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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 10 JULY 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq2pw0)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqf0fm025q)
World's Youngest Country Turns 10

It's ten years since South Sudan won its independence -we look at why it's not achieved as much as it should have. The football transfer market is suffering as Covid continues to affect the game. Tournaments winding up this weekend in Europe and Latin America have had a very different commercial market to those previous. And we look at the latest technology in harvesting strawberries in England - ready for the huge surge in demand as the world-famous Wimbledon tennis tournament continues. We discuss all this live with guest Peter Ryan, ABC's senior business reporter in Sydney.

(Image: Celebrations in South Sudan a decade since its birth. Photo by Andreea Campeanu/ Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq2tm4)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv5fld)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9s5wj)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbn)
'Long Covid nearly ended my career'

On this week's Stumped, Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Jim Maxwell discuss the fallout after the entire England ODI squad was forced into quarantine after a number of players and staff tested positive. An entire new playing and coaching team was named just days before their one-day series against Pakistan.

We also hear from the Northern Diamonds and Yorkshire bowler Katie Levick, who shares her first-hand experience of dealing with the consequences of suspected long Covid. She was left unable to walk down a flight of stairs without a having to take a break and feared the illness would end her career.

And we hear the second part of a wide-ranging interview with Australia all-rounder Ashleigh Gardner. She discusses her aboriginal heritage and how the Australian Women have embraced learning more about the indigenous culture.

Photo: Katie Levick of Northern Diamonds bowls during the Rachel Heyhoe Flint Trophy match between Northern Diamonds and Loughborough Lightning. (Credit: MI News/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq2yc8)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f4)
Burkina Faso gold: A mixed blessing

Gold is now Burkina Faso’s most valuable export, but it’s come at a price. Last month the government announced the closure of small mines in the northern province of Sahel following a deadly attack by Islamic extremists. BBC Africa's Lalla Sy has been following the story from neighbouring Ivory Coast.

Remembering Dilip Kumar
Dilip Kumar, one of India’s earliest and most famous film actors, died this week at the age of 98. We hear some of the many reasons why he was so special from Vandana at BBC Delhi, who has admired Dilip Kumar all her life.

Ukrainian heels
High heels and marching soldiers - not a natural pairing perhaps, and one that directed outrage towards Ukraine's Ministry of Defence. BBC Ukrainian's Irena Taranyuk shares the story.

Afghan resistance
Stories of territorial gains by the Taliban have been extensively covered by BBC Uzbek, which has a big audience among ethnic Uzbeks in northern Afghanistan. Firuz Rahimi is from Jowzjan province, where news outlets have reported that women are joining militias to resist the Taliban.

Cuba's Jewish community
BBC Mundo's Jose Carlos Cueta is Cuban, but only discovered by chance that the island had a small Jewish community. He got digging, and traces its history from Christopher Columbus in 1492, to its peak after the First World War and its presence today.

Image: Gold panning in a Burkina Faso artisan mine, 2006
Credit: Universal Images Group via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyr)
The bombing of the Rainbow Warrior

On 9 July 1985 the Greenpeace campaign ship was bombed by French secret agents in Auckland, New Zealand. One environmental campaigner was killed and the Rainbow Warrior was sunk. Claire Bowes heard from the ship's captain Pete Willcox who was on board when the attack took place.

This programme is a rebroadcast

(Photo: Captain Pete Willcox, courtesy of Greenpeace)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq323d)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsm)
The pandemic brings more robots

The world’s major economies are moving again thanks to mass vaccination against the coronavirus. President Biden says a higher demand for workers will help them negotiate increased wages and better conditions. But instead of welcoming them back, many businesses are replacing workers with automation and artificial intelligence - often a much cheaper and more reliable option in the long term. Even before the pandemic, one influential think tank predicted nearly 25 percent of jobs are being lost to automation. And it is believed that the months of lockdowns have accelerated that shift, especially in routine low-skilled jobs that require minimal human interaction. So where is the shift happening and how has the pandemic affected trends? What jobs are under threat, what are educators and policymakers doing about it, and could it actually mean more people doing more creative and fulfilling jobs? Paul Henley is joined by a panel of experts to discuss how accelerated automation is changing the world of work.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq35vj)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv5sts)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9sk3x)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1p)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

Teenage pilots

How does it feel to fly the plane that won the war? Two Spitfire pilots - one 18 year old from the Battle of Britain, one from today’s
RAF - compare their experiences of unparalleled ecstasy and paralysing fear.

Presenter: Tuppence Middleton
Producers: Alasdair Cross and Emily Knight
Editors: Chris Ledgard and Kirsten Lass


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk6)
Are there 40 million Nigerians on Twitter?

In recent months, Twitter has rarely been out of the headlines in Nigeria. After it deleted a tweet by the country’s president, the Nigerian government responded by banning it altogether. In the media coverage of the story it has been commonly claimed that Nigeria has 40 million Twitter users – but could this really be true? We spoke to Allwell Okpi of the fact-checking organisation AfricaCheck.

Also, which places have the best full vaccination rates in the world? Turns out, its some of the smallest. We run through the top five.

Producer: Nathan Gower


(A Nigerian man at a recent protest against the government's Twitter ban. Photo: Pius Utomi Ekpei /Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq39ln)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt80gffpvr)
Haiti asks for foreign troops

Following the assassination of President Jovenel Moise, Haiti requests troops from both the United Nations and the United States to protect key infrastructure.

Britain’s new immigration law and the international aid agency Medecins Sans Frontieres, suspends work in parts of Ethiopia’s restive Tigray region.


Joining Celia Hatton discuss these and other issues are Tony Connelly, Europe editor for RTE -Ireland's national television and radio broadcaster; and Michela Wrong, journalist and author, specialising in Africa.

(Photo: A Haitian man shows his passport outside the U.S. Embassy after the assassination of President Jovenel Moise, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti July 9, 2021. CREDIT: REUTERS/Estailove St-Val)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq3fbs)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt80gfftlw)
Haiti appeals for international military help

Haiti has called on the United Nations and United States to provide military support to protect the country’s key infrastructure.

We have an Afghanistan special as we are joined by the BBC’s Chief International Correspondent to discuss an eventful week in Afghanistan, which included the US withdrawal of troops and Taliban advances towards the Turkmenistan and Iran borders.

Also, ex-Germany ambassador in North Korea reveals inner workings of nation in new book; and what next for Britney Spears?

Joining Celia Hatton discuss these and other issues are Tony Connelly, Europe editor for RTE -Ireland's national television and radio broadcaster; and Michela Wrong, journalist and author, specialising in Africa.

(Photo: Haitian Ambassador Bocchit Edmond speaks during an interview at the Embassy of Haiti in Washington DC, USA, 08 July 2021. Mr Edmond spoke to the media following the assassination of Haitian President Jovenel Moise on 07 July morning which left the President dead and First Lady Martine Moise injured. CREDIT: EPA/WILL OLIVER)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq3k2x)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt80gffyc0)
Africa’s “worst week” of the pandemic

Africa registers the highest number of Covid-19 cases since the start of pandemic while most countries in the continent is short of vaccines. We speak to Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, from the World Health Organisation

Veteran cartoonist Glenn Head tells the story behind his new graphic memoir.

Also: translating and cooking your mother’s recipes. How gastronomy is helping Moldovans firm up their identity.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Tony Connelly, Europe editor for RTE -Ireland's national television and radio broadcaster; and Michela Wrong journalist and author, specialising in Africa.

(Photo: A man wearing a protective mask looks on ahead of a vaccination in South Africa. Credit: Reuters).


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9sxc9)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6r)
Why women walk

Women throughout the centuries have put their hiking boots on and set out into the great outdoors, but their stories are rarely told. Kim Chakanetsa is joined by two women who, through their own writing and journeys, are helping to change that.

Cheryl Strayed is the author of Wild, a bestselling memoir of her 1100 mile solo hike along the Pacific Crest Trail. Cheryl impulsively embarked on the hike after her mother suddenly died of cancer and her marriage crumbled, without any experience of long-distance hiking. The Oscar-nominated movie adaptation of Wild stars Reese Witherspoon. Cheryl is also the author of Tiny Beautiful Things and Brave Enough. She was the host of the New York Times podcast Dear Sugars.

Dr Kerri Andrews teaches Literature at Edge Hill University and lives in Scotland. Her book, Wanderers, tells the stories of ten female pioneering walkers and writers, from Virginia Woolf to Nan Shepherd. Kerri is also a keen hiker and the co-leader of Women In The Hills, a research network looking at what hinders and what enhances women's experiences of the outdoors.

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE DETAILS:
L: Dr Kerri Andrews (credit Adam Robinson)
R: Cheryl Strayed (credit Holly Andres)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq3nv1)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5x)
Coronavirus: Refusing the vaccine

Official figures suggest the global death toll from Covid-19 now exceeds four million with the virus proliferating in Asia, Africa and South America, where fewer people have been vaccinated.

Host James Reynolds brings three doctors together from Namibia, Bangladesh and Russia, which are among the countries struggling to deal with second and third waves of infections. They describe the constant challenge on the hospital wards and highlight the impact of vaccine hesitancy among patients.

Indonesia is seeing record numbers of infections due to the highly contagious Delta variant. Hospitals are under increasing pressure. Some are running out of vital supplies. Consequently, some Indonesians are having to personally source oxygen, hospital beds and treatment for loved ones who are ill with Covid-19. Two Indonesians tell us about the searches for these supplies for their sick relatives - with different outcomes.

Experts say vaccines offer a path out of this pandemic - yet suspicion, hesitancy and refusal remains. The UK is among the global leaders for vaccination rates and one British man tell us why he refused to take a vaccine and almost died from Covid. We reunite him with the doctor who saved his life.

(Photo: Abderrahmane Fadi, who was hospitalised with Covid-19 after refusing the vaccine. Credit: Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9t13f)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g6z)
11: Korean roulette

The money trail takes us to the best place to launder money back in 2016: the gaming tables of Philippine casinos – where the criminals go on a Baccarat binge.
#LazarusHeist

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/lazarusheist


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1m)
Just how do people go about fixing the world?

Just how do people go about fixing the world? It is certainly an ambitious aim! We put listeners’ questions to the editor of the weekly show of that name and ask what makes a good topic that will inspire the audience?

Plus, a listener in India makes a plea to Business Daily: more emerging technology please!

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq3sl5)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q12qwl6lt)
Wimbledon and the Euros

On this weeks Sportshour with Shabnam Younus-Jewell, we will preview the Wimbledon Women’s final and the Euro 2020 final.

(Photo by Richard Baker / In Pictures via Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq3xb9)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv6j9k)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9t8lp)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3c)
Covid crisis: Does 'burnout leave' work?

Burnout is rising in the world of office goers. Months of disruption and uncertainty caused by the Covid pandemic has led workers at many companies to feel stressed and exhausted. Daily life has been disrupted, and the lines between work and leisure blurred. Many are finding it difficult to cope.

In response to this, many companies have announced burnout leave. It’s being seen as a way to show the workers that they have a support system to lean on. Or is it just a headline grabbing tactic? And what about the professionals who are availing this leave? Has it really helped them?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how companies define wellness, and whether burnout leave actually works.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: TN Hari, HR head, BigBasket; Sahil Mathur, chief HR officer, InMobi Group; Himel Sarkar, content supervisor, Organic by MSL


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq412f)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdr)
The mixed beat

The voices of those from mixed race communities are more frequently heard today and are playing a more central role in shaping discussion around race, identity and what it means to straddle different cultures and experiences. The BBC's Nora Fakim takes this opportunity to reflect on what is happening across the globe and to reflect on what the changes mean across the generations.

Nora's mum is from Morocco and her dad was Mauritian-Indian and she was born and raised in a leafy suburb outside London but struggled to fit in. She thinks things today are changing, as immigration, globalisation and global protests following the death of George Floyd take effect. The voicelessness she and others felt is being replaced by open discussions and even a celebration of what it means to be mixed race.

Her investigation starts with mixed race parents who are creating ever more diversity as they start their own families. As they embark on parenting their own mixed race babies she asks what advice they would have given their younger selves. And speaking to children growing up in this fast changing world she finds a bravery, which she lacked, in the choices being made.

(Photo: Emma and her son. Credit: Emma Nathan)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq44tk)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3ym445)
Taliban gain more territory in Afghanistan

Just over a week after US forces pulled out of the Bagram military base, the Taliban have captured two districts in the province where the base is located. While the Afghan government asks for a return to peace talks, the well-known former mujahedin commander Ismail Khan has promised to fight back.

Also in the programme: Haiti asks the US for military support following the assassination of its president that plunged the impoverished country into deeper turmoil earlier this week; and we speak to the top cyber official from the Obama administration about ransomware attacks from Russia.

(Image: Afghan forces have been struggling to keep the Taliban at bay. Credit: EPA)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq48kp)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t9vn9bx9h)
Sportsworld

Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq4rk6)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv7cjg)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9v3tl)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8d)
Bjorn Borg

In the late 1970s and early 80s, Sweden’s Bjorn Borg was the biggest star in world tennis and arguably the sport’s first sex symbol. Always besieged by young female fans, Borg won five Wimbledon championships in a row and enjoyed a famous rivalry with John McEnroe, which culminated in an epic tie-break in the 1980 final. But Bjorn Borg would then shock the world of sport by retiring in 1983 at the age of just 26. Simon Watts brings together Borg’s Wimbledon memories, as recorded in the BBC archive.

PHOTO: Bjorn Borg at Wimbledon in the 1970s (BBC)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq4w9b)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The World Debate (w3ct2gh4)
The Engineers: Clean Energy

Wind Power, Solar Energy, Battery-powered mega-ships: As the world grapples with the challenge of climate catastrophe, three engineers leading the world in clean energy solutions come together for a special event at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

The BBC World Service and the Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851 links Danielle Merfield of GE Renewable Energy, Henry Snaith of Oxford University and Kristian Eikeland Holmefjord of Corvus Energy with an audience at the V&A and on video link around the world. Can Renewable Energy save the planet? Kevin Fong presents, with a global audience of some of the world’s greatest renewable energy engineers.

Producer: Charlie Taylor
Sound Engineers: Matthew Page, Henry Dutton, Darren Wardrobe, Kate Barker, Ian Mitchell and Ronan Loftus

(Photo: Wind turbines with starry sky composite, Credit: Anton Petrus/Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq501g)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt4)
Actor Vin Diesel

On The Arts Hour this week, Nikki Bedi is joined by Nigerian novelist Chibundu Onuzo and critic Nasri Atallah to discuss cultural highlights of the week

Action hero Vin Diesel on the ninth film in the Fast and Furious franchise

US National Ambassador for young people’s literature, author Jason Reynolds, on getting boys to read

Director Aleem Khan on his film After Love, about a Muslim convert who discovers her husband had a double life

Actor David Oyelowo on his directorial debut film, The Water Man

Nigerian novelist Chibundu Onuzo talks about her novel Sankofa, which tells the story of a woman who goes in search of the West African father she never knew

Argentinian ballerina Marianela Nunez explains how she keeps the classic roles fresh

Composer and singer Arooj Aftab demonstrates how her Pakistani heritage inspires her music


(Photo: Vin Diesel. Credit: Jeff Spicer/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq53sl)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3yn336)
Concerns grow over security in Afghanistan

Afghanistan's president, Ashraf Ghani, has urged the Taliban to resume political negotiations about the country's future. We hear from Kabul where people are nervous about their safety and their future as Taliban take more territories.

In an audio message on Twitter, the widow of Haiti's assassinated president, Jovenel Moise, says he was killed because he wanted to re-write the constitution.

And an equestrian statue of the Confederate general, Robert Lee, in Charlottesville, Virginia, has been taken away from a central square, four years after the city council ordered its removal.

(Photo: Afghan government forces are now responsible for security. Credit: EPA)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq57jq)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc2)
Everybody is a musician with Tshepang, Chelsea Wolfe, Anna von Hausswolff and Colin Greenwood

Tshepang Ramoba of BLK JKS is joined by Chelsea Wolfe, Anna von Hausswolff and Radiohead's Colin Greenwood to discuss simplifying complex music, why Africa is in all music, making sounds that can't ever be created again, and the inspiration behind the artwork to Radiohead’s In Rainbows.

Tshepang Ramoba is the drummer and band leader of BLK JKS, a South African Art-Rock based in Johannesburg. He's joined by Radiohead’s Colin Greenwood, a former Music Life host himself, who he met a few years ago when Colin was touring the country. Anna von Hausswolff is a Swedish singer, musician, theatre composer, sound artist, and organist who blends jazz, metal, doom, and everything in between, and has been described as making ‘funeral pop’. Finally, Chelsea Wolfe is a Californian metal, goth, and folk guitarist and singer. She’s been described as a “musical witch and keeper of lost souls,” and has collaborated with Deftones.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq5c8v)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqbn7kntt)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shdxppqgg)
Sports News

BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9vqk7)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf6)
NFTs: The booming world of digital art

This week The Cultural Frontline is looking into the art world’s latest phenomenon…NFTs or Non Fungible Tokens. And if you’re wondering exactly what that means, join Sophia Smith Galer to find out more about this new form of digital art.

NFTs hit the headlines this year when an NFT artwork by the American digital artist Beeple sold at auction for a record breaking $69.3 million. So what are NFTs and how do they work? NFTs use a lot of energy which is bad for the environment, but they can open up new possibilities for artists. Tim Schneider, Art Business Editor at Artnet News, explains the pros and cons.

Despite million pound sales from the likes of Canadian singer Grimes and American celebrity socialite Paris Hilton, the majority of artists commanding high sales from NFT artworks are men. Scottish art collector and co-founder of international collective Women of Crypto Art Etta Tottie and Senegalese artist and member of Her Story DAO Linda Rebeiz explain how they’re working to make the world of NFT art more diverse.

Artists can sell NFTs via online platforms and they are attracting a new type of buyer: young, digitally savvy and familiar with crypto currency. Now the art world is getting involved with an exhibition of NFT art at UCCA Lab in Beijing and the launch of Institut, an “art world” platform to exhibit and sell NFTs. American writer, artist and NFT expert Kenny Schachter explains how the traditional art world feels about this digital disruption.

NFTs have made headlines for big sales and celebrity connections but one creative couple in Indonesia is using an NFT to raise money for charity. In April 2021, the Indonesian navy submarine, KRI Nanggala 402, sank off the coast of Bali, killing all 53 crew members. Sound designer Ruanth Chrisley Thyssen and illustrator and influencer Cindy Thyssen have joined forces do something to mark the event with an artwork, 53 Never Forgotten.



(Photo: NFT titled 'CryptoPunk 7523' by Larva Labs. Credit: Cindy Ord/Getty Images)



SUNDAY 11 JULY 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq5ls3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yvd)
Human induced climate change heats up fast

Scientists say the record-breaking Pacific North-West heatwave of recent weeks must have been caused by human induced climate change, but as Geert Jan van Oldenborgh explains to Roland Pease, despite a herculean effort to analyse the event in just a week, the precise mechanism to cause such an extreme and sudden event is so far bewildering climate modellers, exceeding even worst expectations.

Looking to the skies, Rosita Kokotanekova of the European Southern Observatory and colleagues have been getting excited about the discovery of a comet maybe twice as large as any observed before. Being so big, it has been spotted much further out from the sun and – if the best telescopes can be convinced to join the fun – will provide astronomers a chance to observe the core of the comet before the solar heat induces a gaseous coma to form as it nears the point in its orbit closest to the sun. It will be around for the next decade before continuing its several million year journey around our mutual star.

But it won’t get terribly close to earth, at least not as close as lumps of an asteroid that fell onto a driveway in the UK earlier this year. Dr Ashley King of the UK’s Natural History Museum is leading a consortium of scientists (benefitting from a rapid research grant by the UK’s STFC) who have now officially classified it and named it. The Winchcombe meteorite is a CM carbonaceous chondrite, meaning it represents the unspoilt early building blocks of the solar system. Falling like 4.5 billion year old leftover celestial lego, only a few are known around the world but perhaps none have been in scientists hands in such a short period of time, continuing its pristine survival.

Dr Pablo Tsukayama has published a preprint paper announcing a new variant of interest in the ongoing evolution of the SARS-CoV2 virus. Now named by the WHO as the Lambda variant, it seems it has driven the pandemic for much of this year in Peru – as much as 80% of cases – and large fractions of the outbreak elsewhere in South America. But as Pablo suggests, the reason we don’t know as much about it as for example the Alpha or Delta variants is likely because it hasn’t thus far affected the countries best equipped to do the analysis. Maybe that could change.

Standing takes less energy than walking, so why does it feel more tiring? At least, it does for CrowdScience listener Nina. She can march for hours without getting tired, but her legs and feet get achy after just a short time standing still.

It’s one of three walking-themed questions CrowdScience is tackling this week. Taking inspiration from our active listeners, Marnie Chesterton walks up a hill with Caroline Williams, author of a new book about why humans are designed to move. We find out how our whole system – body and brain – works better when we’re walking, compared to standing still. We’re probably set up this way because of our evolutionary history: hunting and gathering needed us to be ‘cognitively engaged endurance athletes’.

We stop for a break.. but is it true that we shouldn’t sit down to rest during a walk? Our listener Sarah is a keen hillwalker but likes to take the weight off her feet every now and again. Her hillwalking friends disapprove, saying she should rest on her feet. Is this a myth CrowdScience can bust?

And finally a question from listener Matteo: is walking or running better for your health? Numerous studies show significant benefits to both forms of exercise, but in the end, the best kind of exercise is the one you’re motivated to do.

Image: Wildfires in Lytton, British Columbia
Credit: ProPics Canada Media Ltd/Getty Images


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq5qj7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv8bhh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9w2sm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvg)
Lambda variant of SARS-Cov2

The lambda variant of coronavirus, first seen in Peru and Chile, has now spread to 27 other countries and new research just out suggests it’s better than other variants at escaping the antibodies produced by the CoronaVac vaccine that’s widely used in Latin America. The WHO does only currently classify it as a variant of interest and not a variant of concern. Ricardo Soto Rifo from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Chile, Santiago who conducted this new research explains his findings.

A charity in the UK called Ovacome has long run in person support groups for women with ovarian cancer. And now women who live miles apart, but share similar experiences have got to know each other very well, online, during the pandemic. To find out what happens in these meetings, Health Check dropped in, on Zoom, to listen in to Gill, Gillian, Siobhan, Allyson and Jo.

Dr Per Block, a research lecturer at the University of Oxford, has been investigating whether moods are contagious and crucially whether we pick on up good moods or bad moods more easily. The results of his study with teenage members of choirs and orchestras who were away on tour together have just been published in the journal Emotion. He tells Claudia what he found.

Claudia’s studio guest is family doctor, Ann Robinson, who talks about new research into diet and migraines and whether a David Beckham style plastic boot or a traditional plaster cast is the best treatment for a broken ankle.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright and Paula McGrath

(Picture: A woman receives her first dose of the CoronaVac vaccine during a door-to-door vaccination day against Covid-19 on 03 July 2021 in a rural area of the Jerusalén municipality, Cundinamarca Department, Colombia. Photo credit: Guillermo Legaria/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq5v8c)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq5z0h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv1)
Pulling out: Western troops leave Afghanistan

Stories from Afghanistan, Ethiopia, India and the USA.

It was truly symbolic when the last US forces flew out of Afghanistan’s Bagram Airbase. They left behind military vehicles, furniture and other remains of their 20 year presence. But they also left a country where the Taliban continues to capture territory, and which many fear will now descend into civil war. So what was achieved by the 20 year intervention? Frank Gardner looks back.

A grave humanitarian crisis is unfolding in Ethiopia. Recent fighting in the Tigray region has resulted in widespread hunger – the UN warns that almost two million people are at risk of famine. Meanwhile, Ethiopia’s Prime Minister, Abiy Ahmed has been somewhat elusive. So Catherine Byaruhanga travelled to his home town, to see if she could ask him about the many problems now unfolding.

The lockdown in India seems to be working. The country is still reporting around forty thousand new Covid infections a day, and at least four hundred thousand people have died so far – perhaps many more. Yet death rates are now far lower than they were, and with only a small proportion vaccinated, the drop is being attributed to strict lockdown measures. But isolation is far from easy to sustain. The writer and poet, Tishani Doshi, has spent the time in a secluded spot, where even grocery shopping has become a complex process.

How do you persuade people to come home? That’s the challenge facing New York right now - because more people left New York during the Covid pandemic than any other city in the US. Its residents are now slowly emerging from the nightmare of last spring: restaurants and bars are serving again, the theatres on Broadway are due to reopen. But the city has lost a million jobs and many businesses, and is still losing its people. Lucy Ash has been meeting some of those who are part of the exodus, and the other New Yorkers attempting to lure them back.

(Image: Silhouette of US soldiers in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Credit: Reuters/Baz Ratner)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9wb8w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq62rm)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv8pqw)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9wg10)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2gdb)
Bats: Friend or foe?

What is it about bats? Do we love them or hate them? They are depicted in some cultures as devil-like vampires: images of death and Halloween. But in others they are the opposite and are believed to bring luck and good fortune in China. Fear of bats has been exacerbated in the past 18 months by the Coronavirus pandemic and a blame game, pointing the finger at bats as a potential source of Covid-19. But environmentalists love them for being natural pest controllers – hoovering up harmful insects. Scientists love them too - as a vital source of medical research. How can they carry viruses without getting ill and what is their anti-ageing secret? For their size they live a very long time and they have developed mechanisms to ward off the diseases of old-age.
Caroline Bayley talks to scientists, environmentalists, bat lovers and an eminent philosopher, all trying to uncover the secrets of these extraordinary mammals.

(Photo: Rhinolophus hipposideros (lesser horseshoe bat), Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq66hr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt80gfjlrv)
Widow of assassinated Haitian President accuses political enemies of hiring mercenaries

The widow of assassinated Haitian President claims he was assassinated because he was planning to introduce constitutional reform.

The death of President Moise has led to a dispute over who holds power in Haiti

Also in the programme; the West Coast of America faces record breaking temperatures and South Korea goes into a new lockdown amidst rising Covid-19 numbers.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Leslie Vinjamuri, Director of the US and the Americas programme at the Chatham House, an international affairs think tank, and; Ian Goldin, Professor of Globalisation and Development at the University of Oxford.

(Photo: Security personnel stand guard at the morgue where the body of President Jovenel Moise is located, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, 10 July 2021. CREDIT: EPA/Orlando Barria)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq6b7w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt80gfjqhz)
Gang boss in Haiti sees conspiracy behind president's killing

One of Haiti's most powerful gang leaders, Jimmy Cherizier,said on Saturday his men would take to the streets to protest the assassination of President Jovenel Moise, threatening to pitch the impoverished Caribbean country deeper into chaos.

The UK’s House of Lords plans a new Bill to recognise animals- including crustaceans and molluscs- as sentient beings.

And how the pandemic has affected our mental health? Not as bad as expected, according to a forthcoming report.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Leslie Vinjamuri, Director of the US and the Americas programme at the Chatham House international affairs think tank ; and Ian Goldin, Professor of Globalisation and Development at the University of Oxford and a former vice-president of the World Bank.

(Photo: A woman walks on a sidewalk following the assassination of President Jovenel Moise, in Port-au-Prince. Credit: Reuters.)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq6g00)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt80gfjv83)
Haiti continues in political chaos after President Moïse’s assassination

It is still unclear who organised Wednesday's attack against assassinated Haiti’s president Jovenel Moïse and with what motive. A number of questions remain unanswered, including how the alleged assassins were able to enter the property. Mr Moïse's bodyguards are due to be questioned next week.

South Korea prepares for new tougher lockdown restrictions as Covid-19 cases reach a new high.

And why Neil Diamond’ song Sweet Caroline has been the anthem accompanying England's success at Euro 2020.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Leslie Vinjamuri, Director of the US and the Americas programme at the Chatham House international affairs think tank; and Ian Goldin, Professor of Globalisation and Development at the University of Oxford and a former vice-president of the World Bank.

(Photo: Hundreds of Haitians gathered in front of the US embassy on Saturday in the hope that they will be granted a visa to leave their country. Credit: Reuters.)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9wt8d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfv)
Life lessons from the honey bee

When it comes to food, we have a lot more than honey to thank bees for - more than three quarters of the world’s food crops depend, at least in part, on pollinators. But bee populations, we often hear, are under threat, and that’s largely due to human behaviour.

Emily Thomas speaks to three beekeepers about the challenges of making money from honey and the complicated relationship between the human and the honey bee.

If we look carefully into the hive, she discovers, bees can teach us much about the environment, society and ourselves.

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:

Joan Kinyanjui, Yatta Beekeepers, Nairobi;
Dale Gibson, Bermondsey Street Bees, London;
Ian Steppler, Steppler Farms, Manitoba.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: A honey bee on the end of a human finger. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq6kr4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9wy0j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx3)
Trapped in a "metal coffin" on the ocean floor

In 1988, after colliding with a fishing trawler at the surface, the Peruvian submarine Pacocha began to sink. Some of the sailors started to abandon ship and First Lieutenant Roger Cotrina Alvarado had to make a choice - jump overboard and live, or go back inside the submarine for the rest of the crew. The sinking submarine dragged him and 21 others down 42 metres to the ocean floor. With oxygen running out, it would become Roger's job to find a way to escape. Part 1 of 2.

Presented by Clayton Conn
Produced by Clayton Conn and Mariana Des Forges
Interpreter: Martin Esposito

Picture: Collage of photographs of the Pacocha, crew, the submarine and Roger Cotrina Alvarado
Credit: all Courtesy of Roger Cotrina Alvarado

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq6ph8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g97)
Two smiley faces: Episode two

The emoji, invented in Japan in the 1990s, and now standardised on every device and platform we have, has become a new type of global communication. Whether you love them or hate them, they stir up surprisingly strong feelings and the fight for representation on the emoji keyboard can get very heated. In episode two, we explore how sometimes, emoji are more than they seem. In fact, for some dating app users, criminal gangs and even human traffickers, emoji take on secret meanings. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis and Sarah Treanor are here to crack the code.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9x1rn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2ghy)
Doping, diving and God

In the run up to the Tokyo Olympics professor Robert Beckford explores how cheating in sport conflicts with Christian principles.

He asks how can an Olympic champion stand on the podium with a gold medal and then thank God in an interview if they have taken performance enhancing drugs? Can a footballer celebrate the penalty he has ‘won’ and then point to the sky in honour of God?In this edition of Heart and Soul, featuring Olympic medallist Ben Johnson, Robert explores what the Christianity has to say about fair play and whether by cheating you are dishonouring your faith.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq6t7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv9f6n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9x5hs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2g7n)
The Golden Age Of Gold

Gold: What does the future hold?

Jewellery designer, Rajvi Vora discovers more about precious gold as she looks ahead to the future of gold. With cryptocurrency snapping at its heels, can it remain a financial powerhouse? Ravi unearths what goldmines are doing to our planet and to the people who work at them, including the Indonesian families being poisoned by the goldmines on their back doorsteps. But there is a good side to gold too. She hears from the scientists beginning to tap into the potential of using nanogold to treat cancer.


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq6xzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The World Debate (w3ct2gh4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq71qn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3yq118)
Haiti crisis: gang leader calls for protests

One of Haiti's most powerful gang leaders, Jimmy Cherizier, calls for protests following the assassination of President Jovenel Moise

Also on the programme: Ethiopia's main opposition leader on the conflict in Tigray; and a preview of the Euro 2020 final by an English-Italian couple.

(Image: Haitians on the streets. Credit: EPA/Orlando Barria)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq75gs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t9vn9ft6l)
Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq7s6f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscvbd5p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9y4gt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2ghy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq7wyk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgy)
China cracks down on big tech

Authorities in China ordered Didi to stop taking new ride sharing customers, and banned the sale of the app, because of data sharing issues. Investors in the newly floated company are furious, but this isn’t the first kind of regulatory intervention China has made. So what’s behind this crackdown?
As numerous sporting events take place this weekend we’ll be looking at the political power wielded by sports stars and what that means for the brands that sponsor them.
We’ll head to a geo-thermal plant in Cornwall, UK, to find out whether the industry could provide secure, reliable renewable energy in a de-carbonised world.
Plus, we’ll hear from the woman trying to make amends for her family’s part in slavery.
Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Clare Williamson
(Image: A vehicle of China's ride-hailing platform Didi Chuxing, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq80pp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3yr009)
Haiti crisis: US delegation to assess security situation

A US delegation is due to visit Haiti today to assess the security situation following the assassination of President Jovenel Moise by mercenaries. President Biden's envoys will also meet the three politicians claiming to be the country's legitimate leaders. We hear from a Haitian activist who is wary of outside intervention.

Also in the programme: We hear what happens to pro democracy activists who try to protest against the powers that be in Iraq; and the billionaire businessman, Richard Branson, has successfully flown to the edge of space in his Virgin Galactic rocket plane.

(Photo: Jovenel Moise was assassinated in his home by armed men. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq84ft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g97)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9yhq6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g6z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq885y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqbn7nkqx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shdxpsmck)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9ymgb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 12 JULY 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0dbyc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl8df6rz3m)
How did the Euros change sponsorship?

Italy has won Euro 2020 against England, but a year ago it wasn't clear whether the tournament would even go ahead. How has the competition changed advertising trends? We speak to Simon Chadwick, professor of Eurasian Sport at EM Lyon Business School in Paris.
Also in the programme, as France waits to hear from President Macron later today with an update on the country's fight against coronavirus, we hear what measures might be included from Tomasz Michalski, associate professor at the HEC Paris business school.
And, can anyone make it in the Western world with hard work and a good education? The BBC's Ed Butler is in conversation with Harvard philosopher Michael Sandel, who believes politics should play a bigger role in social mobility.

(Picture: Italy's Alessandro Florenzi celebrates. Credit: Getty)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm2q6r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2g91)
Tooth and claw: Tigers

“As it charges towards you, you can actually feel the drumbeat of its feet falling to the ground”. Nothing quite says fear more than standing before a charging tiger. Yet so often it’s also the poster-predator for conservation. The tiger truly is the ‘prince of the jungle’.. The good news (to some) is that after a century of decline, wild tiger populations have increased recently. But with this comes the increase in human fatalities – there are almost daily attacks on the rural poor across India. A world without wild tigers is not a world we want, but how do we balance the needs of people and the needs of tigers? Adam finds out more about tigers and the people that live around them by speaking with Indian tiger expert Rajeev Matthews and conservation biologist Samantha Helle, who is based in the US and works with communities and tigers in Nepal.

Producer: Rami Tzabar and Beth Eastwood
Presenter: Professor Adam Hart

(Photo: A crouching tiger, Credit: Yudik Pradnyana/Getty Images)


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0dgph)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4h2nr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm2tyw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqq)
Will football tackle the climate crisis?

You don’t often hear climate change and football mentioned in the same sentence, but rising temperatures are set to disrupt every area of our lives, the ‘beautiful game’ included. Heat and other extreme weather have already been affecting training and matches, which experts say we can expect a lot more of in coming years.

But not only is the sport at risk from the climate crisis, it’s also a significant contributor to it. The operation of multi-thousand capacity stadiums, spectator travel and merchandise, not to mention the fossil fuel sponsorship that props up professional tournaments, mean that football is currently part of the climate problem.

Yet football also has an audience of billions – all potentially affected by climate change – who could be part of the solution. Featuring footballers and fans, we ask if football can tackle its carbon problem and be a force for good in the fight against climate change.

Guests
Morten Thorsby, Norwegian midfielder
Sofie Junge Pedersen, Danish midfielder
David Goldblatt, football historian and writer
Manuel Gaber, founder of Unser Fussball campaign
Federico Addiechi, Head of Sustainability and Environment at FIFA

Reporter
Uli Knapp

Presenters: Neal Razzell and Graihagh Jackson
Producer: Zoe Gelber
Series producer: Rosamund Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0dlfm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g97)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm2yq0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2g6z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0dq5r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4hb50)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm32g4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6s)
Women planting trees

Two women restoring forest in Brazil and Nepal tell Kim Chakanetsa about working with local communities to plant thousands of trees and restore the natural environment.

Francy Forero Sánchez is a Colombian primate researcher who volunteers with the environmental organisation Copaiba. It works with the community to restore parts of the Atlantic Forest in south eastern Brazil - one of the most endangered and biodiverse in the world. Run mainly by women the project produces native tree seedlings, plants trees and runs environmental education programmes.

Rachhya Kayastha fell in love with the natural world around her as a child in Nepal and would gather school friends to plant flowers in her neighbourhood. She's now National Director in Nepal for the US charity, Eden Reforestation Projects. The organisation sets up seed collection stations, develops plant nurseries and reforestation schemes giving work to local people, mostly women.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
Francy Forero Sánchez (courtesy Francy Forero Sánchez)
Rachhya Kayastha (courtesy Eden Reforestation Projects)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0dtxw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6ftwym)
Cubans stage rare protests over Covid measures

Thousands of people protest against Cuba's communist government in the capital Havana and other cities.

On Friday, Death Valley in California sweltered through what is thought to be the highest temperature ever recorded on earth. a sizzling 54.4C. The record breaking heat continued over the weekend sparking widespread wildfires.

And European football fans have been treated to an epic game in the Euro 2020 final in London. The game went to penalties with Italy keeping their cool to secure their first European title since 1968.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0dyp0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6fv0pr)
US team to visit Haiti after president's killing

Police in Haiti say they have arrested a doctor they believe is a key suspect in organising last week's assassination of President Jovenel Moïse.

Australia is desperately trying to stem a growing spate of coronavirus infections. But there are complaints that the new restrictions are unfairly targeting minority communities.

And Italy are the victors of Euro 2020 after a nail-biting climax to the tournament in London.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0f2f4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6fv4fw)
Cuba sees unprecedented demonstrations

Marchers are seen calling for freedom, democracy and vaccines to tackle the coronavirus pandemic.

The US is sending a delegation to Haiti to assess the situation there, with three different politicians claiming to be the legitimate authority in the country.

And Richard Branson - the British businessman - has travelled to and from space. The trip paves the way for paying guests to travel on the Virgin Galactic spacecraft.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0f658)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5y)
James Lovelock: The fragility of life on Earth

Stephen Sackur speaks to one of the past century's most influential environmentalists, James Lovelock. He introduced us to the Gaia hypothesis – the idea that our planet and all the life on it are part of one dynamic, self-regulating system. Lovelock is now 101 years old and still having big thoughts about the future of life on Earth. Have we humans sown the seeds of our own destruction?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm3kfn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4y)
Tokyo Olympics: Battle of the super shoes

As we head towards the postponed Tokyo Olympics, the world’s eyes will be on athletics. But huge controversy is brewing over a new type of super shoe which has led to a recent surge in track and field records. Ivana Davidovic asks whether runners' ability is becoming less and less important for success on the track? And what does that do the sport?

US Olympian Mason Ferlic is worried that this is creating a division between the haves and the have nots and thinks that World Athletics should pander less to big brands and tighten regulation on running shoes.
Canadian Olympian Madeleine Kelly talks about the unprecedented situation when rival brands allowed their sponsored athletes to run in Nike's super spikes, which are widely regarded as ahead of the pack at the moment.

But they are not the only ones. Technology used to assist disabled athletes is now propelling their able-bodied counterparts to new heights. Running coach and former World Athletics official Peter Thompson - who also worked in shoe development for Nike and Hoka - says we are nowhere near the limit to where materials can go. He also sees these super shoes as "mechanical doping." While professor of sports innovation Mike Caine warns that to limit innovation would be a commercial disaster for any sport, as viewers and sponsors are attracted by tumbling records.

(Photo: Male sprinter starts from blocks in athletics stadium. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x11)
The race for the jet engine

Using eyewitness recordings from the BBC archive we hear from the pioneers of the jet engine, Sir Frank Whittle and Hans von Ohain, about the struggle to develop a revolutionary new engine in the 1930s. An invention which would change the world.
Photo: Sir Frank Whittle (1907-1996) is pictured here with the Whittle WV engine at the Science Museum in London c 1988 (Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0f9xd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm3p5s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqm)
Why is standing more tiring than walking?

Standing takes less energy than walking, so why does it feel more tiring? At least, it does for CrowdScience listener Nina. She can march for hours without getting tired, but her legs and feet get achy after just a short time standing still.

It’s one of three walking-themed questions CrowdScience is tackling this week. Taking inspiration from our active listeners, Marnie Chesterton walks up a hill with Caroline Williams, author of a new book about why humans are designed to move. We find out how our whole system – body and brain – works better when we’re walking, compared to standing still. We’re probably set up this way because of our evolutionary history: hunting and gathering needed us to be ‘cognitively engaged endurance athletes’.

We stop for a break.. but is it true that we shouldn’t sit down to rest during a walk? Our listener Sarah is a keen hillwalker but likes to take the weight off her feet every now and again. Her hillwalking friends disapprove, saying she should rest on her feet. Is this a myth CrowdScience can bust?

And finally a question from listener Matteo: is walking or running better for your health? Numerous studies show significant benefits to both forms of exercise, but in the end, the best kind of exercise is the one you’re motivated to do.

With Caroline Williams, Dr François-Xavier Li, Professor Dick Greene and Professor Duck-Chul Lee.


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0ffnj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm3sxx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0fkdn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4j5cx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm3xp1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0fp4s)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt8)
Banned from voting for my wife, so we changed the law

When Desmond Meade’s wife Sheena ran for public office in Florida, he wanted nothing more than for her to win. But there was one thing he couldn’t do – vote for her. As an ex-felon, Desmond had a lifetime ban on voting. It was a 150-year-old law that affected over a million people, and so Desmond and Sheena led a historic campaign to overturn it. At times, it felt like an impossible battle that would consume their whole family. And even now after all their successes, that fight is not over. Desmond’s written a book called Let my people vote: my battle to restore the civil rights of returning citizens.

Presenter: Stephanie Hegarty
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Desmond and Sheena Meade
Credit: Getty Images

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0fswx)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4jdw5)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm4559)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0fxn1)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv562d7xwyn)
Cuba's anti-government protests

Thousands of Cubans take to the streets in the country's biggest anti-government demonstrations in decades:

Also in the programme: South Africa's military is deployed to address violence following the imprisonment of former President Jacob Zuma; and after losing to Italy in the final of the Euros, England's football manager Gareth Southgate condemns the racist abuse directed at his Black players.


(Image: People shout slogans against the government during protests against and in support of the government in Havana, Cuba July 11 2021 / Credit: REUTERS / Alexandre Meneghini)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0g1d5)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm4dnk)
BBC News Summary

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MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y480spz08j0)
Cubans join protests as economy struggles

Cubans have been angered by an economic crisis, combined with anti-Covid measures. Thousands joined the biggest anti-government protests in the country for decades, and we find out more from Dr Emily Morris who is a development economist at University College London, specialising in the Cuban economy. Also in the programme, we have a wide ranging interview with Sundar Pichai, who is chief executive of search engine Google and its parent company Alphabet. Plus, there's controversy ahead of the Tokyo Olympic Games, about a new type of running shoe which has led to a recent surge in track and field records. The BBC's Ivana Davidovic asks whether a runner's authentic ability is becoming less important for success on the track.

(Picture: A man is arrested during protests in Havana. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0g549)
BBC News

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MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxll93x52r)
Cuba protests: Thousands rally against the government

Thousands of Cubans have joined the biggest protests in decades against the country's Communist government. People are angry about the state of the economy, restrictions on civil liberties and the authorities' handling of the coronavirus pandemic. We get the latest from our reporter and hear from some of those out on the streets.

Also, as England prepares to ease most Covid restrictions on 19th July, we bring together two people who were hospitalised after catching the virus, to hear their thoughts and concerns about the changes.

And we go to Italy to hear reaction after the country defeated England in the Euro 2020 final.

(Photo: People shout slogans against the government during a protest against and in support of the government, in Havana, Cuba. Credit: Reuters/Alexandre Meneghini)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0g8wf)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxll93x8tw)
Coronavirus: England set to ease almost all restrictions on social contact

We'll get the latest on the Covid-19 situation in England, where Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to confirm the lifting of all legal restrictions on social contact on 19th July. We'll also hear reaction from those who have been hospitalised by Covid-19.

Also, we go to Cuba where thousands of people have been taking part in anti-government protests. Many are angry about the economic situation, restrictions on civil liberties and the authorities' handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

And our coronavirus expert of the day, Dr Manfred Green, joins us to answer your questions about the pandemic. You can WhatsApp us yours on +447730 751925.

(Photo: UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaking during a media briefing in Downing Street, London, on Covid-19. Credit: Daniel Leal-Olivas/PA Wire)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0gdmk)
BBC News

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MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0gjcp)
BBC News

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MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4k4by)
The Newsroom

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MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm4wn2)
BBC News Summary

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MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ndkjzkd61)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0gn3t)
BBC News

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MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm50d6)
BBC News Summary

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MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2ghz)
Dare to Repair: How we broke the future

Materials engineer Professor Mark Miodownik looks back to the start of the electronics revolution to find out why our electronic gadgets and household goods are less durable and harder to repair now. As he attempts to fix his digital clock radio, he reveals that the drive for cheaper stuff and advances in design and manufacturing have left us with a culture of throwaway technology and mountains of electronic waste.

Image: Apron housewife at kitchen dish washer, Credit: George Marks/Getty Images

Producer: Fiona Roberts


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0grvy)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv562d7yr5k)
Heavy police presence in Cuba following protests

The Cuban opposition says that dozens of activists have been arrested since Sunday, when thousands of people joined the biggest protests in decades against the island's Communist government. We speak to one activist in Havana and hear the view from the US.

Also in the programme: the South African government deploys the military to tackle the rioting and looting after former president Jacob Zuma was sentenced to jai; and the team of scientists working at warp speed to develop a blood test for long Covid.

(Picture: People with Cuban flags outside the national headquarters of the Union of Young Communists in Havana. Credit: EPA/Ernesto Mastrascusa)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0gwm2)
BBC News

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MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm57wg)
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MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0h0c6)
BBC News

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MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqpxjw9x5)
The Newsroom

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MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shs600cjt)
Sports News

BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm5cml)
BBC News Summary

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MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48v7fkqjxb)
Cubans join protests as economy struggles

Cubans have been angered by an economic crisis, combined with anti-Covid measures. Thousands joined the biggest anti-government protests in the country for decades, and we find out more from Dr Emily Morris who is a development economist at University College London, specialising in the Cuban economy. Also in the programme, we have a wide ranging interview with Sundar Pichai, who is chief executive of search engine Google and its parent company Alphabet. Plus, there's controversy ahead of the Tokyo Olympic Games, about a new type of running shoe which has led to a recent surge in track and field records. The BBC's Ivana Davidovic asks whether a runner's authentic ability is becoming less important for success on the track.

(Picture: A man is arrested during protests in Havana. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 13 JULY 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0h7vg)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqfcpxdm55)
Dozens arrested in Cuban anti-government protests

Thousands of people have joined the protests, which are taking place across the island - and are the largest demonstrations in decades. Dr Christopher Sabatini, senior fellow at independent policy institute Chatham House, tells us what this could mean for the future of Cuba's government.
Also in the programme, we have an interview with Sundar Pichai, chief executive of search engine Google and its parent company Alphabet.
Plus, ahead of the Tokyo Olympic Games, there's controversy about a new type of running shoe which has led to a recent surge in track and field records. The BBC's Ivana Davidovic asks whether a runner's authentic ability is becoming less important for success on the track.
And we consider whether space tourism may become a reality for the general population following Sir Richard Branson's maiden voyage at the weekend.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Jyoti Malhotra, editor of national and strategic affairs at The Print website in Delhi, and by Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland, who's in Washington DC.

(Picture: A protest rally in Cuba. Credit: Getty)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0hcll)
BBC News

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TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4kzkv)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm5qvz)
BBC News Summary

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TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2gds)
Sporting heroines of history

Multi Gold-winning Paralympian Tanni Grey-Thompson explores the role of women in sport through history. In 2021, women’s sport is in the ascendancy. Women’s football is riding high after the 2019 World Cup, women’s snooker is reaching corners of the world it has never previously reached and darts is no longer a male preserve.

Meanwhile it is the 100th anniversary of the Women’s Olympiad – the first dedicated female sporting event in the world. Tanni looks at some of the milestones in sport for women over the decades and acknowledges several people who were pivotal in helping to make sure women were finally recognised – among them Alice Milliat, the French woman who organised that first international women’s sporting event in Monte Carlo in 1921.

Tanni reflects on some of those whose achievements really helped to change the course of history for women in sport – from athletes like Dale Greig, the first woman to run a marathon in under 3.5 hours, Russian Olgo Korbut who helped to change the perception of women in gymnastics, tennis player Althea Gibson, the first African-American to win a Grand Slam and the footballers who battled a five-decade ban on women playing on official grounds in England.
Tanni also assesses the contribution by women behind the scenes in sport.

(Photo: Tanni Grey-Thompson after finishing Fourth in the 200m T54 for Women at the 2004 Paralympic Games, Athens, Greece)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0hhbq)
BBC News

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TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0hm2v)
BBC News

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TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4l723)
The Newsroom

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TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm5zc7)
BBC News Summary

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TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td6)
Apichatpong Weerasethakul: From Colombia to Cannes

Apichatpong Weerasethakul, the Palme d’Or award-winning Thai filmmaker and artist, is back at the Cannes Film Festival this year with his film, Memoria, which has just been selected for the main competition.

Starring Tilda Swinton, Memoria is Apichatpong’s first feature film to be shot outside his native Thailand.

Apart from being shot in the mountains of Colombia and centering on a widow, played by Swinton, who goes in search of her own identity after hearing a series of mysterious bangs, many details of the film have been kept under wraps.

With exclusive access to the Director, cast and crew, In the Studio joins Apichatpong on the shoot in Colombia and follows him through to the post-production in Thailand.

Join reporter Manuela Ochoa to find out more.

Reporter: Manuela Ochoa
Produced by Ella-mai Robey and Harry Parker for the BBC World Service


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0hqtz)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6fxsvq)
Cuba protests: dozens arrested

Thousands of people joined the biggest protests on the island for decades, as the pandemic and US sanctions hit the economy.

The Australian government is accused of scare tactics over its latest attempt to get people to take up the coronavirus vaccine.

And Greece is accused of sending thousands of migrants back to Turkey without allowing them to apply for asylum.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0hvl3)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6fxxlv)
Poland v EU: What action can Europe take?

Poland's Supreme Court decides what should come first - EU or Polish law - after concerns the nationalist government is eroding judicial, media and civil freedoms.

Britain eases coronavirus restrictions next week, but critics say the government is being irresponsible by not continuing to make facemasks compulsory in certain settings.

And a footballer accuses the British Home Secretary of hypocrisy- saying she can't slam the racist trolling of players now, having failed to defend them when they decided to take the knee.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0hzb7)
BBC News

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TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6fy1bz)
Dozens of protesters arrested in Cuba

Thousands joined the protests against Covid restrictions and calling for more freedoms.

We talk about racism in football after black England players received abuse following the final of the European championship on Sunday.

And a vintage copy of Nintendo's Super Mario - a 1996 video game - has sold at auction for more than 1.5 million dollars


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0j32c)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl2)
How five friends can change a refugee’s life

Dutch friends Evelien and Roel are part of a group sharing their social networks and local knowledge with Laila, a Syrian refugee, and her family. They’re taking part in a pilot project in the Netherlands called Samen Hier, which matches locals and newcomers. The idea is to help people who live nearby get to know one another and encourage integration.

Produced and presented by Claire Bates

Picture: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm6gbr)
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TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jfz)
Why gin is still fizzing

From its early reputation as mothers’ ruin to its prime spot in upscale cocktail bars, we tell the story of the juniper-infused spirit. And as the gin craze in the US and the UK shows no sign of slowing, we ask where the next global hotspots will be. Dr Angela McShane of Warwick University tells Elizabeth Hotson how and why gin drinking became popular in the UK and Sandie Van Doorne, from Lucas Bols - which claims to be the oldest distillery brand in the world - explains how the Dutch spirit, genever, fits into the story. Sean Harrison of Plymouth Gin explains how the company is taking on the new contenders in the market and we hear from up-and-coming brands; Toby Whittaker from Whittakers Gin and Temi Shogelola of Black Crowned Gin. Plus, we hear from Emily Neill, Chief Operating Officer at the IWSR which provides data and analysis on the beverage alcohol market. And a programme about gin wouldn’t be complete without a cocktail; William Campbell-Rowntree, bar supervisor at Artesian in London’s Langham Hotel, gives his tips for the perfect tipple.

Presenter: Elizabeth Hotson
Producer: Sarah Treanor

(Picture of a gin and tonic with garnish; Picture via Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5k)
Prisoner of the Cultural Revolution

As a schoolboy in communist China, Kim Gordon took part in huge rallies to praise Chairman Mao. But when Mao's so-called Cultural Revolution began to target intellectuals and foreigners, Kim's British parents came under suspicion despite being convinced communists. When they tried to leave the country they were arrested with Kim and locked up in a hotel room for two years. Monica Whitlock has been listening to Kim's story.

Photo: Kim Gordon as a schoolboy in China. Courtesy of Kim Gordon.


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0j6th)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gds)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm6l2w)
BBC News Summary

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TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2ghz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0jbkm)
BBC News

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TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0jg9r)
BBC News

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TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4m290)
The Newsroom

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TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm6tl4)
BBC News Summary

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TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0jl1w)
BBC News

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TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwj)
Birdwatching with the men who kidnapped me

In 2004, young biologist Diego Calderón was captured while on a field trip in the Colombian Andes. His captors were Farc guerrillas, who held him for three months, seeking a ransom payment. Life in the Farc camp was basic and tedious, but Diego kept himself busy by studying the wildlife in the unique cloud forest habitat where he was held. Years later, after his release, Diego found himself face to face with the guerrillas once again. But by now a peace deal had been signed, and efforts were being made to use nature and tourism to integrate ex-combatants back into society. Many of them had grown up in the forests and had unique knowledge of the region. Diego was one of the first in line to join his former captors who were now carrying birdwatching binoculars, not guns.

When Jonathan Franklin was a pupil at the famous British boarding school, Eton, in the late 1950s, he adopted two little tawny owls called Dee and Dum. He explains how he tried to train them in his tiny room. He spoke to Outlook’s Jo Fidgen in 2017.

In southern Brazil there lives a parrot named after one of horror's scariest villains. Freddy Krueger, the green Amazonian parrot that is, has seen just as much drama as his namesake. Ilair Dettoni is a vet who acts as Freddy's carer, and has stuck by Freddy since an injury in a shootout almost killed the parrot and earned him his famous name. Ilair spoke to Emily Webb in 2019.

Image: Diego Calderón birding with Leo on the 2018 Expedicion BIO in Anorí
Credit: Federico Ríos Escobar @historiassencillas

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0jpt0)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4m9s8)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm722d)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2ghz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0jtk4)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv562d80svr)
Greek government told to stop 'illegally turning back migrants'

A top EU official has told the BBC that Greece needs to stop deporting migrants who arrive on their borders before giving them a chance to apply for asylum. Greece have denied this. Stelios Kouloglou is a Member of the European Parliament and says its wrong for the EU to entirely place the blame on Greece. Also on the programme, Google has been fined a record six hundred million dollars by the French authorities in a row over copyright and the Taliban in Afghanistan has warned Turkey that its troops will be considered 'invaders', if they remain at Kabul airport once other NATO troops pull out.

( Pic: asylum seekers in boat Credit : PA)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0jy98)
BBC News

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TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm79kn)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bh3ws52pz)
Protests escalate in South Africa

Violence is mounting in South Africa as people protest poverty and unemployment. The unrest was sparked by the jailing of former president Jacob Zuma, but has become more generalised in recent days. Busisiwe Mavuso is chief executive of Business Leadership South Africa, which represents the country's largest employers, and gives us her perspective on recent developments. Also in the programme, property prices in Australia have been rising at their highest levels nationally in 17 years. The BBC's Phil Mercer reports on concerns that almost half of Australian households are struggling with their mortgage payments. Plus, as a gin craze in the US and UK shows no sign of abating, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson explores where the next global hotspots will be for the drink.

(Picture: Looters flee from police in Johannesburg. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0k21d)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxll9401zv)
South Africa Zuma riots: Death toll mounts

We'll get the latest from South Africa, where protests following the arrest of former president Jacob Zuma continue. At least 30 people have now died in the violence. We hear from our reporter on the ground and also people living there.

And as England prepares for so-called “Freedom Day” on 19 July - when most Covid restrictions will be eased - we speak to doctors who say they are preparing for an increase in hospitalisations.

And our regular health expert, Dr Isaac Bogoch, an infectious diseases physician and scientist from the University of Toronto, joins us to answer listener questions about the coronavirus pandemic.

(Photo: Members of the South Africa National Defence Force patrol the streets after looting in Soweto, South Africa, 13 July 2021. Credit:EPA/Kim Ludbrook).


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0k5sj)
BBC News

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TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxll9405qz)
Euro 2020: Racism in football

Following the Euro 2020 final, we hear the conversations happening among black people in the UK. It’s after three black England players, Marcus Rashford, Bukayo Saka and Jadon Sacho were targeted with racial abuse after they missed penalties. Rashford has apologised for the missed penalty, but said: “I will never apologise for who I am and where I came from.” We connect to radio stations that aim to serve black communities and hear whether these events have changed people’s view of England.

We go to South Africa, as protests continue following the arrest of former president, Jacob Zuma. At least 30 people have now died in the violence and about 800 have been arrested. We hear from our reporter on the ground and people living through the violence.

And as England prepares for so-called “Freedom Day” on 19 July - when most Covid restrictions will be eased - we speak to doctors who say they are preparing for an increase in hospitalisations.

(Photo: People gather to view the messages of support at the mural of Manchester United striker and England player Marcus Rashford in Withington. Credit: PA)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0k9jn)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0kf8s)
BBC News

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TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4n181)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm7sk5)
BBC News Summary

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TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ndkjzn934)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0kk0x)
BBC News

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TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gds)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm7x99)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls8)
Fighting for the right to repair

US President Joe Biden has signed an executive order asking the Federal Trade Commission to “limit powerful equipment manufacturers from restricting people’s ability to use independent repair shops or do DIY repairs”. This could mean manufacturers can no longer require repairs only be offered by themselves or through authorised retailers. Gay Gordon-Byrne, CEO of The Repair Association in the US, has been speaking about the impact this could have.

Are public-funded cultural institutions falling behind in creating digital content and in danger of becoming irrelevant? A new report from the Serpentine Galleries, “Future Art Ecosystems: Art x Metaverse”, suggests that might be the case. While the Games Industry is ploughing huge amounts of money into developing the spatial decentralised web (web 3.0), cultural institutions are lagging behind. Kay Watson, Head of the Arts Technologies team at the Serpentine Galleries, tells us more about the tech they are using to be part of this new metaverse.

It’s the 30th anniversary of the first public website. Composer Kieran Brunt is back to tell us about his latest creation. This new work explores how the internet has dramatically reshaped our lives over the past 30 years. Woven around personal stories Kieran Brunt features electronic and vocal elements that explore the impact the internet has had on all our lives. The full Virtual Symphony can be heard on BBC Radio 3 on Sunday 18th July 2021.


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington

Studio Manager:
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


(Image: Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0kns1)
BBC News

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TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv562d81n2n)
Violent unrest continues in South Africa

Looting and violence sparked by the jailing of South Africa's former president, Jacob Zuma, on Friday has continued into its fifth night. We hear from the leader of South Africa's main opposition party, the Democratic Alliance, about the state of the country.

Also in the programme: Smartphone and satellite technology is helping indigenous communities who live in the Amazon rainforest in Peru significantly reduce deforestation; and a father in China is reuinted with his son after a twenty-four-year search for the boy who was abducted from just outside his home.

(Picture: a looted shopping mall in Durban. Credit: Reuters/Courtesy of Kierran Allen)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0ksj5)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm84sk)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0kx89)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqpxjz6t8)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shs6038fx)
Sports News

BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm88jp)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48v7fktftf)
Protests escalate in South Africa

Violence is mounting in South Africa as people protest poverty and unemployment. The unrest was sparked by the jailing of former president Jacob Zuma, but has become more generalised in recent days. Busisiwe Mavuso is chief executive of Business Leadership South Africa, which represents the country's largest employers, and gives us her perspective on recent developments. Also in the programme, property prices in Australia have been rising at their highest levels nationally in 17 years. The BBC's Phil Mercer reports on concerns that almost half of Australian households are struggling with their mortgage payments. Plus, as a gin craze in the US and UK shows no sign of abating, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson explores where the next global hotspots will be for the drink.

(Picture: Looters flee from police in Johannesburg. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 14 JULY 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0l4rk)
BBC News

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WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqfcpxhj28)
Food and used car prices push US inflation to 5.4%

The annual rate of inflation is at its highest in the US since 2008, as the economy reopens after coronavirus lockdowns. We get analysis from Jason Furman, professor of the practice of economic policy at Harvard University and former adviser to the Obama Administration.
We have an exclusive interview with former Nissan and Renault boss Carlos Ghosn. Now living in Lebanon, he describes how he fled Japan in November 2018 after being arrested over allegations he misused company funds.
Also in the programme, the Italian government has permanently banned cruise ships from the Giudecca canal in central Venice, citing environmental damage and threats to the city's foundations. Jan van der Borg is a tourism specialist who teaches at Venice’s Ca’ Foscari University and gives us his views.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Michelle Jamrisko, Bloomberg’s senior Asia economy reporter in Singapore, and by Patrick Barta, Asia Enterprise Editor, overseeing major features projects and investigations for the Wall Street Journal in Asia, who's in Dallas.

(Picture: An iPad in a Costco store. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0l8hp)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbg)
Jess Phillips: What happened to progressive politics?

Stephen Sackur speaks to one of the leading figures in the British Labour party, Jess Phillips MP. She’s a tireless campaigner against domestic violence and has won plaudits for her direct, from-the-heart style of politics. Across continents and cultures there is a common, and corrosive, political phenomenon – rising anger and alienation amongst voters who feel neglected and ignored by the system. Is there a way out of today's polarised politics?


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm8ms2)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0ld7t)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0lhzy)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct2g9n)
The Test

Covid and economic stimulus

Prior to Covid, the US economy had been declining compared with other countries, and the pandemic itself highlighted existing weaknesses. Now America’s economy is surging, powered by President Joe Biden’s massive financial stimulus plan. International economist Jim O’Neill hears from economists who argue that new fiscal policies could support a transformational moment for America’s economy - and from others who warn that dangerous inflationary pressures are being stoked.

(Photo: President Joe Biden delivers remarks on the state of his American Rescue Plan from the State Dining Room at the White House, Washington, D.C. Credit: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm8w8b)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6p)
Lex Gillette

Having lost his sight as a child, Lex Gillette discovered new purpose in his life when he took up athletics. A talented runner, Lex is also a multiple Paralympic long jump medallist, and an advocate for blind people in all areas of life.

And whilst he knows a thing or two about winning - he’s a triple IPC World Champion - his four consecutive silvers in the long jump at the Paralympics mean he might be the greatest athlete in Games history never to have won gold.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0lmr2)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6g0prt)
South Africa riots and looting

As riots spread across South Africa, there are growing concerns about the economic impact of the violence.

Unprecedented drought and heat waves in the US are boosting demand for coal - what impact will that have on climate change?

And we'll be talking about how your driving might reveal early signs of Alzheimer’s.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0lrh6)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6g0thy)
Lebanon's medicine shortage

The growing lack of medicines caused by Lebanon’s economic problems is leading to a medical crisis.

We'll take you to one of the few countries in the world where coronavirus vaccinations are being made compulsory for all adults.

And could the way you drive be an early indicator of Alzheimer's disease ? We talk to the lead researcher from that US study


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0lw7b)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6g0y82)
Newsday

Live news, business and sport from around the world.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0lzzg)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm9c7v)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnr)
Carlos Ghosn speaks out

Carlos Ghosn was the superstar chairman of the Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi alliance, one of the largest automakers in the world. Now, he’s an exile from the Japanese authorities in his home country of Lebanon. Ghosn sat down with the BBC’s Simon Jack to discuss everything that happened between these two points: from his shock arrest in a Tokyo airport charged with financial crimes, to prolonged legal battles and his dramatic escape from Japan.

(Picture: Former Renault-Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn in Beirut on January 8, 2020. Picture credit: JOSEPH EID/AFP via Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7t)
Jane Goodall and chimpanzees

In the 1960s a young Englishwoman made a discovery that changed our understanding of animal behaviour. Jane Goodall was living among wild chimpanzees in Tanzania when she observed them using sticks and grasses as tools to get food. Farhana Haider spoke to her about her life in 2014.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

(Photo: Jane Goodall with chimpanzeess. Credit: AFP)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0m3ql)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2g9n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm9gzz)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0m7gq)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0mc6v)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4pz63)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm9qh7)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0mgyz)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jys)
From intensive care to the Olympic podium

Keeth Smart is an all-time great in the US in the sport of fencing. He was the first American to be ranked the number one fencer in the world. But in 2004 he suffered a devastating defeat at the Olympics when he lost a medal by one point. So in 2008 he was determined to redeem his reputation. Months out from the games, he noticed that his gums and hands were bleeding. Keeth was rushed into intensive care and told he had a 50-percent chance of survival. How he beat leukaemia and ended up winning an Olympic medal.

A short film has been made about Keeth's life called Stay Close.

Picture: Keeth Smart at sabre semi-final at Beijing Olympic Games
Credit: OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0mlq3)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4q6pc)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypm9yzh)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0mqg7)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv562d83prv)
The Islamic State children facing life locked up

A BBC investigation has revealed that thousands of foreign children could be facing life in prison in Syria - because their parents were members of the Islamic State group.

They are being moved from camps to secure children's homes - and ending up in adult jails. And there are fears they are being radicalised along the way. What will happen to these children and their mothers?

Also in the programme, more than 70 people have now been killed in riots and looting in South Africa - violence that began with crowds protesting against the jailing of the former president, Jacob Zuma. And Haiti's Ambassador to the United States speaks about why his country has requested American support to help calm the chaos a power vacuum has created after the assassination of the Haitian president Jovenel Moise a week ago.


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0mv6c)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmb6gr)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cq8zp8y80)
Inflation spikes in US and UK

As the US and UK report inflation hikes, how worried we should be about price rises? Jennifer McKeown of Capital Economics gives us her perspective. Also in the programme, the former Nissan and Renault boss Carlos Ghosn talks to the BBC about his arrest and escape from the Japanese justice system. Plus, we explore the technology of voice cloning and its potential to disrupt jobs and industries. Rupal Patel is chief executive of VocalID, and professor of communications sciences at Northeastern University, who has developed artificial intelligence voice cloning software. And we get reaction from Texan voiceover artist and actor, Tim Heller, whose voice has been cloned using the system.

(Picture: A cashier at a supermarket. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0myyh)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxll942ywy)
South Africa Zuma unrest

We continue to hear from South Africa where long queues have formed outside shops and petrol stations following days of unrest sparked by the jailing of former president Jacob Zuma. We’ll hear from BBC teams on the ground and people living in the areas affected.

We go through the latest coronavirus news with Dr Maria Sundaram an infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto

And we’ll hear from people in Zimbabwe and Uganda about the impact of the Covid 19 pandemic on the education of young people.

Picture: People queue at a supermarket which has been closed after violence erupted following the jailing of former South African President Jacob Zuma, in Hillcrest, South Africa, July 14, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Rogan Ward


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0n2pm)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxll9432n2)
Coronavirus conversations: Education

We hear a conversation between a student and a father in Zimbabwe and Uganda which sees them discuss their experiences of the Covid 19 pandemic on the education of young people.

We continue to hear from South Africa where long queues have formed outside shops and petrol stations following days of unrest sparked by the jailing of former president Jacob Zuma. We’ll hear from BBC teams on the ground and people living in the areas affected.

We go through the latest coronavirus news with Dr Pedro Hallal - an epidemiologist from the Federal University of Pelotas in the south of Brazil.

Picture: Children play outside their home at a time they were supposed to be at school in Epworth, Harare, Zimbabwe, 28 June 2021. The Zimbabwe government has postponed the opening of schools planned for 28 June, due to a surge in the covid -19 pandemic cases in the country. Credit: EPA/AARON UFUMELI


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0n6fr)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0nb5w)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4qy54)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmbpg8)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ndkjzr607)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0nfy0)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2g9n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmbt6d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvh)
Mental health recovery stories

Claudia Hammond presents three stories where people have helped someone who’s going through mental health difficulties.

Dale had spent his childhood playing basketball at an elite level, and when his career stalled he became depressed. A chance meeting with Mike, a customer in the mobile phone shop where Dale was working, has turned his life around.

Poppy was going through a very tough time when she was 16, but a teacher at her college called Sophie Durant was determined to give her the chance to talk if she wanted to. Poppy is now about to start to study dance at university.

Adam’s teenage daughter Megan knew she suffered from food allergies and was always careful with her diet. One evening five years ago, she had a take-away at a friend’s house. They warned the restaurant about her allergies, but she suffered a severe anaphylactic shock and on New Year’s Day she died. Adam has found great support from a group in the UK for men who’ve been bereaved called StrongMen.

It’s never easy to know what to say to a friend or relative who has mental health problems without risking making things worse. Clinical psychologist Linda Blair gives tips on how to handle these conversations.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Pam Rutherford

(Picture: A couple hiking in the Austrian mountains. Photo credit: Westend61/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0nkp4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv562d84jzr)
How can the world deal with children radicalised by Islamic State?

As a BBC investigation reveals that thousands of foreign children could be facing lifetimes of incarceration because their parents were members of the Islamic State group, we ask about prospects for their rehabilitation into normal life. Radicalisation expert Dr Gina Vale explains what we know so far.

Also in the programme: The European Union publishes far-reaching proposals for curbing carbon emissions. How controversial will they be? And a senior US official offers her perspective on the situation in Haiti since the killing of the country's president last week.


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0npf8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmc1pn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0nt5d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqpxk23qc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shs6065c0)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmc5fs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48v7fkxbqj)
Inflation spikes in US and UK

As the US and UK report inflation hikes, how worried we should be about price rises? Jennifer McKeown of Capital Economics gives us her perspective. Also in the programme, the former Nissan and Renault boss Carlos Ghosn talks to the BBC about his arrest and escape from the Japanese justice system. Plus, we explore the technology of voice cloning and its potential to disrupt jobs and industries. Rupal Patel is chief executive of VocalID, and professor of communications sciences at Northeastern University, who has developed artificial intelligence voice cloning software. And we get reaction from Texan voiceover artist and actor, Tim Heller, whose voice has been cloned using the system.

(Picture: A cashier at a supermarket. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 15 JULY 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0p1nn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqfcpxldzc)
EU unveils sweeping climate change plan

The European Union has announced a raft of climate change proposals aimed at pushing it towards its goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2050. We chat to Dr Timothy Johnson, Professor of the Practice of Energy and the Environment at Duke University in the US. Meanwhile, Professor René Rojas from Binghamton University in upstate New York tells us about activists in Chile who are driving a campaign to have the national constitution redrafted by an equal number of women and men. Plus, the former Nissan and Renault boss Carlos Ghosn talks to the BBC's Simon Jack about his arrest and escape from the Japanese justice system. We also explore the technology of voice cloning and its potential to disrupt jobs and industries. Rupal Patel is chief executive of VocalID, and professor of communications sciences at Northeastern University, who has developed artificial intelligence voice cloning software. And we get reaction from Texan voiceover artist and actor, Tim Heller, whose voice has been cloned using the system.
Mehmal Sarfraz, a journalist based in Lahore, and Ralph Silva of Silva Network Toronto join us for commentary throughout the programme.

(Picture credit: AFP)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0p5ds)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z26)
Why did so many indigenous children die in Canada’s residential schools?

The recent discoveries of unmarked graves at the sites of so-called Indian Residential Schools has put Canada’s treatment of its indigenous peoples back under the spotlight.

For more than a century, tens of thousands of children were forced by the state into a religious school system that split families and brutalised the children in its care.

Tanya Beckett looks at the history of the residential schools and asks why so many children died there.

Producer: Rob Cave and Olivia Noon


(former Kamloops Indian Residential School, British Columbia, Canada, 2 June 2021. Credit: Cole Burston/Getty Images)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmcjp5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0p94x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0pdx1)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxk)
Finding Grace

In November 1990 a body of a woman was discovered - near an abandoned farm house in Missouri. The victim had been restrained with six types of rope. Police had no idea who she was, let alone who had killed her. With no clues to go on, and no leads, the police dubbed her ‘Grace’ after one officer said ‘only by the grace of god will she be identified’. For three decades there wasn’t a single lead in the case. However earlier this year, the young woman was identified using a revolutionary technique. It combines advanced DNA genome processing with genealogy websites which people use to trace ancestors and build their family trees. The BBC’s North American technology reporter, James Clayton, discovers Grace’s true identity and meets the victim’s siblings who are grateful to finally get some sense of closure after years of uncertainty. The new method has already solved hundreds of cold cases across America. Yet some worry that uploading DNA onto police databases violates privacy and could be open to abuse.

Radio producer in London - Lucy Ash

(Image: Shawna Beth Garber aged two, who was later known to police as "Grace." Picture courtesy of Danielle Pixler)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmcs5f)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr6)
Nigella Lawson: My life in five dishes

The internationally-acclaimed food writer and TV cook Nigella Lawson, tells her life story through five memorable dishes. Often filmed devouring food with a showy relish, she tells Emily Thomas how her mother’s bulimia sparked a life-long determination to enjoy eating.

Nigella explains how a series of bereavements has led her to memorialise her loved ones through recipes, and why she’s become more protective of her privacy in recent years.

Nigella’s books and TV shows often give the impression of a gregarious host, cooking for a multitude of family and friends, but her latest book ‘Cook, Eat, Repeat’ and its accompanying TV series, partly written and produced during lockdown, show her on her own. We find out how she’s coped.

(Picture: Nigella Lawson. Credit: Matt Holyoak/ BBC).


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0pjn5)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6g3lnx)
UN vaccine warning

The UN health agency says the number of children not receiving vaccines against measles, diptheria and polio rose in every region of the world last year because of the Covid pandemic.

As South Africa deploys up to twenty-five thousand troops to quell the unrest on the streets, we visit a doctor whose clinic was ransacked by looters.

And we have a special report from Afghanistan which the UN is now calling a "humanitarian catastrophe."


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0pnd9)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6g3qf1)
Lawlessness in South Africa

Will the deployment of 25 thousand troops bring an end to the looting and violence in South Africa? Our correspondent brings us the latest.

20 African heads of state are asking for help from the World Bank to help them recover from the impact of the pandemic.

And we have an update on the jihadist insurgency in northern Mozambique.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0ps4f)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6g3v55)
UN warning on Afghanistan

A stark message from the UN describing the situation unfolding in Afghanistan as a "humanitarian catastrophe".

We'll have the latest from South Africa: can 25 thousand troops out on the streets put an end to the looting and restore order ?

We'll hear about a new treatment which may help those who found themselves on ventilators as a result of Covid from suffering permanent damage to their lungs.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0pwwk)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmd84y)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9g)
Transport of the Future

High-tech solutions to congested roads and pollution. As the world looks for ever smarter and more high-tech solutions to congested roads and pollution, Jane Wakefield explores some of the possible transport of the future. Reporting from the Goodwood Festival of Speed in the south of England, Jane hears from the inventors of flying cars to jet packs. Is it all a bit of fun, or do these designs provide a way for us to re-engineer getting from A to B? Does a mind controlled car even work? Jane hears about a new autonomous car re-engineered to clean the air as it goes from Thomas Heatherwick, architect and designer, from Richard Browning, jet pack inventor and founder of Gravity Industries, and more. (Photo: man wearing a jetpack. Photo credit: Getty images).


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x39)
When the Taliban took Kabul

Taliban fighters first took control of Afghanistan's capital city Kabul in late September 1996. They imposed their strict interpretation of Islam on Afghans, outlawing music and TV, banning the education of girls, and requiring men to grow beards. The Taliban ruled most of Afghanistan until 2001 when, following the 9/11 attacks against America, a US-led coalition drove them out of power.

Photo: Taliban gunners outside Kabul in November 1996.(Credit: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0q0mp)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmdcx2)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0q4ct)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rld)
Rain or shine? A short history of the weather forecast

How did we get from not having any reliable way of predicting the weather just 150 years ago, to today's accurate, tailor-made forecasts for places as small as a village? Bridget Kendall and guests trace the history of meteorology, from its first steps as an aid to quicker trans-Atlantic shipping to the latest methods which can help anticipate weather events as short-lived as a tornado.

Bridget is joined by Kristine Harper, a former US Navy forecaster and now a history professor at Florida State University; Peter Gibbs who started out as a meteorologist with the British Antarctic Survey and the UK's Met Office before becoming one of the best known weather forecasters on BBC radio and television; and Peter Moore, a writer and historian with a particular interest in weather discoveries of the 19th century.

Photo: A hurricane is seen from the International Space Station. (Scott Kelly/NASA via Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8f)
Stacy Dragila - Queen of the Women's Pole Vault

At the 2000 Sydney games, women were able to compete in the Pole Vault at the Olympics for the first time. It followed the emergence of a generation of vaulters led by America’s Stacy Dragila, who proved that women could master an event traditionally regarded as too physically demanding and too technically difficult for them. Stacy Dragila went on to win the first women’s Olympic gold medal in her discipline. She talks to Simon Watts.

PHOTO: Stacy Dragila competing in 1999 (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0q83y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4sw36)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmdmdb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0qcw2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k39)
A decade without Dan: The search for my brother gave me purpose

On the 15th of July, 2011, 24-year-old Dan O’Keeffe went missing from his parents’ home in the state of Victoria, Australia.

The family reported him missing but as there were no suspicious circumstances it wasn’t classed as a priority by the police and so Dan’s sister, Loren quit her job and led the long and gruelling search to try and find him, bringing together thousands of strangers along the way through the social media campaign, Dan Come Home.

It would be almost five years before Dan’s body was discovered close to the family home where he was last seen.

A decade since his disappearance Loren O’Keeffe has now dedicated her life to supporting the families of other long-term missing persons across Australia, using her own experience, knowledge and resources she has founded a charity called the Missing Persons Advocacy Network, which creates awareness for missing persons and supports those who are left behind.

If you've been affected by any of the issues discussed in this programme the BBC action line has a list of organisations offering support. Just look online for bbc.co.uk/actionline.

Image: Dan O'Keeffe at the beach
Credit: Loren O'Keeffe

Presenter: Anu Anand
Producer: Thomas Harding Assinder

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0qhm6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4t3lg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmdvwl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0qmcb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv562d86lny)
UN warns of humanitarian catastrophe in Afghanistan

The United Nations' top humanitarian official in Afghanistan, Ramiz Alakbarov, says a 'humanitarian catastrophe' is unfolding as tens of thousands of people are forced to flee the violence as the Taliban continue to capture territory. We have a special report from the BBC's Yogita Limaye who has travelled to Kunduz city in the north of the country – a city effectively under siege from the Taliban. And an Afghan negotiator gives us details of a Taliban proposal for a three-month ceasefire.

Also in the programme: why more than 100 developing countries say not enough has been done to counter climate change ahead of the COP 26 climate summit later this year; and we hear from a supporter of the jailed former South African president, Jacob Zuma.

Photo: A family arrives at a camp for people fleeing the violence near Kunduz, northern Afghanistan Credit: BBC


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0qr3g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmf3cv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y497ysw9xw7)
South Africans face supply chain problems

After days of unrest, South Africans have been urged to stop panic buying fuel. Layton Beard of the Automobile Association of South Africa offers us his reaction, and we get a sense of the wider picture. Also in the programme, the Korean palm oil giant Korindo has been ejected from the world's leading green certification body, the Forest Stewardship Council, in the wake of a BBC investigation. We find out more from the BBC's Rebecca Henschke. On UN Young Skills Day, we speak to Dimitris Lampros and Rania Vlachou of Swim Me, who have created a smart swimming cap and goggles that enable blind people to be more aware of where they are in a pool. Plus, the BBC's Russell Padmore reports on the challenges faced by pubs in Ireland, which have had to remain closed throughout most of the coronavirus pandemic.

(Picture: South Africans protest against looting. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0qvvl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxll945vt1)
South Africa: 25,000 troops deployed after unrest

South Africa has announced a tenfold increase in the number of troops to be deployed in response to widespread violence sparked by the jailing of the former president, Jacob Zuma. KwaZulu-Nata province has seen some of the worst violence, particularly in the town of Phoenix - where police say at least 15 people have been killed as a result of violence between Indian and black communities. We hear from a reporter on the ground as well as from voices in the community.

Also, Instagram has admitted a mistake in its technology meant racist comments and emojis were not removed. It comes after a flood of racist abuse was directed at England footballers Bukayo Saka, Marcus Rashford and Jadon Sancho following the men's Euro 2020 final. We get the latest from our tech reporter.

And we continue our Coronavirus conversations series: As England prepares for so-called “Freedom Day” on 19th July - when most Covid restrictions will be eased – the last remaining businesses that are still closed, will be allowed to finally reopen. But excitement is mixed by concern about rising cases. We speak to two business owners, to hear how they have been preparing.

(Photo: Soldiers patrol while local residents clean up the streets after looting, Johannesburg, South Africa, 15 July 2021. Credit: EPA/Kim Ludbrook)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0qzlq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxll945zk5)
Coronavirus conversations: English businesses prepare for end of Covid restrictions

South Africa has announced a tenfold increase in the number of troops to be deployed in response to widespread violence sparked by the jailing of the former president, Jacob Zuma. KwaZulu-Nata province has seen some of the worst violence, particularly in the town of Phoenix - where police say at least 15 people have been killed as a result of violence between Indian and black communities. We hear from a reporter on the ground as well as from voices in the community.

And we continue our Coronavirus conversations series: As England prepares for so-called “Freedom Day” on 19th July - when most Covid restrictions will be eased – the last remaining businesses that are still closed, will be allowed to finally reopen. But excitement is mixed by concern about rising cases. We speak to two business owners, to hear how they have been preparing.

And a record number of Americans died of drug overdoses last year. Officials said the increase was driven by the lethal prevalence of fentanyl, as well as pandemic-related stressors and problems in accessing care. We speak to a reporter who has been investigating the numbers.

(Photo: People at Oxford Circus underground station, London, Britain, July 4, 2021. Reuters/Henry Nicholls)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0r3bv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0r72z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4tv27)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmflcc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ndkjzv2xb)
2021/07/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0rbv3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmfq3h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3x)
Science when the funding dries up

This week the UK parliament voted to accept the Government’s continued cap on Official Development Aid. This disappointed many researchers around the world, funded directly and indirectly through various scientific funding structures enabling international collaboration on some of the global challenges facing all of us. These funding mechanisms make for a small fraction of the overall amount, but they have been hit hard, with many projects closing altogether.

There had been hope amongst the scientific community that the cap – from 0.7% down to 0.5% of the UK’s Gross Domestic Income – might have been in place just for a year. But it seems like the criteria set to judge when the level of aid might rise again imply that it is unlikely to happen for several years at the earliest.

What, asks Science in Action, does that mean to the world of scientific collaboration on such topics as climate change, contagious disease, and emergency planning?

Researchers Chris Trisos and Jenni Barclay, with journalist Robin Bisson of Research Professional News, update us on the story.

In Zambia, where covid testing remains scarce, a project run by Boston University’s Christopher Gill has been estimating the prevalence of covid in the capital Lusaka by taking nasal swab samples from the noses of around one in five of those recently deceased, in the morgue of a major hospital. Tantalisingly, his team have seen over the last few months a sharp rise in cases to the extent that in June, nearly 90 percent of the cadavers tested positive for covid. But as Chris describes, unrelated to the UK cuts, their funding has now run out, so where the graph leads from here we may not learn for a long time.

Presented by Roland Pease
Produced by Alex Mansfield.

(Image: Getty Images)


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0rgl7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv562d87fwv)
Floods in Germany and Belgium: more than 50 people die

More than 50 people have died and thousands of people have been displaced by extensive flooding in parts of western Germany and Belgium. Germany is the most severely affected country, with dozens of people still missing. The German Chancellor Angela Merkel has called it a catastrophe, linking the events to climate change.

Also in the programme: How Covid is overwhelming Myanmar; and the exiled Belarusian opposition leader on an emotional return to Ireland.

Photo: Damage to the German village of Schuld after heavy flooding. Credit: EPA/ Sascha Steinbach)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0rlbc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmfylr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0rq2h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqpxk50mg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shs609283)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmg2bw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48v7fl07mm)
South Africans face supply chain problems

After days of unrest, South Africans have been urged to stop panic buying fuel. Layton Beard of the Automobile Association of South Africa offers us his reaction, and we get a sense of the wider picture. Also in the programme, the Korean palm oil giant Korindo has been ejected from the world's leading green certification body, the Forest Stewardship Council, in the wake of a BBC investigation. We find out more from the BBC's Rebecca Henschke. On UN Young Skills Day, we speak to Dimitris Lampros and Rania Vlachou of Swim Me, who have created a smart swimming cap and goggles that enable blind people to be more aware of where they are in a pool. Plus, the BBC's Russell Padmore reports on the challenges faced by pubs in Ireland, which have had to remain closed throughout most of the coronavirus pandemic.

(Picture: South Africans protest against looting. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 16 JULY 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0rykr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqfcpxp9wg)
Merkel makes last visit as chancellor to White House

With catastrophic floods back home in Germany, Chancellor Merkel is in Washington - with a big agenda to get through with her host, Joe Biden - including climate change. We speak to Matthias Matthijs who teaches at Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies. Also in the programme, the Korean palm oil giant Korindo has been ejected from the world's leading green certification body, the Forest Stewardship Council, in the wake of a BBC investigation. We find out more from the BBC's Rebecca Henschke. On UN Young Skills Day, we speak to Dimitris Lampros and Rania Vlachou of Swim Me, who have created a smart swimming cap and goggles that enable blind people to be more aware of where they are in a pool. Plus, the BBC's Russell Padmore reports on the challenges faced by pubs in Ireland, which have had to remain closed throughout most of the coronavirus pandemic. James Mayger from Bloomberg in Beijing joins us for commentary throughout the programme, alongside political journalist Erin Delmore in New York


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0s29w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1f)
Mexican journalist Lydia Cacho: Can courage overcome injustice?

Measured by the number of murders Mexico is the most dangerous country in the world to be a journalist. Eight were killed last year; and countless more suffered threats, intimidation and violence. Stephen Sackur speaks to Lydia Cacho - one of Mexico’s most prominent journalists who - after decades of assaults, death threats and at least one assassination attempt - is currently in exile for her own safety. Her particular focus is the violence done to women in Mexico and the failure of those in power to make good on promises of protection. Can courage overcome injustice?

(Photo: Lydia Cacho appears via video link on Hardtalk)


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmgfl8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0s620)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0s9t4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh5)
Football and online hate

England’s black players received a wave of racist abuse after the team lost to Italy in the European Championship final. What could the social platforms do to end such behaviour? Plus websites associated with the hacker group REvil go offline. And why an old Super Mario 64 video game cartridge sold for $1.5m at auction. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield, and BBC cybersecurity reporter Joe Tidy. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: England footballer Marcus Rashford, Credit: PA).


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmgp2j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 World Football (w3ct1tz8)
The Olympics are coming!

USA striker Lynn Williams joins us from Japan as she prepares for the Tokyo Olympics. The USA women's team is hoping to become the first to win back-to-back World Cup and Olympic titles.


Picture: Lynn Williams celebrates after scoring for the USA against Nigeria (Photo by John Todd/ISI Photos/Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0sfk8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6g6hl0)
Germany floods: Merkel vows support after dozens killed

Chancellor Angela Merkel has spoken of the fear, despair and suffering of those affected.

An invisible surveillance wall on the Southern US border - we'll hear about concern that it's a threat to both migrants and American citizens alike.

And can peace be negotiated in Afghanistan? We’ll hear from the government’s chief negotiator ahead of talks with the Taliban later today.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0sk9d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6g6mb4)
Dozens dead in German floods, hundreds missing

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has vowed the government would do its utmost to help the victims.

Can peace be negotiated in Afghanistan? We’ll hear from the government’s chief negotiator ahead of talks with the Taliban, later today.

And Australia is bringing ambassadors - including those from China - to snorkel in the Great Barrier Reef. It's all part of a lobbying effort to keep the area off the World Heritage site’s endangered list.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0sp1j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2qr6g6r28)
Floods devastate Germany and Belgium

A resident of a Belgian city explains how they've been told to evacuate their homes

The US is building a 'smart border' using surveillance cameras and underground sensors from California to Texas. What are the implications?

And we hear from those who witnessed and survived the brutality of Canada’s residential school system.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0sssn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmh521)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0f)
Amazon's fake reviews problem

Online marketplaces are being flooded with bogus reviews. Is the whole model of ecommerce under threat? Rebecca Kesby speaks to Neena Bhati from UK consumer group Which? about the ways unscrupulous sellers are generating fake reviews to boost sales of their products, and Amazon seller Janson Smith tells us the impact fake reviews can have on legitimate small businesses that depend on Amazon for their sales. Saoud Khalifah, CEO of FakeSpot, decribes the scale of the bogus reviews problem, and the threat it poses to the integrity of the ecommerce model.

(Picture: Graphic of a five-star review, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wys)
England's summer of riots

In the summer of 2001 race riots gripped towns in the north of England. They began in Oldham in late May 2001, spreading to Burnley in June, and Bradford in July. All had their own specific local triggers, but all involved clashes between men of white and of South Asian background. A report into the violence found communities were living in complete segregation, brewing suspicion and hatred. Barnie Choudhury reported on the riots for the BBC. He speaks to Farhana Haider about how they unfolded and their repercussions for the UK today.

Photo: Two youths pass by a burnt out car wreck, Oldham 29 May 2001. (Credit: ODD ANDERSEN/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0sxjs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmh8t5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0t18x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsn)
Cuba at a crossroads

Unauthorised public gatherings are illegal in Cuba and protests are rare. But this week the island nation has witnessed its biggest demonstrations in decades. People took to the streets calling for an end to President Miguel Díaz-Canel's government. They blamed him for food and medicine shortages, price hikes and the government's handling of the Covid-19 pandemic. Mr Díaz-Canel described the demonstrators as 'counter-revolutionaries' and blamed the United States and its economic sanctions - in place in various forms since 1962 - for both the protests and Cuba's wider problems. So how big of a challenge do these demonstrations pose to Cuba's Communist government? Fidel Castro ruled for decades and was succeeded by his brother Raúl. How did their departure from the political stage change attitudes in the country and did it make protests more likely? And what is the Biden administration likely to do now? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts to discuss Cuba at a crossroads.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0t511)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4ws09)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmhj9f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tz8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0t8s5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f5)
Women fighting to inherit

Why is it that so many women in the Arab world are deprived of their inheritance rights, even though local laws should protect them? Shereen Nanish of BBC Arabic has been looking at the pressures they face, and she’s met one Jordanian woman who is fighting back.

South Sudan’s first decade
The world's youngest country turned 10 this month. Nichola Mandil of BBC Africa reported from Juba in 2011, and again for the tenth anniversary. He reflects on his hopes and dreams as a brand new South Sudanese citizen back then, and how he feels now.

7,000 Chinese restaurants and counting!
BBC Chinese journalist Zhaoyin Feng shares the story of David Chan, a Chinese American who has eaten in over 7,000 Chinese restaurants since the 1950s, and has the whole thing logged on a spreadsheet!

School's out
Covid restrictions have had a devastating impact on children's education around the world. We hear from Aamir Peerzada in Indian-administered Kashmir, Shahnewaj Rocky of BBC Bengali in Bangladesh and Ishaq Khalid of BBC Hausa in Nigeria about the issues facing children and teachers in their countries.

It's a Hong Kong dog's life
Hong Kong is experiencing a rise in emigration after the introduction of the national security law, and it's had an unexpected knock-on effect - a rise in pet dogs being abandoned by their owners.  But BBC Chinese journalist Eunice Wang met one owner determined to bring her dog with her, whatever the cost: she booked a private jet.

Image: Signing a document
Credit: A Martin UW Photography/Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0tdj9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4x0hk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmhrsp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0tj8f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv562d89hl1)
Europe floods: At least 120 dead and hundreds unaccounted for

Record rainfall caused rivers to burst their banks. Scientists have repeatedly warned that human-induced climate change would bring pulses of extreme rainfall such as this one.

Also in the programme: UNESCO starts considering whether to place the Great Barrier Reef in Australia on the danger list and force the Australian government to give greater protections; And a new high level political delegation from the Afghan government is travelling to Doha in an attempt to end the war with the Taliban.

(Photo: A view of rubble and damaged houses following heavy rainfall in Schuld, Germany. Credit: REUTERS.)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0tn0k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmj08y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46smm2bxhg)
China launches carbon trading market

China has launched the world's largest carbon trading market in a bid to curb emissions. The BBC's Andrew Walker explains how such schemes work, and we ask Sha Hua of the Wall Street Journal whether the new market is likely to achieve its goal. Also in the programme, it's 40 years since what we now call HIV and AIDS were first recorded in the United States. The UN had hoped to eliminate the disease by 2030, though the target appears to be slipping. The BBC's Lucy Burton assesses progress so far, and finds out where help might come from. Plus, new research indicates that not attending gigs and music festivals can prevent people discovering new music. Ricky Wilson is lead singer of the British indie rock band the Kaiser Chiefs, and gives us his perspective.

(Picture: A coal power station in China. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0trrp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxll948rq4)
What now for South Africa?

After a week of violence in South Africa sparked by the jailing of former president Jacob Zuma, we bring together people from several communities to talk about where the country goes from here. Earlier, the current president, Cyril Ramaphosa, visited KwaZulu-Natal to see some of the damage for himself. How will South Africans heal the atmosphere of fear and mistrust between different groups?

Serious flooding after record rainfall has killed more than 100 people in Germany and Belgium, with many more missing. The Netherlands, Luxembourg and Switzerland have also been affected. We'll hear from some of those living through the flood and talk about how much the severe weather can be linked to changes in the climate caused by human activity.

We'll answer your questions on the coronavirus pandemic and talk through the latest issues with our regular expert, Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University.

Picture: A tank patrols near a shopping centre which was damaged after several days of looting in Durban, South Africa (Reuters / Rogan Ward)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0twht)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxll948wg8)
Europe floods: More than 120 killed

Serious flooding after record rainfall has killed more than 120 people in Germany and Belgium, with many more missing. The Netherlands, Luxembourg and Switzerland have also been affected. We'll hear from some of those living through the flood and talk about how much the severe weather can be linked to changes in the climate caused by human activity.

After a week of violence in South Africa sparked by the jailing of former president Jacob Zuma, we bring together people from several communities to talk about where the country goes from here. Earlier, the current president, Cyril Ramaphosa, visited KwaZulu-Natal to see some of the damage for himself. How will South Africans heal the atmosphere of fear and mistrust between different groups?

We'll answer your questions on the coronavirus pandemic and talk through the latest issues with our regular expert, Prof Marc Mendelson from the University of Cape Town.

Picture: A collapsed house after heavy flooding of the River Ahr, in Schuld, Germany (EPA / Sascha Steinbach)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0v07y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0v402)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxk4n4xqzb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmjh8g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ndkjzxztf)
2021/07/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0v7r6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmjm0l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqn)
Why do my cables keep getting tangled?

Anyone who has ever taken the Christmas lights out of the cupboard, only to discover they’re hopelessly tangled, will sympathise with this week’s listener Eric. He has a 45m garden hose that always seems to snarl up and snag when he waters his garden, and he wonders what he’s doing wrong?

Marnie starts by discovering the important difference between tangles and knots, as she scales a cliff with an experienced climber who explains the way you tie rope is a matter of life and death.

Physicists are also fascinated in how string becomes jumbled up and one man has even won an IgNobel award for his work in this field. Doug E Smith discovered that if you put a piece of string in a box then spin it around, its length, thickness and how long you shake the box for, all determine whether it will tie itself up. Not only that, the more the string becomes twisted, the more likely it is to cross over itself and become impossible to untangle.

While tangles might be annoying in hair or cables, they’re also a fundamental part of human life. Our DNA is constantly folding itself to fit inside tiny spaces – there are two metres of the stuff inside every cell, where it’s packed down tightly, before it must untangle and duplicate for those cells to divide. It does this with the help of specific enzymes, and when the process goes wrong it leads to cell death. But scientists are also studying molecular tangles that might benefit us humans, and creating nano-sized knots that can be turned into nets or meshes with incredible properties.
Producer: Ilan Goodman
Presenter: Marnie Chesterton


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0vchb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv562d8bbsy)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0vh7g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmjvhv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tz8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjmhz0vlzl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqpxk7xjk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shs60cz56)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkfypmjz7z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48v7fl34jq)
China launches carbon trading market

China has launched the world's largest carbon trading market in a bid to curb emissions. The BBC's Andrew Walker explains how such schemes work, and we ask Sha Hua of the Wall Street Journal whether the new market is likely to achieve its goal. Also in the programme, it's 40 years since what we now call HIV and AIDS were first recorded in the United States. The UN had hoped to eliminate the disease by 2030, though the target appears to be slipping. The BBC's Lucy Burton assesses progress so far, and finds out where help might come from. Plus, new research indicates that not attending gigs and music festivals can prevent people discovering new music. Ricky Wilson is lead singer of the British indie rock band the Kaiser Chiefs, and gives us his perspective.

(Picture: A coal power station in China. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3ct1gxk)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxk)

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The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1hsm)

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