Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 19 JUNE 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrr81h)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqcxmnnmc6)
Harry Potter publishers demand staff prove vaccination

A growing number of companies are making corona-vaccination mandatory for their employees. Can they do that? Turns out - in America they can, but it's much more complicated in Europe; we speak with US, EU and UK legal experts, including Dr Catherine Barnard, Professor of European Union and Labor Law at the University of Cambridge. Also, the BBC’s Mike Johnson assesses the impact of wealthy nations cutting back their overseas aid budgets. And if you're having problems hiring ... maybe you need to think again about the money. Barry Ritholz tells us the pros and cons of increasing wages to get more staff. We discuss all this with guest Elizabeth Gwynn of ABC News in Australia.

(Image: A digital vaccination passport CovPass app logo is seen on a smartphone screen. Credit: Pavlo Gonchar/ SOPA Images/ LightRocket via Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrrcsm)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwtzrw)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcfr20)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbk)
Should soft signals be scrapped?

Stuart Broad has urged the ICC to review the use of soft signals after New Zealand opener Devon Conway controversially survived a claimed catch by Zak Crawley. This follows comments from India Captain Virat Kohli on DRS where he says 'umpire's call creates a lot of confusion'. The Stumped team debate whether there is still a need in the game for soft signals or whether umpires should rely solely on technology.

Plus India and England are playing in a Test Match against each other for the first time since 2014 but the wicket has caused controversy. It is being placed on a used wicket after Gloucestershire played a T20 match on it last week. We ask whether this is a step back in the women's game.

And we hear the second part of our interview with Cricket Australia Chief Executive Nick Hockley. He speaks about sandpaper gate, parity in the women’s game and cricket being on free to air TV.

Photo: England bowlers Stuart Broad (R) and James Anderson (C) inspect the ball with umpire on the third day of the second Test cricket match between England and New Zealand. (Credit: AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrrhjr)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f1)
Finding treasure inside a whale

A group of Yemeni fishermen recently found a sperm whale carcass floating in the Gulf of Aden, with $1.5 million dollars' worth of ambergris inside its belly. Afra Ahmed of BBC Arabic is from Aden, and tells us about the fishermen, ambergris and memories of Aden.

The hit Turkish TV shows tackling mental health
Turkish TV dramas are famous for their sweeping historical and romantic themes, but in recent years, several top shows have focussed on mental health issues. Dilay Yalcin of BBC Monitoring is a fan and explains the appeal.

Words in the news - watermelons and sea snot
Sometimes words in the news jump out and grab your attention. This week the BBC's Kennedy Gondwe tells us why watermelons have become political in Zambia, and Onur Erem of BBC Turkish elucidates the murky waters of the Sea of Marmara, covered in 'sea snot'.

The problem with women’s underwear in Pakistan
Many Pakistani women have problems buying underwear. It can be expensive, uncomfortable, and embarrassing to buy, often from male market traders. Even talking about it is taboo. Saher Baloch of BBC Urdu tells us about one man who is trying to change things.

Emiliano Mundrucu: Brazil’s forgotten anti-racism pioneer
The first known legal action against racial segregation in the United States was taken in 1834, by a black Brazilian immigrant. BBC Brasil’s Mariana Schreiber shares the story of Emiliano Mundrucu, and asks why this ground-breaking pioneer has been forgotten in both Brazil and the USA.

Image: Yemeni fisherman on the beach with boats in Aden
Credit: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyn)
China's 'Economic Miracle'

Since the 1980s China has witnessed massive economic growth. It’s become known as the 'world’s factory'. The driving force behind much of it has been a vast migrant workforce of millions of people, many from the countryside. But at what cost to village life and rural communities? Rebecca Kesby has been speaking to writer Liang Hong about her experience of leaving the Chinese countryside, and why she is determined to document the lives of those living through seismic change.

(PHOTO:


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrrm8w)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsj)
China's global project has a new rival

At their annual summit in Britain this year, the group of seven industrialised nations, or G7, has agreed to an infrastructure development plan for developing countries. The Build Back Better World – or B3W – is seen as an alternative to the multi-trillion dollar Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) launched by China about a decade ago. The BRI has been a relatively easy source of funding for power plants, mining, road building and a range of other development projects, and more than 100 countries have partnered with Beijing as part of the scheme. But these projects are not without controversy and there are questions about China's long-term intentions in the countries taking part.

The White House says its plan is not about confronting China, but about providing a better and more transparent alternative that reflects the democratic values of the countries involved. But critics say that without a consistent China policy across its member states the G7 plan is bound to face difficulties. What exactly is B3W trying to achieve and how will it benefit the developing world? Will it compete or compliment China's BRI? Can the G7 strategy be as consistent as China's? And how open will developing countries be to accepting the promotion of Western values? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrrr10)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwvc08)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcg39d)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1l)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

The Shilling factor

As brilliant as the Spitfire is, it has one major flaw. Take her into a steep dive and fuel can’t reach the engine. A solution is urgently needed. That’s a job for the fastest woman in Britain: champion motorcycle racer and pioneering engineer, Beatrice Shilling.

Presenter: Tuppence Middleton
Producers: Alasdair Cross and Emily Knight
Editors: Chris Ledgard and Kirsten Lass

The audio for this programme was updated on 16 June 2020.


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk3)
The origins of Covid

To find out where a virus comes from, researchers compare it to other viruses to try to trace its origin. This leads to claims like SARS-CoV-2 is 91 or even 96% similar to other known viruses. But what does that really mean?

Tim Harford talks to the virus ecologist Marilyn J Roossinck.


(Photo: A Microbiology lab carries out sequencing of coronavirus samples. Credit: Javier Pulpo/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrrvs4)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt6xnh3817)
Iranians go to the polls

Iranians have voted to elect a new president, with all but one of the four candidates regarded as hardliners... we'll have the latest.

Also, US Catholic bishops take aim at Joe Biden for his views on abortion.

Plus, Armenians head to the polls to face a choice between an embattled prime minister and a former strong man president, following defeat in the war over Nagorno-Karabakh.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Sanam Vakil, deputy head of the Middle East and North Africa programme at the Chatham House international affairs think tank here in London; and Rafael Behr, a British political commentator and columnist for the Guardian newspaper.

(Image: Iranians cast their votes at a polling station in Tehran, Iran. Credit: ABEDIN TAHERKENAREH/EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrrzj8)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt6xnh3csc)
UN: Real risk of civil war in Myanmar

The UN envoy to Myanmar, Christine Schraner Burgener, says there's a real risk of a large-scale civil war in Myanmar. We ask if there's any way to stop the supply of arms into the country.

Plus, Armenians head to the polls, to face a choice between an embattled prime minister and a former strong man president, following defeat in the war over Nagorno-Karabakh.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Sanam Vakil, deputy head of the Middle East and North Africa programme at the Chatham House international affairs think tank in London; and Rafael Behr, a British political commentator and columnist for the Guardian newspaper.

(Image: Christine Schraner Burgener, United Nations Special Envoy of the Secretary-General on Myanmar. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrs38d)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt6xnh3hjh)
US Catholic bishops in controversy

US Catholic bishops take aim at Joe Biden over his views on abortion.

Plus, the hardline Iranian cleric, Ebrahim Raisi, has been congratulated by his rivals for winning the country's presidential election. We'll have the latest and assess what the election result may mean for Iran's position on the world stage.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Sanam Vakil, deputy head of the Middle East and North Africa programme at the Chatham House international affairs think tank in London; and Rafael Behr, a British political commentator and columnist for the Guardian newspaper.

(Image: The closing Mass of the XIV Ordinary Meeting of the Synod of Catholic Bishops in Rome. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcggjs)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6n)
My life-changing autism diagnosis

As a woman with autism you're likely to receive a diagnosis much later in life than if you are a man with the condition. Why is that and what impact does a late diagnosis have? Kim Chakanetsa is joined by two autistic women who are speaking up about their experience of the condition and seeking to help others.

Morénike Giwa Onaiwu is part of the Autism Women's Network in US. She says many of her early symptoms of autism were dismissed or ignored because she is Black and explains how autism can amplify stereotypes around Black women.

Sara Gibbs is a British comedy writer and autistic. Labelled as a cry baby, scaredy cat and spoiled brat – she finally got a diagnosis in her thirties. She has written a book, Drama Queen, about trying to fit into a world that has often tried to reject her, and says that being on the spectrum doesn't have to be a barrier to a happy life full of love, laughter and success.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
Morénike Giwa Onaiwu
Sara Gibbs [credit Juliet McKee]


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrs70j)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5t)
Women in Iran

Iran has voted for a new president and BBC Persian Service presenter, Rana Rahimpour, hears from different women in conversation on what life is like in the country. Three young women, including one 17-year-old, join Rana to discuss their fears, frustrations and hopes for the future.

A pharmacist and doctor share their experiences in two hospitals after the country underwent a fourth wave of infections. They describe the long days and the financial challenges in the health sector, including the relatively low pay. Rana is also joined by two of her colleagues from BBC Persian to discuss the difficulties of reporting on your homeland from thousands of miles away in London.

(Photo: Iranian women take a selfie at a park in Tehran, Iran May 26, 2021. Credit: Majid Asgaripour/WANA (West Asia News Agency) via REUTERS)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcgl8x)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f92)
8: Cyber warriors

Surveillance, state control, executions and how to become a hacker. Are talented mathematicians being groomed to join North Korea’s “cyber army”? The FBI has accused Park Jin Hyok of being a hacker but how much choice do members of the Lazarus group actually have?
#Lazarusheist

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/lazarusheist


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1j)
How to remain impartial during football commentaries

The European Football Championship is gripping many of you but how does the BBC avoid favouritism? The World Service sports editor parries the shots. Plus the new edition of Death In Ice Valley, which has largely been driven by its avid Facebook community members.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrsbrn)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0pzzxy7rs9)
The Euros Come to Life

It’s the morning after the night before and we’ll get the analysis you really need from the England Scotland game with Comedians Justin Moorhouse and Susie McCabe.

We’ll also preview the days action focusing in on France and looking at what the make-up of their squad says about multiculturalism in the country. Are they still, as talk show host Trevor Noah stated, Africa’s team?!

We look at the devastating effects gambling addiction can have, and why one group of fans are calling for betting advertising to be banned during the Euro’s. We focus in on the particular issues that affect female gambling addicts.

Are mixed events the future of Golf? We look at the success of last week’s Sacndi Mixed tournament and discuss if one day there might be a mixed Solheim/Ryder Cup competition with The Jazzy Golfer.

Image: Getty Images.


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrsghs)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkww2h1)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcgts5)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f38)
How are Indian businesses facing the Covid challenge?

Covid has dealt a heavy blow to Indian businesses. Battling the first and then a ferocious second wave of coronavirus infections, the country has seen consumer demand crash, upended supply chains and a transformation in consumer habits. Millions of jobs have been lost in both rural and urban areas.

Surviving this changed landscape amid an ongoing virus scare has been a major challenge for both big and small businesses. So, how vulnerable are some sectors compared to others? Are there newer opportunities to tap into? Or should the aim be to just stay afloat and tide over this crisis? We take an in-depth look into the survival strategies of Indian businesses facing the Covid challenge.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

(Photo: People visit at Chandni Chowk in Old Delhi. Credit: Sonu Mehta/Hindustan Times/Getty Images)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrsl7x)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fz5)
Deepwater Horizon oil spill

In the evening of 20 April 2010 disaster struck at the Deepwater Horizon oil rig when a blowout caused by a surge in methane gas from the oil well exploded engulfing the platform.

For the next 87 days, BP engineers tried to staunch the flow of crude oil gushing out of the well on the ocean floor. An estimated 184 million gallons were spilt, 18 times the amount spilled by the Exxon Valdez, making it the largest accidental marine oil spill in the world, and the largest environmental disaster in US history.

As oil coated more than 1,000 miles of coastline in six US states, Americans grew more and more angry. A group calling itself Seize BP held demonstrations in 50 US cities, calling for the company to be stripped of its assets. Twelve billion pounds was wiped off the company's value in a single day and BP's CEO, Tony Hayward, was forced to resign.

Kirsty Wark brings together Mark Mazzella, BP’s resident well-control expert, who fought on and off-shore to stop the oil flowing before finally capping it; Admiral Thad Allen, National Incident Commander, who was in charge of the federal response; PJ Hahn, then director of coastal zone management for Plaquemines parish, Louisiana, which was on the front line of the oil spill; Keith Jones, whose son Gordon worked on the Deepwater Horizon rig and was killed in the accident; and Bob Kaluza one of two BP supervisors on the rig that night.

(Photo: Crews on ships work on stopping the flow of oil at the source site of the Deepwater Horizon disaster on 29 May, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico. Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrsq01)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv54mb08p9n)
Hardliner wins Iran's presidential election

Iran's president-elect, the hardline cleric, Ebrahim Raisi, has expressed his gratitude to the Iranian people for his election victory, thanking them for trusting him. After meeting the outgoing president, Hassan Rouhani, he said his incoming government would do their best to serve Iran's citizens.

Also in the programme: the UN special envoy on Myanmar warns of a real risk of civil war in the country; and deaths from Covid in Brazil pass 500,000.

(Picture: Ebrahim Raisi greets the media after casting his vote on Friday. Credit: EPA/Abedin Taherkenareh)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrstr5)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t8rvc0ggz)
Live Sporting Action

On this week’s Sportsworld with Lee James, we will be live in Budapest and Munich for the European Championship games Hungary v France, and Portugal v Germany.

(Photo: Budapest, Hungary by Laszlo Balogh - Pool/Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrtfgt)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z70)
The Confederate flag and America’s battle over race

In June 2015 an American anti-racist activist climbed a flagpole on the South Carolina state house grounds to take down the Confederate flag. The protest followed the killing of 9 black people at a historic Charleston church by a white supremacist who was pictured holding the flag. We discuss the
history of this divisive symbol of America's racist past. Also how life in the Chinese countryside has been dramatically changed by 40 years of migration to the cities. Plus, from the 1980s, a British TV event that shifted attitudes towards victims of rape, East Germany’s iconic Trabant car and the man behind Mindfulness.



Photo Bree Newsome taking down the Confederate flag at the State House in Columbia, SC, on Saturday 27th June 2015. Credit Adam Anderson / Reuters.


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrtk6y)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt1)
Writer Quiara Alegria Hudes

Nikki Bedi is joined by Pulitzer winning playwright, Quiara Alegria Hudes, co-writer of the Tony award winning musical and film In The Heights, and film critic Tara Judah.

Oscar winning actor Kate Winslet talks about her role in Mare of Easttown and changes for women in film.

Debut director Florian Zeller reveals how he made his play, The Father, into a film with Anthony Hopkins in his Oscar winning role as a man with dementia.

Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie discusses Notes on Grief, the book she wrote following the death of her father.

American actor, writer and director John Krasinski talks about directing A Quiet Place II and creating a film soundtrack to reflect the world as perceived by deaf actor Millicent Simmonds.

Feroze Khan, superstar of TV drama in Pakistan, reflects on his reputation as a bad boy and how fans relate to his characters.

DJ Rita Ray brings us her latest selection of African music tracks, from Chad to Tanzania

(Photo: Quiara Alegria Hudes. Credit: John Lamparski/FilmMagic)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrtnz2)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv54mb09n8p)
Iran's new president vows to fight corruption

Ebrahim Raisi promises to lead a government that will fight corruption following his victory in an election that was widely seen as engineered in his favour.
Mr Raisi is a hard-line cleric. Voter turnout was the lowest ever in an Iranian presidential election.

Also in the programme: US Catholic bishops get political; and why Mozart's music might ease epilepsy

(Picture: A supporter of Ebrahim Raisi holds a poster of him during an election rally in Tehran. Credit: WANA via REUTERS: Majid Asgaripour)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrtsq6)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbz)
The tricky third album with Japanese Breakfast, Julia Stone, Black Belt Eagle Scout and Becca Mancari

Japanese Breakfast, Julia Stone, Black Belt Eagle Scout and Becca Mancari discuss why the third album is often the trickiest to make, meeting your heroes in airports, the role producers play in allowing you to tell your story, and getting Hollywood actors to appear in your videos.

Japanese Breakfast is very much the artist of the moment, having released the highly anticipated third album Jubilee. She blends the multiple facets of Pop with Indie, Chamber, and Shoegaze, was born in Seoul and grew up in Oregon, USA. Jubilee follows 2016’s Psychopomp and 2017’s Soft Sounds from Another Planet in 2017. Joining her is Julia Stone, a singer-songwriter from Melbourne, Australia who is known for the Folk Pop duo she formed with her brother Angus. Indie Rock multi-instrumentalist and vocalist Black Belt Eagle Scout is based in Portland USA. Her debut record Mother of My Children came out in 2017 and was inspired by ‘grief, love and being a Native person in the US today’. And finally, Becca Mancari is a Folk Rock singer-songwriter who is part of the trio Bermuda Triangle alongside Brittany Howard from Alabama Shakes. Her latest solo album The Greatest Part channels The Beach Boys sound and explores her experiences of growing up in a deeply religious community in Nashville.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrtxgb)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywp7v97709)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sgb3rc8my)
Sports News

BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcj8qq)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf3)
Syria’s Top Goon: Art and the Arab Spring

BBC Arabic reporter Dima Babilie marks 10 years since the Arab Spring and speaks to poets, film-makers and artists about how that moment of revolutionary change transformed their lives, their countries and their art.

When the protests first broke out in Syria, Dima was a student studying English Literature at the University of Damascus. Everything changed as anti-government protests took hold in Syria. One of the most creative forms of protest from that time was the satirical puppet show Top Goon by the Syrian collective Masasit Mati. Dima spoke to one of the team behind the show Rafat al-Zakout about creating art in Syria and now in exile.

Capturing the mood, or reflecting the feeling of a people is a great challenge for any artist, particularly during a conflict. The Palestinian film-maker Najwa Najjar has dedicated her work to just that – telling the story of ordinary Palestinians through film. Dima spoke to Najwa about her reflections on the Arab Spring, the lives of Palestinians and her career in film.

Plus Algerian poet Samira Negrouche talks to Dima about how the politics of the past and the present both set her home country apart and connect it with its neighbours in the Arab world, through a shared cultural and natural landscape.

Presented by Dima Babilie

(Image: Top Goon. Credit: Art collective Masasit Mati)



SUNDAY 20 JUNE 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrv4yl)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yv9)
Doubling Earth’s Energy Imbalance

On Science in Action this week Nasa scientists have observed that the Earth’s Energy Imbalance has doubled in just 15 years. As greenhouse gas atmospheric concentrations have risen, so too has the difference between the total amount of energy being absorbed from the sun, and the total amount being re-radiated back into space. Meanwhile, as we all heat up, scientists at the LIGO Gravitational Wave Observatory have managed to do something very cool with their mirrors. Such is the precision with which the detectors have been engineered, they have managed to effectively reduce the temperature of one of the big 10kg reflectors to such an extent that it betrays its quantum state as if it were simply one big subatomic particle. So what? Roland Pease finds out.

Also, Scales don’t come planet-sized, so answering a question from David in Ghana may require some ingenuity, after all, calculating the weight of the Earth is a huge task.

Using a set of weighing scales and a 400 year-old equation, Marnie Chesterton attempts to find out just how much the Earth weighs and is it getting heavier or lighter over time?

But how would a planet gain or lose mass? Which tips the scales: meteorites falling from space or gases constantly escaping from our atmosphere?
And does the answer have any implications for the future of Earth? Could the atmosphere eventually run out?


(Image: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrv8pq)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwxwnz)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcjmz3)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvc)
New treatment for Covid

Good news that a new treatment for Covid could help one in three people in hospital. Results are from the Recovery trial in the UK using an infusion of two antibodies made in the laboratory which bind to the virus and stop it replicating. But it is expensive and those people who haven't made their own antibodies should be given the treatment. And Project S - the unique experiment that vaccinated a whole town in Brazil. Claudia speaks to Dr Ricardo Palacios, clinical studies director at the Butantan Institute in Sao Paulo, leading the research. Plus a ground breaking trial in Yogyakarta city, Indonesia, that has cut cases of Dengue Fever by 77% by infecting mosquitoes with a "miraculous" bacteria.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A doctor holds a vial of monoclonal antibodies, a new treatment for Covid-19. Photo credit: Cristian Storto Fotografia/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrvdfv)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrvj5z)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mty)
The aftermath of communal violence in Israel

Stories from Israel, the USA, Thailand and Chad.

Palestinians who hold Israeli passports make up around a fifth of the country’s population, and have rarely been involved in any violent conflict with Israeli Jews. But as rocket fire was exchanged between Israel and Gaza last month, Jewish and Arab mobs took to the streets of Israel’s mixed cities - attacking passers-by, looting shops, vandalising property and desecrating religious sites. Yolande Knell finds that in Jaffa, divisions have opened up that will be hard to heal:

Joe Biden may have been globetrotting these past few weeks, but inside the United States there are still plenty who do not accept that he really is their president. Despite investigations which have uncovered no evidence for it, they believe that the presidential contest was stolen. Gabriel Gatehouse went to a meeting in Texas, where these dissenting voices found a willing audience.

There was a point last year when street protests in Thailand were seen as a threat to the government, and even to the country’s widely-revered monarchy. Tens of thousands of people gathered on the streets of the capital, Bangkok, and in many other cities, defying attempts by the police to disperse them. One year on, however, the protests have fizzled out, with many of their leaders put in jail. Jonathan Head asks why their uprising failed.

There’s a new government in the central African country of Chad. Idris Deby, the military ruler who was in power for nearly thirty years is dead, reportedly killed on the battlefield. Now his son has been installed as a replacement – he too is a general. Meanwhile, ordinary Chadians are fed up with the lack of drinking water, and inadequate roads, schools, and hospitals. Mayeni Jones went to meet a senior member of the new government, and discovered he was far from shy about showing off his own remarkable wealth.


(Image: View over Jaffa. Credit: Menahem Kahana/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcjwgc)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrvmy3)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwy7xc)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmck06h)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2g7p)
Guru

Guru: Living a lie

For the last year, BBC journalist and passionate yoga teacher Ishleen Kaur has been investigating allegations of sexual and emotional abuse at the heart of an organisation she once called home.

Fellow practitioners share with her their stories of cruelty, rape and even the sexual assault of a child - but she wasn't prepared for what she uncovered next.

Join Ishleen for three programmes on a deeply personal journey into the dark legacy which haunts Sivananda Yoga, one of the world’s most revered yoga schools.


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrvrp7)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt6xnh64yb)
Iran’s new president vows to fight corruption

We hear how Iranians are reacting to the election of Ebrahim Raisi as president.

Plus, in Hungary, parliament passes a law banning what’s described as the promotion or portrayal of homosexuality and gender reassignment.

Also, as Covid-19 pandemic sparks a surge of interest in the role of indoor environments, we look at so-called ‘healthy buildings’.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Viola von Cramon, a German member of the European Parliament for the Greens and a rapporteur on Belarus; and Ivan Krastev, Bulgarian political scientist, Chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies in Sofia, and Permanent Fellow at the Institute for Human Science.

(Image: Supporters of Ebrahim Raisi gather near his poster to celebrate his presidential election victory in Tehran, Iran. Credit: Majid Asgaripour/WANA (West Asia News Agency) via REUTERS.


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrvwfc)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt6xnh68pg)
US hopeful on talks on Iran nuclear deal

The United States says it is hopeful that a continuation of talks will be possible on Iran's nuclear programme.

Also, as the West re-evaluates its relationship with China, we hear from Italy - the first G7 country to sign up to its Belt and Road initiative.

And we hear from the departing head of humanitarian affairs at the UN, Mark Lowcock, on how the world can respond better to humanitarian emergencies.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Viola von Cramon, a German member of the European Parliament for the Greens and a rapporteur on Belarus; and Ivan Krastev, Bulgarian political scientist, Chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies in Sofia, and Permanent Fellow at the Institute for Human Science.

(Image: The venue for a meeting of the Joint Commission of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) in Vienna, Austria. Credit: REUTERS)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrw05h)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt6xnh6dfl)
How will Iran's new president impact relations with the West?

Will the election of a hardline cleric as Iran's president have an impact on nuclear negotiations with the West?

Also, France votes in regional elections today, seen as a test for President Macron, ahead of next year's presidential poll.

Plus, weddings are back on here in England, but dancing and singing remain prohibited. But is a wedding a wedding without song and dance?

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Viola von Cramon, a German member of the European Parliament for the Greens and a rapporteur on Belarus; and Ivan Krastev, Bulgarian political scientist, Chairman of the Centre for Liberal Strategies in Sofia, and Permanent Fellow at the Institute for Human Science.

(Image: Supporters of Iranian president-elect Ebrahim Raisi celebrate in Imam Hussein square in Tehran, Iran,Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmckcfw)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Documentary (w3ct2ght)
The life of Kenneth Kaunda

Kenneth Kaunda, the first President of Zambia was a unique African leader. He led the African continent’s fight against Apartheid, gaining a peaceful transition to power in his own country. He was influenced by reading Mahatma Gandhi yet ruled with ‘an iron fist in a velvet glove’. He loved to sing and play guitar, particularly to his wife of many years Betty and in his 27 years as president. In the end he was voted out of office but left with dignity when he admitted defeat in a multi-party election. He was also instrumental in the fight for HIV/Aids on the African continent, after one of his children died from the disease. Audrey Brown charts the rise and fall of former Zambian President Kenneth Kaunda.

(Photo: Zambia"s former president Kenneth Kaunda attends the 40th anniversary of independence in Lusaka October 24, 2004. Credit: Salim Henry/Reuters)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrw3xm)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mty)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmckh60)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx0)
Frank Sinatra's Australian showdown

In 1974, Australian concert producer Robert Raymond got the gig of his life – organising the comeback tour of his musical idol, Frank Sinatra. The anticipation in Australia was huge and the tour sold out immediately. But when his opening night performance caused a scandal, Sinatra found himself caught in a stand-off… and Robert Raymond had the biggest test of his career – how to get Sinatra back on stage? This programme was first broadcast on 23rd of December 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Image: Frank Sinatra
Credit: Jay Dickman/CORBIS/Getty Images


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrw7nr)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Assignment Interview (w3ct2gb5)
The Assignment Interview

Naziha Syed Ali: Pakistan’s fearless female reporter.

Journalist Naziha Syed Ali has made a career out of investigating sometimes scandalous abuses of power in her native Pakistan. Publishing in the country’s main English-language daily newspaper, “Dawn”, she has reported – often undercover – on land confiscation, illegal organ harvesting and sectarian violence. Her work has prompted significant action against wrongdoers, most notably when she exposed malpractice in a major Karachi property development, resulting in a Supreme Court case and payments worth billions of dollars. Being female, she says, can help - if only because Pakistan’s patriarchal society is so sceptical about women’s ability to make an impact, which can lull male subjects into a false sense of security. Nevertheless, her job is arduous and frequently dangerous. In this interview for Assignment with Owen Bennett-Jones, she explains what drives her to work in one of the world’s toughest journalistic beats.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmckly4)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2d31)
Pope Francis in Iraq: The historic pilgrimage

The world watched on as Pope Francis embarked on what he called a pilgrimage to the Middle East, a journey that could possibly be the Holy Father's legacy. Despite worries of the Covid pandemic and the real threat of a terrorist attack, Pope Francis became the first pontiff in history to visit Iraq. Standing among rubble and ruins in the devastated city of Mosul where ISIS took root and threatened to behead him, Pope Francis proclaimed "hope is more powerful than hatred, that peace more powerful than war."

In this programme Colm Flynn travels on the papal flight to Iraq to talk to Iraqi Christians and Muslims who have come out to welcome Pope Francis to their nation. The programme will bring you behind the scenes on a papal trip, and let you experience real moments with the Iraqi people who hope that the Pope's visit will bring long-lasting healing and peace to their land.

Presenter and Producer: Colm Flynn

Additional audio supplied by EWTN
Picture credit: Colm Flynn /EWTN


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrwcdw)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwyzd4)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmckqp8)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2g7k)
Automation Nation

Are we heading for a world without work?

Speaking with a variety of experts and working Americans, Daniel Susskind considers how we might negotiate a world without work. He hears the story of Youngstown, Ohio, where the collapse of the steel industry in the 1970s led to severe job losses and created a perfect storm of societal problems that a fresh wave of rapid automation could replicate on a mass scale. If we’re to avoid such a future, we’re going to have to rethink our attitudes towards taxation, wealth distribution, and even the nature of work itself.


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrwh50)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z22)
Could Covid-19 have come from a lab leak?

For the last year discussions about the origins of Covid-19 have divided people all over the world. Some say it came from nature and others believe it could have escaped from a lab. The idea of a lab accident was originally dismissed as a conspiracy theory but it’s starting to gain attention all over again.

Now President Biden has given the US intelligence service 90 days to try and investigate the virus's origins further.

Many still believe the virus jumped to humans from animals but some say that we need to be open minded until we have all of the data.

But could Covid-19 really have come from a lab?


Presenter: Kavita Puri
Producer: Olivia Noon
Researcher: Kirsteen Knight

(Virus research in a lab. Tek Science/Getty images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmckvfd)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxf)
Syria’s decade of conflict: The many colours of Raqqa

Syrian born reporter Lina Sinjab presents a special series from Assignment’s award winning archive on the ten years of civil war in her country.

In the final programme from the season Lina hears from BBC foreign correspondent Tim Whewell who spoke to Abood Hamam, perhaps the only photojournalist to have worked under every major force in Syria's war - and lived to tell the tale. At the start of the uprising he was head of photography for the state news agency, SANA, taking official shots of President Assad and his wife Asma by day - and secretly filming opposition attacks by night. Later he defected and returned to his home town, Raqqa, where various rebel groups were competing for control. Other journalists fled when the terrorists of so-called Islamic State (IS) took over, but Abood stayed - and was asked by IS to film its victory parade. He sent pictures of life under IS to agencies all over the world - using a pseudonym. As the bombing campaign by the anti-IS coalition intensified, Abood moved away - but returned later to record the heartbreaking destruction - but also the slow return of life, and colour, to the streets. For months, he roamed through the ruins with his camera, seeing himself as ”the guardian of the city." Raqqa's future is still very uncertain, but Abood now wants everyone to see his pictures, which he posts on Facebook, and know his real name. He hopes the colours he's showing will tempt the thousands of families who've fled Raqqa to return home, and rebuild their lives, and their city.

Producer: Mohamad Chreyteh
Sound mix: James Beard
Production coordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Children running in Raqqa, 2019. Credit: Abood Hamam)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrwlx4)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv54mb0cl6r)
Iran nuclear deal: talks take place following election

Talks about reviving the Iran nuclear deal have been taking place in Vienna following the election of Ebrahim Raisi in Friday's presidential vote. Iran's chief nuclear negotiator said that Tehran and six world powers have moved closer to reviving the 2015 nuclear agreement.

Also in the programme: Parliamentary elections take place in Ethiopia on Monday despite continuing conflicts in the country; and on World Refugee Day we hear the personal story of one young woman whose family fled from South Sudan.

(Picture: New generation Iranian centrifuges on display during Iran's National Nuclear Energy Day in April 2021. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrwqn8)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl8)
Falconry: The history of hunting with birds of prey

The practice of hunting with birds of prey is thought to stretch back thousands of years. In early nomadic societies, falconry was used to hunt animals to provide food and clothing in places such as the steppes of Central Asia. As the practice spread, falconry evolved into a pastime that attracted the elite of European society, reflected in the extensive iconography of noblemen and women and their falcons. Today falconry is found in more than 90 countries around the world.

At its core remains the importance of the relationship between falconer and the bird of prey, a bond unlike any other between man and beast.

But although falconry has been classed as intangible cultural heritage by UNESCO, there are challenges to its survival. And some argue that falconry itself is exploitative.

Rajan Datar is joined by the president of the International Association for Falconry, His Excellency Majid al-Mansouri; Adrian Lombard, Chair of the South African Falconry Association; art historian Anne-Lise Tropato, the first Falconry Research Fellow at New York University Abu Dhabi, and social anthropologist Sara Asu Schroer who's researched the relationships between falconers and birds of prey through fieldwork in Britain and Europe.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service

[Image: Emirati Ali Mansouri trains a falcon in the Liwa desert. Credit: KARIM SAHIB/AFP via Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrwvdd)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrwz4j)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t8rvc3lwb)
Live Sporting Action

On this week’s Sportsworld with Delyth Lloyd, we will be live in Rome for the European Championship game Italy v Wales and also keep across Switzerland v Turkey to see which sides can book their place in the last 16.

We will have updates on the final round of the Golf's US Open as it gets underway in California, and we will head over to the South of France as Formula 1's World Champion Lewis Hamilton looks to cut Max Verstappen's lead at the top of the Championship.

(Photo by Ali Balikci/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrxbcx)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwzyc5)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmclpn9)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2d31)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrxg41)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgv)
The men who helped Carlos Ghosn flee

This week, two Americans went on trial in Japan, accused of smuggling former Nissan chief executive, Carlos Ghosn, out of the country in a music equipment box. On Business Weekly, we ask why they did it and if Mr Ghosn will ever face Japanese justice. Plus we hear from the broadcaster, author and activist Gretchen Carlson about the role she played in the #metoo movement. She sued her former boss at Fox News for sexual harassment and says more has to be done to protect women in the workplace. And how do you deliver bad news? We have a special report on the art of making employees redundant. Do you deliver bad news over Zoom or in person? Or just cancel their work passes? We learn how to do it properly. Plus, as prospectors descend on a small South African village, we hear how the discovery of what might be a diamond could potentially transform lives in one of South Africa’s poorest rural areas. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Tokyo Detention Centre sign, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrxkw5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv54mb0dk5s)
Iran nuclear talks advance

Delegates at talks in Vienna on Iran's nuclear programme say they've made progress but there are still gaps between the two sides. Teams from Iran and the EU both said there had been advances.

Also in the programme: Help for the Danube's pelicans; and Thelma and Louise 30 years on.

(Picture:European External Action Service Deputy Secretary General Enrique Mora and Iranian Deputy at Ministry of Foreign Affairs Abbas Araghchi wait for the start of talks on reviving the 2015 Iran nuclear deal in Vienna. Credit: EU handout via REUTERS)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrxpm9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Assignment Interview (w3ct2gb5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcm1wp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrxtcf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywp7v9b3xd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sgb3rg5k1)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcm5mt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kx0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 21 JUNE 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf521x3v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl79m8fj93)
Sweden's government on brink of collapse in row over rent

A vote of no confidence in prime minister Stefan Lofven's government will be held on Monday as politicians remain divided over rent control for newly-built apartments. Jenny Madestam, associate professor of political science at the Swedish Defence University in Stockholm, gives us the background. And Kit Yeung from the credit ratings agency Fitch explains how the vote could impact Sweden's economic recovery.
As the country emerges from lockdown, car showrooms across the US are struggling to keep up with demand for both new and used cars. We get the latest from automotive analyst Michelle Krebs.
Also in the programme, an investigation has found that North Korea is avoiding sanctions by doing business in the Democratic Republic of Congo. We speak to Michelle Krendler-Kretsch of anti-corruption group The Sentry, which discovered the practice.
And Bill Ribbans, the surgeon who spent his career treating famous athletes, tells us how more lucrative sponsorship deals are putting more pressure on top sportsmen and women to get back in action.

(Picture: Sweden's Prime Minister Stefan Lofven. Credit:Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnr8d7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2g8y)
Tooth and Claw: Crocodiles

We have a morbid fascination with predators. And we've had it since the very first people carved figures or painted on cave walls thousands of years ago. Predators are still revered as gods in many cultures. Our cultural fascination is equalled only by our biological fear, hardwired into our primate brains, because if you are not a predator, you ARE the prey. In this series, Professor Adam Hart and explores our complex, challenging and ambiguous relationship with Earth’s greatest predators by talking to the women and men who know them best, researchers who have spent their lives tracking them, protecting them and, sometimes, narrowly escaping them.

Today it’s the crocodile, part of the group known as crocodilians which also includes alligators and gharials, which first appeared 95 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period. Much like Tigers, they don’t stalk their prey but lie in wait – often just below the surface of the water, ready to leap out and snap those ferocious jaws on just about anything – including other predators. But as we’ll discover, there is a very different side to these much maligned creatures, who can be nurturing and cooperative. Adam speaks to Dr Marisa Tellez, Co-Founder of the Crocodile Research Coalition in Belize, Central America and Dr Alan Britton is a Zoologist and crocodile specialist in Darwin, Australia, who has a 5-metre croc named Smaug living in his back garden pond.

Produced by Rami Tzabar and Beth Eastwood

Picture: Caiman Crocodile's eye, close up, Credit: Jonathan Knowles/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5220vz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v64mv7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnrd4c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqm)
Why are we failing to protect the Amazon rainforest?

The Brazilian legislature is currently considering a bill that would legalise the private occupation of some public land in the Amazon region - a move that would most likely lead to further deforestation.

But could renewed international pressure from foreign governments and corporations demanding protection of the Amazon convince the Brazilian government to rethink its policies, or will they simply go ignored, as it favours short-term economic gain over long-term environmental protection?

Presenters Graihagh Jackson and Neal Razzell are joined by:

Diane Jeantet, freelance reporter
Manuela Andreoni, rainforest investigations fellow at the Pulitzer Centre
Marcello Britto, president of the Brazilian Agribusiness Association
Oliver Stuenkel, professor of international relations at FGV in São Paulo
Virgilio Viana, fellow at the International Institute for Environment and Development

Producer: Darin Graham
Researcher: Zoe Gelber
Series producers: Rosamund Jones and Richard Fenton Smith
Editor: Emma Rippon
Sound engineer: Tom Brignell


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5224m3)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Assignment Interview (w3ct2gb5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnrhwh)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f92)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5228c7)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v64wbh)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnrmmm)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6p)
Living through menopause

For a long time there was a wall of silence around the menopause, but more women are choosing to speak candidly about their complicated and illuminating experiences. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women on a mission to demystify the menopause.

Dr Nighat Arif is a British Pakistani family doctor specialising in women’s health. She is passionate about making the menopause a less taboo subject for all, but particularly for women for whom English is not their first language, and she often uses her social media channels to raise awareness.

Barbara Hannah Grufferman is an American writer whose work focuses on healthy aging. After struggling with her symptoms during menopause she decided to become a marathon runner. Her most recent book is Love Your Age and her newsletter is Menopause Cheat Sheet.

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE:
(L) Dr Nighat Arif (credit: courtesy of Dr Nighat Arif)
(R) Barbara Hannah Grufferman (credit: Howard Grufferman)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf522d3c)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhhg43)
Ethiopia faces election test

Parliamentary and regional elections take place against the backdrop of the conflict in Tigray

Hong Kong pro-democracy newspaper Apple Daily could close "in a matter of days" - with its finances frozen. We hear from an advisor to jailed tycoon Jimmy Lai.

And is the Pentagon taking UFOs more seriously? A highly anticipated report will be presented to Congress shortly.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf522hvh)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhhkw7)
Ethiopians go to the polls

But how free and fair will they be with conflict in Tigray and insecurity elsewhere.

Diplomats meet in Vienna for more Iran nuclear talks as hardliner Raisi becomes Iran's new president.

And in France regional elections indicate a poor showing for President Macron and his main opponent Marine Le Pen and her far right National Party.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf522mlm)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhhpmc)
Will Ethiopia's elections truly be representative

Around 20% of constituencies won't hold poll because of security or logistical problems.

Why are French political parties failing to engage with the electorate? We'll look at the poor turnout for both Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen in regional elections over the weekend.

And have extraterrestrials visited earth? A declassified report on UFOs will be released at the end of the month in the USA.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf522rbr)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5v)
REM lead singer Michael Stipe

Michael Stipe was the lead singer of one of the most influential bands of the last four decades, REM. He was the figurehead of indie rock, enigmatic, serious, political. Now he’s a visual artist, so how has his creative vision evolved?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwns3m4)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4v)
The economic life of Gaza

Israel's military says it struck a thousand targets in Gaza last month, in response to more than 4,300 missiles it claims were fired into Israel. With the latest bout of violence now over, the reconstruction can begin once again.

Manuela Saragosa speaks to Samir Mansour, who saw his famous Gaza bookshop destroyed before his eyes. International donors want to help rebuild businesses like Samir's. Elizabeth Campbell, director at the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, describes how this can be done without also enabling the Hamas government, which is labelled a terrorist group by the US, EU and Israel.

Israel and Egypt maintain a blockade on Gaza that has rendered commerce with the outside world almost impossible. But could the economy have great potential, were the blockade ever lifted? Asmaa AbuMezied of Oxfam points to Gaza’s fledgling startup scene, while Manal White of the social enterprise Zaytoun in London highlights the opportunity for Gazan agricultural exports.

Producer: Frey Lindsay

(Picture: Samir Mansour stands before the remains of his bookstore in Gaza; Credit: Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0y)
The Stonewall Inn

In June 1969, the gay community in New York responded to police brutality and harassment by rioting outside the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village. For several days there were battles with the police. The protest sparked the creation of the modern LGBTQ+ rights movement and the first Gay Pride events. Simon Watts spoke to Stonewall veteran, John O'Brien.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

PHOTO: Exterior of the Stonewall Inn, pictured in June 2015 (Credit: Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf522w2w)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwns7c8)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqj)
Does my equator look big in this?

Scales don’t come planet-sized, so answering a question from David in Ghana may require some ingenuity, after all, calculating the weight of the Earth is a huge task.
Using a set of weighing scales and a 400 year-old equation, Marnie Chesterton attempts to find out just how much the Earth weighs and is it getting heavier or lighter over time?
But how would a planet gain or lose mass? Which tips the scales: meteorites falling from space or gases constantly escaping from our atmosphere?
And does the answer have any implications for the future of Earth? Could the atmosphere eventually run out?

Contributors:
Anuradha TK, former project director at ISRO
Matt Genge, geologist at Imperial College London
Jon Larsen, researcher at the University of Oslo
Anjali Tripathi, astrophysicist
Ethan Seigel, journalist and astrophysicist

Presented by Marnie Chesterton.
Produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service.

[Image: Earth on scales. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf522zv0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnsc3d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5233l4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v65qkd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnsgvj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5237b8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt5)
Hunting 'The Serpent': The diplomat turned detective

There are disturbing descriptions throughout this episode that some listeners may find upsetting.

In the 1970s a serial killer was on the loose in South East Asia. His name was Charles Sobhraj, better known as The Serpent. When tourists began going missing, or turning up dead, Dutch diplomat Herman Knippenberg was tasked with investigating the disappearances. The chilling evidence he uncovered put Sobhraj behind bars with a life sentence.

Presenter and producer: Saskia Edwards

(Picture: collage of promotional photos from BBC One and Netflix's The Serpent and Herman Knippenberg's personal collection. Credit: BBC / © Mammoth Screen and Herman Knippenberg)

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf523c2d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v65z1n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnsqbs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf523gtj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv54zl9lg44)
Ethiopia PM faces first election amid conflict

Millions of Ethiopians are voting in twice-postponed parliamentary and regional elections, with nearly 20 percent of constituencies not taking part due to insecurity. Some opposition parties are boycotting the poll. No election is taking place in the northern region of Tigray, where civil war erupted in November, leading to a humanitarian crisis.

Also in the programme: the organisers of the Tokyo Olympics say they will allow up to 10,000 spectators in sporting venues; and as Hong Kong's most prominent pro-democracy newspaper is set to close down, will increasing Chinese pressure lead to businesses leaving the territory?

(Photo: Some 37 million people registered to vote in the election. Credit: Reuters)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf523lkn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnsyv1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y47zpx0ntph)
Swedish government toppled in no confidence vote

Sweden's leader Stefan Lofven has lost a confidence vote following a rent control dispute. The BBC's Maddy Savage explains the background, and we get analysis from Jonas Hinnfors, professor of political science at the University of Gothenburg. Also in the programme, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa asks how Gaza might go about reconstructing, following last month's violence between Israel and Hamas. Plus, as India rolls out free vaccinations for all adults, human rights activist Manjula Pradeep, of the Wayve Foundation in Ahmedabad, offers an assessment of the country's vaccine rollout thus far.

(Picture: Stefan Lofven following the no confidence vote. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf523q9s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkhh5kq87)
Tokyo 2020: Ten thousand spectators allowed in venues

Up to 10,000 Japanese fans will be permitted at Tokyo 2020 Olympic venues despite warnings from health bosses. We’ll be hearing from people in Japan about whether they will be entering the ballot for tickets.

We continue our conversations with people sharing experiences of the global coronavirus pandemic. Today we hear a conversation between people in Barbados, Greece and Egypt who work in the tourism industry. International travel restrictions implemented during the coronavirus pandemic have had a devastating effect on the global tourism industry.

And Dr Eleanor Murray - assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health – will answer listener questions on the latest coronavirus stories.

(Photo: File photo of The Olympic Ring. Credit: Adam Davy/PA Wire)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf523v1x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkhh5kv0c)
Ethiopia elections

Millions of Ethiopians are voting in parliamentary and regional elections, with nearly twenty percent of constituencies not taking part due to insecurity and a bloody conflict in the northern Tigray region. It's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed's first electoral test since coming to power in 2018. We hear from our reporter on the ground.

We continue our conversations with people sharing experiences of the global coronavirus pandemic. Today we hear a conversation between people in Barbados, Greece and Egypt who work in the tourism industry. International travel restrictions implemented during the coronavirus pandemic have had a devastating effect on the global tourism industry.

And Professor Manfred Green a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel will answer questions on the latest coronavirus stories.

(Photo: women queueing to vote in Ethiopia. Credit Reuters)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf523yt1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5242k5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v66pjf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwntftk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ncgr16ycj)
2021/06/21 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf524699)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwntkkp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2g8z)
Tooth and Claw: Lions

From Aslan to Simba, from the Wizard of Oz to heraldry, children in the West probably recognise this king of beasts before they can name the animals in their own back yards. But what about people who have lions roaming in their back yards literally? To find out more about the archetypal ‘man-eater; and how our increasingly complex relationship with them is playing out in Africa, Professor Adam Hart talks to two female researchers who have spent much of their lives working and living in lion country, helping to manage the wildlife conflicts that are becoming a threat to both humans and beasts.

Dr Moreangels Mbizah is the Founding Director of Wildlife Conservation Action in Zimbabwe, and Dr Amy Dickman heads up the Ruaha Carnivore Project in Tanzania.

Producer: Rami Tzabar and Beth Eastwood
Presenter: Professor Adam Hart.

(Photo: Lion, Credit: Nicholas Hodges/Getty Images)


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf524b1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv54zl9m9c1)
Ethiopia: delayed elections take place

Millions of Ethiopians have been voting in delayed parliamentary and regional elections, with nearly a fifth of constituencies not taking part due to insecurity.

Opposition parties have complained that their observers at some polling stations have been denied access and beaten. No poll took place in the entire northern region of Tigray, where civil war erupted in November leading to a humanitarian crisis.
Also on the programme: The latest from Spain as Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez announces that he wants nine Catalan separatists pardoned; and more on a much anticipated declassified report on UFOs that’s due to be delivered to the United States Congress.

(Picture: Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed casts a ballot during the Ethiopian parliamentary and regional elections, at a polling station in the town of Beshasha, Ethiopia Credit: Reuters/Tiksa Negeri)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf524fsk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwntt1y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 Antarctic Midwinter Broadcast (w3ct2gb6)
Antarctic Midwinter Broadcast

Every year, the BBC World Service makes this special programme for the team of scientists and support staff isolated at British research stations in the Antarctic midwinter. The Antarctic Midwinter Broadcast is unlike anything else on the BBC World Service. It features messages from family and friends at home as well as music requests from Antarctica.

Photo: Adelie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) on the southern end of the runway at Rothera Research Station. Credit: BAS/Chester Sands


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf524kjp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywpm3ljw2n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sgpd1nxq9)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwntxt2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48t4mmd32t)
Swedish government toppled in no confidence vote

Sweden's leader Stefan Lofven has lost a confidence vote following a rent control dispute. The BBC's Maddy Savage explains the background, and we get analysis from Jonas Hinnfors, professor of political science at the University of Gothenburg. Also in the programme, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa asks how Gaza might go about reconstructing, following last month's violence between Israel and Hamas. Plus, as India rolls out free vaccinations for all adults, human rights activist Manjula Pradeep, of the Wayve Foundation in Ahmedabad, offers an assessment of the country's vaccine rollout thus far.

(Picture: Stefan Lofven following the no confidence vote. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 22 JUNE 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf524t0y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqd8wz25bn)
US authorities open probe into SolarWinds' cyber breach

The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has begun the inquiry into last December's cyber attack on the IT provider, media reports say. It will ask whether some companies failed to disclose they had been affected. Our technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones explains the story.
As India offers its free vaccinations to all adults, human rights activist Manjula Pradeep of the Wayve Foundation in Ahmedabad offers an assessment of the country's vaccine rollout so far.
And what is it that makes a tweet go viral? Researchers at the University of Cambridge say they've discovered the secret: being rude. We hear more from postgraduate researcher Steve Rathje.
Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Dimuthu Attanayake, journalist and researcher for the LIRNE Asia digital policy think tank, who's in Colombo in Sri Lanka, and by Andy Uhler, reporter for Marketplace in Austin, Texas.

(Picture: The SolarWinds Corp. logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf524xs2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v67jrb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnv91g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2g7q)
Guru

Guru: A dark legacy

For the last year, BBC journalist and passionate yoga teacher Ishleen Kaur has been investigating allegations of sexual and emotional abuse at the heart of an organisation she once called home.

Fellow practitioners share with her their stories of cruelty, rape and even the sexual assault of a child - but she wasn't prepared for what she uncovered next.

Join Ishleen on her deeply personal journey into the dark legacy which haunts Sivananda Yoga, one of the world’s most revered yoga schools.


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5251j6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52558b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v67s7l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnvjjq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td3)
Lungelo Gumede: The uncanny art of wax sculpting

As you enter Lungelo Gumede’s studio, in the heart of South Africa's coastal city of Durban, you are greeted by the smell of paint, clay and other materials.

Across the room, what you see is surprising. At first glance, you are looking at Nelson Mandela, the recently departed King of the Zulu Nation, Goodwill Zwelithini and Queen Elizabeth II. As you get closer, of course, you discover they are wax figures elegantly dressed in real clothes.

That's what Lungelo specialises in - life size statues of prominent global figures in politics, sports and entertainment, with a special focus on African heroes. His art is celebrated across South Africa and, at only 36, he’s on a mission to create the country’s first ever wax museum.

Mpho Lakaje spends a week with Lungelo to discover what it takes to make a new wax figure.

Presented by Mpho Lakaje
Produced by Betsy Shepherd and Mpho Lakaje for the BBC World Service

**Image: Courtesy of Lungelo Gumede**


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52590g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhlc16)
Unesco: Great Barrier Reef should be listed as 'in danger'

It's warned Australia to take "accelerated action" on climate change - but the government there says it will oppose the recommendation.

We'll be looking at what lies behind the mysterious death of twenty miners in South Africa.

And concern grows about the spread of Covid variants in Africa - and what that might mean for vaccine resistance around the whole world


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf525drl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhlgsb)
Australia furious at Unesco's Great Barrier Reef stand

The Great Barrier Reef should be put on a list of World Heritage Sites that are "in danger" over harm caused by climate change, according to the UN's cultural body.

As American troops pull out of Afghanistan, the Taliban is already making substantial territorial gains. We'll be finding out just how far they have progressed.

And a new study claims that the Earth has a “pulse” - a destructive “heartbeat” that beats every 27.5million years causing extinctions, eruptions and floods. We find out more.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf525jhq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhlljg)
Australia angered by Unesco Great Barrier Reef plan

The Great Barrier Reef should be put on a list of World Heritage Sites that are "in danger" over harm caused by climate change, Unesco says.

In Spain, the prime minister is expected to pardon several leaders of the pro-independence movement in Catalonia.

And we'll hear from the artist creating what will be the UK's tallest ceramic sculpture.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf525n7v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkz)
Test-tube rhinos

Scientists have hatched an incredible plan to save the northern white rhino from extinction. The team is using IVF techniques to produce a calf because the only two females left alive are infertile. Nick Holland reports on how close they are to succeeding and of their hopes to eventually release a whole herd back into the wild.

Produced and presented by Nick Holland


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnw0j7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jfw)
Healthcare's digital future

Is medicine about to be transformed by digitisation and artificial intelligence?

Ed Butler has his cognitive abilities assessed by a computer app. Thomas Sawyer of the health tech company Cognetivity, which developed the AI-assisted app claims it will help revolutionise the early detection and treatment of Alzheimer's.

But pretty soon our wellbeing could be monitored by multiple apps - on our phones, in our bathroom scales, even in our toilets - streaming data back to computerised healthcare systems. That's the vision of Robert Wachter, chair of the department of medicine at the University of California in San Francisco. But he also tells Ed of the many pitfalls that could await us in this data-driven future. Plus Sarah Deeny of The Healthcare Foundation in the UK raises concerns about the sensitivity of some of the data being handled.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Doctor holds a tablet computer showing an X-ray image; Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5g)
Woubis, yossis and travestis: LGBT activism in Côte d’Ivoire

Abidjan in Côte d’Ivoire has a buzzing LGBT scene and the country is regarded as one of the more tolerant nations in West Africa. In this Witness History, Josephine Casserly speaks to Barbara, a trans, LGBT activist. In 1992, Barbara was among a group of protesters who stormed the office of a national newspaper, to protest against their depiction of LGBT people.

(Image: Barbara. Credit: From Barbara's personal collection)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf525rzz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g7q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnw48c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2g8z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf525wr3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5260h7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v68mgh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnwcrm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52647c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwf)
My mother, India’s forgotten disco diva

In 2014, Debayan Sen was cleaning the family attic in Kolkata when he made an unexpected discovery: a dusty, old vinyl record called Disco Jazz. What astonished him was that his mother Rupa was on the cover. Debayan had no idea his very traditional Indian mother had even had a music career. Not only would that album reveal Rupa’s secret disco past but also an underground fanbase of millions worldwide.

Zero Freitas in Brazil has amassed what's thought to be the world's largest privately owned vinyl record collection - with over six million copies. He’s been painstakingly cataloguing them for over a decade and also helps people track down old, forgotten tunes. (This is a shorter version of an interview first broadcast in 2015)

Jimmy Rugami is known as the vinyl king of Nairobi's Kenyatta market. He's travelled across east Africa collecting music in his little car, sometimes facing bandits and unfriendly border officials. (This is a shorter version of an interview first broadcast in 2018)

Picture: Rupa Biswas Sen holding a copy of her record Disco Jazz
Credit: Courtesy Rupa Biswas Sen


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5267zh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v68vyr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnwm7w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2g8z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf526cqm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv54zl9pc17)
Myanmar army clashes with Mandalay militia

Gunfire was exchanged during a raid on a boarding school being used as a militia base, according to local reports. This is the first time militia in Mandalay have come up against the army in a major city.

Also in the programme: Hong Kong's top pro-democracy newspaper closes its English language website; and Gabon is to be recognised for its efforts to preserve its rainforests.

Photo: A military handout photograph shows soldiers and police arresting people during a raid in Mandalay. Credit: EPA


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf526hgr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnwvr4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bg12ttmwg)
YouTube wins EU court copyright fight

The online video platform YouTube has won a battle over copyright in a top EU court. The ruling said online platforms are not liable for users uploading unauthorised works, unless the platforms fail to take quick action to remove or block the content. Nina O'Sullivan is an intellectual property lawyer at Mishcon de Reya, and explains what the ruling actually means for the firm. And we get further reaction from Sam Jones and Max Pardsley, who run the NitPix video channel, which parodies and reviews TV shows and movies. Also in the programme, whilst you might expect that the surge in home deliveries over the past 18 months would be a boost to cardboard firms supplying online retailers, Miles Roberts, chief executive of cardboard firm DS Smith tells us why profits at the business are down. Plus, the BBC's Ed Butler asks whether medicine is about to be transformed by digitisation and artificial intelligence.

(Picture: A YouTube logo in front of an EU flag. Picture credit: Reuters.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf526m6w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkhh5nm5b)
Coronavirus conversations: African doctors

The World Health Organisation has warned that a large number of poorer countries are not getting enough Covid-19 vaccines. This comes as some African countries are experiencing a third wave of coronavirus. We'll speak to frontline doctors across the continent to hear about the situation in their countries and the challenges they are facing.

Also, in Egypt a 20-year-old TikTok star has been detained after being convicted of human trafficking charges. On Sunday she was sentenced in absentia to 10 years in prison on charges accusing her of exploiting girls through video-sharing apps for money, which she denies. We'll hear more about the story from our correspondent in the capital Cairo.

And we'll answer your questions about coronavirus with our regular health expert. Today it's Dr Isaac Bogoch - infectious diseases physician and scientist from the University of Toronto.

(Photo: Dr Phumuzo Ndwambi, general surgeon at the Chris Hani Baragwanath academic hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. Credit: Dr Phumuzo Ndwambi|)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf526qz0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkhh5nqxg)
NFL: First ever current player comes out as gay

American football player Carl Nassib has become the first active NFL player to come out as gay. Nassib made the announcement in a video posted on his Instagram account and also donated $100,000 to a suicide prevention service for LGBTQ youth in America. We'll speak to an NFL reporter and also hear from other LGBTQ+ from around the world about their experiences of coming out as gay.

Also, we'll hear the story of a British man who fell victim to a romance fraud in Ukraine and lost most of his savings.

And we'll answer your questions about coronavirus with our regular health expert. Today it's Dr Swapneil Parikh - an infectious disease researcher at the Kasturba Hospital of infectious diseases in Mumbai, India.

(Photo: Las Vegas Raiders defensive end Carl Nassib celebrates at the end of the game in Inglewood 09/11/2020. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf526vq4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf526zg8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v69lfj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnxbqn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ncgr19v8m)
2021/06/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52736d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g7q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnxggs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls5)
Bias in AI – what next?

Our own bias is becoming engrained in computer code. There is a huge amount of evidence showing that human bias and ignorance is encoded into our digitally driven world. The impact of this is unsurprisingly impacting the most vulnerable communities the hardest – decisions on health care, employment and even police surveillance are now being made very often by machines. But can anything be done to stop this bias from getting any worse and can the current bias be removed? As part the WebSci 2021 conference Digital Planet looks at what can be done by public bodies and the private sector to improve AI ethics.

Joining us are Professor Lucy Hooberman, Professor Ricardo Baeza-Yates, Dr. Rumman Chowdhury and Dr. Margaret Mitchell.

(Image: Getty Images)

The programme is presenter by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Bill Thompson
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5276yj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv54zl9q684)
Spain pardons Catalan leaders over independence bid

The Spanish government has formally pardoned nine Catalan separatists who were convicted over a failed independence bid in 2017. The pardons have sparked controversy in Spain and tens of thousands protested against the decision this month. We speak to Catalonia’s president, Pere Aragonès.

Also in the programme: the voices of the Uigyhur parents pleading with the Chinese authorities to give them news of their missing children; and why European football's governing body has stopped a German city from lighting its stadium in rainbow colours.

(A protester holds a poster reading in English "independence is freedom" as people gather to protest the visit of Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez to Barcelona. Credit: EPA).


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf527bpn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnxpz1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf527gfs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywpm3lmrzr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sgpd1rtmd)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnxtq5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48t4mmgzzx)
YouTube wins EU court copyright fight

The online video platform YouTube has won a battle over copyright in a top EU court. The ruling said online platforms are not liable for users uploading unauthorised works, unless the platforms fail to take quick action to remove or block the content. Nina O'Sullivan is an intellectual property lawyer at Mishcon de Reya, and explains what the ruling actually means for the firm. And we get further reaction from Sam Jones and Max Pardsley, who run the NitPix video channel, which parodies and reviews TV shows and movies. Also in the programme, whilst you might expect that the surge in home deliveries over the past 18 months would be a boost to cardboard firms supplying online retailers, Miles Roberts, chief executive of cardboard firm DS Smith tells us why profits at the business are down. Plus, the BBC's Ed Butler asks whether medicine is about to be transformed by digitisation and artificial intelligence.

(Picture: A YouTube logo in front of an EU flag. Picture credit: Reuters.)



WEDNESDAY 23 JUNE 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf527py1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqd8wz527r)
Bitcoin falls below $30,000 on China crypto-crackdown

The cryptocurrency Bitcoin has fallen below $30,000 for the first time in five months, after China told its banks to stop supporting digital currency transactions. Winston Ma is the author of The Digital War: How China's Tech Power Shapes the Future of AI, Blockchain and Cyberspace, and brings us analysis.
Around 5.2 people became millionaires last year, making up more than 1% of the world's population for the first time in history. That's according to a report from Credit Suisse. We speak to Ruchir Sharma, an investor and author who has been researching the growing wealth of billionaires around the world.
And Jason Berry of from the Mental Health Productivity Pilot, which helps employers to understand the link between productivity and mental health, tells us why Bumble's decision to give its employees a week off to 'destress' isn't necessarily a good idea.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Samson Ellis, Taipei bureau chief at Bloomberg in Taiwan, and by Alexis Goldstein, senior policy analyst at Americans for Financial Reform who's in Washington.

(Picture: Bitcoin cryptocurrency coins. Picture credit: Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf527tp5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6bfnf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwny5yk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2g7l)
The Golden Age Of Gold

23/06/2021 GMT

Throughout time our definition of what is valuable and what is rare changes. Yet as economies boom and bust and fashions come and go, one thing seems to remain both financially valuable and personally precious - gold.

Across three episodes for The Compass, we will explore gold's past, present and future and humanity’s obsession with it - from being worshipped in the ancient world, to changing immigration forever during the Gold Rush, and the part it plays in our jewellery, coinage, finance and medicine.

Presenting this programme is jewellery designer Rajvi Vora. As a third generation Kenyan of Indian origin, she understands the cultural importance of gold first hand, and takes us on a journey to discover more about this precious metal that continues to shape the world.


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf527yf9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52825f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6bp4p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnyfft)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6l)
Shaunae Miller-Uibo

Shaunae Miller-Uibo recalls her part in one of the most memorable finishes in Olympic history, when she dove across the line to take 400m gold for the Bahamas at the 2016 Games.

She tells us how she developed the mindset and character to make it to the top and stay there, but also talks about life off the track, and how she switches off from the pressures of racing.

Presented by Scout Bassett, Ed Harry and Eliza Skinner and produced by Joel Hammer for BBC World Service.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5285xk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhp7y9)
Heavy fighting in northern Ethiopia

There are reports of heavy fighting in Ethiopia's Tigray region as the crisis there escalates.

Covid alerts increase in both Australia and New Zealand - we get an update on situation in Sydney

And Zambians are seeing soaring prices, as the country struggles through an economic crisis.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5289np)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhpcpf)
Taliban military gains

Taliban fighters have seized dozens of districts in Afghanistan as they step up attacks during the final withdrawal by foreign troops. So how far will the insurgents get?

As Spain pardons nine Catalan leaders who were imprisoned for their involvement in 2017’s outlawed referendum on independence, we'll how hear how the decision has gone down across the country.

And has bitcoin bitten off more than it can chew? China launches a crackdown on the cryptocurrency so we'll examine its future.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf528fdt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhphfk)
Restoring stability in Libya

An international conference on Libya is about to get underway in Germany and for the first time the country's transitional government is at the table too, but what can the foreign powers do to help restore stability?

We hear about the terrible conditions for migrant children being held on the US southern border.

And the video of police brutality going viral in the Czech Republic - members of the Roma community say its their "George Floyd moment."


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf528k4y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbc)
Rawdah Mohamed: Fashion and Muslim women

Somali-born fashion editor Rawdah Mohamed has taken up a senior role at the soon-to-be launched Vogue Scandinavia. After moving to Norway as a child, she became a model, and in April created a social media storm with a post called ‘Hands off my Hijab’. How far can she use fashion to overturn negative stereotypes of Muslim women?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnyxfb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnn)
How to communicate

Communicating with people from different cultures is a potential minefield. We’ll discover what can happen when things get lost in translation and we’ll also get some tips on how to avoid major clangers and embarrassing faux pas.

We hear from Nazir Ul-Ghani, the Europe, Middle East and Africa director of the software tool Workplace from Facebook and Roger Kreuz, a professor of psychology at the University of Memphis, tells us what can go wrong when companies try to expand into new territories without doing their homework. Plus, we get insights from Lisa Thorne, founder of TogetherGlobal.com who helps personnel in international banks better understand their colleagues in different countries; she also tells us about an unfortunate misunderstanding of her own in 1980s Tokyo. Plus, Jab Borgstrom, worldwide chief creative officer of advertising giant BBH Group, explains how his language skills and dyslexia help him approach communication in a very unique way. Plus Bibek Shrestha from NIC ASIA Bank in Kathmandu, Nepal, tells us how a simple greeting can say a thousand words.

Presenter: Elizabeth Hotson
Producer: Sarah Treanor

(Picture of people talking via Getty Images).


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7q)
The secret diaries of 'Gentleman Jack'

The discovery of the diaries of 19th-century Englishwoman Anne Lister, who wrote in secret code about her love affairs with women and has been called the first modern lesbian. A landowner and a businesswoman, she defied the conventions of the time and was nicknamed 'Gentleman Jack' in the Yorkshire town of Halifax where she lived, because of the way she dressed and acted. Louise Hidalgo spoke to Helena Whitbread, who discovered Anne Lister's diaries in 1983 and spent five years decoding them.
This programme is a rebroadcast.

Picture: portrait of Anne Lister, of Shibden Hall, Halifax (credit: Alamy)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf528nx2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2g7l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnz15g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf528sn6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf528xdb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6cjcl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnz8nq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52914g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyp)
I survived Chechnya's 'gay purge'

In March 2017 Amin Dzhabrailov was dragged out of the hair salon where he worked and bundled into the boot of a car. It was the start of an unprecedented crackdown targeting LGBT people in the Russian republic of Chechnya. Amin says he was taken to a warehouse and tortured alongside other gay men before being outed to his family, who were encouraged to kill him. After his release he knew his life in Chechnya was over and he had to escape - what he couldn't have guessed was where his next steps would take him. Two years later he would go public with his story, defying Chechnya's feared leader and becoming the first Chechen victim of the crackdown to do so. Warning: This programme contains graphic descriptions of torture.

For decades there was a rule in America that banned girls from playing league games in one of the country's most popular sports - baseball. That was until a determined 12-year-old came along. Outlook's Colm Flynn went to meet Maria Pepe, who fought to get the rules changed in the 1970s. This programme was first broadcast in July 2018.

Producer: Kevin Ponniah
Presenter: Emily Webb

Picture credit: Amin Dzhabrailov

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5294wl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6crvv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnzj4z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf5298mq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv54zl9s7yb)
US holding unaccompanied migrant children in 'alarming conditions'

Rampant disease and allegations of sexual abuse were uncovered at a camp in El Paso, Texas, during a BBC investigation. More than 2,000 teenaged children at the camp who crossed the US-Mexico border alone are waiting to be reunified with family in the US.

Also in the programme: The pro-democracy Hong Kong newspaper Apple Daily announces it will close; and how a drought in Madagascar is leaving hundreds of thousands of people short of food.

Photo: A US border detention camp in El Paso, Texas. Credit: BBC


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf529dcv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwnzrn7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cp65qyhfh)
Morgan Stanley to bar unvaccinated staff

Wall Street bank Morgan Stanley's staff will be barred from entry unless Covid vaccinated. The BBC's business editor Simon Jack explains the background to the new policy, which will also apply to visitors. And Geneva-based international trade lawyer Arthur Appleton considers the legal implications of the move. Also in the programme, the pro-democracy Hong Kong newspaper Apple Daily has announced it is to cease production on Thursday, following the arrest of several executives last week. Jack Hazelwood is a columnist for the paper, currently writing from the UK, and gives us his reaction to the news. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the potential pitfalls involved when communicating for work with people from different cultures. Plus, on Intenational Women in Engineering Day, we meet Susana Brooks, who is an engineer at Britain's energy supply network National Grid, working on how to adapt power networks for a low carbon future.

(Picture: Signs on the Morgan Stanley building in New York. Picture credit: Reuters.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf529j3z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkhh5rj2f)
Apple Daily: Hong Kong pro-democracy paper to close

Hong Kong's largest pro-democracy paper Apple Daily has announced its closure following a raid and arrests over allegations that its reports have breached national security law. We speak to a young journalist who lost her job about the future of media scene and press freedom in the city.

More than 20 Russian aircraft and two coastguard ships have shadowed a British warship sailing near Crimea. Our colleague from BBC Russian Service explains.

As part of our coronavirus conversations series, we connect with doctors in Indonesia where the largest rise of daily number of virus cases was recorded this week. We'll also speak to our regular expert, Dr Maria Sundaram, about "Delta plus" strain of the coronavirus and today's other pandemic headlines.

(Photo: A handout photo made available by Apple Daily shows a poster that reads "I love Apple Daily" in the newsroom of the newspaper in Hong Kong, China, 23 June 2021. Credit: APPLE DAILY HANDOUT/EPA)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf529mw3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkhh5rmtk)
Coronavirus conversations: Indonesian doctors

As part of our coronavirus conversations series, we connect with doctors in Indonesia where the largest rise of daily number of virus cases was recorded this week and where many doctors have contracted Covid-19 despite being vaccinated.

Our regular expert, Dr Maria Sundaram, tells us about "Delta plus" strain of the coronavirus and today's other pandemic headlines.

Health workers in Ethiopia say dozens of people have been killed in an airstrike on a market in the northern Tigray region. We hear more from our correspondent.

Hong Kong's largest pro-democracy paper Apple Daily has announced its closure following a raid and arrests over allegations that its reports have breached national security law. We speak to a young journalist who lost her job about the future of media scene and press freedom in the city.

And we'll get an update on Britney Bear's legal battle over who should control her personal and financial life.

(Photo: A doctor conducts a routine medical checkup for a mother and her baby who were exposed to COVID-19, at the Bogor City Hospital, Indonesia, 23 June 2021. Indonesia has recorded over two million COVID-19 cases since the beginning of the pandemic. Credit: ADI WEDA/EPA)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf529rm7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf529wcc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6dhbm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp07mr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ncgr1dr5q)
2021/06/23 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52b03h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2g7l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp0ccw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvd)
Tanzania joins Covax

As Tanzania joins Covax, Rhoda Odhiambo discusses the challenges ahead and says 'joining' makes it sound simple but the requirements that need to be put in place are far from simple. Also,results from the first national TB prevalence survey in South Africa shows that the disease is found more in men and young people than previously recognised. Claudia talks to professor Martie van der Walt, director of the TB platform of the South African Medical Research Council while Taurai Maduna reports from a TB screening clinic in Diepsloot, Gauteng Province. Plus, professor Catherine Loveday on new research assessing lockdown memories and what they mean.

Claudia's studio guest is Matt Fox from Boston University.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Photo: Portrait of a young man wearing a face mask in Nungwi, Tanzania. Credit: Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52b3vm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv54zl9t357)
Dozens reported killed in air attack on Tigray market

Tigrayan rebel forces are said to have made advances in recent days. This has been denied by the Ethiopian government. Thousands of people have been killed and millions displaced after conflict erupted almost eight months ago. We hear from medical staff in Mekelle who told Newshour that soldiers had prevented a convoy of ambulances from reaching the site of the attack. We also hear from a former US Ambassador to Ethiopia and the BBC's Tigrinya Service based in Nairobi.

Also on the programme: the final edition of Hong Kong's pro-democracy newspaper hits the streets; and a special report on a migrant camp in the Texas desert, home to hundreds of children who've crossed the US Southern Border.

(Photo: An infant injured by an air strike that killed dozens of people in Ethiopia's Tigray region is treated at hospital, in Mekelle, Ethiopia Credit: Reuters)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52b7lr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp0lw4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52bcbw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywpm3lqnwv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sgpd1vqjh)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp0qm8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48t4mmkwx0)
Morgan Stanley to bar unvaccinated staff

Wall Street bank Morgan Stanley's staff will be barred from entry unless Covid vaccinated. The BBC's business editor Simon Jack explains the background to the new policy, which will also apply to visitors. And Geneva-based international trade lawyer Arthur Appleton considers the legal implications of the move. Also in the programme, the pro-democracy Hong Kong newspaper Apple Daily has announced it is to cease production on Thursday, following the arrest of several executives last week. Jack Hazelwood is a columnist for the paper, currently writing from the UK, and gives us his reaction to the news. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the potential pitfalls involved when communicating for work with people from different cultures. Plus, on Intenational Women in Engineering Day, we meet Susana Brooks, who is an engineer at Britain's energy supply network National Grid, working on how to adapt power networks for a low carbon future.

(Picture: Signs on the Morgan Stanley building in New York. Picture credit: Reuters.)



THURSDAY 24 JUNE 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52blv4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqd8wz7z4v)
John McAfee: Anti-virus creator dies in prison

Anti-virus software entrepreneur John McAfee has been found dead in a Barcelona prison cell hours after a Spanish court agreed to extradite him to the US to face tax evasion charges. We speak to Steve Morgan the Editor-in-Chief at Cybercrime Magazine who knew him well. Also in the programme, Wall Street bank Morgan Stanley's staff will be barred from entry unless Covid vaccinated. Geneva-based international trade lawyer Arthur Appleton considers the legal implications of the move. Meanwhile, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports on the potential pitfalls involved when communicating for work with people from different cultures. Plus, on International Women in Engineering Day, we meet Susana Brooks, who is an engineer at Britain's energy supply network National Grid, working on how to adapt power networks for a low carbon future. Crain’s Chicago Business editor Ann Dwyer and Simon Littlewood of ACG Global in Singapore join us with their commentary throughout the show.

(Picture: John McAfee. Credit: Reuters)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52bql8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6fbkj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp12vn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxg)
Nigeria’s kidnapped children

Since December, gangs have seized more than a thousand students and members of staff from schools in armed raids across northern Nigeria. The wave of abductions is having devastating consequences for the country, which already has the highest number of children out of education anywhere in the world. Parents face extortionate financial demands in exchange for the freedom of their sons and daughters, and many families in Africa’s most populous nation are now too afraid to send their children to class. Some have decided to flee rural areas for the relative security of cities, adding to demographic pressures and threatening food supplies as crops go untended. For Assignment, the BBC’s Mayeni Jones travels across north-western Nigeria, meeting those who have been affected by the crisis in order to understand why it has arisen – and what the authorities can do to stop it.

Producers: Naomi Scherbel-Ball in Lagos and Michael Gallagher in London
Sound mix: James Beard
Production Co-ordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Mrs Sani shows a photo of her two daughters Rejoice and Victory. They were kidnapped from their school in March and were finally released after being held captive for almost two months. Credit: BBC)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52bvbd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52bz2j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6fl1s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp1bbx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfs)
The lure of on-demand groceries

Do you need a lemon right now but don’t want to leave the house? Just download an app and you’ll have it in 13 minutes. That’s the kind of service you can expect from a swathe of new ‘rapid delivery’ grocery apps. Dozens have appeared around the world since the start of the pandemic, and investors have been flocking to invest, pumping billions into the sector. So are these apps the obvious next step in our on-demand lifestyles, or should they be a cause for concern? When it comes to food, can things become just a bit too convenient?

Tamasin Ford hears from one company boss with big ambitions and a former competition lawyer who’s worried these apps could spell the end for smaller food stores. Plus, we travel to Istanbul in Turkey where people have already been using them for years.

(Picture: Man sat on sofa groceries being handed to him. Credit: Getty/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Alec Dent: Co-Founder, Weezy
Kaya Genç: Novelist
Michelle Meagher: Founder, Balanced Economy Project


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52c2tn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhs4vd)
Biden's plans to fight crime

US President Biden outlined new measures to curtail rogue gun dealers and illegal gun trafficking.

In a court session Britney Spears has spoken out about her last few years in conservatorship.

And China's Communist Party is about to celebrate its one hundredth birthday. Our correspondent speaks to one of China’s most acclaimed street photographers about the massive, sweeping changes he’s seen.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52c6ks)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhs8lj)
Biden proposals to fight crime wave

President Biden announces new gun control measures, targeting the dealers he described as merchants of death who break the law for profit.

Russia says one of its patrol vessels has fired warning shots at a British destroyer, off the coast of Crimea. Our correspondent is on-board HMS Defender.

And US pop star Britney Spears tells a court in LA her father has total control over her, saying the conservatorship arrangement is abusive and she wants it to end.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52cb9x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhsdbn)
Canada: hundreds of unmarked graves found at former indigenous school

Hundreds of unmarked graves have been found at a former residential school for indigenous people in Canada. It's the second such case in a matter of weeks. The co-chair of the North American Indigenous Peoples' Caucus tells us this amounts to "crimes of genocide."

President Biden takes on soaring levels of violence and the highly sensitive issue of gun control - we hear how he intends to go about it.

And why Italy and the Vatican are at odds over a new anti-homophobia law.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52cg21)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z23)
Are the Tokyo Olympic games in trouble?

In just under a month’s time Japan’s capital city Tokyo will host the 32nd Olympic Games.

They were due to take place last year but were delayed because of the pandemic.

But even 12 months later the Japanese public is far from enthused at the prospect of thousands of athletes and their entourages turning up just as the country is experiencing a fourth wave of the coronavirus.

So, Tanya Beckett asks if Japan can pull off the greatest show on earth during a pandemic?

Produced by Soila Apparicio and Rob Cave.


(People pose next to the Olympic Rings in Tokyo, Japan, March 2020. Credit: Carl Court/ Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp1tbf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9c)
Can we trust Big Tech with our health data?

Big Tech companies such as Google, Amazon and Microsoft are moving into AI healthcare services in a big way. But can we trust private, for-profit, companies to use our data properly? Prof Allyson Pollock, director of the Newcastle University Centre for Excellence in Regulatory Science in the UK, tell the BBC's Ed Butler she is alarmed at the rate healthcare services are being privatised in the country. And Nicholson Price, Professor at the University of Michigan School of Law in the US, warns that the stakes are different when tech companies collect healthcare than say marketing information. But Dr Robert Wachter, Professor and Chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, says that though these concerns are real, it may be a price we have to pay for better healthcare in the future.

Producers: Frey Lindsay, Laurence Knight.

(Image credit: Getty Creative)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x36)
China's LGBT 'cooperative marriages'

LGBT people in China sometimes arrange fake marriages to hide their sexuality. Homosexuality is not illegal in China but there is discrimination against LGBT people. In 2005 Lin Hai set up a website to allow lesbians and gay men to get in touch with each other. He came up with the idea to stop his family from putting pressure on him to get married. He spoke to Yashan Zhao in 2019 for Witness History.
This programme is a rebroadcast.

(Photo: Lin Hai and his partner on holiday in Thailand in 2014. Credit: Lin Hai)

Show less


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52ckt5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp1y2k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52cpk9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl9)
The Wizard of Oz: A homegrown American fairy tale

The Wizard of Oz is best known as one of the most watched films of all time, or as one of its many re-incarnations, such as the hugely successful Broadway musical Wicked or the Soviet, The Wizard of the Emerald City. But fewer people nowadays may be aware of the original book by the American writer L. Frank Baum that inspired these stories about a young girl who travels through a magic land in the company of a talking scarecrow, a tin man and a fearful lion. While he was a controversial figure, it was L. Frank Baum’s ideas about social justice and rights for women which pervade not just The Wizard of Oz but also its sequels, and explain why this story in its many forms has inspired many minority groups, from the African American to the LGBT communities.

Joining Bridget Kendall is Michael Patrick Hearn, considered to be the world’s leading Oz scholar, and author of The Annotated Wizard of Oz; Dr Sally Roesch Wagner, who specialises in the feminist aspects of The Wizard of Oz including the influence of Frank Baum’s mother-in-law, the women’s rights campaigner, Matilda Joslyn Gage, and the Russian writer Olga Zilberbourg who has studied the very popular Soviet version of the story.

Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service.

[Image: Publicity still from the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz. Credit: Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l8b)
The Panenka penalty

In June 1976, Czechoslovakia won the men’s European football championship with probably the most famous penalty kick in history. During a penalty shootout against West Germany, midfielder Antonin Panenka waited for the goalkeeper to dive and then casually chipped the ball down the middle of the goal. The technique is now known as a “Panenka” and has been copied by everyone from Zinedine Zidane to Leo Messi. Antonin Panenka talks to Ian Williams.


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52ct9f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6gf8p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp25kt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52cy1k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k36)
My life collecting the folk songs of Iraq

Sa'di al-Hadithi is one of Iraq's best-loved vocalists, known for researching, collecting and translating the folk songs and poetry from the area around the city of Haditha, where he grew up. Raised mostly by his grandmother, his memories of childhood are full of music and poetry, and of the love of his family - but following the Ba'ath party's rise to power in Iraq in the 1960s, he was imprisoned for five years on the false charge of being a communist. He tells Emily Webb about why his years in prison were far from a cultural wasteland, his international singing career, and his enduring sense of love and duty to the songs he collected as a young man in Haditha.

When Rikke Schmit Kjaegaard fell seriously ill with bacterial meningitis no one thought she would make it. She survived but found herself in a terrifying situation, she couldn't talk and the only part of her body she could move was her eyes. At first, no one was aware she was conscious, but then someone noticed her attempts to communicate through the blink of her eyes. For this story Saskia Edwards spoke to Rikke and Peter Kjaergaard in June 2018.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Laura Thomas

Photo and credit: Sa'di al-Hadithi

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52d1sp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6gnry)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp2f22)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52d5jt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv54zl9w4vf)
Rescuers search rubble of collapsed Miami building

Rescuers with sniffer dogs are searching for survivors in the rubble of a 12-storey apartment building that partially collapsed in the US city of Miami. It’s not clear how many people were in the block when one side of it sheared off in the early hours of the morning.

Also in the programme: an indigenous group in Canada says it has found hundreds of unmarked graves at the site of a former school in Saskatchewan, just weeks after a similar discovery in British Columbia; and the sisters designing glasses specifically to fit black faces.

(Picture: The partially-collapsed apartment building near Miami. Credit: EPA/Cristobal Herrera-Ulashkevich)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52d98y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z23)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp2nkb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y496vzxzh1q)
UK junk food TV adverts face pre-9pm ban

The UK government is to impose a pre-9pm ban on TV adverts for unhealthy foods. Barry Popkin is professor of nutrition at the University of North Carolina, and discusses the impact of restrictions already in place around the world. And we get business reaction from Jon Mew, chief executive of the Internet Advertising Bureau. Also in the programme, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports from the Bigfoot craft beer and music festival, which recently took place in Warwickshire, on how festivals can emerge from coronavirus lockdowns. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare explores how best to deal with workplace rivalries.

(Picture: A man holds up a fast food burger. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52df12)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkhh5vdzj)
Hundreds of graves found at Canada residential school

Hundreds of unmarked graves have been found at a former residential school for indigenous children in western Canada, weeks after a similar find in British Columbia. We speak to indigenous people about Canada's school system during the 19th and 20th Centuries that separated indigenous children from their families.

As part of our Coronavirus Conversations series, we’ve brought together three people – in Nepal, South Africa and the US – to discuss their feelings of guilt about surviving or passing the virus to others.

We'll also speak to one of our regular coronavirus experts, Dr Emma Hodcroft, about today’s coronavirus stories including reports that Israel faces a new Covid surge despite being one of the most vaccinated nations in the world.

We’ll look back at the life of the anti-virus software entrepreneur John McAfee who has been found dead in a Spanish prison.

(Photo: Children"s shoes line the base of the defaced Ryerson University statue of Egerton Ryerson, considered an architect of Canada"s residential indigenous school system, following the discovery of the remains of 215 children on the site of British Columbia"s former Kamloops Indian Residential School, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada June 2, 2021. Credit: Chris Helgren/Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52djs6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkhh5vjqn)
Coronavirus conversations: Survivor's guilt

As part of our Coronavirus Conversations series, we’ve brought together three people – in Nepal, South Africa and the US – to discuss their feelings of guilt about surviving or passing the virus to others.

Dr Rick Malley, who specialises in vaccines at the Boston Children’s Hospital, will answer some audiences questions about the virus.

We get the latest from Ethiopia after the army denied targeting civilians in Tuesday's airstrike on the village of Togoga in the Tigray region.

Hundreds of unmarked graves have been found at a former residential school for indigenous children in western Canada, weeks after a similar find in British Columbia. We speak to indigenous people about Canada's school system during the 19th and 20th Centuries that separated indigenous children from their families.

(Photo: A woman is consoled by her relative after her husband died from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside a COVID-19 hospital in Ahmedabad, India, April 26, 2021. Credit: Amit Dave/Reuters)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52dnjb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52ds8g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6hd7q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp34jv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ncgr1hn2t)
2021/06/24 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52dx0l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp388z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3t)
Tales of unexpected DNA data

This week Jesse Bloom of Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research has published an account of some DNA sequence data he located in an internet archive, despite it having been removed from the US NIH’s Sequence Read Archive. He tells Roland Pease of its significance to our understanding of the beginning of the Covid pandemic, but also, of more general interest, to what it might tell scientists about the full availability of relevant virological evidence.

Elsewhere, Elena Zavala of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig has been using new techniques for sequencing tiny fragments of mitochondrial DNA found in layers of mud to trace a long narrative of different evolutionary species of human and animal and their changing fortunes. As she describes in a paper published in Nature, sediments from different depths of the floor of the famous Denisova cave tell a long story of different humans (Denisovan and Neanderthal), bears, hyenas and other animals living there over different periods in the last 250 thousand years.

Over in the journal Science, several papers describe a new type of early hominin found in Nesher Rambla, Israel, that may be yet another instance of a human species that didn’t quite make it. As Marta Lahr, professor in human evolutionary biology at Cambridge University tells Roland the new findings all point to the bigger question – given the similar ages, technologies, and even neighbourhoods that all these types of hominin shared, just what was it about our own direct ancestor species that enabled us to take over the world?

Since almost the beginning of the Covid pandemic, in some parts of the world, the drug Ivermectin has been repurposed as a therapy against the disease, with some even believing it to convey protection against infection – a situation not without tragic consequences. The evidence for any meaningful effect has been less than obvious to most scientists and health authorities. Not the first controversial drug in the story of Covid-19, the discourse has led to abuse directed at scientists and officials, and scathing arguments across social media. As Oxford University’s PRINCIPLE trial this week begins to include Ivermectin in its investigations, BBC Reality Check’s Jack Goodman reports on the Ivermectin’s tortuous path.




(Image: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52f0rq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv54zl9x02b)
Search for survivors in collapsed Miami building

Rescuers are still searching for survivors in the rubble of a 12-storey apartment, the back part of which collapsed overnight north of Miami. It’s still not clear how many people were in the block in the town of Surfside, but the emergency services say that one person has died and 51 others are unaccounted for.

Also in the programme: An indigenous group says it has found hundreds of unmarked graves in Canada and astronomers say they have found evidence of when the first stars and galaxies began to shine.

(Picture: A building that partially collapsed near Miami, Florida. Credit: Reuters)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52f4hv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z23)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp3hs7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52f87z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywpm3ltksy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sgpd1ymfl)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp3mjc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48t4mmnst3)
UK junk food TV adverts face pre-9pm ban

The UK government is to impose a pre-9pm ban on TV adverts for unhealthy foods. Barry Popkin is professor of nutrition at the University of North Carolina, and discusses the impact of restrictions already in place around the world. And we get business reaction from Jon Mew, chief executive of the Internet Advertising Bureau. Also in the programme, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports from the Bigfoot craft beer and music festival, which recently took place in Warwickshire, on how festivals can emerge from coronavirus lockdowns. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare explores how best to deal with workplace rivalries.

(Picture: A man holds up a fast food burger. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 25 JUNE 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52fhr7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqd8wzbw1y)
Biden announces bipartisan infrastructure deal

President Biden has announced he's reached a deal with senators from both parties on re-building US infrastructure. We talk to our correspondent Peter Bowes in Los Angeles. Also in the programme, we look at why Canada Goose, the maker of luxury-priced winter coats, has announced it will no longer use animal fur on its clothing. The UK government is to impose a pre-9pm ban on TV adverts for unhealthy foods. Barry Popkin is professor of nutrition at the University of North Carolina, and discusses the impact of restrictions already in place around the world. And we get business reaction from Jon Mew, chief executive of the Internet Advertising Bureau. Also in the programme, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson reports from the Bigfoot craft beer and music festival, which recently took place in Warwickshire, on how festivals can emerge from coronavirus lockdowns. We are joined throughout the programme by Paddy Hirsch, the editor of NPR's daily business and economics podcast, and Jyoti Malhotra from Delhi, the National & Strategic Affairs Editor at The Print.

(Image: Joe Biden at campaign event, Credit: Leah Mills/Reuters)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52fmhc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6j7gm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp3zrr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tz5)
Euro 2020: The knockouts begin

As the knockout stage of Euro 2020 gets underway, the former Denmark international and European Championship winner John Sivebek discusses the emotions of Danish fans after the collapse of Christian Eriksen in the opening game and their hard-fought qualification to the round of 16. We also hear from the former Austria captain Christian Fuchs as his team prepare for a difficult match against the in-form Italians....and the former Juventus player Sebastien Giovinco gives us the Italian perspective.


(Photo: Italian fans react as they watch the Wales match on giant screens at a fan zone in Rome. Credit: Antonio Masiello/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52fr7h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52fvzm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6jgyw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp4780)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g94)
Finding my Hinduism

Colourful temples, bells , incense and a multitude of deities and festivals - journalist Nalini Sivathasan grew up immersed in her parents’ religion, Hinduism. But as she has grown older, she has found it harder to connect with her faith and speaking to her friends, she finds she is not alone.

Unlike most other religions, Hinduism has no single founder, no single scripture nor commonly agreed set of teachings – which for some, can make it tricky to navigate.

On her journey to discover ‘her Hinduism’, Nalini talks to the Hindu Academy, which provides online classes and resources on the religion.

It’s seen a rise in engagement among young people over the past few years, yet the number of young people attending temples has fallen across the UK. Nalini visits a temple she grew up visiting to find out why and discovers how it’s trying to engage young people in ways other than worship.

For charity Go Dharmic, which was founded on the Hindu principle of dharma, practising seva - or selfless service - is the best way for young Hindus to connect with their faith and the world around them. While for vlogger Parle Patel, social media is the place to connect with young Hindus. But Parle says he is often criticised for proudly showcasing his Hinduism identity online.

Couple Abhinaya and Rahul are planning their Hindu wedding ceremony. For them the ceremony is more of a cultural event, rather than religious. Will understanding the importance and symbolism of the rituals bring them any closer to their faith?

Nalini also speaks to Indian politician Shashi Tharoor. While unsparing in his criticism of certain elements sometimes linked to Hinduism, he describes himself as a proud, believing Hindu. How is he able to navigate the apparent contradictions he sees within his religion?

Nalini tries to make sense of what it means to be a Hindu today, talks to those practising the faith in their own distinct way and decides whether there is a version of Hinduism out there which best suits her.


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52fzqr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhw1rh)
Dozens missing after Miami building collapse

At least one person has died after the collapse of the 12-storey residential building.

There's concern in Russia about a surge in Covid cases: 20,000 twenty in a day, the worst total since January.

And 100 days after Samia Suluhu Hassan came to power in Tanzania, we hear views in an opposition stronghold


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52g3gw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhw5hm)
Rescue workers hunt for survivors after Miami apartment collapse

We hear from the mayor of Surfside where the 12 storey building collapsed. Nearly 100 people are still missing.

The first study of its kind in Australia has found consistent links between racism and poor mental and physical health of Aboriginal Australians. 

And the former policeman Derek Chauvin is sentenced later today for the murder of George Floyd.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52g770)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2pndhw97r)
Governor declares state of emergency after apartment collapse

Around 100 people are still missing after 12 storey building collapsed in Miami.

The Afghan president is due to meet President Biden amidst the US troop withdrawal - with the Taliban making big gains.

And why getting people to vote could be the biggest ask in France's regional elections.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52gbz4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1b)
Zainab Ahmed: Can Nigeria avert financial meltdown?

Africa is going through its first recession in more than a quarter of a century because of the global downturn caused by the Covid pandemic. The economic crisis is being keenly felt in Nigeria, the continent’s most populous country. Its 200 million people are struggling with long-standing challenges, which have been exacerbated by the pandemic and deteriorating security. Zeinab Badawi speaks to Nigeria’s finance minister, Zainab Ahmed. What is her plan to avert financial meltdown as well as help deliver stability?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp4q7j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j0b)
Co-ordinating intimacy

There is a new job on film sets, a job that has grown out of the #MeToo movement. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Ita O’Brien, the woman who created the guidelines for the role, about why every film set needs an intimacy co-ordinator.

Could their inclusion as members of the production team become a legal requirement? We hear from Elizabeth Wagmeister, Variety magazine's senior correspondent in Los Angeles.

Producer: Sarah Treanor and Benjie Guy

(Photo: Actors Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan in the film Fifty Shades of Grey. Credit: Alamy)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyp)
The repeal of 'Don't ask, don't tell'

LGBT servicemen and women in the US armed forces had to keep their sexuality secret until the 'Don't ask, don't tell' policy was repealed in 2011. Lieutenant Colonel Heather Mack served under the policy for most of her military career. She spoke to Rachael Gillman about her experiences.
This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Lieutenant Colonel Heather Mack (l) with her wife Ashley (r) and their two children. Courtesy of Heather Mack


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52ggq8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh2)
Antivirus pioneer John McAfee found dead

The colourful and controversial entrepreneur created an entire industry with his early antivirus software. But he was now facing extradition from Spain to the US on tax charges. Plus, gamers say no to Facebook’s attempt to put ads in virtual reality titles. And has a year of meeting and hanging out virtually whetted people’s appetites for a metaverse? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Stock photo of John McAfee, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp4tzn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52glgd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsk)
Hydrogen: A climate game-changer?

With less than six months to go before the next big climate conference (COP26) in Scotland, the world's major polluters are under pressure to significantly increase their ability to cut greenhouse gas emissions. One of the solutions being discussed is to increase the production of clean hydrogen. At present most of the world's hydrogen has a high carbon footprint, but engineers are coming up with innovative ways to produce the gas with the help of renewable energy. They say it will allow for a faster reduction of carbon emissions without the need to overhaul existing industrial infrastructure. It’s also claimed that hydrogen-powered cells can drastically cut pollution from aviation and transportation.

But others argue that using large amounts of wind and solar power to create ‘green hydrogen’ is wasteful and that governments should instead focus on improving the supply of renewables. So how clean can hydrogen get and how valuable could it be in the fight against climate change? Will the high costs involved in developing the industry pay off in the long run, or does the technology give us all false hope? Ritula Shah and a panel of experts discuss the role of hydrogen in attempts to cut greenhouse gas emissions.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52gq6j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6kb5s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp52gx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tz5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52gtyn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f2)
Hotel Rwanda hero on trial

Paul Rusesabagina became internationally famous after the film Hotel Rwanda told the story of how he helped save over a thousand Tutsis during the 1994 genocide, sheltering them in the hotel where he worked. But many inside Rwanda dispute his heroic portrayal, and he's currently standing trial in Rwanda accused of terrorism offences. BBC Great Lakes journalist Prudent Nsengiyumva has been following the case.

World's oldest alligator
BBC Serbian had a big hit on its website last week with a story about probably the world’s oldest alligator. His name is Muja, he’s at least 85 years old, and lives in Belgrade zoo. BBC Serbian's Petra Živić was the lucky person who landed herself a daytrip to the zoo.

Vaccine inducements
Cars, gym membership, eggs and hand-blenders: global solutions to persuading the vaccine hesitant to take the jab, with BBC Russian's Oleg Boldyrev, Nisrine Hatoum of BBC Arabic and BBC Gujarati's Roxy Gagdekar.

Back to the country in South Korea
The Covid-19 pandemic has led to many in South Korea to leave the built up, super-competitive cities, and relocate to the country. BBC Korean's Julie Yoonnyung Lee follows the story of Yun Sihu, whose family moved from Seoul to a remote village, where he now attends a tiny school, and spends his days playing in rivers and fields.

Connecting the favelas
They call it “the Favela LinkedIn,” a database that neighbours from Paraisopolis and volunteers have created to connect people looking for jobs with local companies in the second largest favela in São Paulo. BBC Brasil’s Thais Carranca went to see this and other innovative initiatives to fight the effects of Covid-19.

Image: Paul Rusesabagina at the Supreme Court in Kigali, Rwanda
Credit: Simon Wohlfahrt/AFP/Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52gyps)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6kkp1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp59z5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52h2fx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv54zl9z1rj)
Miami building collapse : Four dead and 159 missing

Rescuers are working around the clock to try and find survivors who may be trapped in the rubble of a 12-story building that collapsed near the US city of Miami. Structural engineer in Florida Greg Batista explains what he thinks may have contributed to the collapse.

Also on the programme: The Prime Minister of Pakistan, Imran Khan, is facing a growing backlash after he blamed victims of rape for wearing "very few clothes" and conflict in Afghanistan continues ahead of the first face to face meeting between President Biden and the Afghan President Ashraf Ghani.

(Picture: Collapsed building in Miami. Credit: AFP)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52h661)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n1b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp5kgf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46rjt40gny)
Amazon and Google probed over online reviews

Amazon and Google are under investigation in the UK over the prevalence of fake reviews. Natasha Lomas of the technology news website TechCrunch discusses the background to the move. And we ask Agustin Reyna of the European consumer association BEUC what more the tech giants could be doing to combat the problem. Also in the programme, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on the emergence of the intimacy co-ordinator role that has arisen on film sets, partly as a result of the #MeToo movement. Plus, South Africa's Rooibos tea has become the first African product to be given protected designation of origin status by the European Union, meaning tea sold with the name in the bloc must come from two particular regions outside Cape Town. Professor Johann Kirsten is an expert on the economics of origin-based foods in Stellenbosch in Western Cape province, and discusses the significance of the development for South African producers.

(Picture: A woman with a payment card looks at a laptop. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52h9y5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkhh5y9wm)
Miami building collapse: Dozens are still missing

We’ll get the latest on the building collapse in Miami. We’ll speak to our reporter at the scene and hear from some of those whose relatives are unaccounted for.

Russia is seeing a surge in infections and our correspondent Sarah Rainsford - who has been reporting from St Petersburg - explains what's caused this latest surge. We'll also get questions answered on the pandemic from our regular expert, Dr Megan Murray from Harvard Medical School.

We’ll hear what Americans think about the deal President Biden has announced for an infrastructure bill that includes funding for roads, bridges, public transport and internet.

(Photo: Emergency crew members search for missing residents in a partially collapsed building in Surfside, near Miami Beach, Florida, U.S., June 24, 2021. Credit: Octavio Jones/Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52hfp9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxkhh5yfmr)
Miami building collapse: Four people confirmed dead

The number of people listed as missing after the collapse of a 12-storey building in the US city of Miami has risen to 159. We’ll speak to our reporter at the scene and to some of those whose relatives are unaccounted for.

Russia is seeing a surge in infections and our correspondent Sarah Rainsford - who has been reporting from St Petersburg - explains what's caused this latest surge. We'll look at today’s other coronavirus stories with our regular expert Dr Marc Mandelson in Cape Town, South Africa.

We’ll also go to Minneapolis where Derek Chauvin – who was convicted in April for the killing of George Floyd – will be sentenced today.

(Photo: Emergency crews continue search and rescue operations for survivors of a partially collapsed residential building in Surfside, near Miami Beach, Florida, U.S. June 25, 2021. Credit: Octavio Jones/Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52hkff)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52hp5k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxj1v6l94t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp61fy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0ncgr1ljzx)
2021/06/25 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjlf52hsxp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdvwp6562)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqk)
What happened to my sense of smell?

It took a while before it was officially recognised as a major symptom of Covid-19, but loss of smell has affected up to 60 percent of people who have had the virus. And for a significant portion, smell continues to be an issue for weeks or months after their recovery. So what’s going on and how can you get your sense of smell back?

We tend to think of our sense of smell as something universal – if it smells bad to me, it probably does to you but that is not the case for CrowdScience listener Annabel, who wonders why things other people love to sniff, she finds disgusting. Anand Jagatia investigates the science of smell, gets up close to the world’s smelliest plant and finds out if smell training can help those with long-term issues after Covid.


Contributors
Ellie Byondin, supervisor of the Princess of Wales Conservatory at London’s Kew Gardens
Thomas Hummel, University of Dresden
Carl Philpott, from the UK’s Norwich Medical School
Sissel Tolaas, artist and smell historian based in Berlin
Noam Sobel, Weizmann institute of science

Presented by Anand Jagatia and Produced by Marijke Peters for the BBC World Service


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Amazon and Google probed over online reviews

Amazon and Google are under investigation in the UK over the prevalence of fake reviews. Natasha Lomas of the technology news website TechCrunch discusses the background to the move. And we ask Agustin Reyna of the European consumer association BEUC what more the tech giants could be doing to combat the problem. Also in the programme, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on the emergence of the intimacy co-ordinator role that has arisen on film sets, partly as a result of the #MeToo movement. Plus, South Africa's Rooibos tea has become the first African product to be given protected designation of origin status by the European Union, meaning tea sold with the name in the bloc must come from two particular regions outside Cape Town. Professor Johann Kirsten is an expert on the economics of origin-based foods in Stellenbosch in Western Cape province, and discusses the significance of the development for South African producers.

(Picture: A woman with a payment card looks at a laptop. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rt1)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3ct1rt1)

The Assignment Interview 10:06 SUN (w3ct2gb5)

The Assignment Interview 22:06 SUN (w3ct2gb5)

The Assignment Interview 03:06 MON (w3ct2gb5)

The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2dqm)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2dqm)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2dqm)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct2g7k)

The Compass 02:32 WED (w3ct2g7l)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct2g7l)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct2g7l)

The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p6n)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p6p)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p6p)

The Cultural Frontline 23:32 SAT (w3ct1pf3)

The Cultural Frontline 04:32 SUN (w3ct1pf3)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1pf3)

The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2fz5)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct2fz5)

The Documentary 05:32 SUN (w3ct2g7p)

The Documentary 08:32 SUN (w3ct2ght)

The Documentary 02:32 TUE (w3ct2g7q)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct2g7q)

The Documentary 20:06 TUE (w3ct2g7q)

The Documentary 10:06 WED (w3ct2fz5)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20f1)

The Fifth Floor 12:06 FRI (w3ct20f2)

The Fifth Floor 18:06 FRI (w3ct20f2)

The Food Chain 04:32 THU (w3ct1rfs)

The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3ct1rfs)

The Food Chain 22:32 THU (w3ct1rfs)

The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rl8)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3ct1rl9)

The History Hour 19:06 SAT (w3ct1z70)

The Inquiry 12:06 SUN (w3ct1z22)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z23)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct1z23)

The Inquiry 22:06 THU (w3ct1z23)

The Lazarus Heist 09:32 SAT (w3ct2f92)

The Lazarus Heist 22:32 SUN (w3ct2f92)

The Lazarus Heist 03:32 MON (w3ct2f92)

The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172xyxhpkwtzrw)

The Newsroom 05:06 SAT (w172xyxhpkwvc08)

The Newsroom 11:06 SAT (w172xyxhpkww2h1)

The Newsroom 23:06 SAT (w172xywp7v97709)

The Newsroom 02:06 SUN (w172xyxhpkwxwnz)

The Newsroom 05:06 SUN (w172xyxhpkwy7xc)

The Newsroom 11:06 SUN (w172xyxhpkwyzd4)

The Newsroom 19:06 SUN (w172xyxhpkwzyc5)

The Newsroom 23:06 SUN (w172xywp7v9b3xd)

The Newsroom 02:06 MON (w172xyxj1v64mv7)

The Newsroom 04:06 MON (w172xyxj1v64wbh)

The Newsroom 11:06 MON (w172xyxj1v65qkd)

The Newsroom 13:06 MON (w172xyxj1v65z1n)

The Newsroom 19:06 MON (w172xyxj1v66pjf)

The Newsroom 23:06 MON (w172xywpm3ljw2n)

The Newsroom 02:06 TUE (w172xyxj1v67jrb)

The Newsroom 04:06 TUE (w172xyxj1v67s7l)

The Newsroom 11:06 TUE (w172xyxj1v68mgh)

The Newsroom 13:06 TUE (w172xyxj1v68vyr)

The Newsroom 19:06 TUE (w172xyxj1v69lfj)

The Newsroom 23:06 TUE (w172xywpm3lmrzr)

The Newsroom 02:06 WED (w172xyxj1v6bfnf)

The Newsroom 04:06 WED (w172xyxj1v6bp4p)

The Newsroom 11:06 WED (w172xyxj1v6cjcl)

The Newsroom 13:06 WED (w172xyxj1v6crvv)

The Newsroom 19:06 WED (w172xyxj1v6dhbm)

The Newsroom 23:06 WED (w172xywpm3lqnwv)

The Newsroom 02:06 THU (w172xyxj1v6fbkj)

The Newsroom 04:06 THU (w172xyxj1v6fl1s)

The Newsroom 11:06 THU (w172xyxj1v6gf8p)

The Newsroom 13:06 THU (w172xyxj1v6gnry)

The Newsroom 19:06 THU (w172xyxj1v6hd7q)

The Newsroom 23:06 THU (w172xywpm3ltksy)

The Newsroom 02:06 FRI (w172xyxj1v6j7gm)

The Newsroom 04:06 FRI (w172xyxj1v6jgyw)

The Newsroom 11:06 FRI (w172xyxj1v6kb5s)

The Newsroom 13:06 FRI (w172xyxj1v6kkp1)

The Newsroom 19:06 FRI (w172xyxj1v6l94t)

The Newsroom 23:06 FRI (w172xywpm3lxgq1)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1hsj)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3ct1hsk)

The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3ct1yv9)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172xyt6xnh3817)

Weekend 07:06 SAT (w172xyt6xnh3csc)

Weekend 08:06 SAT (w172xyt6xnh3hjh)

Weekend 06:06 SUN (w172xyt6xnh64yb)

Weekend 07:06 SUN (w172xyt6xnh68pg)

Weekend 08:06 SUN (w172xyt6xnh6dfl)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wyn)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3ct1x0y)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct1x0y)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3ct1x0y)

Witness History 03:50 TUE (w3ct1x0y)

Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3ct1x5g)

Witness History 12:50 TUE (w3ct1x5g)

Witness History 18:50 TUE (w3ct1x5g)

Witness History 03:50 WED (w3ct1x5g)

Witness History 08:50 WED (w3ct1x7q)

Witness History 12:50 WED (w3ct1x7q)

Witness History 18:50 WED (w3ct1x7q)

Witness History 03:50 THU (w3ct1x7q)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3ct1x36)

Witness History 12:50 THU (w3ct1x36)

Witness History 18:50 THU (w3ct1x36)

Witness History 03:50 FRI (w3ct1x36)

Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3ct1wyp)

Witness History 12:50 FRI (w3ct1wyp)

Witness History 18:50 FRI (w3ct1wyp)

WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f38)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzl79m8fj93)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y47zpx0ntph)

World Business Report 23:32 MON (w172y48t4mmd32t)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172y4bg12ttmwg)

World Business Report 23:32 TUE (w172y48t4mmgzzx)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172y4cp65qyhfh)

World Business Report 23:32 WED (w172y48t4mmkwx0)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172y496vzxzh1q)

World Business Report 23:32 THU (w172y48t4mmnst3)

World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172y46rjt40gny)

World Business Report 23:32 FRI (w172y48t4mmrpq6)

World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1tz5)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1tz5)

World Football 22:32 FRI (w3ct1tz5)