Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 31 JULY 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnf4pj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqg37kbj07)
Japan imposes further covid restrictions

A surge of Covid cases in parts of Asia has brought new restrictions on businesses - we speak with an expert epidemiologist in India to look at how it is spreading in the region. A big fine for Amazon shows that the battle over data privacy is starting to get pricey, and we'll hear from one of the most high profile women on Wall Street about her fears that women are being financially left behind by the pandemic. We discuss all this with Sharon Brettkelly - presenter of the Detail podcast for Radio New Zealand.

(Image: A station employee walks by a COVID-19 infection prevention instructions sign at a Tokyo metro station in Tokyo. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnf8fn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv4)
Rebuilding Beirut one year after the blast: Renovation or more destruction?

Stories from Lebanon, Mexico, Barbados and from the Olympics in Tokyo

How to rebuild? How to pay for it? A year after a chemical dump blew up in Beirut’s harbour, the Lebanese capital has barely begun the task of recovery. Lebanon’s economy was already on its knees, but the explosion, along with political instability and Covid have caused a financial meltdown. Even if money can be found to pay for rebuilding, it is an open question how to spend it. Tim Whewell found locals nervously wondering whether their way of life might be swept away by a bout of new construction.

Drugs like cocaine may be illegal in the Mexican state of Sinaloa, but they are also a mainstay of the economy. Nobody knows that more than cosmetic surgeon - gangsters, they say, like their wives and girlfriends to be nipped, tucked and if necessary stuffed with silicone, all to give them the “perfect body.” Linda Pressly visited the office of one local doctor, a man so devoted to his work, he performed cosmetic surgery on his own mother.

Later this year Barbados will become a republic and Queen Elizabeth II will no longer be head of state on the island, which was once part of the British Empire. This is part of an on-going effort to come to terms with the history of Barbados, and its slavery which lies at the heart of it. Barbados was the first British territory to be run on slavery, and for a time, the most profitable. Zeinab Badawi visited a former slave-owner’s mansion, there, to hear about slavery’s legacy, and attempts by campaigners to claim compensation for it.

There is no bar to hang out in at the end of the night, no chance to party with celebrity athletes, and if you’re unlucky, you could end up locked down in your hotel room for two weeks. That is the life of a sports correspondent, covering this year’s Olympics in Tokyo. It is a far cry from the many other international sporting events which the BBC’s Alex Capstick has covered, and he tells us precisely why.

(Image: A soldier stands on rubble at the site of the Beirut explosion. Credit: EPA/Thibault Camus)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp783mq1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbr)
'I want to break the 80mph bowling record'

We speak to South Africa's all time leading wicket taker and one of the fastest female bowlers in world, Shabnim Ismail, as we discuss whether the 80 miles per hour women's bowling record could be broken soon.

Plus, we'll look at the concerns over this winter's Ashes, and India's injury list ahead of the Test series with England.

Photo: Shabnim Ismail of South Africa bowls during the ICC Women's T20 Cricket World Cup match between South Africa and Pakistan at Sydney Showgrounds (Credit:Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnfd5s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f7)
Kyiv march: 'Eucharist is our vaccine'

This week tens of thousands of Orthodox Christians marched through Kyiv, despite coronavirus restrictions, to mark the anniversary of Vladimir the Great adopting the Christian faith. Myroslava Petsa of BBC Ukrainian reported from the march and tells us why it was so controversial this year.

For the love of dancehall
Egyptian Yara Saleh turned her back on a prestigious career as an oil engineer to devote her life to dance. Specifically to dancehall, a genre that originated in Jamaica. She's now choreographing routines and introducing dancehall to fellow Egyptians, as Rana Taha found out for BBC Arabic.

Our Ancestors
BBC Indian languages are running their second Humari Purakhin, or Our Ancestors, season, celebrating India's female pioneers. This season focuses on marginalised communities, and BBC Marathi's Anagha Pathak chose the first recorded Dalit headmistress and feminist, Jaibai Chaundray.

Discovering the world's largest sapphire
A Sri Lankan man became fabulously wealthy overnight after finding the world's largest star sapphire while digging a well in his garden. It is estimated to sell for $100 million. The BBC's Anbarasan Ethirajan in Delhi has followed the story.

From bans to Olympic medals: Brazil’s skateboard journey
Brazil’s Olympic skateboarders are being hailed as heroes with their medal success in Tokyo. But skateboarding was banned in many Brazilian cities in the late 1980s. Thais Carrança of BBC Brasil tells us about the skateboarders of Sao Paulo, and the new mayor who gave them back their freedom.

Image: Worshippers in the streets of Kyiv
Credit: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyv)
The Tsunami and Fukushima

Remembering the earthquake and tsunami which devastated Japan and triggered a nuclear emergency in 2011. Max Pearson, who reported from Japan at the time, presents eyewitness accounts of the disaster which left thousands dead and led to many questioning the future of the country's nuclear industry.

Photo: Tsunami smashes into the city of Miyako in Iwate prefecture shortly after an earthquake hit the region of northern Japan, 11th March 2011 (JIJI PRESS/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnfhxx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsq)
Why has Australia's Covid strategy faltered?

Australia has been seen as a success story when it comes to controlling the spread of the coronavirus and was praised by US official Dr Anthony Fauci as being a world leader in “containment and management of emerging variants”. The country had zero deaths from locally acquired Covid-19 infections during the first half of 2021 and has seen fewer than 1,000 deaths since the start of the pandemic. But a new outbreak of the Delta variant has thrown Sydney into lockdown and cases continue to rise, prompting other states to accuse New South Wales of not locking down fast enough or hard enough. The national government in Canberra has been criticised for one of the slowest vaccine rollouts among industrialised countries and reports of rare blood clots linked to the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab have left many confused as to which age groups should take it. So what went wrong with Australia's 'gold standard' response to Covid-19? As anti-lockdown protesters take to the streets, why is the policy failing to bring down cases in Sydney? Has Delta changed the game and could vaccine hesitancy delay any return to normal? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnfmp1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf9)
Reviving live music: South African cellist Abel Selaocoe

As pandemic restrictions ease in different countries, musicians from across the world discuss how performing live gives them a special connection with audiences.

Cellist and singer Abel Selaocoe talks about his Proms concert, called Africa Meets Europe, coming up in London in August – and how he first got involved in music as a boy in Sebokeng, South Africa.

Egyptian-Australian oud virtuoso Joseph Tawadros shares how he’s tried to maintain contact with his fans despite lockdown. His latest album is called Hope In An Empty City.

Sudanese jazz musician and radio presenter Islam Elbeiti tells how being a female bass player appearing on stage can be challenging in a conservative society.

And Israeli musician Kutiman shares three lessons he’s learned about reinventing his art in isolation. His single, Guruji, is out in August.


Presenter: Chi Chi Izundu

Producers: Paul Waters, Kirsty McQuire & Olivia Skinner

(Photo: Abel Selaocoe. Credit: Mlungisi Mlungwana)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp783zyf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct1xzr)
The TikTok news revolution

TikTok became successful by being the app for watching viral dance videos. But with global downloads of the app recently topping three billion, it’s also increasingly a place where users are also going to find news - though not any old news.

While traditional media organisations are struggling to gain a foothold on the platform, a wave of fresh and diverse creators are finding innovative ways to present the news in a style that engages TikTok’s massive young audience.

Trending explores the potential and the pitfalls of news on TikTok. We hear from the journalist who makes comedy videos in which he plays a Covid-19 variant and his dad. And we meet the man who is the biggest star in TikTok news - who despite his fame still has to work other jobs to make ends meet.

Presenter: Jonathan Griffin
Reporter: Abbie Richards
Producer: Matt Munday
Editor: Ed Main
Photo: Collage of TikTok news creators
Photo credit: BBC/TikTok


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk9)
Breaking climate records

June saw a brutal heatwave shatter a number of all-time temperature records in Canada and the Northwest of the USA. But when can we attribute new records to man-made climate change, rather than natural variation? Peter Stott, an expert in climate attribution at the UK’s Met Office, explains how climate change has dramatically increased the probability of seeing such extremes.

Presenter: Tim Harford

Producer: Nathan Gower


Picture: Kids cool off at a community water park on a scorching hot day in Richmond, British Columbia, June 29, 2021. Credit: Don MacKinnon/Getty images


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnfrf5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt938cs4p8)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnfw59)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt938cs8fd)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnfzxf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt938csd5j)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp784c5t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6v)
World leaders: Michelle Bachelet and Helen Clark

What does it take to run a country? Kim Chakanetsa is joined by two international leaders who have championed women’s health, equality and empowerment throughout their careers. They will discuss their personal journeys, the impact Covid-19 has had on the wellbeing of women around the world, and why more women should join the political arena. The guests will also be taking questions from two young female activists and leaders in women’s rights, health and climate change.

Michelle Bachelet became Chile’s first female president in 2006 and served a second term in 2014. In 1973, her father was detained and tortured under General Pinochet’s dictatorial rule. Two years later she was also imprisoned with her mother and then exiled for four years. When she returned to Chile, she became a doctor and worked with victims of torture. She is currently the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Helen Clark was the first woman to be elected as prime minister of New Zealand and the first woman to serve for three consecutive terms. After her premiership, Helen Clark became the first female head of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and last year she co-chaired an Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response to explore the global response to Covid-19. She’s also chairing the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health (PMNCH).

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE DETAILS
(L) Michelle Bachelet, credit Getty Images
(R) Helen Clark, credit Getty Images


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hng3nk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d60)
Extreme weather

In recent weeks the world has seen floods in Europe and China and devastating wildfires in Canada, the United States and Siberia. It’s difficult to link single events to global warming but climate change is expected to increase the frequency of extreme weather events.

Host Nuala McGovern hears from those affected by flooding in Germany and Belgium as well as people in the city of Zhengzhou, in Henan, China, which recently recorded the equivalent of a year’s average rainfall in just three days.

A couple who escaped with their lives from a wildfire in Oregon, in the US, but lost their home also share why they’ve decided to leave the state for good. And one woman in British Columbia, Canada, explains why she’s decided to stay in her home and fight the fire.

Plus, climate experts in South East Asia, Europe and the United States discuss the seriousness of the situation and why nature may be the best solution to the effects of extreme weather.

(Photo: Firefighter silhouetted against orange flames and glow of the Bootleg fire, Oregon, July 22, 2021. Credit: NWCG / US Forest Service)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp784gxy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g72)
14: Kill switch

A frightening global attack, hospital in chaos and an accidental hero. A virus spreads from computer to computer in 150 countries, causing billions of dollars in damage. It’s the story of WannaCry and Marcus Hutchins.
#LazarusHeist

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/lazarusheist


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1q)
Unmasking those who tried to influence the influencers

BBC Trending investigated who was behind a secret scheme to pay social media stars to falsely discredit the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine? We speak to the team behind the programme.
Plus: a listener in Nigeria asks how The Inquiry selects its panel members - unhappy with what he sees as regional bias.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hng7dp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q25jtxnfb)
'An achievement of a lifetime' – Jolanda Neff on winning Olympic gold

Switzerland’s Jolanda Neff reflects on winning the gold medal in the cross-country mountain bike event at the Tokyo Olympics. Neff and her team-mates made history as Switzerland won all three medals in the event. The 28-year-old says it will take some time to comprehend what they have achieved. Neff also tells us how she broke her hand just six weeks before the Olympics and explains how she did not start riding and jumping her bike again until she arrived in Japan.

We look ahead to the women’s 100m final with the 2004 Olympic silver medallist Lauryn Williams. The former USA star tells us how to execute the perfect race, recalls how she felt winning an Olympic medal and gives us her thoughts on what gymnast Simone Biles has been through this week. Biles pulled out of the women’s team final to protect her mental health and Williams believes the situation will shine a spotlight on athlete welfare.

We also hear from former USA swimmer Ella Eastin on the pressure elite athletes are under, South Africa’s first black female Olympic gymnast Caitlin Rooskrantz and the BBC’s Ade Adedoyin is with us throughout the programme with all the latest news on day eight of the Olympics.

Plus, Sporting Witness heads back to the London 2012 Olympics to tell the story of 400m runner Zamzam Farah. Having grown up in war-torn Somalia, even reaching the Games was a huge personal achievement.

(Image: Jolanda Neff, of Team Switzerland, celebrates winning the gold medal during the Women's Cross-country race, at Izu Mountain Bike Course, Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hngc4t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5sjz42)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp784qf6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3g)
Does India need a two-child policy?

India has a population of almost 1.4 billion people and is expected to become the most populous country in the world, overtaking China, by 2027, according to the United Nations. And now, India's most populous state, has unveiled a controversial bill to curb population growth. With over 220 million people, Uttar Pradesh says it'll deny government jobs, subsidies and the right to contest local polls - to anyone who has more than two children. Critics say it's likely to encourage sex selective abortions and further impede minorities' rights in a state, which is often challenged for its divisive, right-wing Hindu nationalist image.

So, should the government strengthen education and healthcare campaigns to stabilise population growth? Or, do fertility rates require stricter governance in more states across India?

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Dr SY Quraishi, former chief election commissioner, India; Gopika Kaul, parent; PKD Nambiar, political strategist and commentator


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnggwy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2cbd)
Beijing: Beyond the masks

Over a year after the Covid-19 pandemic hit the headlines in China, Liyang Liu explores the hidden impacts on people in her home city Beijing.

Life has in some ways got back to normal in China’s capital, especially compared to many other global cities, but Liyang discovers things have changed in more subtle ways beyond the masks in this mega city of over 20 million people.

We hear from business owners and entrepreneurs about the economic impacts of pandemic restrictions, and from those in the tourist industry about how the year has affected this vast industry in Beijing.

Liyang reflects on the psychological impacts for herself and those around her of the strict pandemic control. She also visits markets in the city to find out how attitudes to food and consumption have changed over the past year. And we talk to students, parents, single people and retirees about how they have adapted to life online during quarantines and lockdowns.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hngln2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxwykyp)
Afghanistan: clashes between government and Taliban forces intensify

There are fears that Kandahar could fall to the Taliban. On Friday a UN compound in the city of Herat came under fierce attack. Taliban forces have already seized several districts on the outskirts of the city as well as border crossings with Iran and Turkmenistan.

Also on the programme we'll be getting the latest on the fighting in Northern Ethiopia and hearing from a Rohingya refugee who rescued his family from the recent floods in Bangladesh.

(Picture: Afghan security officials stand guard outside the UN office in Herat. Credit: EPA / Reyazee)


SAT 13:49 Sportsworld (w172y6f3kp4wvpf)
Sportsworld Extra

LIVE commentary on the women’s 100m final from the Olympic Stadium in Tokyo

(Photo credit: LUIS ACOSTA/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hngqd6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tbyg7pc40)
Sportsworld

Christian Coleman (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnh6cq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5sktbz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp785kn3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct1xzr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8h)
Zamzam Farah - Somalia's inspiring runner

At the London 2012 Olympics, Somalia sprinter Zamzam Farah became a crowd favourite after finishing last in her 400-metre heat by a whopping 27 seconds. Zamzam had grown up in war-torn Mogadishu, where she had to dodge violence from the militant Al-Shabab group while training on the so-called "Road of Death". Zamzam competed with her body fully covered, but, after the Olympics, her family in Somalia received death threats because of what Al-Shabab considered unacceptable behaviour for a Muslim woman. She remained in the UK and won asylum. Zamzam Farah talks to Ian Williams.

PHOTO: Zamzam Farah competing at the 2012 Olympics (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnhb3v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Evidence (w3ct2hfs)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

Whatever happened to…those Covid-19 stories

Whatever happened to those sniffer dogs who were seeking out any passengers infected with Covid-19 at Helsinki airport? And did plans to sample sewage to spot outbreaks early prove successful? This week on The Evidence, we have listeners’ questions about some of the clever ideas which were in the news early on in the pandemic but we haven’t heard about for a while. Trials of treatments like the cheap steroid dexamethasone proved successful – but what about the anti-parasite medication, ivermectin, which has sparked fierce debate on social media?

Because of its role in our body’s immune system, researchers wondered if Vitamin D might be useful in preventing Covid infections or treating people in hospital. We hear about some of the flaws in those studies – and the role which genetics plays in how much Vitamin D there is in our bodies.
Nasal sprays have been used for colds and flu to help shorten how long you are ill for and reduce the symptoms – can we achieve the same result for Covid infections by using a spray which contains seaweed?

Vaccination is key to ending the pandemic – but have all of the vaccines bought by countries like the United States been used? And what will happen to any which are left over, can they be given to countries which desperately need them? Once enough people are vaccinated or have immunity from being infected we should reach the magical “herd immunity” level where there aren’t enough people vulnerable to infection for Covid-19 to spread. We hear how new variants of the virus could mean that number will grow – making it more difficult to bring the pandemic to an end.

Claudia Hammond’s panel of experts will guide you through some of the ideas which have been tested like nasal sprays and nicotine patches – to separate the duds from the winners – as well as highlight others which could still prove to be promising. Claudia’s expert panel includes global health epidemiologist from the University of Boston, Professor Matthew Fox; from The Netherlands Professor Marion Koopmans who’s Head of the Erasmus MC Department of Viroscience in Rotterdam, who was a member of the WHO’s mission to Wuhan in China earlier this year to investigate the origins of Covid-19; Vice Dean of the Faculty of Intensive Care Medicine Dr Danny Bryden, who’s a Consultant at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals; medical journalist Clare Wilson from New Scientist Magazine.

Produced by: Paula McGrath, Samara Linton and Maria Simons
Studio Engineers: Jo Longton

Picture: Covid-19 Sniffing Dogs Activity In A School In Bolzano, Credit: Alessio Coser / Getty Images


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnhfvz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt7)
Musician and film-maker Questlove

Nikki Bedi and guests, Egyptian director Ayten Amin and film critic Guy Lodge, discuss the cultural highlights of the week.

Hip-hop star turned documentary film-maker Questlove takes us back to 1960s Harlem for a Summer of Soul and shares a forgotten story of American music history.

The actor Jude Law remembers a classic scene from his movie past.

Gambian musician and queen of the kora Sona Jobarteh reflects on growing up in a Griot family and mastering the traditional form of storytelling.

Director M Night Shyamalan tells us about shooting his latest film Old.

We hear from Ivorian director Philippe Lacôte; He discusses his new prison drama Night of the Kings.

Nikki Bedi talks to Egyptian director Ayten Amin about her critically acclaimed coming-of-age drama Souad.

And Canadian folk star Martha Wainwright shares her musical memories of her family.


(Photo: Questlove. Credit: Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnhkm3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxwzjxq)
US federal eviction moratorium runs out

US charities say millions of Americans are at risk of homelessness as a federal ban on evicting tenants during the pandemic comes to an end today.

Also in the programme: fierce clashes between government troops and Taliban forces in three major cities in Afghanistan; and thousands take to the streets of Paris and other French cities to protest the government's mandatory "health passes".

(Image: people camp out on the steps of the U.S. Capitol to highlight the upcoming expiration of the pandemic-related federal moratorium on residential evictions / Credit: REUTERS/Elizabeth Frantz)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnhpc7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc5)
When fans don't like your best song with Ray BLK, Joeboy, 2baba and Ayra Starr

Joeboy, Ray BLK, 2baba and Ayra Starr discuss their best choruses, the direction Nigerian music is going in, mums crying to their music, and why it’s important to remember: “if I can't remember the lyrics or melody to my own song, how can anybody else?”

Mr Eazi protégé Joeboy blends Afrobeats, R&B and pop and was discovered online covering Ed Sheeran. He’s just released his debut album, Somewhere Between Beauty & Magic.

2Baba is one of Nigeria's biggest pop icons. He's a singer, songwriter, producer and entrepreneur who found fame with his international hit African Queen in 2006, and has worked with everybody from Burna Boy to WizKid and Tiwa Savage. Nigerian-Beninese artist Ayra Starr is tipped to be West Africa’s first female global teen superstar, the voice of a generation on the rise. She’s gained fans all over the world for her blend of trap, Afropop and R&B, and racked up 3 million views for her smash single Away. And finally, Nigerian-born London-based singer Ray BLK is one of the most important voices coming out of the UK right now. She’s been called “the UK’s answer to Lauryn Hill” for her ability to blend different genres and take on subjects ranging from youth violence to female empowerment.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnht3c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrfg5x3nb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjhqn158z)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp7865cr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Documentary (w3ct2gj3)
A tale of two Tokyos

The wait is finally over for the Tokyo Olympics, 2020. Ken Nishikawa and Nick Luscombe take inspiration and hope from the Tokyo Olympics of 1964 which kick-started a new internationalism in Japan as the first Olympic games to be held in Asia. Together they meet the designer of the new grand stadium Kengo Kuma and many more Tokyo residents whose lives were touched by the games in 1964 to contrast the Tokyo of the past with the city and its people today.

(Photo: Chefs at the Tokyo Olympics 1964. Credit: Tadao Watanabe)



SUNDAY 01 AUGUST 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnj1lm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp786dw0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 Trending (w3ct1xzr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnj5br)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp786jm4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g72)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnj92w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2cbd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnjdv0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh1)
Record profits for Silicon Valley giants

This week the major technology companies posted record-breaking quarterly results, as they reaped the benefits of a world in lockdown. However, as politicians seek to curb their power, will they be able to keep making such vast amounts of money forever? Also on Business Weekly, we hear why more of us are quitting our jobs, why the price of coffee is close to a seven-year high and whether rental fashion is really good for the environment. Plus from near bankruptcy to the Bangles via The Police – the legendary music producer Miles Copeland tells us about his long and successful career in the industry. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Logos of the major tech firms displayed on a smartphone, AFP/Getty)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnjjl4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp786wvj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnjnb8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt938cw1lc)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnjs2d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt938cw5bh)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnjwtj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt938cw92m)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp78782x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfy)
Is it time to kill the calorie?

Calories are ubiquitous across most of the world and have been used to help people manage their weight for more than a century. But have we been counting them wrong all along? In this episode, Emily Thomas finds out how the calorie is a lot more complex than many of us realise.

Historian Louise Foxcroft describes how this measure of energy became the darling of scientists and public health experts across the globe, and the unwitting bedfellow of the diet industry. Geneticist Giles Yeo argues that calorie counting can actually be harmful, encouraging us to make unhealthy choices, and Bridget Benelam from the British Nutrition Foundation explains why she thinks that despite all its flaws, the calorie will be with us for a good while yet.


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnk0kn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp787cv1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx6)
What Susan did on Death Row

Ugandan Susan Kigula was a young mother when she was sentenced to hang for murder. She always maintained her innocence and sang songs of sorrow in a choir she formed with her fellow inmates on death row. Behind bars Susan also started a school and completed a law degree, but it's what she did next which would change the lives of more than 400 other inmates, as well as the law of the land. This programme was first broadcast on 2nd June 2018.

Image and credit: Susan Kigula

Presenter: Datshiane Navanayagam

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnk49s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g9b)
Two smiley faces: Episode five

Our journey into the emoji universe takes some surprising directions. We reveal some of the human stories behind those tiny pictures on our screens. From the early days of reggae in Kingston, Jamaica to San Francisco’s Chinatown, we meet some of the people responsible for the emojis we have today.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp787hl5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2hdw)
Hidden children of the Church

For decades, the Catholic Church rarely acknowledged the fact that supposedly ‘celibate’ priests were fathering children. The scale and impact of these secretive births is only now coming to light. The Vatican does not deny that there could be as many as 10,000 children of Catholic priests living around the world. Many who are now adults describe childhoods separated from their fathers, shrouded in secrecy and shame. For this Heart and Soul, three of them – Vincent Doyle, Michael McGuirk and Sarah Thomas – tell their stories.

Produced by Dan Tierney


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnk81x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5smw15)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp787mb9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2g9q)
The Test

Can America change?

International economist Jim O’Neill asks economists and historians if President Biden’s ambitions to ‘build back better’ - with a new focus on investing in human capital and addressing racial and financial inequalities - could result in fundamental changes to the characteristics of America’s economic system. Has the resilience that is critical to the DNA of America's economic system - its capacity to weather recurring financial storms and bounce back - survived Covid?

(Photo: US President Joe Biden speaks as Vice President Kamala Harris (L) looks on at an event marking the day that families will get their first monthly Child Tax Credit relief payments through the American Rescue Plan. Credit: Alex Edelman/ EPA)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnkct1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Evidence (w3ct2hfs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnkhk5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxx1gvs)
Afghanistan: Taliban attack three cities

There are warnings of a humanitarian crisis as Islamist militants look to take their first provincial capital. They have made rapid rural gains since it was announced almost all foreign troops would leave by September.

Also on the programme: we hear from Myanmar where the military ruler has promised to hold elections within two years; and an eye witness tells us about the wildfires raging in Turkey.

(Image: An Afghan security official stands guard outside the UN office in Herat, Afghanistan, on 31 July 2021. Credit: EPA/ Rezayee)


SUN 13:49 Sportsworld (w172y6f3kp4zrlj)
Sportsworld Extra

LIVE commentary on the men’s 100m final from the Olympic Stadium in Tokyo

(Photo by Gary Mitchell/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnkm99)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlg)
The Panama Canal: The real story behind the engineering triumph

Completed in 1914, the Panama Canal has long been regarded as a triumph of American ingenuity, a conquest over nature that helped secure the United States’ position as a world power. Taking ten years to build, it opened up new trading routes between East and West by providing a vital waterway between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. But what was the real story behind this challenging engineering project? How were the Panamanians affected? Who were the tens of thousands of workers who built the canal? And what was the environmental impact of work that literally cut through a mountain and redirected two oceans? And with climate change, will the Panama Canal be such a vital waterway in the future?

Joining Bridget Kendall, is the Panamanian academic Dr Marixa Lasso, author of “Erased: The Untold Story of the Panama Canal”, the first major book on the Canal from the Panamanian point of view; Julie Greene, Professor of History at the University of Maryland, and the author of “The Canal Builders: Making America’s Empire at the Panama Canal”, and Paul Sutter, Professor of Environmental History at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and author of a forthcoming book on the impact of US public health measures during the construction of the Panama Canal.

Producer: Anne Khazam

(Image: A painting depicting the S.S. Ancon, the first ship to pass through the Panama Canal on the opening day on 15 August,1914 in the Canal Zone, Panama. Credit: Illustration by Ed Vebell/Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnkr1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnkvsk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tbyg7shjc)
Sportsworld

Shelly Ann Fraser Pryce (Photo by Ian MacNicol/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnl70y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5snv06)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp788l9b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2hdw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnlbs2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnlgj6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxx2ftt)
Senior TDF commander: "We had no choice"

General Tsadkan Gebretensae, a member of the Tigray Defence Forces' Central Command, tells Newshour they had no choice but to take the battle to the Ethiopian government

Also in the programme: a Belarussian athlete is under police protection in Tokyo after Belarus sports officials tried to put her on a plane home against her will; and we hear from the frontline in the western Afghan city of Herat as Taliban forces continue their offensive.



(Image: abandoned ammunition boxes lie on the ground following a battle between the Ethiopian military and Tigray forces along the road between Sheweate Hugum and Yechila in south-central Tigray, Ethiopia, July 10, 2021 / Credit: REUTERS/Giulia Paravic


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnll8b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp788yjq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g72)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnlq0g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrfg600kf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjhqn4262)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp78928v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 02 AUGUST 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryqsrw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl9h753dy4)
Americans banned from investing in some Chinese companies

From Monday Americans will be banned from investing in 59 Chinese companies, including technology firms like Huawei. The move aims to stop the flow of capital into defence and surveillance technology companies which the White House says will undermine security. We get analysis from Shirley Wu, a research fellow at the University of Harvard, who monitors relations between Beijing and Washington. Wildfires, record high temperatures and strong winds are sweeping parts of Greece, Turkey and Lebanon, forcing the evacuation of thousands of people; we hear from Eleni Myrivili, a former deputy mayor of Athens, who has just been appointed as the City's Chief Heat Officer. On August 12th, Zambians will vote in a national election, which comes as poverty is more widespread, the country's foreign debt has increased, the economy has suffered recession and a third wave of of Covid 19 is keeping children out of school. So what will the implications be for the economy? We speak to Paul Nyambe, founder and chief executive of Zamgoat a company that farms and produces goat meat in Lusaka. Over the last year surfing has seen a boom in popularity, as people who want escape lockdown have taken to the waves. The surge in popularity is a major boost to Europe's biggest online surf equipment retailer, Boardshop in the UK and we hear from co-founder, Roger Moon. (Picture of a trader on the New York stock exchange via Getty Images).


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkf518)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td8)
Aditi Mittal: Creating the laughs

Aditi Mittal came to prominence as one of the first female stand-up comedians in India and has won plaudits for her work, observing what she calls “fempowerment” and her life as an Indian woman. Her shows have toured around the world and been on Netflix. Now she’s writing new work from her home in Mumbai for her first online comedy show, and trialling it out on the internet. But without an audience in the room, and with new technical demands, it’s a challenge.

Yasmeen Khan follows Aditi over a month as she writes, performs, rewrites and hones her material. How will she adapt to the constraints of Zoom? And with India in the grip of Covid-19, how easy is it to find humour during this time?

Reporter: Yasmeen Khan

Produced by Emma Kingsley and Rebecca Armstrong for BBC World Service.


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryqxj0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n61)
Sir Hilary Beckles: Reparations for slavery

Zeinab Badawi speaks to the eminent historian professor Sir Hilary Beckles in Barbados. Over three centuries, Africans were transported to the Caribbean to toil on sugar and cotton plantations - a trade that made Britain rich. For decades there have been calls for compensation to atone for the sins of slavery. Sir Hilary is Chair of the CARICOM Reparations Commission. Can there be justice for the descendants of enslaved Africans?


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkf8sd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqq)
Do I really have to clean my recycling?

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. It’s a well-known phrase that we all try and follow in our day to day lives. But are our current recycling habits the best they can be? It’s a hot topic at Crowdscience - multiple listeners have contacted Crowdscience with questions about the ins and outs of recycling.

We follow one listener’s food waste to a processing plant to investigate whether or not it could be processed in our own homes. But aside from the food waste, what about the containers it comes in? We investigate if food containers really need to be cleaned before we put them in recycling bins, or if that just wastes water.

Recycling processes differ all over the world, so we hear from reporter Chhavi Sachdev in Mumbai, India, who follows her plastic waste to find out how plastic sorting and recycling is a whole economy of its own.

But new technologies have meant that biodegradable and bioderived plastics are starting to appear in our packaging, and one Crowdscience listener wants to know which is better for the environment – traditional plastic that has been recycled, or bioplastic and compostable alternatives? And looking to the future, could we ever recycle our plastic waste at home and use 3D printers to make useful things out of our own waste?

Marnie Chesterton delves into these questions with Circular Economy Project Manager Dr Rhiannon Hunt of Manchester Metropolitan University, to discover the details of recycling and unearth how we can make our own recycling as efficient as possible.

With Dave Atkins, reporter Chhavi Sachdev and Dr Rhiannon Hunt.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Produced by Hannah Fisher for the BBC World Service.



[Image credit; Getty Images]


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryr184)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g9b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkfdjj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2hdw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryr508)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqt)
What do we tell the kids?

Climate change is going to shape young people’s lives, and yet many students feel their schools are not equipping them with the knowledge and skills to face this future. Teachers aren’t always confident broaching climate change in the classroom. And governments have been slow to get comprehensive and compulsory climate change education onto national curriculums.

But how do you teach young children about something so big and scary? And how should adults deal with the hopelessness that some young people feel when faced with a crisis they feel powerless to change? This week, we’re going to Ghana, the US, China, the UK and Europe to find answers.

Contributors:
Christina Kwauk, Kwauk & Associates, Brookings Institution
Lily Henderson, Teach the Future
Koen Timmers, Climate Action Project
Dr Emmanuel Tachie-Obeng, Ghana Environmental Protection Agency

Presenters: Neal Razzell and Katie Prescott
Reporter: Thomas Naadi
Producer: Josephine Casserly
Series producer: Rosamund Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound engineer: Tom Brignell


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkfj8n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8t)
Travels with my ukulele

Despite its long and rich history, the ukulele has often been snubbed or dismissed as a novelty instrument by the music world. But over the years, rock stars have embraced the guitar’s smaller cousin, from Elvis Presley to the Beatles to Taylor Swift. Kim Chakanetsa meets two women who turned their love for the ukulele into a successful musical career.

When Taimane was gifted a ukulele at 5 years old, it was the start of a musical journey that would take her from busking on the streets to appearing on the world’s biggest stages. She is now considered one of the world’s leading ukulele players and is based in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Zee Avi is a singer-songwriter, ukulele player and guitarist from Malaysia. Zee taught herself to play music when she was a teenager and she got her first record deal at 22, thanks to a video that she posted on the internet back in 2007. Her songs have appeared in numerous TV shows and films.

Produced by Alice Gioia and mixed by Donald MacDonald.

IMAGE DETAILS:

(L) Taimane, credit NPR/Laura Beltrán Villamizar
(R) Zee Avi, credit XENO Entertainment

MUSIC DETAILS:

Taimane: AIR; Water; Beethoven, System of a Down, Led & ACDC Medley, Deh vieni alla finestra (Don Giovanni, Mozart) performed by Taimane and Quinn Kelsey at the Hawaii Opera Theatre.
Zee Avi: Bitter Heart; I am me once more.


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryr8rd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0d5bs4)
East Jerusalem evictions

The high court in Israel is expected to rule on a controversial plan to evict some Palestinian families from a neighbourhood in East Jerusalem.

We'll have more on the Taliban advances in Afghanistan as major cities in the south come under attack.

And we'll hear how Russians view the Olympic Games when the country is banned from taking part following the doping scandal.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryrdhj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0d5gj8)
Israeli Supreme Court decision expected on evictions

Israel's Supreme court is expected to rule on the controversial eviction of Palestinian families from a neighbourhood in East Jerusalem.

Australian soldiers are out on the streets of Sydney today helping to enforce one of the country's strictest Covid-19 lockdowns. They will be unarmed, but are they necessary ?

And we'll hear how scientists in Europe are looking at ways to limit the damage caused by future disasters following last month's catastrophic flooding in various countries.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryrj7n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0d5l8d)
East Jerusalem residents await court decision

In the next few hours the Supreme Court in Israel is expected to rule on a controversial plan to evict Palestinian families from a neighbourhood in East Jerusalem.

The UK eases coronavirus travel restrictions for some American and European travellers.

And we hear more about the Belarusian sprinter who has refused to fly home early from the Olympics after she expressed fears for her safety.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryrmzs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkg085)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j51)
GMOs - from 'Frankenfoods' to Superfoods?

Since they first appeared in the nineties, GMOs have remained wildly unpopular with consumers, who see them as potentially sinister tools of big agricultural companies. Ivana Davidovic explores if the new scientific developments might make them shed their bad image.

She visits Norwich in the east of England where professor Cathie Martin has been developing genetically modified tomatoes for decades. One purple variety - unusually high in antioxidants - has shown high cancer-fighting properties in mice and is expected to be approved for sale directly to consumers in the US later this year.

Alex Smith's Alara Wholefoods based in London was licensed by the Soil Association back in 1988 to produce the first Organic certified cereal in the world. He explains why he changed from anti-GMO campaigner to someone who believes this technology could help with the worst effects of climate change.

Rose Gidado, the Assistant Director at the National Biotechnology Development Agency in Nigeria, explains why the country approved the world's first GM cowpea - also known as black-eyed pea - and why gene editing and genetically modifying staple crops could help combat malnutrition.

Marta Messa from the Slow Food movement is particularly concerned about the implications of intellectual property rights behind some of the genetically engineered produce.

And professor Fred Gould, who chaired a large study into safety of GMOs for the National Academy of Sciences in the US, warns that this technology is not a silver bullet for solving all of our environmental and health problems.

PHOTO: Genetically modified tomato created by professor Cathie Martin at the John Innes Centre/Ivana Davidovic/BBC


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x14)
Dorothy Butler Gilliam: American news pioneer

In 1961, the Washington Post newspaper hired an African American woman as a reporter for the first time. Dorothy Butler Gilliam was only 24 when she got the job. At the time there were hardly any women or minorities working in newsrooms. Most of her white colleagues wouldn’t speak to her, taxis wouldn’t stop for her. Dorothy has been speaking to Farhana Haider about the difficulties she faced as a black woman journalist in 1960s America and her fight to diversify the media in the US.

(Photo Dorothy Butler Gilliam Washington Post newsroom 1962. Copyright Harry Naltchayan, The Washington Post.)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryrrqx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkg409)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryrwh1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkg7rf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct1xzr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrys075)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g2vm6f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkgchk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrys3z9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y6dlkx6m5h5)
Sportsworld

(Photo by Serhat Cagdas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrys7qf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g2vvpp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkglzt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryscgk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv575668bs5)
Sheikh Jarrah: Israeli court decides on eviction ruling

An Israeli court decides the fate of Palestinians facing eviction in East Jerusalem in a case which has become the focus of international attention. The long-awaited hearing concerns four of more than 70 families appealing against an order to leave their homes in Sheikh Jarrah neighbourhood.

Also in the programme: Belarusian Olympic athlete, Kryscina Tsimanouskaya, receives a humanitarian visa at Poland’s embassy in Tokyo as confirmed by Poland's deputy foreign minister Marcin Przydacz ; and we have a response from the Ethiopian minister of democratization, Zadig Abraha, to the claim the federal government is blockading the region and preventing humanitarian assistance from getting through.

(Photo: Palestinian residents of the East Jerusalem neighbourhood of Sheikh Jarrah attend a discussion at the Israeli Supreme Court in East in Jerusalem, Israel, 02 August 2021. Credit: EPA).


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrysh6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkgvh2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y481whxbqbj)
Square to buy Australia's Afterpay

In Australia's biggest ever buyout, Jack Dorsey's Square has offered to buy Afterpay. Jonathan Shapiro writes about banking and finance at The Australian Financial Review, and tells us what is so attractive about the $29bn 'buy now, pay later' giant. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ivana Davidovic reports on whether new scientific developments might help genetically modified foods to shed the suspicion with which they've been viewed by many consumers and health authorities around the world. Plus, America's Sunset Studios, behind hits such as La La Land, plans to invest almost a billion dollars creating a major new film, television and digital production complex in Hertfordshire, England. We find out more about the project from Georg Szalai, international business editor of The Hollywood Reporter.

(Picture: An Afterpay logo in a shop window. Picture credit: Reuters.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryslyt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxmp327lx8)
Belarus Olympian given Polish visa after refusing 'forced' flight home

We get the latest on the case of Krystina Timanovskaya, the Belarusian sprinter who refused to fly home early from the Olympics. The 24-year-old said she was forcibly taken to the airport for criticising coaches, and that she feared for her safety. She is now at the Polish embassy in Tokyo after being granted a humanitarian visa by Poland.

Also, we hear from people living in Sydney where hundreds of soldiers have been deployed to enforce a Covid lockdown. New South Wales has recorded more than 3,400 locally-transmitted Covid cases since mid-June, with the Delta variant thought to be behind the surge.

And after Italy's two shock gold medals at the Olympics, as well as July's UEFA European Football Championship win, we get reaction from Italians to their country's sporting success.

(Photo: Belarusian sprinter Krystina Timanovskaya arrives at the Polish embassy in Tokyo, Japan. Credit: Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrysqpy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxmp327qnd)
Italy at the Olympics

As the Tokyo Olympics enter their final week, we speak to Italian sports fans about the success the country has achieved recently. Lamont Marcell Jacobs became the first Italian to win the Olympics 100m final on Sunday. It comes weeks after the Italian football team won the Euros. What does this success mean for a country that was so badly hit at the start of the coronavirus pandemic?

Also, we get the latest on the case of Krystina Timanovskaya, the Belarusian sprinter who refused to fly home early from the Olympics. The 24-year-old said she was forcibly taken to the airport for criticising coaches, and that she feared for her safety. She is now at the Polish embassy in Tokyo after being granted a humanitarian visa by Poland.

And our our health expert of the day, Professor Manfred Green, helps answer some of the questions emerging from the latest headlines. If you have a question you would like to ask, send us a message on WhatsApp on +447730 751925.

(Photo: Gold medallist Lamont Marcell Jacobs of Italy celebrates with his medal at the Olympic Games in Tokyo. Credit: Reuters/Phil Noble)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrysvg2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtc)
Helping the drug addict who stole my dog to get into rehab

Canadian Brayden Morton was devastated when his beloved dog Darla was stolen from him. He ended up tracking her down but when he encountered the thief, he saw a distressed young homeless woman with a serious drug addiction and his own past was brought back to him in an unexpected and painful way. Brayden is himself a recovering addict with a troubled history including serving time in prison. He’s now a drugs interventionist and decided not to press charges against the young woman and instead help her through rehab.

Growing up in Singapore, May Ooi wanted to practise martial arts but was told by her parents that ‘girls don’t fight’ and she wasn't allowed. So, instead, May went on to excel at swimming, even competing at the Barcelona Olympics. But her yearning for combat sports never died and after she fell in love with a martial arts teacher, she would become one of the country’s top fighters. This interview was first broadcast in 2019.

Picture: Brayden Morton with Darla
Credit: Courtesy Brayden Morton

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x14)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrysz66)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g2wl5g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkhbgl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nfnbxwv0k)
2021/08/02 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryt2yb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkhg6q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1m82)
A sense of music

Music can make us feel happy and sad. It can compel us to move in time with it, or sing along to a melody. It taps into some integral sense of musicality that binds us together. But music is regimented, organised. That same 'sense' that lets us lean into Beethoven makes a bad note or a missed beat instantly recognisable. But does that same thing happen in the minds of animals? Can a monkey feel moved by Mozart? Will a bird bop to a beat?

Do animals share our 'Sense of Music'?

Charles Darwin himself thought that the basic building blocks of an appreciation for music were shared across the animal kingdom. But over decades of scientific investigation, evidence for this has been vanishingly rare.

Fresh from his revelation that animals' experience of time can be vastly different to our own, in the award-winning programme 'A Sense of Time', presenter Geoff Marsh delves once more into the minds of different species. This time he explores three key aspects of musicality: rhythm, melody and emotional sensitivity.

Geoff finds rhythm is lacking in our closest relatives, the chimpanzees. But it's abundantly clear in a dancing Cockatoo, and internet sensation, named Snowball. He speaks with scientists who have revealed that birds enjoy their own music, but may be listening for something completely different to melody. And Geoff listens to music composed for tamarin monkeys, that apparently they find remarkably relaxing, but which sets us on edge.

In 'A Sense of Music', discover what happens when music meets the animal mind.

Produced by Rory Galloway
Presented by Geoff Marsh


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryt6pg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv575669602)
Afghanistan: US carries out air strikes as ferocious fighting continues

US jets are reported to have conducted more air strikes on suspected Taliban positions in the southern Afghan city of Lashkar Gah, where security forces and the Taliban are involved in heavy battles. We hear from a doctor working in the city.

Also in the programme: The Ethiopian government rejects the latest demands of advancing Tigrayan rebels; and what do Russian athletes think about competing under a neutral flag at the Tokyo Olympics?

(Image: An Afghan security official stands guard at a check point in Lashkar Gah, the provincial capital of Helmand province. Credit: Epa/Watan Yar)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrytbfl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkhppz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p8t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrytg5q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrsqh6rqp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjvzybtcb)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkhtg3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48wb7j1zqv)
Square to buy Australia's Afterpay

In Australia's biggest ever buyout, Jack Dorsey's Square has offered to buy Afterpay. Jonathan Shapiro writes about banking and finance at The Australian Financial Review, and tells us what is so attractive about the $29bn 'buy now, pay later' giant. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ivana Davidovic reports on whether new scientific developments might help genetically modified foods to shed the suspicion with which they've been viewed by many consumers and health authorities around the world. Plus, America's Sunset Studios, behind hits such as La La Land, plans to invest almost a billion dollars creating a major new film, television and digital production complex in Hertfordshire, England. We find out more about the project from Georg Szalai, international business editor of The Hollywood Reporter.

(Picture: An Afterpay logo in a shop window. Picture credit: Reuters.)



TUESDAY 03 AUGUST 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrytpnz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqgghvr1zp)
Square to buy Australia's Afterpay

In Australia's biggest ever buyout, Jack Dorsey's Square has offered to buy Afterpay. Jonathan Shapiro writes about banking and finance at The Australian Financial Review, and tells us what is so attractive about the $29bn 'buy now, pay later' giant. As day 12 of the Olympics begins in Tokyo, we hear whether Japan's hosting of the games is still unpopular given the mounting costs and increasing covid-19 cases in the country. America's Sunset Studios, behind hits such as La La Land, plans to invest almost a billion dollars creating a major new film, television and digital production complex in Hertfordshire, England. We find out more about the project from Georg Szalai, international business editor of The Hollywood Reporter. And the BBC's Ivana Davidovic reports on whether new scientific developments might help genetically modified foods to shed the suspicion with which they've been viewed by many consumers and health authorities around the world.

All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the world: Alison Van Diggelen, host of the Fresh Dialogues interview series, in California and Peter Landers, from the Wall St Journal, in Tokyo.

(Picture: An Afterpay logo in a shop window. Picture credit: Reuters.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryttf3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl5)
Turning preachers into LGBT allies

The LGBT community in Mombasa, Kenya has suffered from violent mob attacks in recent years - often fuelled by influential preachers spreading messages of hate. But one group decided to tackle this in a remarkable way: they have directly engaged with faith leaders. In carefully controlled meetings the pastors and imams get to know LGBT people and have their misconceptions challenged. This has led to a big reduction in violence. Now many of those religious leaders use their influence to help the LGBT community fight discrimination wherever they find it.

Produced and presented by Richard Kenny

Picture: Getty Images


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkj5ph)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 Discovery (w3ct1m82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryty57)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x14)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryv1xc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gws)
Africa’s vaccine ambitions

Africa is a continent of 1.3 billion people, but only makes 1% of the lifesaving vaccines it needs. The continent’s 54 nations are almost entirely dependent on agencies like Unicef and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, for these essential pharmaceuticals. But the pandemic of 2020 has been a harsh lesson in the dangers of relying on other countries and agencies for such crucial provisions.

Numerous vaccine clinical trials have been conducted in Africa, yet these nations still find themselves at back of the queue for Covid 19 jabs. However, efforts are now underway to change this. At a conference in early April, African leaders pledged to manufacture 60% of the vaccines they need by 2040. But is this an achievable goal? Building a successful vaccine manufacturing sector will need several things to come together at the same time: financial investments amounting to hundreds of millions of dollars; expanding expertise in scientific research and development; long term commitments from governments to purchase a range of vaccines; and globally recognised regulatory bodies. At the moment, Africa is lacking many of these elements. This is a situation which is clearly neither acceptable nor sustainable.

In this documentary Rhoda Odhiambo speaks with the key figures working to harness the intellectual and financial capital of the world’s fastest growing populations to make vaccine manufacturing in Africa a home grown industry, rather than a global charity case.

Guests:
Dr Ama Pokuaa Fenny, Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Statistical, Social and Economics Research, University of Ghana.
Professor Christian Happi, Director -African Centre of Excellence for Genomics of Infectious Diseases at Redeemer’s University
Dr Nicaise Ndembi, Senior Science Advisor, Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention
Patrick Tippo, Executive Director, African Vaccine Manufacturing Initiative

Presenter Rhoda Odhiambo

Producer: Sandra Kanthal

Editor: Richard Vadon


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkjf5r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td9)
Composer and Pianist Nils Frahm

Packed with warmth, humour and genuine insight, this unmissable edition of In The Studio focusses on All Melody, the 2018 work and tour by contemporary composer and pianist, Nils Frahm. The programme reveals the creative, emotional and physical processes involved when new material is combined with vast stage shows for an international schedule of truly daunting proportions.

Captured during a number of visits to his studio, Nils opens up to his good friend, Sebastian Schipper, director of single-take Berlin heist, Victoria, for which Nils composed the award-winning original score. He also chats to his biggest fan, British TV, film and stage writer, Sam Bain. Not only does the show combine three incredible minds of music, film and TV, the audience is also treated to an immersive binaural experience, recorded at London’s Barbican Centre during a run of sold-out concerts.

Dropping to a thunder of approval from tastemakers and reviewers the world over, All Melody represented thousands of hours of intense work at Nils’ studio, the refurbished East German palace of mid-20th century tech, Funkhaus Berlin. It is here that he spent nearly 2 years deconstructing and reconstructing his studio, Saal 3. From the cabling and electricity to the woodwork, before moving on to other more demanding elements; building a pipe organ and creating a mixing desk from parts sourced from all over the world.

The pianist is renowned for his unconventional approach to scoring and mixing analogue sounds and so it is in true Frahm style that a wholly unique space would be required to realise his ambitions. This work was born out of the freedom this new environment provided. Nils had to relearn it, adapt it and perform it for eager crowds from Manchester to Montreal, Singapore to San Fransisco…Keeping it All about the Melody.


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryv5nh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0d87p7)
Afghanistan: Taliban attack key city

We'll have the latest on the humanitarian situation in Afghanistan as the Taliban continue their advance.

Iran's new president will be formally endorsed later today but he faces massive challenges at home.

And we'll hear about the many different reasons why some Americans are saying no to the coronavirus vaccine.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryv9dm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0d8cfc)
Afghanistan: fierce fighting in three cities

We're live in Kabul where heavy fighting continues between government forces and the Taliban. There are fears that Lashkar Gah could be the first city to fall.

We'll go to China where the entire population of Wuhan is to be tested for coronavirus, after the city where the disease first emerged recorded its first cases in more than a year.

And how do you handle having a parent who is spreading false information about the pandemic?


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryvf4r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0d8h5h)
Street fighting in Afghan three cities

We're live in Afghanistan where heavy fighting continues between government forces and the Taliban. There are fears that Lashkar Gah could be the first city to fall.

A 'killer robot treaty' may sound like something out of a film plot, but it's real, and it's serious. Diplomats from 50 countries are meeting to discuss limiting or even banning lethal autonomous weapons.

And we go to Tunisia to get a sense of the political situation, a week after the decision by the president to fire his prime minister and take on executive powers.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryvjww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkjx58)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jg2)
Why isn't Africa producing vaccines?

Less than two percent of Africa’s population has been vaccinated against Covid-19. Could homegrown vaccines be the solution? If so, why isn’t it happening? Is it an issue with patents and intellectual property rights? Is big pharma standing in the way? Or is it simply about money and profits?

Things are beginning to happen. Last month a consortium was set up with the aim of opening an mRNA technology transfer hub in South Africa. If they succeed it will be the first regional mRNA vaccine manufacturing production facility in Africa.

In this edition of Business Daily, Tamasin Ford hears from Marie-Paule Kieny, the chair of the Governance Board of the Medicines Patent Pool, Toyin Abiodun from the Tony Blair Global Institute for Change, based in Rwanda, and from Petro Terblanche, the Managing Director of Afrigen, the South African biotech company where the first African vaccines will hopefully be produced.

(Image: Health workers prepare a dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine during a mass vaccination campaign against the Covid-19, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5n)
Chipko: India’s tree-hugging women

The 1970s were a time of rapid development in the Indian Himalayas. New roads had recently been built, allowing logging companies greater access to the region’s vast, remote forests. Local people made a subsistence livelihood from these woods, and when the trees were cut down they endured erosion, poor farming conditions and catastrophic floods. A resistance movement was formed, named Chipko – Hindi for ‘hugging’ – after its trademark protest tactic of embracing the trees. Many of its first organisers were women. Environmentalist and ecological activist, Dr Vandana Shiva was a young student when she first learnt about Chipko. She tells Viv Jones how she was inspired to volunteer for the movement. (Photo by Bhawan Singh/ The India Today Group via Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryvnn0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkk0xd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct1m82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryvsd4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryvx48)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g2yj3j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkk8dn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryw0wd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y6dlkx6q2d8)
Sportsworld

Image: Armand Duplantis (Photo by Andre Weening/BSR Agency/Getty Images)


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryw4mj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g2yrls)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkkhwx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct1m82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryw8cn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57566c7p8)
Belarus Tokyo Olympics athlete speaks of ordeal

In an exclusive interview, the Belarusian sprinter Krystina Timanovskaya tells Newshour that Belarus is not safe and she may not be able to go home for five to ten years.

We also hear the story of the Belarusian activist found dead, hanged in a park in the capital, Kiev; the Ukrainian authorities suspect it is murder disguised as a suicide.

Also in the programme, the Taliban and Afghan forces continue to battle for strategic cities. Afghan civilians are fearing for their lives, there are concerns that carbon offset schemes are not fit for purpose, and there's an interview with the eccentric rock group Sparks about their enduring appeal.


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrywd3s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkkrd5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bj6pqhjjh)
Chinese gaming shares slide

After Chinese state media likened gaming to drugs, shares in two tech giants fell. Tencent and NetEase shares recovered some ground after slipping 10% in early trade, and Josh Ye, technology and media journalist at the South China Morning Post explains the background. Also in the programme, to cushion the blow of the pandemic, the board of governors at the world's lender of last resort, the International Monetary Fund, has approved the largest injection of resources in its history. Tara Sinclair is associate professor of economics and international affairs at George Washington University, and tells us how the additional $650bn might be used. Plus, as voters in Zambia prepare to head to the polls next week, we take stock of the country's economy. Musician Fumba Chamo discusses the challenges ordinary Zambians are facing as a consequence of high inflation. Zambian economist Twivwe Siwale explores the root causes of that inflation, following depreciation in the value of Zambia's currency, the kwacha. And we hear from Bupe Mulapesi, who runs a strawberry farm near Lusaka, how the pandemic has impacted business.

Picture: gamers in China. Credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrywhvx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxmp32bhtc)
Belarus activist found dead

We get the latest from Ukraine, where the head of a group helping people who have fled Belarus has been found dead. Vitaly Shishov’s body was found hanged in a park in Kyiv. We hear what the response has been to the story both in Ukraine and internationally. We hear from someone who knew Mr Shishov well and we take time to remind ourselves of the political situation in Belarus.

Dr. Isaac Bogoch is an infectious diseases physician and scientist at the University of Toronto, he answers audience questions about the coronavirus pandemic.

And following Simone Biles’ emotional return to the Olympics gymnastics competition, and her bronze medal win in the beam final, we hear a conversation with other gymnasts around the world.

Picture: Vitaly Shishov, head of a Kyiv-based organisation that helps Belarusians fleeing persecution, Picture taken July 18, 2021. Credit Reuters via RBC-Ukraine/Handout


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrywmm1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxmp32bmkh)
Simone Biles returns to Olympics

After Simone Biles’ emotional return to the Olympics gymnastics competition, and her bronze medal in the beam final, we hear a conversation with other gymnasts around the world. We'll discuss mental health in the sport as well as the performances in the competition today.

We'll hear from our reporter in Kabul as fighting continues in Afghanistan's southern province of Helmand, between Taliban militants and Afghan forces.

And, Dr Swapneil Parikh is an infectious disease researcher at the Kasturba Hospital of infectious diseases in Mumbai and author of The Coronavirus: What you Need to Know about the Global Pandemic. He will answer listeners' questions about the global coronavirus pandemic.

Picture: Simone Biles at Tokyo 2020 Olympics before the Gymnastics Beam Final Credit: REUTERS/Mike Blake


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrywrc5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwm)
The Omani football nerd who went from player to pundit

Rumaitha Al Busaidi is credited with being the first female football analyst in the Arab world, but she started as a footballer in the first national women's team of Oman. When their funding was cut, the team refused to give up and took to the radio where Rumaitha confronted callers who told her women didn't have a place in football. Determined to prove them wrong, she turned that experience into a career as a commentator and after a bet with her grandfather Rumaitha's persistence even led her to trek across the South Pole.

Award-winning British actor Timothy Spall is well-known for his roles as Wormtail in the Harry Potter films and as Winston Churchill in The King's Speech but he's recently turned his hand to painting. It was only after playing two famous artists on the big screen - William Turner and LS Lowry - that Timothy realised his childhood dream of becoming a painter. He spoke to Outlook's Anna Bailey at his solo exhibition at the Pontone Gallery in London.

Picture: Rumaitha Al Busaidi
Credit: Courtesy of Rumaitha Al Busaidi

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryww39)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g2zh2k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkl7cp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nfnbxzqxn)
2021/08/03 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrywzvf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hklc3t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsc)
How Jersey is leading tech development

This week we’re reporting from Jersey, somewhere that’s at the forefront of development for digital technology. Known for its financial tech it’s also leading the way in ecological and medical technology too. This digital innovation is supported by a commitment to connectivity on the Island. Every home and almost every commercial property in Jersey has had fibre broadband installed, and its internet speeds are some of the highest in the world. On top of this it has total 4G LTE coverage, and it was the first nation globally to achieve this
.
We’re joined by Tony Moretta, CEO of Digital Jersey, which is dedicated to growing the digital sector in Jersey. Nick Ogden, founder of Worldpay, who is currently developing frictionless atomic settlements which can move trillions of dollars around the world in milliseconds and Rebecca Curtis, Monitoring and Impact Officer for Jersey Overseas Aid, who are using technology to enable effective aid projects including major conservation work in southern Rwanda.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Digital Planet/BBC)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryx3lk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57566d2x5)
Belarusian activist found dead in Ukraine

Police in Ukraine have opened a murder inquiry into the death of Belarusian opposition activist Vitaly Shishov, after he was found hanged in a park in Kyiv. Bruises and scratches on his face may indicate that he was forced into a noose.

Also in the programme: the situation in southern Afghanistan is going from bad to worse for Afghan residents. We hear from one in the besieged city of Lashkar Gah who says the Afghan army's evacuation order to residents is 'not logical'.

And ahead of the one-year anniversary of the deadly blast in Beirut, Human Rights Watch has slammed the Lebanese authorities for 'criminal negligence'. We speak to the Lebanese ambassador to the UK.

(Image: Vitaly Shishov, head of a Kyiv-based organisation that helps Belarusians fleeing persecution, is seen in Kyiv, Ukraine July 18, 2021. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryx7bp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkllm2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryxc2t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrsqh9nms)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjvzyfq8f)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hklqc6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48wb7j4wmy)
Oil tanker hijacked off UAE ordered to sail to Iran

A Panama-flagged ship has been hijacked by armed men in the Gulf of Oman and ordered to sail to Iran. We get the latest from Richard Meade is the editor of of Lloyd's List, the shipping intelligence service, who confirmed the incident. New York is to become the first city in the US to mandate proof of vaccination to allow people to enter indoor venues such as theatres, restaurants and gyms. We hear from Andrew Rigie, executive director of the New York City Hospitality Alliance. Plus, as voters in Zambia prepare to head to the polls next week, we take stock of the country's economy. Musician Fumba Chamo discusses the challenges ordinary Zambians are facing as a consequence of high inflation. Zambian economist Twivwe Siwale explores the root causes of that inflation, following depreciation in the value of Zambia's currency, the kwacha. And we hear from Bupe Mulapesi, who runs a strawberry farm near Lusaka, how the pandemic has impacted business.

(Picture: the oil tanker MV Asphalt Princess. Credit: Steve Geronazzo.)



WEDNESDAY 04 AUGUST 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryxll2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqgghvtyws)
New York indoor businesses to require vaccination

New York is to become the first city in the US to mandate proof of vaccination to allow people to enter indoor venues such as theatres, restaurants and gyms. We hear from Andrew Rigie, executive director of the New York City Hospitality Alliance. A Panama-flagged ship has been hijacked by armed men in the Gulf of Oman and ordered to sail to Iran. We get the latest from Richard Meade is the editor of of Lloyd's List, the shipping intelligence service, who confirmed the incident. Also in the programme, as voters in Zambia prepare to head to the polls next week, we take stock of the country's economy. Musician Fumba Chamo discusses the challenges ordinary Zambians are facing as a consequence of high inflation. Zambian economist Twivwe Siwale explores the root causes of that inflation, following depreciation in the value of Zambia's currency, the kwacha. And we hear from Bupe Mulapesi, who runs a strawberry farm near Lusaka, how the pandemic has impacted business. Plus,after Chinese state media likened gaming to drugs, shares in the tech giants Tencent and NetEase fell. Josh Ye, technology and media journalist at the South China Morning Post explains the background.

All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the world: Dante Disparte chief strategy officer at Circle, a leading digital financial services firm and Racheal Cartland from Cartland Consulting, in Hong Kong.

(Picture: a mobile pharmacy advertises the COVID-19 vaccine in New York City. Credit: Getty Images.)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryxqb6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbk)
RoseAnne Archibald: Uncovering Canada's dark past

Stephen Sackur speaks to RoseAnne Archibald, newly elected National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations, Canada. The truth about the deaths of thousands of indigenous children in schools infamous for abuse and neglect has shocked the world. Why has Canada failed to heal the wounds of a dark past?


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkm2ll)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryxv2b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryxytg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3csz4bd)
Changing World, Changing Bodies

How modern life is changing our feet

For nearly two million years we evolved in close sync with our environment but 250 years ago the industrial revolution happened and changed everything. The innovation and technology it brought had many benefits but there was a physical cost as progress also designed out movement from our lives.

From spending hours on our feet outdoors, our jobs have moved indoors and largely involve sitting down for most of the day in offices, factories or driver cabs. It has resulted in feet that are getting flatter, backs that are weaker and eyes that cannot see very much without help.

Dr Vybarr Cregan-Reid hears from evolutionary biologists, academics, anatomists and public health professionals in Singapore, Kenya, Australia, the UK and the United States; about the impact of modern life on our physical self and what we can do to return our bodies to the state that nature intended.

The good news is there is no need to spend hours on treadmills or pumping iron, in fact we would injure ourselves a lot less if we were a bit more cautious when exercising. Our bodies are marvellously adaptable and reintroducing small movements into our daily lives in most cases will do the trick!

(Photo: Womens' feets splashing in a pool. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkmb2v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 The Documentary (w3ct2hgh)
Three Pounds In My Pocket

Three pounds in my pocket

Since 2014 Kavita Puri has been charting the social history of British South Asians in post-war Britain. Many came with as little as three pounds due to strict currency controls.

This series looks at critical decade for British South Asians: the 1990s. We begin with Norman Tebbit and his so-called 'cricket test', which questioned the loyalty of those who supported India over England in international cricket. It was a far cry from the multicultural Britain that would be ushered in by Tony Blair's New Labour in 1997.

Amidst this changing political landscape, the children of the three pound generation were finding mainstream cultural success. Goodness Gracious Me was a hit on national television, films like East is East found success, and there were hit records from acts like Apache Indian, Bally Sagoo and Panjabi MC. Regular British Asian music nights at commercial venues began, such as Bombay Jungle at Soho's Wag Club, and soon hundreds were queuing up in central London to get in.

(Image: British South Asians remember the 1990s. Credit: DJ Ritu)


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryy2kl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0dc4lb)
Afghanistan fighting

We have the latest on Afghanistan as Taliban fighters continue their advance and now appear to be in almost complete control of a key provincial capital.

President Biden leads calls for one of the country's most prominent politicians to resign over a damning sexual harrassment report.

And who might be behind the hijacking of an oil tanker off the coast of the United Arab Emirates ? Iranian-backed forces are suspected...but Tehran denies any involvement.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryy69q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0dc8bg)
Gunmen attack minister's home in Kabul

Taliban fighters continue their advance and they now appear to be in almost complete control of a key provincial capital.

We'll have more on the death of a Belarussian opposition activist in the Ukraine.

And President Biden leads calls for one of the country's most prominent politicians to resign over a damning sexual harassment report.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryyb1v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0dcd2l)
Fighting between Afghan forces and Taliban

As the Taliban continue their advance we'll hear from the former United Nations envoy to the country.

We will be live in Lebanon, one year after the massive Beirut explosion. Families of the victims are still fighting for those responsible to be held to account.

And we’ll go to Belarus where two prominent opposition activists are going on trial.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryyfsz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkmt2c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnv)
China's Tech Crackdown

Is China's behavior towards its innovators separating the country further from the world? That's the question on everybody's mind, as the Chinese authorities continue to exert their political power over the country's rising tech companies. George Magnus, associate at the China Centre at Oxford University warns that despite increasing western interest in the Chinese market, foreign investors should be wary about political clampdowns on companies. But Angela Zhang at the University of Hong Kong, argues some of the government's actions could be seen simply as prudent regulatory moves against the power of Big Tech. And Ker Gibbs, Chairman of the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai, explains how businesses are navigating this intersection between politics and commerce.

Producer: Frey Lindsay.

(Picture: Logo of Didi Chuxing, China's largest ride-hailing company. Picture credit: Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7x)
Escaping Nigeria’s Civil War

When the south-east region of Nigeria declared itself to be the independent state of Biafra, civil war broke out. More than a million people died before the fighting stopped. We bring you one child’s story of getting caught up in the frontline. Paul Waters hears from Patricia Ngozi Ebigwe, now better known as TV and music star Patti Boulaye, who was 13 years old when she had to try to escape the conflict. ‘We were told: Careless talk kills‘ Patricia remembers. ‘When you walked past dead bodies in the street, I didn’t want to look at their faces, because maybe it was someone I knew.’ Photo: 13-year-old Patricia Ngozi Ebigwe (Courtesy of Patti Boulaye)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryykk3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3csz4bd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkmxth)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryyp97)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2cbd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryyt1c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g31f0m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkn59r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct2hgh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryyxsh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y6dlkx6sz9c)
Sportsworld

Image: Wojciech Nowicki (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images)


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryz1jm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g31nhw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkndt0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryz58r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57566g4lc)
Afghanistan fighting on multiple fronts

Fighting in Afghanistan continues on multiple fronts. After the Taliban attacked the Afghan defence minister's house in Kabul last night, an Afghan official blames Pakistan for helping the Taliban. But the Pakistani government says Kabul is just making his country a scapegoat.

General Petraeus, the former head of US forces in Afghanistan highlights the dire situation and a female MP talks about why people across Afghanistan have been coming out on the streets and on rooftops at night to chant "God is Great" in support of Afghan security forces fighting an increasingly desperate battle against the Taliban.

Also in the programme, a year after the huge port explosion that rocked Beirut, a witness laments no one having been brought to justice and we hear from a pro-government voice that Tehran might not be behind a hijacking they have been accused of by the West.

(Picture shows Afghan people shouting slogans against the bomb attack as they gather on the streets of Kabul, Afghanistan on 3 August 2021. Credit: Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryz90w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hknn98)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4crcsmmd2j)
Beirut blast: one year on

A year on from a deadly explosion that rocked Beirut, we examine the city's economy. Dr Nasser Saidi is a former minister of economy and industry in Lebanon, and offers us his assessment. And James Swanston of Capital Economics tells us what the international community could do to help Lebanon more generally. Also in the programme, the BBC's Sameer Hashmi reports on how the United Arab Emirates is offering remote work visas, in an attempt to attract nomad workers. Plus, toymaker Mattel has brought out a new Barbie doll, in the image of AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine pioneer Dame Sarah Gilbert. Kay Hussein is chief executive of Wise, whose goal is to boost the participation and success of women in science, technology, engineering and maths, and responds to the news.

(Picture: The Beirut grain silo that exploded. Picture credit: EPA.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryzds0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxmp32fdqg)
Lebanon: A year from Beirut explosion

We'll be live in Beirut where a remembrance service is taking place to mark the moment of the blast that killed over 200 people a year ago. We have also reconnected with a woman who lost her home in the blast.

In the final week of the Tokyo Olympics, we'll hear the experiences of two people who decided to join the Games as volunteers. We'll also speak to two people who opposed hosting the Games but have since had a change of heart.

We'll also talk about the success of young skateboarders in Tokyo.

And we get the latest on the fighting in Afghanistan between the government forces and the Taliban.

(Photo: People carry flags and banners as they march to mark the one-year anniversary of Beirut"s port blast, in Beirut Lebanon August 4, 2021. Credit: Mohamed Azakir/Reuters)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryzjj4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxmp32fjgl)
Tokyo Olympics: Final week

In the final week of the Tokyo Olympics, we'll hear the experiences of two people who decided to join the Games as volunteers. We'll also speak to two people who opposed hosting the Games but have since had a change of heart.

A remembrance service has been taking in the Lebanese capital to mark the moment of the blast that killed over 200 people a year ago. We have reconnected with a woman who lost her home in the blast. We also speak to our regional expert about the investigation into the blast and Lebanon's deteriorating economic situation.

We watch the developments with the trial of two leading Belarusian opposition figures that has begun behind closed doors at a court in Minsk.

(Photo: Sky Brown of Britain competes during the Skateboarding Women"s Park Final of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at the Ariake Urban Sports Park in Tokyo, Japan, 04 August 2021. Credit: FAZRY ISMAIL/EPA)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryzn88)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyw)
The criminal double life of a stage actor

Jack Charles is a venerated Aboriginal Australian actor, but at one point addiction led him to a life of crime. For years, after curtain fell, he'd slip away to burgle houses. He spoke to Outlook's Datshiane Navanayagam.

Pete Goss and Raphaël Dinelli are ocean yachtsmen who formed a friendship during a violent storm. They were on separate missions to circumnavigate the globe, but when Raphaël's yacht began to sink Pete had to carry out a dramatic rescue. They spoke to Datshiane in 2018.

Photo: Jack Charles
Credit: Getty Images/Don Arnold

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryzs0d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g32czn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkp48s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nfnby2mtr)
2021/08/04 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlryzwrj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3csz4bd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkp80x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvl)
Twisties and sporting mental health

Spatial awareness in sport: USA gymnast Simone Biles won Olympic bronze but withdrew from earlier events due to ‘The twisties’ and resulting mental health issues. Family Doctor Graham Easton looks at the evidence for what causes this condition.

Childhood myopia: A new study finds an increase in childhood short-sightedness during the pandemic. Lead author Jason C. S. Yam explains the potential impact of lockdowns on eye health by increasing close work on screens and decreasing outside activity.

Cannabis and vomiting: Alison van Diggelen reports on an under recognised condition, Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome [CHS] where users of marijuana get bouts of vomiting, nausea, and severe abdominal pain that can need hospitalisation. It mostly impacts long term users though some younger people who smoke concentrates only a few times a week have had it too. Severe weight loss and the dehydration caused by vomiting can have long term impacts on the heart, liver and kidneys even causing death in extreme cases.

Oxygen monitoring: Updated guidance showing that pulse oximeters – a device designed to measure early signs of a dangerous drop in oxygen - works less well in people with darker skin.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Simone Biles of Team United States competes in the Women's Balance Beam Final on day eleven of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Ariake Gymnastics Centre in Tokyo, Japan. Photo credit: Jamie Squire/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz00hn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57566gzt8)
Opposition leaders on trial in Belarus

Two leading Belarusian opposition figures have gone on trial behind closed doors at a court in Minsk. Protest organiser Maria Kolesnikova and opposition lawyer Maxim Znak have been charged with incitement to undermine national security.

Also in the programme: Protests in Beirut a year on from a large explosion and Czech women to be compensated after being forcibly sterilised.

(Picture: Belarus opposition politician Maria Kolesnikova. Credit: EPA/Ramil Nasibulin)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz047s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkphj5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct2hgh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz07zx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrsqhdkjw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjvzyjm5j)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkpm89)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48wb7j7sk1)
Beirut blast: one year on

A year on from a deadly explosion that rocked Beirut, we examine the city's economy. Dr Nasser Saidi is a former minister of economy and industry in Lebanon, and offers us his assessment. And James Swanston of Capital Economics tells us what the international community could do to help Lebanon more generally. Also in the programme, the BBC's Sameer Hashmi reports on how the United Arab Emirates is offering remote work visas, in an attempt to attract nomad workers. Plus, toymaker Mattel has brought out a new Barbie doll, in the image of AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine pioneer Dame Sarah Gilbert. Kay Hussein is chief executive of Wise, whose goal is to boost the participation and success of women in science, technology, engineering and maths, and responds to the news.

(Picture: The Beirut grain silo that exploded. Picture credit: EPA.)



THURSDAY 05 AUGUST 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz0hh5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqgghvxvsw)
Mexico sues US gun manufacturers

Mexico is suing US gun companies,accusing them of knowingly fueling violence in Mexico by knowingly flooding the market with firearms attractive to drug cartels. We hear from Ioan Grillo, a journalist based in Mexico and author of 'Blood Gun Money: how America arms gangs and cartels'. A year on from a deadly explosion that rocked Beirut, we examine the city's economy. Dr Nasser Saidi is a former minister of economy and industry in Lebanon, and offers us his assessment. And James Swanston of Capital Economics tells us what the international community could do to help Lebanon more generally. Also in the programme, the BBC's Sameer Hashmi reports on how the United Arab Emirates is offering remote work visas, in an attempt to attract nomad workers. Plus, toymaker Mattel has brought out a new Barbie doll, in the image of AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine pioneer Dame Sarah Gilbert. Kay Hussein is chief executive of Wise, whose goal is to boost the participation and success of women in science, technology, engineering and maths, and responds to the news.

All this and more discussed throughout the show with our two guests on opposite sides of the world: Dante Disparte, head of policy at the Libra Association. And Rachel Cartland, a writer based in Hong Kong.

(Picture: illegal guns and drugs in a warehouse.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz0m79)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z29)
What’s behind the recent rioting in South Africa?

The jailing of former South African president Jacob Zuma sparked huge unrest in the country, but was there more behind the riots than the fact of his imprisonment?

While some believe the riots were not only a reaction to Zuma’s jailing for contempt of court, but a planned attempt to bring the country to its knees, others say poverty and inequality also played its part.

Paul Connolly examines the factors behind the riots and asks how the country can rebuild from disturbances that have left many dead and parts of the country in ruins.

Producers: Rob Cave and Olivia Noon

(Rioters loot the Gold Spot Shopping Centre southeast of Johannesburg, July 12 2021. Credit: Guillem Sartorio /Getty Images)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkpzhp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz0qzf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz0vqk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxn)
Malta and the El Hiblu 3

This is the curious story of how a child refugee ended up in Malta accused of the most serious crime - of being a terrorist. Lamin was 13 when he ran away from his home in Guinea in search of a better life. He had never even heard of Malta. But after attempting the perilous sea crossing to Europe, he and two other teenagers were accused of hijacking the ship, the El Hiblu, that rescued them and brought them to shore. If found guilty he and the young men could face life in prison. Two years on the case has still not been taken to trial and the three remain in limbo. For Assignment, the BBC’s Europe correspondent Jean Mackenzie travels to Malta to hear Lamin’s story, as she searches for answers about what happened on board the ship that day and why Malta is taking such a tough stance on these young migrants.

Producer Kate Vandy.


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkq6zy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfz)
Is there a ‘chefsplainer’ in your kitchen?

Is there someone in your life who needs to have total control in the kitchen? Someone who breathes down your neck, micromanages your every move and can’t resist explaining exactly how to chop a carrot? If so, you may be in the company of what we’re calling ‘a Chefsplainer’. Or perhaps all this rings a bell because you are a chefsplainer? Whoever you are - this episode of The Food Chain is for you.

Emily Thomas meets a married couple, a mother and son, and two friends to unpack their power dynamics in the kitchen. They explore why some people feel the need to take control over the cooking, how this reflects our emotional attachment to food, and whether what happens in the kitchen reflects or changes relationships outside it. Plus - why do some of us think that it’s ok to behave in certain ways in the kitchen - that we wouldn’t dream of elsewhere?

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: couple argue in a kitchen. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Contributors:

Abby Saverino
Russell Newlove
Harriet Gore
Joel Gore
Louis Coiffait
Ali Potter


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz0zgp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0dg1hf)
Brazil president electoral fraud claims

A Supreme Court judge in Brazil has ruled President Jair Bolsonaro should be investigated for unproven claims that the country's electronic voting system is vulnerable to fraud.

We bring you the latest from Afghanistan - where 200 thousand people are currently being evacuated from Lashkar Gah in southern Helmand province as the Taliban advance.

We’ll talk about censorship laws in the US as there is new guidance for teachers in Tennessee on discussing topics of race, gender and sexuality. They could face million-dollar fines if they ignore restrictions.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz136t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0dg57k)
Live news, business and sport from around the world.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz16yy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0dg8zp)
Live news, business and sport from around the world.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz1bq2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkqpzg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9k)
The lessons of WeWork

Have tech startup founders become the new cult leaders? The spectacular rise and fall of WeWork founder Adam Neumann left investors out of pocket to the tune of billions, and more importantly, confused as to what happened. Eliot Brown, Wall Street Journal reporter and author of "The Cult of We" explains how the young Neumann managed to string along Silicon Valley and venture capital for years, shedding their cash all the while. Meanwhile venture capital continues to flow into new ventures. Patricia Nakache, partner with Trinity Ventures, explains why VC sentiment never seems to wane. And Scott Galloway, a Professor of Marketing at NYU Stern, suggests a tech founder with an enticing pitch could be the modern-day spiritual leader.

(Picture: Co-Founder and CEO of WeWork Adam Neumann in 2017. Picture credit: Noam Galai/Getty Images for TechCrunch)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3d)
Afghanistan's battle of the airwaves

When the US led invasion of Afghanistan ousted the repressive Taliban regime in 2001, it was no longer illegal to listen to music or news on the radio. Afghan businessman Saad Mohseni returned to his home town of Kabul to launch Arman FM, a new radio station which played modern music and comedy programmes amongst other things which had been banned under the Taliban. He tells Rebecca Kesby why he wanted to help rebuild the cultural life of Afghanistan, how one radio station expanded into a multimedia company, and how persistent security problems have impacted his staff.

(Photo: Afghan radio DJ, Seema Safa, talks on Arman FM radio station in Kabul in 2014. WAKIL KOHSAR/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz1gg6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkqtql)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz1l6b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlh)
Inside the mind of crime writer Patricia Highsmith

Patricia Highsmith was one of the most successful suspense writers of the 20th century. Known especially for her novels The Talented Mr. Ripley, Carol and Strangers on a Train, she created complex and alluring characters, capable of terrible things and at the same time deeply human. Yet for much of her life, Highsmith herself remained an enigmatic figure, often seen as eccentric, troubled and difficult. But she had a circle of close friends who were loyal to the end.

Presenter Bridget Kendall is joined by Andrew Wilson, author of the first biography of Highsmith, and Vivien De Bernardi, a close friend of Highsmith's during her later years in Switzerland.

Produced by Jo Impey for BBC World Service

Image: Patricia Highsmith at her home in France, 1976
Image credit: Derek Hudson, Getty Images


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8j)
The Golden Couple of the first Tokyo Olympics

At the Tokyo 1964 Olympics, British sweethearts Ann Packer and Robbie Brightwell became household names all over the world when they both competed in the running events. Ann would win a gold medal at her least favourite distance, the 800 metres, while Robbie had to make do with a silver in the 4x400 relay. As this was the amateur era, the couple retired after their first and only Olympic to get married and work as school-teachers. They talk to Ashley Byrne. The programme is a Made In Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Ann Packer and Robbie Brightwell pictured with their Olympic medals in 1964 (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz1pyg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g349xq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkr26v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz1tpl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y6dlkx6ww6g)
Sportsworld

(Photo by Massimo Bertolini/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz1yfq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g34kdz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkr9q3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz225v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57566k1hg)
Greece and Turkey battle deadly fires

Evacuations are underway as fire fighters struggle to cope with the situation. People on the Greek island of Evia were forced to flee by boat as wildfire spread rapidly, destroying homes in its wake.

Also on the programme: The mounting perils of being a journalist critical of the government in Russia; and the Australian government offers compensation for its treatment of indigenous children.

(Image: A woman carries clothes outside of a burnt house after a wildfire in the area of Varybobi, northeastern suburb of Athens, Greece, 04 August 2021. Credit EPA/Panagiotou)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz25xz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkrk6c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4991ltncpr)
Covid vaccine boosts Moderna profits

Vaccine maker Moderna has reported net income of $2.8bn for the three months to June 30th. Rasmus Bech Hansen is chief executive of the life sciences data analytics company Airfinity, and tells us how the company's coronavirus vaccine has boosted its prospects. Also in the programme, workers at Minera Escondida, which is the world's largest copper mine, in Chile, have voted to go on strike. The BBC's Jane Chambers updates us on the negotiations from Santiago, and Julian Kettle, mining analyst with Wood Mackenzie considers the potential impact on the global copper market. We hear how games console maker Nintendo is faring after a bumper year in 2020 as a result of lockdowns, from Dr Serkan Toto, chief executive of the games industry consultancy Kantan Games in Tokyo. Plus, in the wake of the saga of office sharing company WeWork, the BBC's Ed Butler explores whether technology startup founders have become the latest wave of cult leaders.

(Picture: A vial of Moderna's coronavirus vaccine. Picture credit: Reuters.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz29p3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxmp32j9mk)
Wildfires in southern Europe

Firefighters in Greece are battling to save the historic birthplace of the Olympic games from encroaching wildfires. In Turkey, a wildfire that has raged for more than a week has reached a thermal power station on the country's Aegean coast. We speak to people in some of the regions that are affected.

As the Tokyo Olympic Games are approaching their final few days, we'll be hearing from two doctors who were both sceptical about Japan hosting the Games. How do they think the country has managed the coronavirus during this period?

And our regular coronavirus health expert Rick Malley, a paediatric infectious disease doctor at Boston Children’s Hospital - specialising in vaccines – answers listeners' questions.

Our reporter joins us to talk about her investigation into "cronic illness influencers" and how their followers sometimes fake illnesses online.

(Photo: A fireman battles to extinguish a wildfire in Koskinas village in the area of Ancient Olympia, Peloponnese, Greece, 05 August 2021. Credit: ORESTIS PANAGIOTOU/EPA)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz2ff7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxmp32jfcp)
Belarus sprinter Krystina Timanovskaya in Poland

The Belarusian sprinter who fell foul of her coaches at the Olympics has said her grandmother persuaded her it was not safe to return home. We hear a part of the interview she gave to the BBC in Poland, and speak to other Belarusians who have left the country.

We also hear from people affected by wildfires in Greece and Turkey.

As the Tokyo Olympic Games are approaching their final few days, we'll be hearing from two doctors who were both sceptical about Japan hosting the Games. How do they think the country has managed the coronavirus during this period?

Also, according to a new study, a sprawling network of more than 350 fake social media profiles is pushing pro-China narratives and attempting to discredit those seen as opponents of China's government. We are joined by our colleague from the BBC’s Disinformation Team, who have been looking into this story

(Photo: Defected Belarusian Olympic sprinter Krystsina Tsimanouskaya (L) and member of Belarus"s opposition council Pavel Latushko (R), during a press conference in Warsaw, Poland, 05 August 2021. Credit: RADEK PIETRUSZKA POLAND OUT/EPA)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz2k5c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3d)
I saw a smile on the suicide bomber's face

In August 2006, 17-year-old Qusay Hussein was playing a game of volleyball with his brothers and friends in his home country Iraq.  As they were playing a man drove a truck onto the local sports pitch, directly towards Qusay.  It got so close he could see exactly what the driver was wearing and the smile on his face.

The truck came within a metre of Qusay before the driver detonated a devastating explosion killing 16 people and injuring 56 others. Qusay was severely wounded, blinded and given 30 minutes to live but somehow he survived. There are descriptions which you might find upsetting.

Qusay now lives in Austin, Texas where he works as a mentor for students across the American state and is studying towards a PHD.

Picture: Qusay Hussein
Credit: Qusay Hussein

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz2nxh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g358wr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hks15w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nfnby5jqv)
2021/08/05 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz2snm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hks4y0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l40)
Record-shattering weather

July 2021 saw temperatures in the western US and Canada smash previous records by 5 degrees. And that’s what we should expect, according to a study prepared much earlier but published, coincidentally, just a few days later. A hallmark of rapid climate change, says author Erich Fischer of ETH Zurich, will be an accelerating number of record-shattering, and socially disruptive, events.

A large new study on communications and hierarchy across a large range of our ape and monkey relatives has just been published. Lead author Katie Slocombe of the University of York explains the findings: like us, the primates live socially in groups, and there are leaders, but the more tolerant ones are also the more communicative ones. In species with ‘despotic’ leaders, order seems to be maintained with more menacing silence.

The double helix of all DNA on earth twists in one direction. But researchers at Tsinghua University in China have made some important steps towards making mirror life, in which the DNA twists in the opposite direction. Chemistry journalist Mark Peplow discusses the significance of this discovery with Roland Pease.

One of the benefits of science’s ability to read normal DNA has been to compare human genomes from across the globe – for example in the Human Genome Diversity Project – for what they reveal about both our health – and our past. But sequences from the Middle East have been sadly lacking. The Sanger Institute’s Mohamed Almarri and colleagues have just rectified that, saying that the Middle East played such a key role in the human story.




(Photo By Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Editor: Deborah Cohen


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz2xdr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57566kwqc)
Partner of Belarusian activist speaks out

Newshour speaks to Bazhena Zholudzh, the partner of the Belarusian opposition activist, Vitaly Shishov, who was found hanged in the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv. Police in Ukraine are investigating whether his death was suicide or murder.

Also in the programme: Ebrahim Raisi has been sworn in as Iran's new president and one of the world's greatest footballers, Lionel Messi is leaving Barcelona.

(Picture: Vitaly Shishov, head of a Kyiv-based organisation that helps Belarusians fleeing persecution. Credit: RBC-Ukraine/Handout via REUTERS)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz314w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hksdf8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz34x0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrsqhhgfz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjvzymj2m)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hksj5d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48wb7jbpg4)
President Biden says 50% of US-made cars electric by 2030

President Biden has said that by 2030, half of the cars produced in the US will be zero emission vehicles. But is this realistic and does it go far enough? We ask Becca Ellison, deputy policy director at the environmental campaign group Evergreen Action. Vaccine maker Moderna has reported net income of $2.8bn for the three months to June 30th. Rasmus Bech Hansen is chief executive of the life sciences data analytics company Airfinity, and tells us how the company's coronavirus vaccine has boosted its prospects. After the news that Lionel Messi will leave Barcelona, we ask his official biographer Guillem Balague, why money is the reason the world's greatest footballer is leaving his club of 20 years. Plus, in the wake of the saga of office sharing company WeWork, the BBC's Ed Butler explores whether technology startup founders have become the latest wave of cult leaders.

(Picture: US President Joe Biden getting out of a car. Credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 06 AUGUST 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz3dd8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqgghw0rpz)
Apple to scan phones for child abuse imagery

Tech giant Apply has said that all of its smartphones and tablets in the US will soon scan them for images of child abuse and report those found. The move has already alarmed some, who are concerned devices could now be spied on. We speak to Matthew Green, a cryptographer and professor at Johns Hopkins University in the United States who revealed details about Apple's plans before they were officially announced. President Biden has said that by 2030, half of the cars produced in the US will be zero emission vehicles. But is this realistic and does it go far enough? We ask Becca Ellison, deputy policy director at the environmental campaign group Evergreen Action. Vaccine maker Moderna has reported net income of $2.8bn for the three months to June 30th. Rasmus Bech Hansen is chief executive of the life sciences data analytics company Airfinity, and tells us how the company's coronavirus vaccine has boosted its prospects. Plus, in the wake of the saga of office sharing company WeWork, the BBC's Ed Butler explores whether technology startup founders have become the latest wave of cult leaders. And after the news that Lionel Messi will leave Barcelona, we ask his official biographer Guillem Balague, why money is the reason the world's greatest footballer is leaving his club of 20 years.

All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the world: Tony Nash, chief economist at Complete Intelligence in Texas and Zyma Islam, journalist for the Daily Star in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

(Picture: Someone using a smartphone in bed. Credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz3j4d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1j)
Sir Andrew Pollard: The war on Covid-19

Stephen Sackur speaks to Professor Sir Andrew Pollard, Director of the Oxford Vaccine Group and a key figure in the development of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. Science has offered up tools to beat the virus - but from vaccine hesitancy to vaccine inequality - are we making the most of them?


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkswds)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz3mwj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz3rmn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh8)
China cracks down on online games

A state-run media outlet brands online games ‘electronic drugs’ and calls for more curbs on the industry. Plus, the AI that’s claimed to speed up insurance claims following extreme weather events. And could machine learning make recruitment fairer? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Stock photo of a young woman with large headphones looking at her smartphone, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkt3x1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 World Football (w3ct1tzc)
St Pauli's Jackson Irvine and South Africa's Ode Fulutudilu

Australian international Jackson Irvine talks about his move to Hamburg's FC St Pauli. Also on the programme, South Africa's Ode Fulutudilu discusses her tough journey to professional football.

Picture: FC St. Pauli fans at the Millerntor Stadium for a match against Holstein Kiel (Photo by Cathrin Mueller/Getty Images).


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz3wcs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0djydj)
Live news, business and sport from around the world.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz403x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0dk24n)
Live news, business and sport from around the world.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz43w1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2rv0dk5ws)
Live news, business and sport from around the world.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz47m5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hktlwk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0j)
The company that invented the future

Simulmatics Corporation pioneered data analytics in the 1960s - raising the same qualms then as fake news and social media manipulation do today.
Manuela Saragosa speaks to historian Jill Lepore, whose book "If Then: How Simulmatics Corporation Invented the Future" charts the company's rise, and its role in helping John F Kennedy get elected US President in 1960.

At the heart of their work was using mainframe computers - a novelty at the time - to crunch polling, census and electoral data on voters in order to figure out the best targeted messages for their candidate to voice. It foreshadows the far more sophisticated modern use of data to target voters on social media. So what lessons from history are there for us today?

(This programme originally aired September 20th, 2020.)

(Picture: Two men work at a console in a Univac computer room in 1960; Credit: H. Armstrong Roberts/ClassicStock/Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyw)
Gay activism in 1990s India

In the early 1990s, when homosexuality was still a criminal offense in India, a group of gay men and lesbian women set up the Counsel Club in the city of Kolkata. It was one of the first queer support groups in India. Their first meetings took place in secret at the home of one of the members. Later, the group campaigned for gay rights in India and helped other gay people with family problems or anxieties over coming out. Mike Lanchin has been speaking to Pawan Dhall, one of the club's founding members.

Photo credit: REUTERS/Jayanta Shaw


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz4cc9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hktqmp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz4h3f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsr)
How does the Taliban keep going?

The Taliban is advancing in Afghanistan, launching major offensives to retake key cities as the last remaining US and international forces prepare to pull out. The group has taken more territory in the past couple of months than it has at any time since being ousted from power in 2001. Tens of thousands of Taliban fighters have been killed during twenty years of fighting, yet the militants remain a potent threat to the survival of the Afghan government, its military, and other institutions nurtured by global powers. So what’s the secret behind the Taliban’s longevity? The UN says the sale of opium and illegal mining provides them with a steady stream of income, as do local taxes. Officials in Kabul also allege that the organisation is being propped up by foreign governments and that it continues to welcome foreign fighters in its ranks. Global efforts to starve them of funds have failed and Taliban officials now openly speak of victory, insisting that the United States has ‘lost’. Who’s helping to prop up the Taliban and what does the last two decades tell us about their strength and potential after the last Western forces have gone?

Ritula Shah is joined a panel of Afghanistan experts. Producers: Junaid Ahmed and Paul Schuster.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz4lvk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g376tt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hktz3y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz4qlp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y6dlkx6zs3k)
Sportsworld

(Photo by Sergei Bobylev\TASS via Getty Images)


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz4vbt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g37gb2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkv6m6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz4z2y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv57566mydk)
Afghan government spokesman killed

Afghans react with horror to the latest Taleban attack - the assassination of the government's spokesman in Kabul.


Also in the programme: shocking new evidence that the ocean current system in the Atlantic, which has a huge influence on the world's climate, is in danger of collapse; and Italy adopts Covid passports for people who want access to indoor venues.

(Image: Afghan security officials inspect the scene of an attack on Dawa Khan Menapal, the head of the Afghan government"s information centre, in Kabul, Afghanistan, 06 August 2021 / Credit: EPA / Jawed Kargar)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz52v2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkvg3g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46tqf0pc9z)
CNN fires unvaccinated employees going to office

News network CNN has fired three unvaccinated employees for going to an office. We explore the legal implications of such a move with Robert Lian, who is an attorney with Akin Gump, specialising in complex labour and employment litigation. Also in the programme, locations in Italy now require a Covid pass for entry, via vaccination or a negative test. The rules apply to restaurants, theatres and tourist attractions, and we get reaction to the move from Cristina Caroli, who runs the Caffe Aroma in Bologna. The BBC's Tamasin Ford reports on efforts to bring coronavirus vaccine production to Africa. Plus, the Barcelona FC football player Lionel Messi is to leave the club after more than two decades, according to the club, because of Spanish league rules that limit what players can be paid compared to club revenues. Spanish football journalist Alvaro Romeo explains the background.

(Picture: A CNN logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz56l6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxmp32m6jn)
OS conversations: Olympic gold medallists

As the Olympic Games comes to an end we'll look back at the events of the past two weeks. We'll speak to our correspondents in Tokyo to hear what it's been like reporting from an Olympics during a pandemic. We'll also speak to some of the athletes who have won gold at the Games to hear their experiences.

Also, we're continuing to go to countries around the world that we haven't heard much from during the pandemic. Today we'll look at the biggest news stories from the South American country of Guyana. Alongside Covid, they have also been dealing with flooding. We'll speak to a newspaper journalist there to hear more.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to answer listener questions about Covid-19 and the vaccines. Today our guest is Dr Megan Murray - Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University.

(Photo: Gold medallist Mutaz Essa Barshim of Qatar celebrates on the podium Credit: Reuters/Dylan Martinez)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz5bbb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxmp32mb8s)
What's it like reporting from the Olympics?

As the Olympic Games comes to an end we'll look back at the events of the past two weeks. We'll speak to our correspondents in Tokyo to hear what it's been like reporting from an Olympics during a pandemic. We'll also speak to some of the athletes who have won gold at the Games to hear their experiences.

Also, we're continuing to go to countries around the world that we haven't heard much from during the pandemic. Today we'll look at the biggest news stories from the South American country of Guyana. Alongside Covid, they have also been dealing with flooding. We'll speak to a newspaper journalist there to hear more.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to answer listener questions about Covid-19 and the vaccines. Today our guest is Marc Mendelson, Professor of Infectious Diseases at Groote Schuur Hospital, University of Cape Town.

(Photo: An aerial view of the National Stadium, the main stadium of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics. Credit: European Photopress Agency)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz5g2g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f8)
On the front line: New York, Ukraine

Ukraine has regained its own New York after parliament this week voted to give the name back to a small town near the front line in the conflict with pro-Russian separatists. Svyatoslav Khomenko of BBC Ukrainian has been asking locals what they think of the return to the original name.

Jaffa after the violence
For a few nights in May, the Israeli city of Jaffa was the scene of violent clashes between Jews and Arabs.  Similar outbreaks happened across Israel, after rising tensions triggered by threatened evictions in East Jerusalem, confrontations at al-Aqsa mosque, and fighting between Israel and the militant group Hamas, who control Gaza.  BBC Arabic's Michael Shuval tells us about the impact of the violence in Jaffa.

Before the Olympics:  the Palić Games
Sixteen years before the birth of the modern Olympic Games, a Hungarian nobleman was inspired by the ancient Olympics to start his own version in today's Serbia.  BBC Serbian's Nataša Andjelković tells the remarkable story of the Palić Games and its founder Lajoš Vermeš.

Saving Sierra Leone's chimpanzees
Sierra Leone is losing its forests at an alarming rate, despite laws meant to protect them.  One area that remains almost intact is around the Tacugama Chimpanzee Sanctuary.  The BBC's Umaru Fofana, who recently visited the sanctuary, explains how the fate of the forests is closely linked to that of the chimpanzees.

Peru's new president
In his trademark white hat, Pedro Castillo was sworn in as the new president of Peru last week. From a poor farming background, Castillo is very different to Peru's previous four presidents.  Martin Riepl reports from Lima for BBC Mundo, and he tells us more about this surprising new leader.

Image: Svyatoslav Khomenko next to the sign for New York, Ukraine
Credit: BBC


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz5ktl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxl7g385sv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkvy2z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nfnby8fmy)
2021/08/06 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz5pkq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkw1v3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqr)
Can video games help me or harm me?

Today, up to 3 billion people around the world play video games, from candy based mobile puzzles to virtual battlegrounds filled with weapons. Many people have turned to gaming during the pandemic as a way of staying connected – but what does science really say about the impact of gaming?

Does playing violent video games lead to violence in the real world? Do brain training apps really work? How much gaming is too much – can videogames really be addictive? And how can videogames help us to explore difficult issues like death, grief and loss?

Alex Lathbridge and Anand Jagatia look at the evidence and play some games along the way, speaking to psychologists, doctors and game designers about the power of video games to change us - for better or worse.

With Adrian Hon, Professor Andrew Przybylski, Professor Pete Etchells, Professor Henrietta Bowden-Jones and Dr Sabine Harrer


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz5t9v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv57566nsmg)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz5y1z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkw9bc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tzc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjnlrz61t3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrsqhlcc2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjvzyqdzq)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkh1hkwf2h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48wb7jflc7)
CNN fires unvaccinated employees going to office

News network CNN has fired three unvaccinated employees for going to an office. We explore the legal implications of such a move with Robert Lian, who is an attorney with Akin Gump, specialising in complex labour and employment litigation. Also in the programme, locations in Italy now require a Covid pass for entry, via vaccination or a negative test. The rules apply to restaurants, theatres and tourist attractions, and we get reaction to the move from Cristina Caroli, who runs the Caffe Aroma in Bologna. The BBC's Tamasin Ford reports on efforts to bring coronavirus vaccine production to Africa. Plus, the Barcelona FC football player Lionel Messi is to leave the club after more than two decades, according to the club, because of Spanish league rules that limit what players can be paid compared to club revenues. Spanish football journalist Alvaro Romeo explains the background.

(Picture: A CNN logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3ct1gxn)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxn)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gxn)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkgp783mq1)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkgp783zyf)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkgp784c5t)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkgp784gxy)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkgp784qf6)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkgp785kn3)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkgp7865cr)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172xzkgp786dw0)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkgp786jm4)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkgp786wvj)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkgp78782x)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkgp787cv1)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzkgp787hl5)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkgp787mb9)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkgp788l9b)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkgp788yjq)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkgp78928v)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkf518)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkf8sd)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkfdjj)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkfj8n)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkg085)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkg409)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkg7rf)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkgchk)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkglzt)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkgvh2)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkhbgl)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkhg6q)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkhppz)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkh1hkhtg3)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkh1hkj5ph)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkh1hkjf5r)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzkh1hkjx58)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkh1hkk0xd)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkh1hkk8dn)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j51)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqg37kbj07)

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Business Weekly 04:06 SUN (w3ct2dh1)

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CrowdScience 02:32 MON (w3ct1pqq)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lsc)

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Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct1m82)

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From Our Own Correspondent 02:06 SAT (w3ct1mv4)

From Our Own Correspondent 05:06 SUN (w3ct1mv4)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mv4)

HARDtalk 02:06 MON (w3ct1n61)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n61)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n61)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3ct1n61)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nvl)

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Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nvl)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvl)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2hdw)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2hdw)

Heart and Soul 03:32 MON (w3ct2hdw)

In the Studio 01:32 MON (w3ct1td8)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1td9)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1td9)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1td9)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dk9)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dk9)

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More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dk9)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hc5)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2rv0d5bs4)

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Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172xv56sxwykyp)

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Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172xv56sxx1gvs)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172xv56sxx2ftt)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172xv575668bs5)

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Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kx6)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1q)

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People Fixing the World 02:06 TUE (w3ct1pl5)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pl5)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nfnbxwv0k)

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Sportsworld 13:49 SAT (w172y6f3kp4wvpf)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tbyg7pc40)

Sportsworld 13:49 SUN (w172y6f3kp4zrlj)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0tbyg7shjc)

Sportsworld 12:06 MON (w172y6dlkx6m5h5)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lbr)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct2g9q)

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The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p6v)

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The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p8t)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3ct1p8t)

The Cultural Frontline 05:06 SAT (w3ct1pf9)

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The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2cbd)

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The Evidence 19:06 SAT (w3ct2hfs)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rfy)

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The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rlg)

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The Inquiry 02:06 THU (w3ct1z29)

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The Lazarus Heist 09:32 SAT (w3ct2g72)

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The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1hsq)

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