Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 03 JULY 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd9k85)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqdn596xkw)
US economy adds 850,000 jobs

The US economy added 850,000 jobs in June, whilst the unemployment rate was at 5.9%. We get analysis of the US labour market from Chris Low of FHN Financial. Also in the programme, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the growing popularity of milk alternatives, and examines the potential impact on dairy farmers. The main Indonesian island of Java has gone into lockdown, as the country battles multiple outbreaks and an alarming spike in Covid-19 cases. Resty Woro Yuniar of the South China Morning Post explains the latest from the island. Plus, Kai Ryssdal from our sister programme Marketplace, delves into supply chains with Willy Shih of Harvard Business School. And record label owner and movie mogul David Geffen has donated $150 million to Yale University to make its drama school tuition free. The school's Dean, James Bundy, explains how students will benefit studying without a load of debt hovering over them.

All through the show we'll be joined by Sharon Brettkelly, co-host of The Detail podcast for Radio New Zealand.

(Picture: A 'now hiring' sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd9p09)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3jd8zk)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf750018p)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbm)
When will Pakistan next host the Cricket World Cup?

On this week's Stumped, we'll speak to the Chief Executive of the Pakistan Cricket Board Wasim Khan who outlines Pakistan's hopes of co-hosting the cricket World Cup in 2027 and 2031.

We'll also discuss the T20 World Cup being moved from India to the UAE.

And we'll hear from Australia All rounder Ashleigh Gardner who's looking forward to the much anticipated one off Test Match against India, taking place at the Waca later this year.

Photo: Pakistan Cricket Board CEO Wasim Khan addresses the media. (Credit: AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd9srf)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f3)
Lebanon: A web of corruption

BBC Arabic's Moe Chreif tells us about the biggest corruption investigation in the history of Lebanon’s energy sector, which resulted in allegations involving multi-million dollar agreements, bribery, and shipments of substandard oil.

The women pushing boundaries in Pakistan’s rural milk market
In rural Pakistan women milk cows, but male relatives take the milk to male-run collection centres. Shuja Malik of BBC Urdu visited a village where women have been hired to work in the milk centre. The development has had mixed reactions.

Word in the news: black rain
Children love it, businesses hate it – Pody Lui from BBC Hong Kong explains the rain warning system, and why black rain warnings are taken so seriously.

Mango madness in India
South Asia diaspora reporter Gaggan Sabherwal shares the story of the Indian couple who’ve employed security guards after discovering they had planted an extremely rare mango tree by mistake – at $50 a mango they aren't taking any chances!

My journey to journalism: Elodie Toto
Elodie Toto of BBC Afrique tells the story of what inspired her to become a journalist, and takes us on a journey from the suburbs of Paris to Kinshasa, capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Image: Cables of the electric generators in the Lebanese capital Beirut
Credit: ANWAR AMRO/AFP via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyq)
China's trailblazing foreign students

China has the largest number of overseas students in the world but when students first started venturing out of Communist China it was still a country feeling the aftereffects of the Cultural Revolution. Launched in 1966 by Communist leader Mao Zedong the Cultural Revolution plunged China into a decade of chaos. The education of millions of young people were disrupted and China was cut off from the rest for world. Farhana Haider has been speaking to Chinese American writer Zha Jianying, one of the first batch of Chinese students to arrive in the US in the early 1980s.

Image: Chinese writer Zha Jianying, July 2015 Credit: Simon Song/ Getty Images


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd9xhk)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsl)
Palestinians turn against the leadership

There is continuing anger in the West Bank over the death in custody of a vociferous critic of the Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas. Nizar Banat, an anti-corruption campaigner, was picked up in a violent night-time raid at his home in Hebron. The Palestinian Authority has launched an investigation into the circumstances of Banat's death and has promised action against anyone responsible. But that's done little to placate protesters who allege that the Palestinian security forces use extra-judicial force against anyone who questions or criticises the leadership. They say this behaviour is emblematic of a wider break down of law and order and a thriving culture of corruption in the West Bank, where elections were last held over 15 years ago. So why is corruption such a problem and where is it happening? Is there scope for reforms with the current leadership in charge? And how dependent is any change on the overall relationship with Israel and rival administration in Gaza, run by Hamas? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of Palestinian commentators.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdb17p)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3jdn6y)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf7500dj2)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1n)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

Faster and higher

It wasn’t just Spitfire production that needed to escape the bombs; the designers of the plane also need to find a safe place to improve the Spitfire to deal with Germany’s latest fighter developments.

Presenter: Tuppence Middleton
Producers: Alasdair Cross and Emily Knight
Editors: Chris Ledgard and Kirsten Lass


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk5)
Is Ivermectin a Covid ‘wonder drug’?

To some on the internet, the cheap anti-parasitic drug Ivermectin is a potential wonder drug that could dramatically change the global fight against Covid-19. It has passionate proponents, from a small group of scientists to the more conspiratorially-minded. But with a scattered evidence base of varying quality, what - if anything - do we know for sure about Ivermectin? And is uncovering the truth a more complex process than some appreciate?

With Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz from the University of Wollongong, Australia.

Producer: Nathan Gower


(Packets of the drug Ivermectin. Credit: Soumyabrata Roy/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdb4zt)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt7n63nk7x)
Ransomware attacks target about 200 US businesses

Another ransomware attack has affected about two hundred businesses in the US at the start of the Independence Day holiday weekend.

Also, emergency teams in western Canada are trying to contain more than a- hundred wildfires, fuelled by an unprecedented heatwave.

Plus, the United Nations Security Council has heard that months of fighting in the Tigray region of Ethiopia has left nearly two million people on the brink of famine.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani, a Nigerian novelist and journalist; and Roger Garside, a British author, former diplomat and capital markets adviser.

(Image: A programmer shows a sample of a ransomware cyberattack on a laptop. Credit: EPA)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdb8qy)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt7n63np01)
Church politics in the US

Ed Litton newly-elected president of the Southern Baptist Convention - America's largest Protestant church group - on the politics and rifts within his organisation.

Also, a huge ransomware attack has hit about 200 businesses in the US at the start of the Independence Day holiday weekend. Experts say the consequences are severe and may take a very long time to unravel.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani, a Nigerian novelist and journalist; and Roger Garside, a British author, former diplomat and capital markets adviser.

(Image: Pastor Ed Litton answers questions after being elected president of the Southern Baptist Convention. Credit: AP)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdbdh2)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt7n63nsr5)
European Night of Museums returns

Art fans are in for a treat tonight, as the annual European Night of Museums returns after last year’s event was called off, because of the coronavirus pandemic. Museums and other cultural venues have been hit hard by the closures and restrictions of the past year.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss this and other issues are Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani, a Nigerian novelist and journalist; and Roger Garside, a British author, former diplomat and capital markets adviser.

(Image: Rembrandt's famed 'Night Watch' is seen back on display for the first time in 300 years at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf7500rrg)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6q)
Viral dance videos launched my career

Kim Chakanetsa talks to two choreographers whose careers took off after they posted dance routines on social media.

Sienna LaLau is an Hawaiian choreographer and dancer. Her routine with K-Pop sensations BTS, for the music video 'ON', where she also dances, was watched 7 million times within 3 days of its release. Just 20 years old she's gained an international reputation, working with artists like Jennifer Lopez and Justin Bieber.

Rwandan Sherrie Silver, won the MTV Video Music Award for Best Choreography in 2018 for her work on Childish Gambino’s ‘This Is America’. She’s since choreographed for some of the biggest names in music, including Rihanna, Celine Dion and Burna Boy. She brings traditional dance moves from African cultures to an international audience.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
L Sienna Lalau (courtesy The Lab Studios)
R Sherrie Silver (courtesy Malaria No More UK)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdbj76)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5w)
Coronavirus: Face masks

Face coverings have been part of the fight against the spread of the virus in many countries but the debate around them continues.

Israel has been one of the most successful countries in the world in tackling the pandemic but, just days after lifting the requirement of wearing face masks indoors, the restriction was reimposed. The decision was made after a rise in Covid cases due to the Delta variant. We speak to relatives Adam and Lee, who have seven children between them. They discuss how they feel about being told to wear face masks once more and whether they will continue to do so inside the family home.

We also hear from two students in Italy about their feelings now that they are allowed to go outdoors without a face mask for the first time since October 2020.

Meanwhile, Russia is dealing with a third wave of the virus. Two residents in Moscow discuss the tighter restrictions in places like bars and restaurants, together with the push to get more people vaccinated.

(Photo: A woman holds a protective face mask. Credit: Reuters/Gleb Garanich/File Photo)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf7500whl)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f94)
10: The getaway

A car loaded with cash, fake millionaires and death threats – we’re following the money. The story moves to the Philippines.
#LazarusHeist

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/lazarusheist


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1l)
Uncovering abuse at an Indian school for yoga

We hear from the team behind Guru - an investigation into the sexual, physical and emotional abuse allegations at Sivananda Yoga, one of the world’s most revered yoga schools. Listeners share their thoughts about the series. Plus, feedback on the debate A Right To Health - one listener asks how the panel and questioners were selected.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdbmzb)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q0qgkt1zz)
Giro d'Italia Donne: Elisa Longo Borghini cycles home

We join home favourite Elisa Longo Borghini on the start line of the Giro d'Italia Donne, the most prestigious road race in women's cycling. She tells us why seeing her family cheer her on will be extra special this year, and what it would mean for an Italian to take the title.

The opening ceremony of the Olympics is now just a few weeks away and whether Evy Liebfarth grabs gold or not, she is guaranteed to make history. Alongside her fellow competitors, Liebfarth will be one of the first women to ever compete in canoeing at the games. She'll also be one of the younger competitors in Tokyo, but that's not to say she's new to the sport. Under the guidance of her father, the 17-year-old has been waiting for her moment for years!

Everyone dreams of gold, but for many simply getting to the Games marks a huge achievement. Ahead of the Rio Games in 2016, we met Houry Gebeshian who was set to become the first Armenian woman to compete in artistic gymnastics. She told us about her gruelling schedule, so was it worth the effort?

Almost 17 years to the day after Greece won Euro 2004, American-Greek film maker Christopher Andr' Marks tells us about arguably the biggest shock in football history. His new documentary 'King Otto' examines how Otto Rehhagel, the German manager who spoke no Greek, led Greece to a most improbable victory.

Plus, we're live at Wimbledon assessing all the action from the first week and look ahead to what might happen in the final stages; and we're also at the Euro's ahead of the two remaining quarter-final matches.

Photo: Elisa Longo Borghini of Italy and Team Trek- Segafredo during the 5th Liege - Bastogne - Liege 2021. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdbrqg)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3jfcpq)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf75013zv)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f3b)
The gender gap in India's vaccination drive

After a promising start in January, India's vaccine drive has been hobbled by challenges. A severe shortfall from May onwards left many searching for jabs.
But logistics aside, another problem has cropped up – women are falling behind men in getting vaccinated.

According to recent data, of the total jabs administered so far, 54% have gone to men and only a little over 46% to women. Experts say women's health has always taken a backseat due to patriarchal social norms. Access to healthcare continues to be a challenge, particularly in rural areas, where nearly 65% of India's population lives. On top of that, unfounded beliefs that the vaccine may cause infertility or menstruation issues also are keeping women away.

What can be done to counter these challenges at the grassroots, as well as at a policymaking level? In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the measures needed to bridge the gender divide in India's vaccination programme.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Shivangi Karmakar, sr project officer, DEF; Dr Tanya Seshadri, community health practitioner; Dr Gagandeep Kang, virologist, professor, CMC Vellore


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdbwgl)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9p)
Jane Harper

World Book Club this month talks to the world-renowned Australian author Jane Harper at her home in Melbourne, Australia, about her internationally garlanded thriller, The Dry.

Amid the worst drought to ravage Australia in a century, tensions in a small town community become unbearable when the Hadler family are found brutally murdered. Everyone thinks Luke Hadler’s guilty, committing suicide after slaughtering his wife and son.

But policeman Aaron Falk returns to the town of his youth for the funeral of his best friend and is reluctantly drawn into the investigation. As he probes deeper into the killings, secrets from the past bubble to the surface and he questions the truth of his friend's crime.

A chilling story set under a sweltering sun dealing with issues of climate change, alcoholism and a community on the brink of breaking down.

(Picture: Jane Harper. Photo credit: Katsnapp Photography.)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdc06q)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvmtzjb)
Captured Ethiopian troops paraded through Tigray

As thousands of Ethiopian government forces, now prisoners or war, are marched through the capital province of Tigray and with rebels claiming a major victory, what now for the conflict. We hear the latest from the region.

Also on the programme, we hear how Sudanese volunteers are helping to untangle the corruption of the previous regime; and we speak to the scientists trying to get robots to clean up the UK's five million tonnes of nuclear waste.

(Photo: Captured Ethiopian soldiers are paraded through the Tigrayan regional capital Mekelle on Friday; Credit: Joo Photographer)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdc3yv)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t9hczkrpn)
Live Sporting Action

On this week’s Sportsworld with Lee James, we will be live in Baku for the European Championship game Czech Republic v Denmark.

We will also be bringing you live Wimbledon updates.

Adidas Uniforia match ball is seen at an Adidas store on June 29, 2021 in Shanghai, China. Adidas Uniforia is the official match ball for UEFA Euro 2020. (Photo by VCG/VCG via Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdcvfm)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt3)
The BBC Cardiff Singer of the World 2021

This week’s Arts Hour meets some of the talented rising stars taking part in one of the most prestigious international competitions in classical music, the BBC Cardiff Singer of the World.

Nikki Bedi introduces the stories of six young opera singers from five different continents.

We hear from baritone Gihoon Kim from the Republic of Korea, who carried home the trophy and £20,000 main prize at this year's competition, and from South African soprano Masabane Cecilia Rangwanasha, winner of this year’s Song Prize which is presented for the art of singing songs that are not from operas, such as folksongs and lieder.

We also hear from some of the other singers taking part from around the globe. From the US, baritone Reginald Smith Junior recalls how he was inspired to sing after seeing the African American baritone Donnie Ray Albert on stage.

Soprano Elbenita Kajtazi from the Republic of Kosovo, represented for the first time this year, tells us about her journey from child refugee in Albania to opera star.

Venezuelan soprano Maria Brea explains how despite the odds, she found a way to get to New York to continue her musical studies, and Georgian mezzo soprano Natalia Kutateladze on how the voice of Maria Callas moved her to try opera.

We’ll also hear from veteran American soprano Roberta Alexander, one of the judges on this year’s panel, and Dame Kiri Te Kanawa the patron of the prize speaks to us from her home in Auckland, New Zealand.



(Photo: Gihoon Kim. Credit: BBC / Kirsten McTernan)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdcz5r)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvmvyhc)
What now for Tigray?

Tigrayan forces remain in control of much of the region including the capital Mekelle after retaking control on Monday. But what do Tigrayans want now - and what is possible - after eight months of civil war?

Also in the programme: how Sudanese volunteers are helping to untangle the corruption of the previous regime; and the former number three at the Vatican and a cardinal of the Catholic Church is to face trial on corruption charges.

(Image: the mountains of Tigray are well known to the fighters of the TPLF / Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdd2xw)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc1)
Forgetting the words on stage with Stuart Braithwaite, David Pajo, Rachel Goswell and Du Blonde

Mogwai's Stuart Braithwaite, Slowdive's Rachel Goswell, Slint's David Pajo, and Beth Jeans Houghton - aka Du Blonde - discuss how much they care about their live shows sounding like the record, and that awkward moment when you forget the words to your own song live on stage.

Stuart Braithwaite is a guitarist, songwriter and vocalist in Scottish post-rock band Mogwai, who have released 10 studio albums since forming in 1995. Their most recent record, As the Love Continues, went to number one in the UK earlier this year, and marks 25 years since their debut single.

Stuart’s guests include friend and collaborator Rachel Goswell, best known as the vocalist and guitarist in shoegaze band Slowdive. She’s also a member of the Soft Cavalry and supergroup the Minor Victories, alongside Stuart.

Also joining them is David Pajo, famed for his guitar shredding in US post-rock band Slint. He’s also collaborated with the likes of Interpol, Stereolab, and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs.

And Beth Jeans Houghton is a London-based artist who makes music under the moniker Du Blonde. Her latest record, Homecoming, came out earlier this year. She’s also directed music videos for the likes of Ezra Furman, LUMP, and the Red Hot Chili Peppers.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdd6p0)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywpzcxsj6z)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sh1ncxkvm)
Sports News

BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf7502kyd)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf5)
Seth Rogen: The book that inspired my comedy

This week on The Cultural Frontline, South African comedian Tumi Morake is looking at what makes us laugh globally and asking if comedy is the best way to approach uncomfortable topics.

Ventriloquist and comedian Conrad Koch and his outspoken puppet Chester Missing are well known in South Africa. Conrad Koch uses Chester Missing to explore South African history and discuss issues of race and colonialism. He explains why he wants to use comedy to start difficult conversations.

Has a song, a poem or a book ever changed the course of your life? Canadian-American actor, writer and comedian Seth Rogen shares the science fiction book that inspired his comedy writing, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams.

Stand-up comedy didn’t exist in China until recently but the success of comedy TV programmes, like the popular talent show Rock and Roast, has meant that the popularity of stand-up is soaring. Two women who have been pioneers in China’s comedy scene, Norah Yang and Maple Zuo, talk about cultural differences and the unique stand-up scene in China.

Canadian comedian Vance Banzo has used his solo stand up career to reconnect with his Indigenous heritage, often opening up conversations with his audience. He tells Tumi about his work with the award winning TV sketch comedy foursome, Tallboyz and explains why he wants to see more Indigenous Canadian comedians in the spotlight.


(Photo: Seth Rogen. Credit: Stefanie Keenan/Getty Images for CTAOP)



SUNDAY 04 JULY 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfddg58)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yvc)
Insects in incredible detail

The Natural History Museum in London holds a massive collection of insects. It asked researchers at the Diamond light source, a facility near Oxford, to develop a high throughput X-ray microscope to take 3D scans of them all. Roland Pease has been to see the new technology in action.

Many people seeking compensation for the impacts of climate change are turning to the law courts. Successes so far have been few. Oxford University’s Friederike Otto, who specialises in connecting weather extremes to the greenhouse effect, has just published a paper looking at the challenge in bringing successful climate lawsuits.

Spacecraft will be returning to Venus in the next decade with the recent approval of two NASA missions to the planet, and one from the European Space Agency, ESA. Philippa Mason of Imperial College is a planetary geologist on that mission, Envision. She plans to use radar to peer through that dense and interesting atmosphere to follow up evidence of volcanic activity and tectonics on the surface beneath.

A few years ago synthetic biologist Jim Collins of Harvard found a way to spill the contents of biological cells onto … basically … blotting paper, in a way that meant by just adding water, all the biochemical circuitry could be brought back to life. With a bit of genetic engineering, it could be turned into a sensor to detect Ebola and Nipah viruses. His team have kept developing the idea, and this week they report success in a smart face mask that can detect SARS-CoV-2 in your breath.

Also, Food. For all of us it is a basic necessity and for those lucky enough, it is something we spend a lot of time planning and enjoying.
CrowdScience listeners certainly have a lot of food related questions; in this buffet of an episode Marnie Chesterton opens the fridge door to pick the tastiest. Starting with the seemingly simple question of what makes us feel hungry, and ending in outer-space, Marnie investigates flavour, nutrition and digestion.

After a year when watching TV has become a core activity for many people stuck in their homes, one listener wants us to find out if eating food whilst watching the TV affects our perception of taste. We then journey to the skies and ask if it is true that food tastes blander on aeroplanes, what does that mean for astronauts’ mealtimes? Back on earth, Marnie explores whether humans are the only animals that season their food.

Tuck in your napkins and prepare to feast on a smorgasbord of scientific snacks.

(Image: Hairy Fungus Beetle - Prepared by Malte Storm. Credit: Diamond light Source Ltd)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfddkxd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3jh5wn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf7502y5s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvf)
Mixing Covid vaccines

New evidence on whether mixing Covid vaccines and spreading doses out gives better results.

Plus, has five years of food labels in Chile warning of high fat, sugar or salt made a difference to obesity levels? Jane Chambers reports.

And what gives some people a sense of entitlement? Emily Zitek, Associate Professor of Organisational Behaviour at Cornell University explains her new research.

Claudia's studio guest is James Gallagher, BBC Health and Science Correspondent.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Three vials with different vaccines against Covid-19 by (L-R) Moderna, AstraZeneca and Pfizer-BioNTech. Photo credit: Thomas Kienzle/AFP/ Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfddpnj)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfddtdn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv0)
Suffering alone: the children held in a US refugee camp

Stories from the US, Liberia, Lebanon and France.

A BBC investigation has found evidence that hundreds of children are being detained under terrible conditions, at a camp in the Texan desert. Many reportedly arrive unaccompanied, having crossed the border illegally from Mexico. They are then held in a centre where there are reports of disease, sexual abuse, and where it’s been claimed, they don’t get clean clothes or proper medical care. Staff at Fort Bliss have been told not speak about their work, but a few secretly revealed what was going on to Hilary Andersson.

In Liberia, West Africa, parts of the forest are teeming with interesting and endangered creatures, including the pangolin, sought after for its scales, and for its meat. Demand for the animals is increasing, as they become extinct in the Far East, with Chinese buyers particularly keen. Lucinda Rouse spent a day out with local hunters, for whom this animal has become their main source of income.

How can you work out who is corrupt and who clean in Lebanon? That was the challenge facing the BBC documentary maker, Mo Chreif, when he began investigating the country’s notoriously unreliable electrical supply. He uncovered a story of tainted oil, faked tests, and a justice system in in hock to politicians. But how could Mo work out who was telling the truth?

You might think there was nobody more British than the fictional secret agent James Bond. But in fact, the man known as 007 made his debut in a novel set largely in France. The Bond author, Ian Fleming travelled frequently in the country, and went on to make it the setting for many of his creation’s most famous escapades. The BBC’s Paris Correspondent, Hugh Schofield, is something of a Bond aficionado, and has been tracking down the spots where his hero carried out some of his greatest acts of daring-do, and indeed where some of Bond’s enemies had their lairs.

(Image: A Five year old asylum-seeking migrant boy from El Salvador. Credit: Reuters/Adrees Latif)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf75035p1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfddy4s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3jhk41)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf75039f5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2g7r)
Guru

Guru: Who knew what and when?

For the last year, BBC journalist and passionate yoga teacher Ishleen Kaur has been investigating allegations of sexual and emotional abuse at the heart of an organisation she once called home.

Fellow practitioners share with her their stories of cruelty, rape and even the sexual assault of a child - but she wasn't prepared for what she uncovered next.

Join Ishleen on a deeply personal journey into the dark legacy which haunts Sivananda Yoga, one of the world’s most revered yoga schools.


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdf1wx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt7n63rg50)
Demolition of Miami site brought forward

The demolition of the standing portion of the apartment block that collapsed near Miami has been brought forward due to an approaching tropical storm.

Also, should an international body investigate the human rights violations against the Indigenous people in Canada?

Plus, as Turkey withdraws from the Istanbul Convention, an international treaty which helps protect women from domestic violence, we’ll speak to a former Turkish lawmaker from the ruling AKP party who was actively involved in its writing.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Colleen Graffy, former United States Deputy Assistant Secretary of State and law professor at Pepperdine University's Caruso Law School in the US; and Nigar Goksel, Turkey project director for the International Crisis Group - an independent conflict prevention organisation.

(Image: Search-and-rescue operation at the partially collapsed Champlain Towers in Surfside, Florida. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdf5n1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt7n63rkx4)
Lightning triggers wildfires in British Columbia

Emergency teams in the Canadian province of British Columbia say the number of wildfires burning there, following an unprecedented heatwave, is now more than a hundred and seventy.

Also, Americans abroad and the burden of tax. Why are expat Americans increasingly unhappy with US citizenship tax rules?

And how an all-women Kurdish militia took on the Islamic State in Syria and won. We’ll hear the story as told by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon in her new book, “The Daughters of Kobani”.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Colleen Graffy, former United States Deputy Assistant Secretary of State and law professor at Pepperdine University's Caruso Law School in the US; and Nigar Goksel, Turkey project director for the International Crisis Group - an independent conflict prevention organisation.

(Image: A wildfire burns on the side of a mountain in Lytton, British Columbia, Canada. Credit: Canadian Press/REX/Shutterstock)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdf9d5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt7n63rpn8)
Taliban advances: What now for Afghanistan?

As NATO troops pull out of Afghanistan and Taliban advance towards Kabul, we'll ask a former Afghan Deputy Minister of Defence what will become of the country?

Former European Council president Donald Tusk returns to front line politics in Poland as leader of the opposition

Also, the life and times of the Indian musician, Ravi Shankar

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Colleen Graffy, former United States Deputy Assistant Secretary of State and law professor at Pepperdine University's Caruso Law School in the US; and Nigar Goksel, Turkey project director for the International Crisis Group - an independent conflict prevention organisation.

(Image: Afghan scrap dealers buy items discarded by the US forces outside Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan. Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf7503nnk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rft)
The endurance diet

When you’re competing in a round-the-world race and you have to take all your food with you, what do you bring and how do you cook it?

If you’re scrambling up and down mountains for days on end, or swimming across an entire ocean, how do you find the time to eat, and what can you stomach?

Tamasin Ford speaks to three extreme endurance athletes about the planning, practicalities and monotony of these gruelling events. Is food simply fuel, or can it power competitors in other ways?

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:

Dee Caffari;
Billy White;
Benoit Lecomte

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: A runner in the 2019 Marathon des Sables race. Credit: Erik Sampers/Gamma-Rapho/Getty/ BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdff49)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mv0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf7503sdp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx2)
I ran with the men, and changed history

Kathrine Switzer is a US runner whose dream - back in 1967 - was to be allowed to run a marathon. Back then there was a belief that women were physically incapable of doing such long distances, and it could even be dangerous for their health. Kathrine was 20 when she signed up for the world famous Boston Marathon using only her initials, but when she was spotted by race official Jock Semple he attacked her, outraged that a woman was running in the men-only event. Photos of that moment went across the world, and changed Kathrine’s life and the future of the sport. She went on to campaign for women’s official inclusion in the Boston Marathon in 1972, helped create the first women’s road race, and was instrumental in making the women’s marathon an official Olympic event in 1984. This programme was first broadcast on 13th of January 2021.

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Rebecca Vincent

Picture: Kathrine Switzer is accosted by race official Jock Semple at the 1967 Boston Marathon
Credit: Bettmann via Getty Images


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdfjwf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g96)
Two smiley faces

The emoji, invented in Japan in the 1990s, and now standardised on every device and platform we have, has become a new type of global communication. Whether you love them or hate them, they stir up surprisingly strong feelings and the fight for representation on the emoji keyboard can get very heated. In this first episode, we explore how for many of us, these cute symbols have become a natural part of our daily digital lives. We also meet two emoji lovers as they prepare to take on Silicon Valley and try to have their longed-for emoji approved. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis and Sarah Treanor will be your global emoji guides and explain why the tiny pictures can lead to big emotions.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf7503x4t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2ghx)
Sex, Christianity and purity

Where does God fit into your sex life? Decades after signing up to remain ‘pure’ until marriage, many Evangelical Christian Millennials are still confused by that question – and some are turning to counselling for help. In the 1990s a sexual abstinence movement became popular in the US and eventually spread to the UK. This ‘purity culture’ recruited young people to wait until marriage before having sex, and wear a silver ring to advertise their pledge. But what effect did it have on the thousands of teenagers who took part.

Journalist Harriet Bradshaw went to a Christian evangelical/Pentecostal youth church as a teenager, and has been fascinated with the movement ever since. She revisits her own past, and hears from others who signed up to find out what their lives are like now.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdfnmk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3jj8lt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf75040wy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2g7m)
The Golden Age Of Gold

Gold: Its role around the globe

Jewellery designer Rajvi Vora discovers more about the precious metal that has had such an impact on her life, and the world. Rajvi is learning about gold’s current role across the globe and hoping to understand the many faces of it. From where it starts life in the goldmines of Colombia - hidden in lush forests that serve their communities, to Ghana where illegal goldmines are killing crops and livelihoods. She also speaks to celebrity jewellers making extravagant creations for the rich and famous in LA, and dip down into Dubai’s gold vaults where gold is stashed away as a safe haven investment.

(Photo: 818 Vault, Dubai. Credit: Vikram Jethwani)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdfscp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z24)
Can we make the super-rich pay more tax?

Rich people are often able to pay little or no tax compared to their wealth because of the way the system works. In recent years, many have called for changes and reforms so that instead of income, wealth is also taxed.

But, wealth taxes are not a new thing. Many argue that they are key for addressing inequality but some say they simply aren’t an effective way of gaining revenue.

Charmaine Cozier asks can we make the super-rich pay more tax?

Producer: Olivia Noon
Researcher: Bethan Head


(Activists March In Manhattan NY, calling for a tax on Billionaires. Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images).


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf75044n2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxh)
The runaway maids of Oman

Two hundred young women from Sierra Leone, west Africa, have been trapped in the Arabian sultanate of Oman, desperate to get home. Promised work in shops and restaurants, they say they were tricked into becoming housemaids, working up to 18 hours a day, often without pay, and sometimes abused by their employers. Some ran away, to live a dangerous underground existence at the mercy of the authorities – but now they are being rescued and repatriated, and some are empowering themselves as independent farmers back home. Tim Whewell tells their story.

(Photo: Sierra Leonean women hoping for repatriation after leaving their employers in Oman. Credit: Do Bold)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdfx3t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvmxwff)
Russia: Critic Mikhail Khodorkovsky describes Putin as a gangster

President Putin's most prominent critic in exile, Mikhail Khodorkovsky, has warned western leaders to be wary of promoting dialogue with the Russian leader. Mr Khodorkovsky told Newshour that they should bear in mind that they were dealing with a gangster who did not share their values.

Hungary's LGBTQ community reacts to a controversial new law that's led to international criticism.

And why black swimmers are making waves about a special cap that's been banned from the Olympics.

(Photo: Mikhail Khodorkovsky. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdg0vy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlb)
Tracing the roots of ancient trees

Have you ever sat against the trunk of a large old tree, looked up into its canopy and wondered what it’s seen in its lifetime? There are many species of tree that survive well beyond a human lifespan, for hundreds of years, and some that can live far longer than that, spanning millennia. What can we learn from large old trees around the world? How do they influence the environment? And how can we preserve them for future generations?

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss ancient trees are Peter Crane, former director of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew in London; Valerie Trouet, Professor at the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at the University of Arizona in the US; and conservation biologist, Michael Gaige.

Produced by Jo Impey for BBC World Service

Image: A Bristlecone Pine, one of the oldest living organisms on earth

Image credit: Piriya Photography / Getty Images


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdg4m2)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdg8c6)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t9hcznx30)
Live Sporting Action

We’ll have live commentary of the Diamond League meeting in Stockholm as a number of the world’s best athletes including Marie-Josee Ta Lou, Kirani James and Armand Duplantis continue their preparations for the Tokyo Olympics.

There’ll also be build up to the Euro 2020 and Copa America semi-finals, as well as live updates from the third one day international between England and Sri Lanka and reaction to the Austrian Grand Prix.


Photo: Armand Duplantis of Sweden sets an indoor pole vault world record of 6.17m during Copernicus Cup on February 8, 2020. (Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdgmll)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3jk7kv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf7504zvz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2ghx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdgrbq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgx)
Tourism in a post-covid world

Global tourism has lost trillions of dollars during the pandemic, leaving communities who rely on the sector desperate. Now that parts of the world are slowly starting to open up again, Business Weekly asks whether travel can be done safely and sustainably in a pandemic. We hear from an intimacy co-ordinator whose job it is to ensure actors feel comfortable with their sex scenes. She tells us why having someone in their role is vital in the post #metoo era. Meanwhile menopause has been called the last workplace taboo as women all over the globe drop out of the workforce as they struggle with symptoms. Should businesses give them more support and, if so, in what form should that be? Plus, should we think about trading with aliens? The Pentagon hasn’t ruled out the existence of extra-terrestrials and some people are already thinking about what we could sell them! Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Sun sets on an Albanian beach, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdgw2v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvmyvdg)
Putin critic Mikhail Khodorkovsky says be wary of dialogue with Russia

President Putin's most prominent critic in exile, Mikhail Khodorkovsky, has warned western leaders to be wary of promoting dialogue with the Russian leader. Mr Khodorkovsky told Newshour that they should bear in mind that they were dealing with a regime who did not share their values.

Also in the programme:

South Africa's former president Jacob Zuma says he has no intention of handing himself over and going to prison because he is challenging his fifteen month sentence.

And the Tigrayan People's Liberation Front, which has been at war with Ethiopian government forces for the last eight months, has issued a long list of preconditions for a ceasefire.

(CAPTION: Mikhail Khodorkovsky Credit: BBC/Oxford Films, Stephen Foote)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdgztz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g96)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf7505c3c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfdh3l3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywpzcxwf42)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sh1nd0grq)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf7505gvh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 05 JULY 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppm6bj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl814wzths)
US to investigate ransomware attack

President Biden has ordered US intelligence agencies to investigate a sophisticated ransomware attack, which is thought to have hit hundreds of American businesses. Hackers broke into the system of the technology provider Kaseya and used its tool to distribute a malicious update to its customers. We hear more from Emma Green, founder of Green CDL a cyber and data protection consultancy. One of the world's richest men, Jeff Bezos, will stand aside as chief executive of Amazon on Monday; we get analysis from Brad Stone, author of The Everything Store and Amazon Unbound. Meanwhile, in Hungary the government has reversed a controversial plan for a Chinese university to build a campus in Budapest. Objections were raised after it emerged the construction work would be reserved for Chinese companies and funded by banks in China; we hear from Yojana Sharma, Asia Editor of University World News. (Photo: hacker on laptop via Getty Images).


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf99klx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2g90)
Tooth and claw: Bears

Teddy bears might be popular with children but real bears are anything but cuddly. Brown, Black and Grizzly bears are the most well-known and have a well-deserved fearsome reputation. But for most part, bear attacks are not nearly as common as you might think. They are solitary, curious and you are unlikely to see one unless you are really lucky – or unlucky depending on your point of view. So what should you do if you find yourself facing one in a forest? To learn more about these fascinating creatures, which can spend the winter months in a deep state of biological hibernation, professor Adam Hart speaks to Dr Clayton Lamb from the University of British Columbia in Canada and Dr Giulia Bombieri from the Science Museum in Trento, Italy, about their work and experiences of these amazing beasts, whose numbers are increasing in some parts of the world, leading to an increase of defensive attacks on people.

Producedr: Rami Tzabar and Beth Eastwood
Presenter: Professor Adam Hart.

Picture: Brown bear, Credit: Szabo Ervin-Edward/EyeEm/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppmb2n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctpy1x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf99pc1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqp)
Could climate change cause more water conflicts?

Freshwater sources around the world are becoming more irregular, and disputes between countries are common, with fears that access to water could eventually lead to conflict.

There’s a high-profile case going on right now in northeast Africa, where talks about a huge new dam on the Blue Nile in Ethiopia have stalled. Ethiopia says it needs the hydroelectric dam to help solve some of its power supply problems. However, the Blue Nile is the largest source for the river Nile, which runs through Egypt, and there are concerns there that the dam will have huge consequences for people living further downstream.

According to the United Nations, around two-thirds of rivers shared by two countries or more lack formal agreements on how to manage the water.

So how can we help countries reach agreements over equal access to water, and ensure they stick to them in the future?

Graihagh Jackson and Neal Razzell are joined by:

Samuel Marunga, editor, BBC Monitoring
Lenka Thamae, executive secretary of the Orange-Senqu River Commission
Ashok Swain, professor of peace and conflict research at Uppsala University
Susanne Schmeier, associate professor of water law and diplomacy at IHE Delft

Producer: Darin Graham
Series producers: Richard Fenton-Smith and Rosamund Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound engineer: Tom Brignell


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppmfts)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g96)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf99t35)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppmkkx)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctq5k5)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf99xv9)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6r)
Why women walk

Women throughout the centuries have put their hiking boots on and set out into the great outdoors, but their stories are rarely told. Kim Chakanetsa is joined by two women who, through their own writing and journeys, are helping to change that.

Cheryl Strayed is the author of Wild, a bestselling memoir of her 1100 mile solo hike along the Pacific Crest Trail. Cheryl impulsively embarked on the hike after her mother suddenly died of cancer and her marriage crumbled, without any experience of long-distance hiking. The Oscar-nominated movie adaptation of Wild stars Reese Witherspoon. Cheryl is also the author of Tiny Beautiful Things and Brave Enough. She was the host of the New York Times podcast Dear Sugars.

Dr Kerri Andrews teaches Literature at Edge Hill University and lives in Scotland. Her book, Wanderers, tells the stories of ten female pioneering walkers and writers, from Virginia Woolf to Nan Shepherd. Kerri is also a keen hiker and the co-leader of Women In The Hills, a research network looking at what hinders and what enhances women's experiences of the outdoors.

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE DETAILS:
L: Dr Kerri Andrews (credit Adam Robinson)
R: Cheryl Strayed (credit Holly Andres)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppmpb1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy41rbs)
Afghan Taliban: all foreign troops must leave by deadline

Group tells BBC that any soldiers in country beyond September will be treated as an occupying force.

Drama and demonstrations in Chile as an indigenous leader is elected to spearhead the writing of a new constitution.

And we're looking at the mental and psychological effects of Covid throughout the programme.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppmt25)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy41w2x)
Afghanistan: Nato troops complete withdrawal

The Taliban continues its rapid gain of territory with foreign troops only protecting key sites like the airport.

The assembly which will draw up a new constitution for Chile has made history by electing an indigenous woman as its leader. We hear more about Elisa Loncón.

The UN's special rapporteur on Belarus presents her report to the Human Rights Council - but will it make any difference for exiled opposition leaders and those locked up by President Lukashenko?


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppmxt9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy41zv1)
Taliban warning: Foreign troops will be treated as 'occupying force'

Most Nato troops have left Afghanistan, well ahead of the agreed September deadline.

We look at the woman who has just been picked by the indigenous Mapuche people of Chile. She will lead them in drafting the country's new constitution.

And we take a look at what the situation is now like in Israeli cities where Arab and Jewish residents turned on each other during the recent troubles.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppn1kf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5x)
Christian Happi: Can Africa become a world leader in vaccine development?

Zeinab Badawi speaks to Professor Christian Happi whose ground-breaking research is helping tackle diseases that kill thousands every year. He gave up a career at Harvard University in the US and moved back to Africa where is setting up a world-class laboratory in Nigeria which will have a pandemic early detection system. He believes Africa could become a global centre of knowledge about infectious diseases such as Covid-19. How realistic is his vision?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9bdtt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4x)
Tapping the sun beneath our feet

Could geothermal energy provide a big missing piece in the puzzle of how to decarbonise the world economy? And do we need the help of oil companies to make use of it?

Laurence Knight visits the UK's first ever geothermal power project at United Downs in Cornwall. The project's managing director Dr Ryan Law says it could provide the perfect complement to solar and wind energy, while the resident geologist Hazel Farndale explains how and why they have drilled down more than 5km into Cornwall's granite beds.

The last two years have seen a rush of investment and interest in geothermal energy, much of it from the traditional oil and gas fracking industry. Renewable energy journalist David Roberts describes the many innovative new techniques being developed to drill even deeper down into "superhot" rock, including lasers and microwaves.

Programme contains a clip from the film There Will Be Blood, produced by Ghoulardi Film Company and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson.

(Picture: 3D rendering of the Earth's core and mantel; Credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x10)
Cuba's blindness epidemic

As Cuba faced a devastating economic crisis in the early 1990s, leading to severe food shortages and malnutritiion, some 50,000 Cubans were inexplicably struck down with sight loss. But health officials on the communist-led island as well as experts at WHO initially believed it was caused by a viral infection spreading through the population. Despite hostile relations between his country and Cuba, the American eye specialist Dr Alfredo Sadun was asked to go to the island in May 1993 to investigate. He tells Mike Lanchin about his meetings with Fidel Castro, and how he helped solve the mystery of what was termed the Cuban epidemic of optic neuropathy.

Photo: A doctor examines a patient affected by sight loss at a clinic in Havana, Cuba, May 1993 (ADALBERTO ROQUE/AFP via Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppn59k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9bjky)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pql)
Why do I feel hungry?

Food. For all of us it is a basic necessity and for those lucky enough, it is something we spend a lot of time planning and enjoying.
CrowdScience listeners certainly have a lot of food related questions; in this buffet of an episode Marnie Chesterton opens the fridge door to pick the tastiest. Starting with the seemingly simple question of what makes us feel hungry, and ending in outer-space, Marnie investigates flavour, nutrition and digestion.

After a year when watching TV has become a core activity for many people stuck in their homes, one listener wants us to find out if eating food whilst watching the TV affects our perception of taste. We then journey to the skies and ask if it is true that food tastes blander on aeroplanes, what does that mean for astronauts’ mealtimes? Back on earth, Marnie explores whether humans are the only animals that season their food.

Tuck in your napkins and prepare to feast on a smorgasbord of scientific snacks.
Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Produced by Melanie Brown and Hannah Fisher for the BBC World Service.

Guests:
Professor Charles Spence
Dr Kristine Beaulieu
Mr. Takashi Funahashi
Ruben Meerman
Chef Jozef Youseff


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppn91p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9bnb2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppndst)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctr0s2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9bs26)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppnjjy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt7)
My unknown song became a political anthem in Hong Kong

Matthew 'Kashy' Keegan knew from a very young age that he wanted to be a pop star. He just didn't know how. He spent years writing and making music and knocking on the doors of the music industry but to no avail. By age 25, demoralised and fed up, he decided to quit. He took a job at a radio station and settled into his new life. But years later, when he was home one evening, his phone started to beep incessantly. He clicked on one of the alerts to find scenes of thousands of people out on the streets of Hong Kong waving the lights of their phones through the air and his song playing on the tannoy. The song he'd written many years earlier had now, in 2013, become a political anthem in a country he'd never even visited.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Matthew Keegan
Credit: Eva Li


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppnn92)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctr88b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9c0kg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppns16)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3y4rbt)
Afghanistan: Soldiers flee to Tajikistan after militant clashes

Tajikistan says more than a thousand Afghan government troops have fled across their border, as Taliban territorial gains accelerate. We have an interview with a Taliban spokesman and also hear from Fawzia Koofi who is a member of the Afghan delegation negotiating peace with the Taliban in Doha Qatar.

We have a report from Israel on the unease between Arabs and Jews in the mixed city of Lod, the scene of serious conflict in May.

And how to build bridges which will withstand earthquakes.

(Photo credit: Reuters)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppnwsb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9c81q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y480ffn73x5)
Chinese apps face crackdown from regulators

Chinese authorities have frozen several prominent apps that recently listed in New York. Yuan Yang of the Financial Times in Beijing explains the background to the dispute, which includes preventing ride-hailing app Didi from adding new users. Also in the programme, Europe's three biggest truckmakers have agreed to invest almost $600m in a network of electric charging points. However, significant hurdles to electrifying road haulage remain, and we find out more from Claes Eliasson, senior vice-president at Swedish truckmaker Volvo. Despite the high profile of college sports, most of its athletes are amateurs. But a recent ruling by the US Supreme Court opens the door to the professionalisation of the sector. Professor Gabe Feldman is director of the sports law programme at Tulane University in New Orleans, and tells us where the college sports teams' income has historically been spent. Justine Hartman played basketball for the University of California at Berkeley, and explains why she's one of a number of athletes who took legal action against the National Collegiate Athletic Association. And Chicago economist and business consultant Colleen Loughlin makes the case for maintaining the amateur status of college sports. Plus, with widespread reports of worker shortages in various sectors as the pandemic recedes in some parts of the world, our regular workplace commentator Pilita Clarke considers where the workers might have gone.

(Picture: A Didi logo on a smartphone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppp0jg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxl70t40gx)
Afghan Taliban's warning

A spokesperson for the Afghan Taliban has told the BBC that foreign troops must all leave Afghanistan by the agreed September deadline. There are reports that 1,000 mainly US troops could remain to protect diplomatic missions and Kabul's international airport. Meanwhile, violence continues with Taliban forces gaining more territory across the country. We'll hear how Afghans feel about the direction of their country and explain the background.

We’ll bring together doctors who are dealing with third waves of coronavirus in their countries to find out how they’re coping and how it compares to what they’ve experienced before. We’ll hear doctors in Dhaka, St Petersburg and Lusaka in conversation.

We’ll explain what we know about a new story of mass kidnapping in Nigeria. Reports say gunmen abducted at least eight people, including babies, from a hospital in Zaria in the north-west of the country.

Picture: Taliban spokesperson Suhail Shaheen (BBC)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppp48l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxl70t4471)
Coronavirus conversations: Third wave doctors

We’ll bring together doctors who are dealing with third waves of coronavirus in their countries to find out how they’re coping and how it compares to what they’ve experienced before. We’ll hear doctors in Dhaka, St Petersburg and Lusaka in conversation.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is due to give a news conference on the next phase of easing Covid restrictions in the UK, with reports that he will announce that face coverings will no longer be a legal requirement in indoor public spaces.

A spokesperson for the Afghan Taliban has told the BBC that foreign troops must all leave Afghanistan by the agreed September deadline. There are reports that 1,000 mainly US troops could remain to protect diplomatic missions and Kabul's international airport. Meanwhile, violence continues with Taliban forces gaining more territory across the country. We'll hear how Afghans feel about the direction of their country and explain the background.

Picture: Dr Suraya Zebin-Mousumi in Dhaka, Bangladesh (Credit: Dr Zebin-Mousumi and colleagues)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppp80q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pppcrv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctrzr3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9cr17)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nd68ns7l6)
2021/07/05 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppphhz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9cvsc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2g91)
Tooth and claw: Tigers

“As it charges towards you, you can actually feel the drumbeat of its feet falling to the ground”. Nothing quite says fear more than standing before a charging tiger. Yet so often it’s also the poster-predator for conservation. The tiger truly is the ‘prince of the jungle’.. The good news (to some) is that after a century of decline, wild tiger populations have increased recently. But with this comes the increase in human fatalities – there are almost daily attacks on the rural poor across India. A world without wild tigers is not a world we want, but how do we balance the needs of people and the needs of tigers? Adam finds out more about tigers and the people that live around them by speaking with Indian tiger expert Rajeev Matthews and conservation biologist Samantha Helle, who is based in the US and works with communities and tigers in Nepal.

Producer: Rami Tzabar and Beth Eastwood
Presenter: Professor Adam Hart

(Photo: A crouching tiger, Credit: Yudik Pradnyana/Getty Images)


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pppm83)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3y5lkq)
Afghanistan: Russia's envoy says situation unstable

Russia, Iran and Turkey have suspended diplomatic operations at their consulates in the northern Afghan city of Mazar-e-Sharif as the Taliban make sweeping advances across the region. Russia's envoy Zamir Kabulov said Afghan government troops had surrendered too many districts, making the situation unstable. The speed of the Taliban advance has raised concerns that the Afghan military will collapse once US and international troops complete their withdrawal.

Also today: The Florida rescue worker hunting for the missing with her dog Magnus in the collapsed apartment block in Surfside; and a gay rights event in Georgia is stormed by far-right protesters.

(Photo: Afghan security officials stand guard during a ceremony in Herat. Credit: EPA/Jalil Rezayee)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pppr07)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9d38m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pppvrc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqbn7359b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shdxp76xz)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9d70r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48tw57yd9h)
England: most Covid rules coming to an end

Face masks will no longer be legally required and distancing rules will be scrapped at the final stage of England's Covid lockdown roadmap, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has confirmed. The rule of six inside private homes will be removed and work-from-home guidance abolished as 16 months of on-off restrictions on daily life end. But is it too soon?

Chinese authorities have frozen several prominent apps that recently listed in New York. Yuan Yang of the Financial Times in Beijing explains the background to the dispute, which includes preventing ride-hailing app Didi from adding new users.

Also in the programme, Europe's three biggest truckmakers have agreed to invest almost $600m in a network of electric charging points. However, significant hurdles to electrifying road haulage remain, and we find out more from Claes Eliasson, senior vice-president at Swedish truckmaker Volvo.

Despite the high profile of college sports, most of its athletes are amateurs. But a recent ruling by the US Supreme Court opens the door to the professionalisation of the sector. Professor Gabe Feldman is director of the sports law programme at Tulane University in New Orleans, and tells us where the college sports teams' income has historically been spent. Justine Hartman played basketball for the University of California at Berkeley, and explains why she's one of a number of athletes who took legal action against the National Collegiate Athletic Association. And Chicago economist and business consultant Colleen Loughlin makes the case for maintaining the amateur status of college sports.

Picture credit: Getty Images



TUESDAY 06 JULY 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppq37m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqf0flmgkb)
Most Covid rules set to end in England

Face masks will no longer be legally required and distancing rules will be scrapped at the final stage of England's Covid lockdown roadmap, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has confirmed. The rule of six inside private homes will be removed and work-from-home guidance abolished as 16 months of on-off restrictions on daily life end. But is it too soon?

Chinese authorities have frozen several prominent apps that recently listed in New York. What is behind the dispute, which includes preventing ride-hailing app Didi from adding new users?

Also in the programme, Europe's three biggest truckmakers have agreed to invest almost $600m in a network of electric charging points. However, significant hurdles to electrifying road haulage remain, and we find out more from Claes Eliasson, senior vice-president at Swedish truckmaker Volvo.

Despite the high profile of college sports, most of its athletes are amateurs. But a recent ruling by the US Supreme Court opens the door to the professionalisation of the sector.

Picture credit: Getty Images


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppq6zr)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctstz0)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9dl84)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2gdb)
Bats: Friend or foe?

What is it about bats? Do we love them or hate them? They are depicted in some cultures as devil-like vampires: images of death and Halloween. But in others they are the opposite and are believed to bring luck and good fortune in China. Fear of bats has been exacerbated in the past 18 months by the Coronavirus pandemic and a blame game, pointing the finger at bats as a potential source of Covid-19. But environmentalists love them for being natural pest controllers – hoovering up harmful insects. Scientists love them too - as a vital source of medical research. How can they carry viruses without getting ill and what is their anti-ageing secret? For their size they live a very long time and they have developed mechanisms to ward off the diseases of old-age.
Caroline Bayley talks to scientists, environmentalists, bat lovers and an eminent philosopher, all trying to uncover the secrets of these extraordinary mammals.

(Photo: Rhinolophus hipposideros (lesser horseshoe bat), Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppqbqw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppqgh0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctt2g8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9dtrd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td5)
Emma Kathleen Thomas: A tapestry of species

Emma Kathleen Thomas was confronted with the fragility of life at a young age. The British-Mexican artist lost both of her parents early, and this painful experience has made her passionate about preserving the rich variety of life on earth, protecting the planet for her young children and - she hopes - instilling in them the confidence to bring children into the world themselves one day.

To mark International Day for Biological Diversity 2021, Emma has been planning an ambitious collaborative artwork: a tapestry of large-scale images of endangered species, laid out in different-coloured clothes and visible from the air, which will unfold in real time across the planet’s surface. The project will involve participants from countries including Australia, Ghana, the UK and the US, who will create images as diverse as the white-necked picathartes, a bird living in Africa for 44 million years and now critically endangered, and the golden paintbrush, a prairie flower that is disappearing due to the loss of its habitat. Each image will be completed at exactly 17:00 local time, creating a 'Mexican wave’ of endangered species around the globe, with audiences worldwide following online.

Danish visual artist Eske Kath joins Emma in Copenhagen as she oversees the Danish leg of the project - a huge image featuring the great yellow bumblebee, laid out in a sports ground in the Danish capital - and finds out how some of the other participating groups have fared.

Image: Emma Kathleen Thomas (Courtesy of Emma Kathleen Thomas)


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppql74)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy44n7w)
UK Covid: Is 'Freedom Day' reckless?

The government is criticised for promising to ease restrictions just as cases surge.

The dementia calculator: you can't escape it if you're going to get it, but with the help of an algorithm you might be able to delay the onset of the condition.

And one of the biggest events in the world of cinema gets underway later today, as the Cannes Film Festival holds its opening ceremony.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppqpz8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy44s00)
British government confirms Covid restrictions to be scrapped

Critics say lifting of restrictions will be 'reckless' at a time when rates are rising because of the delta variant.

US troops pulled out of their biggest base in Afghanistan under the cover of darkness and without telling their Afghani allies. We hear from the US journalist who got the story.

And how Indian doctors are facing abuse from bereaved families who've lost loved-ones to the pandemic.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppqtqd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy44wr4)
Covid-19: UK gambles on reopening

We ask if 'Freedom Day' is a good idea - and how countries can best unlock after the pandemic.

We hear about the latest kidnappings of children in Nigeria - two in 24 hours.

And move over Ant-Man: can Robo-Insect become the new mini superhero?


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppqygj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl1)
The great mosquito swap

A large study published in June showed how a peculiar intervention could help prevent the spread of dengue fever. Instead of vaccinating people, the World Mosquito Program has found a way to breed mosquitoes carrying bacteria that prevent them catching the disease in the first place. The organisation releases millions of these designer mosquitos into a city with the aim of displacing the wild population and protecting the human residents. People Fixing the World saw the method in action in Colombia in 2019 – this is another chance to hear that report, and get an update.

Presenter: Tom Colls
Reporter / Producer: William Kremer

(Photo Caption: The Aedes Aegypti Mosquito / Photo Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9f9qx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jfy)
Player power

Footballers and other athletes are standing up to the sponsors who subsidise them. Ed Butler speaks to Laurence Halsted, a former British Olympic Fencer who wrote about his concerns about the Games in Rio de Janeiro, in 2016. Sports marketing consultant Tim Crow says the involvement of people's politics in sport makes the usual bonanza for sponsors at events a lot more problematic. Martyn Ziegler, chief sports reporter at The Times, thinks the Olympics may find itself under growing pressure as players blur the messages that brands and governments are hoping to promote.

Produced by Benjie Guy.

(Picture: Portuguese footballer Cristiano Ronaldo at a Euro 2020 press conference. Credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5j)
Britain's wartime gold

When Britain went to war with Germany in 1939 it had to find somewhere to keep its money. Because of the risk of invasion, a decision was made to send the country's gold reserves to Canada. Vincent Dowd reports on what became known as 'Operation Fish'.

Photo: Gold ingots. Credit: Science photo library


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppr26n)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9ffh1)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2g91)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppr5ys)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppr9px)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscttxp5)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9fnz9)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pprfg1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwh)
Rugby star Gareth Thomas: Strong, vulnerable and HIV+

Gareth Thomas is one of the most successful and famous Welsh rugby players of all time. He's also celebrated for being the first rugby player in the world to come out as gay. But when he was diagnosed with HIV, he was wracked with fear because of the stigma the condition carries. He started telling a few people close to him about his HIV status, but one of his confidants started blackmailing him. Gareth decided to take matters into his own hands and reveal his secret in a very public way. He's written a book called Stronger.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Gareth Thomas of Wales passes the ball during an RBS Six Nations Championship match in 2006
Credit: Mike Hewitt/Getty Images


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pprk65)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctv55f)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9fxgk)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2g91)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pprny9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3y7n7x)
Belarus jails top Lukashenko critic for 14 years

A court in Belarus jails a prominent opponent to President Lukashenko in the 2020 election. Newshour speaks to another opponent, also disqualified from standing; Valery Tsepkalo who fled, fearing he too would be jailed.

Also on the programme: The Americans slip out of Bagram airbase in Afghanistan without telling Afghan officials; harrowing scenes in Nigeria, where hundreds of students have been kidnapped in Kaduna State; and more easing of Covid restrictions in the UK, despite surging numbers of infections.

(Photo: Former Belarusian presidential contender Viktor Babariko attends a court hearing in Minsk, Belarus Credit: Ramil Nasibulin/BelTA/via REUTERS)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pprspf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9g4yt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bgrmgcy34)
Tech giants threaten to quit Hong Kong

An industry group representing tech giants has warned they could pull out of Hong Kong. The Asia Internet Coalition said proposed government legislation is too broad in its crackdown over personal data that may have been published online. Kris Cheung is a freelance journalist from Hong Kong, now working in London, and explains the background to the dispute. Also in the programme, Iceland has been experimenting with a four day week for workers, which researches say has been "an overwhelming success". Joe Ryle is from Autonomy, a UK research group which helped authorities in the country with the trials, and discusses the project. The BBC's Laurence Knight reports on whether geothermal energy could provide a big missing piece in the puzzle of how to decarbonise the world economy. Plus, the Cannes film festival gets under way in the south of France today. Hannah Strong, associate editor of the film magazine Little White Lies, is currently in Cannes, and tells us what the atmosphere is like.

(Picture: The Hong Kong skyline. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pprxfk)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxl70t6xd0)
US leave Bagram Airfield

Our team in Kabul tell us about how the US military left Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan in the dead of night without notifying the Afghan military. The base's new commander General Asadullah Kohistani told the BBC that the Afghan military found out hours later that they were gone. We hear about the fears facing Afghans.

We check in on the situation with the pandemic in Indonesia as cases rise. There's growing concern about a lack of oxygen.

And we speak to a man in the UK who turned down the Covid-19 vaccine and was later hospitalised with the virus.

Picture: An Afghan security forces member keeps watch in an army vehicle in Bagram U.S. air base, after American troops vacated it. (Reuters/Mohammad Ismail)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pps15p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxl70t7144)
Coronavirus conversations: Refusing the vaccine

We speak to a man in the UK who turned down the Covid-19 vaccine and was later hospitalised with the virus. We also hear from the doctor who helped save his life.

A new law in Norway is coming into force that will mean social media influencers can't post modified photos without declaring what they've done. We hear from one social media influencer to see what she makes of the move.

The authorities in the northern Nigerian state of Kaduna have ordered the immediate closure of schools in areas vulnerable to attacks. This comes a day after gunmen abducted about 150 students from a secondary school n the state. Our correspondent brings us the latest.

Picture: Medical staff holds a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine against the coronavirus disease in Barcelona, Spain (Reuters/ Albert Gea)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pps4xt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pps8ny)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctvwn6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9gmyb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nd68nw4h9)
2021/07/06 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppsdf2)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9grpg)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls7)
Big tech platforms to protect women online

Four of the world’s biggest tech platforms are adopting a new set of commitments to tackle online abuse and improve women’s safety online. This is the first time there has been cross-industry collaboration on ways companies can address the issue. Web Foundation Senior Policy manager Azmina Dhrodia is on the show to explain how, while Azerbaijani journalist Arzu Geybulla tells us about some of the abuse she has received online.

Wireless pacemaker that dissolves in the body
A wireless pacemaker that can dissolve in the body has been created for patients who need only temporary help to regulate their heartbeat. Pacemakers can be used for short periods, especially after open heart surgery, but are associated with quite a few issues such as infection from leads or the dislodging of the power supply and damaging heart tissue on removal. Professor John Rogers from Northwestern University, Illinois in the US, has developed a battery-free pacemaker that can be implanted directly onto the surface of the heart and it can then be absorbed by the body when no longer needed. He’s on the programme to discuss the tech that made the invention possible.


Reducing car pollution from tyres
Future car pollution will mainly come from tyres, not the exhaust. Even now tyre and road wear pollution is one of the leading causes of microplastics in the air. Our reporter Jason Hosken has been investigating how technology can be used to reduce the harmful impacts of tiny tyre particles, that are released from vehicles as they drive along.

(Image: Internet troll sending comment to picture on imaginary social media website with smartphone
Credit: Tero Vesalainen/Getty Images)

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: John Boland
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppsj56)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3y8hgt)
How a school kidnapping unfolded in Nigeria

The authorities in Nigeria's northern Kaduna state have ordered the closure of all schools vulnerable to attack following the abduction of about 150 students on Monday. Schools located more than a 30-minute drive from a security post will be shut. More than 1,000 students have been abducted since December last year.

Also in the programme: The Lebanese prime minister warns that the country is a few days away from a social explosion, given the economic collapse; and the Australian craft brewery using algae to cut CO2 emissions.

(Photo: A boy walks inside the premises of a Teachers Training College in Kaduna. Credit: Reuters/Afolabi Sotunde)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppsmxb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9h05q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppsrng)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqbn7626f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shdxpb3v2)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9h3xv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48tw58196l)
Tech giants threaten to quit Hong Kong

An industry group representing tech giants has warned they could pull out of Hong Kong. The Asia Internet Coalition said proposed government legislation is too broad in its crackdown over personal data that may have been published online. Kris Cheung is a freelance journalist from Hong Kong, now working in London, and explains the background to the dispute.

Also in the programme, we hear from Stacie Marshall - a farmer in Georgia - who, after discovering her family had owned slaves, decided to try and make amends and reparations

Plus, Iceland has been experimenting with a four day week for workers, which researches say has been "an overwhelming success". Joe Ryle is from Autonomy, a UK research group which helped authorities in the country with the trials, and discusses the project.

And, the Cannes film festival gets under way in the south of France today. Hannah Strong, associate editor of the film magazine Little White Lies, is currently in Cannes, and tells us what the atmosphere is like.

(Picture: The Hong Kong skyline. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 07 JULY 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppt04q)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqf0flqcgf)
What next for Chinese tech apps?

China is trying to exert more control over Hong Kong - efforts which are making the tech giants of Silicon Valley nervous. The authorities are trying to crack down on what's become known as "doxxing" that’s revealing someone’s personal information without their permission - police officers in Hong Kong have been frequent targets of this during anti-government protests. Asia Internet Coalition, a group representing firms including Amazon, Facebook and Twitter, has written to the Hong Kong government to express concern about these new proposed new privacy laws. They say it could make them liable for the malicious sharing of private information online.

Also in the programme, we hear from Stacie Marshall - a farmer in Georgia - who, after discovering her family had owned slaves, decided to try and make amends and reparations.

Plus, Iceland has been experimenting with a four day week for workers, which researches say has been "an overwhelming success"

And, the Cannes film festival gets under way in the south of France today.

PHOTO: Hong Kong/Reuters


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppt3wv)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctwqw3)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9hh57)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2g7n)
The Golden Age Of Gold

Gold: What does the future hold?

Jewellery designer, Rajvi Vora discovers more about precious gold as she looks ahead to the future of gold. With cryptocurrency snapping at its heels, can it remain a financial powerhouse? Ravi unearths what goldmines are doing to our planet and to the people who work at them, including the Indonesian families being poisoned by the goldmines on their back doorsteps. But there is a good side to gold too. She hears from the scientists beginning to tap into the potential of using nanogold to treat cancer.


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppt7mz)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pptcd3)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctwzcc)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9hqnh)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6n)
Brighton Zeuner

At just 16 years old, Brighton Zeuner will be one of the youngest participants at Tokyo 2020 - but she’ll also be one of the favourites for gold at the Games when skateboarding makes its debut.

She tells us how she balances being a normal teenager with the pressure of being an elite sports star, mixing fame with being a fan herself and being a role model to others who hope to follow her path.

She also tells us how she deals with nerves when competing, and offers advice to those new to the sport on how to overcome the challenges of both the physical demands and social pressures.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppth47)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy47k4z)
Afghanistan: Minority groups fear Taliban reprisals

As more districts fall to Taliban control in Afghanistan, fears are rising among minority groups that suffered under the earlier Taliban rule decades ago. We look into the concerns among different communities there.

A celebrated Dutch crime reporter is fighting for his life after being seriously wounded in a shooting in central Amsterdam. We have the latest.

And we're live in South Africa where the former president Jacob Zuma must hand himself in today or face being arrested. His lawyers have appealed. A constitutional lawyer takes us through the possible outcomes.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pptlwc)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy47nx3)
Shock at shooting of Dutch crime journalist

Peter R de Vries rose to prominence reporting on the types of crimes he has fallen victim to and the mayor of Amsterdam Femke Halsema said he was "fighting for his life" and condemned his shooting as a "cruel, heartless attack". We speak to Dutch MEP Sophie in't Veld.

What effect will the withdrawal of NATO troops have in Afghanistan. A military analyst gives his assessment.

And we go live to Nigeria where a number of schools in the northern state of Kaduna are now closed for fear of more mass kidnappings.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pptqmh)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy47sn7)
Dutch crime journalist's shooting sparks outrage and shock

Police in Amsterdam say Peter R de Vries, a prominent crime journalist, was taken to hospital in a serious condition after being gunned down in the city centre on Tuesday evening. The Dutch MEP Sophie in 't Veld describes the shock this shooting has caused.

With US forces out of Afghanistan and a newly emboldened Taliban making dramatic gains, will those loyal to the government fight on? We have a military assessment.

And the former South African president, Jacob Zuma, is due to go to jail after being sentenced to 15 months in jail for contempt of court. But he has launched an appeal to a lower court. We hear from one of his supporters.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pptvcm)
BBC News

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WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbf)
Writer Lionel Shriver

In our culture of 24/7 news and trending social media reactions, it sometimes takes a novelist’s eye to chart the deeper, current events swirling beneath society’s surface. Lionel Shriver is a British-based American writer whose fiction has addressed school shootings, obesity, economic crisis and in her latest book, voluntary euthanasia. She’s a contrarian, but is she also a combatant in the western world’s culture wars?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9j6n0)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnq)
The tyranny of merit

Can anyone make it in the modern western world with hard work and good education? No, says Harvard philosopher Michael Sandel in conversation with Ed Butler. He says liberal politicians have lied to us, which is why populist politics has taken root. So what's the solution to the failure of globalisation?

(Picture: Michael Sandel addresses a theatre audience. Credit: http://justiceharvard.org)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7s)
The famine in North Korea

Communist North Korea suffered a devastating famine in the 1990s after the collapse of the Soviet Union which had been one of the country's main supporters. Hundreds of thousands of people died of starvation. Some estimates put the death toll at more than two million. Josephine Casserly has been hearing from Joseph Kim, who was a child in North Korea in the 1990s, about the struggles of his family.

Joseph has written a book about his experience called Under the Same Sky.

Photo: North Korean boys at a kindergarten in Pyongyang pose for a World Food Programme Emergency Food Assistance photographer in 1997. Their thin arms and legs, knobby knees and distended abdomens show that they are seriously malnourished. (Credit: Susan North/AFP/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pptz3r)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2g7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9jbd4)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppv2vw)
BBC News

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WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3ct1x9p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppv6m0)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctxtl8)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9jkwd)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppvbc4)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyr)
Stories from Syria's secret library

In 2015 the Syrian town of Darayya was under siege. Its residents were being subjected to almost constant shelling, no-one could enter or leave, food was running out and there wasn’t enough medicine to treat the sick and injured. But deep in the bowels of a high-rise building, in a basement room, Darayya’s residents were slipping into a very different world. One filled with adventure, romance, comedy, tragedy, and the odd 'who dunnit'... this is the story of Syria's secret library and one of its founders.

Translation by Youssef Taha.

The readings you heard came from:
The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
They Tricked Her Is Saying Belle and Stand For The Teacher, both by Ahmad Shawqi
The Body in the Library by Agatha Christie
Hamlet by William Shakespeare

Music:
D'un crépuscule, l'autre by Abderraouf Ouertani
Shata by Dhafer Youssef

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Damaged books
Credit: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppvg38)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscty22j)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9jtcn)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppvkvd)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3ybk50)
Haiti President Jovenel Moïse killed

Unidentified gunmen stormed the property at 01:00 local time (05:00 GMT), interim PM Claude Joseph said. Mr. Joseph called the shooting of the president a "heinous, inhuman and barbaric act", saying the attackers spoke "English and Spanish". Newshour speaks to Jacqueline Charles of the Miami Herald, one of the best-informed journalists working in Haiti, and the writer and journalist Michael Deibert who has covered Haiti for the past 20 years and he's twice met and interviewed Jovenel Moïse himself.

Also on the programme: Taliban militants are fighting their way into a provincial capital in western Afghanistan, their first urban assault since US troops pulled out; and we'll celebrate the life and career of one of India's finest actors, Dilip Kumar, who's died at the age of 98.

(Photo: A view of the port and the area near the presidential palace in Haiti Credit: REUTERS/Valerie Baeriswyl)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppvplj)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9k1vx)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cpxqchsn5)
Heathrow to trial fast-track vaccinated arrivals

Two airlines are trialling priority lanes at a UK airport for Covid-vaccinated arrivals. British Airways and Virgin are carrying out the trial at London's Heathrow airport, and we find out more about the project from Phil Collings, former head of aviation at East Midlands Airport in the UK. Also in the programme, a report released today by the German government reveals that more than three decades on from reunification, economic output in the former East Germany continues to lag as much as 20% behind that in the West. The BBC's Damien McGuinness tells us more. We have a report from India examining the economic impact of the most recent wave of coronavirus infections on the country's rural economy. Plus, we hear about the social media influencers helping to boost traditional book sales, from Selene Velez, who goes by the tag moongirlreads on TikTok. And we get wider context from Shannon DeVito, director of books at the American retail giant Barnes & Noble.

(Picture: Passengers queue at a UK airport passport control. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppvtbn)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxl70t9t93)
Haiti's president killed

The Haitian president, Jovenel Moïse, has been shot dead after a group of men attacked his home. We'll explain the recent context, including widespread protests against his rule and his claim of an attempted coup against him back in February.

We'll hear the experience of two Indonesians searching for treatment for close relatives with Covid-19. Indonesia is suffering a deadly surge in the virus as the Delta variant spreads. We'll hear how people are using social media to try to find hospital beds and medical oxygen supplies for their loved ones.

We'll also get your coronavirus questions answered by one of our regular experts: Dr Maria Sundaram from ICES Ontario in Toronto.

Picture: President Jovenel Moïse of Haiti, pictured in January 2020 at a ceremony to mark the anniversary of the 2010 Haiti earthquake (EPA / Jean Marc Herve Abelard)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppvy2s)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxl70t9y17)
Coronavirus conversations: Indonesians seeking help

We'll hear the experience of two Indonesians searching for treatment for close relatives with Covid-19. Indonesia is suffering a deadly surge in the virus as the Delta variant spreads. We'll hear how people are using social media to try to find hospital beds and medical oxygen supplies for their loved ones.

The Haitian president, Jovenel Moïse, has been shot dead after a group of men attacked his home. We'll explain the recent context, including widespread protests against his rule and his claim of an attempted coup against him back in February.

We'll hear the conversation amongst supporters ahead of the second semi-final of Euro 2020, the men's European Championship. England are playing Denmark, with England trying to reach their first major final in 1966 and Denmark trying replicate their surprise triumph in 1992.

Picture: A disaster management officer prepares an oxygen tank to distribute to hospitals in Jakarta, as Indonesia deals with an oxygen shortage during a surge in Covid-19 cases (Reuters / Willy Kurniawan)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppw1tx)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppw5l1)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctysk9)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9kjvf)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nd68nz1dd)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppw9b5)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2g7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9knlk)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvg)
Lambda variant of SARS-Cov2

The lambda variant of coronavirus, first seen in Peru and Chile, has now spread to 27 other countries and new research just out suggests it’s better than other variants at escaping the antibodies produced by the CoronaVac vaccine that’s widely used in Latin America. The WHO does only currently classify it as a variant of interest and not a variant of concern. Ricardo Soto Rifo from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Chile, Santiago who conducted this new research explains his findings.

A charity in the UK called Ovacome has long run in person support groups for women with ovarian cancer. And now women who live miles apart, but share similar experiences have got to know each other very well, online, during the pandemic. To find out what happens in these meetings, Health Check dropped in, on Zoom, to listen in to Gill, Gillian, Siobhan, Allyson and Jo.

Dr Per Block, a research lecturer at the University of Oxford, has been investigating whether moods are contagious and crucially whether we pick on up good moods or bad moods more easily. The results of his study with teenage members of choirs and orchestras who were away on tour together have just been published in the journal Emotion. He tells Claudia what he found.

Claudia’s studio guest is family doctor, Ann Robinson, who talks about new research into diet and migraines and whether a David Beckham style plastic boot or a traditional plaster cast is the best treatment for a broken ankle.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright and Paula McGrath

(Picture: A woman receives her first dose of the CoronaVac vaccine during a door-to-door vaccination day against Covid-19 on 03 July 2021 in a rural area of the Jerusalén municipality, Cundinamarca Department, Colombia. Photo credit: Guillermo Legaria/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppwf29)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3ycdcx)
Haiti: State of emergency after President shot dead

Haiti's interim Prime Minister Claude Joseph has declared a state of emergency, which grants the executive greater powers -- just hours after the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse. Mr Joseph says he has taken charge of the country after unidentified gunmen shot President Moïse dead, at his home in Port-au-Prince.

We hear from a resident of the capital who says people are scared, from a government minister and from a US Congressman worried about the country's future.

Also today: in Myanmar, the BBC has been given access to the first group of police officers to defect from the force -- they say they're now prepared to take up arms against their former colleagues.

(Photo: Haiti's assassinated President Jovenel Moïse. Credit: Reuters)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppwjtf)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9kx2t)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppwnkk)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqbn78z3j)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shdxpf0r5)
Sports News

BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9l0ty)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48tw58463p)
Turmoil in Haiti after killing of President

As details are still emerging about the killing of Haiti's President Jovenel Moïse in the nation's capital, Port-au-Prince, Fritz Jean, the former governor of the Haitian central bank, founding member of the Haitian Stock Exchange and one-time interim Prime Minister of Haiti, joins the programme to discuss the mood in the country right now, and all the challenges keeping the Haitian economy in dire straits. Also in the programme, former US president Donald Trump has filed a lawsuit against tech giants Google, Twitter and Facebook, claiming that he is the victim of censorship. Emily Birnbaum from Politico explains how the case may play out, and David Greene of the Electronic Frontier Foundation says though we've seen such cases before, it's another reminder that Big Tech could manage their platforms with more transparency. We'll also get an update on the US markets from Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago. Plus, we hear about the social media influencers helping to boost traditional book sales, from Selene Velez, who goes by the tag moongirlreads on TikTok. And we get wider context from Shannon DeVito, director of books at the American retail giant Barnes & Noble.

(Picture: Jovenel Moïse. Picture credit: Reuters.)



THURSDAY 08 JULY 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppwx1t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqf0flt8cj)
Turmoil in Haiti after killing of President

As details are still emerging about the killing of Haiti's President Jovenel Moïse in the nation's capital, Port-au-Prince, Fritz Jean, the former governor of the Haitian central bank, founding member of the Haitian Stock Exchange and one-time interim Prime Minister of Haiti, joins the programme to discuss the mood in the country right now, and all the challenges keeping the Haitian economy in dire straits. Also in the programme, former US president Donald Trump has filed a lawsuit against tech giants Google, Twitter and Facebook, claiming that he is the victim of censorship. Emily Birnbaum from Politico explains how the case may play out, and David Greene of the Electronic Frontier Foundation says though we've seen such cases before, it's another reminder that Big Tech could manage their platforms with more transparency. We have a report from India examining the economic impact of the most recent wave of coronavirus infections on the country's rural economy. Plus, we hear about the social media influencers helping to boost traditional book sales, from Selene Velez, who goes by the tag moongirlreads on TikTok. And we get wider context from Shannon DeVito, director of books at the American retail giant Barnes & Noble.

All through the show we'll be joined by Sarah Birke, Mexico Bureau Chief for The Economist in Mexico City and Sushma Ramachandran, independent business journalist and columnist for the tribune newspaper in Delhi.

(Picture: Jovenel Moïse. Picture credit: Reuters.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppx0sy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctzms6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9ld2b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxj)
Missing from Manhattan

Last spring New York looked like the epicentre of the pandemic with boarded up shops, makeshift morgues in refrigerated trucks and the constant wail of ambulance sirens echoing through the deserted streets. This summer, as America’s biggest city emerges from the coronavirus crisis, what has changed? For Assignment, Lucy Ash focuses on the most dramatically affected area – the Midtown section of Manhattan – and goes on a hunt for the missing people in this once dynamic, densely populated part of the Big Apple. She talks to those who have fled for the greener pastures of New Jersey where property prices have spiked and she meets a Broadway star who became a florist when theatres went dark. Lucy also finds out what happened to tens of thousands of Midtown cleaners and restaurant staff who couldn’t work from home and were abruptly laid off with no safety net. As undocumented migrants, most didn’t qualify for any state aid.

New York producer: Guglielmo Mattioli
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: A view of Midtown Manhattan and Bryant Park. Credit: Reuters/Carlo Allegri)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppx4k2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppx896)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjsctzw8g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9lmkl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfv)
Life lessons from the honey bee

When it comes to food, we have a lot more than honey to thank bees for - more than three quarters of the world’s food crops depend, at least in part, on pollinators. But bee populations, we often hear, are under threat, and that’s largely due to human behaviour.

Emily Thomas speaks to three beekeepers about the challenges of making money from honey and the complicated relationship between the human and the honey bee.

If we look carefully into the hive, she discovers, bees can teach us much about the environment, society and ourselves.

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:

Joan Kinyanjui, Yatta Beekeepers, Nairobi;
Dale Gibson, Bermondsey Street Bees, London;
Ian Steppler, Steppler Farms, Manitoba.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: A honey bee on the end of a human finger. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppxd1b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy4bg22)
Haiti President assassination: Several suspects killed

We're live in Haiti for the latest after the President was killed in an attack on his home. We also hear from Haiti's Ambassador to the UN.

Jacob Zuma, South Africa's former president, has handed himself in to police to start serving the prison sentence he was handed last week, for contempt of court.

And we find out about a new mission to look for the location of the great Antarctic explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton’s ship 'Endurance' which sank in 1915.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppxhsg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy4bkt6)
Latest on Haiti President's assassination

We have the latest on the assassination in the early hours of Wednesday morning of Haiti's President Jovenel Moïse and the wounding of the First Lady. Police say they have killed four suspects.

We're live in South Africa where the former president, Jacob Zuma, has spent his first night in jail, after handing himself him to serve his sentence for contempt of court.

And we go to Nigeria after the abduction of over a hundred students - the gunmen have contacted officials to say the students are alive.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppxmjl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy4bpkb)
Suspects killed after Haiti President's assassination

We speak to Haiti's Ambassador to the US for his reaction to the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse.

We're live in South Africa and the former president Jacob Zuma hands himself to police to start his prison sentence for contempt of court.

And we take a look at the Covid-19 picture in Peru where four out of five cases are down to one variant of the virus, and it's not Delta.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppxr8q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z25)
Is Nigeria becoming impossible to govern?

The kidnapping of at least 140 schoolchildren in the north-west of Nigeria is the latest crime to shake a country already struggling to contain militants in the north and separatists in the south. Add to this young protesters on the streets amid rising food prices and crime and the security situation in the country starts to look even shakier.

Charmaine Cozier examines the deeper reasons for Nigeria’s worsening instability and asks if Africa’s largest country is becoming impossible to govern.

Producers Soila Apparicio and Rob Cave


(A young girl reunites with family after she was kidnapped from her school in northwestern Nigeria March 2021. Photo: Aminu Abubakar/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9m3k3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9f)
Bustling or bust: How is the City of London coping after Brexit?

It’s been six months since the UK’s transition period from the EU ended. While the two sides hammered out arrangements for how various goods-producing sectors would continue to trade post-Brexit, financial services was largely left out of negotiations. We hear from the boss of Euronext, the head of securities trading at the London Stock Exchange, the man who authored a government-commissioned report on reforming the city’s listings regime, and a host of others to find out whether Brexit has been good or bad for the industry.

Presented by: Victoria Criag
Produced by: Stephen Ryan, Nisha Patel, Jonathan Frewin


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x38)
The first World Romani Congress

Roma people from all over Europe met in England for a conference in 1971. The Roma, who migrated from India over a thousand years ago, often used to be called gypsies. Many Roma led a travelling life, moving from place to place doing seasonal work. They suffered persecution and prejudice for centuries, and many died in the Holocaust during World War Two. But their common language and culture brought them together. Claire Bowes has been speaking to Grattan Puxon who organised the Congress.
Image: First World Romani Congress


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppxw0v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9m797)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppxzrz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlc)
Emile Berliner, inventor of the gramophone

A young immigrant to the USA who started out working in a draper's shop, Emile Berliner ended up paving the way for the world of recordings and home entertainment that we delight in today. But even before he got to work on his recording machine - which he would later call the gramophone - Berliner made a major contribution to another piece of technology that's very familiar to us today: the telephone. And not content with all these achievements, he also promoted the pasteurisation of milk, financed a major scholarship for women to pursue academic research and tried to develop a working helicopter.
So how did Berliner come up with these ideas? Why was he at one point prevented from selling his gramophones and records? And why is his name less well known today than those of his contemporaries Nikola Tesla, Thomas Edison and Alexander Graham Bell?

Bridget Kendall is joined by three Berliner experts: Dr. Anja Borck, director of the Musee des ondes Emile Berliner in Montreal; Sam Brylawski, former head of recorded sound at the Library of Congress in Washington which houses an extensive Berliner archive; and David Giovannoni, a historian of recorded sound and the co-author of E. Berliner's Gramophone - a study of the American disc industry from 1892 to 1900.

[Image: Berliner gramophone, 1890. Credit: Science & Society Picture Library/SSPL/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8d)
Bjorn Borg

In the late 1970s and early 80s, Sweden’s Bjorn Borg was the biggest star in world tennis and arguably the sport’s first sex symbol. Always besieged by young female fans, Borg won five Wimbledon championships in a row and enjoyed a famous rivalry with John McEnroe, which culminated in an epic tie-break in the 1980 final. But Bjorn Borg would then shock the world of sport by retiring in 1983 at the age of just 26. Simon Watts brings together Borg’s Wimbledon memories, as recorded in the BBC archive.

PHOTO: Bjorn Borg at Wimbledon in the 1970s (BBC)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppy3j3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv0qhc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9mgsh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppy787)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k38)
A plane crash left me lost in the Amazon

Antônio Sena is a Brazilian pilot who survived a dramatic plane crash in the Amazon rainforest earlier this year. He found himself alone, with very little food, and hundreds of kilometres from the nearest town. After waiting a week for rescuers to find him, he set off on an arduous trek into the dense forest. He tells Emily Webb that he kept himself going by eating fruit, and using knowledge of the Amazon that he had picked up as a child. His life was saved when he stumbled across a family of Brazil nut pickers, 36 days after his accident.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Antônio Sena after being rescued
Credit: Marcelo SEABRA / Brazil's Para State Government / AFP


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppyc0c)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv0yzm)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9mq8r)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppygrh)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3yfg23)
Jacob Zuma starts his term in jail

South Africa's former President Jacob Zuma has begun his prison sentence for contempt of court, after finally handing himself in.

Also in the programme: what next for Haiti as police shoot dead four mercenaries suspected of killing the President? And why have more than 120 scientists signed a letter calling the UK Government's Covid plan "a dangerous and unethical experiment"?


(Image: Estcourt Correctional Centre, where South Africa"s former president Jacob Zuma is being held after he turned himself in to begin a 15-month sentence for contempt of court, in Estcourt, South Africa, July 8, 2021 / Credit: REUTERS / Siyabonga Sishi)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppylhm)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9mys0)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y497ljkjs8d)
Cairn Energy can seize Indian assets

UK oil firm Cairn Energy can seize Indian state assets following a French court ruling. It is part of a dispute with New Delhi over a $1.7bn award to Cairn by an international tribunal last December, although the ruling reportedly relates to around $20m of assets held in France, potentially including some owned by Air India, as the BBC's Nikhil Inamdar explains. And we get reaction to the development from David Nisbet, who is Cairn Energy's director of group corporate affairs. Also in the programme, we hear why authorities in Nigeria have instructed banks to freeze assets of the South African media company MultiChoice. Plus, we have an extended report from the BBC's Victoria Craig, examining the future of the City of London as a global financial hub, six months on from the end of the Brexit transition period.

(Picture: An Air India plane. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppyq7r)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxl70tdq66)
Haiti explained

The latest news on the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, after four men were shot dead by security forces looking for the assassins. We also explain the context and history of the politics of Haiti.

We’ll hear how women living in Afghanistan feel about the future, as the Taliban makes gains ahead of international troops withdrawing from the country. Our Afghanistan correspondent will spend time with us to explain some of the implications of the current violence.

We'll bring in our coronavirus expert to answer your questions and talk about the latest pandemic news, including the announcement that spectators will not be permitted in Olympic venues when the Tokyo Games begin later this month.

Picture: Police agents work near the house of the assassinated Haitian president, Jovenel Moïse, in Port-au-Prince (EPA/Jean Marc Herve Abelard)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppytzw)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxl70tdtyb)
Coronavirus conversations: Doctors in Indonesia

We get the latest news on the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse, after four men were shot dead by security forces looking for the assassins. We also explain the context and history of the politics of Haiti.

We’ll hear how women living in Afghanistan feel about the future, as the Taliban makes gains ahead of international troops withdrawing from the country. Our Afghanistan correspondent will spend time with us to explain some of the implications of the current violence.

And doctors in Indonesia tell us how they are coping as hospitals run out of beds, oxygen and medicines amid a sharp rise in Covid cases.

(Photo: A doctor conducts a routine medical checkup for a mother and her daughter who were exposed to COVID-19, at the Bogor City Hospital, Indonesia, 23 June 2021. Credit: EPA/Adi Weda)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppyyr0)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppz2h4)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv1pgd)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9nfrj)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nd68p1y9h)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppz678)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9nkhn)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3w)
Human induced climate change heats up fast

Scientists say the record-breaking Pacific North-West heatwave of recent weeks must have been caused by human induced climate change, but as Geert Jan van Oldenborgh explains to Roland Pease, despite a herculean effort to analyse the event in just a week, the precise mechanism to cause such an extreme and sudden event is so far bewildering climate modellers, exceeding even worst expectations.

Looking to the skies, Rosita Kokotanekova of the European Southern Observatory and colleagues have been getting excited about the discovery of a comet maybe twice as large as any observed before. Being so big, it has been spotted much further out from the sun and – if the best telescopes can be convinced to join the fun – will provide astronomers a chance to observe the core of the comet before the solar heat induces a gaseous coma to form as it nears the point in its orbit closest to the sun. It will be around for the next decade before continuing its several million year journey around our mutual star.

But it won’t get terribly close to earth, at least not as close as lumps of an asteroid that fell onto a driveway in the UK earlier this year. Dr Ashley King of the UK’s Natural History Museum is leading a consortium of scientists (benefitting from a rapid research grant by the UK’s STFC) who have now officially classified it and named it. The Winchcombe meteorite is a CM carbonaceous chondrite, meaning it represents the unspoilt early building blocks of the solar system. Falling like 4.5 billion year old leftover celestial lego, only a few are known around the world but perhaps none have been in scientists hands in such a short period of time, continuing its pristine survival.

Dr Pablo Tsukayama has published a preprint paper announcing a new variant of interest in the ongoing evolution of the SARS-CoV2 virus. Now named by the WHO as the Lambda variant, it seems it has driven the pandemic for much of this year in Peru – as much as 80% of cases – and large fractions of the outbreak elsewhere in South America. But as Pablo suggests, the reason we don’t know as much about it as for example the Alpha or Delta variants is likely because it hasn’t thus far affected the countries best equipped to do the analysis. Maybe that could change.

Image: Wildfires in Lytton, British Columbia
Credit: ProPics Canada Media Ltd/Getty Images

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppz9zd)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3yg990)
Haiti's acting prime minister on president's assassination

Haiti's acting prime minister Claude Joseph talks to the BBC about the assassination of the country's president Jovenel Moïse.

He outlines the efforts to apprehend potential suspects and says they are "foreign mercenaries".

Also in the programme: As President Biden says the US withdrawal from Afghanistan will be complete by the end of August, we hear what that means for the country; and a former parathlete reflects on what having no spectators at the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics will be like.


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppzfqj)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9nszx)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppzkgn)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqbn7cw0m)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shdxphxn8)
Sports News

BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9nxr1)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48tw58730s)
Fans largely barred from Tokyo Olympics

Imagine it: an Olympic games, without any spectators. The opening ceremony of the Olympics in Japan will take place on July 23rd and the games look as though they will essentially be a television event, which of course will have serious economic implications, but also make a huge impact on the athletes, as Andrew Zimbalist explains.

Also in the programme, we hear why authorities in Nigeria have instructed banks to freeze assets of the South African media company MultiChoice.

Plus, we have an extended report from the BBC's Victoria Craig, examining the future of the City of London as a global financial hub, six months on from the end of the Brexit transition period.

PHOTO: Olympic rings in Tokyo/AFP via Getty Images



FRIDAY 09 JULY 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppzsyx)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqf0flx58m)
Fans largely barred from Tokyo Olympics

Imagine it, an Olympic games, without any spectators. The opening ceremony of the Olympics in Japan will take place on July 23rd and the games look as though they will essentially be a television event, which of course will have serious economic implications, but also make a huge impact on the athletes, as Andrew Zimbalist explains.

UK oil firm Cairn Energy can seize Indian state assets following a French court ruling. It is part of a dispute with New Delhi over a $1.7bn award to Cairn by an international tribunal last December, although the ruling reportedly relates to around $20m of assets held in France, potentially including some owned by Air India.

Also in the programme, we hear why authorities in Nigeria have instructed banks to freeze assets of the South African media company MultiChoice.

Plus, we have an extended report from the BBC's Victoria Craig, examining the future of the City of London as a global financial hub, six months on from the end of the Brexit transition period.

PHOTO: Olympic rings in Tokyo/AFP via Getty Images


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4ppzxq1)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv2jp9)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9p8zf)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tz7)
Euro 2020, Claudio Ranieri and Copa America

Claudio Ranieri looks ahead to the final of Euro 2020 between Italy and England. We're also joined by former England international Tony Dorigo. Plus, can Lionel Messi win his first major international title when Argentina take on Brazil in the final of the Copa America?

Picture: Jorginho celebrates after scoring the winning penalty for Italy in the Euro 2020 semi-final shoot out against Spain (Claudio Villa/Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq01g5)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq0569)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv2s5k)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9pjgp)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2ghy)
Doping, diving and God

In the run up to the Tokyo Olympics professor Robert Beckford explores how cheating in sport conflicts with Christian principles.

He asks how can an Olympic champion stand on the podium with a gold medal and then thank God in an interview if they have taken performance enhancing drugs? Can a footballer celebrate the penalty he has ‘won’ and then point to the sky in honour of God?In this edition of Heart and Soul, featuring Olympic medallist Ben Johnson, Robert explores what the Christianity has to say about fair play and whether by cheating you are dishonouring your faith.


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq08yf)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy4fbz5)
Haiti police says foreign hit squad killed president

We hear from Haiti's prime minister, Claude Joseph, as more revelations are revealed about the assassination of President Juvenal Moise.

We're heading towards an Olympics without any fans in the stadiums - we'll go to Tokyo to find out what it means for the games.

And California is poised to pay out up to $25,000 to those sterilised because they were considered unfit to have children.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq0dpk)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy4fgq9)
Haiti crisis: Colombian 'assassins' paraded before cameras

The authorities parade 17 men from the unit allegedly involved in the president's assassination.

The Olympic torch is in Tokyo ahead of the usual tour before the tournament.. but the usual crowds were missing as the city is under a state of emergency because of rising Covid levels.

And today marks 10 years since South Sudan got its independence, but is there anything to celebrate?


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq0jfp)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2qcy4flgf)
Haiti: Colombian 'hit squad' accused of president's assassination

17 retired soldiers are captured and paraded in front of the cameras. Others are still on the run.

South Sudan is 10 years old today - but most people aren't celebrating, because of Covid lockdown measures. Many say they also feel a sense of disappointment.

And we visit a coral reef where China is accused of blocking traditional fishing boats.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq0n5t)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1d)
N Ram: Is freedom of expression under threat in India?

Stephen Sackur speaks to one of India’s most influential media voices, N. Ram, director of the Hindu Group. With independent journalists complaining of intimidation and social media facing new curbs, is freedom of expression under threat in the world’s biggest democracy?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9q0g6)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0d)
Climate change: the financial fight

When it comes to climate change, what is the world of finance doing? Manuela Saragosa speaks to Jan Erik Saugestad, executive vice president of Norwegian asset managers Storebrand, whose investments must meet certain environmental, social and governance standards. This week also saw finance ministers from the V20 group of countries most vulnerable to climate change meet virtually. We talk climate justice with former president of the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, currently speaker of the country's parliament.

Produced by Benjie Guy.

(Picture: coins in a jar with plant on a table. Credit Getty Images.)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyr)
The bombing of the Rainbow Warrior

On 9 July 1985 the Greenpeace campaign ship was bombed by French secret agents in Auckland, New Zealand. One environmental campaigner was killed and the Rainbow Warrior was sunk. Claire Bowes heard from the ship's captain Pete Willcox who was on board when the attack took place.

This programme is a rebroadcast

(Photo: Captain Pete Willcox, courtesy of Greenpeace)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq0rxy)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh4)
Have apps helped tackle the pandemic?

Did exposure and contact tracing apps live up to the hopes for them? Plus, how ransomware-as-a-service is becoming a serious cyber threat. And new laws in the US could give people access to the information and parts they need to repair, rather than replace, their devices. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporters Chris Vallance and Cody Godwin. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Hands of people at a picnic with their phones and face masks, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9q46b)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq0wp2)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsm)
The pandemic brings more robots

The world’s major economies are moving again thanks to mass vaccination against the coronavirus. President Biden says a higher demand for workers will help them negotiate increased wages and better conditions. But instead of welcoming them back, many businesses are replacing workers with automation and artificial intelligence - often a much cheaper and more reliable option in the long term. Even before the pandemic, one influential think tank predicted nearly 25 percent of jobs are being lost to automation. And it is believed that the months of lockdowns have accelerated that shift, especially in routine low-skilled jobs that require minimal human interaction. So where is the shift happening and how has the pandemic affected trends? What jobs are under threat, what are educators and policymakers doing about it, and could it actually mean more people doing more creative and fulfilling jobs? Paul Henley is joined by a panel of experts to discuss how accelerated automation is changing the world of work.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq10f6)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv3mdg)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9qcpl)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tz7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq145b)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f4)
Burkina Faso gold: A mixed blessing

Gold is now Burkina Faso’s most valuable export, but it’s come at a price. Last month the government announced the closure of small mines in the northern province of Sahel following a deadly attack by Islamic extremists. BBC Africa's Lalla Sy has been following the story from neighbouring Ivory Coast.

Remembering Dilip Kumar
Dilip Kumar, one of India’s earliest and most famous film actors, died this week at the age of 98. We hear some of the many reasons why he was so special from Vandana at BBC Delhi, who has admired Dilip Kumar all her life.

Ukrainian heels
High heels and marching soldiers - not a natural pairing perhaps, and one that directed outrage towards Ukraine's Ministry of Defence. BBC Ukrainian's Irena Taranyuk shares the story.

Afghan resistance
Stories of territorial gains by the Taliban have been extensively covered by BBC Uzbek, which has a big audience among ethnic Uzbeks in northern Afghanistan. Firuz Rahimi is from Jowzjan province, where news outlets have reported that women are joining militias to resist the Taliban.

Cuba's Jewish community
BBC Mundo's Jose Carlos Cueta is Cuban, but only discovered by chance that the island had a small Jewish community. He got digging, and traces its history from Christopher Columbus in 1492, to its peak after the First World War and its presence today.

Image: Gold panning in a Burkina Faso artisan mine, 2006
Credit: Universal Images Group via Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq17xg)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv3vwq)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9qm5v)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq1cnl)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3yjbz6)
Haiti suspects displayed

Members of the group accused of assassinating Haiti's president have been displayed in public - but it's still not clear who ordered the attack, and how the killers got into the president's home:

Also in the programme: the Taliban take control of an important border crossing from Afghanistan into Iran, just days after almost all US troops pull out; and growing anger in Brazil about President Bolsonaro's handling of the pandemic.


(Image: Suspects in the assassination of President Jovenel Moise, who was shot dead early Wednesday at his home, are shown to the media in Port-au-Prince, Haiti July 8, 2021 / Credit: REUTERS/Estailove St-Val)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq1hdq)
BBC News

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FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9qvp3)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46s8brkrwm)
South Sudan at 10

South Sudan marks its 10th anniversary today, and we assess the country's economy. Luris Mulla is an entrepreneur who's working to bring foreign investment into the oil and gas sector, as well as agriculture, and offers her perspective. But corruption in the country remains a powerful deterrent to would-be investors, as Alan Boswell, senior analyst for South Sudan at the International Crisis Group explains. Also in the programme, after a year of postponed or cancelled tournaments and playing in empty stadiums, there is now a feel-good factor to football with the Euros and the Copa America taking place. The BBC's Rahul Tandon asks whether these tournaments will give the game the financial boost it needs, and revive its flagging transfer market. Plus, a new strawberry variety called Malling Ace, with an extended growing season, appears set to shake up the industry. The BBC's Victoria Craig has been finding out more.

(Picture: South Sudanese people celebrate 10 years of independence. Picture credit: Reuters.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq1m4v)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxl70thm39)
Bangladesh factory fire

We'll get our correspondent to explain what we know so far about a fire in a food processing plant near Dhaka, Bangladesh. Hundreds of people were said to be inside the factory when the fire began on Thursday night.

The region of Catalonia is re-imposing restrictions on nightlife due to a huge surge in coronavirus cases. We’ll hear from two club owners on how they feel about closing their clubs once again. What’s been the impact on their business and the industry? What has been the impact on them mentally and financially?

And a teenage basketball prodigy has become the first African American to win the US Scripps National Spelling Bee competition. Zaila Avant-garde, a 14-year-old from New Orleans, Louisiana, cruised to victory with the word "murraya", a type of tropical tree. We’ll reflect the conversation about her being the first African American to win the competition.

Picture:The fire at the Hashem Foods Ltd factory in Rupganj, Narayanganj district, on the outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh (Reuters / Mohammad Ponir Hossain)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq1qwz)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxl70thqvf)
Taliban claims '85% control' of Afghanistan

The Afghan government has dismissed the Taliban's claim that they now control 85% of the country as part of a propaganda campaign. Two important border posts fell to the militants earlier on the frontiers with Iran and Turkmenistan. We'll speak to our chief international correspondent Lyse Doucet in Kabul as Afghans assess their future once international troops have departed.

The region of Catalonia is re-imposing restrictions on nightlife due to a huge surge in coronavirus cases. We’ll hear from two club owners on how they feel about closing their clubs once again. What’s been the impact on their business and the industry? What has been the impact on them mentally and financially?

After pictures of former US President's Donald Trump's teenage son Barron revealed that he is now 2 metres tall, his name was trending on social media, with plenty of people mocking his height. We'll speak to people who know what it's like to be an exceptionally tall teenager.

Picture: Members of the Taliban political office attend a news conference in Moscow (Reuters / Tatyana Makeyeva)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq1vn3)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq1zd7)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjscv4lch)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9rbnm)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nd68p4v6l)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq234c)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9rgdr)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqm)
Why is standing more tiring than walking?

Standing takes less energy than walking, so why does it feel more tiring? At least, it does for CrowdScience listener Nina. She can march for hours without getting tired, but her legs and feet get achy after just a short time standing still.

It’s one of three walking-themed questions CrowdScience is tackling this week. Taking inspiration from our active listeners, Marnie Chesterton walks up a hill with Caroline Williams, author of a new book about why humans are designed to move. We find out how our whole system – body and brain – works better when we’re walking, compared to standing still. We’re probably set up this way because of our evolutionary history: hunting and gathering needed us to be ‘cognitively engaged endurance athletes’.

We stop for a break.. but is it true that we shouldn’t sit down to rest during a walk? Our listener Sarah is a keen hillwalker but likes to take the weight off her feet every now and again. Her hillwalking friends disapprove, saying she should rest on her feet. Is this a myth CrowdScience can bust?

And finally a question from listener Matteo: is walking or running better for your health? Numerous studies show significant benefits to both forms of exercise, but in the end, the best kind of exercise is the one you’re motivated to do.

With Caroline Williams, Dr François-Xavier Li, Professor Dick Greene and Professor Duck-Chul Lee.


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq26wh)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55q3yk663)
Newshour

Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq2bmm)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9rpx0)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tz7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjm4pq2gcr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywqbn7grxq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0shdxpltkc)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkflf9rtn4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48tw589zxw)
South Sudan at 10

South Sudan marks its 10th anniversary today, and we assess the country's economy. Luris Mulla is an entrepreneur who's working to bring foreign investment into the oil and gas sector, as well as agriculture, and offers her perspective. But corruption in the country remains a powerful deterrent to would-be investors, as Alan Boswell, senior analyst for South Sudan at the International Crisis Group explains. Also in the programme, after a year of postponed or cancelled tournaments and playing in empty stadiums, there is now a feel-good factor to football with the Euros and the Copa America taking place. The BBC's Rahul Tandon asks whether these tournaments will give the game the financial boost it needs, and revive its flagging transfer market. Plus, a new strawberry variety called Malling Ace, with an extended growing season, appears set to shake up the industry. The BBC's Victoria Craig has been finding out more.

(Picture: South Sudanese people celebrate 10 years of independence. Picture credit: Reuters.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3ct1gxh)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gxj)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxj)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gxj)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkf750018p)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkf7500dj2)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkf7502kyd)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkf7502y5s)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkflf9hh57)

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BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjlsfd9k85)

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BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjlsfddg58)

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BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjm4ppm6bj)

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BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjm4ppq37m)

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BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172xzjm4ppr26n)

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BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjm4ppr9px)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzjm4pprfg1)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjm4pprk65)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172xzjm4pprny9)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172xzjm4pprspf)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjm4pprxfk)

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BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjm4pps4xt)

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BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjm4ppsj56)

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BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjm4ppsrng)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjm4ppt04q)

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BBC News 05:00 WED (w172xzjm4ppth47)

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BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzjm4pptvcm)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjm4pptz3r)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjm4ppv2vw)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjm4ppv6m0)

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BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjm4ppvg38)

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BBC News 19:00 WED (w172xzjm4ppw5l1)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172xzjm4ppw9b5)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjm4ppwf29)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjm4ppwjtf)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjm4ppwnkk)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppwx1t)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppx0sy)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppx4k2)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppx896)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppxd1b)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppxhsg)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppxmjl)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppxr8q)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppxw0v)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppxzrz)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppy3j3)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppy787)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppyc0c)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppygrh)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppylhm)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppyq7r)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppytzw)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppyyr0)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppz2h4)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppz678)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppz9zd)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppzfqj)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjm4ppzkgn)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjm4ppzsyx)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172xzjm4ppzxq1)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172xzjm4pq01g5)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172xzjm4pq0569)

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BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172xzjm4pq0wp2)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzjm4pq10f6)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172xzjm4pq145b)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172xzjm4pq17xg)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172xzjm4pq1cnl)

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BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172xzjm4pq26wh)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzjm4pq2bmm)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjm4pq2gcr)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d5w)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxl70t40gx)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxl70t4471)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxl70t6xd0)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172xxxl70t7144)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172xxxl70t9t93)

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BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxxl70tdtyb)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j4x)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jfy)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jnq)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1j9f)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j0d)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqdn596xkw)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqf0flmgkb)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqf0flqcgf)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqf0flt8cj)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqf0flx58m)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dgx)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pql)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pql)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pqm)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1ls7)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1ls7)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1ls7)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2g90)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2g91)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct2g91)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2g91)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mv0)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mv0)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n5x)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n5x)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3ct1n5x)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1nbf)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1nbf)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3ct1nbf)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n1d)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n1d)

HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3ct1n1d)

Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nvf)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nvg)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nvg)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvg)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2ghx)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2ghx)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2ghy)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1td5)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1td5)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1td5)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dk5)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dk5)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2dk5)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dk5)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hc1)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hc1)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2qcy41rbs)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv2qcy41w2x)

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Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172xv2qcy4fgq9)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172xv2qcy4flgf)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172xv55bvmtzjb)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172xv55bvmvyhc)

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On the Podium 04:32 WED (w3ct2g6n)

On the Podium 11:32 WED (w3ct2g6n)

On the Podium 22:32 WED (w3ct2g6n)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kx2)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3ct1kx2)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1l)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l1l)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pl1)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pl1)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3ct1pl1)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l3w)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l3w)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3ct1l3w)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 05:32 SAT (w3ct0t1n)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 10:32 MON (w3ct0t1n)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nd68ns7l6)

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Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3ct1l8d)

Sports News 23:20 SAT (w172y0sh1ncxkvm)

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