006 when he was working as an ambulance driver.

Picture: Royd Tolkien taking on his bucket list
Credit: Royd Tolkien Productions

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x15)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18kdb8)
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MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqdn09j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw7rln)
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MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18kj2d)
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MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgj1hd0)
UN reveals landmark climate report

The world's largest ever report into climate change is published, setting out the stark reality of the state of the planet. The report "is a code red for humanity", says the UN chief. One of the report authors, Dr Friederike Otto, told Newshour that climate change’s tipping point is a decade earlier but urgent actions could help reverse.

Also in the programme: Taliban captures sixth Afghanistan provincial capital; and Russia’s longtime human rights defender Sergei Kovalev dies.

(Image: A protester carries a sign depicting the earth during the Peoples Climate March near the White House in Washington in 2017. Credit: REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18kmtj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n62)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw802x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4827s73vyc)
France extends Health Pass to cafes, bars, and restaurants

Today in France, the so-called Health Pass - a digital certificate showing that the holder has had at least one jab of a covid vaccine, a negative test, or has had the virus, is being extended to bars, cafes and restaurants. We speak to Emma Pearson, editor of The Local France and get reaction from Celine Pigier, co-director of Le Hasard Ludique, a venue in Paris.

Many people have had to be evacuated from Greece's second largest island, Evia, due to wildfires. The BBC's Metta Tsikrika is on the island and tells us about the disruption the fires are causing on local residents and businesses, whose property has been destroyed.

Doping is a growing problem in the multi-billion dollar industry of competitive online gaming – but remains an open secret. Tamasin Ford investigates the issue.

(Photo: coffee cup at a cafe, Getty Images/F.J. Jimenez.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18krkn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxn1cd0rj3)
Climate change report: Your questions answered

We look in detail at a new report on the impact of global warming, and how human activity is changing the climate. The study, by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), warns of increasingly extreme heatwaves, droughts and flooding, and a key temperature limit being broken in just over a decade. We explain what else is in the report, and how the world could change in our lifetimes.

Also, our environment correspondent, Matt McGrath, joins us to answer your questions on climate change. If you have a question you would like to ask, send us a WhatsApp message +447730 751925.

And our health expert, Professor Manfred Green, joins us to answer questions about Covid-19 and go through some of the main headlines of the day.

(Photo: A wildfire rages in the village of Vasilika, on Evia island, Greece, August 7, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Alexandros Avramidis)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18kw9s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxn1cd0w87)
Climate change: How are farmers impacted?

We look in detail at a new report on the impact of global warming, and how human activity is changing the climate. The study, by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), warns of increasingly extreme heatwaves, droughts and flooding, and a key temperature limit being broken in just over a decade. Dr Laura Wilcox, a climate scientist and contributor to the report, tells us more.

Also, farmers in Malawi and Germany discuss how climate change has impacted them and their livelihoods.

And our coronavirus expert of the day, Professor Manfred Green, joins us to go through the main headlines of the day and answer your questions. If you would like to ask a question send us a message on WhatsApp +447730 751925.

(Photo: Firefighters battle a wind driven wildfire in the hills of Canyon Country north of Los Angeles, California, U.S. October 24, 2019. Credit: Reuters/Gene Blevins)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18l01x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x15)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18l3t1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqdnqs9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw8h2f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ng0m7nzmd)
2021/08/09 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18l7k5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw8ltk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1m83)
Lost for words

Struggling to find words might be one of the first things we notice when someone develops dementia, while more advanced speech loss can make it really challenging to communicate with loved ones. And understanding what’s behind these changes may help us overcome communication barriers when caring for someone living with the condition.

When Ebrahim developed Alzheimer’s Disease, for example, he’d been living in the UK for many years. Gradually his fluent English faded and he reverted to his mother tongue, Farsi - which made things tricky for his English-speaking family who were caring for him. Two decades on, his son, the journalist and author David Shariatmadari, seeks answers to his father’s experience of language loss. What can neuroscience reveal about dementia, ageing, and language changes? Why are some aspects of language more vulnerable than others - and, importantly, what are the best approaches to communicating with someone living with dementia?

David reflects on archive recordings of his dad, and speaks to a family in a similar situation to theirs, to compare the ways they tried to keep communication alive. And he discovers there are actually clear benefits to bilingualism when it comes to dementia: juggling two or more languages can delay the onset of symptoms by around four years. So while losing one of his languages posed practical difficulties for Ebrahim, it’s possible that by speaking two languages in the first place, he was able to spend more valuable lucid years with his family.

Presented by David Shariatmadari and produced by Cathy Edwards


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18lc99)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgj2blx)
IPCC climate report hits home

The IPCC's powerful latest report on the science of climate change lays out - in the clearest possible terms - the details and impact of man made climate change. We hear from a young activist in Uganda, and also ask whether China will emerge as a climate leader.


Also in the programme: we report from Greece, where fires continue to devastate forested areas; and on the first anniversary of his disputed election victory, President Alexander Lukashenko of Belarus takes aim at his critics - and the West.

(Image: a participant studies the presentation of the Sixth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change IPCC, as the report is streamed to a press conference of the Swiss Academy of Sciences in Bern, Switzerland, 09 August 2021. / Credit: EPA/ALESSANDRO DELLA VALLE)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18lh1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n62)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw8v9t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18llsk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyws4zszxbj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sk7883yz5)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw8z1y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48wphtv4bp)
France extends Health Pass to cafes, bars, and restaurants

Today in France, the so-called Health Pass - a digital certificate showing that the holder has had at least one jab of a covid vaccine, a negative test, or has had the virus, is being extended to bars, cafes and restaurants. We speak to Emma Pearson,editor of The Local France.

Many people have had to be evacuated from Greece's second largest island, Evia, due to wildfires. The BBC's Metta Tsikrika is on the island and tells us about the disruption the fires are causing on local residents, whose homes have been destroyed.

Doping is a growing problem in the multi-billion dollar industry of competitive online gaming – but remains an open secret. Tamasin Ford investigates the issue.

(Photo: coffee cup at a cafe, Getty/F.J. Jimenez)



TUESDAY 10 AUGUST 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18lv8t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqgts5j6lj)
Climate change: IPCC report is 'code red for humanity'

Human activity is changing the climate in irreversible ways, a major UN scientific report has said. Nick Molho, executive director of the climate-minded business alliance the Aldersgate Group, explains how deep supply-chain changes need to go to reverse the effect. Also in the programme, tobacco giant Philip Morris has raised its bid to buy respiratory drugmaker Vectura to more than $1bn. Michelle Fleury in New York explains why they are so keen to purchase the niche company. In France, the so-called Health Pass - a digital certificate showing that the holder has had at least one jab of a Covid vaccine, a negative test, or has had the virus, is being extended to bars, cafes and restaurants. We speak to Emma Pearson, editor of The Local France. And staff at Ocado Group, the tech firm behind the online grocer, can now work abroad remotely for one month a year. We'll ask our guests Peter Morici, an economist at the University of Maryland, and Catherine Yeung from Fidelity in Hong Kong, where they would go if they could work anywhere.

(Picture: A huge cloud of fire smoke covering Athens. Picture credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18lz0y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl6)
Locust Hunters

People in Kenya have been paid to catch swarms of locusts eating farmers’ crops. The insects are full of protein and the captured ones are ground up and put into animal feed. The BBC’s Nick Holland and Claire Bates find out what tricks these 'locust hunters' use to catch the critters and what difference the cull makes.
They also hear about a way of capturing tiny micro-plastic particles that come off car tyres and delve into a clever project feeding homeless people in Mumbai.

Written and produced by Nick Holland
Presented by Nick Holland and Claire Bates

Image Credit: Getty Images


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw9b9b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 Discovery (w3ct1m83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18m2s2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x15)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18m6j6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct2hdt)
Hiroshima successors

When photographer Haruka Sakaguchi set out to Hiroshima document atomic bomb survivors' stories, she discovered they were far more difficult to find than she expected. Stigmatisation and survivor’s guilt discourage many from disclosing their past, and with dwindling survivors left to tell their story, memories of the atomic bomb are fading.

But a new generation has developed an unusual method of keeping those memories alive. Denshosha are the designated guardians of survivors’ memories. They act as storytellers, working with survivors to record their story and pass it down to future generations, embodying the survivor in a deeply personal way, so they do not permanently disappear.

To understand the importance of remembering, Haruka speaks with Hiroshima survivor Setsuko Thurlow and Nagasaki survivor Yasuaki Yamashita, hearing what happened that day and how it stayed with them, along with Keiko Okinishi, a denshosha who now passes on her mother’s story - despite it being a secret for much of her life.

(Photo: Setsuko Thurlow, of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), and survivor of the nuclear attack on Hiroshima, poses with medal of Nobel Prize. Credit: David Benito/Getty Images)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrw9ksl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdb)
Michael Harding: In vivid colour

Dick Pope, the Oscar-nominated cinemtatographer of Mr. Turner and The Illusionist, visits master paint-maker Michael Harding at his colour mill in Cwmbran, Wales.

Michael takes Dick on a drive to his local stables to collect a special ingredient for an ancient paint recipe. On the way, they discuss the challenges of their respective crafts, and the time-tested ways they each create colour in their work.

Back at the colour mill, Michael shows Dick around and recounts some of the weird and wonderful ways paints and pigments have historically been made, taking him into a heavily padlocked shipping container where the special ingredient they collected earlier helps to create a brilliant white paint.

Image: Michael Harding (Credit: Ned Carter-Miles)


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18mb8b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68q1d92)
Prince Andrew accuser files civil lawsuit in US

Prince Andrew is being sued in New York, accused of historical sexual abuse - something he's always denied. We get legal advice on why New York, why now and what happens next.

We're still talking about the dramatic warning in the UN climate report - and hear from a Californian town that burnt to the ground in a wildfire.

The family of Chinese elephants that have been on the road for 17 months appear to be going home.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18mg0g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68q1j16)
Civil lawsuit filed against Prince Andrew in New York

Virginia Giuffre claims she was sexually assaulted by Prince Andrew in London and New York, a claim the prince has consistently denied.

In Lebanon, the economic crisis continues to cause misery. Several people have died in fights over fuel - and the main hospital in Beirut may now run out of fuel for its generators and lose power.

And we'll speak to the man who has discovered what's being described as the closest thing to a real life dragon.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18mkrl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68q1msb)
Prince Andrew faces civil lawsuit in US

We hear why his accuser needed to bring the case now, and in New York.

Fresh tensions between China and Canada as a Chinese court upholds a death sentence passed on a Canadian national convicting of smuggling drugs.

And one of the authors of the UN's climate change report joins us to take your questions.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18mphq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwb1s3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jg3)
Bitcoin ban has opposite effect in Nigeria

Bitcoin’s popularity in Nigeria has exploded – with one of the youngest populations in the world, coupled with a high unemployment rate, its popularity was almost inevitable. Many young Nigerians are attracted to cryptocurrencies as an alternative and quick way to make money. Jude Umeano tells us that he lives his life using only Bitcoin, and that the government ban on funding crypto-based businesses only made him find loopholes. In fact, the government ban was likely the catalyst that increased its popularity, says Idayat Hassan from the Centre of Democracy and Development in Abuja. But there are still common, old fashioned concerns that make crypto investing so popular – and that’s mainly because it’s seen as a more secure and valuable currency in the global markets, says Eke Urum, chief executive of Risevest, one of Nigeria’s many investment platforms, which is still seeing users grow, despite the government ban.

(Image: Bitcoin app in Lagos. Credit: Alexander Sanchez/ Getty images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5p)
Escaping from East Berlin

How a young West German student helped East Berliners escape communism at the height of the Cold War. Volker Heinz told Robin Lustig how he worked with a Syrian diplomat to smuggle people across the Berlin Wall in the boot of the diplomat's car. From March to September 1966 the pair managed to help more than 60 people to make the crossing.

This programme is a rebroadcast

(Photo: East German border guards in 1966 scanning the Berlin Wall. Credit: Keystone/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18mt7v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2hdt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwb5j7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct1m83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18mxzz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18n1r3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqdqnqc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwbf0h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18n5h7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwn)
I changed my name to change my life

James Plummer Jr grew up navigating poverty and instability; his dad was a drug dealer and he moved around a lot, changing schools, houses and states multiple times. One day, when he was nine years old, he was reading an encyclopedia and got to 'E'. He discovered Albert Einstein's theory of relativity and a lifelong passion began – one that was to lead him out of poverty. James really understood physics. He started to win at state science fairs and after college was admitted to the elite physics course at Stanford University. But James had a secret: he was hooked on crack cocaine. He also knew he had to change and conquer his addiction if he was to fulfil his academic ambitions. It took a confession to a special person in his life, someone he admired and respected, to turn his life around. And with his new identity came a carefully chosen new name: Hakeem Muata Oluseyi.

A Quantum Life is by Hakeem Oluseyi and Joshua Horwitz.

Picture: Hakeem Oluseyi
Credit: Freddie Claire


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18n97c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqdqx6m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwbnhr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct1m83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18ndzh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgj4d93)
Aid agency: thousands killed in Afghanistan

Humanitarian agencies say the fighting in Afghanistan is taking a terrible toll on civilians, with thousands killed or wounded as the Taliban advance. We’ll hear from the Norwegian Refugee Council in Kabul.

Also in the programme: WHO warns of deadly Marburg virus in West Africa; and how Artificial Intelligence could diagnose dementia in a day.

(Photo: An internally displaced Afghan child from northern provinces. Credit: REUTERS/Stringer)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18njqm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwbx00)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bjkz18p4b)
World timber shortage hits construction

A global shortage of timber is causing challenges for the construction industry. David Hopkins is managing director of the Timber Trade Federation, and tells us what has caused the problem. And we hear about a shortage of garden sheds in the UK from retail analyst Kate Hardcastle. Also in the programme, the BBC's Theo Leggett reports on the growth of the British electric commercial vehicle maker Arrival. Only around 2% of people living in Africa are fully vaccinated against coronavirus, but the African Union hopes to reach 60% within a year. It has signed a deal for 400 million shots of Johnson and Johnson's vaccine, and Dr Ahmed Ogwell, deputy director of the Africa Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, discusses the challenges the continent faces in getting shots into people's arms. Barcelona's football star Lionel Messi is transferring to Paris St Germain, subject to a medical examination. Messi's biographer Guillem Balague tells us what is known about the new contract. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Stephanie Hare, explores how best to approach giving and receiving feedback so that it is actually useful.

(Picture: A lorry is loaded with timber. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18nngr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxn1cd3nf6)
Afghanistan conflict

As fierce fighting continues in Afghanistan between Taliban and government forces, we hear the latest on the conflict from our BBC correspondent. We also take a look at the recent history that has seen Afghanistan return to internal conflict.

The UN has said at least 27 children have been killed in Afghanistan in three days. We hear Afghan women discuss how they see their future and that of their country.

We have the latest on the case brought by a US woman who alleges that she was brought to the UK aged 17 to have sex with the Duke of York, claims the Duke has consistently denied.

And as Lionel Messi leaves Barcelona to join Paris St Germain, we hear fans from each club discuss the move.

Picture: An internally displaced boy from northern provinces, who fled from his home due the fighting between Taliban and Afghan security forces, is comforted by his sister in a public park that they use as shelter in Kabul, Afghanistan Credit: REUTERS/Stringer


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18ns6w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxn1cd3s5b)
OS Conversations: Women in Afghanistan

As fighting continues in Afghanistan between Taliban and government forces, we hear Afghan women discuss how they see their future and that of their country. We also hear the latest on the conflict from our BBC correspondent and we take a look at the recent history that has seen Afghanistan return to internal conflict.

We catch up on the story of Princess Latifa, the daughter of the ruler of Dubai. In footage earlier this year she said she was being held captive by her father, she is now said to be in Iceland. Our regional analyst has the latest.

And as Lionel Messi leaves Barcelona to join Paris St Germain, we hear fans from each club discuss the move.

Picture: Internally displaced families from northern provinces, who fled from their homes due the fighting between Taliban and Afghan security forces, take shelter in a public park in Kabul, Afghanistan, August 10, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Stringer


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18nwz0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18p0q4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqdrmpd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwcczj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ng0m7rwjh)
2021/08/10 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18p4g8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2hdt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwchqn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsd)
Brazil’s Data Protection Law comes into force

Brazil’s Data Protection Law
Brazil has started to enforce its data protection law with companies facing fines of up to $10m USD if they fail to comply. We’re speaking to the Director of the recently formed National Data Protection Authority, Miriam Wimmer, about how the legislation will protect the data of individuals and the impact on companies in Brazil.

Twitter Disaster Bot
As the clean-up operation following the floods in Henan province in central China continues Yuan Ren reports on the tech that has or hasn’t worked in preventing and managing these floods. We also hear about a disaster alerting twitter bot that’s been developed in Indonesia. Jakarta produces 2% of all tweets globally, it is also hit by a huge number of disasters, from flooding to earthquakes. The information people are tweeting about these disasters can now be collected into a real time map, PetaBencana or Disaster Map, with the help of a twitter bot. This bot recognises certain words associated with disasters, such as “flood”, and will respond to the sender to ask if they’d like to add the info onto the map. This real time map can help local residents and emergency services know what is happening on the ground. Director Nashin Mahtani told us more.

Bitclout
Harrison Lewis reports on a brand new form of social media. Bitclout is not a company, but a proof of work blockchain designed for running social media. A platform where you can speculate, buy and sell creator coins associated with the social media user, this could be a friend, influencer or high profile celeb like Elon Musk. To do so, you need to hold a token for the website, this is called Bitclout and can be bought with Bitcoin. In itself Bitclout is a native cryptocurrency. Even if you do make money though, you can’t retrieve it.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Angelica Mari.

(Image: A hand holding a padlock in front of html code to illustrate online data protection
Credit: Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)


Studio Manager: Nigel Dix
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18p86d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgj57j0)
Taliban capture eighth provincial capital

Afghanistan has 34 provinces in total. Reports say that thousands of civilians have been killed or wounded in fighting.

Also on the programme: New York’s Governor Andrew Cuomo resigns a week after the publication of an investigation which found that he had sexually harassed eleven women. And the interior minister of Latvia explains why her country has declared a state of emergency at its border with Belarus.


(Picture: Internally displaced families take shelter in a public park in Kabul. Credit: Reuters/Stringer)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18pcyj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwcr6x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18phpn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyws4zt2t7m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sk7886vw8)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwcvz1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48wphty17s)
World timber shortage hits construction

A global shortage of timber is causing challenges for the construction industry. David Hopkins is managing director of the Timber Trade Federation, and tells us what has caused the problem. And we hear about a shortage of garden sheds in the UK from retail analyst Kate Hardcastle. Also in the programme, the BBC's Theo Leggett reports on the growth of the British electric commercial vehicle maker Arrival. Only around 2% of people living in Africa are fully vaccinated against coronavirus, but the African Union hopes to reach 60% within a year. It has signed a deal for 400 million shots of Johnson and Johnson's vaccine, and Dr Ahmed Ogwell, deputy director of the Africa Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, discusses the challenges the continent faces in getting shots into people's arms. Barcelona's football star Lionel Messi is transferring to Paris St Germain, subject to a medical examination. Messi's biographer Guillem Balague tells us what is known about the new contract. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Stephanie Hare, explores how best to approach giving and receiving feedback so that it is actually useful.

(Picture: A lorry is loaded with timber. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 11 AUGUST 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18pr5x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqgts5m3hm)
Bipartisan infrastructure bill passes U.S. Senate

After 50 hours of US congressional debate over some 2,700 pages, the $1tn infrastructure bill passed the 100-member Senate 69-30 on Tuesday, but that just means it will now be punted back to the House of Representatives. Also in the programme, hackers have stolen some $600m in what appears to be one the largest cryptocurrency heists ever. The BBC's Theo Leggett reports on the growth of the British electric commercial vehicle maker Arrival. And is it time for Brits to retire the term "curry" as a synecdoche for Indian food overall? Food blogger Chaheti Bansal explains why.

All through the show we'll be joined by journalists Sushma Ramachandran in Delhi and Andy Uhler in Austin.


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18pvy1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbl)
Daryl Davis: Reaching out to the KKK

Stephen Sackur speaks to Daryl Davis, a black musician who has spent four decades trying to talk to America’s most diehard racists, the Ku Klux Klan. He claims to have forged friendships with white supremacists and opened their minds, but is reaching out to the KKK a distraction from the bigger task of dismantling systemic racism?


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwd76f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18pzp5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18q3f9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3csz4bf)
Changing World, Changing Bodies

How modern life is changing our backs

Dr Vybarr Cregan-Reid investigates what the last 250 years has done to our backs. What is it about modern life that has promoted back pain, especially lower back pain, from a rarity to the number one cause of pain and disability in the world?

In the remote Kenyan Village of Pemja, Dr Cregan-Reid meets people with such excellent backs that they are the subject of international study. He hears from pain-wracked workers in Nairobi whose backs today are a pale version of those of their grandparents' and at the London Design museum he comes face-to-face with the artefact that has done most to weaken our backs - the chair.

Chairs with backs are now so ubiquitous it is reckoned there are around 10 for each of us but as recently as 1800 they were a rarity. Not that we have much choice but to sit down today. At the start of the 19th Century fractions of one per cent of people sat down for a living but today three quarters work in offices or drive for a living. We put our spines into positions they were not designed to sustain for hours on end.

He discusses with Australian academics their research which claims that half of back pain is in the mind and why simple movement is probably more effective than surgery, manipulation and powerful painkillers in getting to the bottom of back pain.

(Photo: A woman rubs her lower back. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwdgpp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Documentary (w3ct2hgj)
Three Pounds In My Pocket

Three pounds In my pocket

Since 2014, Kavita Puri has been charting the social history of this community in post-war Britain. Many came with as little as three pounds due to strict currency controls.

In 2001, everything changed for British South Asians. After the optimism and progress of the 1990s, there was an abrupt change in 2001. The year began positively enough - in Spring, Foreign Secretary Robin Cook declared chicken tikka masala a national dish. It may not have been something that many - if any - British South Asians cooked at home, but Cook's speech was an imagining of Britain as diverse, open and multicultural.

Later that year, there was civil unrest in areas with large numbers of British South Asians, including Oldham, Burnley and Bradford. Racial tensions in Oldham were stoked by the British National Party. Their leader Nick Griffin made some electoral gains in the General Election in June. And then a few months later, on 11 September, al-Qaeda attacked the Twin Towers in New York City.

(Photo: Abdul Malik-Ahad with kind permission)


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18q75f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68q4965)
Taliban advance in Afghanistan

What are the prospects for talks in Afghanistan when the Taliban continue to make major territorial gains?

One of America's best known politicians has resigned in the face of allegations of sexual misconduct - we'll be talking about the end of Andrew Cuomo's tenure in New York state.

And we bring you a BBC investigation into Russian mercenaries operating in Libya and suspected war crimes.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18qbxk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68q4dy9)
Taliban tighten their grip on the north

The Taliban take another provincial capital as they tighten their grip on the north of the country. We'll speak to a prominent military expert.

We'll head to France to hear how some Parisians are reacting to the new Covid Health Pass.

In the US, New York State's controversial governor has resigned after numerous allegations of sexual harassment.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18qgnp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68q4jpf)
Canadian jailed in China for spying

A Canadian businessman, Michael Spavor, has been sentenced to 11 years in prison by a Chinese court for espionage. We'll bring you the details from Beijing.

We'll look at the wildfires in Algeria which have killed forty five people, including military firefighters. The government claims many of these fires have been started deliberately.

And Facebook says it has removed hundreds of accounts with links to a Covid vaccine disinformation campaign based in Russia.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18qldt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwdyp6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnw)
Electrifying Sierra Leone

Bringing electricity to his village for the first time, we speak with Jeremiah Thoronka in Sierra Leone about the challenges of energy inequality in the country. As a teenager, using kinetic energy, Jeremiah changed the lives of hundreds of people – we speak to them to talk about the difference between the two worlds – and why having more light often means more hours to earn money, in a country where economic success lags behind its neighbours. As three quarters of people in the world with no access to electricity live in Africa, UN energy representative Damilola Ogunbiyi explains why Africa energy poverty persists, despite some pockets of success, and answers why it takes ‘heroes’ like Jeremiah to change the lives of people, and why leaders should be stepping up.

(Image: Lightning storm approaches Freetown, Sierra Leone. Credit: Michael Duff / Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7y)
Exiled from East Germany: Wolf Biermann

East Germany's most famous singer-songwriter was exiled to the West in November 1976, causing an international outcry. Wolf Biermann was stripped of his GDR citizenship while on tour in West Germany.

Wolf Biermann spoke to Lucy Burns about his political songs and his fame on both sides of the Berlin Wall.

This programme is a rebroadcast

Picture: Wolf Biermann in concert. Credit: Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18qq4y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3csz4bf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwf2fb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18qtx2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18qyn6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqdtkmg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwf9xl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct2hgj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18r2db)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyx)
The improbable rise of Europe’s 'Tofu King'

When Bernard Drosihn was growing up in 1970s Germany he rebelled against the predominantly meat-heavy diet. These were the days when no one around him had even heard of vegetarianism. He later spent time in New York where he came across tofu - a bean curd block - and a product that wasn't available in Germany. So he and some other young hippies decided to produce their own, setting up a tofu collective. Bernard tells Jo Fidgen that the local authorities saw them as dangerous radicals, and the so-called ‘meat police’ raided their premises and even threw them in jail for a few nights. Undeterred, Bernard went on to become one of Europe’s biggest producers of tofu.

Steven Bradbury is an Australian speed skater who became a controversial winner at the Winter Olympic Games in 2002. He survived a late wipeout in which four of his competitors toppled, allowing him to clinch victory against all the odds. His success gave rise to the phrase 'doing a Bradbury'. This interview was first broadcast in 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Bernard Drosihn in his tofu factory
Credit: Marcus Simaitis, laif, Camera Press


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18r64g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqdtt3q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwfkdv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18r9wl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgj7966)
Afghanistan army head sacked

General Wali Mohammad Ahmadzai was replaced after the Taliban took nine provincial capitals in less than a week. President Ashraf Ghani has been rallying beleagured government troops in Mazar-i-Sharif as Taliban fighters close in on the northern city.

Also in the programme: The Algerian government says arson is behind wildfires burning out of control in the country; China sentences former Canadian diplomat to 11 years in prison in a politically charged espionage case.

Photo: People sleeping on the streets of Kabul after fleeing their homes. Credit: Reuters.


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18rfmq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwfsx3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4crr1ydjpc)
Lebanese energy crisis intensifies

Lebanon's central bank said it would offer credit lines for fuel imports based on the market price for the Lebanese pound from Thursday, effectively ending a
fuel subsidy that has drained its reserves since the country descended into financial crisis. The BBC's Mohamed El Aassar explains what this means for Lebanese citizens. Also in the programme, Brookings economist Nicol Turner Lee takes a close look at President Biden's infrastructure bill, and whether it will help alleviate the country's widening digital divide. We'll also hear how markets are reacting to the bill, along with record-high inflation in the US, with Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago. And we discuss energy inequality with Jeremiah Thoronka in Sierra Leone. As a teenager, he developed a method of using kinetic energy to bring electricity to remote areas.

(Image: Lebanese citizens wait in long queues to fill their gas cylinders and vehicles at gas station in Beirut, Lebanon. Image credit: Getty Images)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18rkcv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxn1cd6kb9)
Afghanistan: Taliban take more territory

The head of the Afghan army has been sacked following a rapid offensive by the Taliban who've taken over nine provincial capitals. The key northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif is now under pressure from the militants. Regional experts say its fall would be catastrophic for the government. We get the latest developments from our reporter in the capital Kabul.

Also, we hear a conversation amongst Afghani students. With the continued escalation of violence, and the uncertainty surrounding the country's future, we hear about their hopes, fears and aspirations.

And one of our regular coronavirus health experts, Dr Maria Sundaram, infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto, answers listener’s questions. You can send in a question via WhatsApp on +447730 751925.

(Photo: A member of the Afghan security forces stands guard in Rodat district of Nangarhar province, Afghanistan, 11 August 2021. Credit: EPA/GHULAMULLAH HABIBI)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18rp3z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxn1cd6p2f)
OS conversations: Students in Afghanistan

We continue to follow the unfolding situation in Afghanistan – where on Wednesday President Ashraf Ghani flew in to rally his beleaguered troops in Mazar- i- Sharif - a crucial northern city near the border with Tajikistan. Meanwhile, the Taliban seized three more provincial capitals in Afghanistan, officials said on Wednesday, putting nine of the nation’s 34 in the armed group’s hands. We speak to our reporter in the capital Kabul to get the latest developments.

And the US and UK governments have urged their citizens to leave Afghanistan immediately because of the worsening security situation. But what is life like for ordinary Afghani people, unable to leave? What’s been the impact on them? We hear from a group of students, who tell us about their experiences and their hopes and fears for the future.

Also, there are reports that the Ethiopian military and its allies are responsible for widespread sexual violence against women in Tigray. According to Amnesty International the scale of violations during the nine-month conflict in the north of the country amounts to war crimes. Ethiopian officials have not responded to the allegations. Our Africa correspondent has been looking into the story for us.

(Photo: Afghan girls attend Tajrobawai Girls High School in Herat, Afghanistan, 09 May 2021. Credit: EPA/JALIL REZAYEE)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18rsw3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18rxm7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqdvjlh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwg8wm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ng0m7vsfl)
2021/08/11 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18s1cc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3csz4bf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwgdmr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvm)
Impact of wildfires

Claudia Hammond and her studio guest global health journalist Sarah Boseley discuss the health impact of the fires that are raging in many places including Southern Europe and the US. Lizzie Crouch reports on the longer term physical and mental effects of fires on people who experienced them in Colorado last year.

Two reports, from the Netherlands and the US, are published this week that highlight the lack of women in drug trials for heart disease. Heart disease is often thought to be more common in men than women but that isn’t the case and new drugs need to be tested on women as well as on men.

As the Olympics comes to an end Claudia talks to Adrian Bauman, Emeritus Professor of Global Health at the University of Sydney, about if there is any legacy for the general public in terms of increased exercise and fitness. He has just published a paper in The Lancet exploring this question – and the answer is a no.

And Sarah Boseley and Claudia discuss the case of Marburg Disease in Guinea, the first to be reported in West Africa.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Deborah Cohen

(Picture: People run away from a forest fire in the Milas district of Muğla province, Turkey on 3rd August 2021. Photo credit: Ali Balli/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18s53h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgj84f3)
Taliban advance continues

Our reporter behind Taliban lines in northern Afghanistan challenges commanders on their treatment of civilians. Nine provincial capitals are now in the hands of the Taliban

Also in the programme: Canada says it will appeal an 11-year prison sentence imposed by a Chinese court on a Canadian businessman Beijing accuses of spying; and we hear about the hackers who stole millions of dollars worth of cryptocurrency and then started to pay it back.

(Picture: Taliban fighters patrol Farah, Afghanistan Credit: Reuters/Stringer)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18s8vm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwgn40)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct2hgj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18sdlr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyws4zt5q4q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sk7889rsc)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwgrw4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48wphv0y4w)
Millions stolen - then returned - in cryptocurrency heist

Hackers have stolen some $600 million dollars from the block chain site, PolyNetwork. Reports say the same hackers are beginning to drip feed some of the stolen assets back. We ask Glen Goodman, author of The Crypto Trader, to explain what's happening.
Zambia is going to the polls tomorrow. Last year, it missed an interest repayment on its massive debt, making it the first African country to default on a loan during the pandemic. The BBC's Nomsa Maseko is there looking at how the economy has become a big election talking point.
We discuss energy inequality with Jeremiah Thoronka in Sierra Leone. As a teenager, he developed a method of using kinetic energy to bring electricity to remote areas.
(Image: ipopba/Getty)



THURSDAY 12 AUGUST 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18sn30)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqgts5q0dq)
US infrastructure bill: the digital divide

Can President Biden’s infrastructure plan bring broadband coverage to all citizens? Brookings economist Nicol Turner Lee takes a close look. Also in the programme, Lebanon's central bank said it would offer credit lines for fuel imports based on the market price for the Lebanese pound from Thursday, effectively ending a fuel subsidy that has drained its reserves since the country descended into financial crisis. The BBC's Mohamed El Aassar explains what this means for Lebanese citizens. And we discuss energy inequality with Jeremiah Thoronka in Sierra Leone. As a teenager, he developed a method of using kinetic energy to bring electricity to remote areas.

All through the programme we'll be joined by Kimberly Adams from Marketplace in Washington and Tim Martin, Korea bureau chief for the Wall Street Journal in Seoul.

(Image credit: Getty Creative.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18srv4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2b)
Can we run the world on electricity?

The target for many countries around the world is to reach net zero emissions within the next few decades. That means a dramatic move away from fossil fuels like oil, coal and gas. For some the answer to the problem is to boost “green” electricity production, so that we can run our transport, our homes and our industry on electrical power. We already have a lot of the technology to produce clean electricity. But for hundreds of millions of people around the world, especially in sub-saharan Africa, the real problem is the lack of access to electricity.

Image: Wind turbines and solar panels in Vietnam (Credit: Quang Ngoc Nguyen/Getty Images)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwh43j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18swl8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18t0bd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxp)
What’s killing Israel’s Arabs?

Israel’s Arab population is in the grip of a violent and deadly crime wave. Since the start of the year, scores of Arab citizens have lost their lives and increasingly, even women and children are victims of drive-by killings, point-blank shootings and escalating gang warfare. Arabs account for only around one in five of all Israelis, yet they are now the majority of the country’s murder victims. Many say the problem of organised crime has grown out of control within their communities; others argue that the police do little to combat it. Some claim that Israel’s Jewish majority simply does not care. With a new coalition government now in office, which includes an Arab party, the BBC’s Yolande Knell meets victims’ families and those in authority to find out what is going on, and what hope there is for an end to the carnage.

Producers: Quique Kierszenbaum in Israel and Michael Gallagher in London
Editor: Bridget Harney


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwhcls)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr2)
Yotam Ottolenghi: My life in five dishes

The influential Israeli-born, UK-based chef tells his life story through some of his most memorable dishes.

Often credited with bringing Middle Eastern food into the mainstream in the UK, he now has a string of restaurants and delicatessens behind him, along with several best-selling cookbooks, but he was a late starter in the kitchen - almost pursuing a career in philosophy instead.

He tells Emily Thomas about his youth in the vibrant and diverse Jerusalem of the 1970s, coming out as gay in Tel Aviv, and the huge impact of his younger brother’s death.

Usually reluctant to delve into politics, Yotam also explains why he’s decided to speak out in support of his industry during the coronavirus pandemic.

Producers: Simon Tulett, Siobhan O'Connell and Sarah Stolarz

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Yotam Ottolenghi. Credit: David Loftus/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18t42j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68q7638)
Afghans flee their homes as Taliban advance

The dramatic advance of the Taliban on Afghanistan's regional capitals has terrified people and prompted tens of thousands to flee their homes creating a humanitarian catastrophe.

In business the oil giant Shell has agreed to pay compensation to Nigerian communities for crude oil spills in 1970 during the Nigerian civil war.

And is the Atlantic island nation of Iceland really the tip of a vast underwater continent?


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18t7tn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68q79vd)
A journey through Taliban country

We'll be hearing from the Taliban as they seize a succession of provincial capitals and re-establish their system of Sharia law in many parts of the country.

In Iraq, many militia's connections to neighbouring Iran have been considered a necessary evil as the country fends off the threat from ISIS. But could they take this opportunity to carry out attacks against US interests ?

New Zealand has announced that it will keep in place its Covid-19 border controls until the end of the year. The Pacific nation has successfully controlled the pandemic through a strict restrictions on people leaving and entering the country.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18tcks)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68q7flj)
Afghans seek refuge as fighting continues

We're live in Afghanistan where the Taliban continue to make rapid advances. We find out what this means for the civilians who've sought refuge in the capital Kabul.

The spokesperson for the Tigray People's Liberation Front tells the BBC they will keep fighting until Ethiopian national forces no longer pose a military threat to them.

In Algeria the fires have now killed over 60 people - we speak to someone helping those who've had to flee their homes.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18th9x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwhvl9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9l)
Neurodiversity at work

Neurodiversity is a broad term inclusive of a number of very different things including, but not limited to, autism, ADHD, dyslexia and dyspraxia. And until relatively recently, it's not something that many workplaces have paid much attention to. But rethinking those spaces and the way neurodiverse staff can be best accommodated, can reap benefits for both the companies involved and their employees. Stand-up comedian Don Biswas, explains how his different way of thinking has shaped his comedy routine, we also hear about the trials and tribulations faced by successful author Elle McNicoll. PR executive, Yemi Gbadebo describes the impact of getting an ADHD diagnosis as an adult, and Professor Amanda Kirby explains why females in general are less readily diagnosed with all forms of neurodiversity. Plus, Paul Graham, Britvic's managing director for the GB region, tells us how his neurodiverse family has inspired his approach to the workplace and Professor Robert Austin from Ivey Business School in Ontario, Canada, describes how the understanding of cognitive differences is gradually improving.

(Picture of a group of young people via Getty Images).


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3f)
East Germany's nudists

For years Germans have been bathing nude at the beach. Many are members of a naturist movement called the FKK, which was banned under the Nazis and faced official disapproval during the early years of communist rule in East Germany. Mike Lanchin spoke to one East Berliner who recalled the heyday of naked sunbathing beside the Baltic Sea.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Bathers enjoying the beach at Baerwalder See, Eastern Germany (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18tm21)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwhzbf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18tqt5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlj)
Sailing by the stars: The pioneering voyages of David Lewis

David Lewis was of one of the most remarkable nautical explorers of modern times. In the mid-1960s, he took his wife and two small daughters - who were less than five years old - on a sailing trip around the world in a small catamaran. What is more, for one part of the journey, he rejected standard 20th-Century navigational equipment and relied on much older methods of finding his way across the Pacific. In fact, it was his lifelong goal to prove that ancient seafaring methods were still valuable and his research helped revive ancient Polynesian navigation methods. In his more than eventful life, he also wrote a dozen books, practised as a GP in London’s East End and tackled many unclimbed peaks as a mountaineer. And he undertook hazardous trips to the Antarctic including one in which he was presumed dead.

Rajan Datar is joined by David’s son Barry, who is also an accomplished sailor and who accompanied David on some of his seminal voyages; Dr. Christina Thompson, the editor of Harvard Review and the author of Sea People: The Puzzle of Polynesia; and Ben Lowings, a yachtsman, BBC journalist and the author of David Lewis's biography entitled The Dolphin.

[Photo: David Lewis sets out on his 1972 trip to the Antarctic in his 32-foot sloop Ice Bird. Credit: George Lipman; Stuart William MacGladrie/Fairfax Media/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8k)
Kenya's Paralympic Record-Breaker

In 1995, promising Kenyan runner Henry Wanyoike suffered a stroke and lost his sight. After initially feeling depressed, Henry learnt how to run tethered to a guide and went on to a set a series of long-distance running records for the blind. Henry Wanyoike talks to Alex Last.

(Photo: Henry Wanyoike, right, with his guide on a run in 2013. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18tvk9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqdxgjk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwj6tp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18tz9f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3f)
I found the Titanic during a top-secret Cold War mission

For more than 70 years oceanographers and scientists searched for the wreckage of the most famous ship in recent history - the Titanic. Then in 1985, Robert Ballard was on a classified US Navy mission to locate sunken nuclear submarines in the North Atlantic when he made the discovery of a lifetime. But finding the Titanic is just one of Robert’s many astonishing deep-sea expeditions; his discoveries have rewritten the book of life itself. He tells Outlook’s Clayton Conn how he believes his dyslexia has given him an edge to find the things others can’t on the ocean floor. His memoir is called Into the Deep.

South African Paralympian Achmat Hassiem dreamed of becoming a professional footballer, until 2006, when a lifeguard-training exercise with his brother Tariq went horribly wrong. Achmat lost his leg in an encounter with a huge great white shark, but in this astonishing interview from 2015, he tells Jo Fidgen why he now campaigns for their protection.

Picture: Collage of images from Robert Ballard's deep-sea expeditions
Credit: Emory Kristof/National Geographic Image Collection, Robert Ballard and Martin Bowen/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Gabriel Scarlett/National Geographic Image Collection, Rob Lyall/National Geographic Image Collection


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18v31k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqdxq0t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwjg9y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18v6sp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgjb639)
Taliban take 10th provincial capital

Taliban fighters have captured the strategically important city of Ghazni, in Afghanistan. We hear from Kandahar and the Afghan government.

Also in the programme: a new media bill in Poland targets the Discovery network; and crime within Israel's Arab minority.

(Picture: Taliban militants patrol the city of Ghazni in Afghanistan. Credit: EPA/NAWID TANHA)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18vbjt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwjpt6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y499dw4fj9l)
China unveils plans for tighter regulation of the economy

China has announced a plan to tighten regulation of its economy. The five-year plan is seen by some as a further crackdown on the tech sector by Beijing.
China has already started targeting the technology and education industries. We ask Dr Sara Hsu, visiting scholar at Fudan University, to analyse the new plans. In the UK the latest GDP figures show growth of 4.8 % for the quarter between April and June. However, the British economy is still 4.4% smaller than it was before the pandemic. Kyle Monk from the British Retail Consortium tells us how the reopening of the retail sector has impacted growth figures. And neurodiversity is an umbrella term referring to conditions including autism and dyslexia. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson investigates how employers are responding to the needs of their neurodiverse employees.

(Image: Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Getty)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18vg8y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxn1cd9g7d)
OS conversations: Journalists in Afghanistan

The Taliban fighters in Afghanistan have captured the strategically important city of Ghazni. Our reporters and regional experts will be bringing updates and analysis on the fighting and on the humanitarian crisis in the country. We also continue to bring more conversations with the Afghans. Working as a journalist in Afghanistan has become increasingly difficult with those working in media organisations being targeted, killed and abducted. We hear from two journalists in Kabul about the challenges they are facing.

We’ll also get your coronavirus questions answered by our regular medical expert, Dr Emma Hodcroft in Switzerland.

And we’ll look at the latest developments with extreme weather events and hear from people in Sicily. The Italian island may have registered the hottest temperature ever recorded in Europe, 48.8C.

(Photo: An Afghan journalist reports next to a damaged van after a blast in Kabul, Afghanistan June 3, 2021. Credit: Stringer/Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18vl12)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxn1cd9kzj)
Afghanistan: Taliban in battle to capture Kandahar

The Taliban in Afghanistan say they're involved in a major battle for the key city of Kandahar -- once their stronghold -- and are in the process of capturing it from government forces. We'll get the latest from our reporter. We also continue to bring more conversations with the Afghans. Working as a journalist in Afghanistan has become increasingly difficult with those working in media organisations being targeted, killed and abducted. We hear from two journalists in Kabul about the challenges they are facing.

We’ll also get your coronavirus questions answered by our regular medical expert, Dr Emma Hodcroft in Switzerland.

And we’ll look at the latest developments with extreme weather events and hear from people in Sicily. The Italian island may have registered the hottest temperature ever recorded in Europe, 48.8C.

(Photo: A scene of destruction on display at a photo exhibtion showing the images of destruction and civilian casualities cuased in conflicts, in Kabul, Afghanistan, 12 August 2021. Credit: JAWED KARGAR/EPA)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18vps6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18vtjb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqdyfhl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwk5sq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ng0m7ypbp)
2021/08/12 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18vy8g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwk9jv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l41)
Methane - a climate solution?

The latest IPCC assessment raised alarm about the rate at which manmade emissions are contributing to climate change. Much of the focus for action is on reducing levels of carbon dioxide, however there is a more potent greenhouse gas, methane, produced by natural and industrial processes which, says Drew Shindell of Duke University and lead author on the Global Methane Assessment, is relatively easy to target for reduction.

Neuroscientist John Cryan of University College, Cork in Ireland is interested in the effects our gut microbes can have on our behaviour. It’s an unusual connection and one which he’s been experimenting on in mice. By feeding the faeces of younger mice to older ones he has found that the older ones’ took on some of the younger ones’ behaviour.

Ball lightning is the stuff of legend and the supernatural. And yet there are many reported sightings of this phenomenon. Texas State University's Karl Stephan is keen to uncover the science behind these observations. He’s running a crowd sourcing project encouraging people to contribute video recordings of any ball lightening events they might observe.

And Chile is home to the oldest known mummies in the World. UNESCO world heritage status has been given to a collection of around 300 mummies from Chile’s northern deserts. The mummies of babies, children and adults are thought to have been created in response to arsenic poisoning in the region around 7,000 years ago.

Image: Livestock farm in Brazil
Credit: Photo by Igor Do Vale/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18w20l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgjc1b6)
Taliban capture four more provincial capitals

On the most dramatic day yet of their advance across Afghanistan, the Taliban have captured a further four provincial capitals, including the country's third largest city, Herat. A senior adviser to the Afghan High Peace Council, says it's a disaster for the government in Kabul.

Also in the programme: as Greece struggles with record high temperatures and fires, we speak to the woman appointed as the Chief Heat Officer in Athens; and the Deputy Mayor of Denver County, whose job it is to enforce Covid vaccinations for all public employees, explains the rationale for the policy.

(Photo: Taliban militants patrol after taking control of the Governor's house in Ghazni city, Afghanistan, 12 August 2021. Credit: EPA/Zikrullah Rasooli)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18w5rq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z2b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwkk13)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18w9hv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyws4zt8m1t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sk788dnpg)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwkns7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48wphv3v1z)
US census data released

For the first time in history, the United States' white population has declined according to new census data. The figures also showed the country's population growth was the lowest since the Great Depression in the 1930's. We speak to Kimberly Adams from Marketplace in Washington about how the demographic change will affect businesses. In China the government has announced a plan to tighten regulation of its economy. The five-year plan is seen by some as a further crackdown on the tech sector by Beijing. China has already started targeting the technology and education industries. We ask Dr Rana Mitter, from Oxford University, to analyse the new plans. And neurodiversity is an umbrella term referring to conditions including autism and dyslexia. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson investigates how employers are responding to the needs of their neurodiverse employees.

(Image: Census form, Getty)



FRIDAY 13 AUGUST 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18wk03)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqgts5sx9t)
US census data released

The United States has experienced its first ever decline in its white population, according to new census data. We ask Kimberly Adams from Marketplace in Washington about the economic implications of the data. Also in the programme, we discuss Britney Spears, whose father, has agreed to step down as conservator of her estate after 13 years. Elizabeth Wagmeister is a senior correspondent at Variety who has been following the story. In China the government has announced a plan to tighten regulation of its economy. The five-year plan is seen by some as a further crackdown on the tech sector by Beijing. We ask Dr Rana Mitter, from Oxford University, to analyse the new plan. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson investigates how employers are responding to the needs of their neurodiverse employees. Cary Leahey from Decision Economics also reflects on Disney's latest stellar results.

Throughout the show, we will be joined by US journalist Erin Delmore in Berlin and financial expert Jessica Khine in London.
(Image: Census form, Getty)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18wnr7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1k)
Getachew Reda: What is the endgame for Tigray's rebels?

The humanitarian suffering in northern Ethiopia is appalling, as conflict continues on multiple fronts. Tigrayan rebel forces have won a string of victories over the Ethiopian military, and Ethiopia’s prime minister now says all the state's military resources will be deployed to crush the rebels. Stephen Sackur speaks to Getachew Reda, spokesperson for the Tigray People’s Liberation Front. With the death toll rising and man-made famine taking hold, what is the endgame for Tigray’s rebels?


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwl10m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l41)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18wshc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18wx7h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh9)
Removing carbon from the air

Can tech to capture and store carbon prevent a climate catastrophe? Plus how cyber criminals can now check whether their planned cryptocurrency transfers will raise suspicions. And is there any significant market for folding phones? Presented by Joe Tidy, with BBC Click tech reporter Jen Copestake. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwl8hw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 World Football (w3ct1tzd)
Messi in Paris and Greuther Fürth back in the Bundesliga

Greuther Fürth captain Branimir Hrgota looks ahead to the new season, following their promotion to the Bundesliga. Plus, Pat Nevin and Heather O'Reilly discuss Lionel Messi's move to Paris Saint Germain.

Picture: Players of Greuther Fürth celebrate their promotion to the Bundesliga after being Fortuna Duesseldorf (Thomas Langer/Bongarts/Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18x0zm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68qb30c)
Advancing Taliban claim capture of Kandahar

As more major cities fall to the Taliban advance, can anything stop them?

We report from Lithuania where the number of people trying to cross illegally from Belarus is skyrocketing.

And for fans of English football the wait is almost over as the Premier League kicks off later today. We get a preview of what to expect this season.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18x4qr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68qb6rh)
Afghanistan: more key cities fall to Taliban

Can the government stop the advance as the Taliban take Kandahar and other cities?

Former guerillas in Colombia are putting down their guns and picking up binoculars, as they find a new direction for themselves and their children through birdwatching.

And is Britney Spears finally free? She's taken legal action to try to get her father removed from involvement in her affairs - and it looks like he's agreed to this.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18x8gw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2s68qbbhm)
Afghanistan's second city falls to Taliban

The US sends 3,000 troops to Kabul to evacuate citizens after Kandahar is taken by the Taliban.

Covid cases and hospitalisations are high in the Deep South of the United States, where vaccine uptake is low among some religious communities. We hear from anti-vaxxers, bereaved families and intensive care staff.

And the asteroid collision is a staple of sci fi movies - but what's the reality as asteroid Bennu makes its way towards earth?


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18xd70)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwlrhd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0k)
No boss, no problems

A young entrepreneur builds the ‘happiest company in the world’, an online shoe retailer so profitable that Amazon snaps it up for over a billion dollars. But what if the company’s profits and happiness could be boosted by a radical reimagining of the workplace? No more bosses, no more job titles, just creativity, equality and pure joy. We hear the story of Tony Hsieh, a visionary entrepreneur who abandoned social hierarchy in his Las Vegas-based shoe company. Could it be that the secret to happiness lies in making everybody equal?

(Image: Tony Hsieh in 2013. Credit: Christopher Farina/ Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyx)
Inside an East German jail

Vera Lengsfeld was a prominent human rights activist in East Germany who was arrested and jailed for taking part in a peaceful protest. She was sent to Hohenschönhausen, the main political prison of the former East German Communist Ministry of State Security, the Stasi. There she was kept in solitary confinement until shortly before the Berlin Wall came down. Vera Lengsfeld spoke to Lucy Williamson about her time in jail.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: A cell inside Hohenschönhausen Prison which has now been made into a museum. Credit: Flickr Commons.


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18xhz4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwlw7j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l41)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18xmq8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hss)
Silencing dissidents

A year on from the disputed election in Belarus, the country’s president has denied claims his security services were involved in the death of dissident Vitaly Shishov, who was found hanged in neighbouring Ukraine last week. The death follows EU accusations that Minsk effectively “hijacked” a plane en route to Lithuania earlier this year, forcing it to land in Belarus where a journalist on board who was a critic of the president was arrested. Technology allows many dissidents to continue impacting events whether they live at home or abroad. But reports suggest spyware developed in Israel and sold to multiple governments may have been used to target rights activists, journalists and lawyers. The company behind the software denies any wrongdoing and says it’s intended for use against criminals and terrorists. But with surveillance systems proliferating and activists increasingly voicing fears over their safety, is the role that dissidents play under threat?

Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests. Producers: Paul Schuster and Zak Brophy.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18xrgd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqf0cfn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwm3qs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18xw6j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f9)
Russian mercenaries in Libya

We hear how BBC Russian and BBC Arabic collaborated in a joint investigation into the role of mercenaries from Russia's secretive Wagner Group in the conflict in Libya. Kateryna Khinkulova and Nader Ibrahim explain how they identified Russian fighters and uncovered evidence of suspected war crimes.

China's wandering elephants
A herd of elephants have finally returned to their nature reserve in southern China after leaving it 17 months ago to trek over 500 kilometres. It is still unclear why the elephants embarked on the journey. BBC Chinese editor Howard Zhang tells us about reactions to the wayward elephants.

Why are South Korean women reclaiming short hair?
When South Korean archer An San won three gold medals at the Tokyo Olympics, many online comments focussed on her short hair, not her sporting success. An was labelled a feminist, a loaded term in South Korea. Julie Yoonnyung Lee of BBC Korean explains the background to the controversy.

Goodbye Lionel Messi
After 21 years, the great Argentinian footballer Lionel Messi has left Barcelona to start a new career with Paris Saint Germain, amid tears from himself and his fans. Among those mourning his departure is BBC Mundo’s Enric Botella, who’s from Barcelona.

Image: Russian mercenaries in Libya
Credit: Wagner telegram group


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18xzyn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqf0lxx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwmc71)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l41)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18y3ps)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgjf30d)
Kandahar falls to Taliban

Afghanistan's second city of Kandahar has fallen under Taliban control. A third of provincial capitals and vast swathes of the rural areas are currently in the hands of the militants.

Also in the programme: The head of South Korean tech giant, Samsung, has been released from prison; and It's 60 years since the Berlin Wall was constructed.

(Picture: Taliban militants gather around the main square after taking control of Kandahar, Afghanistan. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18y7fx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwmlq9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46v2pbghxt)
Samsung heir released from prison

Samsung heir Lee Jae-yong has been released from a South Korean prison and is on parole. Mr Lee is de facto head of Samsung, served just over half of his sentence, and we hear how the release has been received in South Korea from Joyce Lee, who is a reporter with the Reuters news agency in Seoul. Also in the programme, China's third busiest port, Ningbo-Zhoushan has been partially shut down, due to a worker being infected with coronavirus. Nick Sevidies is editor of the shipping magazine Loadstar, and tells us how it might impact the global shipping industry. We find out from television critic Scott Bryan why Amazon Studios has decided to switch filming of the upcoming Lord of the Rings TV series from New Zealand to the UK. Plus, the BBC's Frey Lindsay reports on how tensions are rising on all sides, as the European Union and Turkey try to negotiate renewed funding for a migration deal made at the height of the migrant crisis in 2016, which limited the number of asylum seekers arriving on EU shores.

(Picture: Lee Jae-yong walks free. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18yc61)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxn1cddc4h)
Afghanistan: Your questions answered

As the Taliban regain power across the country, we'll get the latest updates on the balance of power between the miltant group and the Afghan forces. Our regional experts and reporters will be answering listeners' questions about the situation.

And our world affairs correspondent will bring us the details on the reaction internationally.

Dr Rick Malley, who specialises in vaccines at the Boston Children’s Hospital, will answer some audience questions about the coronavirus.

(Photo: Taliban militants gather after taking control of Lashkar Gah, the provincial capital of Helmand, Afghanistan, 13 August 2021 Credit: STRINGER/EPA)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18ygy5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxn1cddgwm)
Afghanistan: US troops in Kabul to evacuate diplomats

The first American troops sent to evacuate diplomats from Afghanistan have arrived in Kabul. Germany says it's reducing the staffing at its embassy to an absolute minimum, and Denmark and Norway are closing their embassies in the city.

A Pentagon official has said that the Taliban could be back in power in Kabul faster than previously thought. We'll get the latest updates on the balance of power between the miltant group and the Afghan forces. Our regional experts and reporters will be answering listeners' questions about the situation.

And, we’ll get questions answered about the pandemic by our regular expert, Dr Marc Mendelson in Cape Town, South Africa.

(Photo: Taliban militants gather after taking control of Lashkar Gah, the provincial capital of Helmand, Afghanistan, 13 August 2021 Credit: STRINGER/EPA)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18ylp9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18yqff)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxllqf1bdp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwn2pt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ng0m81l7s)
2021/08/13 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18yv5k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwn6fy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqs)
How can smart tech tackle climate change?

Humans are responsible for emitting over 40 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year – and we all know that we need to reduce that figure to prevent devastating climate change. Listener Saugat wonders whether smart technology and artificial intelligence can help us do this more quickly?

Green energy will go a long way to tackling the problem, but integrating wind and solar into our current electricity grid is complicated. CrowdScience hears how AI is being used at a wind farm on the island of Orkney to predict periods of high winds, so that excess energy can be turned into hydrogen and stored, then converted back to electricity when there’s greater demand.

Digital mirrors are also playing a major role in optimising performance, and scientists say cloud-based “twins” of physical assets like turbines can improve yield by up to 20%, allowing engineers to identify problems via computer without ever having to be on site.

Marnie visits an intelligent building in London’s financial district where sensors control everything from air-conditioning to lighting, and machine learning means the building knows which staff will be on which floor at any given time, switching off lifts that are not in use and adjusting ventilation to save on power. Its designer says incorporating this kind of digital technology will help companies achieve net zero more quickly.

And in India, more than half the population are involved in agriculture, but the sector is plagued by inefficiency and waste. Tech start-ups have realised there’s potential for growth, and are using drones to monitor crop production and spraying, giving farmers apps which help them decide when and where to fertilise their fields.

Produced by Marijke Peters for BBC World Service.

Featuring:

Professor Srinivasan Keshav, University of Cambridge

Matthew Marson, Arcadis Group


[Image Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18yyxp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57jgjfy79)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18z2nt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwnfy6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tzd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnz18z6dy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xyws4ztchyx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sk788hklk)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkhdrwnkpb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48wphv6qz2)
Samsung heir released from prison

Samsung heir Lee Jae-yong has been released from a South Korean prison and is on parole. Mr Lee is de facto head of Samsung, served just over half of his sentence, and we hear how the release has been received in South Korea from Joyce Lee, who is a reporter with the Reuters news agency in Seoul. Also in the programme, China's third busiest port, Ningbo-Zhoushan has been partially shut down, due to a worker being infected with coronavirus. Nick Sevidies is editor of the shipping magazine Loadstar, and tells us how it might impact the global shipping industry. We find out from television critic Scott Bryan why Amazon Studios has decided to switch filming of the upcoming Lord of the Rings TV series from New Zealand to the UK. Plus, the BBC's Frey Lindsay reports on how tensions are rising on all sides, as the European Union and Turkey try to negotiate renewed funding for a migration deal made at the height of the migrant crisis in 2016, which limited the number of asylum seekers arriving on EU shores.

(Picture: Lee Jae-yong walks free. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d61)

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BBC Proms on the World Service 19:06 SAT (w3ct2gdc)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j52)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqgghw3nm2)

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Business Weekly 04:06 SUN (w3ct2dh2)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dh2)

CrowdScience 02:32 MON (w3ct1pqr)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqr)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pqr)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pqs)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lsd)

Digital Planet 02:32 WED (w3ct1lsd)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lsd)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lsd)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct1m83)

Discovery 02:32 TUE (w3ct1m83)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct1m83)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct1m83)

From Our Own Correspondent 05:06 SUN (w3ct1mv5)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mv5)

Global Questions 02:06 SAT (w3ct2hfv)

Global Questions 02:06 SUN (w3ct2hfw)

Global Questions 22:06 SUN (w3ct2hfv)

Global Questions 10:06 MON (w3ct2hfw)

HARDtalk 02:06 MON (w3ct1n62)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nvm)

Health Check 02:32 THU (w3ct1nvm)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nvm)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvm)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2hgm)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2hgm)

Heart and Soul 03:32 MON (w3ct2hgm)

In the Studio 01:32 MON (w3ct1td9)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tdb)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tdb)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1tdb)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dkb)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dkb)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2dkb)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dkb)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hc6)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hc6)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2s68pyhcz)

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Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kx7)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1r)

Over to You 01:50 SUN (w3ct1l1r)

People Fixing the World 02:06 TUE (w3ct1pl6)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pl6)

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Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tc9qkghqv)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lbs)

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Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1nh9)

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The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p8t)

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The Documentary 23:32 SAT (w3ct2gws)

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