Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 26 JUNE 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52jdnb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqd8wzfrz1)
Reaction to George Floyd verdict

Ex-officer Derek Chauvin was sentenced to 22.5 years for the murder of George Floyd. We hear reaction from Terencio Safford, a social justice campaigner in Minnesota. Also in the programme, Amazon and Google are under investigation in the UK over the prevalence of fake reviews. The BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on the emergence of the intimacy coordinator role that has arisen on film sets, partly as a result of the #MeToo movement. Plus, South Africa's Rooibos tea has become the first African product to be given protected designation of origin status by the European Union, meaning tea sold with the name in the bloc must come from two particular regions outside Cape Town.

All through the show we are joined by Colin Peacock of Radio New Zealand in Wellington.

(Photo: Derek Chauvin at trial. Picture credit: Reuters)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52jjdg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6m4cq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp6wnv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbl)
Sri Lankan cricket has to ‘change’

On this week's Stumped we hear from former Sri Lanka cricket captain Kumar Sangakkara who says since winning the World Cup in 1996, their players been held back by administrative upheaval and archaic systems where everyone is extremely resistant to change.

Sangakarra who was this month inducted into the ICC Hall of Fame, believes his country have now been surpassed by other cricketing nations and now is the ‘time to draw a line and say it’s enough’.

Plus we debate the pros and cons of the format of the World Test Championship final and celebrate New Zealand becoming the inaugural winners.

And we ask the question whether women's test matches should be extended to five days?

Photo: Sri Lanka batsman Kumar Sangakkara raises his bat after scoring a century at the Bellerive Oval ground during the 2015 Cricket World Cup Pool A match between Scotland and Sri Lanka in Hobart on March 11, 2015. (Credit: INDRANIL MUKHERJEE/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52jn4l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f2)
Hotel Rwanda hero on trial

Paul Rusesabagina became internationally famous after the film Hotel Rwanda told the story of how he helped save over a thousand Tutsis during the 1994 genocide, sheltering them in the hotel where he worked. But many inside Rwanda dispute his heroic portrayal, and he's currently standing trial in Rwanda accused of terrorism offences. BBC Great Lakes journalist Prudent Nsengiyumva has been following the case.

World's oldest alligator
BBC Serbian had a big hit on its website last week with a story about probably the world’s oldest alligator. His name is Muja, he’s at least 85 years old, and lives in Belgrade zoo. BBC Serbian's Petra Živić was the lucky person who landed herself a daytrip to the zoo.

Vaccine inducements
Cars, gym membership, eggs and hand-blenders: global solutions to persuading the vaccine hesitant to take the jab, with BBC Russian's Oleg Boldyrev, Nisrine Hatoum of BBC Arabic and BBC Gujarati's Roxy Gagdekar.

Back to the country in South Korea
The Covid-19 pandemic has led to many in South Korea to leave the built up, super-competitive cities, and relocate to the country. BBC Korean's Julie Yoonnyung Lee follows the story of Yun Sihu, whose family moved from Seoul to a remote village, where he now attends a tiny school, and spends his days playing in rivers and fields.

Connecting the favelas
They call it “the Favela LinkedIn,” a database that neighbours from Paraisopolis and volunteers have created to connect people looking for jobs with local companies in the second largest favela in São Paulo. BBC Brasil’s Thais Carranca went to see this and other innovative initiatives to fight the effects of Covid-19.

Image: Paul Rusesabagina at the Supreme Court in Kigali, Rwanda
Credit: Simon Wohlfahrt/AFP/Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyp)
The repeal of 'Don't ask, don't tell'

LGBT servicemen and women in the US armed forces had to keep their sexuality secret until the 'Don't ask, don't tell' policy was repealed in 2011. Lieutenant Colonel Heather Mack served under the policy for most of her military career. She spoke to Rachael Gillman about her experiences.
This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Lieutenant Colonel Heather Mack (l) with her wife Ashley (r) and their two children. Courtesy of Heather Mack


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52jrwq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsk)
Hydrogen: A climate game-changer?

With less than six months to go before the next big climate conference (COP26) in Scotland, the world's major polluters are under pressure to significantly increase their ability to cut greenhouse gas emissions. One of the solutions being discussed is to increase the production of clean hydrogen. At present most of the world's hydrogen has a high carbon footprint, but engineers are coming up with innovative ways to produce the gas with the help of renewable energy. They say it will allow for a faster reduction of carbon emissions without the need to overhaul existing industrial infrastructure. It’s also claimed that hydrogen-powered cells can drastically cut pollution from aviation and transportation.

But others argue that using large amounts of wind and solar power to create ‘green hydrogen’ is wasteful and that governments should instead focus on improving the supply of renewables. So how clean can hydrogen get and how valuable could it be in the fight against climate change? Will the high costs involved in developing the industry pay off in the long run, or does the technology give us all false hope? Ritula Shah and a panel of experts discuss the role of hydrogen in attempts to cut greenhouse gas emissions.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52jwmv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6mhm3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp77x7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1m)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

New planes, new rules

Ramping up Spitfire production requires another new factory. Bigger, better, full of cutting-edge machinery and the best workers in the business. But it’s a catastrophe – one that nearly costs Britain dearly.


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk4)
Maths and the Mayflower

This year sees the delayed 400th anniversary celebrations of the Mayflower voyage, an event seen as a crucial moment in the history of the United States. But how many people alive today can trace back their lineage to those first 102 passengers? Tim speaks to Rob Eastaway and Dr Misha Ewen about maths and the Mayflower.

Producer: Nathan Gower


(The replica ship Mayflower II sailing to Plymouth, Massachusetts. Photo: Scott Eisen/Getty images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52k0cz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt78xswdn2)
George Floyd’s murderer sentenced to over 22 years

The US white ex-police officer convicted of murdering African-American man George Floyd is sentenced to 22 years and 6 months in jail.

Also, we’ll be speaking to the Hungarian Justice Minister Judit Varga on legislation which bars portrayal of homosexuality to minors in the country. Does the Hungarian government think that there’s anything wrong with being gay?

And Africa’s third coronavirus wave.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other stories are Nanjala Nabola, a writer and researcher based in Nairobi, Kenya; and Yannis Palaiologos, European Union correspondent for Kathimerini, the Greek daily, political and financial morning newspaper.

(Image: Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin reacts as the judge announces his sentence. Credit: REUTERS)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52k443)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt78xswjd6)
George Floyd’s murderer sentenced to over 22 years

The US white ex-police officer convicted of murdering African-American man George Floyd is sentenced to 22 years and 6 months in jail.

As a panel of legal experts comes up with a definition of ecocide, we’ll discuss why it must be listed along genocide as an international crime.

Also, how English and its study can enrich your life.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other stories are Nanjala Nabola, a Kenyan writer and researcher based and Greek journalist, Yannis Palaiologos.

(Image: Protesters march after the sentencing of Derek Chauvin. Credit: REUTERS)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52k7w7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt78xswn4b)
George Floyd’s murderer sentenced to over 22 years

The US white ex-police officer convicted of murdering African-American man George Floyd is sentenced to 22 years and 6 months in jail. But has justice been served? We’ll ask Anika Robbins, outgoing chair of Minneapolis Civil Rights Commission, independent body for enforcing civil rights for the city.

We look at the impact of travel restrictions brought on by the coronavirus pandemic on the tourism sector in Greece.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other stories are Nanjala Nabola, a Kenyan writer and researcher based and Greek journalist, Yannis Palaiologos.

And as Tour de France gets underway, we’ll go to Slovenia, home of the reigning champion, Tadej Pogacar.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other stories are Nanjala Nabola, a Kenyan writer and researcher based and Greek journalist, Yannis Palaiologos.

(Image: Protesters march during a brief rally after the sentencing of Derek Chauvin. Credit: REUTERS)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp7m4m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6p)
Living through menopause

For a long time there was a wall of silence around the menopause, but more women are choosing to speak candidly about their complicated and illuminating experiences. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women on a mission to demystify the menopause.

Dr Nighat Arif is a British Pakistani family doctor specialising in women’s health. She is passionate about making the menopause a less taboo subject for all, but particularly for women for whom English is not their first language, and she often uses her social media channels to raise awareness.

Barbara Hannah Grufferman is an American writer whose work focuses on healthy aging. After struggling with her symptoms during menopause she decided to become a marathon runner. Her most recent book is Love Your Age and her newsletter is Menopause Cheat Sheet.

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE:
(L) Dr Nighat Arif (credit: courtesy of Dr Nighat Arif)
(R) Barbara Hannah Grufferman (credit: Howard Grufferman)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52kcmc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5v)
Coronavirus: Survivor's guilt

Worldwide almost four million people have now died from Covid-19. For each individual who has lost a loved one, each statistic is a deeply personal experience.

The disease has not just attacked our physical health, it has also had a mental impact - whether from anxiety, depression or loneliness. We hear from three people from Nepal, South Africa and the United States who are all dealing with survivor’s guilt. Suswopna, in Kathmandu, responded by setting up a Facebook support group. Douglas, in Durban, is coping with the recent death of his fiancé and wishes he could have done more to help. Paul, in Illinois, is trying to overcome his guilt at not being at his father’s bedside when he died.

Some African countries are currently undergoing a third wave of infections. Host Karnie Sharp hears from three doctors - in Namibia, Uganda and South Africa - about the challenges they are facing.

(Photo: A woman is consoled by her relative after her husband died from Covid-19 outside a hospital in Ahmedabad, India. Credit: Amit Dave/Reuters)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp7qwr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f93)
9: Cyber slaves

Welcome to hacker hotel. And a friend disappears after texting “I don’t think I’ll be coming back.”
#LazarusHeist

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/lazarusheist


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1k)
A global shortwave broadcast for just 35 people

How an annual shortwave tradition aimed at just a handful of listeners trapped in 24 hours of darkness got itself a global audience. We share listeners' thoughts on the BBC’s midwinter broadcast to Antarctica. And we are always keen to get to know about listeners' everyday lives and habits, so there’s another in our series How I Hear.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52khch)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0q0c680xd4)
Euros: The Knockout stage

We preview the knockout stages at the Euros.

As the Tour de France begins, we’re on the start line with former England footballer Geoff Thomas, as he attempts to complete the exact course of cycling’s greatest competition, a week ahead of the race.

We’ll look at the environmental impact of the Olympic and Paralympic Games. We’ll hear from ‘ecoathletes’, one group of athletes who are at the forefront of bringing attention to climate change thought their sporting platform.

After Pele called for snooker to be included in the Olympics we speak with Igor Figueiredo, the only professional snooker player from Brazil.

As the Women’s PGA takes place in Atlanta, Georgia, we look at why some sports are shunning the state and others aren’t.

Image: Getty Images.


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52km3m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6n72w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp7zd0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f39)
Covid: India's child malnutrition crisis

An estimated 115 million children in India are said to be at risk of malnutrition. Experts say India's Covid lockdowns interrupted crucial government schemes that benefit hundreds of millions of women and children.

The malnutrition rates were already on the rise in the years leading up to the Covid outbreak. India’s lockdowns, some of the severest anywhere in the world, have made matters worse. In fact, recent reports indicate stunting among children in some areas has gone up by as much as 20% in a matter of just a few months.

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss the challenges and the measures being taken to tackle child malnutrition during a devastating pandemic.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Dr Pavitra Mohan, co-founder, Basic HealthCare Services; Sophie Healy-Thow, food systems & nutrition activist, Ireland; Dr Sreehari M, state nodal officer - child health, NHM, Kerala


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52kqvr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g95)
A right to health

What will be the biggest healthcare issue in the next decade? What is the future of public healthcare around the world? The BBC World Service brings together the acclaimed US physician and Berggruen Prize winner, Dr Paul Farmer, with health experts and members of the public from across the globe to discuss one of the most urgent issues of our time.

Presenter: Razia Iqbal
Producers: Helen Towner and Charlie Taylor

(Photo: A healthcare worker in Nairobi administers an Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine to her colleague, Credit: Dennis Sigwe/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52kvlw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv54zlb1txh)
Police officer sentenced to 22 years for killing of George Floyd

Relatives of George Floyd - whose murder in the US last year sparked worldwide protests against racism - have called the 22-year prison sentence imposed on his killer a "historic" step towards racial reconciliation. We’ll have a report from Minneapolis to hear the reaction from there and hear from a police officer who hopes this will bring about reform.

Also in the programme: three aid workers are killed in an attack on their vehicle in the northern Ethiopian region of Tigray; and we’ll hear how the Vatican is likely to respond after Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau asks the Pope to apologise over abuses at church-run residential schools for indigenous children.

Photo: Protesters march during a brief rally after the sentencing of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis policeman found guilty of killing George Floyd. Credit: REUTERS/Eric Miller


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52kzc0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgw)
How Tokyo is attempting to make the Olympics safe

On this edition of Business Weekly, we talk Tokyo 2020 and hear how the organisers of the Olympic Games are trying to get spectators into venues whilst trying to minimise the risk from coronavirus. We also take a look at legal challenges brought against employers who are insisting their workers have a Covid vaccination before they re-enter the office, hearing from a lawyer representing a group of hospital workers in Texas who want to take their case all the way to the Supreme Court. Plus we hear how getting the nuance wrong in corporate communications can be costly. Business Weekly is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Olympic torch bearer in Gotemba, Japan, Getty Images)


SAT 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52l334)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 15:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t943nsqty)
Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52lpts)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt2)
The Arts Hour on virtual tour in Sydney

The Arts Hour takes a virtual visit to Sydney, Australia, with music, comedy, a live audience and leading artists all joining Nikki Bedi to discuss the long term impact of Covid 19 on the city’s arts community, in a country that’s closed its borders to so many.

It has been 250 years since James Cook’s first voyage to Australia, which along with the Black Lives Matter movement, once again sparked debate about the treatment and representation of indigenous Australians, or First Nation People, as well as other minorities. We discuss how that has impacted the city and its arts.

Director Shannon Murphy discusses her film Babyteeth, which won in nine categories at last year’s Australian Academy Awards, including best film and best director.

Author Dr Michael Mohammed Ahmad explains why it was important to put his own experiences into his novels The Lebs and The Other Half of You.

Playwright and director Wesley Enoch tells us how he’s brought indigenous arts to the fore.

There’s comedy from one of Australia’s favourite comedians, Alice Fraser.

The Artistic Director of the Sydney Festival, Olivia Ansell, takes us on a personal tour to some of the hippest venues in the city, including the Flying Nun theatre and the Red Rattler.

One of Sydney’s hottest bands, Lime Cordiale, give us a special performance of their songs Robbery and No Plans to make Plans.

And there is a live performance from the powerful First Nation rapper Barkaa, whose music was played during the Black Lives Matter protests.

Producer Andrea Kidd

This edition of The Arts Hour was recorded just before parts of Sydney went into lockdown

(Photo: Lime Cordiale, credit: Tim Swallow; Shannon Murphy, credit: Daniele Venturelli/WireImage via Getty Images; Dr Michael Mohammed Ahmad, credit: Anna Kucera; Alice Fraser; Barkaa, credit: Tristan S Edouard; Wesley Enoch, credit: Saverio Marfia/WireImage via Getty Images; Olivia Ansell, credit: Daniel Boud.)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52ltkx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv54zlb2swj)
Fire hampers search for survivors in Miami

Rescue teams are searching the wreckage of the collapsed Miami apartment block for survivors but are being hampered by fires deep under the rubble.

Also in the programme: Britain’s embattled Health Minister, Matt Hancock, resigns after days of criticism after photos and videos of him in a passionate clinch with an aide were published by a tabloid newspaper; and one of Turkish President Erdogan's pet projects, a 45 kilometre shipping canal joining the Black and Marmara Seas and running parallel to the Bosphorus Strait, has been criticised for its multi-billion dollar cost as well as its the environmental impact.

(Photo: Chaplain Polk County Sheriff Office Ossler Robert prays in front of the missing persons memorial installed near the partially collapsed 12-story condominium building in Surfside, Florida, USA, 26 June 2021. Credit: EPA/Cristobal Herrera-Ulashkevich)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52lyb1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc0)
100th episode: Best of the guests

We celebrate Music Life’s 100th episode with some of the highlights from Episodes 50–100. Pop icon and previous Music Life host Melanie C is back to guide us through some of the show’s biggest moments so far.

So far in the series we’ve heard Hans Zimmer explain how he went from playing in a new wave pop band to composing for the biggest films in the world, Moonchild Sanelly on what she can’t say in her music, David Byrne on the pressure to do something different, Kranium on how he made his best chorus, Eris Drew on the importance of positivity in dance music, Mykki Blanco on the role of resistance in their work, and Becky Hill on how to write the perfect hit.

Throughout 50 episodes we’ve travelled the globe, learned the behind-the-scenes secrets that went into some of the world’s biggest hits, and listened in to some of the most honest and surprising conversations in music. Here’s to the next 50.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52m225)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywpm3m0cm4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sgpd24f7s)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp9fbk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf4)
Film-maker Salomé Jashi and the art of trees

In her documentary Taming the Garden, which premiered at the Sundance film festival this year, the award-winning Georgian film-maker Salomé Jashi captured the transplantation of trees from Georgia’s coast to a controversial new park and arboretum. She tells presenter Sophia Smith Galer about evoking conflicting feelings on film.

Music and sound artists at this year’s Helsinki Biennial are inspired by listening to trees. The BBC’s Lucy Ash hears from Teemu Lehmusruusu, a Finnish artist converting the sounds of decaying trees into organ music and Finnish-British artist Hanna Tuulikki, whose soundscape and choreography blend the folklore of the past with present-day eco-anxiety.

The Jamaican poet Jason Allen Paisant has just published his debut collection Thinking with Trees, exploring identity, belonging and the right to roam. He is joined in discussion by fellow poet Craig Santos Perez, a member of the Indigenous Chamorro community, originally from the Pacific Island of Guam, who protests with trees against the climate crisis in his latest poetry collection, Habitat Threshold. They tell Sophia how they’re each reinventing nature poetry to reflect their roots and their rights.

Plus, we take a trip to the park with Dian Jen Lin, the Taiwanese fashion designer and co-founder of sustainable design studio Post Carbon Lab, who designs with trees to create carbon-capture clothing, using bacteria foraged from tree trunks.

Presenter: Sophia Smith Galer

Producer: Kirsty McQuire, Lucy Ash, Lucy Collingwood, Paul Waters

(Photo: Taming the Garden film. Credit: Salomé Jashi)



SUNDAY 27 JUNE 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52m9kf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yvb)
Tales of unexpected DNA data

This week Jesse Bloom of Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research has published an account of some DNA sequence data he located in an internet archive, despite it having been removed from the US NIH’s Sequence Read Archive. He tells Roland Pease of its significance to our understanding of the beginning of the Covid pandemic, but also, of more general interest, to what it might tell scientists about the full availability of relevant virological evidence.

Elsewhere, Elena Zavala of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig has been using new techniques for sequencing tiny fragments of mitochondrial DNA found in layers of mud to trace a long narrative of different evolutionary species of human and animal and their changing fortunes. As she describes in a paper published in Nature, sediments from different depths of the floor of the famous Denisova cave tell a long story of different humans (Denisovan and Neanderthal), bears, hyenas and other animals living there over different periods in the last 250 thousand years.

Over in the journal Science, several papers describe a new type of early hominin found in Nesher Rambla, Israel, that may be yet another instance of a human species that didn’t quite make it. As Marta Lahr, professor in human evolutionary biology at Cambridge University tells Roland the new findings all point to the bigger question – given the similar ages, technologies and even neighbourhoods that all these types of hominin shared, just what was it about our own direct ancestor species that enabled us to take over the world?

Since almost the beginning of the Covid pandemic, in some parts of the world, the drug Ivermectin has been repurposed as a therapy against the disease, with some even believing it to convey protection against infection – a situation not without tragic consequences. The evidence for any meaningful effect has been less than obvious to most scientists and health authorities. Not the first controversial drug in the story of Covid-19, the discourse has led to abuse directed at scientists and officials, and scathing arguments across social media. As Oxford University’s PRINCIPLE trial this week begins to include Ivermectin in its investigations, BBC Reality Check’s Jack Goodman reports on the Ivermectin’s tortuous path.

It took a while before it was officially recognised as a major symptom of Covid-19, but loss of smell has affected up to 60 percent of people who have had the virus. And for a significant portion, smell continues to be an issue for weeks or months after their recovery. So what’s going on and how can you get your sense of smell back?

We tend to think of our sense of smell as something universal – if it smells bad to me, it probably does to you but that is not the case for CrowdScience listener Annabel, who wonders why things other people love to sniff, she finds disgusting. Anand Jagatia investigates the science of smell, gets up close to the world’s smelliest plant and finds out if smell training can help those with long-term issues after Covid.




(Image: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52mf9k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6q18t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp9sky)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvd)
Tanzania joins Covax

As Tanzania joins Covax, Rhoda Odhiambo discusses the challenges ahead and says 'joining' makes it sound simple but the requirements that need to be put in place are far from simple. Also,results from the first national TB prevalence survey in South Africa shows that the disease is found more in men and young people than previously recognised. Claudia talks to professor Martie van der Walt, director of the TB platform of the South African Medical Research Council while Taurai Maduna reports from a TB screening clinic in Diepsloot, Gauteng Province. Plus, professor Catherine Loveday on new research assessing lockdown memories and what they mean.

Claudia's studio guest is Matt Fox from Boston University.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Photo: Portrait of a young man wearing a face mask in Nungwi, Tanzania. Credit: Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52mk1p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g95)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52mnst)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtz)
Spain: A nation divided

Stories from Spain, the US, Romania and from around Africa.

It was always going to be a gamble – when Spain’s Prime Minister decided to pardon nine leaders of the Catalan independence movement this week, he hoped it would lower the temperature in what has become a bitter political conflict. But opponents of independence have cried betrayal, accusing Pedro Sanchez of selling out the country for reasons of political opportunism. Guy Hedgecoe tells us where this has left a population already divided on an issue which affects the very fabric of their country.

The gangster’s moll is a classic image from movies: an attractive female companion for the main character, keeping him happy while he runs his nefarious enterprises. Yet a very different picture has been emerging in US court-rooms. The man known simply as “El Chapo” was prosecuted for running a vast international drugs enterprise from his headquarters in Mexico. And what has come out about his wife, and indeed, his mistress, showed women who were very much strong characters in their own right, as Tara McKelvey tells us.

With millions now dead as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, it can be hard to remember the individual stories behind statistics, that any dead person might be a parent, a son or daughter, or indeed, a friend. The writer, Stephen McGrath lives in rural Romania, and describes what happened when one of his neighbours died from Covid, a man who also served as the village priest.

Regular radio listeners will be familiar with hearing the name of a producer read out at the end of a programme. But what exactly does a producer do? When it comes to news programmes, it’s usually the presenter or reporter who gets all the attention, the voice or face with which you become familiar. Andrew Harding is one of the more seasoned BBC correspondents, a journalist who has covered wars and other dramas around the globe. He pays tribute to the producers, unsung heroes of broadcasting.

(Image: People opposed to Catalan independence wave Spanish flags at a demonstration. Credit: Alvaro Laguna/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwpb126)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52msjy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6qdj6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwpb4tb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2g7q)
Guru

Guru: A dark legacy

For the last year, BBC journalist and passionate yoga teacher Ishleen Kaur has been investigating allegations of sexual and emotional abuse at the heart of an organisation she once called home.

Fellow practitioners share with her their stories of cruelty, rape and even the sexual assault of a child - but she wasn't prepared for what she uncovered next.

Join Ishleen on her deeply personal journey into the dark legacy which haunts Sivananda Yoga, one of the world’s most revered yoga schools.


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52mx92)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt78xsz9k5)
Death toll rises in Miami high-rise collapse

Evidence emerges of mistakes made before the deadly high-rise collapse in Miami.

Also, former US President Trump holds his first revenge rally since leaving office.

Plus, will shark nets on Australia's beaches become a thing of the past?

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Caroline Frost, a British writer and entertainment and media journalist; and Mark Galleoti, expert and consultant on Modern Russia and honorary professor at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London.

(Image: Emergency crews continue search and rescue operations for survivors, in Surfside, near Miami Beach, Florida. Credit: REUTERS)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52n116)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt78xszf99)
Deadly mistakes in Florida apartment collapse

Clear evidence emerges of deadly mistakes made before the collapse of a highrise apartment block in Miami.

Also, the campaign in Australia to make shark nets a thing of the past.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Caroline Frost, a British writer and entertainment and media journalist; and Mark Galleoti, expert and consultant on Modern Russia and honorary professor at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at University College London.

(Image: A view of the collapsed condo in Surfside in Miami, Florida. Credit: Alamy Live News.)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52n4sb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt78xszk1f)
Regional elections in France

Voters in France are going to the polls for a second round of regional elections, today, in what is the last nationwide electoral test for the main parties ahead of next year’s presidential and parliamentary elections.

Also, rescuers continue their search for survivors in the rubble of a collapsed apartment block in Florida.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Caroline Frost, a British writer and entertainment and media journalist; and Mark Galleoti, expert and consultant on Modern Russia and honorary professor at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at University College London.

(Image: Renaud Muselier, candidate for the regional elections casts his ballot in Marseille, France. Credit: REUTERS)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwpbj1q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfs)
The lure of on-demand groceries

Do you need a lemon right now but don’t want to leave the house? Just download an app and you’ll have it in 13 minutes. That’s the kind of service you can expect from a swathe of new ‘rapid delivery’ grocery apps. Dozens have appeared around the world since the start of the pandemic, and investors have been flocking to invest, pumping billions into the sector. So are these apps the obvious next step in our on-demand lifestyles, or should they be a cause for concern? When it comes to food, can things become just a bit too convenient?

Tamasin Ford hears from one company boss with big ambitions and a former competition lawyer who’s worried these apps could spell the end for smaller food stores. Plus, we travel to Istanbul in Turkey where people have already been using them for years.

(Picture: Man sat on sofa groceries being handed to him. Credit: Getty/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Alec Dent: Co-Founder, Weezy
Kaya Genç: Novelist
Michelle Meagher: Founder, Balanced Economy Project


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52n8jg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwpbmsv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx1)
Fire, ice and thunder: A chase on the high seas

The Thunder was the most notorious and elusive poaching ship in the world; for ten years governments had struggled to catch it. Then, in 2014, a crew from the organisation Sea Shepherd - known for its anti-whaling activity - found it illegally hunting Patagonian toothfish in the ice floes of the Antarctic and decided to stop it. They pursued the Thunder for 110 days over 10,000 miles before a dramatic stand-off in the Gulf of Guinea. Captain Peter Hammarstedt, from Sea Shepherd, tells Jo Fidgen about the dramatic chase and eventually watching the Thunder as it burned. A longer version of this interview was broadcast on 19th November 2020 and is available as a podcast in the Outlook feed.

On-board recordings in this piece are from the documentary Ocean Warriors: Chasing the Thunder, courtesy of Brick City TV.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Mariana Des Forges

Photo: The Thunder surrounded by icebergs
Credit: Sea Shepherd

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52nd8l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gh3)
Marvellous medicine

Most of us were blindsided by the novel virus SarsCov2, but infectious disease experts had been warning about the possibility of a global pandemic for years. For them it was never a matter of if, but when. What did come as a surprise was the speed of scientific progress to fight Covid 19. The first effective vaccine, from Pfizer/BioNTech, was developed in under 300 days, followed in successive weeks by Moderna and Oxford/AstraZeneca. The results of the UK’s RECOVERY trial, which was organised in a matter of weeks, has saved an estimated million lives worldwide by identifying which treatments are effective in treating Covid-19.

During the pandemic, the world witnessed how fast medicine can advance with an abundance of cash and collaboration. Is progress at this speed and cost sustainable?

Sandra Kanthal asks if drug development is something which should still take decades, or have we learned how to permanently accelerate the process?

(Photo: Covid-19 vaccine vials on dry ice illustration. Dado Ruvic/Reuters)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwpbrjz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g94)
Finding my Hinduism

Colourful temples, bells , incense and a multitude of deities and festivals - journalist Nalini Sivathasan grew up immersed in her parents’ religion, Hinduism. But as she has grown older, she has found it harder to connect with her faith and speaking to her friends, she finds she is not alone.

Unlike most other religions, Hinduism has no single founder, no single scripture nor commonly agreed set of teachings – which for some, can make it tricky to navigate.

On her journey to discover ‘her Hinduism’, Nalini talks to the Hindu Academy, which provides online classes and resources on the religion.

It’s seen a rise in engagement among young people over the past few years, yet the number of young people attending temples has fallen across the UK. Nalini visits a temple she grew up visiting to find out why and discovers how it’s trying to engage young people in ways other than worship.

For charity Go Dharmic, which was founded on the Hindu principle of dharma, practising seva - or selfless service - is the best way for young Hindus to connect with their faith and the world around them. While for vlogger Parle Patel, social media is the place to connect with young Hindus. But Parle says he is often criticised for proudly showcasing his Hinduism identity online.

Couple Abhinaya and Rahul are planning their Hindu wedding ceremony. For them the ceremony is more of a cultural event, rather than religious. Will understanding the importance and symbolism of the rituals bring them any closer to their faith?

Nalini also speaks to Indian politician Shashi Tharoor. While unsparing in his criticism of certain elements sometimes linked to Hinduism, he describes himself as a proud, believing Hindu. How is he able to navigate the apparent contradictions he sees within his religion?

Nalini tries to make sense of what it means to be a Hindu today, talks to those practising the faith in their own distinct way and decides whether there is a version of Hinduism out there which best suits her.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52nj0q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6r3zz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwpbw93)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2g7l)
The Golden Age Of Gold

23/06/2021 GMT

Throughout time our definition of what is valuable and what is rare changes. Yet as economies boom and bust and fashions come and go, one thing seems to remain both financially valuable and personally precious - gold.

Across three episodes for The Compass, we will explore gold's past, present and future and humanity’s obsession with it - from being worshipped in the ancient world, to changing immigration forever during the Gold Rush, and the part it plays in our jewellery, coinage, finance and medicine.

Presenting this programme is jewellery designer Rajvi Vora. As a third generation Kenyan of Indian origin, she understands the cultural importance of gold first hand, and takes us on a journey to discover more about this precious metal that continues to shape the world.


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52nmrv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Evidence (w3ct2g9r)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

How Covid damages the human body

A year and a half in, and in many ways Covid-19 is still an enigma. All over the world, doctors and scientists are still struggling to understand exactly how this new virus undermines our defences and then damages, even destroys, our bodies, in so many different ways. And why are some people completely unaffected?

In this edition of The Evidence, Claudia Hammond and her panel of experts chart the remarkable journey to understand this chameleon-like virus, including the long tail of the pandemic, Long Covid. Millions the world over are suffering under the dark shadow of post-Covid, with a multitude of symptoms months after the infection. Some of them, listeners to the programme, share their experiences.

And, the background story of the world famous RECOVERY trial, set up at record speed in the UK (but now international) to test which treatments could save the lives of the sickest Covid patients. So far 10 treatments for Covid have been randomised and tested on thousands of patients and the results have shown that six, including the widely used and promoted hydroxychloroquine, make no difference to chances of surviving a hospital stay. While evidence that the cheap, widely-available steroid, dexamethasone, does work, and has so far saved more than a million lives world-wide.

Joint chief investigator of RECOVERY, Sir Martin Landray, Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology at the University of Oxford, admits to Claudia that he’s been asked to include bee pollen and snake venom in the trial, but so far he’s resisted.

Claudia’s expert panel also includes Professor K. Srinath Reddy, cardiologist and epidemiologist and President of the Public Health Institute of India; Dr Sherry Chou, intensivist and neurologist from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine who heads the Global Consortium Study on Neurological Dysfunction in Covid-19 (GCS-NeuroCOVID) and Dr Melissa Heightman, respiratory consultant and Clinical Lead for post-COVID services at University College London Hospitals.

Produced by: Fiona Hill, Hannah Fisher and Maria Simons
Studio Engineers: Donald MacDonald and Matilda Macari

Picture: Male Asian doctor is writing a X-Ray summary of coronavirus patients on a tablet at the hospital, Credit: warodom changyencham/Getty Images


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52nrhz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv54zlb4qtl)
Classified UK government documents found at bus stop

One set of documents discusses the likely Russian reaction to the passage of a British navy ship through Ukrainian waters off the Crimea coast on Wednesday. Another details plan for a possible UK military presence in Afghanistan after the US-led NATO operation there ends.

Also in the programme: Bangladesh is introducing new stricter measures to bring down a surge in Covid-19 cases; and the Spanish Balearic island of Ibiza carries out an experiment to see if it can re-start its famous club scene.

(Photo: Photo from the Ministry of Defence Documents. In one “secret, UK eyes only” can be read, in another it says “UK-US Defence dialogue”. Credit: BBC).


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52nw83)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl9)
The Wizard of Oz: A homegrown American fairy tale

The Wizard of Oz is best known as one of the most watched films of all time, or as one of its many re-incarnations, such as the hugely successful Broadway musical Wicked or the Soviet, The Wizard of the Emerald City. But fewer people nowadays may be aware of the original book by the American writer L. Frank Baum that inspired these stories about a young girl who travels through a magic land in the company of a talking scarecrow, a tin man and a fearful lion. While he was a controversial figure, it was L. Frank Baum’s ideas about social justice and rights for women which pervade not just The Wizard of Oz but also its sequels, and explain why this story in its many forms has inspired many minority groups, from the African American to the LGBT communities.

Joining Bridget Kendall is Michael Patrick Hearn, considered to be the world’s leading Oz scholar, and author of The Annotated Wizard of Oz; Dr Sally Roesch Wagner, who specialises in the feminist aspects of The Wizard of Oz including the influence of Frank Baum’s mother-in-law, the women’s rights campaigner, Matilda Joslyn Gage, and the Russian writer Olga Zilberbourg who has studied the very popular Soviet version of the story.

Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service.

[Image: Publicity still from the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz. Credit: Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52p007)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hc0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52p3rc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t943nwrh5)
Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52pgzr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6s2z0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwpcv84)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g94)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52plqw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52pqh0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv54zlb5psm)
Miami rescuers refuse to give up hope

As rescue workers combed through the rubble of the twelve storey building in Surfside, local officials have updated the number of confirmed victims to nine - with more than a 150 people still missing. The Vice Mayor of Surfside, Tina Paul, speaks to Newshour about the rescue efforts.

Also in the programme: South Africa's president, Cyril Ramaphosa, announces new restrictions to limit the impact of what he called a devastating wave of the coronavirus; and why is the Yemeni city of Marib, swelled by a million refugees, such a crucial battle in the conflict between the Saudi-backed government and Houthi rebels?

(Photo: Rescue teams search the partially collapsed 12-story condominium building in Surfside, Florida, USA, 27 June 2021. Credit: EPA/Cristobal Herrera-Ulashkevich)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52pv74)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gh3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwpd6hj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f93)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52pyz8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywpm3m38j7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sgpd27b4w)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwpdb7n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 28 JUNE 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcv1qp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl7nwl6nwy)
Warning issued against major digital currency firm

The UK’s financial regulator, the Financial Conduct Authority, warns consumers against using Binance, a major digital currency company. Cryptocurrency investor Colin Stone tells us why this is the latest in an ongoing tussle between the scepticism of financial regulators, and free-market investors in currencies like Bitcoin. We go to Lisbon to hear about the latest in Portugal’s covid travel restrictions – the BBC’s Alison Roberts explains what missing out on UK summer tourism means for the country. Japan’s business culture is in the spotlight once again, as Tokyo-based Toshiba yields to global management styles, in a move away from an insular corporate environment; economist Michael Hughes tells us what it means for the world’s third largest economy. Oil prices have been flip-flopping for years, in an indication of competition between Saudi Arabia and the US – analyst Ellen Wald gives us the latest. Finally, as money flows in to the tech start-up space, we speak to Martin MacMillan, the founder of Pollen VC - a firm involved in the behind-the-scenes world of financing lucrative start-ups.

(Image: A Binance logo is seen on a smartphone screen. Credit: Thiago Prudencio/ SOPA Images/ LightRocket/ Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zjf02)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2g8z)
Tooth and claw: Lions

From Aslan to Simba, from the Wizard of Oz to heraldry, children in the West probably recognise this king of beasts before they can name the animals in their own back yards. But what about people who have lions roaming in their back yards literally? To find out more about the archetypal ‘man-eater; and how our increasingly complex relationship with them is playing out in Africa, Professor Adam Hart talks to two female researchers who have spent much of their lives working and living in lion country, helping to manage the wildlife conflicts that are becoming a threat to both humans and beasts.

Dr Moreangels Mbizah is the Founding Director of Wildlife Conservation Action in Zimbabwe, and Dr Amy Dickman heads up the Ruaha Carnivore Project in Tanzania.

Producer: Rami Tzabar and Beth Eastwood
Presenter: Professor Adam Hart.

(Photo: Lion, Credit: Nicholas Hodges/Getty Images)


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcv5gt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3hxsg2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zjjr6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqn)
Why is Australia so slow to act on climate change?

Australia is one of the world's biggest per-capita greenhouse gas emitters, and a Climate Question listener wants to know why the world isn't demanding her country do more.

Jodie lives in tropical Queensland, which she says is 'paradise', but it's also a place affected by bushfires, drought, and cyclones.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison says 'Australia can always be relied upon' to deliver action on climate change, but critics at home and abroad point to a record of over-promising and under-delivering.

Observers also blame the country's powerful and profitable fossil fuel industries as a reason why the Australian government has been slow to make progress.

But is it time, as listener Jodie asks, to give her country a 'a kick up the bum'?


Contributors:
Dr Niklas Hohne, The New Climate Institute, Cologne
Greg Bourne, The Climate Council Australia

Presenters - Neal Razzell and Graihagh Jackson
Reporter - Issy Phillips, FBi Radio, Sydney

Producer – Jordan Dunbar
Editor – Emma Rippon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcv96y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2gh3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zjnhb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f93)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcvdz2)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3hy0yb)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zjs7g)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6q)
Viral dance videos launched my career

Kim Chakanetsa talks to two choreographers whose careers took off after they posted dance routines on social media.

Sienna LaLau is an Hawaiian choreographer and dancer. Her routine with K-Pop sensations BTS, for the music video 'ON', where she also dances, was watched 7 million times within 3 days of its release. Just 20 years old she's gained an international reputation, working with artists like Jennifer Lopez and Justin Bieber.

Rwandan Sherrie Silver, won the MTV Video Music Award for Best Choreography in 2018 for her work on Childish Gambino’s ‘This Is America’. She’s since choreographed for some of the biggest names in music, including Rihanna, Celine Dion and Burna Boy. She brings traditional dance moves from African cultures to an international audience.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
L Sienna Lalau (courtesy The Lab Studios)
R Sherrie Silver (courtesy Malaria No More UK)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcvjq6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0nt8lqy)
Islamic State in Africa: what can be done?

As the group claims another attack in DRC, foreign ministers meet to discuss the threat.

In Miami, rescuers try a new tactic to find those they believe may be trapped under the rubble of a collapsed tower block. More than 150 people remain unaccounted for.

And we hear about a looming deadline that means millions of Brits living in the European Union could end up losing their residency and working rights.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcvngb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0nt8qh2)
Anti-Islamic State coalition meets

International politicians meet for the first time in two years to discuss how to stop the rise of IS in Africa.

The video, the affair, the kiss and the resignation of a British government minister. Health Secretary Matt Hancock told citizens to socially distance because of the pandemic but didn't follow his own advice.

And in sport, the reigning champions of Europe, Portugal, are knocked out of the Euros.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcvs6g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0nt8v76)
Rome Conference: combatting IS in Africa

World leaders look at ways to tackle the growing affiliation to Islamic State in the African continent.

The search is still going on for survivors after a building collapsed in Miami last week. Around 150 people remain unaccounted for.

The far right National Rally Party of Marine Le Pen has failed to win any region in elections in France this weekend. Emmanuel Macron's party also had disappointing results.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcvwyl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5g)
Marina Abramović: A remarkable career pushed to the limits

Much of the art we love is presented via a medium - be it a canvas, a recording or celluloid. Stephen Sackur interviews Marina Abramović, an artist whose primary resource is her own body. In the course of a remarkable career, the world's most famous and garlanded performance artist has pushed herself to the very limits of physical endurance and stirred intense reaction from audiences confronting her eye to eye. Her art and life are one; so what do they tell us?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zk86z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4w)
How to be Idle

Is crushing office boredom a curse or an opportunity?

Manuela Saragosa hears from David Bolchover, a writer who spent years at major insurance firms with almost nothing to do all day, and Tom Hodgkinson, founder of the Idler magazine, on why being idle is so important to the creative process.

(Photo: A man relaxing at work, Credit: Thinkstock)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0z)
Zimbabwe's mass UFO sightings

It was one of the most reported UFO sightings in recent history. Local people in the quiet rural town of Ruwa in Zimbabwe reported a 'strange craft' and lights in the sky. Around 60 children said they'd seen a 'space ship' and 'aliens' in bush land near their school playground in September 1994. The children drew pictures of what they'd seen, and despite differences in quality, the details and proportions were very similar. A BBC TV crew were among the first on the scene, Rebecca Kesby looks back through the archive of 'the Ruwa School incident'.

(Photo: Child's impression of UFO Zimbabwe 1994)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcw0pq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zkcz3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqk)
What happened to my sense of smell?

It took a while before it was officially recognised as a major symptom of Covid-19, but loss of smell has affected up to 60 percent of people who have had the virus. And for a significant portion, smell continues to be an issue for weeks or months after their recovery. So what’s going on and how can you get your sense of smell back?

We tend to think of our sense of smell as something universal – if it smells bad to me, it probably does to you but that is not the case for CrowdScience listener Annabel, who wonders why things other people love to sniff, she finds disgusting. Anand Jagatia investigates the science of smell, gets up close to the world’s smelliest plant and finds out if smell training can help those with long-term issues after Covid.


Contributors
Ellie Byondin, supervisor of the Princess of Wales Conservatory at London’s Kew Gardens
Thomas Hummel, University of Dresden
Carl Philpott, from the UK’s Norwich Medical School
Sissel Tolaas, artist and smell historian based in Berlin
Noam Sobel, Weizmann institute of science

Presented by Anand Jagatia and Produced by Marijke Peters for the BBC World Service


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcw4fv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zkhq7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcw85z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3hyw57)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zkmgc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcwcy3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt6)
Discovering my sister's inner world

A complicated sisterhood: growing up, Arifa Akbar and her older sister Fauzia had shared everything from a bedroom, to secrets, to favourite movies and books. They'd moved from Lahore, Pakistan to London for a better life but ended up destitute. The change took its toll on Fauzia who developed depression as a teenager. Complex feelings of jealousy and anger took over and the two became estranged. Then in 2016, when Fauzia was 45, she contracted a mysterious illness. The sisters reconciled at Fauzia's bedside before she passed away but Arifa wanted to know more about the sister she'd lost and the illness that had killed her. She tells Anu Anand about an extraordinary journey that began in North London and took her all the way to the Sistine chapel in Rome.

Arifa's memoir is called Consumed.

If you've been affected by any of the issues in this programme, you can find resources and help at www.bbc.co.uk/actionline

Get in touch outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Fauzia and Arifa Akbar in Lahore
Credit: Courtesy of Arifa Akbar


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcwhp7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3hz3nh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zkvym)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcwmfc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvmclqz)
Meeting to tackle Islamic State in Africa

Foreign ministers from the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS meet in Rome to discuss the growing threat of the Islamic State group in Africa. We ask where are the threats, and what can be done?

Also in the programme: why understanding that the COVID-19 virus is airborne is vital to stopping the highly transmissible Delta variant taking hold in Australia; and the Roman Catholic church in Poland receives hundreds more allegations of childhood sexual abuse by its clergy, some dating back many decades.


(Image: G20 Ministerial Meeting of the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS (Islamic State, IS) in Rome, Italy, 28 June 2021/ Credit: EPA / Giuseppe Lami)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcwr5h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zl3fw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y48025bfz9b)
Twitter India executive resigns

A senior executive at Twitter India resigned amid growing tensions with the government. Varsha Bansal is a technology journalist based in India's IT capital Bangalore, and explains the background to the dispute. Also in the programme, there has been a boom in the global market for DIY meal kits from restaurants and schemes such as Hello Fresh. But will the trend continue once the pandemic recedes? Arzoo Dina is a food and lifestyle journalist based in India who has been reviewing new food options at home. Myles Hopper is co-founder of delivery service Mindful Chef, and discusses the growth of his business. And Pete Butler, chief executive of Dishpatch, which came into being in March 2020 as a means of high end restaurants getting their food to locked down customers, says the pandemic was the catalyst for a whole new industry. The world's biggest cryptocurrency exchange, Binance, has been banned by the UK financial regulator. Adam Samson of the Financial Times explains the background. Plus, as the reality TV hit Love Island returns to UK screens, former contestant Rosie Williams discusses the evolving nature of reality shows.

(Picture: A Twitter logo on a tablet computer. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcwvxm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkvrhbvw2)
Miami building collapse: More than 150 missing

Rescue workers say they are searching "every bit of hope" for survivors under the rubble of a collapsed Florida apartment block. More than 150 people are still missing, with nine confirmed to have died in Thursday's disaster. We'll hear from those whose relatives are missing.

Russia is facing a sharp rise in coronavirus infections, and we have brought together people in the capital Moscow where they now have to have a proof of vaccination or negative coronavirus test to go to restaurants or cafes.

Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University is our medical expert today to help us answer listeners questions about the virus.

We'll speak a journalist in Poland about the data showing that the Roman Catholic Church received more than 360 reports of its clergy sexually abusing children, within the past three years.

(Photo: Leo Soto, 25, who lost his friend in the disaster, reacts as people hang up signs of missing residents from the partial collapse in Surfside where the rescue personnel continue their search for victims the day after, in Surfside near Miami Beach, Florida, U.S., June 25, 2021. Credit: Maria Alejandra Cardona /Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcwznr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkvrhbzm6)
Coronavirus conversations: New restrictions in Moscow

Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin has warned the Russian capital is facing an uphill struggle in its efforts to contain the Covid-19 epidemic. We've brought together three people to discuss the situation and new rules that has come into force today. Only people who can prove they have been vaccinated, recently tested or have antibodies can visit restaurants and bars.

Professor Manfred Green is a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel, and he will be joining us to discuss the latest news and research about the virus.

In the US, rescue workers say they are searching with "every bit of hope" for survivors under the rubble of a collapsed Florida apartment block. More than 150 people are still missing, with ten confirmed to have died in Thursday's disaster. We speak to a parish priest in the area.

(Photo: Russian people leave a vaccination point after receiving an injection of Russia"s Sputnik V (Gam-COVID-Vac) vaccine against COVID-19 at the vaccination point at the shopping center Solaris in Moscow, Russia, 25 June 2021. Credit YURI KOCHETKOV/EPA)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcx3dw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcx750)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3hzv48)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zllfd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ncv0c02zc)
2021/06/28 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcxbx4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zlq5j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2g90)
Tooth and claw: Bears

Teddy bears might be popular with children but real bears are anything but cuddly. Brown, Black and Grizzly bears are the most well-known and have a well-deserved fearsome reputation. But for most part, bear attacks are not nearly as common as you might think. They are solitary, curious and you are unlikely to see one unless you are really lucky – or unlucky depending on your point of view. So what should you do if you find yourself facing one in a forest? To learn more about these fascinating creatures, which can spend the winter months in a deep state of biological hibernation, professor Adam Hart speaks to Dr Clayton Lamb from the University of British Columbia in Canada and Dr Giulia Bombieri from the Science Museum in Trento, Italy, about their work and experiences of these amazing beasts, whose numbers are increasing in some parts of the world, leading to an increase of defensive attacks on people.

Producedr: Rami Tzabar and Beth Eastwood
Presenter: Professor Adam Hart.

Picture: Brown bear, Credit: Szabo Ervin-Edward/EyeEm/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcxgn8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvmdfyw)
Ethiopia's Tigray rebels take regional capital

Rebels in Ethiopia's Tigray province have entered the regional capital Mekelle after days of fierce fighting, reportedly driving out the administration installed by the federal government. Federal forces from Addis, which had been aided by Eritrean troops, have fled, along with members of the interim administration that had been running Tigray since last year.

Also in the programme: A Burmese American journalist describes his torture at the hands of Myanmar's military junta; and, the Tour de France spectator being hunted by the French police.

(Picture: Amhara region militiamen ride on their truck as they head to face the Tigray People"s Liberation Front in Sanja in May/ Credit:Tiksa Negeri Reuters)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcxldd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zlyns)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcxq4j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywpzcxb0ph)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sh1ncg2b4)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zm2dx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48thwy57pn)
Twitter India executive resigns

A senior executive at Twitter India resigned amid growing tensions with the government. Varsha Bansal is a technology journalist based in India's IT capital Bangalore, and explains the background to the dispute. Also in the programme, there has been a boom in the global market for DIY meal kits from restaurants and schemes such as Hello Fresh. But will the trend continue once the pandemic recedes? Arzoo Dina is a food and lifestyle journalist based in India who has been reviewing new food options at home. Myles Hopper is co-founder of delivery service Mindful Chef, and discusses the growth of his business. And Pete Butler, chief executive of Dishpatch, which came into being in March 2020 as a means of high end restaurants getting their food to locked down customers, says the pandemic was the catalyst for a whole new industry. The world's biggest cryptocurrency exchange, Binance, has been banned by the UK financial regulator. Adam Samson of the Financial Times explains the background. Plus, as the reality TV hit Love Island returns to UK screens, former contestant Rosie Williams discusses the evolving nature of reality shows.

(Picture: A Twitter logo on a tablet computer. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 29 JUNE 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcxyms)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqdn58v9yh)
Case to break up Facebook dismissed

A US judge dismisses a case against Facebook – effectively a win for Facebook, it means the government's attempts to rein in the power of Big Tech faces a setback. E-cigarette brand Juul is fined $40m and told it must stop advertising to adolescents – health expert Dr Nicola Gray tells us more. And we report from Vietnam where there is a surge in Covid cases, and the emergence of a possible Delta Plus coronavirus variant. Plus, the BBC’s Clare Williamson explores the after-effects of the boom in meal-kits delivered to peoples’ homes. We discuss all this with Lien Hoang, a reporter for Nikkei Asia, and from Washington DC by Peter Morici, professor emeritus at the Smith School at the University of Maryland.


(Image: Logo of Facebook displayed on a phone screen. Credit: Jakub Porzycki/ NurPhoto/ Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcy2cx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j0pc5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zmfn9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2g7r)
Guru

Guru: Who knew what and when?

For the last year, BBC journalist and passionate yoga teacher Ishleen Kaur has been investigating allegations of sexual and emotional abuse at the heart of an organisation she once called home.

Fellow practitioners share with her their stories of cruelty, rape and even the sexual assault of a child - but she wasn't prepared for what she uncovered next.

Join Ishleen on a deeply personal journey into the dark legacy which haunts Sivananda Yoga, one of the world’s most revered yoga schools.


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcy641)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcy9w5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j0xvf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zmp4k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td4)
Ai-Da: The world’s first AI robot artist

When the world’s first AI “robot artist” was announced in 2019, In the Studio was given exclusive access to the design and making of Ai-Da, a humanoid robot capable of drawing people from real life, and named after Ada Lovelace, the first female computer programmer in the world.

As an exhibit of Ai-Da’s artwork is shown at the UK’s Design Museum, and she takes up her first artist residency, we hear how the team used AI processes and algorithms, cameras in her eyes and a pen in her robotic hand, to allow Ai-Da to draw from sight.

Karl Bos talks to the creative visionary behind the project, gallery director Aidan Meller, along with the young engineers tasked with making her drawing arm and the team producing her head, face and body.

Presenter and producer: Karl Bos
Executive producer: Ella-mai Robey


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcyfm9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0ntchn1)
Ethiopian government declares Tigray truce

The move comes as the regional capital, Mekelle, is claimed by Tigrayan forces - with reports of celebrations in the streets.

Lack of vaccines and lack of trust in vaccines: two challenges to beating Covid-19 in Africa. We get the thoughts of former Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.

And President Biden has promised to look carefully at the profits of the giant tech companies - so how has Facebook just topped a trillion dollars in stock market value?


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcykcf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0ntcmd5)
Tigrayan forces capture regional capital, Mekelle

We hear from an advisor to the Tigrayan TPLF on the government's decision to call a ceasefire on humanitarian grounds.

After the two countries normalised relations last year, Israel's new foreign minister visits the United Arab Emirates - the first known visit by a top Israeli diplomat there.

And how genetically modified cancer-killing cells can destroy malignant tumours: the lead author of the study explains the breakthrough.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcyp3k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0ntcr49)
Ethiopian government declares a truce in Tigray

Tigray leadership calls for international aid as Ethiopian troops pull out of regional capital.

The World Wildlife Fund says that European Union funding -- set aside to make our air cleaner -- is going into the wrong hands.

And yesterday was declared 'one of the most thrilling days ever' in tournament football as 14 goals are scored in just two games in the Euros.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcysvp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl0)
The career where it helps to have a criminal past

Former criminals are being employed to run part of the probation system in one of America’s deeply troubled, gang-ridden communities. It’s a bold new approach to crime prevention, and it seems to be working - young lives are being transformed and reconviction rates are dropping.

Produced and presented by Jo Mathys


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zn542)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jfx)
Menopause - the last workplace taboo?

Women across the globe are leaving their jobs and sometimes careers because they are unsupported at work when they go through the menopause. But could mandated menopause leave re-dress the balance?

Ivana Davidovic speaks with Lauren Chiren, who abandoned her high-flying career in finance because her menopause symptoms were so bad she thought she had early onset dementia. Karen Arthur, who also left her job as a teacher due to menopause and now hosts the Menopause While Black podcast, says that women of colour are particularly worried about being sidelined at work.

British MP Carolyn Harris discusses her "menopause revolution", while Emily Mutua, an HR executive from Nairobi, says that menopause conversations in Kenyan workplaces are almost non-existent. Plus Tanuj Kapilashrami from Standard Chartered explains what the big multinational bank has in store to support its staff, and Australian professor Marian Baird asks whether some of the menstrual and menopause policies could actually increase discrimination.

(Picture: Co-workers having a meeting in the lobby; Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5h)
The Syrian playwright who challenged the regime

An experimental play staged in Damascus in 1971 undermined official Syrian propaganda. Simply by stating that the Arab nations had been defeated by Israel during the Six Day War its author, Sadallah Wannous, identified himself as an opposition figure. Zak Brophy spoke to his widow, Faizah Shawish, about the play and its place in Syrian theatre.

Photo: Sadallah Wannous with his parents and daughter in 1988. With the permission of the Wannous family.


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcyxlt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g7r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zn8w6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2g90)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcz1by)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcz532)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j1s2b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74znjcg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfcz8v6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwg)
Life as the UK's first black TV reporter

Sir Trevor McDonald grew up in Trinidad, but when he got a job with the BBC World Service, he moved to the UK. He went on to become the first black television reporter and one of the country's most prominent presenters. Over the course of his career, he's interviewed Saddam Hussein, Colonel Gaddafi and even danced on screen with Desmond Tutu. He’s written a book about his life called An Improbable Life: The Autobiography. This interview was first broadcast on 7 Nov 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Trevor McDonald in 1973
Credit: Keystone/Getty Images


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfczdlb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j20kl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74znrvq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2g90)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfczjbg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvmghn2)
Ethiopia rebels seize Tigray region capital

Rebels in Ethiopia's Tigray region say they have taken control of the regional capital, Mekelle. The Ethiopian government, which took Mekelle in November after Tigrayan rebels rejected political reforms and captured army bases, has now called a unilateral ceasefire.

Also in the programme: France expected to give lesbian couples and single women access to IVF and we hear from a reporter from a now-defunct pro-democracy newspaper in Hong Kong.

(Picture: More than five million people are in urgent need of food aid in the region, according to the UN. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfczn2l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zp0bz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bgdc4lsh9)
Nigeria food prices soar

Whilst overall inflation in Nigeria is running at 18%, food prices are rising even faster. Matty Ukhuegbe Osaro runs The Fish Lady restaurant in Lagos, and discusses the impact on her business. And Bismarck Rewane, chief executive of Financial Derivatives Company, assesses the health of the Nigerian economy. Also in the programme, women across the globe are leaving their jobs and sometimes careers because they are unsupported at work when they go through the menopause. The BBC's Ivana Davidovic asks whether mandated menopause leave might redress the balance. Entrepreneur Elon Musk is set to outline the rollout of his Starlink internet via satellite scheme to the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. We get analysis from the BBC's technology correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones. Plus, we examine the future of the office in a post-pandemic world, with Liviu Tudor, president of the European Property Federation.

(Picture: A food market in Lagos, Nigeria. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfczrtq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkvrhfrs5)
Jacob Zuma sentenced to 15 months in prison

South Africa's former President Jacob Zuma has been sentenced to 15 months in jail after the Constitutional Court found him guilty of defying its order to appear at an inquiry into corruption while he was president. We'll have more details from our correspondent in Johannesburg.

We'll also get an update from Ethiopia where rebels in the Tigray region have captured the regional capital from the government forces.

Our medical expert Dr Isaac Bogoch joins us from Toronto to explain some of today’s coronavirus stories.

We'll speak to French lesbian and single women who are celebrating a milestone when parliament passes a bill giving them access to fertility treatment for the first time.

And we play messages from football fans who are going to watch the eagerly anticipated EURO 2020 clash between old rivals England and Germany.

(Photo: Former South African President Jacob Zuma sits in the dock after recess in his corruption trial in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, May 26, 2021 Credit: Phill Magakoe/Pool via REUTERS/File Photo)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfczwkv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkvrhfwj9)
OS conversations: France to give lesbians and single women IVF rights

Lesbian couples and single women in France are set to celebrate a milestone when parliament passes a bill giving them access to government funded fertility treatment for the first time. We'll hear from women who have been affected by the current law that has only allowed heterosexual couples the right to access IVF.

We’ll also go to Miami to get the latest on the rescue operation in the collapsed apartment building.

Dr Swapneil Parikh, an infectious disease researcher in Mumbai India will answer audience questions about Covid-19.

In football, the eagerly anticipated EURO 2020 clash between old rivals England and Germany is underway, and we'll hear from fans who have just finished watching the first half of the game.

(Photo: Computer artwork of cells during in vitro fertilization (IVF). Credit: Science Photo Library)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd009z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd0423)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j2r1c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zphbh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ncv0c2zwg)
2021/06/29 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd07t7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g7r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zpm2m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls6)
YouTube’s rules silencing human rights activists

Why did YouTube take down video testimonies from family members of people imprisoned in China’s internment camps? To ensure the credibility of these videos, people show proof of identity. Now, YouTube says it has concerns that these people may be harassed. Eileen Guo, who reported the story for MIT Tech Review is on the show.

Matter connecting our devices
With so many smart devices in the home its incredibly frustrating that setting them up and connecting them to your house is so complicated. Now a new standard has been agreed. It’s called ‘Matter’ and the first Matter certified products are to be released at the end of this year. Tech journalist and IoT expert Stacey Higginbotham explains why this new standard will make smart devices much easier to use and much more secure.

Sonic the Hedgehog is 30!
The cute blue spikey hedgehog Sonic has been on our screens for 30 years. Digital Planet’s gaming reporter Chris Berrow has been finding out about the tech that made his design possible.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson


Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz

(Image: Getty Images)


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd0ckc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvmhbvz)
Tigrayan fighters gain ground

Tigrayan fighters in northern Ethiopia are continuing to gain ground after seizing the regional capital Mekelle on Monday. United Nations officials say the rebels have entered the town of Shire. It was earlier abandoned by Eritrean troops who've been supporting Ethiopian federal forces in the eight-month conflict.

Also in the programme: Former South African president Jacob Zuma sentenced to 15 years in jail; and Frankie Vallie releases a jazz album aged 87.

(Picture: Ethiopian refugees fleeing from the fighting in Tigray region, wait for food at the Um Rakoba camp, on the Sudan-Ethiopia border 07/05/2021. Credit: Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah /Reuters)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd0h9h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pl0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zpvkw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd0m1m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywpzcxdxll)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sh1ncjz77)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zpzb0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48thwy84lr)
Nigeria food prices soar

Whilst overall inflation in Nigeria is running at 18%, food prices are rising even faster. Matty Ukhuegbe Osaro runs The Fish Lady restaurant in Lagos, and discusses the impact on her business. And Bismarck Rewane, chief executive of Financial Derivatives Company, assesses the health of the Nigerian economy. Also in the programme, women across the globe are leaving their jobs and sometimes careers because they are unsupported at work when they go through the menopause. The BBC's Ivana Davidovic asks whether mandated menopause leave might redress the balance. Entrepreneur Elon Musk is set to outline the rollout of his Starlink internet via satellite scheme to the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. We get analysis from the BBC's technology correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones. Plus, we examine the future of the office in a post-pandemic world, with Liviu Tudor, president of the European Property Federation.

(Picture: A food market in Lagos, Nigeria. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 30 JUNE 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd0vjw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqdn58y6vl)
United Airlines' biggest ever order

United Airlines makes its biggest ever order of aircraft in a bet on a post pandemic travel renaissance; the BBC’s Theo Leggett gives us the full details and how safe the bet might be. As many people abandon the office for working from home, property companies say they need to lure us back to the office by making us want to go back - Liviu Tudor is the President of the European Property Federation and tells us how he plans on making office spaces more alluring. As some companies introduce leave from work for women in menopause, the BBC’s Ivana Davidovic speaks to women about why it’s so hard to talk about menopause in a corporate landscape. Plus, cheap pork has flooded the market as China’s pigs recover from the African Swine Flu – Kirk Maltais from the Wall Street Journal explains how the oversupply of pork has forced US producers to cut their prices to very low levels. We discuss all this with guests Shuli Ren, Bloomberg Opinion columnist in Hong Kong, and Tony Nash, chief Economist at Complete Intelligence in Houston, Texas.

(Image: Boeing 787 Dreamliner from United Airlines. Credit: Massimo Insabato/ Archivio Massimo Insabato/ Mondadori Portfolio / Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd0z90)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j3l88)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zqbkd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2g7m)
The Golden Age Of Gold

Gold: Its role around the globe

Jewellery designer Rajvi Vora discovers more about the precious metal that has had such an impact on her life, and the world. Rajvi is learning about gold’s current role across the globe and hoping to understand the many faces of it. From where it starts life in the goldmines of Colombia - hidden in lush forests that serve their communities, to Ghana where illegal goldmines are killing crops and livelihoods. She also speaks to celebrity jewellers making extravagant creations for the rich and famous in LA, and dip down into Dubai’s gold vaults where gold is stashed away as a safe haven investment.

(Photo: 818 Vault, Dubai. Credit: Vikram Jethwani)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd1314)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd16s8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j3trj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zql1n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6m)
Sizwe Ndlovu

Sizwe Ndlovu became the first black African to win an Olympic rowing gold, as part of the South Africa's lightweight coxless four in 2012. He describes that day as changing the rest of his life.

Sizwe tells us about the challenges of growing up in a township, and how the end of apartheid and the sport of rowing helped him carve out a life he couldn't even have imagined possible as a child.

A remarkable and inspirational story of achievement and perseverance, his victory became a symbol of hope for the post-apartheid South Africa.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd1bjd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0ntgdk4)
Dozens dead amid Canada's historic heatwave

Canada's burning temperatures continue to set records and start to kill people - dozens of them.

Street celebrations in Ethiopia's Tigray region after rebels recapture their stronghold and make further advances.

The army is on the streets of Bangladesh to enforce the latest covid lockdown.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd1g8j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0ntgj98)
Hot Canada: unprecedented heatwave smashes temperature records

Dozens dead in a record shattering heatwave in Canada as highs hit almost fifty degrees while in Italy farm workers have been stopped from working in the heat of the day after the tragic death of a fruit-picker.

In Ethiopia celebrations in the streets of Mekelle, the capital of Tigray, after rebel forces recapture it from Ethiopia's army.

A stark warning from the UN after Covid 19 pandemic devastates the tourism industry at a cost to the global economy of trillions of dollars with lower income countries hit the hardest.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd1l0n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0ntgn1d)
UN counts economic consequences of Covid-19

The world economy has been battered by the Covid-19 pandemic - estimated so far to have been reduced by $2.4 trillion dollars.

European citizens face a deadline as they apply for settled status in the UK - one of the consequences for Britain leaving the EU - and many claim they are being left in limbo by the UK government.

In the former British colony of Hong Kong people consider the changes in the Chinese territory one year on from the national security law being imposed.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd1prs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbd)
Victor Gao: 100 years of the Chinese Communist Party

As the Chinese Communist Party marks its 100th anniversary, Stephen Sackur speaks to veteran party loyalist Victor Gao, vice president of the Centre for China and Globalization in Beijing. The party has engineered a remarkable transformation that’s made China a global superpower, but is the level of internal control and repression sustainable?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zr215)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnp)
How would we trade with aliens?

A US government report on UFOs has said there was no clear explanation for the unidentified aircraft, but did not rule out extra-terrestrial origin. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been invested into searching for signs of alien intelligence. Ed Butler speaks to Lisa Kaltenegger, an astronomer at Cornell University, who has analysed the closest, most likely planets to support alien life. If, or when, we do make contact what could we trade with our new neighbours? David Brin, a science fiction writer and astro-physicist says our culture would be the most easily exchanged aspect of our civilisation. And what about making money on Earth from the continued interest in aliens? Juanita Jennings is the public affairs director for the town of Roswell, New Mexico. The site of the most famous UFO sighting.

(Picture: a UFO over the Mojave desert, USA. Credit: Getty Images.)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7r)
The world's first offshore wind farm

Witness History talks to Danish inventor and wind energy pioneer, Henrik Stiesdal, who oversaw the construction of the world's first offshore wind farm back in 1991. Built off the coast of Denmark, it became a reference for offshore wind farms around the world, continuing to generate electricity until 2017. Louise Hidalgo asks Henrik Stiesdal about his work, which has helped to make Denmark a world leader in wind energy, and about building his first wind turbine at the age of 19.

Picture: A wind farm off the coast of Denmark (credit: Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd1thx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2g7m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zr5s9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd1y81)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g95)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd2205)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j4nzf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zrf8k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd25r9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyq)
Making friends with the man who stole my paintings

In 2015, Czech artist Barbora Kysilkova had two of her paintings stolen from a gallery in the Norwegian capital Oslo. Months later, a surprising encounter with one of the thieves in the courtroom led to an enduring friendship between the painter and the thief. As their friendship evolved, Karl-Bertil Nordland became not just Barbora’s friend, but also her muse. And as Karl-Bertil overcame his drug addiction, Barbora went on a quest to try to find out what had happened to her missing paintings.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Barbora and Karl hugging in front of her painting of Karl
Credit: Medieoperatørene, photographer: Kristoffer Kumar


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd29hf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j4xgp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zrnrt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd2f7k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvmkdk5)
Anniversary of Hong Kong's new security measures

Today is the first anniversary of the national security law imposed on Hong by Beijing; many feel they don't recognise their city anymore. We hear from both sides of the debate.

Also on the programme, we go to Sudan where there are anxieties that the democratic transition may not last; and we hear about the record breaking heatwave in Western Canada that has caused dozens of deaths.

(Photo: China flag is displayed on the side of a building on the Kowloon Peninsula in Hong Kong; Credit:EPA/JEROME FAVRE)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd2jzp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zrx82)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cpkg1qn1b)
Lack of tourism could cost $4tn

The UN has warned the pandemic's impact on the tourism industry could cost up to $4tn. We get the perspective of Simon Pestridge of Desa Potato Head, which runs a hotel and beach club in Bali, and further analysis from Zoritsa Urosevic of the UN's World Tourism Organisation. Also in the programme, the BBC's Deborah Weitzmann reports on the environmental impact of washing clothes, and finds out how to keep it to a minimum. Plus, a prototype flying car, called AirCar, has completed a 35-minute flight between two airports in Slovakia. Anton Zajac is co-founder of Klein Vision, which is behind the venture, and tells us more about the project.

(Picture: Empty sun loungers on a beach in Crete. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd2nqt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkvrhjnp8)
Dozens of deaths in Canada heatwave

Dozens of people have died in the record-breaking heatwave, and we speak to local people in the US and Canada about how they are coping with the hot weather. We'll also explain how extreme heat overwhelms your body and becomes deadly.

We continue to bring together people to share experiences of the pandemic. Today two members of the same family in Israel discuss the government’s decision to reimpose its indoor mask mandate just days after lifting it, following a rise in Covid cases.

We’ll also speak to our regular health expert Dr Maria Sundaram about today’s other coronavirus stories.

And we hear about an investigation that helped to expose sexual abuse at the heart of one of the world’s biggest international yoga organisations.

(Photo: A view of the city after the scorching weather triggered an Air Quality Advisory in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada June 28, 2021. Credit: /Jennifer Gauthier/Reuters)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd2sgy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkvrhjsfd)
Coronavirus conversations: Israel's indoor mask mandate

Just days after lifting it, Israel has reimposed indoor mask mandate because of a rise in cases caused by the Delta variant. We have been talking to two members of a family who don’t quite agree about whether the decision is the right one or not.

Dozens of people have died in the record-breaking heatwave in the US Pacific north-west and Canada. We'll explore how extreme heat can affect the body and also hear how people are coping in temperatures that have soared close to 50C.

We'll go to Miami to get the latest on the apartment block collapse.

We'll also hear why some black Tik Tok users are striking because of what they're calling dance appropriation.

(Photo: Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett smiles as he adjusts his protective mask during his visit to a Maccabi healthcare maintenance organisation (HMO) outlet which offers vaccinations against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Holon, near Tel Aviv, Israel June 29, 2021. Creadit: Amir Cohen/Reuters)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd2x72)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd30z6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j5myg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zsd7l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ncv0c5wsk)
2021/06/30 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd34qb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2g7m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zshzq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvf)
Mixing Covid vaccines

New evidence on whether mixing Covid vaccines and spreading doses out gives better results.

Plus, has five years of food labels in Chile warning of high fat, sugar or salt made a difference to obesity levels? Jane Chambers reports.

And what gives some people a sense of entitlement? Emily Zitek, Associate Professor of Organisational Behaviour at Cornell University explains her new research.

Claudia's studio guest is James Gallagher, BBC Health and Science Correspondent.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Three vials with different vaccines against Covid-19 by (L-R) Moderna, AstraZeneca and Pfizer-BioNTech. Photo credit: Thomas Kienzle/AFP/ Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd38gg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvml7s2)
President Biden calls for renewed action against wildfires

The move comes as the American Northwest and Canada suffer from an historic heatwave. President Biden says the threat of wildfires in western states is as severe as it's ever been and instead of being seasonal it's now a year-round problem.

Also on the programme: Sudan, two years on from the revolution; and why Wimbledon's grass courts seem more slippery this year

(Picture:A man cools off at a misting station during the scorching weather of a heatwave in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada June 27, 2021. Credit: Jennifer Gauthier/REUTERS)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd3d6l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zsrgz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd3hyq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywpzcxhthp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sh1ncmw4b)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zsw73)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48thwyc1hv)
Lack of tourism could cost $4tn

The UN has warned the pandemic's impact on the tourism industry could cost up to $4tn. We get the perspective of Simon Pestridge of Desa Potato Head, which runs a hotel and beach club in Bali, and further analysis from Zoritsa Urosevic of the UN's World Tourism Organisation. Also in the programme, the BBC's Deborah Weitzmann reports on the environmental impact of washing clothes, and finds out how to keep it to a minimum. Plus, a prototype flying car, called AirCar, has completed a 35-minute flight between two airports in Slovakia. Anton Zajac is co-founder of Klein Vision, which is behind the venture, and tells us more about the project.

(Picture: Empty sun loungers on a beach in Crete. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 01 JULY 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd3rfz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqdn5913rp)
China’s Communist Party turns 100

As China celebrates 100 years of its ruling communist party, we hear why it's not been the smoothest of roads - but the world's second largest economy is looking increasingly powerful. Meanwhile, Hong Kong reflects on a year of the new security law imposed by Beijing. Plus, the boss of a flying car company will tell us about their successful test flight. But will such vehicles really be coming to the roads and skies near you? Plus, how often do you wash your clothes? The BBC’s Deborah Weitzmann has been taking a look at some of the companies around the world putting a sustainable spin on our laundry. We discuss all this with Rachel Cartland, author, writer and expert on Hong Kong and Erin Delmore, a political reporter based in New York City.

(Image: People stand next to a display commemorating the 100th anniversary of the foundation of the Communist Party. Credit: Hector RETAMAL / AFP)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd3w63)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j6h5c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zt7gh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxh)
The runaway maids of Oman

Two hundred young women from Sierra Leone, west Africa, have been trapped in the Arabian sultanate of Oman, desperate to get home. Promised work in shops and restaurants, they say they were tricked into becoming housemaids, working up to 18 hours a day, often without pay, and sometimes abused by their employers. Some ran away, to live a dangerous underground existence at the mercy of the authorities – but now they are being rescued and repatriated, and some are empowering themselves as independent farmers back home. Tim Whewell tells their story.

(Photo: Sierra Leonean women hoping for repatriation after leaving their employers in Oman. Credit: Do Bold)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd3zy7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd43pc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j6qnm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74ztgyr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rft)
The endurance diet

When you’re competing in a round-the-world race and you have to take all your food with you, what do you bring and how do you cook it?

If you’re scrambling up and down mountains for days on end, or swimming across an entire ocean, how do you find the time to eat, and what can you stomach?

Tamasin Ford speaks to three extreme endurance athletes about the planning, practicalities and monotony of these gruelling events. Is food simply fuel, or can it power competitors in other ways?

Producer: Simon Tulett

Contributors:

Dee Caffari;
Billy White;
Benoit Lecomte

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: A runner in the 2019 Marathon des Sables race. Credit: Erik Sampers/Gamma-Rapho/Getty/ BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd47fh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0ntk9g7)
Bill Cosby's conviction for sexual assault overturned

The American star Bill Cosby has been released from prison after his conviction for sexual assault was overturned.
The Chinese Communist Party is celebrating its 100th birthday.
In Bangladesh a national covid lockdown has started, enforced by the army.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd4c5m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0ntkf6c)
President Xi Jinping marks 100 years of the Chinese Communist Party

The Chinese communist party is celebrating its 100th anniversary and its rigid leadership of a country now positioned as a global super power.

Some 182 unmarked graves have been uncovered in a third Canadian indigenous residential school - found on the eve of the official National Day holiday.

Economists often point to gender disparities as a major brake on development - today a host of world leaders are gathering in Paris to tackle this problem with a $40 billion investment.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd4gxr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0ntkjyh)
China's ruling Communist Party celebrates its 100th birthday

The Chinese communist party has been on a 100 year path to domination of China, today it marks its centenary with lavish celebrations across the country.
How North Korea is handling the coronavirus pandemic after their leader Kim Jong-un publicly spoke of a 'grave' incident.
And on what would have been Princess Diana's 60th birthday, both her sons - Prince William and Prince Harry - unveil a new tribute to her in London.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd4lnw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z24)
Can we make the super-rich pay more tax?

Rich people are often able to pay little or no tax compared to their wealth because of the way the system works. In recent years, many have called for changes and reforms so that instead of income, wealth is also taxed.

But, wealth taxes are not a new thing. Many argue that they are key for addressing inequality but some say they simply aren’t an effective way of gaining revenue.

Charmaine Cozier asks can we make the super-rich pay more tax?

Producer: Olivia Noon
Researcher: Bethan Head


(Activists March In Manhattan NY, calling for a tax on Billionaires. Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images).


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74ztyy8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9d)
The rise and rise of plant milk

There's a bewildering world of milk alternatives. From oats, to tiger nuts, the list of varieties keeps growing but not everyone’s delighted about the march of plant based drinks. Some dairy farmers worry that the rural economy is at risk and just don’t get the hype. Elizabeth Hotson talks to plant-based pioneers, Camilla Barnard, co-founder of Rude Health and Alpro's General Manager Sue Garfitt. We also hear from ex-beef and dairy farmer Jay Wilde who now produces oat milk at his farm in Derbyshire in the north of England. And Carrie Mess, a Wisconsin dairy farmer and speaker on agriculture puts forward the case for cows' milk, whilst Deborah Valenze, author of Milk: a Local and Global History tells us the story behind milk consumption.

Presenter: Elizabeth Hotson
Producer: Sarah Treanor

(Photo of various kinds of plant milk. Photo Credit: Getty Images).


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x37)
The Chinese Communist Party

A small group of revolutionaries formed the Chinese Communist Party in July 1921. Led by Chairman Mao, they fought their way to power in the world's most populous nation and have stayed in control since the end of China's civil war in 1949. Zhu Zhende was a young recruit in the People's Liberation Army who marched in front of Chairman Mao at celebrations in Beijing when the communists took power. He spoke to Yashan Zhao about the optimism and excitement of that time, and about how the Communist Party changed his life.

The programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: a communist statue in Tiananmen Square, Beijing. Credit: BBC.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd4qf0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zv2pd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd4v54)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rlb)
Tracing the roots of ancient trees

Have you ever sat against the trunk of a large old tree, looked up into its canopy and wondered what it’s seen in its lifetime? There are many species of tree that survive well beyond a human lifespan, for hundreds of years, and some that can live far longer than that, spanning millennia. What can we learn from large old trees around the world? How do they influence the environment? And how can we preserve them for future generations?

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss ancient trees are Peter Crane, former director of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew in London; Valerie Trouet, Professor at the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at the University of Arizona in the US; and conservation biologist, Michael Gaige.

Produced by Jo Impey for BBC World Service

Image: A Bristlecone Pine, one of the oldest living organisms on earth

Image credit: Piriya Photography / Getty Images


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8c)
France’s Euro 2000 Triumph

In July 2000, France became only second team to hold the World Cup and European Championship titles at the same time. Already the reigning World Champions, a French side featuring all-time greats such as Zinedine Zidane and Didier Deschamps struggled to break down their Italian opponents. But everything changed in the final moments of a dramatic final, as midfielder Robert Pires tells Steve Hankey. The programme is a Whistledown Production.


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd4yx8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j7kwj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zvb5n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rft)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd52nd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k37)
The siege and the cat that saved my life

Aged 16 Amra Sabic El-Rayess was a grade-A student with a bright future ahead but then one day when she got to school almost all her ethnic Serb classmates were gone.

This was Bihać in Bosnia Herzegovina in June 1992 and the city was soon surrounded by ethnic Serb forces. The remaining mainly Bosnian Muslims, which included Amra and her family, would face a three-year siege. But amidst the death and destruction Amra found a lucky charm, a 'refugee' cat called Maci who adopted her and who she credits with saving her life.

Professor Amra Sabic El-Rayess now lives in the US and has written a book about her life called The Cat I Never Named.

Irma Thomas is known as the ‘Soul Queen of New Orleans.’ She celebrated her 80th birthday earlier this year and the multi Grammy award winner spoke to Outlook's Emily Webb about her extraordinary life and music career. This interview was first broadcast in 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Composite image with Amra Sabic El Rayess
Credit: Courtesy of Amra Sabic El Rayess + Gian Luca Salis / EyeEm via Getty Images


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd56dj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j7tcs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zvknx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd5b4n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvmn9g8)
China: Communist Party celebrates 100th birthday

Xi-Jinping delivers a defiant speech warning foreign powers not to influence or bully China, saying those that try will "get their heads bashed". Speaking at an event marking the centenary of the CCP, he also said China would not allow "sanctimonious preaching" - remarks widely seen as directed at the United States.

Also in the programme: Indonesia announces a Covid lockdown on its main island, Java, and the tourist destination, Bali; and the Trump organisation's chief financial officer hands himself in to the authorities as part of a criminal investigation into the former president's company.

Photo: Celebrations in Beijing marking the Chinese Communist Party's 100th birthday. Credit: Getty Images.


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd5fws)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z24)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zvt55)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y497787rmnk)
Nissan announces major UK electric car expansion

Car maker Nissan has announced plans for a $1.4bn investment in the northeast of England. The new plant will produce electric car batteries and a new car model, and the BBC's Theo Leggett tells us how electric vehicle production is shaping up across Europe. Also in the programme, satellite broadband provider OneWeb has now launched enough satellites to start a commercial service. The company faces stiff competition from the likes of Elon Musk's Starlink and Amazon's Kuiper, and Neil Masterson, chief executive of OneWeb, talks us through his ambitions for the company. Plus, the entire western region of the United States has been experiencing an abnormally hot early summer. Christine Gemperle farms 135 acres of almonds in California, and discusses the impact on her business. And Jeanine Jones, interstate resources manager at California's Department of Water Resources, explains the impact of water shortages on the state's dams, which provide electricity.

(Picture: UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson in a Nissan. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd5kmx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkvrhmklc)
Trump organization indicted in tax probe

We start in the US where former US President Donald Trump's company and its finance chief, Allen Weisselberg, have been indicted in an investigation into alleged tax crimes. Our reporter has the latest.

The heatwave in Canada has started to ease, but a wildfire has forced an evacuation of the village of Lytton. We’ll hear more accounts of how people are coping.

And we continue our coronavirus conversations. Today, we bring together two Italians who discuss the new rules around mask-wearing in their country, after the health ministry lifted the mandatory wearing of masks outdoors in 20 low risk regions.

(Photo: Trump Organization chief financial officer Allen Weisselberg in the background and former President Trump. May 2016. Credit: Reuters/Carlo Allegri/File Photo)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd5pd1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkvrhmpbh)
Coronavirus conversations: Italy relaxes mask-wearing rules

We head to Italy to continue our coronavirus conversations and hear from two Italians who discuss the new rules around mask-wearing in their country. For the first time since the beginning of the pandemic, the health ministry has lifted the mandatory wearing of masks outdoors in 20 low risk regions.

Also, we go to Canada where a wildfire has forced an evacuation of the village of Lytton. We’ll get more accounts of how people are coping.

And our regular medical expert, Dr Helena Wimalarathna, joins us to look at today’s coronavirus stories and answer audience questions about the virus.


(Photo: Spectators wear protective face masks prior to the 13th stage of the 2021 Giro d"Italia cycling race over 198km from Ravenna to Verona, Italy, 21 May 2021. Credit : EPA/LUCA ZENNARO)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd5t45)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd5xw9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j8jvk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zw94p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ncv0c8spn)
2021/07/01 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd61mf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zwdwt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3v)
Insects in incredible detail

The Natural History Museum in London holds a massive collection of insects. It asked researchers at the Diamond light source, a facility near Oxford, to develop a high throughput X-ray microscope to take 3D scans of them all. Roland Pease has been to see the new technology in action.

Many people seeking compensation for the impacts of climate change are turning to the law courts. Successes so far have been few. Oxford University’s Friederike Otto, who specialises in connecting weather extremes to the greenhouse effect, has just published a paper looking at the challenge in bringing successful climate lawsuits.

Spacecraft will be returning to Venus in the next decade with the recent approval of two NASA missions to the planet, and one from the European Space Agency, ESA. Philippa Mason of Imperial College is a planetary geologist on that mission, Envision. She plans to use radar to peer through that dense and interesting atmosphere to follow up evidence of volcanic activity and tectonics on the surface beneath.

A few years ago synthetic biologist Jim Collins of Harvard found a way to spill the contents of biological cells onto … basically … blotting paper, in a way that meant by just adding water, all the biochemical circuitry could be brought back to life. With a bit of genetic engineering, it could be turned into a sensor to detect Ebola and Nipah viruses. His team have kept developing the idea, and this week they report success in a smart face mask that can detect SARS-CoV-2 in your breath.

(Image: Hairy Fungus Beetle - Prepared by Malte Storm. Credit: Diamond light Source Ltd)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd65ck)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvmp4p5)
Ethiopia: US pressing UN Security Council to discuss Tigray crisis

The aid group, the International Rescue Committee, says a key bridge in Ethiopia's Tigray region has been destroyed, further hampering efforts to deliver assistance to hundreds of thousands of desperate people. We have an interview with the US ambassador to the United Nations, Linda Thomas-Greenfield, who is pressing for the Security Council to urgently discuss the crisis in open session.

The Turkish president has defended his decision to withdraw from an international treaty to combat violence against women.

And the mayor of Lytton in Canada on seeing his town destroyed.

(Photo: More than five million people are in urgent need of food aid in the region, according to the UN. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd693p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z24)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zwnd2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rft)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd6dvt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywpzcxlqds)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sh1ncqs1f)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zws46)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48thwyfydy)
Nissan announces major UK electric car expansion

Car maker Nissan has announced plans for a $1.4bn investment in the northeast of England. The new plant will produce electric car batteries and a new car model, and the BBC's Theo Leggett tells us how electric vehicle production is shaping up across Europe. Also in the programme, satellite broadband provider OneWeb has now launched enough satellites to start a commercial service. The company faces stiff competition from the likes of Elon Musk's Starlink and Amazon's Kuiper, and Neil Masterson, chief executive of OneWeb, talks us through his ambitions for the company. Plus, the entire western region of the United States has been experiencing an abnormally hot early summer. Christine Gemperle farms 135 acres of almonds in California, and discusses the impact on her business. And Jeanine Jones, interstate resources manager at California's Department of Water Resources, explains the impact of water shortages on the state's dams, which provide electricity.

(Picture: UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson in a Nissan. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 02 JULY 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd6nc2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqdn5940ns)
Historic tax deal announced

Officials from 130 countries have agreed to overhaul the global tax system to ensure big companies "pay a fair share" wherever they operate.The OECD said on Thursday that negotiators had backed a proposed minimum corporate tax rate of at least 15%. US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said: "Today is an historic day for economic diplomacy." Alex Cobham of the advocacy group Tax Justice Network tells the BBC's Fergus Nicoll he welcomes the news, but says the deal could have gone further. Also in the programme, former US President Donald Trump's company and its finance chief have been charged with tax-related crimes. Allen Weisselberg, 73, turned himself in to New York authorities on Thursday, where he was later charged with avoiding taxes on $1.7m worth of income. The BBC's Samira explains what we know of the indictment. Satellite broadband provider OneWeb has now launched enough satellites to start a commercial service. The company faces stiff competition from the likes of Elon Musk's Starlink and Amazon's Kuiper, and Neil Masterson, chief executive of OneWeb, talks us through his ambitions for the company. Plus, the entire western region of the United States has been experiencing an abnormally hot early summer. Christine Gemperle farms 135 acres of almonds in California, and discusses the impact on her business. And Jeanine Jones, interstate resources manager at California's Department of Water Resources, explains the impact of water shortages on the state's dams, which provide electricity.

All through the show we'll be joined by Hayley Woodin of BIV News in Vancouver, Nicole Childers with Marketplace in Los Angeles, and Liv Casben with the Australian Associated Press in Sydney.

(Picture: US Treasury Secretary, Janet Yellen. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd6s36)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j9d2g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zx4cl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tz6)
Euro 2020: Shocks, thrillers and own goals

Hungary coach Marco Rossi tells us why selfishness and a lack of unity cost France, Portugal and Germany their places at Euro 2020. Former Czech Republic captain Václav Němeček looks ahead to the quarter-finals. And the former coach of Denmark Åge Hareide explains why the Danish players have such strong bonds.

Picture: France's forward Kylian Mbappe reacts after a missed chance against Switzerland (MARKO DJURICA/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd6wvb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x37)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd70lg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3j9mkq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zxcvv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2ghx)
Sex, Christianity and purity

Where does God fit into your sex life? Decades after signing up to remain ‘pure’ until marriage, many Evangelical Christian Millennials are still confused by that question – and some are turning to counselling for help. In the 1990s a sexual abstinence movement became popular in the US and eventually spread to the UK. This ‘purity culture’ recruited young people to wait until marriage before having sex, and wear a silver ring to advertise their pledge. But what effect did it have on the thousands of teenagers who took part.

Journalist Harriet Bradshaw went to a Christian evangelical/Pentecostal youth church as a teenager, and has been fascinated with the movement ever since. She revisits her own past, and hears from others who signed up to find out what their lives are like now.


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd74bl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0ntn6cb)
Survivors can be found in Miami rubble, says Biden

US President Joe Biden has been meeting families of people who died or are missing after the collapse of an apartment block last week.

The billionaires' commercial Space race is heating up. Richard Branson has announced he will head to space in just over a week - just before his rival Jeff Bezos.

And we hear about the mangrove forests protecting livelihoods and the environment on the Kenyan coast.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd782q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0ntnb3g)
President Biden meets families of Miami apartment disaster

US President says it is 'still possible' to find survivors in the rubble of a building that collapsed last week near Miami in Florida.

British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson and his German counterpart, Angela Merkel meet face-to-face today, with international travel and post-Brexit relations at the top of the agenda.

And should we vaccinate children before Covid restrictions are lifted? We hear why one scientist thinks it's the right thing to do.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd7ctv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2q0ntnfvl)
Afghanistan withdrawal: all troops have now left main US base

The BBC's Chief International Correspondent tells us what the ending of the US mission might mean for the country.

As President Biden visits the site of the Miami building collapse, we talk to one of the people investigating why the tower turned to rubble.

And St Petersburg in Russia hosts the first quarter final of the Euros football tournament - while dealing with a surge in Covid cases


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd7hkz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyp)
Douglas Stuart: Stories of tender souls in tough places

Stephen Sackur speaks to the Booker prize-winning author Douglas Stuart. His novel, Shuggie Bain, centres on a boy growing up amid poverty, addiction and intolerance in Glasgow. There are deep parallels with his own life. How does he extract so much love from hardship?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zxvvc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0c)
Do oil companies have a future?

Shareholders and courts pile pressure on the oil majors. Amid falling demand for oil and targets to cut carbon emissions, what role if any do companies like ExxonMobil and Shell have in a decarbonised world? Manuela Saragosa speaks to Aeisha Mastagni from the California State Teachers' Retirement System - a shareholder in ExxonMobil pushing the company to change its long-term strategy. Lord Browne, former boss of BP, tells us why oil companies need to diversify if they want to survive. And Charlie Kronick from Greenpeace explains why the winds have turned agains the oil industry in recent weeks.

(Photo: Oil drilling operations in California. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyq)
China's trailblazing foreign students

China has the largest number of overseas students in the world but when students first started venturing out of Communist China it was still a country feeling the aftereffects of the Cultural Revolution. Launched in 1966 by Communist leader Mao Zedong the Cultural Revolution plunged China into a decade of chaos. The education of millions of young people were disrupted and China was cut off from the rest for world. Farhana Haider has been speaking to Chinese American writer Zha Jianying, one of the first batch of Chinese students to arrive in the US in the early 1980s.

Image: Chinese writer Zha Jianying, July 2015 Credit: Simon Song/ Getty Images


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd7mb3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh3)
Should robots look like humans?

SoftBank pauses production of the Pepper service robot with no date for when it will resume. Does it suggest a lack of appetite for humanoid devices? Plus, Mobile World Congress is back in hybrid form. Does the online / in-person attendance model work for big tech events? Plus, why the system of internet addresses is preventing many people from getting online. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Stock photo of the Pepper robot, Credit: Reuters).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zxzlh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd7r27)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsl)
Palestinians turn against the leadership

There is continuing anger in the West Bank over the death in custody of a vociferous critic of the Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas. Nizar Banat, an anti-corruption campaigner, was picked up in a violent night-time raid at his home in Hebron. The Palestinian Authority has launched an investigation into the circumstances of Banat's death and has promised action against anyone responsible. But that's done little to placate protesters who allege that the Palestinian security forces use extra-judicial force against anyone who questions or criticises the leadership. They say this behaviour is emblematic of a wider break down of law and order and a thriving culture of corruption in the West Bank, where elections were last held over 15 years ago. So why is corruption such a problem and where is it happening? Is there scope for reforms with the current leadership in charge? And how dependent is any change on the overall relationship with Israel and rival administration in Gaza, run by Hamas? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of Palestinian commentators.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd7vtc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3jbgsm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zy72r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tz6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd7zkh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f3)
Lebanon: A web of corruption

BBC Arabic's Moe Chreif tells us about the biggest corruption investigation in the history of Lebanon’s energy sector, which resulted in allegations involving multi-million dollar agreements, bribery, and shipments of substandard oil.

The women pushing boundaries in Pakistan’s rural milk market
In rural Pakistan women milk cows, but male relatives take the milk to male-run collection centres. Shuja Malik of BBC Urdu visited a village where women have been hired to work in the milk centre. The development has had mixed reactions.

Word in the news: black rain
Children love it, businesses hate it – Pody Lui from BBC Hong Kong explains the rain warning system, and why black rain warnings are taken so seriously.

Mango madness in India
South Asia diaspora reporter Gaggan Sabherwal shares the story of the Indian couple who’ve employed security guards after discovering they had planted an extremely rare mango tree by mistake – at $50 a mango they aren't taking any chances!

My journey to journalism: Elodie Toto
Elodie Toto of BBC Afrique tells the story of what inspired her to become a journalist, and takes us on a journey from the suburbs of Paris to Kinshasa, capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Image: Cables of the electric generators in the Lebanese capital Beirut
Credit: ANWAR AMRO/AFP via Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd839m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3jbq8w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zygl0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd871r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvmr6cc)
US pulls out of main military base in Afghanistan

US forces have left their main military base in Afghanistan, the Bagram Air Base which was the hub for the twenty-year mission against the Taliban and al Qaeda - in the clearest sign yet America's longest war is ending. The BBC's Chief International Correspondent Lyse Douset explains how this decision is being received in the country. Lieutenant Colonel Daniel Davis now retired after more than twenty years in the US army, including two deployments to Afghanistan says the move is long overdue.

Also in the programme: As billionaires Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson compete to get to space first, we look at space as a tourist destination. The UN food programme restarts operations in Tigray after months of conflict that have led to one of the world's worst humanitarian situations. And we hear from the Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland which has found a way to open this year.

( Picture: Afghan soldiers guarded Bagram on Friday Credit: Reuters )


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd8bsw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zyq28)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46rx2fsm8s)
US economy adds 850,000 jobs

The US economy added 850,000 jobs in June, whilst the unemployment rate was at 5.9%. We get analysis of the US labour market from Chris Low of FHN Financial. Also in the programme, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the growing popularity of milk alternatives, and examines the potential impact on dairy farmers. Plus, research has found that homes with smart devices can be susceptible to thousands of attacks from cyber criminals each week. Kate Bevan is editor of Which? Computing, and discusses their findings.

(Picture: A 'now hiring' sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd8gk0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkvrhqghg)
'Massacre' in eSwatini

We hear accounts of deadly violence in response to protests in the southern African kingdom of eSwatini. Our correspondent covering the story will explain the context to what we're hearing from people who live there. She'll also tell us about the political grievances driving the unrest in Africa's last remaining absolute monarchy.

We'll answer your questions on the coronavirus pandemic, with the help of one of our regular expert guests. We're also spending time going to countries we've not yet visited during the pandemic to find out how they've been dealing with Covid. On this edition, we'll speak to a journalist from Oman.

Australia's government has halved the number of weekly arrivals from overseas to try to relieve pressure on the country's Covid quarantine system. We'll hear from some of the Australians stranded around the world due to pandemic measures, who tell us how they feel about the latest decision.

Picture: King Mswati III of eSwatini (Getty Images)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd8l94)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkvrhql7l)
Fleeing Lytton's wildfire

We speak to a man who evacuated his home after Canada's deadly heatwave led to intense fires. Lytton in British Columbia had seen record temperatures of more than 49 degrees Celsius this week.

We hear accounts of deadly violence in response to protests in the southern African kingdom of eSwatini. Our correspondent covering the story will explain the context to what we're hearing from people who live there. She'll also tell us about the political grievances driving the unrest in Africa's last remaining absolute monarchy.

We're examining the effects of the pandemic on countries we've not yet covered in the past 18 months of Covid-19. We'll speak to a journalist in the Middle Eastern nation of Oman to find out the impact of the virus there.

Picture: The sign for the town of Lytton in British Columbia, with wildfire smoke in the background (REUTERS/Jennifer Gauthier)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd8q18)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd8tsd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxjf3jcfrn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zz61s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ncv0ccplr)
2021/07/02 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd8yjj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zz9sx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pql)
Why do I feel hungry?

Food. For all of us it is a basic necessity and for those lucky enough, it is something we spend a lot of time planning and enjoying.
CrowdScience listeners certainly have a lot of food related questions; in this buffet of an episode Marnie Chesterton opens the fridge door to pick the tastiest. Starting with the seemingly simple question of what makes us feel hungry, and ending in outer-space, Marnie investigates flavour, nutrition and digestion.

After a year when watching TV has become a core activity for many people stuck in their homes, one listener wants us to find out if eating food whilst watching the TV affects our perception of taste. We then journey to the skies and ask if it is true that food tastes blander on aeroplanes, what does that mean for astronauts’ mealtimes? Back on earth, Marnie explores whether humans are the only animals that season their food.

Tuck in your napkins and prepare to feast on a smorgasbord of scientific snacks.
Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Produced by Melanie Brown and Hannah Fisher for the BBC World Service.

Guests:
Professor Charles Spence
Dr Kristine Beaulieu
Mr. Takashi Funahashi
Ruben Meerman
Chef Jozef Youseff


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd928n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv55bvms1l8)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd960s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zzk95)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tz6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjlsfd99rx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywpzcxpm9w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sh1nctnyj)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkf74zzp19)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48thwyjvb1)
US economy adds 850,000 jobs

The US economy added 850,000 jobs in June, whilst the unemployment rate was at 5.9%. We get analysis of the US labour market from Chris Low of FHN Financial. Also in the programme, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the growing popularity of milk alternatives, and examines the potential impact on dairy farmers. Plus, research has found that homes with smart devices can be susceptible to thousands of attacks from cyber criminals each week. Kate Bevan is editor of Which? Computing, and discusses their findings.

(Picture: A 'now hiring' sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gxh)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxh)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gxh)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkdvwp6wnv)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkdvwp77x7)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkdvwp7m4m)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkdvwp7qwr)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkdvwp7zd0)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkdvwp9fbk)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j4w)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqd8wzfrz1)

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Business Weekly 14:06 SAT (w3ct2dgw)

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CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqk)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1ls6)

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Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2g8z)

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From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mtz)

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HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n5g)

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Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nvd)

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Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2g94)

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In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1td4)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1td4)

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More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dk4)

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More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dk4)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hc0)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2q0nt8lqy)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k37)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1k)

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People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pl0)

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Spitfire: The People’s Plane 05:32 SAT (w3ct0t1m)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0ncv0c02zc)

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Sportsworld 15:06 SAT (w172y0t943nsqty)

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