Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 24 JULY 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bn02p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqfqz7kcdd)
Bangladesh imposes strict lockdown

Bangladesh has imposed strict lockdown measures after a spike in coronavirus infections. The BBC's Nagib Bahar in Dhaka explains the new restrictions. We also get reaction from Rubana Huq of Mohammadi Group, which makes clothing products including shirts and blouses, on the news that Bangladesh's garment factories will also have to close for the lockdown.
China's president Xi Jinping has visited Tibet, the first official visit to the region by a Chinese leader in 30 years. Howard Zhang, head of the BBC's Chinese Service, explains the significance of the visit and the president's reasons for going.
And coffee prices have hit a seven year high following severe frosts in Brazil. Kona Haque from global commodities merchant ED&F Man explains what the impact will be on farmers and consumers.

Sasha Twining is joined throughout the programme by journalist Karen Percy, who's in Melbourne in Australia.

(Picture: Empty roads in Dhaka. Credit: Getty)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bn3tt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv3)
Counting the cost: the homes and livelihoods destroyed in South Africa’s riots

Stories from South Africa, the Netherlands, Brazil and Azerbaijan

Shops destroyed, homes ransacked, people killed in the streets: South Africa is recovering from the worst civil unrest for many years. This was triggered by the imprisonment of the country’s former President, Jacob Zuma, in connection with allegations of corruption – indeed, some claim it was his supporters who started it. The British writer, Gregory Mthembu-Salter has lived in South Africa for many years, and has been hearing from extended family and friends who lost out in the violence.

With China and parts of Europe hit by severe flooding, there have been more demands for tougher measures to combat climate change. The equation is simple: warmer air holds more moisture, so global heating will mean more severe downpours. This is a particular threat for the Netherlands, where most of the country is below sea level, or only just above it. Anna Holligan has been hearing how Dutch people reacted to this latest sign of an existential threat to their country.

There have been more protests in Brazil, whose controversial President is blamed by many for failing to tackle Covid. More than half a million in the country have now died from the disease, but Jair Bolsonaro has dismissed it as no more than “a little flu.” He has opposed many attempts to lock the country down, and is against asking people to wear masks - yet some of those out on the streets are demonstrating in favour of their President. Orla Guerin went to meet them.

Sometimes it’s the little things which are a sign of bigger changes. Colin Freeman reported on the war in Nagorno-Karabakh, where he saw particularly fierce fighting in the town of Shusha. On his first trip, it was Armenians in charge, but he returned after troops from Azerbaijan took over. And how could he tell? Well for a start, there was Azerbaijani beer on sale in the local hotel.

(Image: A shopping mall, looted following unrest at the jailing of former South African President Jacob Zuma. Credit: Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yybh36)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbq)
'It's the best game I've ever played in'

On this week’s Stumped, Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Jim Maxwell are joined by Oval Invincibles and England T20 bowler Tash Farrant. Farrant featured in the inaugural match of The Hundred, as the competition finally got underway a year later than originally planned. We discuss the new format, how well it worked and how it's helping towards gender equality in the sport.


And we hear from the 11-year-old boy who's been given a new lease of cricketing life - all thanks to a special set of glasses.

Photo: Tash Farrant of Oval Invincibles bowls during the The Hundred match between Oval Invincibles and Manchester Originals. (Credit:Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bn7ky)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f6)
Khuzestan: Iran's thirsty province

Protests have swept through Iran's Khuzestan province.  Severe water shortages and a lack of drinking water have brought demonstrators to the streets, shouting 'I am thirsty'.  BBC Persian's Parham Ghobadi explains why water has become such a flashpoint.

My Home Town:  Sahaspur, India
Khadeeja Arif of BBC Urdu takes us to her home town in Uttar Pradesh, a place to chat with neighbours under mango trees.

Doctor without Stigma 
An Indonesian doctor is campaigning to remove the stigma many women face when they visit a gynaecologist.  If they say they are unmarried, they may be refused treatment.  Callistasia Wijaya of BBC Indonesian shares the story of the Doctor without Stigma initiative.

The Tokyo Olympics in 5 words
Mexican Lourdes Heredia was a student in Japan 25 years ago, and has returned to work on the BBC's Olympic coverage.  It's been bittersweet, with the triumph of the Olympics dimmed by Covid.  She shares five Japanese words which perfectly describe her impressions.

Brazil's illegal gold miners
Conflict between illegal gold miners and the indigenous Yanomami people has reached levels of violence not seen for decades with an attack on a remote village in the Amazon rainforest.  BBC Brasil's Hugo Bachega has been following the story.

Image:  Women in Khuzestan Province
Credit: TASNIM AGENCY


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyt)
The paintings of Vincent Van Gogh

In a rare interview, a member of the Van Gogh family talks about growing up in the shadow of the famous artist and playing as a child among some of Vincent Van Gogh's most iconic works. These paintings belonged to Vincent Van Gogh's only nephew who was just a few months old when his uncle died in July 1890. His grandson Willem Van Gogh tells Louise Hidalgo how for years the paintings hung in his grandfather's home, before his grandfather transferred the entire collection to the Dutch state to be housed in the Van Gogh museum in Amsterdam.

Picture: Almond Blossom, painted in 1890 by Vincent van Gogh to celebrate the birth of his only nephew (Credit: DeAgostini/Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bncb2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsp)
What's China doing to fight climate change?

This week a year’s worth of rain fell in just three days in China’s Henan province, flooding roads and public transport systems, killing dozens and displacing thousands. Floods are common in China’s rainy season, but this event is being linked to the climate crisis. China is the biggest emitter of greenhouse gases in the world – and many of its most carbon-intensive sectors employ vast numbers of people. At the same time the country has led efforts to develop green technologies like solar and wind, bringing down prices and encouraging the global shift away from fossil fuels. China says it shouldn’t be expected to follow the same decarbonisation timetable as major Western economies. But the US Climate Envoy John Kerry this week insisted that efforts to keep global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius will be "essentially impossible" without faster action from Beijing. So how crucial is China to the fight against climate change? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bnh26)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf8)
Japan: Art and the Olympics

As the Olympics start in Tokyo, we’re focusing on Japanese artists who are examining history, re-inventing tradition and telling new stories.

Visual artist Meiro Koizumi tells presenter Mariko Oi about the importance of capturing lost war stories and his artistic take on the Olympic torch relay. Koizumi’s prize-winning video installation The Angels of Testimony brings to life the darker side of Japanese history. Centred around a 99-year-old veteran’s experiences of perpetrating violence in China during WWII, young people are filmed performing his shocking words on the streets of Tokyo.

Studio Ghibli is one of the biggest names in animation, famous for films such as My Neighbour Totoro and the Oscar-winning Spirited Away. Since the company’s founder Hayao Miyazaki retired in 2014, his son, Goro Miyazaki has emerged as a new leading creative force at the iconic Japanese anime house. Our reporter Anna Bailey speaks to Goro ahead of the release of his third film, Earwig and the Witch.

Japanese singer Hatis Noit creates atmospheric, multi-layered music using her soulful voice. One of her most haunting tracks is the piece she created in response to the Fukushima disaster. She performed the piece, Inori, at a ceremony when many of the evacuated residents were allowed to return home. Hatis talks to Mariko about her belief in the power of the human voice and her musical tribute to Fukushima.

As international teams gather in Tokyo to compete, one artistic project is representing more than 200 countries in the form of Kimono. Every traditional Japanese robe has been beautifully crafted to reflect the climate, culture and countryside of each place. Designer Maki Yamamoto speaks about the details and purpose of the Imagine One World Kimono Project.

Presenter: Mariko Oi
Producer: Lucy Collingwood


(Photo: Shop curtains, themed on sports and culture, and produced by six overseas artists who competed in the Olympics and Paralympics are displayed at an underground passageway ahead of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games on July 19, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. Credit: Toru Hanai via Getty Images)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yybvbl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct1xzq)
The anti-vax influencer plot that flopped

Who was behind a secret plot to pay social media stars to falsely discredit the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine?

Trending investigates an attempt to weaponise the power of influencer marketing in the online disinformation war over the pandemic.

In May this year a marketing agency contacted influencers in several countries with an extraordinary offer. A mystery client was offering big money if the influencers would use their YouTube and Instagram videos to spread lies about the health risks associated with the Pfizer vaccine. The anonymous sponsor wanted them to pretend they weren’t being paid so the fake message would appear genuine.

The plan failed spectacularly when several influencers went public and blew the whistle. But who was behind it and what were their motives?

Presenter: Charlie Haynes

Reporter: Flora Carmichael

Editor: Ed Main

Photo: French YouTuber Leo Grasset

Photo credit: Leo Grasset


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk8)
The Rise of Delta

The Delta Variant was first identified in India, fuelling a huge wave of cases and deaths. It is now spreading around the world, becoming the most dominant variant in many countries. This week we take a look at the numbers - where’s it spreading, how is this different to previous waves and what can be done to stop it?

Tim Harford speaks to Professor Azra Ghani, Chair in Infectious Disease Epidemiology at Imperial College, London and John Burn-Murdoch, the chief data reporter at The Financial Times.


(People wear protective face masks in Jakarta, Indonesia where Delta is on the rise. Credit: Afriadi Hikmal /Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bnltb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt8r02002f)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bnqkg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt8r0203tk)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bnv9l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt8r0207kp)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyc6kz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6t)
Ghostwriters for hire

Some people live the most amazing lives but aren't always the best at putting those experiences into words. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two ghostwriters about collaborative writing - what do they enjoy about telling someone else's story?

Michelle Burford is a celebrity memoir collaborator who’s written for hugely successful women like Cicely Tyson, Alicia Keys and Simone Biles. Having carved out a niche writing with famous Black women she’s also collaborated on the traumatic memoir of Michelle Knight, kidnapped and held captive by Ariel Castro in Cleveland, Ohio for ten years – and TV carpenter, Clint Harp.

Ellen Banda-Aaku is an author from Zambia. She's written award winning books for children and adults and took up ghostwriting to bring in a steady income. She writes for StoryTerrace - a paid-for service which helps people write their autobiographies. This has included a woman smuggled out of Iran, another who left an abusive marriage and a man jailed in Somalia who later dedicated his life to humanitarian aid.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
(L) Michelle Burford, credit Meg Rybicki
(R) Ellen Banda-Aaku, courtesy Ellen Banda-Aaku


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bnz1q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5z)
The Tokyo Olympics

A year later than planned, due to the pandemic, the Tokyo Olympics are underway. Yet Covid cases in the capital are rising, and a recent poll showed that 55% of people in Japan were opposed to the Games being held in Tokyo with fears that it could become a super spreader event.

For the athletes, it’s business as usual, albeit under extraordinary circumstances. Host Nuala McGovern hears from 19 year old US-born Joseph Fahnbulleh, who is representing Liberia on the athletics track in the 200 metres race; and Mary Hanna who has competed in five previous Olympics as part of the Australian equestrian team. At 66 years old, she is the oldest athlete at the Games and gives Joe some invaluable advice. They also discuss how the pandemic has affected training - for better and worse - and how they feel about competing during a pandemic.

Plus, we hear from three volunteers and discover why one of them had a last minute change of heart, and three residents in Tokyo share their thoughts and concerns about the arrival of thousands of athletes and delegates coming to their city.

(Photo: Tokyo 2020 Olympics - Basketball 3x3 Training - Aomi Urban Sports Park, Tokyo, Japan - July 22, 2021 Stephanie Mawuli of Japan during training. Credit: Andrew Boyers/Reuters)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yycbb3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g71)
13: Cat and mouse

What happened to those who helped spirit the stolen money away?
#LazarusHeist

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/lazarusheist


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1p)
Investigating a format unchanged for 66 years

It is a format that has remained basically unchanged for 66 years. Listeners tell us what they think about From Our Own Correspondent - and one of its producers explains how it is put together. Plus, there is another in our regular series about listeners' everyday lives and habits, How I Hear.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bp2sv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q1t8j4hth)
Sportshour at the Tokyo Olympic Games

We’re live in Japan on day one of the delayed Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. The BBC’s Ed Harry reflects on the opening ceremony and rounds up the best of the action so far, while Japanese Olympic historian, Roy Tomizawa, gives us a sense of how the local population feel about the event taking place against the backdrop of the coronavirus pandemic.

We also hear from Mayar Sherif who makes history as the first Egyptian woman to play tennis at an Olympic Games and from USA water polo player Kaleigh Gilchrist, who is in Tokyo two years on from being injured when a balcony collapsed in a nightclub she was in.

Simon Gleave from Gracenote tells us which nations are predicted to do well in the medals table and in Sporting Witness, wrestler Yojiro Uetake recalls his memories of competing in the Tokyo Olympics of 1964.

And Australia bowler Amanda-Jade Wellington tells us about her excitement about playing in new cricket format, The Hundred. The Southern Brave player tells us it doesn’t need to try and replicate the Big Bash League as she’s confident the new tournament will make a name for itself. She also tells us of her hopes of seeing cricket return to the Olympic Games and about her love for Pokemon.

Image: Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Olympic Stadium on July 23, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Toru Hanai/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bp6jz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgrtj7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yycktc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3f)
How to deal with a bully boss

Toxic workplaces take many forms, but they share a common thread of bullying, negativity and harm. And they may result in wide-ranging consequences - right from physical health impacts to poor mental health and burnout, as well as organisational fallout.

Experts say most bullying originates from poor management, with destructive behaviours trickling down from the top level. Abusive bosses can engage in harassing behaviour anywhere – before the pandemic, it would be during in-person meetings, presentations or casual workplace interactions. Now, they even occur on Zoom team calls, in messages or over e-mails.

Bullying affects the quality of people's work, but what can be done about it? And how can you confront a bullying boss who's making your work-life a misery?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the ways one can deal with bullying at the workplace.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Astha Chandra, life coach; Rosita Rabindra, co-founder, Diversity Dialogues; Sagar Mandhani, product manager at a startup; Anindita Sharma, communications consultant; Ronak Kotecha, media professional


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bpb93)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdv)
The road to rock'n'roll

In a segregated US, black audiences, entertainers and entrepreneurs established their own network of live performance venues known as the Chitlin’ Circuit. Concentrated primarily in the Deep South, it provided many pioneers of modern music with the platform to hone their craft and perfect their style as they travelled the country.

Virtually every notable African-American performer from the '30s to the '60s graced the circuit. The roster almost reads like a ‘who’s who?’ of black American musicians of this period: Ray Charles, Little Richard, Tina Turner, Sam Cooke, The Jacksons, Billie Holiday, John Coltrane, Jimi Hendrix - the list goes on.

The venues would vary as much as the entertainers who graced them. From famous urban institutions like The Apollo Theater in New York or The Howard Theatre in Washington D.C, to a run-down barn on a country back-road.

It was in these settings, amidst a backdrop of segregation, that the sounds of rhythm and blues and rock’n’roll emerged and evolved, long before they captivated the world.

Fresh from his second Grammy in four years, the “King of the Chitlin’ Circuit” bluesman Bobby Rush is now over 85 years old, and has spent most of his life since the early '50s, touring and performing to black audiences in these same locations.

In this documentary, with his harmonica in hand and the help of Little Richard, Mary Wilson, B.B. King, Lou Rawls and others, Bobby shines a light on a hugely influential network of venues that paved the way for rock’n’roll and shaped music history.

(Photo: The opening gala of the historic Howard Theatre in Washington, DC on April 12, 2012. Credit: Eva Hambach/AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bpg17)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnl5fbv)
Can the Taliban be stopped from retaking Afghanistan?

With the Taliban gaining territory following the exit of foreign forces from Afghanistan, we ask: can they retake the country? An MP from the city of Kandahar gives us his views, and the BBC's Lyse Doucet looks at the prospects for a political solution.

Also in the programme: we hear from an academic who joined the resistance in the war-torn Ethiopian region of Tigray, and Frederick Forsyth, the author of the seminal thriller The Day of the Jackal.

(Photo: Taliban fighters in Laghman Province in March 2020. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bpksc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tbl5xx6j5)
Sportsworld

Image: Beatriz Piron of the Dominican Republic lifts during the Women's Weightlifting 49kg (Photo by Patrick Smith/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bq1rw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgsnr4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yydf18)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct1xzq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8g)
The first Tokyo Olympics

The first Olympic Games in Japan were held in 1964, less than 20 years after the country lost the Second World War. The bombed-out centre of Tokyo had been virtually rebuilt following the Allied Occupation, and the Japanese took the opportunity to showcase new technology such as the Bullet Train and colour TV broadcasts. Ashley Byrne talks to wrestling gold medallist, Yojiro Uetake, about his memories of the games. The programme is a Made In Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Japanese student Yoshinori Sakai about to light the Olympic Cauldron in October 1964 (Keystone/Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bq5j0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z75)
Darfur's ethnic war

We hear about the start of the war in Darfur, through the eyes of a teenage boy whose life was changed when the Sudanese military allied to a local militia, the Janjaweed, laid waste to villages across the region, killing and raping as they went. We hear from a survivor of Norway's worst day of terror, when a far-right extremist, Anders Breivik, launched a bomb attack on government offices and attacked a summer camp. Plus a story from our archives from a British army officer during World War Two who witnessed the end of Italy's colonial rule in East Africa during a final battle in the Ethiopian town of Gondar. From Brazil, the women's rights activist whose story of abuse inflicted by her husband inspired the country's first legislation recognising different forms of domestic violence in 2006. Lastly, the story of how the family of the artist Vincent Van Gogh worked to get him recognised as a great painter after he died penniless in 1890.


Photo: A young Darfurian refugee walks past a Sudan Liberation Army Land Rover filled with teenage rebel fighters on October 14 2004 in the violent North Darfur region of Sudan. (Photo by Benjamin Lowy/Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bq984)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt6)
Director Quentin Tarantino

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined by Icelandic novelist Eva Björg Ægisdóttir and critic Leila Latif to discuss cultural highlights of the week.

Double Oscar winning screenwriter and director Quentin Tarantino on turning his film, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, into a novel.

British Comedian Gina Yashere on her memoir Cack-Handed, her life as the child of Nigerian immigrants, being left handed and racism in the U.K and the U.S.A.

Finnish director Zaida Bergroth discusses her biopic of Moomins creator and Finnish national treasure, Tove Jansson.

British actor Vanessa Kirby on her role in the film The World To Come, set on the bleak American frontier in the mid-nineteenth century.

Eva Björg Ægisdóttir talks about her best-selling crime thriller, Girls who Lie, the second in her Forbidden Iceland series.

We hear from Italian producer and director Uberto Pasolini about his film Nowhere Special, and its moving story of a terminally ill single father, searching for a family to take care of his only son.

And music from the Andean mountains of Colombia, with guide Betto Arcos.


(Photo: Quentin Tarantino. Credit: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic via Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bqf08)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnl6d9w)
Ethiopia Tigray crisis: New front opens

Fighters from Tigray in northern Ethiopia have opened up a new front in their struggle against the central government in Addis Ababa. Leaders said this week that their fighters had entered the neighbouring Afar region to the east because pro-government forces were now massing for an attack. We’ll hear from Afar.

Also in the programme: a restaurant owner in Paris speaks to us about the Covid-19 'health pass' and compulsory vaccination tests; and large numbers of people in Hungary take part in the annual Pride march despite concerns about LGBT rights.

(Photo: More than a million people have been displaced by the conflict in Tigray. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bqjrd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc4)
'Good for the ego, bad for the soul' with Manika Kaur, Ali Riaz Baqar, Gurujas Khalsa and Abi Sampa

Manika Kaur, Ali Riaz Baqar, Gurujas Khalsa and Abi Sampa discuss individual definitions of success, why you're going to offend somebody no matter what music you make, the rollercoaster effect, and what their studio spaces look like.

Manika Kaur is a singer and contemporary performer of Sikh kirtan music. Predominately performed by men in gurdwara temples, kirtans are devotional singing or sacred chants. Manika is changing the landscape of the music by reinterpreting, recording, and performing outside of the temples, and being one of the few women to sing them.

Ali Riaz Baqar is a guitarist, bandleader, and chief composer of the group Jaubi. Based in Lahore, Pakistan, their debut album Nafs at Peace draws on elements of north Indian classical music, hip-hop and jazz. Gurujas Khalsa is a singer and songwriter from the Grammy-winning band White Sun, based in Los Angeles. Their music is a "sweeping exploration of New Age, through the lens of the Kundalini Yogic tradition", and their songs are also on the syllabus at the University of Southern California, where they are used to study stress management. And Abi Sampa is a multi-instrumentalist, veena virtuoso, and the UK’s first female Qawwal. She first rose to prominence when she sang on TV show The Voice UK in 2013. Born in London to Sri Lankan Tamil refugees, she’s now inspiring a new generation of British Asians with her music.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bqnhj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywr25w3z1h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sj4gb80p4)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyf0rx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Documentary (w3ct2gdt)
Lex Gillette: A leap in the dark

Lex Gillette was seven years old when his eyes stopped working. At first, things were a little blurry, a little distorted. Then, after 10 operations to treat the retinas that kept detaching in both his right and his left, he saw nothing but darkness.

But that did not stop him: Lex learned to ride a bike. He learned to run around. And eventually, he learned to to jump - jump farther than any other blind person in the world. Lex Gillette - world record long jumper, four time Paralympic medal winner - is on his way to Tokyo in 2021 to get the gold medal he has wanted since he was a child.

The other half of the Lex Gillette Paralympic success story is his guide coach, Wesley Williams. He and Lex have trained and competed together for 14 years. Tokyo will be their third Games together. As Lex begins his approach, running the 16 steps towards the take-off point, amidst all the sound of stadium, Wesley will make as much noise as he can - clapping and shouting in the way they have practised over and over again - keeping Lex on target to jump from the right spot and fly as far as he can. Further than any blind man in history. So far, that’s 6.73 metres.

The key to their success is the record of their relationship. They share vulnerabilities in order to develop strength, they are humble in order to hear, and they have a clear, shared vision that becomes phenomenal success.

(Photo: Elexis Gillette of the United States competes the Men's Long Jump T11 Final, Paralympics Athletics Grand Prix, Rio 2016 Olympics. Credit: Buda Mendes/Getty Images)



SUNDAY 25 JULY 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bqwzs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


SUN 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyf885)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:32 Trending (w3ct1xzq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 01:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7br0qx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyfd09)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g71)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7br4h1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7br875)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh0)
The great vaccine passport debate

In this episode of Business Weekly, we look at the use of vaccine passports in the tourism and hospitality industries. Owning a 'pass sanitaire' will shortly be compulsory to visit certain sites in France and nightclubs in the UK have been told they can only admit people who’ve been double-jabbed come September. We also have a special report on the Champlain Tower in Miami, where nearly a hundred people died last month when the building collapsed. What lessons should be learned? And Jeff Bezos blasted into space this week, hot on the heels of fellow billionaire supersonic joyrider Richard Branson. We’ll ask why.

Business Weekly is produced by Matthew Davies and presented by Lucy Burton.

(Image: Person uses health pass in France, Getty Images)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7brcz9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyfr7p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7brhqf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt8r022wzj)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7brmgk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt8r0230qn)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7brr6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt8r0234gs)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyg3h2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfx)
Should 'junk food' sponsor sport?

Sugary drink and fast food sponsors have become almost inseparable from sporting superstars and major events like the Olympics. But why are these epitomes of health and exercise aligning themselves with products linked to obesity, heart disease and diabetes?

Simon Tulett explores the reasons for this relationship's long history and hears about the damage it could be doing to young, impressionable fans.

If this sponsorship is a problem, whose job is it to end it, and can it be done without leaving event organisers, athletes and grassroots sport facing a financial black hole?

Producer: Sarah Stolarz

Contributors:

Michael Payne, former IOC marketing executive;
Dr Sandro Demaio, VicHealth;
Tuhin Mishra, Baseline Ventures;
Tammy Aitken

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Composite of an American football player catching a burger. Credit: Lew Robertson, Rubberball/Mike Kemp, Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7brvyt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyg776)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx5)
The Paralympian who was trapped inside her body

When Victoria Arlen was a child, she had dreams of being an athlete. But at the age of 11 she became unwell and lost consciousness, only to wake up years later in a hospital bed locked into her body, unable to communicate or move. For months she was alert, but nobody knew it and all she had were her thoughts. Slowly she recovered and took up para-swimming, going on to break a world record at the London 2012 Paralympic Games. This story was first broadcast on the 30th of September 2018.
 
Presenter: Harry Graham
Producer: Katy Davis
 
Picture: Victoria Arlen
Credit: Harry Engles / Getty Images
 
Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7brzpy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g99)
Two smiley faces: Episode four

So how do you get an emoji added to the list? We hear from the women who have had hundreds of emoji approved between them, from the sari, to the mirror, to the one-piece bathing suit. How did they do it? And will Amy and Rachel finally get their drone emoji? We ask the woman who is in charge of it all.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yygbzb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2h08)
Should I take the knee?

Since the murder of George Floyd in 2020, taking the knee has become a prominent sight at protests and sports events, signifying opposition to racism and discrimination.
But with some fans booing players for kneeling and some black players refusing to take the knee – has this anti-racist gesture now lost its potency?

For rapper and football fan Guvna B taking the knee has an added significance. He is a committed Christian, and knows the religious significance of kneeling. To mark the start of the Olympic Games, he explores taking the knee and its relationship to sport, prayer and protest.

Athletes like Colin Kaepernick, who sacrificed his NFL career to take the knee before a game have cited their faith as an inspiration, but many Christian sports women and men have remained upright, refusing to kneel. They say that kneeling is only reserved for God.

Kneeling was meant to be a gesture of solidarity by black and white athletes to show their contempt for racism, but divisions have also formed - footballers have been booed by their own fans because, they say, of its links with the organisation Black Lives Matter.

Guvna B explores the history of taking the knee, speaks to athletes like NBA star Jonathan Isaac who have refused to take the knee because of their love for God, and ask what’s next for taking the knee and for the sporting world’s response to racism.
Athletes at the Olympics are banned from taking the knee. But with issues like systemic racism still dominating headlines, as athletes stand on the podium in Tokyo, what will their response be, and what will be the reaction to it?


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bs3g2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgvqfb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyggqg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2g9p)
The Test

Inflation and challenges to the dollar

International economist Jim O’Neill explores the implications for the dollar of America’s response to the Covid-driven economic crisis. With help from economists and historians, he asks if China can challenge the dollar's dominant place in the global economy - or whether digital currencies, such as bitoin, could prove more disruptive in the long term?

(Photo: Representations of the Ripple, Bitcoin, Etherum and Litecoin virtual currencies on a PC motherboard. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bs766)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z27)
Can China raise its birth rate?

China’s decades-long One Child Policy has led to a low birth rate, and a shrinking workforce. It has also been placing a heavy burden on the younger generations who will have to support two parents and four grandparents. It’s predicted that in five years’ time, a quarter of the population will be over 65. With a smaller workforce, the country risks becoming poorer.

China tried to address the problem by allowing couples to have two children instead of one, but except for an initial uptick, the birth rate has continued to fall regardless. So now China has introduced a three-child policy. But couples continue to worry about the lack of affordable childcare, and the high financial and emotional cost of raising children. So in this edition of The Inquiry, Tanya Beckett asks: can China raise its birth rate?

Producer: Arlene Gregorius

(A mother and her child waving Chinese flags near Tiananmen Square in Beijing, China. Photo: Peter Parks/Getty Images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyglgl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxl)
Dangerous liaisons in Sinaloa

The Mexican state of Sinaloa is synonymous with drug trafficking. With the profits from organised crime a driver of the local economy, the tentacles of ‘narco cultura’ extend deep into people’s lives – especially those of women. In the city of Culiacan, plastic surgeons service demand for the exaggerated feminine silhouette favoured by the men with guns and hard cash. Often women’s surgery will be paid for by a ‘sponsor’ or ‘godfather.’ Meanwhile, a group of women trackers spend their weekends digging in isolated parts of the state, looking for the remains of loved ones who disappear in Sinaloa’s endless cycle of drug-fuelled violence.

Producer / presenter: Linda Pressly
Producer in Mexico: Ulises Escamilla
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Photo: Lawyer Maria Teresa Guerra advocates for women in Sinaloa. Credit: BBC/Ulises Escamilla)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bsbyb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnl8b7y)
World leaders meet to discuss climate change after recent environmental disasters

Climate and environment ministers from fifty-one countries begin a two-day meeting on Sunday, hosted by Britain, to prepare for the COP26 summit in Glasgow in November. After the recent environmental disasters, will there be any action? We speak to Alok Sharma, the UK’s minister presiding over that summit.

Also in the programme: the Tokyo Olympics are under way, is Japanese opposition to the Games decreasing now that they have started?; and the British military is accused of failing servicewomen who've suffered rape ,bullying and discrimination.

(Photo: Demonstrators protest against the G20 Ministerial meeting on Environment, Climate and Energy, in Naples, Italy, 22 July 2021. Credit: EPA).


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bsgpg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlf)
Ida Pfeiffer: 19th Century globetrotter

Ida Pfeiffer's desire to see the world was like many childhood fantasies - destined to remain just that. And yet at the age of 44 once her sons had reached adulthood, she set off from her home in Vienna on a series of journeys that no woman of her time or background had contemplated.

Beginning with a trip to the Middle East, Pfeiffer travelled mostly alone, documenting her voyages and collecting specimens that she later sold to help finance her adventures abroad. Budget travel was her mantra, as she was not a wealthy aristocrat like many travellers of that time. On her journeys Pfeiffer was attacked, kidnapped, robbed and almost drowned. She met head-hunters and endured extreme conditions to pursue her dream. Defying all convention, Pfeiffer became celebrated as the most travelled woman on the planet, circumnavigating the globe twice. But despite her trailblazing attitude, she was no feminist, believing that women should be either professionals or home-builders, not both.

Rajan Datar discusses the life of this most unlikely traveller with the social and cultural anthropologist Hiltgund Jehle; Ulrike Brisson, whose research has focused on 19th and early 20th-Century European women's travel writing; and John van Wyhe, senior lecturer in the department of biological sciences at Tembusu College in Singapore, and author of Wanderlust: The Amazing Ida Pfeiffer, the first female tourist.

Producer: Fiona Clampin

(Image: Portrait of the Austrian traveller Ida Pfeiffer (1797-1858), from Il Giro del mondo (World Tour), Journal of geography, travel and costumes, Volume XVII, Issue 8, February 23, 1873. Credit: DEA /Biblioteca Ambrosiana/Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bslfl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bsq5q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0tbl5y0bxj)
Sportsworld

Image: Elijah Winnington day one of the Australian Olympic swimming (Photo by MICHAEL ERREY/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bt2f3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkhxgwpdc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyhfph)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2h08)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bt657)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dh0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7bt9xc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56fnl996z)
COP26 President: global warming "urgency”

Climate and environment ministers from more than 50 countries have been meeting in London; we speak to the British politician who has been leading the meeting.

Also on the programme: President Macron of France is making his first visit to French Polynesia. He wants to talk about his strategic vision for the region, but many residents want to talk about the legacy of the nearly 200 nuclear tests that France carried out there; and we'll hear a first-hand account of life among the gangs in the capital of Haiti.

(Picture: Fire fighters try to extinguish wildfire in the Republic of Sakha, Russia Credit: EPA)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7btfnh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyhsxw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g71)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmw7btkdm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywr25w6vyl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sj4gbbxl7)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkg9yyhxp0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 26 JULY 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hmyn51)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl93yvb8b9)
Ministers set agenda for COP26 as floods continue in Europe

Environment ministers met in London as flash floods sent parts of the city under water. They set the agenda for COP26, the international climate change conference taking place in November. But are the politicians doing enough to tackle the effects of climate change? We speak to Dr Sarah Ivory, director of the Centre for Business, Climate Change and Sustainability at the University of Edinburgh Business School.
And as Australia heads back into lockdown to limit cases of the Delta variant of COVID-19, we speak to Sarah Hunter, chief economist at Oxford Economics about how that is likely to affect the country's economy.

(Picture: Cars driving through a flooded London street. Credit: Getty)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77n0ff)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td7)
Designing football boots

Adidas senior design director, Dave Surace and senior category director Rob Ashcroft create the next pair of football boots for the years ahead. These boots - if a success - will sit on shop shelves across the world and grace the feet of the biggest footballing stars.

Football journalist Raphael Honigstein guides us through the duo's process, as they balance new, exciting ideas with tried and tested formulas. Dave sketches out the new design, discussing the materials he uses and the dream boots he has in his mind, and reflects on how designing links back to his childhood.

For Rob Ashcroft, his domain lies in what has worked before. Armed with the stats about which designs sell well and why, he guides Dave and his team towards a boot that not only looks good, but performs well on the pitch and the shop floor too.

But what is success for them both? A slick design? An impressed athlete? Or a sales boom? And which one of these takes precedence when designing a new football boot?

Raphael follows the process from rigorous testing to the storytelling of the product, and hears the final moment when Dave and Rob get to unbox their creation for the very first time.

Producer: Sean Allsop

(Image: A pair of Adidas X Speedflow boots, courtesy of adidas)


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hmyrx5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n60)
Hamdullah Mohib: Can the Afghan government hold out against the Taliban?

Since the United States pulled its troops out of Afghanistan at the beginning of July, the Taliban have continued to retake vast swathes of the country. Reports have emerged that they are once again enforcing the same repressive practices of their past rule; including the closure of girls' schools, public beatings and a prohibition on women travelling unaccompanied outside their homes. Peace talks between the Taliban and the Afghan government are not making progress and there are real fears of an all out civil war. Sarah Montague speaks to Afghanistan's National Security Advisor Hamdullah Mohib. Can the Afghan government hold out against the Taliban?

Photo: Afghanistan"s National Security Advisor Hamdullah Mohib in Kabul, Afghanistan, June 2021 Credit: Reuters


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77n45k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqp)
Am I a psychopath?

One CrowdScience listener finds herself unconcerned about much of the world’s problems, it leaves her wondering: am I a psychopath?

Inspired by a previous episode on empathy, this listener asked is it true that psychopaths don’t empathise and what are the character traits of psychopathy?

Marnie Chesterton talks with a diagnosed pro-social psychopath to find out.

She also pays a visit to the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and gets into an MRI scanner to discover what is happening in her brain when she empathises.

Studies suggest around 1 percent of the general population exhibit traits associated with psychopathy and that rises to 3-4 percent in the world of business. But is this really the case?

Why is there so much stigma associated with psychopathy and do psychopaths even exist or is it just a convenient term to label those whose emotional range sits outside of the “norm”?

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service.

Guests:
Julia Shaw
Jim Fallon
Valeria Gazzola
Kalliopi Ioumpa


[Image credit: Getty Images]


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hmywn9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g99)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77n7xp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2h08)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 on Sunday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hmz0df)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqs)
Can shipping fix its climate problem?

It's estimated that 9 out of 10 items sold in our shops are shipped halfway around the world on ships. The resulting emissions amount to around 3% of the global total, more than many countries, but we rarely hear about the role shipping plays in the climate crisis.

Partly this is because most of shipping's pollution occurs far out at sea, out of the sights and minds of many consumers - and largely out of the reach of regulation. Like aviation, ships travel across borders, so their emissions are not attributable to any one country.

There's no simple fix to shipping's climate problem. Currently most ships use one of the dirtiest forms of fossil fuels, known as 'bunker fuel' - because it's plentiful and cheap. And they use a lot of it - 300 million tonnes per year. But there are alternatives out there. Hydrogen, sustainable bio-fuels - even wind power - are all possible, so why aren't they already being used? What will it take to turn the shipping industry around?

Contributors:
Alan McKinnon, Professor of Logistics at Kuehne Logistics University, Hamburg
Camille Bourgeon, International Maritime Organisation
Diane Gilpin, CEO of Smart Green Shipping
Faig Abbasov, Shipping Programme Director at Transport and Environment


Presenters: Neal Razzell and Graihagh Jackson
Reporter: Lotte von Gaalen
Producer: Zoe Gelber
Series producer: Rosamund Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77ncnt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6v)
World leaders: Michelle Bachelet and Helen Clark

What does it take to run a country? Kim Chakanetsa is joined by two international leaders who have championed women’s health, equality and empowerment throughout their careers. They will discuss their personal journeys, the impact Covid-19 has had on the wellbeing of women around the world, and why more women should join the political arena. The guests will also be taking questions from two young female activists and leaders in women’s rights, health and climate change.

Michelle Bachelet became Chile’s first female president in 2006 and served a second term in 2014. In 1973, her father was detained and tortured under General Pinochet’s dictatorial rule. Two years later she was also imprisoned with her mother and then exiled for four years. When she returned to Chile, she became a doctor and worked with victims of torture. She is currently the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.

Helen Clark was the first woman to be elected as prime minister of New Zealand and the first woman to serve for three consecutive terms. After her premiership, Helen Clark became the first female head of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and last year she co-chaired an Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response to explore the global response to Covid-19. She’s also chairing the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health (PMNCH).

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE DETAILS
(L) Michelle Bachelet, credit Getty Images
(R) Helen Clark, credit Getty Images


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hmz44k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2d659)
Tunisia protests

Tunisia's president has sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament, after violent protests broke out across the country.

We will be in Sydney where military checkpoints have been set up after huge anti lockdown rallies took place over the weekend.

And a world first on the programme from India - a new drug that could save the lives of thousands of pregnant women. We will be joined by the doctor administering it.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hmz7wp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2d9xf)
Tunisia's prime minister sacked

Tunisia is in political crisis with the dismissal of the prime minister, following a day of protests against the government's handling of the Covid-19 pandemic.

We cross to California where wildfires continue to rage and more people are forced to flee their homes.

And we will be in Sydney where military checkpoints have been set up after huge anti lockdown rallies took place over the weekend.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hmzcmt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2dfnk)
Civilian casualties in Afghanistan

New figures from the United Nations suggest Afghanistan has seen a record number of civilians killed in the first half of this year.

The Iraqi Prime Minister goes to Washington to demand that President Biden withdraws all US combat troops from his country. So will the United States comply?

We'll go to India where there have been torrential downpours in the past few days in the west coast - we'll be asking if this weather was unexpected for the country.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hmzhcy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77nvnb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j50)
Just how bad is rental fashion?

Rental fashion is in the spotlight when it comes to climate footprint. A new study suggests it might not be the silver bullet as once thought, but environmental journalist Lucy Siegle cautions the study is too limited to give a blanket judgment on the rental industry overall. Meanwhile, Christina Dean, of the charity Redress, argues that the potential for rental fashion marks a revolutionary step in the way we think about our clothing. Eshita Kabra, founder of By Rotation, the world's first social fashion rental app, says people around the world could easily solve the fashion industry’s problem with the clothes already in their wardrobe. And sustainable stylist Susie Holland argues that there is a wealth of value stored up in second-hand and recycled clothing.

(Picture: Clothes hanging in the wardrobe. Picture credit: Getty Image.)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x13)
Japan's Bullet Train

On 1 October 1964, the fastest train the world had ever seen was launched in Japan. The first Shinkansen, or bullet train, ran between Tokyo and Osaka, and had a top speed of 210km per hour. Lucy Burns spoke to Isao Makibayashi, one of the train's first drivers.

This is a rebroadcast

(Photo: Shinkansen, or bullet train. Credit: Keystone/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hmzm42)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77nzdg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hmzqw6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77p34l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct1xzq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hmzvmb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5s2gll)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77p6wq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hmzzcg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y6dl6mwv0wb)
Sportsworld

Image: Sky Brown (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn033l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5s2q2v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77pgcz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn06vq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxwh65b)
Tunisia’s political turmoil

There's mounting tension in Tunisia as President Kais Saied sacks the Prime Minister and suspends parliament after mass protests nationwide. We spoke to Dr. Yusra Ghannouchi, spokeswoman for Tunsia's biggest party Ennahdha and daughter of the Speaker of the House.

Also in the programme: As top diplomats meet to discuss relations, China accuses the US of turning it into an imaginary enemy to cover up its own problems; and skateboarding at the Olympics.

(Photo: Tunisians gather after president ousts government in Tunis. Credit: Reuters/Zoubeir Souissi)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn0blv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77ppw7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y481j7lkkqp)
Incentivising coronavirus vaccination in Europe

Sweden and Germany are taking contrasting approaches to encouraging Covid-19 vaccinations. Whilst Sweden is trialling a system to pay young people to encourage them to get vaccinated, Germany is considering refusing access for the unvaccinated to restaurants, night clubs and sporting venues. We get reaction from a bar owner in Sweden and restaurant proprietor in Germany, and assess the contrasting approaches to incentivisation with Stephen Reicher, who is a professor of psychology at the University of St Andrews. Also in the programme, authorities in China have banned providers in Hong Kong of private tuition to school children from making a profit, causing their share prices to plummet. Hudson Lockett is a capital markets reporter for the Financial Times in Hong Kong, and explains the background to the move. Thirty years on from reforms that transformed the Indian economy, the BBC's Nikhil Inamdar examines the impact of those changes. Plus, with some employers arguing that home working suits the least engaged workers, our regular workplace commentator Pilita Clark looks at the relationship between physical presence and employee competence.

(Picture: A young person in Europe is vaccinated. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn0gbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxm9trgg9f)
What's behind protests in Tunisia?

We hear from Tunisia, where violent mass protests have been taking place over the government's handling of the coronavirus pandemic. The country has seen a massive recent spike in cases. President Kais Saied, who was elected in 2019, has sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament, announcing that he is taking over. We get more from our reporter and those out on the streets in Tunisia.

Also, we speak to two women who have reported being sexually harassed at quarantine hotels in the UK. A total of 16 women have reported harassment to the BBC, and some say their complaints have been ignored or disbelieved. The British government has now announced that women quarantining in UK hotels will have female guards when possible.

And our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Eleanor Murray, joins us to answer your questions about the pandemic. If you have something you'd like to ask, or an experience to share, send us a message on WhatsApp +447730 751925.

(Photo: A protester sits on top of a gate outside the parliament building in the capital Tunis, Tunisia. Credit: EPA/STR)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn0l33)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxm9trgl1k)
Covid quarantine hotels: Women say they were harassed by guards

We speak to two women who have reported being sexually harassed at quarantine hotels in the UK. A total of 16 women have reported harassment to the BBC, and some say their complaints have been ignored or disbelieved. The British government has now announced that women quarantining in UK hotels will have female guards when possible.

Also, the latest from Tunisia, where violent mass protests have been taking place over the government's handling of the coronavirus pandemic. The country has seen a massive recent spike in cases. President Kais Saied, who was elected in 2019, has sacked the prime minister and suspended parliament, announcing that he is taking over. We get more from our reporter and those out on the streets in Tunisia.

And our regular health expert, Professor Manfred Green, joins us to answer your questions about the coronavirus pandemic. If you have something you'd like to ask, or an experience to share, send us a message on WhatsApp +447730 751925.

(Photo: Women arriving at UK airport. Credit: Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn0pv7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtb)
The train driver asking men to open up about mental health

Heather Waugh is Scotland’s only female freight train driver, and she’s committed to improving the mental health of her male colleagues. Her work was inspired partly by a traumatic incident she witnessed while driving a train, when a young man took his life on the tracks. Now she’s been trained by a mental health charity to spot the early warning signs of mental health problems. She spoke to Outlook’s Andrea Kennedy.

If you are feeling emotionally distressed, support is available internationally at https://www.befrienders.org and in the UK at bbc.co.uk/actionline

Cheick Sanou aka Iron Biby is a strong man from Burkina Faso. Growing up he was bullied for his size, but when he started hitting the gym it became apparent how incredibly strong he was. He’s now a world class contender in Strongman and he holds the record for the highest number of overhead presses of another person in a minute.

When Hussain Zaidi started his journalistic career, his home city of Mumbai was caught up in a vicious mafia war. The men who ran the gangs wielded huge power over business, smuggling and the entertainment industry. As they fought for dominance the body count rose. Hussain was a crime reporter and he wanted to get the whole story, and so he embarked on a high risk mission to track down and interview the most dangerous criminals in the city. Eventually, his work would lead him to the most famous don of them all, Dawood Ibrahim. Hussain spoke to Andrea back in 2019.

Picture: Heather Waugh
Credit: BBC

Presenter: Andrea Kennedy
Producer: Harry Graham

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x13)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn0tlc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5s3fkm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77q5vr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nf92m3pdq)
2021/07/26 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn0ybh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77q9lw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2gj1)
Dare to repair: Fixing the future

Mark Miodownik, explores the environmental consequences of the throwaway society we have become and reveals that recycling electronic waste comes second to repairing broken electronics. He asks what we can learn from repair cultures around the world , he looks at manufacturers who are designing in repair-ability, and discovers the resources available to encourage and train the next generation of repairers.

Producer: Fiona Roberts

(Photo: Teen boy solders wires to build robot, Credit: SDI Productions/Getty Images)


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn122m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxwj1d7)
Curfew ordered as unrest in Tunisia continues

President Kais Saied has ordered a night curfew, a day after he suspended the country's parliament. He's also sacked key ministers, and said the work of most public servants should be halted for forty-eight hours. The army is barring access to parliament, and the largest political party, Ennahdha, has accused Mr Saied of staging a coup.

Also one the programme will wealthy nations stand by their pledge to give a billion dollars a year to help poorer nations fight climate change? And on the day that the Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi. meets President Biden in Washington, what will it mean when the us formally ends its combat operations in Iraq?

(Picture: A Tunisian protester sits on top of a gate outside the parliament building in Tunis Credit: EPR)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn15tr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77qk34)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn19kw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrfg5fm3v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjhqmknrh)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77qnv8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48vyz68v40)
Incentivising coronavirus vaccination in Europe

Sweden and Germany are taking contrasting approaches to encouraging Covid-19 vaccinations. Whilst Sweden is trialling a system to pay young people to encourage them to get vaccinated, Germany is considering refusing access for the unvaccinated to restaurants, night clubs and sporting venues. We get reaction from a bar owner in Sweden and restaurant proprietor in Germany, and assess the contrasting approaches to incentivisation with Stephen Reicher, who is a professor of psychology at the University of St Andrews. Also in the programme, authorities in China have banned providers in Hong Kong of private tuition to school children from making a profit, causing their share prices to plummet. Hudson Lockett is a capital markets reporter for the Financial Times in Hong Kong, and explains the background to the move. Thirty years on from reforms that transformed the Indian economy, the BBC's Nikhil Inamdar examines the impact of those changes. Plus, with some employers arguing that home working suits the least engaged workers, our regular workplace commentator Pilita Clark looks at the relationship between physical presence and employee competence.

(Picture: A young person in Europe is vaccinated. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 27 JULY 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn1k24)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqg37jyxcv)
Sales at luxury goods group LVMH up 84%

The world's biggest luxury brand made sales of $17 billion in the three months to June. Its sale for the first half of the year were also 11% higher than pre-pandemic levels. Julie Zerbo is the founder and editor of The Fashion Law website and tells us how LVMH has survived the pandemic.
Also in the programme, Sweden and Germany are taking different approaches to encouraging Covid-19 vaccinations. Whilst Sweden is trialling a system to pay young people to encourage them to get vaccinated, Germany is considering refusing access for the unvaccinated to restaurants, night clubs and sporting venues. We get reaction from a bar owner in Sweden and restaurant proprietor in Germany, and assess the contrasting approaches to incentivisation with Stephen Reicher, who is a professor of psychology at the University of St Andrews.
New homes sales in the US have hit a 14-month low. We ask Robert Dietz, chief economist for the National Association of Home Builders, what's behind this trend.

Sasha Twining is joined throughout the programme by Mehmal Sarfraz, journalist and co-founder of the Current PK website in Lahore in Pakistan, and by Peter Morici, economist and professor emeritus at the University of Maryland, who's in Washington DC.

(Picture: A Louis Vuitton shop. Picture credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn1nt8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl4)
The ATMs that dispense clean fuel

Sleek blue machines have been popping up in convenience stores across Nairobi over the past two years. These “Koko points” look like cash machines but instead of giving out money they dispense bioethanol, a fuel made from plants which can be used in cooking stoves.

At the moment 80% of Kenyans use wood or charcoal as their main cooking fuel – but these materials have a devastating impact on the environment, and the smoke causes hundreds of deaths every week. Koko’s high-tech solution offers Kenyans a cleaner alternative, although it means a move away from some dearly-held customs.

Reporter: Mercy Juma
Producer: William Kremer


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77r12n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 Discovery (w3ct2gj1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn1skd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jtb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x13)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn1x9j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gj3)
A tale of two Tokyos

The wait is finally over for the Tokyo Olympics, 2020. Ken Nishikawa and Nick Luscombe take inspiration and hope from the Tokyo Olympics of 1964 which kick-started a new internationalism in Japan as the first Olympic games to be held in Asia. Together they meet the designer of the new grand stadium Kengo Kuma and many more Tokyo residents whose lives were touched by the games in 1964 to contrast the Tokyo of the past with the city and its people today.

(Photo: Chefs at the Tokyo Olympics 1964. Credit: Tadao Watanabe)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77r8kx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td8)
Aditi Mittal: Creating the laughs

Aditi Mittal came to prominence as one of the first female stand-up comedians in India and has won plaudits for her work, observing what she calls “fempowerment” and her life as an Indian woman. Her shows have toured around the world and been on Netflix. Now she’s writing new work from her home in Mumbai for her first online comedy show, and trialling it out on the internet. But without an audience in the room, and with new technical demands, it’s a challenge.

Yasmeen Khan follows Aditi over a month as she writes, performs, rewrites and hones her material. How will she adapt to the constraints of Zoom? And with India in the grip of Covid-19, how easy is it to find humour during this time?

Reporter: Yasmeen Khan

Produced by Emma Kingsley and Rebecca Armstrong for BBC World Service.


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn211n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2h32d)
American forces to leave Iraq

We get reaction to the news that the United States is ending its combat mission in Iraq after 18 years.

We then cross the border to Syria to look at the situation in Raqqa where many people including children are still living without water and electricity.

And a young Afghan entrepreneur tells us how the deteriorating security situation is affecting businesses across the country.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn24ss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2h6tj)
North and South Korea restore hotline

North and South Korea have announced that they've restored a cross-border hotline, a year after Pyongyang severed ties.

President Biden says US troops will end their combat mission in Iraq by the end of the year, to focus on training local forces to fight Islamic State militants.

And the Tunisian president has imposed a night- time curfew for the next month, after sacking several government ministers and suspending parliament.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn28jx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2hbkn)
North and South Korean telephone hotline restored

North and South Korea restore channels of communication. Is this a sign that North Korea is getting ready to talk with the United States?

The US has announced it will end its combat mission in Iraq by the end of this year. We'll be looking at what this means with our security correspondent.

And almost half of the athletes competing at the Olympics this year are women - more than in any Games in history.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn2d91)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77rrkf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jg1)
The great resignation wave

Has the pandemic encouraged more of us to quit our jobs? Rebecca Kesby speaks to Anthony Klotz, associate professor at Texas A&M University, who says the US is about to face a wave of resignations, as many people re-evaluate what they want from a job after months of lockdowns. Ben Kiziltug from the HR software company Personio tells us why companies who managed their staff poorly during the pandemic risk losing workers now. But Zeynep Ton from the MIT Sloan School of Management explains why there might not be a long-lasting shift in power from employers to employees.

(Photo credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5m)
The birth of Karaoke

Daisuke Inoue was playing keyboards in a band in Kobe, Japan, when he invented the Karaoke machine in 1971. He had a customer who wanted to impress business clients by singing along to his favourite songs. Ashley Byrne spoke to Daisuke Inoue about his invention in 2015.

(Photo: A group of women sing karaoke. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn2j15)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gj3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77rw9k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2gj1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn2ms9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn2rjf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5s5chp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77s3st)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn2w8k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y6dl6mwxxsf)
Sportsworld

Image: Pat McCormack (Photo: ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images)


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn300p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5s5lzy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77sc92)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2gj1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn33rt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxwl32f)
Hong Kong: guilty verdict in first security law trial

A young activist, Tong Ying-kit, charged and tried under Hong Kong’s draconian national security law has been found guilty in a landmark ruling. We hear reaction from Finn Lau, a Hong Kong political activist living in self-imposed exile in the UK.

Also in the programme: North and South Korea restore hotline after a year; and pregnant women in Brazil die in large numbers from Covid.

(Photo: A security guard stands at the entrance of the High Court in Hong Kong. Credit: EPA/MIGUEL CANDELA)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn37hy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77slsb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bhvfdqcxn)
Chinese technology shares fall

As investors fret about China's crackdown on tech firms, share prices continue to fall. David Kuo is co-founder of the Smart Investor website in Singapore, and explains the background. Also in the programme, we take a close look at prospects for the US's African Growth and Opportunity Act, which gives many African exporters tariff free access to the US, and faces renegotiation ahead of its expiry in four years' time. Pankaj Bedi is chair of Kenya's United Aryan EPZ which has been a beneficiary of the accord. Ekart Naumann is an economist at South Africa's Trade Law Centre and discusses the impact AGOA has had in Africa. And we hear what might replace AGOA from former Assistant US Trade Representative, Rosa Whitaker. Plus, the Qatar Goodwood Festival horse racing event runs until Saturday, and is the first major racing event to be held in the UK since all coronavirus restrictions were lifted just over a week ago. Adam Waterworth is managing director of the event and tells us how the races will differ from those that happened before the pandemic hit.

(Picture: A Chinese shareholder monitors prices. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn3c82)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxm9trkc6j)
Tokyo Olympics: Simone Biles pulls out of gymnastics women's team final

We get the latest from the Olympic Games in Tokyo, where US gymnast Simone Biles has pulled out of the women's team final. USA Gymnastics said she withdrew due to a medical issue, but gave no further details. Biles is the most successful US gymnast of all time and winner of four gold medals and a bronze at Rio 2016.

Also, we hear from Bermuda and the Philippines, which have both won their first ever Olympic gold medals. Berumda became the smallest nation to win a gold medal at a summer Games, with a population of just 63,000. Flora Duffy, who represented Bermuda at the triathlon, finished more than a minute ahead of Great Britain and the US. Weighlifter Hidilyn Diaz made history for the Philippines, also setting an Olympic record after lifting a combined weight of 224 kilograms.

And our medical expert of the day, Dr Isaac Bogoch, answers listener questions about the coronavirus pandemic. If you have a question or an experience you would like to share, send us a WhatsApp to +447730 751925.

(Photo: Simone Biles of the United States wearing a protective face mask at the Olympic Games in Tokyo. Credit: Reuters/Lindsey Wasson)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn3h06)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxm9trkgyn)
US Capitol riot inquiry begins

We start in the US, where a congressional panel set up to investigate the US Capitol riot by supporters of Donald Trump will hold its first public hearing. The committee will look at how and why demonstrators stormed the building on January 6th. Our correspondent in Washington brings us the latest.

Also, we go to the Olympic Games in Tokyo, where US gymnast Simone Biles has pulled out of the women's team final. USA Gymnastics said she withdrew due to a medical issue, but gave no further details. Biles is the most successful US gymnast of all time and winner of four gold medals and a bronze at Rio 2016.

And our coronavirus expert of the day, Dr Swapneil Parikh in India, talks us through the main news lines of the day and answers your questions. If you have a question or an experience you would like to share, send us a WhatsApp to +447730 751925.

(Photo: Supporters of former US President Donald Trump demonstrate on the second floor of the US Capitol near the entrance to the Senate in Washington, US, January 6, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Mike Theiler/File Photo)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn3lrb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwl)
I was the sole survivor of a plane crash at the age of 11

When a plane carrying 11-year-old Norman Ollestad, his father and his father’s girlfriend, got caught in a snowstorm and crashed into the California mountains in 1979, Norman was the only survivor. Stranded on the edge of a cliff, Norman relied on the skills his father had taught him throughout his childhood to make it down the treacherous mountain to safety. 27 years later when Norman was married and had a son, he decided to return to the crash site to find out what really happened - there he made an extraordinary discovery.

Norman's memoir is called Crazy For the Storm. He has also written a short story called Formentera about the fraying relationship of a married couple.

The archive you heard comes courtesy of CBS.

Picture: Norman Ollestad
Credit: Courtesy of Norman Ollestad

Presenter: Mariana Des Forges
Producer: Mariana Des Forges

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn3qhg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5s6bgq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77t2rv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nf92m6l9t)
2021/07/27 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn3v7l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gj3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77t6hz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsb)
IoT saves driver after kidnapping in Mexico

After a fleet driver was kidnapped whilst driving in Mexico, the technology he had in his car alerted emergency services. Artificial vision and in-cabin video were used to flag the event in real-time. Combining Artificial Intelligence and Internet of Things technology sent the driver's location and video to the company's control centre who alerted law enforcement, allowing them to track him down and return him safely the same day. To find out more we spoke to Romil Bahl CEO of KORE Wireless the company behind the technology and Niv Yarimi CEO of KABAT, the fleet company whose driver was kidnapped.

Protecting the Amazon from deforestation with tech
Providing indigenous communities in the Amazon with technology, including satellite images, maps, smart phones and GPS, can reduce deforestation. Data delivered to remote communities on USB by couriers navigating the Amazon river enabled communities to monitor for forest loss. Connecting deforestation alerts with indigenous communities means local patrols can guide themselves to areas thought to be undergoing unauthorised deforestation. In turn this allows communities to defend their land from deforestation. Jessica Webb from Global Forest Watch tells us more.

Neurorights in Chile
Brain altering technology is becoming more sophisticated. Mostly developed to try and treat conditions including Parkinson's and epilepsy, there are concerns however about what might be created in the future. Could future smart devices in our homes read our thoughts? Chile hopes to protect neurorights through modification of their constitution. Jane Chambers reports.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Angelica Mari.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Concept of technology of the future in safe driving by car. Credit: Igor Borisenko / Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn3yzq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxwly9b)
US Capitol riot inquiry underway

Police on duty during the storming of the US Capitol building by Donald Trump supporters, have been giving their testimonies at a Congressional inquiry into the events of January 6th.

Also in the programme: Allegations of historic child abuse uncovered in the UK and America's most decorated gymnast pulls out of an Olympic final.

(Picture: Police officer Harry Dunn becomes emotional as he testifies before the inquiry investigating the attack on the US Capitol. Credit: EPA/Oliver Contreras / POOL)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn42qv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77tg07)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn46gz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrfg5jj0y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjhqmnknl)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77tkrc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48vyz6cr13)
Chinese technology shares fall

As investors fret about China's crackdown on tech firms, share prices continue to fall. David Kuo is co-founder of the Smart Investor website in Singapore, and explains the background. Also in the programme, we take a close look at prospects for the US's African Growth and Opportunity Act, which gives many African exporters tariff free access to the US, and faces renegotiation ahead of its expiry in four years' time. Pankaj Bedi is chair of Kenya's United Aryan EPZ which has been a beneficiary of the accord. Ekart Naumann is an economist at South Africa's Trade Law Centre and discusses the impact AGOA has had in Africa. And we hear what might replace AGOA from former Assistant US Trade Representative, Rosa Whitaker. Plus, the Qatar Goodwood Festival horse racing event runs until Saturday, and is the first major racing event to be held in the UK since all coronavirus restrictions were lifted just over a week ago. Adam Waterworth is managing director of the event and tells us how the races will differ from those that happened before the pandemic hit.

(Picture: A Chinese shareholder monitors prices. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 28 JULY 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn4fz7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqg37k1t8y)
Google owner posts record profits

Google owner Alphabet makes record financial successes – we hear from Sean Hollister at tech site The Verge about how the company made such an impressive post-pandemic recovery. The International Monetary Fund tells us about vaccine inequality in the world – Petya Koeva Brooks says there’s ‘no better investment’ than in reducing the gap. Meanwhile, the World Health Organisation has called for e-cigarettes to be regulated, warning that they are dangerous to health, and can lead children and young people in to smoking tobacco. Dr Rudiger Krech is director of health promotion at WHO. Finally, the American gymnastics champion, Simone Biles, has pulled out of the US women's team final in the Tokyo Olympics, citing mental health concerns – we discuss all of this with guests Lori Ann LaRoccoa, senior editor atCNBC in New Jersey and Simon Littlewood from ACG Global in Singapore.

(Image: Google logo seen displayed on a smartphone. Credit: Omar Marques/ SOPA Images/ LightRocket via Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn4kqc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbj)
Péter Szijjártó: Is Hungary undermining European values?

Stephen Sackur speaks to Hungarian Foreign Minister Péter Szijjártó. On a range of issues from press freedom to LGBT rights, Hungary routinely ignores the collective interpretation of EU values. Populist Prime Minister Viktor Orban seems to regard his increasingly toxic relationship with the EU’s institutions as a badge of honour and a political asset. But could Hungary's ongoing row with Brussels cost the country dear?

(Photo: Hungarian Foreign Minister Péter Szijjártó appears via video link on Hardtalk)


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77txzr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn4pgh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn4t6m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct2g9q)
The Test

Can America change?

International economist Jim O’Neill asks economists and historians if President Biden’s ambitions to ‘build back better’ - with a new focus on investing in human capital and addressing racial and financial inequalities - could result in fundamental changes to the characteristics of America’s economic system. Has the resilience that is critical to the DNA of America's economic system - its capacity to weather recurring financial storms and bounce back - survived Covid?

(Photo: US President Joe Biden speaks as Vice President Kamala Harris (L) looks on at an event marking the day that families will get their first monthly Child Tax Credit relief payments through the American Rescue Plan. Credit: Alex Edelman/ EPA)


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77v5h0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6r)
Helen and Kate Richardson-Walsh

Kate and Helen Richardson-Walsh relive the thrilling moment they won gold as part of the Great Britain field hockey team in a penalty shoot-out in Rio in 2016.

What is it like to win as a team? How do you create cohesion and spirit in a group, and what challenges does being partners off the field present to the whole team when you are on it?

We also look at how attitudes to LBGTQ+ people vary across sports. Why do some sports seem more welcoming and inclusive than others?


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn4xyr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2kzzh)
Americans urged to wear masks indoors

American health officials urge people to wear masks indoors again to combat a sharp rise in Covid cases. But will all states adhere to the rules?

US police officers have been giving harrowing accounts of how they were attacked by Trump supporters who stormed the US Capitol in January. We hear about the evidence given on the first day of the probe.

We head to Sydney where a lockdown has been extended by four weeks as vaccination rates remain low in Australia ?


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn51pw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2l3qm)
CDC recommends Americans wear masks indoors

The US Center for Disease Control and Prevention asks Americans to return to wearing masks in public indoor spaces as spread of the Delta variant continues.

A police officer who defended the US Capitol during the January the 6th riots on Capitol Hill by Donald Trump supporters, said he feared he would be crushed by the mob.

And Lebanon names an ex-PM as new the premier designate. Najib Mikati has urged unity to begin recovery from months of economic and financial ruin.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn55g0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2l7gr)
New US guidance on mask-wearing

American health officials urge people to wear masks indoors again to as the Delta variant leads to a sharp rise in Covid cases.
But will people heed the message?

There have been more appeals in the UK to allow former Afghan interpreters for the British forces settle in Britain rather than put their lives at risk in Afghanistan

And we have a report about the Covid situation in Myanmar amid accusations that the military rulers are withholding treatment from those who oppose them.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn5964)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77vngj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnt)
The billionaire space race

Why Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk are battling it out among the stars. Ed Butler speaks to Brad Stone, author of the book Amazon Unbound, about Amazon founder Jeff Bezos's lifelong obsession with space, and to Christian Davenport, space reporter for the Washington Post, about the growing rivalry between the worlds two richest men over government space contracts and the future of the space economy. Former astronaut Janet Kavandi tells us why, like Elon Musk, NASA has Mars colonisation in its sights.

(Photo: Jeff Bezos among Blue Origin’s New Shepard crew after flying into space on July 20, 2021. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7w)
The soldier who never surrendered

In January 1972 a Japanese soldier was found hiding in the jungle on the Pacific island of Guam. He had been living in the wild there for almost 30 years unaware that World War Two had ended. His name was Shoichi Yokoi. Mike Lanchin spoke to his nephew and biographer.

This programme is a rebroadcast

Photo: Shoichi Yokoi on his arrival back in Japan in 1972. Credit: Getty Images.


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn5dy8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2g9q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77vs6n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn5jpd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn5nfj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5s88ds)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77w0px)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn5s5n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y6dl6mx0tpj)
Sportsworld

Image: Andreas Toba (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images)


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn5wxs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5s8hx1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77w865)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lsb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn60nx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxwnzzj)
Russia and the US revive arms control talks

Senior officials from Russia and the United States meet in Geneva to kickstart talks on arms control negotiations.

Also in the programme: heavy rains hit Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh; and president Macron visits French Polynesia.

(Picture: The "Admiral Gorshkov" Russian warship in the White Sea makes a test launch of a Zircon hypersonic cruise missile. Credit: EPA/RUSSIAN DEFENCE MINISTRY PRESS SERVICE HANDOUT)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn64f1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77whpf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cr0j9v7gp)
US tech sees giant profits

Apple, Google's parent Alphabet and Microsoft made $57bn profits in the past three months. Kathleen Brooks is the director of Minerva Analysis, and explains why the US technology giants are performing so strongly. Also in the programme, we find out why the US pharmaceutical firm Pfizer is expecting to make significantly more money from its coronavirus vaccine than previously expected. The toy maker Mattel, known for its Barbie dolls, says it will have to raise prices in the run up to Christmas. Gary Grant, founder and chairman of toy retailer The Entertainer discusses the implications. Plus, as the world emerges from the pandemic, experts are predicting a wave of resignations, as millions of people reconsider what job they should be doing. The BBC's Rebecca Kesby asks whether power now lies with workers who might want a change.

(Picture: A Microsoft logo on an iPhone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn6855)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxm9trn83m)
Covid-19 in Asia

We'll look at the rapid rise in Covid cases in many parts of Asia, and hear about the situation in China, Malaysia and Bhutan. We speak to the BBC's regional specialists.

The US President Joe Biden has again appealed to all Americans to be vaccinated, and this week he is expected to announce a Covid-19 vaccination requirement for federal employees. We speak to health reporters in two American states - in Alabama where vaccination rate is the lowest in the country, and in Vermont which continues to lead the nation with the highest percentage of adults vaccinated.

And, we speak to our regular health expert Dr Maria Sundaram who answerd listeners' questions about the coronavirus.

Photo: An elderly man receives a dose of Covid-19 vaccine from a volunteer doctor in Malaysia. Credit: Ahmad Yusni/EPA)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn6cx9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxm9trncvr)
US Covid-19 vaccinations

US President Joe Biden has again appealed to all Americans to be vaccinated, and this week he is expected to announce a Covid vaccination requirement for federal employees. We speak to health reporters in two American states, in Alabama where vaccination rate is the lowest in the country, and in Vermont which continues to lead the nation with the highest percentage of adults vaccinated.

We'll speak to one of our regular coronavirus experts Dr Pedro Hallal, an epidemiologist from the Federal University of Pelotas in the south of Brazil.

And, Gymnast Simone Biles has withdrawn from Thursday's individual all-around final in Tokyo, following her earlier decision to pull out of the women's team final. We'll bring all the reaction to the latest.

Picture: A woman holds a small bottle labeled with a "Coronavirus COVID-19 Vaccine" sticker and a medical syringe in front of displayed USA flag in this illustration taken, October 30, 2020. Credit: REUTERS/Dado Ruvic


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn6hnf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyv)
The 80s song that brought back my memories

In the aftermath of a car accident at 19 years old, Thomas Leeds was left with no memories of his childhood, of his family and friends, even cultural references were all wiped away. As Thomas began to rebuild his life he struggled with thoughts about his future because, he says, he didn't know where he'd come from. He became obsessed with the popular culture of the 80s and 90s — the era of his childhood — hoping something would trigger his memory. Then, aged 30 while planning the perfect playlist for his 80s-themed birthday party, a song suddenly unlocked memories that had been lost for 10 years.

You can follow Thomas' story on twitter @thomasleeds

Picture: Collage of pictures of Thomas Leeds' brain scans, as a child and recently in hospital getting tests
Credit: All photos courtesy of Thomas Leeds

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Mariana des Forges

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn6mdk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5s97ct)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77wzny)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nf92m9h6x)
2021/07/28 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn6r4p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2g9q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77x3f2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvk)
Covid vaccination in prisons

New research on Covid vaccination in prisons. Plus can financial incentives like free tuition or free cruises encourage people to get the jab? Samara Linton reports on some surprising examples, while Professor Stephen Higgins reviews the evidence. And does the use of words like "provider" or "customer" subtly change healthcare? Claudia's guest is Matt Fox, Professor of Global Health Epidemiology at Boston University.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Prisoners at the La Modelo Correctional Facility wait to receive a Covid-19 vaccination administered by medical workers in Bogota, Colombia in July 2021. Photo credit: Juancho Torres/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn6vwt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxwpv6f)
China expanding its nuclear capabilities, scientists say

It is the second new silo field reported to be under construction in western China in the last two months. The site could house about 110 silos, which are underground facilities used for the storing and launching of missiles.

Also on the programme: France's top appeals court has upheld the conviction of the son of Equatorial Guinea's president for using public money to fund his lavish lifestyle, and we hear from an archaeologist who works at Chankillo in Northern Peru, the oldest solar observatory in the world, which has just been awarded Unesco World Heritage Status.

(Picture: U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman (L) and Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov. Credit: U.S. Mission Geneva/Handout via REUTERS)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn6zmy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77xbxb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn73d2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrfg5mdy1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjhqmrgkp)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77xgng)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48vyz6gmy6)
US tech sees giant profits

Apple, Google's parent Alphabet and Microsoft made $57bn profits in the past three months. Kathleen Brooks is the director of Minerva Analysis, and explains why the US technology giants are performing so strongly. Also in the programme, we find out why the US pharmaceutical firm Pfizer is expecting to make significantly more money from its coronavirus vaccine than previously expected. The toy maker Mattel, known for its Barbie dolls, says it will have to raise prices in the run up to Christmas. Gary Grant, founder and chairman of toy retailer The Entertainer discusses the implications. Plus, as the world emerges from the pandemic, experts are predicting a wave of resignations, as millions of people reconsider what job they should be doing. The BBC's Rebecca Kesby asks whether power now lies with workers who might want a change.

(Picture: A Microsoft logo on an iPhone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 29 JULY 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn7bwb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqg37k4q61)
Trillion dollar US plan voted on

President Biden welcomes Senate Republicans and Democrats coming together to agree a trillion dollar infrastructure package - Dr Iris Tien specialises in structural engineering and infrastructure at Georgia Tech University and tells us the benefits to US buildings and technology. The US’s central bank, the Federal Reserve, has given its outlook for the US economy after its latest policy meeting – although there is positive news for the economy, cheaper money in the form of low interest may not last as long as some hoped. Plus, we look at how Covid has made Pfizer one of the best known companies in the world and boosted its profits – with more on the horizon. We discuss all this live guests Erin Delmore, a political reporter in New York and Samson Ellis, Bloomberg’s Taipei Bureau Chief.


(Image: President Joe Biden speaks at a truck factory on July 28, 2021 in Pennsylvania. Credit: Michael M. Santiago/ Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn7gmg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z28)
Why was the president of Haiti assassinated?

Haiti was the first Caribbean country to gain its independence after a successful revolt against slavery. But the country has been troubled ever since, suffering dictatorships, coups and natural disasters.

Now its most recent president, Jovenel Moise, has been assassinated. His controversial rule was marred by the rise of gang violence, and protests against corruption and impunity. He upset people in the fields of politics and business too. And as he failed to hold elections, parliament is no longer functioning. So in this edition of The Inquiry, Charmaine Cozier asks: why was the president of Haiti assassinated? And where can the country go from here?

Producer: Arlene Gregorius

(President Jovenel Moise in the capital Port-au-Prince in 2016. Photo: Hector Retamal /Getty Images.)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77xtwv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn7lcl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn7q3q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxm)
Rebuilding Beirut’s village in a city

A year ago Johnny Khawand saw the home he grew up in ripped apart by the massive explosion in a chemical dump in the port of Beirut, Lebanon – one of the largest non-nuclear blasts in history.
For hours Johnny fought to save neighbours trapped in the rubble, seeing some die in front of him. Now, after months of restoration work, he’s coming back to try to rebuild his life, hoping that the unique spirit of his close-knit, multi-faith neighbourhood – Karantina – will survive. As he enters his house again for the first time, memories flood back – both comforting and distressing. Johnny and other survivors have formed close bonds with some of the volunteers, including engineers and architects, who’ve spent the last year rebuilding the district for free. They’re passionate about restoring its ancient buildings exactly as they were before. But they’re angry that they’ve received no help from the Lebanese state, which is accused of negligence over the explosion. And Johnny and others now fear that wider redevelopment plans will bring in big money and change Karantina’s character forever. Tim Whewell asks if Beirut’s “village in a city”, with its many layers of history and memory, can survive?

Reporter and producer: Tim Whewell
Producer: Mohamad Chreyteh
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Beirut explosion survivors Manal Ghaziri and Johnny Khawand outside the ruins of a neighbours' house in the Karantina district. Credit: Mohamad Chreyteh/BBC)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77y2d3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfy)
Is it time to kill the calorie?

Calories are ubiquitous across most of the world and have been used to help people manage their weight for more than a century. But have we been counting them wrong all along? In this episode, Emily Thomas finds out how the calorie is a lot more complex than many of us realise.

Historian Louise Foxcroft describes how this measure of energy became the darling of scientists and public health experts across the globe, and the unwitting bedfellow of the diet industry. Geneticist Giles Yeo argues that calorie counting can actually be harmful, encouraging us to make unhealthy choices, and Bridget Benelam from the British Nutrition Foundation explains why she thinks that despite all its flaws, the calorie will be with us for a good while yet.


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn7tvv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2nwwl)
US trillion-dollar infrastructure bill moves a step closer

President Joe Biden had pledged during his election campaign to rebuild the roads, rail-tracks, power grids, broadband and waterways of the United States and this plan has received a boost after a majority of Senators agreed to debate this bill.

We go to Peru where President of Pedro Castillo, a former schoolteacher and Union leader, has been sworn in after a lengthy and acrimonious vote count.

And we find out about the Global Education Summit where the British and Kenyan leaders are discussing how to transform access to education for millions of vulnerable children.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn7ylz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2p0mq)
Major boost to President Biden's infrastructure plans

A bipartisan group of US Senators has agreed to move forward with a debate on one of President Biden's key election pledges. The infrastructure bill is worth over a trillion dollars. We ask why this moment is significant and whether the bill might pass.

We go to Lebanon as the country prepares to mark a year since the devastating explosion which rocked the capital Beirut.

And we take a look at Olympic mums. If you think it's hard to win a gold medal, what about when you also have a very young child!


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn82c3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2p4cv)
US breakthrough in $1tn infrastructure bill

The US Senate has voted to advance a historic, trillion-dollar infrastructure package which is seen a breakthrough after weeks of bitter negotiations. So what would the money be spent on, if it passes?

We are live in Bhutan to speak to a member of the Covid-19 vaccination taskforce after the Himalayan Kingdom managed to vaccinate 90% of its population in just seven days.

And we go to Senegal which is one of the countries waiting for vaccines. Its initial success in fighting Covid has now turned into a crisis.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn8637)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z28)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77ykcm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9j)
Miles Copeland's life in the music business

Lessons from nearly fifty years producing and managing bands, with industry veteran Miles Copeland III. From brilliantly promoting his brother's band The Police, to founding a record label for all the misfits in the industry: the Buzzcocks, the Cramps, The Go Go's, R.E.M., The Bangles, and many more; the American-born, Lebanon-raised record executive, and now the author of the memoir 'Two Steps Forward, One Step Back', tells the BBC's Ed Butler how he built his empire with music nobody else wanted.

Producer: Frey Lindsay.

(Picture: Stewart Copeland, Andy Summers and Sting from The Police at the A&M offices after signing a record deal. Their manager, Miles Copeland is 3rd from left. Picture credit: Richard E. Aaron/Redferns via Getty Images.)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3c)
Fighting for the pill in Japan

After decades of campaigning in Japan, the pill was finally legalised in 1999. In contrast, the male impotency drug Viagra was approved for use in just six months, and legalised before the contraceptive pill for women. Politician Yoriko Madoka pushed hard for the right to take the pill and told Rebecca Kesby that sexism and male dominance in Parliament is why it took so long.

(Photo: A collection of contraceptive pills. Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn89vc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77yp3r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn8flh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlg)
The Panama Canal: The real story behind the engineering triumph

Completed in 1914, the Panama Canal has long been regarded as a triumph of American ingenuity, a conquest over nature that helped secure the United States’ position as a world power. Taking ten years to build, it opened up new trading routes between East and West by providing a vital waterway between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. But what was the real story behind this challenging engineering project? How were the Panamanians affected? Who were the tens of thousands of workers who built the canal? And what was the environmental impact of work that literally cut through a mountain and redirected two oceans? And with climate change, will the Panama Canal be such a vital waterway in the future?

Joining Bridget Kendall, is the Panamanian academic Dr Marixa Lasso, author of “Erased: The Untold Story of the Panama Canal”, the first major book on the Canal from the Panamanian point of view; Julie Greene, Professor of History at the University of Maryland, and the author of “The Canal Builders: Making America’s Empire at the Panama Canal”, and Paul Sutter, Professor of Environmental History at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and author of a forthcoming book on the impact of US public health measures during the construction of the Panama Canal.

Producer: Anne Khazam

(Image: A painting depicting the S.S. Ancon, the first ship to pass through the Panama Canal on the opening day on 15 August,1914 in the Canal Zone, Panama. Credit: Illustration by Ed Vebell/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8h)
Zamzam Farah - Somalia's inspiring runner

At the London 2012 Olympics, Somalia sprinter Zamzam Farah became a crowd favourite after finishing last in her 400-metre heat by a whopping 27 seconds. Zamzam had grown up in war-torn Mogadishu, where she had to dodge violence from the militant Al-Shabab group while training on the so-called "Road of Death". Zamzam competed with her body fully covered, but, after the Olympics, her family in Somalia received death threats because of what Al-Shabab considered unacceptable behaviour for a Muslim woman. She remained in the UK and won asylum. Zamzam Farah talks to Ian Williams.

PHOTO: Zamzam Farah competing at the 2012 Olympics (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn8kbm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5sc59w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77yxm0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn8p2r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y6dl6mx3qlm)
Sportsworld

Image: Simone Biles (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn8stw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5scdt4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77z538)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn8xl0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxwrwwm)
World leaders gather to tackle global education crisis

World leaders are meeting in London for a global education summit that is aiming to raise $5billion to tackle a catastrophic disruption to schooling globally, caused by the pandemic. The summit wants to support the education of 175 million children globally. Girls' education is at the forefront of the agenda, with the Summit also hoping to fund books, train teachers and build classrooms. We speak to the Summit CEO.

Also on the programme: a billionaire businessman jailed in China for 'picking quarrels and provoking trouble'; and the Olympic athletes who are also new mothers.

(Picture: The summit wants to support the education of 175 million children in the world's poorest countries. Credit: )


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn91b4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z28)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77zdlj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y498pbhw72x)
US economic recovery continues

US economic growth for the second quarter brought the economy back to pre-pandemic levels. The BBC's Samira Hussain talks us through the latest data, and we get analysis from Dr Steve Hanke, professor of applied economics at Johns Hopkins University. Also in the programme, thirty years after the overthrow of President Siad Barre in Somalia, the country is still struggling to rebuild. We take a closer look at its prospects, and Professor Laura Hammond of the School of Oriental and African Studies explains the country's current situation. Somalia is rapidly building an online economy, and Mohamed Abdala Mohamud talks us through the Faras Online Market. And Abdalah Abdullahi Mohamud of Somalia's largest telecoms provider Hormuud, which is behind the popular money transfer app EVC+, explains how Somalia has become a near-cashless society. Plus, the BBC's Russell Padmore reports on how the pandemic has impacted the finances of Europe's football clubs.

(Picture: A worker on a vehicle production line. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn9528)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxm9trr50q)
Covid-19 in Asia

Many countries across South East Asia are seeing rising numbers of Covid-19 infections and fresh outbreaks. We'll speak to our correspondents about the situations in Thailand, Myanmar and Indonesia.

Also, after recent extreme weather events in North America, Europe and Asia, we’ll bring together climate change experts in those regions to discuss how climate change contributes to these events. We’ll discuss preparedness, solutions and also look ahead to the UN climate change conference later this year.

And Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland – will answer your questions about coronavirus and the vaccine.

(Photo: Residents and school students wait for their turn to receive a dose of COVID-19 vaccine during a mass vaccination at a school building in Jakarta, Indonesia, 29 July 2021. Credit: EPA/ADI WEDA)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn98td)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxm9trr8rv)
Extreme weather and climate change: Your questions answered

In the last few weeks we've seen extreme weather events all around the world - North America, Europe and Asia - whether that's flooding, heatwaves or wildfires. Today we'll bring together three climate change experts from these regions to answer questions from listeners around the world.

Also, in Malta a public inquiry into the assassination of investigative journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia has found the state responsible for her death. Caruana Galizia died in a car bomb attack near her home in October 2017. We'll bring you the latest from a journalist there.

And Dr Helen Wimalarathna, Molecular Epidemiologist at the University of Buckingham in the UK, will answer your questions on coronavirus and the vaccines.

(Photo: India's National Disaster Response Force RF personnel rescuing stranded villagers from flooded areas in Maharashtra state, India, 25 July 2021. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn9dkj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3c)
'Horses saved my life' - how a boy from West Philly made polo history

Kareem Rosser grew up in one of Philadelphia’s most deprived neighbourhoods - an unlikely environment to discover a love for the elite game of polo, also known as the sport of kings. He shares his story of making history with his all African American team.

Picture: A young Kareem Rosser riding a horse
Credit: Image from CTL Cover, credit Lezlie Hiner

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn9j9n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5sd48x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp77zwl1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nf92mdd40)
2021/07/29 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn9n1s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp7800b5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3z)
The earliest traces of animal life on earth.

Do rocks found in Canada show animal life 350 million years older than any found before?
And, delving to the core of Mars, the guts of cats, and into the life of Steven Weinberg.

Prof Elizabeth Turner of Canada's Laurentian University reports in the journal Nature structures in some of the oldest sedimentary rocks that resemble the residue left by sponges such as the sort you might find in a bath. 350 million years older than the oldest such fossils yet identified, if they are left by such animals, they represent a complex life that existed some 90 million years before - it has been supposed - there was even enough oxygen to support such development. As she tells us, rather like previous geologists investigating the deep history of life, Elizabeth has been sitting on this idea since she was a young researcher.

Since 2019 NASA's InSight probe has been on the surface of Mars listening for seismic waves from below to try to form a picture of the planet's internal structure. Last week in the journal Science, three papers presented data and analysis and some surprises for planetary scientists trying to work out how a planet that began almost, but not quite, so similar to earth could have turned out so different today. Cambridge University's Dr Sanna Cottaar gives us her take on the exciting findings.

Most of our understanding of genetics – diseases and heritability – is derived from decades of deep studies into just a few model species besides humans. But Prof Lesley Lyons runs a lab at the University of Missouri focusing almost entirely on cats. She describes to Roland a proclamation she makes this week to her fellow scientists to do more work into cat genetics and how, because of the similarities between cats and human genomes, that will bring all sorts of benefits to human (and cat) health.

Earlier this week we heard of the death of physicist Steven Weinberg - one of the giants of 20th century particle physics and cosmology. Roland presents recordings and reminiscences of a remarkable scientist who provided so much insight into the first 3 minutes of our universe's existence...

Image: Field locations in Northwest Territories, Canada
Credit: Elizabeth Turner, Laurentian University

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn9rsx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxwsr3j)
More than $4 billion raised at Global Education Summit

Nobel laureate Malala Yousafzai said girls in particular faced an "education crisis". UK PM Boris Johnson said that investing in education in some of the world's poorest countries is the "single best investment we can make in the future of humanity".

Also on the programme, a public inquiry into the assassination of Maltese investigative journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia has found the state responsible for her death. And the grammy award winning artist Olga Tañon pays tribute to Johnny Ventura, the legendary merengue singer who has died at the age of 81.

(Picture: Malala Yousafzai, joining by video link on the second day of the Global Education Summit in London. Credit: Akmen/ Reuters)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hn9wk1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z28)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp7807tf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnb095)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrfg5q9v4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjhqmvcgs)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp780ckk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48vyz6kjv9)
President Biden announces vaccine requirement for US federal workers

US President Biden has announced federal employees will be required to get a Covid vaccine or submit to regular testing in order to work. The announcement comes as US economic growth for the second quarter brought the economy back to pre-pandemic levels. We'll hear from Liz Ann Sonders of Charles Schwab and Cary Leahy of Decision Economics. Also in the programme, thirty years after the overthrow of President Siad Barre in Somalia, the country is still struggling to rebuild. We take a closer look at its prospects, and Professor Laura Hammond of the School of Oriental and African Studies explains the country's current situation. Somalia is rapidly building an online economy, and Mohamed Abdala Mohamud talks us through the Faras Online Market. And Abdalah Abdullahi Mohamud of Somalia's largest telecoms provider Hormuud, which is behind the popular money transfer app EVC+, explains how Somalia has become a near-cashless society. And the BBC's James Clayton gets an inside look into a gas-powered cryptocurrency mine.

(Picture: US President Joe Biden. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 30 JULY 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnb7sf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqg37k7m34)
President Biden announces vaccine requirement for US federal workers

President Biden has announced federal employees will be required to get a Covid vaccine or submit to regular testing in order to work. The announcement comes as US economic growth for the second quarter brought the economy back to pre-pandemic levels. We'll hear from Cary Leahy of Decision Economics. Also in the programme, thirty years after the overthrow of President Siad Barre in Somalia, the country is still struggling to rebuild. We take a closer look at its prospects, and Professor Laura Hammond of the School of Oriental and African Studies explains the country's current situation. Somalia is rapidly building an online economy, and Mohamed Abdala Mohamud talks us through the Faras Online Market. And Abdalah Abdullahi Mohamud of Somalia's largest telecoms provider Hormuud, which is behind the popular money transfer app EVC+, explains how Somalia has become a near-cashless society. And the BBC's James Clayton gets an inside look into a gas-powered cryptocurrency mine.

All through the show we'll be joined by Rachel Puppazoni of ABC News in Australia, and Paddy Hirsch of NPR in Los Angeles.

(Picture: US President Biden. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnbcjk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1h)
Lazarus Chakwera: President of Malawi

Sarah Montague speaks to the President of Malawi, Lazarus Chakwera. The preacher turned politician won power last year pledging to create a million jobs and “clear the rubble” of corruption. But a year on, the economy is being hit hard by the effects of Covid, his government admits it has no idea how many jobs have been created and he’s been accused of nepotism. Can President Chakwera keep the promises he made during the election?

(Photo: Lazarus Chakwera, President of Malawi in the Hardtalk studio)


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp780qsy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnbh8p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnbm0t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh7)
Intel’s road ahead

Pat Gelsinger, the CEO of Intel, outlines his plan to regain the lead in silicon chips. Plus, the US tech giants report bumper quarterly profits. Will regulators be taking note? And is the battle against online terrorist propaganda being won? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Stock photo of a silicon chip with a road vanishing into the distance, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp780z96)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 World Football (w3ct1tzb)
Olympic opportunities, regression and pressure

South Africa's Janine van Wyk discusses the future opportunities for Zambia's Barbra Banda following some impressive performances at the Tokyo Olympics. China's under-16 coach Chan Yuen Ting reflects on why the country isn't producing more talented players. And Pat Nevin looks ahead to the start of the new season in Scotland.

Picture: Zambia's Barbra Banda celebrates a goal against China at the Tokyo Olympics. (Photo by KOHEI CHIBAHARA/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnbqry)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2rssp)
Biden: federal workers must be vaccinated or tested

The US president also calls on states to offer financial incentives to vaccinated people.

In Tokyo, South African swimming has had a historic moment at the Olympic games.

And street protests and a national strike in Guatemala: protesters call for the president to resign after an anti-corruption judge is sacked.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnbvj2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2rxjt)
Biden says US facing 'pandemic of the unvaccinated'

The President announces a series of new measures aimed to stop the spread of Covid.

We have a report from inside one of the Bitcoin-making plants which release as much Carbon dioxide into the air as the whole of Colombia.

And Mexicans are worried by a significant rise in the cost of tortillas, the countries corn-based staple food


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnbz86)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2rgr2s18y)
US Covid: could the offer of $100 encourage Americans to get the jab?

President Biden announces that federal workers must get vaccinated or be tested regularly. He's also called on states to pay people to have the vaccine.

It can be one of the coldest places on earth so why is Siberia being plagued by wildfires?

And a stone Age axe dating back 1.3 million years is unearthed in Morocco. We find out what it could teach us about our human ancestors.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnc30b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp781g8q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0h)
The rise of digital therapy

Mental health care apps have boomed during the pandemic. But can receiving therapy through an app ever be as good as face to face? And do they raise concerns over our privacy? Tamasin Ford speaks to Brad Kettridge, founder and CEO of the mental health care app Brightside as well as the co-founder of the Oliva app, Sancir Sahin, which is aimed at businesses. We also hear from writer Julie Peck who suffers from bipolar disorder on why she sought help from one of these apps. John Torous, director of the digital psychiatry division at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, and Heleen Riper, professor of eMental-Health and Clinical Psychology at the Amsterdam University Medical Centre, discuss some of the concerns around privacy and effectiveness of digital mental health care.

(Image credit: Getty Images).


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyv)
The Tsunami and Fukushima

Remembering the earthquake and tsunami which devastated Japan and triggered a nuclear emergency in 2011. Max Pearson, who reported from Japan at the time, presents eyewitness accounts of the disaster which left thousands dead and led to many questioning the future of the country's nuclear industry.

Photo: Tsunami smashes into the city of Miyako in Iwate prefecture shortly after an earthquake hit the region of northern Japan, 11th March 2011 (JIJI PRESS/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnc6rg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp781l0v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hncbhl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsq)
Why has Australia's Covid strategy faltered?

Australia has been seen as a success story when it comes to controlling the spread of the coronavirus and was praised by US official Dr Anthony Fauci as being a world leader in “containment and management of emerging variants”. The country had zero deaths from locally acquired Covid-19 infections during the first half of 2021 and has seen fewer than 1,000 deaths since the start of the pandemic. But a new outbreak of the Delta variant has thrown Sydney into lockdown and cases continue to rise, prompting other states to accuse New South Wales of not locking down fast enough or hard enough. The national government in Canberra has been criticised for one of the slowest vaccine rollouts among industrialised countries and reports of rare blood clots linked to the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab have left many confused as to which age groups should take it. So what went wrong with Australia's 'gold standard' response to Covid-19? As anti-lockdown protesters take to the streets, why is the policy failing to bring down cases in Sydney? Has Delta changed the game and could vaccine hesitancy delay any return to normal? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hncg7q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5sg26z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp781tj3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tzb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnckzv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 Sportsworld (w172y6dl6mx6mhq)
Sportsworld

(Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images)


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hncpqz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5sg9q7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp78220c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hncth3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxwvssq)
Tigray: 400,000 people living in famine-like conditions says UN

More than 5 million people are in need of urgent aid in the Ethiopian region of Tigray. Months of insecurity and conflict in the region have made it impossible for farmers to plant as normal - and aid convoys have met with obstacles as they've tried to reach families in need.

Also on the programme: the Australian government says it's deploying hundreds of soldiers on to the streets of Sydney to enforce the continuing lockdown; and today sees the start of the BBC Proms festival, which will have no social distancing.

(Picture: Woman in Tigray. Credit: Reuters/ Paravicini)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hncy77)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp7829hm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46tc4px6q4)
Eurozone out of recession

Whilst the Eurozone economy remains smaller than pre-pandemic, it is out of recession. BBC economics correspondent Andrew Walker takes a closer look at the picture across the various countries that use the Euro. And with Spain and Portugal among the strongest performing economies, Jorge Trader, who manages those countries at the European Tourism Association, tells us what recovery looks like in his sector. Also in the programme, a new assessment from the central bank of South Korea says the North Korean economy has suffered its sharpest decline in more than 20 years. Peter Ward of Seoul National University in South Korea discusses the figures and explains how estimates of North Korean economic activity are made. Mental health care apps have boomed in popularity during the pandemic. The BBC's Tamasin Ford asks if they are as good as face-to-face treatment, and explores privacy concerns. Plus, the Hollywood star Scarlett Johansson is suing Disney for breach of contract after it streamed her film Black Widow at the same time as its cinema release, arguing that the move deprived her of potential earnings. Anna Nicolaou is US media correspondent for the Financial Times and considers the prospects for the case.

(Picture: A packed beach in San Sebastian, Spain. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnd1zc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxm9trv1xt)
Covid-19 in Asia

This week we've been looking at the countries across Asia that are seeing rising numbers of Covid-19 infections and fresh outbreaks. We'll speak to our correspondents about the situations in China, South Korea and Vietnam.

President Biden has called on Congress to extend the federal moratorium that protects renters and aims to prevent the spread of Covid-19. Millions of people are facing eviction when the moratorium ends this week, and we’ll hear from some of them.

In July and August we're speaking to journalists from countries we've not covered yet when it comes to Covid-19. Today we're going to Norway. This week the country postponed - for a second time - an end to lockdown due to the continued spread of the Delta variant.

(Photo: A woman gets a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test at a coronavirus testing site in Seoul, South Korea, July 15, 2021. Credit: Kim Hong-Ji/File Photo/Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnd5qh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxm9trv5ny)
Simone Biles still struggling with 'twisties'

US gymnast Simone Biles says she is still struggling with the 'twisties', raising doubts over her participation in her remaining Olympic finals. We hear from other gymnasts who've had similar experiences.

President Biden has called on Congress to extend the federal moratorium that protects renters and aims to prevent the spread of Covid-19. Millions of people are facing eviction when the moratorium ends this week, and we’ll hear from some of them.

This week we've been looking at the countries across Asia that are seeing rising numbers of Covid-19 infections and fresh outbreaks. We'll speak to our correspondents about the situations in China, South Korea and Vietnam.

(Photo: Simone Biles has withdrawn from the individual all-around competition at the Tokyo Olympics “to focus on her mental health”, USA Gymnastics has announced. Credit: Martin Rickett/PA Wire)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hnd9gm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f7)
Kyiv march: 'Eucharist is our vaccine'

This week tens of thousands of Orthodox Christians marched through Kyiv, despite coronavirus restrictions, to mark the anniversary of Vladimir the Great adopting the Christian faith. Myroslava Petsa of BBC Ukrainian reported from the march and tells us why it was so controversial this year.

For the love of dancehall
Egyptian Yara Saleh turned her back on a prestigious career as an oil engineer to devote her life to dance. Specifically to dancehall, a genre that originated in Jamaica. She's now choreographing routines and introducing dancehall to fellow Egyptians, as Rana Taha found out for BBC Arabic.

Our Ancestors
BBC Indian languages are running their second Humari Purakhin, or Our Ancestors, season, celebrating India's female pioneers. This season focuses on marginalised communities, and BBC Marathi's Anagha Pathak chose the first recorded Dalit headmistress and feminist, Jaibai Chaundray.

Discovering the world's largest sapphire
A Sri Lankan man became fabulously wealthy overnight after finding the world's largest star sapphire while digging a well in his garden. It is estimated to sell for $100 million. The BBC's Anbarasan Ethirajan in Delhi has followed the story.

From bans to Olympic medals: Brazil’s skateboard journey
Brazil’s Olympic skateboarders are being hailed as heroes with their medal success in Tokyo. But skateboarding was banned in many Brazilian cities in the late 1980s. Thais Carrança of BBC Brasil tells us about the skateboarders of Sao Paulo, and the new mayor who gave them back their freedom.

Image: Worshippers in the streets of Kyiv
Credit: BBC


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hndf6r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxkw5sh160)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp782sh4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nf92mh913)
2021/07/30 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hndjyw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp782x78)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqq)
Do I really have to clean my recycling?

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. It’s a well-known phrase that we all try and follow in our day to day lives. But are our current recycling habits the best they can be? It’s a hot topic at Crowdscience - multiple listeners have contacted Crowdscience with questions about the ins and outs of recycling.

We follow one listener’s food waste to a processing plant to investigate whether or not it could be processed in our own homes. But aside from the food waste, what about the containers it comes in? We investigate if food containers really need to be cleaned before we put them in recycling bins, or if that just wastes water.

Recycling processes differ all over the world, so we hear from reporter Chhavi Sachdev in Mumbai, India, who follows her plastic waste to find out how plastic sorting and recycling is a whole economy of its own.

But new technologies have meant that biodegradable and bioderived plastics are starting to appear in our packaging, and one Crowdscience listener wants to know which is better for the environment – traditional plastic that has been recycled, or bioplastic and compostable alternatives? And looking to the future, could we ever recycle our plastic waste at home and use 3D printers to make useful things out of our own waste?

Marnie Chesterton delves into these questions with Circular Economy Project Manager Dr Rhiannon Hunt of Manchester Metropolitan University, to discover the details of recycling and unearth how we can make our own recycling as efficient as possible.

With Dave Atkins, reporter Chhavi Sachdev and Dr Rhiannon Hunt.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Produced by Hannah Fisher for the BBC World Service.



[Image credit; Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hndnq0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv56sxwwn0m)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hndsg4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp7834qj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tzb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjn7hndx68)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywrfg5t6r7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sjhqmy8cw)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkgp7838gn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48vyz6nfrd)
Eurozone out of recession

Whilst the Eurozone economy remains smaller than pre-pandemic, it is out of recession. BBC economics correspondent Andrew Walker takes a closer look at the picture across the various countries that use the Euro. And with Spain and Portugal among the strongest performing economies, Jorge Trader, who manages those countries at the European Tourism Association, tells us what recovery looks like in his sector. Also in the programme, a new assessment from the central bank of South Korea says the North Korean economy has suffered its sharpest decline in more than 20 years. Peter Ward of Seoul National University in South Korea discusses the figures and explains how estimates of North Korean economic activity are made. Mental health care apps have boomed in popularity during the pandemic. The BBC's Tamasin Ford asks if they are as good as face-to-face treatment, and explores privacy concerns. Plus, the Hollywood star Scarlett Johansson is suing Disney for breach of contract after it streamed her film Black Widow at the same time as its cinema release, arguing that the move deprived her of potential earnings. Anna Nicolaou is US media correspondent for the Financial Times and considers the prospects for the case.

(Picture: A packed beach in San Sebastian, Spain. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3ct1gxl)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3ct1gxm)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxm)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gxm)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkg9yybh36)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkg9yybvbl)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkg9yyc6kz)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkg9yycbb3)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkg9yycktc)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkg9yydf18)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkg9yyf0rx)

BBC News Summary 01:30 SUN (w172xzkg9yyf885)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkg9yyfd09)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkg9yyfr7p)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkg9yyg3h2)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkg9yyg776)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzkg9yygbzb)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkg9yyggqg)

BBC News Summary 12:30 SUN (w172xzkg9yyglgl)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkg9yyhfph)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkg9yyhsxw)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkg9yyhxp0)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkgp77n0ff)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkgp77n45k)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkgp77n7xp)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172xzkgp77ncnt)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzkgp77nvnb)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172xzkgp77nzdg)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172xzkgp77p34l)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkgp77p6wq)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkgp77pgcz)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkgp77ppw7)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkgp77q5vr)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkgp77q9lw)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkgp77qk34)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkgp77qnv8)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkgp77r12n)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkgp77r8kx)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzkgp77rrkf)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkgp77rw9k)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkgp77s3st)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkgp77sc92)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkgp77slsb)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzkgp77t2rv)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzkgp77t6hz)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzkgp77tg07)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkgp77tkrc)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkgp77txzr)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkgp77v5h0)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkgp77vngj)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172xzkgp77vs6n)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkgp77w0px)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkgp77w865)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkgp77whpf)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkgp77wzny)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzkgp77x3f2)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkgp77xbxb)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkgp77xgng)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkgp77xtwv)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkgp77y2d3)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkgp77ykcm)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzkgp77yp3r)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkgp77yxm0)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzkgp77z538)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzkgp77zdlj)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkgp77zwl1)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzkgp7800b5)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzkgp7807tf)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkgp780ckk)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkgp780qsy)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkgp780z96)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzkgp781g8q)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172xzkgp781l0v)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkgp781tj3)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzkgp78220c)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzkgp7829hm)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzkgp782sh4)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172xzkgp782x78)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172xzkgp7834qj)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkgp7838gn)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bn02p)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bn3tt)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bn7ky)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bncb2)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bnh26)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bnltb)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bnqkg)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bnv9l)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bnz1q)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bp2sv)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bp6jz)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bpb93)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bpg17)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bpksc)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bq1rw)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bq5j0)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bq984)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bqf08)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bqjrd)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172xzjmw7bqnhj)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7bqwzs)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7br0qx)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7br4h1)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7br875)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7brcz9)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7brhqf)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7brmgk)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7brr6p)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7brvyt)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7brzpy)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7bs3g2)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7bs766)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7bsbyb)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7bsgpg)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7bslfl)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7bsq5q)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7bt2f3)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7bt657)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7bt9xc)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7btfnh)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172xzjmw7btkdm)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjn7hmyn51)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172xzjn7hmyrx5)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172xzjn7hmywn9)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172xzjn7hmz0df)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172xzjn7hmz44k)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172xzjn7hmz7wp)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172xzjn7hmzcmt)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172xzjn7hmzhcy)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172xzjn7hmzm42)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172xzjn7hmzqw6)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjn7hmzvmb)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172xzjn7hmzzcg)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172xzjn7hn033l)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172xzjn7hn06vq)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172xzjn7hn0blv)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172xzjn7hn0gbz)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzjn7hn0l33)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172xzjn7hn0pv7)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172xzjn7hn0tlc)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172xzjn7hn0ybh)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172xzjn7hn122m)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172xzjn7hn15tr)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjn7hn19kw)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn1k24)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn1nt8)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn1skd)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn1x9j)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn211n)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn24ss)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn28jx)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn2d91)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn2j15)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn2ms9)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn2rjf)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn2w8k)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn300p)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn33rt)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn37hy)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn3c82)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn3h06)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn3lrb)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn3qhg)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn3v7l)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn3yzq)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn42qv)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjn7hn46gz)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn4fz7)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn4kqc)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn4pgh)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn4t6m)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn4xyr)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn51pw)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn55g0)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn5964)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn5dy8)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn5jpd)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn5nfj)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn5s5n)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn5wxs)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn60nx)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn64f1)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn6855)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn6cx9)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn6hnf)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn6mdk)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn6r4p)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn6vwt)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn6zmy)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjn7hn73d2)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn7bwb)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn7gmg)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn7lcl)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn7q3q)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn7tvv)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn7ylz)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn82c3)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn8637)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn89vc)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn8flh)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn8kbm)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn8p2r)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn8stw)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn8xl0)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn91b4)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn9528)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn98td)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn9dkj)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn9j9n)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn9n1s)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn9rsx)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172xzjn7hn9wk1)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjn7hnb095)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hnb7sf)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hnbcjk)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hnbh8p)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hnbm0t)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hnbqry)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hnbvj2)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hnbz86)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hnc30b)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hnc6rg)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hncbhl)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hncg7q)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hnckzv)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hncpqz)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hncth3)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hncy77)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hnd1zc)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hnd5qh)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hnd9gm)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hndf6r)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hndjyw)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hndnq0)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hndsg4)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjn7hndx68)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d5z)

BBC OS Conversations 02:06 SUN (w3ct2d5z)

BBC OS Conversations 22:06 SUN (w3ct2d5z)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxm9trgg9f)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxm9trgl1k)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxm9trkc6j)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172xxxm9trkgyn)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172xxxm9trn83m)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172xxxm9trncvr)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172xxxm9trr50q)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxxm9trr8rv)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172xxxm9trv1xt)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxm9trv5ny)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j50)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jg1)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jnt)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1j9j)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j0h)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqfqz7kcdd)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqg37jyxcv)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqg37k1t8y)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqg37k4q61)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqg37k7m34)

Business Weekly 04:06 SUN (w3ct2dh0)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dh0)

CrowdScience 02:32 MON (w3ct1pqp)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqp)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pqp)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pqq)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lsb)

Digital Planet 02:32 WED (w3ct1lsb)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lsb)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lsb)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2gj1)

Discovery 02:32 TUE (w3ct2gj1)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct2gj1)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2gj1)

From Our Own Correspondent 02:06 SAT (w3ct1mv3)

From Our Own Correspondent 05:06 SUN (w3ct1mv3)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mv3)

HARDtalk 02:06 MON (w3ct1n60)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n60)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n60)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3ct1n60)

HARDtalk 02:06 WED (w3ct1nbj)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1nbj)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1nbj)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3ct1nbj)

HARDtalk 02:06 FRI (w3ct1n1h)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n1h)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n1h)

HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3ct1n1h)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nvk)

Health Check 02:32 THU (w3ct1nvk)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nvk)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvk)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2h08)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2h08)

Heart and Soul 03:32 MON (w3ct2h08)

In the Studio 01:32 MON (w3ct1td7)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1td8)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1td8)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1td8)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dk8)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dk8)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2dk8)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dk8)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hc4)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hc4)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2rgr2d659)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv2rgr2d9xf)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172xv2rgr2dfnk)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172xv2rgr2h32d)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172xv2rgr2h6tj)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172xv2rgr2hbkn)

Newsday 05:06 WED (w172xv2rgr2kzzh)

Newsday 06:06 WED (w172xv2rgr2l3qm)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172xv2rgr2l7gr)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172xv2rgr2nwwl)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172xv2rgr2p0mq)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172xv2rgr2p4cv)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172xv2rgr2rssp)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172xv2rgr2rxjt)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172xv2rgr2s18y)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172xv56fnl5fbv)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172xv56fnl6d9w)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172xv56fnl8b7y)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172xv56fnl996z)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172xv56sxwh65b)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172xv56sxwj1d7)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172xv56sxwl32f)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172xv56sxwly9b)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172xv56sxwnzzj)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172xv56sxwpv6f)

Newshour 14:06 THU (w172xv56sxwrwwm)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172xv56sxwsr3j)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172xv56sxwvssq)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172xv56sxwwn0m)

On the Podium 04:32 WED (w3ct2g6r)

On the Podium 11:32 WED (w3ct2g6r)

On the Podium 22:32 WED (w3ct2g6r)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kx5)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3ct1kx5)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct1jtb)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3ct1jtb)

Outlook 18:06 TUE (w3ct1jwl)

Outlook 03:06 WED (w3ct1jwl)

Outlook 18:06 WED (w3ct1jyv)

Outlook 03:06 THU (w3ct1jyv)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3ct1k3c)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k3c)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1p)

Over to You 01:50 SUN (w3ct1l1p)

People Fixing the World 02:06 TUE (w3ct1pl4)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pl4)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pl4)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3ct1pl4)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l3z)

Science in Action 02:32 FRI (w3ct1l3z)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l3z)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3ct1l3z)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nf92m3pdq)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172y0nf92m6l9t)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172y0nf92m9h6x)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172y0nf92mdd40)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172y0nf92mh913)

Sporting Witness 18:50 SAT (w3ct1l8g)

Sporting Witness 02:50 SUN (w3ct1l8g)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3ct1l8h)

Sports News 23:20 SAT (w172y0sj4gb80p4)

Sports News 23:20 SUN (w172y0sj4gbbxl7)

Sports News 23:20 MON (w172y0sjhqmknrh)

Sports News 23:20 TUE (w172y0sjhqmnknl)

Sports News 23:20 WED (w172y0sjhqmrgkp)

Sports News 23:20 THU (w172y0sjhqmvcgs)

Sports News 23:20 FRI (w172y0sjhqmy8cw)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0q1t8j4hth)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0tbl5xx6j5)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0tbl5y0bxj)

Sportsworld 12:06 MON (w172y6dl6mwv0wb)

Sportsworld 12:06 TUE (w172y6dl6mwxxsf)

Sportsworld 12:06 WED (w172y6dl6mx0tpj)

Sportsworld 12:06 THU (w172y6dl6mx3qlm)

Sportsworld 12:06 FRI (w172y6dl6mx6mhq)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lbq)

Tech Tent 04:06 FRI (w3ct1nh7)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1nh7)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3ct1nh7)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rt6)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3ct1rt6)

The Climate Question 04:06 MON (w3ct2dqs)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2dqs)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2dqs)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct2g9p)

The Compass 04:06 WED (w3ct2g9q)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct2g9q)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct2g9q)

The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p6t)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p6v)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p6v)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3ct1p6v)

The Cultural Frontline 05:06 SAT (w3ct1pf8)

The Cultural Frontline 01:06 SUN (w3ct1pf8)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1pf8)

The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2gdv)

The Documentary 23:32 SAT (w3ct2gdt)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct2gdv)

The Documentary 10:06 SUN (w3ct2g99)

The Documentary 03:06 MON (w3ct2g99)

The Documentary 04:06 TUE (w3ct2gj3)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct2gj3)

The Documentary 20:06 TUE (w3ct2gj3)

The Documentary 10:06 WED (w3ct2gdv)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20f6)

The Fifth Floor 18:06 FRI (w3ct20f7)

The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rfx)

The Food Chain 04:32 THU (w3ct1rfy)

The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3ct1rfy)

The Food Chain 22:32 THU (w3ct1rfy)

The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rlf)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3ct1rlg)

The History Hour 19:06 SAT (w3ct1z75)

The Inquiry 12:06 SUN (w3ct1z27)

The Inquiry 02:06 THU (w3ct1z28)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z28)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct1z28)

The Inquiry 22:06 THU (w3ct1z28)

The Lazarus Heist 09:32 SAT (w3ct2g71)

The Lazarus Heist 02:32 SUN (w3ct2g71)

The Lazarus Heist 22:32 SUN (w3ct2g71)

The Newsroom 11:06 SAT (w172xyxkhxgrtj7)

The Newsroom 18:06 SAT (w172xyxkhxgsnr4)

The Newsroom 23:06 SAT (w172xywr25w3z1h)

The Newsroom 11:06 SUN (w172xyxkhxgvqfb)

The Newsroom 19:06 SUN (w172xyxkhxgwpdc)

The Newsroom 23:06 SUN (w172xywr25w6vyl)

The Newsroom 11:06 MON (w172xyxkw5s2gll)

The Newsroom 13:06 MON (w172xyxkw5s2q2v)

The Newsroom 19:06 MON (w172xyxkw5s3fkm)

The Newsroom 23:06 MON (w172xywrfg5fm3v)

The Newsroom 11:06 TUE (w172xyxkw5s5chp)

The Newsroom 13:06 TUE (w172xyxkw5s5lzy)

The Newsroom 19:06 TUE (w172xyxkw5s6bgq)

The Newsroom 23:06 TUE (w172xywrfg5jj0y)

The Newsroom 11:06 WED (w172xyxkw5s88ds)

The Newsroom 13:06 WED (w172xyxkw5s8hx1)

The Newsroom 19:06 WED (w172xyxkw5s97ct)

The Newsroom 23:06 WED (w172xywrfg5mdy1)

The Newsroom 11:06 THU (w172xyxkw5sc59w)

The Newsroom 13:06 THU (w172xyxkw5scdt4)

The Newsroom 19:06 THU (w172xyxkw5sd48x)

The Newsroom 23:06 THU (w172xywrfg5q9v4)

The Newsroom 11:06 FRI (w172xyxkw5sg26z)

The Newsroom 13:06 FRI (w172xyxkw5sg9q7)

The Newsroom 19:06 FRI (w172xyxkw5sh160)

The Newsroom 23:06 FRI (w172xywrfg5t6r7)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1hsp)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3ct1hsq)

Trending 05:32 SAT (w3ct1xzq)

Trending 18:32 SAT (w3ct1xzq)

Trending 01:32 SUN (w3ct1xzq)

Trending 10:32 MON (w3ct1xzq)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172xyt8r02002f)

Weekend 07:06 SAT (w172xyt8r0203tk)

Weekend 08:06 SAT (w172xyt8r0207kp)

Weekend 06:06 SUN (w172xyt8r022wzj)

Weekend 07:06 SUN (w172xyt8r0230qn)

Weekend 08:06 SUN (w172xyt8r0234gs)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wyt)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3ct1x13)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3ct1x13)

Witness History 03:50 TUE (w3ct1x13)

Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3ct1x5m)

Witness History 18:50 TUE (w3ct1x5m)

Witness History 03:50 WED (w3ct1x5m)

Witness History 08:50 WED (w3ct1x7w)

Witness History 18:50 WED (w3ct1x7w)

Witness History 03:50 THU (w3ct1x7w)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3ct1x3c)

Witness History 18:50 THU (w3ct1x3c)

Witness History 03:50 FRI (w3ct1x3c)

Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3ct1wyv)

Witness History 18:50 FRI (w3ct1wyv)

WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f3f)

WorklifeIndia 05:32 SUN (w3ct2f3f)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzl93yvb8b9)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y481j7lkkqp)

World Business Report 23:32 MON (w172y48vyz68v40)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172y4bhvfdqcxn)

World Business Report 23:32 TUE (w172y48vyz6cr13)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172y4cr0j9v7gp)

World Business Report 23:32 WED (w172y48vyz6gmy6)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172y498pbhw72x)

World Business Report 23:32 THU (w172y48vyz6kjv9)

World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172y46tc4px6q4)

World Business Report 23:32 FRI (w172y48vyz6nfrd)

World Football 04:32 FRI (w3ct1tzb)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1tzb)

World Football 22:32 FRI (w3ct1tzb)