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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 12 JUNE 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfz3fn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqckcbwgrc)
Acute food shortages in northern Ethiopia

The UN warns of food shortages in Ethiopia's Tigray region, so is famine being concealed? Freelance journalist Samuel Getachew has visited the affected areas in recent weeks, and tells us what he saw. And we get wider context from Peter Smerdon of the UN's World Food Programme. Also in the programme, Kai Ryssdal from our sister programme Marketplace talks about how rising lumber prices are pushing the cost of housing up. The BBC's Maddy Savage visits Northvolt's new electric car battery factory in northern Sweden. Plus, as Hong Kong introduces strict new movie censorship rules as a result of the territory's new national security law, former civil servant Rachel Cartland, who still lives in Hong Kong, gives us her reaction.

All through the programme we'll be joined by Peter Ryan of ABC in Sydney.

(Picture: A man in Tigray collects a box of food provided by USAID. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfz75s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9l1v51)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1nlg5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbj)
English cricket's social media row: What's next?

We discuss the latest developments following the suspension of England bowler Ollie Robinson and ask how diverse is English cricket?

We’ll hear from the now permanent CEO of Cricket Australia Nick Hockley. He tells us more about whether English fans will be likely to attend the Ashes in Australia, whether Australian players will be playing in the IPL and their selection for The Hundred.

And we hear from Australia Women’s World Cup winner Megan Schutt on reciprocal IVF after announcing that her wife is pregnant.

Photo: The England team line up in their Anti-Discrimination T-Shirts during the 'Moment of Unity' before day one of the second Test Match between England and New Zealand at Edgbaston. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfzbxx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f0)
Germany's apology to Namibia

The German state has formally recognised that its colonial troops committed genocide in what's now Namibia at the start of the twentieth century. It is also paying $1.3 billion towards development projects in affected communities, but as BBC Africa's Pumza Fihlani reports, the offer has not been welcomed by descendants of the Nama and Herero survivors.

South Korea's 'flower prescription' tattooist
A tattoo artist in South Korea is using her art to help clients who have struggled with their mental health. She works with them to design flower tattoos which cover self-harm and traumatic scars. BBC Korean's Julie Yoon has been to meet her.

A Fifth Floor guide to Cornwall
Leaders from the G7 nations are meeting in the Cornish holiday resort of Carbis Bay to discuss the world's biggest issues. It's a packed agenda, but should they have a few hours off, we asked our colleagues on the Fifth Floor for their tips on where to go, what to do, and what to pack. Suggestions from Issariya Praithongyaem of BBC Thai, BBC Brasil's Eric Camara, Janina Litvinova of BBC Russian and Dahami Ranaweera of BBC Sinhala.

Returning cheetahs to India
Cheetahs are set to make a comeback in India, where they became extinct more than half a century ago. They have a rich history in the country, and were bred for sport under the Mughals. BBC correspondent Soutik Biswas tells us about the efforts to get the world’s fastest cat back into the wild.

Israeli, Jewish and Moroccan
BBC Arabic’s Fethi Benaissa recently made a short film about Israeli Moroccan singer Neta Elkayam. Her music gives a clue to her background, born in Israel to Jewish Moroccan parents, and with a grandmother from Morocco’s indigenous Amazigh community. It’s a rich cultural mix – one that appealed to Fethi.


Image: Graves next to the Swakopmund Concentration Camp Memorial in Namibia
Credit: Christian Ender/Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wym)
The Fall of Madrid

In 1939, the Spanish capital, Madrid, finally fell to the fascist forces of General Franco – spelling the end of a brutal Civil War in which hundreds of thousands of troops and civilians were killed. The city had been under siege for more than two years and had become a symbol of resistance for the defeated Spanish Republic. Simon Watts has been listening to the memories of Rene MacColl and William Forrest, two British war correspondents who reported from Madrid.

PHOTO: Franco's troops entering Madrid in 1939 (Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfzgp1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsh)
Iran’s presidential election: What do the people want?

Iranians go to the polls next week to decide who’ll be the country’s next president. Hundreds of potential candidates were disqualified, some of whom represent the reform movement, leaving just seven men in the running. Whoever wins will inherit a dire economy, with one-in-ten Iranians unemployed, inflation running at roughly 50%, and growing queues to buy everyday items like chicken. The victor will also have to share power with Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the Islamic Revolution Guard Corps (IRGC), and parliament. So what kind of mandate will he have? How democratic are the country’s elections? And what impact will the new leader’s policies have on Iran, its people and its place in the world? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of Iranian guests.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfzlf5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9l26df)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1nypk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1k)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

Women take control

The new Spitfires need to be flown to RAF bases desperate for reinforcements. That’s the job of the ATA Girls - the female flyers of World War Two, some of the first women in Britain to receive the same wages as their male counterparts.

Presenter: Tuppence Middleton
Producers: Alasdair Cross and Emily Knight
Editors: Chris Ledgard and Kirsten Lass


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk2)
The doubling of life-expectancy

Steven Johnson, author of Extra Life, tells the fascinating history of life expectancy, and the extraordinary achievements of the last century, in which it has practically doubled.

It’s a story that has data at its heart, from the ground-breaking invention of the category itself in 17th century London to the pioneering social health surveys of W.E.B. Du Bois in 1890s Philadelphia.

Tim Harford spoke to Steven about the numbers beneath possibly the most important number of all.


Produced by Nathan Gower.


(Author, sociologist, historian and civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois at home in Brooklyn Heights, New York, 1958. Credit: David Attie /Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfzq59)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt6kd5b3fd)
G7 leaders unveil global anti-pandemic action plan

Leaders of the G- seven countries, meeting in England, are expected to sign a declaration on Saturday aimed at preventing further global pandemics. They will be joined by international experts drawn from industry and science who will advise how to respond to future threats and avoid a repeat of the devastation caused by the coronavirus.

The build-up to the presidential election in Iran, questions raised by former president Barack Obama about democracy in Poland and Hungary, and Jeff Bezos's dream of travelling to space.

Joining Julian Worricker on the programme: Kate Crawford, a leading scholar of the social and political implications of artificial intelligence, and Radek Sikorski, a Member of European Parliament and Poland's former foreign minister.


(Photo: The G7 leaders attended a reception at the Eden Project on Friday evening. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfztxf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt6kd5b75j)
Climate change on the agenda at G7

On the second day of their summit in Britain, the leaders of the G- seven advanced economies are to commit to a new plan to stop future pandemics.

We assess the state of the transatlantic relationship under the new US president, and ask if the so-called 'special relationship' between the US and the UK is alive and well? Plus the return to the stage of live opera.


Joining Julian Worricker on the programme: Kate Crawford, a leading scholar of the social and political implications of artificial intelligence, and Radek Sikorski, a Member of European Parliament and Poland's former foreign minister.


(Photo credit: PA Media)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmfzynk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt6kd5bbxn)
G7 summit: Biden to defend Nato

At the G7 summit, President Biden is expected to call for a new Western alliance to counter China's growing influence. We will look ahead at the upcoming Nato summit as the alliance prepares for an upgrade to confront Beijing's military rise. We will hear from one of NATO's top officials.

And why are immersive exhibitions featuring Van Gogh's art work spreading around the world?

Joining Julian Worricker on the programme: Kate Crawford, a leading scholar of the social and political implications of artificial intelligence, and Radek Sikorski, a Member of European Parliament and Poland's former foreign minister.

(Photo credit: EPA)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1p9xy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6m)
Skating my way through life

Skateboarding is no longer an outsider sport for rebellious young men: more women are getting on the board and embracing the lifestyle that comes with it. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women who are trying to make skating a more inclusive and welcoming community for women across the globe.

Annina Brühwiler is a Swiss downhill skateboarder – which means skating down hair-raising mountain routes at high speeds, sometimes getting up to 90 km/h. She started skating at 24 and within two years was competing on the international scene. She has been travelling the world following her passion, and uses the lessons learnt on the board to coach other women.

Teresa Batista is UK longboard dancing champion. She taught herself how to skate on the streets of East London before moving to Brazil, to explore how the skating culture meets salsa dancing. She choreographs dance moves on her board and runs a school for women and older adults who might feel intimidated by skate parks.

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE:
(L) Annina Brühwiler (credit: Jorge Gonzales)
(R) Teresa Batista (credit: courtesy of Teresa Batista)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg02dp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5s)
Life in Iran

As Iran prepares to hold its presidential election to select a replacement for Hassan Rouhani, BBC Persian presenter Rana Rahimpour brings together Iranians, both in the country and living abroad, to hear about their lives and thoughts.

Three young Iranians discuss what it’s like to live in a country where many people want to leave and need two jobs to make ends meet. Plus two sisters - one in London and the other still living in Iran with their parents - discuss the emotional difficulties of separation.

Rana will also be joined by her colleagues from the BBC Persian Service for their analysis on the country’s history and the forthcoming election.

(Photo: Iranian women wait for a Taxi next to a poster depicting Iranian presidential candidate Ebrahim Raisi in a street in Tehran, Iran, 09 June 2021. Iranians will vote in a presidential election on 18 June 2021. Credit: Abedin Taherkenareh/EPA)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1pfp2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f91)
7: Hacker hunters

The inside story of how a group of cybercrooks broke into Bangladesh Bank, and how the FBI finally unmasked one of their members.
#LazarusHeist

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/lazarusheist


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1h)
The challenges faced in reporting disturbing facts

We hear the upsetting story of children being beaten and chained in religious schools in Sudan. What challenges did the production team face in bringing this story to light? And what are the BBC’s editorial processes and controls involved in reporting very disturbing facts?

Plus, another episode in our regular series How I Hear.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg064t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0pzmnmgm5g)
'Why is ending racism a debate?'

Exactly a year ago the hockey player Darcy Bourne left her home in London to take part in the Black Lives Matter protests. Darcy who represents England at Under 21 level and studies at Duke University in North Carolina, had in her hand a placard that read "Why is ending racism a debate?" An image of her holding that simple message went viral. It was shared and viewed by tens of millions of people, and as it turns out completely changed her life.

We explore what it means to be English and the important role football plays in national identity after Gareth Southgate penned a heartfelt letter to England fans ahead of Euro 2020. That theme is also being explored in a play being performed for the first time next week. ENG-ER-LAND is written and performed by Hannah Kumari who used her experiences of being a young, female, mixed race football fan in the 1990's to explore what it means to be accepted.

The International Gay and Lesbian Football Association, IGLFA, have announced their World Cup in 2024 will take place in Argentina, and significantly it's being backed by the Argentine football association. For Gus Penaranda, President of the IGLFA, the decision has a personal connection, he tells us why.

Plus we preview the final of the women’s French Open and the European football championships.

Photo: A Minnesota Twins player wears an End Racism shirt during batting practice before the game against the Kansas City Royals at Kauffman Stadium on June 3, 2021 in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by Kyle Rivas/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg09wy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9l2xw6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1pp5b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f37)
Fighting India’s Covid infodemic

Fake news and misinformation are hampering India's battle with the coronavirus pandemic. Right from the origins of the virus to unproven alternative cures to efficacy of vaccines, a wave of mass anxiety has washed over the country's social media.

While most misleading messages spread through online platforms, experts say senior leaders and influencers have also played a role in fuelling traditional sentiments that prefer alternative therapies to modern medicine. This has increased vaccine hesitancy, especially in rural India, and led to political as well as medical misinformation.

Conspiracy theories and false claims not only spread rapidly, they also prompt people to take action in real life - often with severe consequences.

What kinds of fake news have dominated India's coronavirus landscape? What role can tech companies play to keep this in check? And is the government a bigger stakeholder in fighting the fake news menace?

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Pratik Sinha, co-founder, Alt News; Apar Gupta, executive director, Internet Freedom Foundation; Dr Vasundhara Rangaswamy, microbiologist, primary care physician


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg0fn2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g8x)
When Kissinger went to China

In July 1971, Kissinger, then US National Security Advisor, made a clandestine visit to the People’s Republic of China – then America’s sworn enemy. At the time China was isolated from the outside world amidst the chaos of the Cultural Revolution. America was looking for a way out of the Vietnam war. Both countries had had no contact for over 20 years.

The 48-hour mission paved the way for President Richard Nixon’s historic handshake with Chairman Mao a few months later. It changed the geometry of the Cold War. It also began a decades-long US engagement policy towards China.

Fifty years on, the US and China are at a historic crossroads. Washington’s paradigm in dealing with Beijing abruptly ended with the election of Donald Trump. Great power competition is now under way. Some fear we are already locked in a “new cold war”. Others say it is an “uneasy peace”.

So what happened since Kissinger stepped on Chinese soil in that summer half a century ago? How did we get to where we are today? Looking back, what can Presidents Biden and Xi learn from Kissinger’s secret trip?

The Guardian’s China Affairs correspondent Vincent Ni tells the story of Henry Kissinger’s 1971 secret mission, and asks what that trip tells us about the future of the world’s most consequential bilateral relationship?

(Photo: Kissinger greeted in Beijing. Credit: White House/CNP/Getty Images)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg0kd6)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5481phjpt)
G7: Leaders to unveil global anti-pandemic action plan

G7 leaders are expected to sign up to measures to tackle future pandemics. On the second day of their summit in Cornwall, they will issue a declaration that sets out a series of measures. The aim is to slash the time needed to develop vaccines to under 100 days.

Also in the programme: the US Justice Department will investigate attempts by officials in the Trump administration to seize the phone records of leading Democrats; and the music of protest in Myanmar.

(photo: G7 leaders in Cornwall)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg0p4b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t8dl179w4)
Live Sporting Action

On this week’s Sportsworld with Lee James, we will be live in Baku for the European Championship game between Wales and Switzerland.

We’ll also have the latest from the French Open Women’s Final, the third test match between England and New Zealand and the NBA playoffs.

Photo by NIKLAS HALLE'N/AFP via Getty Images


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg153v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9l3s33)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1qjd7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l88)
The Van Basten wonder goal

In June 1988, Holland finally won a major international football tournament when they defeated the Soviet Union in the final of the 1988 European Championship. The Dutch sealed victory with an almost-impossible volley by striker Marco Van Basten. Matthew Kenyon talks to Arnold Muhren, the veteran midfielder who set up one of the greatest goals in football history.

PHOTO:


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg18vz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfh)
G7 Summit

As G7 wealthiest democracies gather in the UK to discuss the world’s big issues, World Questions convenes its parallel ‘summit’ tackling questions from the public all around the world. A powerful panel representing each of the seven countries discusses the threat to democracy, climate change, and whether China is a challenge to a rule-based world order. Jonny Dymond presents.
The panel:
Senator Rui Matsukawa: Vice-Minister for Defence and for the Cabinet Office, Japan
Bob Rae: Canada’s Ambassador to the United Nations
Nathalie Tocci: Director of the Italian Institute for International Affairs
Christian Makarian: Former Foreign Affairs Editor of the French newspaper L’Express
Christopher Hill: US Former Ambassador to Iraq
Daniela Schwarzer: Executive Director of Open Society Foundations for Europe and Eurasia, based in Germany
Tom Tugendhat, MP: Chair of the UK’s Select Committee on Foreign Affairs

Producers: Charlie Taylor and Helen Towner
Sound Engineers: Darren Wardrobe, Mark MacDonald and Bob Nettles

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: G7 flags in circle on world map background, Credit: Kachura Oleg / Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg1dm3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt0)
Musician Angélique Kidjo

In a special edition of The Arts Hour, Nikki Bedi hears from two women at the height of their creative powers; Angelique Kidjo and Sam Taylor-Johnson.

Beninese American singer, songwriter and activist Angelique Kidjo is known globally for her joyous and exuberant music which has seen her collaborate with the industry’s biggest names and earned her four Grammy awards.

Her new album Mother Nature sees her join forces with West Africa’s most creative musicians including Burna Boy, Yemi Alade, Zaynab and Sampa The Great. The album, which was written during lockdown, highlights her activism and addresses the issues of climate change, the Black Lives Matter movement and Nigeria’s End Sars protests.

Nikki Bedi also speaks to British artist and filmmaker Sam Taylor-Johnson. Having gained international recognition for her photography and video installations, Sam Taylor-Johnson turned her creative energies to filmmaking.

She’s directed the blockbusters Fifty Shades of Grey, the John Lennon biopic Nowhere Boy and adapted James Frey’s controversial novel A Million Little Pieces for the screen. She talks to Nikki Bedi about her latest project, the star studded Amazon TV drama Solos, and discusses the trajectory of her career.


(Photo: Angelique Kidjo. Credit: Fabrice Mabillot)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg1jc7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5481pjhnv)
G7 summit: Spending plan to rival China adopted

G7 leaders seeking to rival China have adopted a plan to support lower- and middle-income countries in building better infrastructure. In a statement at their summit in the English county of Cornwall, the G7 leaders said they would offer a "values-driven, high-standard and transparent" partnership. However, details of how the plan will be financed remain unclear.

Also in the programme: In Nigeria crowds have gathered to protest about worsening violence and a ban on Twitter; and we have a listen to the music that has defined Myanmar’s anti-coup protests.

(Photo: Prime Minister Boris Johnson next to US President Joe Biden in Carbis Bay, during the G7 summit in Cornwall. Credit: PA).


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg1n3c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hby)
'Are you proud of your music?' with Billy Nomates

British post-punk newcomer Billy Nomates talks to Simone Marie Butler, Xenia Rubinos and Radie Peat about the pressures of living up to expectations, whether or not they feel proud of their work so far, and songs they write when they think no one else will hear them.

Simone Marie Butler is best known as the bassist in rock band Primal Scream. She’s also recorded with Joel Culpepper, the Stooges’ James Williamson, and the Horrors’ Faris Badwan.

Xenia Rubinos is a singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist from New York whose sound blends pop, soul, punk, and Latin influences with her jazz training.

Radie Peat is a singer and musician best known for her vocals in Irish folk band Lankum, and she is working on her debut solo record.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg1rvh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnwkzg2dg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfyvfl413)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1r43w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf2)
Beatie Wolfe: Art against climate change

Beatie Wolfe is a musician and experimental artist whose been described as a “musical weirdo and visionary.” Now in her latest work, From Green to Red, she is tackling climate change. Beatie tells Chi Chi Izundu how she created the work which is part music video, part protest piece using 800,000 years of historic NASA data.

This week sees the opening of the Serpentine Pavilion, one of the world’s most prestigious architecture commissions. The creative mind behind the 2021 design is South African architect Sumayya Vally. Sumayya speaks to Chi Chi about how her upbringing in apartheid South Africa influenced her community focused vision of urban design.

A new exhibition on borders has opened in Belfast from the Turner Prize-nominated artist Willie Doherty. The exhibition is called Where and it features video, imagery and text to explore issues of division at borders around the world including Northern Ireland and the United States and Mexico border. Chi Chi Izundu talks to Willie about the exhibition and why he hopes it will challenge assumptions and thinking.

Plus French shoe designer to the stars, Christian Louboutin, talks about how his childhood visits to one of the most notable Parisian museums sparked his creativity and may well have helped launch his career.


Presented by Chi Chi Izundu


(Photo: Beatie Wolfe. Credit: Ross Harris)



SUNDAY 13 JUNE 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg20br)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yv8)
Evolving viral variant trickery

Dr. Clare Jolly and colleagues have been looking at how the first of the major covid variants – alpha - evolved to be more transmissible. Whilst a lot of attention has been on the spike binding areas of the virus and the effectiveness of antibodies from either vaccine or prior infection, their preprint paper this week reports how the virus evolved an ability to inhibit our bodies' innate virus response once it has infected a cell.

Prof Dan Shugar and colleagues have been studying the conditions that led to the tragic rock and ice avalanche in February in Chamoli, Uttarakhand. 27 million cubic meters of rock and ice broke off the steep mountainside and plummeted almost two km down into the valleys below. Using satellite, seismic and video data the scientists have investigated the sequence of events that led to the tragic deaths of 204 people in the floods that followed.

It was a thankfully rare combination of geography and geology and events, but highlights the care that should be taken when building the growing number of hydroelectric plants in high mountainous areas.

But avalanches don’t just happen in mountains. A year before in a canyon under the sea near the outflow of the Congo river, a sediment avalanche rumbled on for almost 2 days along some 1,100km of the ocean floor. And as Prof Pete Talling describes, whilst it didn’t trigger a tsunami, it did sever cables supplying internet connectivity between South Africa and Nigeria.

And the BBC’s Samara Linton reports on research into a type of DNA you perhaps haven’t heard of – Z-DNA. It winds the other way to what we consider normal DNA, and scientists are finally beginning to understand its role in many human diseases, including cancer, with some future promise of novel therapeutics.

Also, Why do I have such a sweet tooth?

They say life is sweet. Well that’s certainly the case for CrowdScience listener Trevor in Poland who wonders why he can’t stop reaching for the cookie jar. He grew up drinking fruit juice with added sugar but wonders whether his genes could be as important as his environment when it comes to his sweet tooth, especially since his wife seem to be satisfied with mainly savoury snacks. The World Health Organisation says added sugar should constitute a maximum of 5% of our daily energy intake because it can contribute to diabetes, heart disease and obesity. But that’s tricky when you consider it’s now in everything from salad dressings, to savoury sauces.

Manufacturers have been promoting sugar alternatives for decades but recreating the unique taste and feel of it in the mouth are a challenge. Marnie Chesterton gets to try a brand new innovation – a so-called ‘rare’ sugar that has 70 percent of the sweetness but almost none of the calories. In nature, allulose is found in figs, but one producer has discovered a way to make it in the lab. Does it taste as good as it claims? Whilst switching to alternative sugars and sweeteners may reduce the calories, some researchers claim that tasting sweetness, wherever it comes from, can disrupt the body’s mechanism for regulating blood-sugar levels, increasing the risk for conditions like diabetes.

(Image: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg242w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9l4r24)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1rhc8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvb)
FDA approves new Alzheimer’s drug

Aducanumab the controversial new drug for Alzheimer’s disease, just approved by the FDA in the US is the first approved breakthrough in nearly 20 years. But, as Sarah Boseley explains, scientists dispute the drug’s effectiveness.

Good news from a study published in Lancet Healthy Longevity looking at protection levels from getting Covid. It studied the risk of COVID reinfection in care home staff and occupants up to 10 months after first being unwell and showed substantial levels of protection is retained.

And a new paper on Vitamin D deficiency in Africa – the first large prevalence study in children on the continent.

Plus bestselling author and gynaecologist Dr Jen Gunter on her Menopause Manifesto, part two in our mini-series on Health Check. Dr Gunter unpicks the facts and feminism of how society’s focus on what happens to women’s bodies has shaped and hindered treatment for the menopause.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

Image: Abstract medical icon of head showing Alzheimer's memory loss due to dementia and brain disease
Credit: wildpixel/Getty Images


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg27v0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g8x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg2cl4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtx)
North Korea’s Kim Jong-Un cracks down on foreign influence

Stories from North Korea, Turkey, Armenia and the Czech Republic.

Foreign-style clothes are out, so too are unusual haircuts. Using South Korean slang is forbidden, and as for watching a western film – that can get you executed. North Korea has long been a highly repressive society, but there’s recently been a particularly severe crackdown on any kind of influence from outside the country. The BBC’s Laura Bicker tells us about this latest development, and the people it affects.

A thick white foam has been causing havoc to Turkey’s coastline. Technically, it’s known as “marine mucilage,” an algae growing out of control because of pollution or climate change. But the mucilage has more commonly been dubbed “sea snot,” and it’s devastating marine life. The BBC’s Neyran Elden went scuba-diving below the surface of the affected waters to see the damage for herself.

Armenia claims that two hundred of its people are still being held as prisoners of war in neighbouring Azerbaijan. The two countries fought a war last year, over the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh – a war which only came to an end with a Russian-brokered truce. For its part, Azerbaijan insists it’s only holding a few dozen Armenians, all of them classified as terrorists. But now, Armenia’s Prime Minister has made a remarkable suggestion: he will offer up his own son, he says, in exchange for the prisoners. Rayhan Demytrie has met some of people still waiting for their loved ones to come home.

Women in the Czech Republic may soon be able to take non-gendered versions of their surnames, after MPs backed a change in the law. By the traditional rules of Czech grammar, the ending -ová is added automatically to almost all female surnames, and can only be dropped in very limited circumstances. It’s been this way for centuries. But as the BBC’s Rob Cameron explains, change is on the way.

(Image: North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Credit: North Korea’s Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) via Reuters)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1rqvj)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg2hb8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9l539j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1rvln)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2g6x)
Being mum

Are children always better off in a two-parent family? Ateira Griffin, daughter of a single mother and the director of non-profit organisation that supports black single mothers and their daughters, explores what it is like for a family to be headed by a mum without a dad, a family structure that is on the rise in her native United States.

The label ‘single mum’ can provoke pretty strong reactions and judgements, especially for Black women and Women of colour. Statistics tell us that children of single mothers are less likely to do well at school and more likely to struggle with substance abuse or turn to criminal activity. Ateira challenges the assumptions and goes beyond the statistics, speaking to black single mothers in her home city of Baltimore.

Baltimore on the East Coast of America has one of the highest rates of single mums – nearly 60% of households with children are led by single parents, and of those, the majority are Black single mums. In fact children in single mum households account for half of all African-American kids growing up in America and Ateira explores the context for this historically and in terms of contemporary social policy.


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg2m2d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt6kd5f0bh)
David Attenborough to address G7

Leaders at the G7 summit will be told they're facing some of the most important decisions in the history of humanity when they discuss the climate crisis today.


Also on the programme: The Israeli parliament is to vote on a new governing coalition; violence on the streets of Colombia with the police being accused of brutally suppressing protesters; and why self-driving taxis may not be part of future road transportation.


Joining Julian Worricker on the programme: Ellie Geranmayeh, Deputy Director of the Middle East and North Africa programme at the European Council on Foreign Relations and Oscar Guardiola Rivera, professor of human rights and political philosophy at the University of London's Birkbeck College.


(Photo: UK PM Boris Johnson and David Attenborough. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg2qtj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt6kd5f42m)
Benjamin Netanyahu set to lose power to new government

The speaker of the Israeli parliament has announced that a vote of confidence on a proposed new coalition government will be held today. If it secures approval, it will sweep aside Benjamin Netanyahu's administration - ending his twelve years as Prime Minister.

Also in this hour - A look at Spain where demonstrators are planning to gather in Madrid to protest against Socialist Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez's expected decision to pardon nine jailed Catalan independence leaders; and we discuss Iran's upcoming presidential election.

(Picture: Benjamin Netanyahu, Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg2vkn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt6kd5f7tr)
G7 leaders to tackle climate change

As the G7 summit enters its third and final day, the naturalist, Sir David Attenborough, will tell leaders they must work together on one of the most important issues the world faces.

And how members of Britain's Bangladeshi community have suffered disproportionately from Covid-19.

Joining Julian Worricker on the programme: Ellie Geranmayeh, Deputy Director of the Middle East and North Africa programme at the European Council on Foreign Relations and Oscar Guardiola Rivera, professor of human rights and political philosophy at the University of London's Birkbeck College.

(The Great Barrier Reef's condition is deteriorating as a result of climate change - say scientific studies. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1s6v1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfq)
Raymond Blanc: My life in five dishes

The celebrated French chef Raymond Blanc tells Emily Thomas about his life through five dishes.

From a childhood roaming magical forests in Eastern France, to the rather less enticing restaurant scene of 1970s England, Raymond describes how with little grasp of the language and no formal training, he quickly became one of the UK’s best known chefs. His restaurant, Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons, has been thriving for almost 40 years and during that time he has added a string of cookbooks, TV shows and brasseries to his name. Raymond explains how he balances being a gastronome and perfectionist with running a large business.

But we also hear another side to the exuberant chef. The past year has been perhaps one the most difficult of Raymond’s life - closing his restaurants, the isolation of lockdown, the death of his mother and being hospitalised with coronavirus for a month. He tells us why he thinks it will make him a better man.


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg2z9s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1sbl5)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kwz)
The spies in my house

Arrested, interrogated and watched: Ulrike Poppe was a dissident in the former GDR and spent 15 years being spied on by the East German secret police - the Stasi- who installed secret microphones in her home and cameras pointing through the windows. Then, in 1992, after Berlin Wall came down, she was granted access to the Stasi archives and discovered 20,000 pages of details about her life with the names of friends and colleagues who'd informed on her. In those pages she also found the name of the Stasi officer in charge of her case and decided to track him down and confront him.

Presenter: Andrea Kennedy
Interpreter: Jo Impey
Producer: Mariana Des Forges

Picture: Ulrike Poppe in 1999
Credit: P/F/H/ullstein bild via Getty Images

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg331x)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Assignment Interview (w3ct2gb4)
Hugh Sykes: Reporting from the frontlines.

Hugh Sykes has reported for the BBC since the 1970s and has travelled far and wide to witness some of the most significant events of our age. Here, in conversation with Owen Bennett-Jones, he discusses what some of those stories mean to him, and explains the journalistic values he applied to them. From the historic British coal miners’ strike of 1984-5 to the insurgency in Iraq, Sykes has faced down danger, surviving respectively an attack by angry strikers who threatened to throw him into a canal, and a roadside bomb. Yet he has always insisted on keeping his own feelings out of the story, in order to let his subjects communicate directly to listeners. Meanwhile, we hear too about his love of Iran, formed by years spent there as a child, about his preference for the medium of radio over television – and about how high spirits in the studio once nearly landed him in trouble with BBC bosses.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1sgb9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g6s)
Ministering behind bars

Can the prison be a “citizen factory” where the rebellious soul goes in and comes out as a demure, indoctrinated model citizen? Is the God of Punishment the same as the God of Salvation? How do priests, imams and rabbis work with inmates who wish to return to faith?

Lipika Pelham examines whether the Foucauldian phrase “soul is the prison of the body” offers a guideline to the modern criminal system for its rehabilitation programme. Traditionally, religious beliefs have inclined to the opposite, that the body imprisons the soul. Earlier ways of dealing with outlaws often involved extreme physical stress to achieve the docility of the body. This was believed to be the key to making prisoners conform to social norms and become good citizens. Lipika asks representatives of major world religions if they think the pathway to correction is through faith. She hears conversations between an inmate and his Christian worker; reflections of a rabbi, an imam, and a Buddhist meditation teacher about their methods to stop offenders from committing further crimes.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg36t1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9l5ts9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1sl2f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2g7j)
Automation Nation

Automation and the future of jobs

Economist Daniel Susskind asks what the new wave of high-tech automation means for jobs. He hears from a company leading the way in the development of driverless trucks, and a long-haul truck driver who’s deeply worried about it. If jobs like trucking disappear, many of America’s millions of drivers may be forced into sectors like the service industry, but, as we hear on our visit to the world’s first automated restaurant, that isn’t immune to automation either. With technology already encroaching on traditionally white collar jobs as well, there’s only so much education and retraining can do.


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg3bk5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg3g99)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv5481plflx)
Israeli parliament to vote for new government

Israel's parliament is expected to approve the formation of a new government, a coalition of parties that has a majority of one seat. Right-wing nationalist Naftali Bennett is poised to become PM in a power-sharing deal with a centrist leader.

Also on the programme: the role of climate negotiations in the ongoing G7 summit in Cornwall, England; and we hear from an intimacy coordinator about consent on a film set.

(Photo: Israeli coalition party leaders meet in the Knesset ahead of the vote of confidence.Credit: Courtesy/Ariel Zandberg )


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg3l1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl7)
Aramaic: An imperial language without an empire

Aramaic is a language that for some three thousand years facilitated the exchange of ideas across large tracts of the Middle East and Asia. In its heyday it was the main official and written language across the Neo-Assyrian and Achaemenid empires. It was the language in which several sections of the Old Testament Bible were written. A Galilean dialect of Aramaic was probably the language Jesus spoke. Different dialects of Aramaic still exist today but numbers of speakers are dwindling and there are fears that it could die out.

So what is the story of Aramaic? Why did it become so influential and then go into decline? And how much has it changed over its long history?

Bridget Kendall is joined by three distinguished scholars of Aramaic: Professor Holger Gzella from Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich is the author of numerous publications on Aramaic as well as being an expert on other Old Testament languages.

Professor Alison Salvesen from Oxford University works on ancient interpretations of the Hebrew Bible including its Aramaic versions. She is also an authority on Jacob of Edessa, a leading religious scholar who wrote in one of the many variants of Aramaic.

Dr. Alinda Damsma teaches Biblical Hebrew at University College London and Aramaic at the Ecole Rabbinique in Paris. She studies medieval Aramaic dialects, especially in Jewish mystical literature, and has also done field research on the current use of the language.

[Image: Aramaic script on a stone slab from Palmyra, Syria. Credit: mtcurado/Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg3psk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hby)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 Sportsworld (w172y0t8dl1bfww)
Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg45s2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhb9l6srb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1tk1g)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg49j6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgt)
How the FBI used a messaging company to catch crooks

Earlier this week the FBI, in conjunction with the Australian authorities, used an encrypted messaging app to swoop in and arrest more than 800 suspected criminals. On Business Weekly, we look at how they were able to crack global organised crime groups by running their own messaging service, putting it on bespoke phones and handing them out, through undercover officers, to the criminals themselves. We also look at the booming business of ransomware. Hackers are making millions from demanding Bitcoin payments from companies - so how can this new kind of cyberwarfare be stopped? Plus, Turkey says it will no longer accept waste plastic from other countries. So, where will our plastic end up? Business Weekly is produced by Matthew Davies and presented by Lucy Burton.

(Image: ANoM logo displayed on smartphone, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg4f8b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5481pmdky)
Netanyahu out as new Israeli government approved

Benjamin Netanyahu has lost his 12-year hold on power in Israel after its parliament voted in a new coalition government. The right-wing nationalist Naftali Bennett has been sworn in as prime minister, leading a "government of change".

Also in the programme: The G7 nations have agreed to step up action on climate change and renewed a pledge to raise $100bn a year to help poor countries cut carbon emissions; and we look at the work of intimacy coordinators in the film industry.

(Credit: Benjamin Netanyahu ahead of a special session of the Knesset held to approve and swear-in a new coalition government. Credit: Reuters.)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg4k0g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Assignment Interview (w3ct2gb4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1tx8v)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f91)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkpmg4nrl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnwkzjz9k)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfyvfp0y6)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkd4c1v10z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kwz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 14 JUNE 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wr8rj0)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl6ybyncp8)
G7: Vaccines and climate pledges but plenty of questions as summit ends

G7 leaders meeting in the UK made big pledges around vaccines for developing countries, and new climate targets. But did they go far enough, and is there a financial will both inside and outside the G7 to press ahead with the plans? We ask Terry Haines of Pangaea Policy in Washington DC and Anthony Dworkin from the European Council on Foreign Relations.
Also on the programme the economist Michael Hughes looks at looming inflation worries in the US, whilst Paul McBride the founder of Irish technology firm Peroptyx ponders whether the unpredictability of the pandemic, is actually impacting the predictability the algorithms that dictate our digital world rely on.
PIC: Getty Images.


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmbz3sd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct1m7t)
Peter Goadsby on migraine

neurological condition is far more common than you might think, affecting more people than diabetes, epilepsy and asthma combined.

While medications, to help relieve the symptoms of migraine, have been around for some time, they haven’t worked for everyone. And what happens in the brain during a migraine attack was, until recently, poorly understood.

Peter Goadsby is Professor of Neurology at King's College London’s Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience and is a true pioneer in the field of migraine.

Over the course of his career, he has unravelled what happens in the brain during a migraine attack and his insights are already benefiting patients - in the form of new medications that can not only treat a migraine, but also prevent it from occurring.

Peter shares this year’s Brain Prize, the world's largest prize for brain research, with three other internationally renowned scientists in the field.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Picture: Woman with head in hands, Credit: Ivan Nanita/EyeEm/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wr8w84)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwch7d)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmbz7jj)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dql)
Carbon capture and storage

It’s likely that there will be no successful green transition without an element of carbon capture, storage and re-use. The oil industry has been burying CO2 underground since the 1970s, so the infrastructure and technology is already available, but removing CO2 from the air at scale is new, and the companies doing it are small. We head to an experimental ‘direct air capture’ plant in Canada to hear how they are making fuel out of air, and explore what changes will be required to ensure that their industry becomes a significant one in the years to come. But if we think that a technology fix is out there, might we limit other efforts?

Presenters: Neal Razzell and Manuela Saragosa

Contributors:
Steve Oldham, CEO, Carbon Engineering
Dr Jennifer Wilcox, Acting Assistant Secretary for the Office of Fossil Energy and Carbon Management at the US Department of Energy
Prof Stuart Haszeldine, professor of carbon storage and capture at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland
Dr Simon Evans, policy editor, Carbon Brief

Producer: Jordan Dunbar
Series producer: Rosamund Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wr9008)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Assignment Interview (w3ct2gb4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmbzc8n)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f91)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wr93rd)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwcqqn)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmbzh0s)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6n)
My life-changing autism diagnosis

As a woman with autism you're likely to receive a diagnosis much later in life than if you are a man with the condition. Why is that and what impact does a late diagnosis have? Kim Chakanetsa is joined by two autistic women who are speaking up about their experience of the condition and seeking to help others.

Morénike Giwa Onaiwu is part of the Autism Women's Network in US. She says many of her early symptoms of autism were dismissed or ignored because she is Black and explains how autism can amplify stereotypes around Black women.

Sara Gibbs is a British comedy writer and autistic. Labelled as a cry baby, scaredy cat and spoiled brat – she finally got a diagnosis in her thirties. She has written a book, Drama Queen, about trying to fit into a world that has often tried to reject her, and says that being on the spectrum doesn't have to be a barrier to a happy life full of love, laughter and success.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
Morénike Giwa Onaiwu
Sara Gibbs [credit Juliet McKee]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wr97hj)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2p945q9j8)
Israel gets new Prime Minister after four elections

Naftali Bennett vows to unite nation after two years of political stalemate.

The former revolutionary leader in Nicaragua, the current president Daniel Ortega, rounds up former revolutionary colleagues in the latest move to cement his power.

And Australia reveals bold plans to cut plastic use - as campaigners say people ingest more than a credit card size worth of plastic each week.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wr9c7n)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2p945qf8d)
Israel: Benjamin Netanyahu forced out of office after 12 years

Naftali Bennett becomes new Prime Minister as unprecedented coalition of right-wing, centrist and Arab parties takes power.

State governments in Australia announce bold plans to drastically cut the amount of waste plastic over the next 20 years: plastic bags and stirrers are on the way out.

And we get a view from South Africa about the decision by G7 leaders against lifting Covid vaccine patents - preventing countries from producing their own.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wr9gzs)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2p945qk0j)
Naftali Bennett becomes Israel's new prime minister

An unprecedented coalition of right, left and Arab parties topples Benjamin Netanyahu after 12 years in power.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to put a four week delay on Covid "Freedom Day" - a date much of the British population was eagerly anticipating.

And why Covid variants and lack of vaccines are leading to an upward trend in coronavirus figures in South Africa.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wr9lqx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyt)
Stephen King: Are you afraid of the dark?

Millions of readers all over the world are drawn to fiction that explores our fears. Horror sells and no-one does it better or more prolifically than Stephen King. He’s written more than 60 books, sold close to 400 million copies - he is the master manipulator of dark places and the paranormal. If you're not a reader you may have seen the Shining, Carrie, Stand by Me - all films based on his stories. He's been writing for half a century – how has our appetite for fear evolved?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmbzz09)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4t)
Can bad news be delivered well?

No one wants to be told they’ve lost their job, or that their entire department is disappearing, but the way that message is delivered can have consequences - both in the short term and sometimes years into the future.

We hear the best techniques for delivering negative tidings; and some clangers. Elizabeth Hotson gets tips and advice from Heather McGregor, entrepreneur author and Dean of Heriot Watt Business School, hears about a very awkward conversation from former Chairman of the airline Jet Blue, now Stanford professor, Joel Peterson, and from Neal Hartman, a professor at the Sloan School of Management at MIT, specialising in communications and leadership.

Presenter: Elizabeth Hotson
Producer: Sarah Treanor

(Picture: Woman on a laptop with a headache. Credit: Getty Creative)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0x)
The Confederate flag and America’s battle over race

In June 2015 an American anti-racist activist climbed a flagpole on the South Carolina state house grounds to take down the Confederate flag. The protest followed the killing of 9 black people at a historic Charleston church by a white supremacist who was pictured holding the flag. The Confederate flag was the battle flag of the troops who fought to retain slavery during America’s civil war. For African Americans the flag is a symbol of slavery, segregation and black subordination. Bree Newsome Bass talks to Farhana Haider about her act of protest.

Bree Newsome taking down the Confederate flag at the State House in Columbia, SC, on Saturday 27th June 2015 . She was arrested for her action. (Photo by Adam Anderson / Reuters)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wr9qh1)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc02rf)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqh)
Why do I have such a sweet tooth?

They say life is sweet. Well that’s certainly the case for CrowdScience listener Trevor in Poland who wonders why he can’t stop reaching for the cookie jar. He grew up drinking fruit juice with added sugar but wonders whether his genes could be as important as his environment when it comes to his sweet tooth, especially since his wife seem to be satisfied with mainly savoury snacks. The World Health Organisation says added sugar should constitute a maximum of 5% of our daily energy intake because it can contribute to diabetes, heart disease and obesity. But that’s tricky when you consider it’s now in everything from salad dressings, to savoury sauces.

Manufacturers have been promoting sugar alternatives for decades but recreating the unique taste and feel of it in the mouth are a challenge. Marnie Chesterton gets to try a brand new innovation – a so-called ‘rare’ sugar that has 70 percent of the sweetness but almost none of the calories. In nature, allulose is found in figs, but one producer has discovered a way to make it in the lab. Does it taste as good as it claims? Whilst switching to alternative sugars and sweeteners may reduce the calories, some researchers claim that tasting sweetness, wherever it comes from, can disrupt the body’s mechanism for regulating blood-sugar levels, increasing the risk for conditions like diabetes.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and produced by Marijke Peters for the BBC World Service


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wr9v75)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc06hk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wr9yz9)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwdkyk)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc0b7p)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrb2qf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt4)
Andy Cole: Goals, glory and the battle for his life

Andy Cole is one of England’s most successful footballers, notably part of the legendary Manchester United squad that won a historic treble in 1999. His path to the top wasn’t easy – as a young player he had to deal with racism in football, and then grapple with the expectations of stardom. But Andy’s biggest challenge was off the pitch when he faced a deadly health scare. This interview contains offensive language.

Sissel Tolaas is a smell collector from Norway. She travels the world gathering smells and has amassed over 6,000 - including those of her former partners. She's even made a cheese from the smell of David Beckham's shoes. This interview was first broadcast in 2017.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Andy Cole with teammates David Beckham and Paul Scholes in 1999
Credit: Laurence Griffiths/Allsport via Getty Images


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrb6gk)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwdtft)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc0kqy)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrbb6p)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv54m9zt9j9)
Israel's new Prime Minister promises to unite nation

Israel's new Prime Minister, Naftali Bennett, has promised to unite a nation frayed by years of political stalemate. He succeeds Benjamin Netanyahu, who was forced out of office after 12 years.

Also in the programme: The trial of Aung San Suu Kyi has begun in Myanmar, four months after her government was overthrown by the military. And two Americans have told a Japanese court they helped smuggle the former head of Nissan out of Japan.

(Photo: Naftali Bennett's support became crucial for the formation of a coalition government after the last election. Credit: AFP)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrbfyt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc0t76)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y47zbmpwp2n)
WhatsApp launches privacy campaign

Messaging service WhatsApp has launched its first big privacy-focused campaign in the UK. It follows a customer backlash against changes to its terms and conditions, announced earlier this year. We hear from WhatsApp's chief executive, Will Cathcart. Also in the programme, an American father and son have told a court in Japan how they smuggled former Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn out of the country. Hans Greimel is Asia editor for Automotive News, and brings us the details of the case. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson finds out about the best technique for delivering bad news in the workplace.

(Picture: A WhatsApp logo on a smartphone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrbkpy)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxk46vsknd)
Nato summit

We go live to the Nato summit in Belgium, and explain what the alliance is and the significance of today’s meeting. Leaders issues a statement describing China's behaviour as a "systemic challenge".

Our health expert of the day, Dr Eleanor Murray, joins us to discuss the Delta variant, first discovered in India. Symptoms linked to the variant are thought to include a headache, sore throat and running nose.

And we hear from young people living in Iran ahead of elections there. They tell us what daily life is like in the country, the restrictions placed on them, and their hopes for the election.

Picture: NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg gives a press conference during a NATO summit at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, 14 June 2021. Credit: EPA/Olivier Hoslet)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrbpg2)
BBC News

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MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxk46vspdj)
What is Nato and why does it exist?

We go live to the Nato summit in Belgium, and explain what the alliance is and the significance of today’s meeting. Leaders issues a statement describing China's behaviour as a "systemic challenge".

We hear from BBC Burmese as Myanmar’s deposed leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, makes her first court appearance since the military took over the country. Ms Suu Kyi is accused of accepting cash and gold in bribes, and faces up to 15 years in jail if found guilty.

Our health expert of the day, Professor Manfred Green, joins us to answer listener questions. We’ll discuss the Delta variant, its symptoms and whether vaccines work against it.

And young people living in Iran speak to us ahead of the weekend’s elections in the country. They tell us what their daily life is like, the restrictions placed on them, and their hopes for the election.

Pictuire: NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg gives a press conference during a NATO summit at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, 14 June 2021.Credit: EPA/Olivier Hoslet)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrbt66)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrbxyb)
BBC News

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MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwfjxl)
The Newsroom

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MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc196q)
BBC News Summary

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MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nc3gqfsrp)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrc1pg)
BBC News

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MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc1dyv)
BBC News Summary

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MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2g8y)
Tooth and Claw: Crocodiles

We have a morbid fascination with predators. And we've had it since the very first people carved figures or painted on cave walls thousands of years ago. Predators are still revered as gods in many cultures. Our cultural fascination is equalled only by our biological fear, hardwired into our primate brains, because if you are not a predator, you ARE the prey. In this series, Professor Adam Hart and explores our complex, challenging and ambiguous relationship with Earth’s greatest predators by talking to the women and men who know them best, researchers who have spent their lives tracking them, protecting them and, sometimes, narrowly escaping them.

Today it’s the crocodile, part of the group known as crocodilians which also includes alligators and gharials, which first appeared 95 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period. Much like Tigers, they don’t stalk their prey but lie in wait – often just below the surface of the water, ready to leap out and snap those ferocious jaws on just about anything – including other predators. But as we’ll discover, there is a very different side to these much maligned creatures, who can be nurturing and cooperative. Adam speaks to Dr Marisa Tellez, Co-Founder of the Crocodile Research Coalition in Belize, Central America and Dr Alan Britton is a Zoologist and crocodile specialist in Darwin, Australia, who has a 5-metre croc named Smaug living in his back garden pond.

Produced by Rami Tzabar and Beth Eastwood

Picture: Caiman Crocodile's eye, close up, Credit: Jonathan Knowles/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrc5fl)
BBC News

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MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv54m9zv4r6)
President Biden's first NATO summit

NATO holds its first summit with Joe Biden as leader of its most powerful member. But how does this old military alliance deal with all the new threats? NATO's Secretary General talks to us about China, cyber and space.......as well as the threat from Russia.

Also in the programme: the small US biotech company that's produced a powerful new COVID vaccine; and the British Prime Minister announces pandemic restrictions will now stay until at least mid-July.

(Image: U.S. President Joe Biden holds a news conference during a NATO summit at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) headquarters in Brussels, Belgium June 14, 2021/ Credit: Olivier Hoslet/Pool via REUTERS)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrc95q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc1ng3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrcdxv)
BBC News

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MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywp7v8rqgt)
The Newsroom

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MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sgb3qws3g)
Sports News

BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc1s67)
BBC News Summary

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MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48ssc9lygz)
WhatsApp launches privacy campaign

Messaging service WhatsApp has launched its first big privacy-focused campaign in the UK. It follows a customer backlash against changes to its terms and conditions, announced earlier this year. We hear from WhatsApp's chief executive, Will Cathcart. Also in the programme, an American father and son have told a court in Japan how they smuggled former Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn out of the country. Hans Greimel is Asia editor for Automotive News, and brings us the details of the case. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson finds out about the best technique for delivering bad news in the workplace.

(Picture: A WhatsApp logo on a smartphone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 15 JUNE 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrcnf3)
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TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqcxmn90qt)
Nato finds China its new 'challenge'

Nato says China is its latest priority as its defence technology gets more advanced. We hear about the global defence economy and if Nato is still relevant, with Dr Jacob Parakilas, an expert on transatlantic military strategy.

WhatsApp has launched a campaign vowing to maintain privacy– or ‘end-to-end encryption’ – of messages sent on the app. Should employers be allowed to fire you if you have not had the coronavirus vaccine? We discuss with Bob Lian Junior, an employment lawyer at Akin Gump, about whether or not it is legal for companies to ask to see proof of vaccination.

Finally, we discover what the best way is to break bad news at work with the BBC’s Elizabeth Hotson. We discuss all this live with guests Jeanette Rodrigues from Bloomberg News in Mumbai, and economist Peter Morici in the US.

(Photo: US President Joe Biden at the Nato summit. Credit: Olivier Hoslet/ AFP/Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrcs57)
BBC News

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TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwgd4h)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc24fm)
BBC News Summary

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TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2g7p)
Guru

Guru: Living a lie

For the last year, BBC journalist and passionate yoga teacher Ishleen Kaur has been investigating allegations of sexual and emotional abuse at the heart of an organisation she once called home.

Fellow practitioners share with her their stories of cruelty, rape and even the sexual assault of a child - but she wasn't prepared for what she uncovered next.

Join Ishleen for three programmes on a deeply personal journey into the dark legacy which haunts Sivananda Yoga, one of the world’s most revered yoga schools.


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrcwxc)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrd0nh)
BBC News

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TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwgmmr)
The Newsroom

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TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc2cxw)
BBC News Summary

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TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td2)
Dream machines: Inside Porsche's design lab

Motoring journalist Erin Baker gets behind the wheel of Porsche's latest 911 sports car.

Michael Mauer, current chief designer at Porsche, and Tony Hatter, design manager on models including the 993, describe to Erin what it takes to design a car that will be both instantly recognisable and desirable. From the initial sketch to full-scale models and the final product, Erin gets under the bonnet of the design process.

Porsche is also the largest high performance vehicle manufacturer in the world. Erin asks what the future holds for Porsche design, and driving for pleasure, beyond the internal combustion engine.

A 2 Degrees West production for BBC World Service.
Presenter: Erin Baker
Producer: Helen Lennard


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrd4dm)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2p945t6fc)
Biden calls Putin a 'worthy adversary'

The US president says he will take a firm stance at their summit later this week but will cooperate with Russia if Moscow chooses to do so.

At least 2,000 police are being deployed in East Jerusalem for today's contentious march by Jewish nationalists – we’ll tell you why the March of Flags is so controversial.

And we have a special report from India where the holy Ganges River is being choked by the dead from the Covid pandemic.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrd84r)
BBC News

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TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2p945tb5h)
Biden: US could work together with Russia

The American President says he'll be 'tough' on Vladimir Putin when they meet this week.

Britain and Australia have agreed the broad terms of a trade deal, the first that London has negotiated from scratch since leaving the European Union.

And the Hungarian parliament will be voting today to ban the promotion of homosexuality for children under eighteen.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrdcww)
BBC News

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TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2p945tfxm)
President Biden: 'I'll lay down red lines' with Vladimir Putin

US President accuses Russia and China of driving a wedge between Europe and America.

The controversial "March of the Flags" event is to go ahead today in Jerusalem. Far right nationalists and settlers will parade through East Jerusalem despite warnings from Hamas.

And we'll hear from the man recognised for his efforts to protect one of the worlds most trafficked animals, the pangolin.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrdhn0)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pky)
Smashing the glass ceiling for young Africans

A young Zimbabwean, Farai Munjoma, has set up a network of mentors to help Africa’s youth achieve their dreams.

The idea is to link young people up with someone who can inspire and guide them as they apply to university and jobs.

Reporter: Victoria Uwonkunda
Producer: Jo Mathys


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc2vxd)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jfv)
Gretchen Carlson: My fight to stop sexual harassment

Five years ago she successfully sued her former boss at Fox News, Roger Ailes, for sexual harassment.

Now, American broadcaster Gretchen Carlson tells Ed Butler about how she helped kick off the #MeToo movement, why major American companies continue to gag employees and protect workplace predators through non-disclosure agreements, and how she is fighting in Washington DC to make the working environment safer for women.

Producer: Nisha Patel

(Picture: Gretchen Carlson; Credit: Stephanie Cowen)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5f)
Mindfulness for the masses

In 1979 scientist Jon Kabat-Zinn opened the Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, pioneering a meditative approach to treat pain and depression. In a few decades, mindfulness has gone from being a specialist element of Buddhist teaching to a billion dollar industry. In 2019, Farhana Haider spoke to Dr Kabat-Zinn about the popularising of mindfulness to tackle the stresses of modern life.

(Photo Jon Kabat-Zinn teaching MBSR at the University of Massachusetts Medical School 1992, Credit Jon Kabat-Zinn)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrdmd4)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g7p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc2znj)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2g8y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrdr48)
BBC News

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TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rt0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrdvwd)
BBC News

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TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwhgvn)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc374s)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrdzmj)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwd)
The quiet Louisiana grandma who became an environmental warrior

69-year-old Sharon Lavigne has six children and 12 grandchildren and, by her own admission, has never been one for public speaking. She has lived in St James Parish in Louisiana her whole life. It's located along an 85-mile stretch of the Mississippi between New Orleans and Baton Rouge with the undesirable nickname 'cancer alley'. Sharon says she has seen a lot of illness in her community. There are around 150 chemical plants located along this stretch of the Mississippi River and when a giant plastics manufacturing company wanted to construct a plant near Sharon's home, she successfully led the campaign to stop it from being built. Sharon has been awarded the Goldman Environmental Prize for her work.

Kabelo Ramolahloane comes from the township of Botshabelo, in South Africa's Free State Province. Born with a rare genetic condition that affects his arms and legs, a chance encounter at school with a crack team of rugby players has introduced him to a sport which he excels at. Mpho Lakaje has been hearing his story.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Sharon Lavigne
Credit: Goldman Environmental prize


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrf3cn)
BBC News

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TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwhqbx)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc3gn1)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2g8y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrf73s)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv54m9zx6fd)
Israeli ultra-nationalists are preparing to march in occupied East Jerusalem

Israeli ultra-nationalists are preparing to march in occupied East Jerusalem in an event that Palestinians have branded a provocation.

Also in the programme: The United States and the European Union have resolved a long-running trade dispute over subsidies to aircraft manufacturers.
And researchers in Cambridge University say the early warning signs of self-harm in children can appear almost a decade before it starts.

(Photo: The annual Jerusalem Day flag march marks Israel's capture of East Jerusalem in 1967. Credit: EPA)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrfbvx)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc3q49)
BBC News Summary

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TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bfntj1h8m)
US and EU resolve aircraft subsidies row

The US and the EU have resolved a 17-year long dispute over Boeing and Airbus subsidies. The two parties have agreed to phase out billions of dollars in punitive tariffs, and we get reaction from Markus Beyrer, director general of lobbying group BusinessEurope. Also in the programme, the UK and Australia have announced the first post-Brexit trade deal negotiated entirely from scratch. Mary Quicke is a cheesemaker who currently exports 10% of her cheeses to Australia, and tells us she is cautiously optimistic about what the deal might lead to. Five years ago, American broadcaster Gretchen Carlson successfully sued her former boss at Fox News, Roger Ailes, for sexual harassment. She discusses her concern that major American companies continue to gag employees, and protect workplace predators through non-disclosure agreements. Plus, scientists have developed a technique to turn waste plastic bottles into the synthetic vanilla flavouring vanillin. Joanna Sadler of the University of Edinburgh, who conducted the research, explains how the process works.

(Picture: A Boeing plane comes in to land. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrfgm1)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxk46vwgkh)
Why do people troll online?

Model Chrissy Teigen has sparked a conversation on social media about trolling by apologising for bullying several people on Twitter in the past. We’ll speak to people who managed to change their habit of trolling.

We’ll have the latest from Israel where the new government is facing a tough test as Jewish ultra-nationalists prepare to march through East Jerusalem.

Dr Swapneil Parikh, an infectious disease researcher in Mumbai, will explain some of today’s coronavirus stories.

We continue to bring together Iranians to hear about their lives and thoughts ahead of this week’s presidential elections. In today’s conversation two sisters - one in London and the other still living in Iran - discuss why so many people want to leave Iran and emotional difficulties of separation.

CNN’s Christian Amanpour has revealed during her show that she’s been diagnosed with ovarian cancer. We’ll hear from women who’ve had the ovarian cancer about their experiences.

(Photo: Chrissy Teigen at 91st Academy Awards at Vanity Fair in Beverly Hills, California, U.S., February 24, 2019 Credit: Danny Moloshok/File Photo/Reuters)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrflc5)
BBC News

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TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxk46vwl9m)
OS conversations: Iranian sisters

We continue to bring together Iranians to hear about their lives and thoughts ahead of this week’s presidential elections. In today’s conversation two sisters - one in London and the other still living in Iran - discuss why so many people want to leave Iran and emotional difficulties of separation.

We’ll bring updates on the Euro 2020 football tournament and go to Hungary where the match between Hungary and Portugal is taking place in a full stadium. The authorities have dismissed concerns that it will lead to a rise in Covid infections.

Our medical expert Dr Isaac Bogoch joins us from Toronto to explain some of today’s coronavirus stories.

Model Chrissy Teigen has sparked a conversation on social media about trolling by apologising for bullying several people on Twitter in the past. We’ll speak to people who managed to change their habit of trolling.

We’ll also speak to a reporter in Atlanta Georgia about an argument over face masks that led to the death of a grocery store worker.

(Photo: Iranians walk on a street in Tehran, Iran May 26, 2021. Credit: Majid Asgaripour/WANA (West Asia News Agency) via REUTERS)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrfq39)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrftvf)
BBC News

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TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwjftp)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc463t)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nc3gqjpns)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrfylk)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g7p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc49vy)
BBC News Summary

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TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls4)
Bitcoin’s environmental cost

El Salvador has voted to recognise bitcoin as legal tender, and there is a great deal of interest globally in digital currencies that provide an alternative to cash. However mining bitcoin, the intensive computation needed to claim ownership of new Bitcoins, uses vast amounts of electricity – more than many countries produce. Currently most of this energy is supplied from traditional fossil fuel sources rather than renewables.
Larisa Yarovaya from Southampton Business school discusses whether Bitcoin is really worth the environmental cost.

Drones for surveying disaster areas with cameras have been around for a while , but now researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Communication, Information Processing, and Ergonomics have revealed a drone based system that can listen to the environment and pinpoint people who may be in distress following floods or earthquakes. Researcher Macarena Varela describes the drone and its microphone array.

And lidar, the survey method which used lasers to reveal topographic detail is now finding a use in mapping Rio De Janero’s Favelas. These areas of informal housing developed in largely unplanned ways, but a wider understanding of their geography might help those who live there access essential services. The lidar survey has the advantage of being conducted without revealing the inhabitants personal information say MIT researchers Arianna Salazar Miranda and Claire Gorman.

(Image: Getty Images)



The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Angelica Mari

Studio Manager: Sue Maillot
Producer: Julian Siddle


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrg2bp)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv54m9zy1n9)
Thousands of Israeli nationalists march in East Jerusalem

Hard-line nationalist Israelis have been marching through parts of East Jerusalem to mark the annexation of the area by Israel more than 50 years ago. We hear from a minister in the coalition on what he makes of the march and what to expect from an Israel under new management.

Also on the programme: the longest Arctic expedition produces one of the most worrying warnings on climate change; and ahead of the Biden-Putin summit, what is it the Russian leader wants?

(Picture: Organisers of the event insisted that participants had a right to march through Jerusalem. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrg62t)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc4kc6)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrg9ty)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywp7v8vmcx)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sgb3qzp0k)
Sports News

BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc4p3b)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48ssc9pvd2)
US and EU resolve aircraft subsidies row

The US and the EU have resolved a 17-year long dispute over Boeing and Airbus subsidies. The two parties have agreed to phase out billions of dollars in punitive tariffs, and we get reaction from Markus Beyrer, director general of lobbying group BusinessEurope. Also in the programme, the UK and Australia have announced the first post-Brexit trade deal negotiated entirely from scratch. Mary Quicke is a cheesemaker who currently exports 10% of her cheeses to Australia, and tells us she is cautiously optimistic about what the deal might lead to. Five years ago, American broadcaster Gretchen Carlson successfully sued her former boss at Fox News, Roger Ailes, for sexual harassment. She discusses her concern that major American companies continue to gag employees, and protect workplace predators through non-disclosure agreements. Plus, scientists have developed a technique to turn waste plastic bottles into the synthetic vanilla flavouring vanillin. Joanna Sadler of the University of Edinburgh, who conducted the research, explains how the process works.

(Picture: A Boeing plane comes in to land. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 16 JUNE 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrgkb6)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqcxmncxmx)
EU and US call trade truce

The US and the EU have agreed a truce in a 17-year trade dispute over subsidies for the aircraft manufacturers Boeing and Airbus.
We hear why they've chosen now to call a truce with Mary Lovely, Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics.
Also on the programme, what to do with plastic before it ends up covering the planet? We meet a scientist who has found a micro-organism that can chomp its way through it and turn it into vanilla essence. Plus, the rise of Non Disclosure Agreements means that many employers can restrict employees from spreading trade secrets – but are they being abused? The BBC’s Ed Butler reports. We discuss all this live with guests Stefanie Yuen Thio, Joint Managing Partner at TSMP Law in Singapore, and in New York City, political reporter Erin Delmore.

(Image: Airbus airplane in France. Credit: Getty Images/ AFP)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrgp2b)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwk91l)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc51bq)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2g7k)
Automation Nation

Are we heading for a world without work?

Speaking with a variety of experts and working Americans, Daniel Susskind considers how we might negotiate a world without work. He hears the story of Youngstown, Ohio, where the collapse of the steel industry in the 1970s led to severe job losses and created a perfect storm of societal problems that a fresh wave of rapid automation could replicate on a mass scale. If we’re to avoid such a future, we’re going to have to rethink our attitudes towards taxation, wealth distribution, and even the nature of work itself.


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrgstg)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrgxkl)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwkjjv)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc58tz)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6k)
Oksana Masters

Abandoned by her birth parents, Oksana Masters had birth defects caused by radiation, most likely from Chernobyl. Trapped and struggling to survive inside an abusive orphanage system in Ukraine, at the age of eight she was adopted by an American single mother.

Oksana tells us how she used the trauma of her youth to push herself to sporting greatness, including winning medals at the winter and summer Paralympics. Harnessing the anger and drawing on massive reserves of determination, this is a remarkable story of coming to terms with trauma and refusing to let it define you.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrh19q)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2p945x3bg)
What to expect when US and Russian leaders meet today

When the US and Russian leaders meet in Geneva it will be the first time since Joe Biden became President, so what should we look out for? We get the view of Rose Gottemoeller, a former Deputy Secretary General of NATO and a Russia expert.

Israel says it has launched air strikes against Hamas targets in the Gaza Strip, in retaliation for incendiary balloons fired from the territory. We get the latest.

And we speak to the Chief Prosecutor to the International Criminal Court, Fatou Bensouda, who leaves her post today after nine years.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrh51v)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2p945x72l)
Israel launches air strikes in Gaza

Israel has launched air strikes against Hamas targets in the Gaza Strip overnight, in retaliation for incendiary balloons being launched from the territory. We go live to Gaza.

Ahead of their first face-to-face meeting since Joe Biden became US president, Mr Biden called Vladimir Putin a "worthy adversary", and Mr Putin has said US-Russian relations are at their "lowest point in recent years". So what can we expect?

And in Equatorial Guinea two soldiers are on trial over the death of more than a hundred people there, and injuring another 600 more, after a massive explosion at an army barracks in March. We have the latest.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrh8sz)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2p945xbtq)
A Russian view of the Putin-Biden summit

We go to Moscow to get a Russian perspective ahead of today's summit between the US and Russian leaders - their first since Joe Biden took office.

The International Criminal Court has a new Chief Prosecutor. Fatou Bensouda steps down after nine years and Karim Khan will be sworn in today. So what challenges does he face?

And we hear from the winner of the opening event in this year's cliff diving championships - it's frightening enough just to watch the video!


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrhdk3)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbb)
Jens Stoltenberg: Is the old alliance ready to tackle new threats?

President Biden says the US is determined to lead NATO's response to evolving geographical and technological threats. But there have been marked disagreements between alliance members on relations with Russia, the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan, defence spending and the so-called ‘systemic challenge’ posed by China. Just how united is the West’s military alliance?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc5rth)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnm)
Sexual harassment: Can smart tech help?

Can technology help victims of sexual harassment feel more confident in reporting their perpetrators?

Ed Butler hears how the #MeToo movement inspired Ariel Weindling to start up a reporting app called #NotMe. Meanwhile, Neta Maidev's own experience of sexual harassment eventually led her to create another app - Vault Platform.

But can HR departments sometimes be part of the problem? That's the view of Nuala Walsh, founding director of the Global Association of Applied Behavioural Scientists. But Rachel Suff of the UK's Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development takes issue with. Plus, Dr Frances Frei of the Harvard Business School, who has helped a range of US firms reassess their workplace culture, says there's much still to be done.

Producer: Nisha Patel

(Picture: Woman looking uncomfortable next to a colleague in the office; Credit: Prot Tachapanit / EyeEm)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7p)
The police rape interview that shocked Britain

When the BBC broadcast a documentary called 'A Complaint of Rape' in 1982 the public was shocked. It was part of a fly-on-the-wall series about the police in which officers were filmed aggressively questioning a woman about her allegation of rape. It made news around the world and inspired the British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher to question the procedure as well as the attitude of those involved. The woman was asked personal questions about her sex life, menstruation and about her mental health. The officers told her directly that they didn't believe her claim. It led individual police forces to reassess the way they investigated allegations of rape. Claire Bowes has been speaking to film-maker Roger Graef about the footage.

Photo: an image from the film 'A Complaint of Rape' by Roger Graef and the BBC (1982).


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrhj97)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2g7k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc5wkm)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrhn1c)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g8x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrhrsh)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwlcrr)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc641w)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrhwjm)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyn)
We bought the wrong house at auction

Cal Hunter and Claire Segeren tried to buy a two-bedroom flat in Glasgow, but when a house auction went wrong, they ended up accidentally buying a wrecked manor in a small community called Dunoon in rural Scotland. Now they're living on site in a caravan, trying to turn a ruin into a dream home. They've documented their build in a blog called "What have we Dunoon".

Christian Clot is an explorer who travels to the world's most inhospitable places to try and survive. But recently, he worked with scientists on something a little different. Christian took 14 others into a labyrinthine cave system in south-western France to see what happens to humans' perception of time in the absence of clocks and natural light. They spent 40 days inside and did not expect to react the way they did when told the experiment was over.

Ulrike Poppe spent 15 years under Stasi surveillance in East Berlin. In the 1990s she tracked down the agent who’d known everything about her.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Cal Hunter and Claire Segeren, and their ruined house in rural Scotland
Credit: Cal Hunter and Claire Segeren


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrj08r)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwlm80)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc6ck4)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrj40w)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv54mb003bh)
Putin and Biden meet at much-anticipated summit

The talks in Geneva come at a time when both sides describe relations as being at rock bottom. The discussions are set to include arms control and the US allegations of Russian cyber-attacks.

Also on the programme: the case for compulsory vaccinations for care workers worldwide; and we look ahead to the elections in Iran.

(Photo: U.S. President Joe Biden and Russia’s President Vladimir Putin shake hands as they arrive for the U.S.-Russia summit at Villa La Grange in Geneva, Switzerland on 16 June 2021.Credit: Loeb/ Pool/ Reuters)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrj7s0)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc6m1d)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cntxf5btn)
Putin and Biden meet in Geneva

As the Russian and US presidents meet in Geneva, we examine the state of Russia's economy. Chris Weafer is chief executive of the economic consultancy Macro Advisory, and offers us his analysis. Also in the programme, the presidents of Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo have officially opened a major new bridge between the countries. Nebert Rugadya, business journalist from Kampala, and tells us what difference the new border crossing will make. Andrew Ssentongo of energy company GRS Commodities discusses whether solar power might offer a solution to get reliable electricity to those off the grid across Africa. Plus, as the European Union starts releasing pandemic recovery funds, we ask how Spain's tourism sector is faring, with Giles Brown from Spanish radio station, Talk Radio Europe.

(Picture: Presidents Biden and Putin meet in Geneva. Picture credit: Reuters.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrjcj4)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxk46vzcgl)
When Putin met Biden

The current presidents of the United States and Russia have held their first face-to-face meeting at a mansion in Geneva in Switzerland. We'll explain some of the background to the current state of the difficult relationship. We should hear each leader's thoughts on the meeting too, with their news conferences due during this edition.

We've got BBC correspondents covering the politics of each country to explain what each leader hopes to achieve with this meeting. We'll also hear a conversation between an American and a Russian on how they view each other's countries. Could they ever imagine the two nations to be friends?

Also, we'll talk about the idea of mandatory Covid-19 vaccines for certain workers, something on the agenda in several nations at the moment, including Russia, Canada and the UK. It's one of the areas we'll discuss with our regular expert, Dr Maria Sundaram from ICES Ontario.

(Photo: US President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin during their meeting in Geneva. Credit: EPA/Denis Balibouse)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrjh88)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxk46vzh6q)
When Biden met Putin

The current presidents of the United States and Russia have held their first face-to-face meeting at a mansion in Geneva in Switzerland. We'll explain some of the background to the current state of the difficult relationship. We should hear each leader's thoughts on the meeting too, with their news conferences due during this edition.

We've got BBC correspondents covering the politics of each country to explain what each leader hopes to achieve with this meeting. We'll also hear a conversation between an American and a Russian on how they view each other's countries. Could they ever imagine the two nations to be friends?

Also, we'll talk about the idea of mandatory Covid-19 vaccines for certain workers, something on the agenda in several nations at the moment, including Russia, Canada and the UK. It's one of the areas we'll discuss with our regular expert, Dr Pedro Hallal from the Federal University of Pelotas in Brazil.

(Photo: US President Joe Biden and Russia's President Vladimir Putin shake hands at Villa La Grange in Geneva, Switzerland Credit: Denis Balibouse / Pool/Reuters)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrjm0d)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrjqrj)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwmbqs)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc730x)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nc3gqmlkw)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrjvhn)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2g7k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc76s1)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvc)
New treatment for Covid

Good news that a new treatment for Covid could help one in three people in hospital. Results are from the Recovery trial in the UK using an infusion of two antibodies made in the laboratory which bind to the virus and stop it replicating. But it is expensive and those people who haven't made their own antibodies should be given the treatment. And Project S - the unique experiment that vaccinated a whole town in Brazil. Claudia speaks to Dr Ricardo Palacios, clinical studies director at the Butantan Institute in Sao Paulo, leading the research. Plus a ground breaking trial in Yogyakarta city, Indonesia, that has cut cases of Dengue Fever by 77% by infecting mosquitoes with a "miraculous" bacteria.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A doctor holds a vial of monoclonal antibodies, a new treatment for Covid-19. Photo credit: Cristian Storto Fotografia/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrjz7s)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv54mb00ykd)
Biden and Putin say summit was ‘constructive’

The two leaders met in Geneva and discussed issues such as human rights, cyber security and Ukraine. Both leaders have spoken positively of the talks. We’ll have an assessment from both sides.

Also in the programme: is starvation being used as a weapon in Tigray? And we hear from the wife of an imprisoned opposition candidate who’d hoped to run in elections in Nicaragua.

(Photo: U.S. President Joe Biden at the end of a news conference after the U.S.-Russia summit with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin, in Geneva, Switzerland, June 16, 2021. Credit: Peter Klaunzer/ Pool via REUTERS)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrk2zx)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nbb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc7g89)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrk6r1)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywp7v8yj90)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sgb3r2kxn)
Sports News

BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc7l0f)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48ssc9sr95)
Putin and Biden meet in Geneva

As the Russian and US presidents meet in Geneva, we examine the state of Russia's economy. Chris Weafer is chief executive of the economic consultancy Macro Advisory, and offers us his analysis. Also in the programme, the presidents of Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo have officially opened a major new bridge between the countries. Nebert Rugadya is business editor of Uganda's Radio One, and tells us what difference the new border crossing will make. Andrew Ssentongo of energy company GRS Commodities discusses whether solar power might offer a solution to get reliable electricity to those off the grid across Africa. Plus, as the European Union starts releasing pandemic recovery funds, we ask how Spain's tourism sector is faring, with Giles Brown from Spanish radio station, Talk Radio Europe.

(Picture: Presidents Biden and Putin meet in Geneva. Picture credit: Reuters.)



THURSDAY 17 JUNE 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrkg79)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqcxmngtk0)
Russia-US summit in Geneva

Biden and Putin praise Geneva summit talks but discord remains. We hear about their separate media briefings - in which Mr Putin spoke first, followed by Mr Biden. Nina Jankovich of the Wilson Center in Washington picks out her highlight from each leader's remarks. Also in the show, Susan Schmidt of Aviva Investors in Chicago chats to us about unemployment and inflation in the US. We take a look at sexual harassment in the workplace and whether smart tech can help increase a victim's confidence in reporting - and the role HR plays in tackling these workplace offences. Also, we chat about vaccination incentives, including Krispy Kreme who have been handing out a free donut a day to anyone that can prove they've been vaccinated. Mitchell Hartman, a Senior Reporter for Marketplace on American Public Media - joins the programme from Portland, Oregon; and the author and former civil servant Rachel Cartland is with us from Hong Kong.

(Image: Biden and Putin shaking hands. Credit: Reuters)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrkkzf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwn5yp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc7y7t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxf)
Syria’s decade of conflict: The many colours of Raqqa

Syrian born reporter Lina Sinjab presents a special series from Assignment’s award winning archive on the ten years of civil war in her country.

In the final programme from the season Lina hears from BBC foreign correspondent Tim Whewell who spoke to Abood Hamam, perhaps the only photojournalist to have worked under every major force in Syria's war - and lived to tell the tale. At the start of the uprising he was head of photography for the state news agency, SANA, taking official shots of President Assad and his wife Asma by day - and secretly filming opposition attacks by night. Later he defected and returned to his home town, Raqqa, where various rebel groups were competing for control. Other journalists fled when the terrorists of so-called Islamic State (IS) took over, but Abood stayed - and was asked by IS to film its victory parade. He sent pictures of life under IS to agencies all over the world - using a pseudonym. As the bombing campaign by the anti-IS coalition intensified, Abood moved away - but returned later to record the heartbreaking destruction - but also the slow return of life, and colour, to the streets. For months, he roamed through the ruins with his camera, seeing himself as ”the guardian of the city." Raqqa's future is still very uncertain, but Abood now wants everyone to see his pictures, which he posts on Facebook, and know his real name. He hopes the colours he's showing will tempt the thousands of families who've fled Raqqa to return home, and rebuild their lives, and their city.

Producer: Mohamad Chreyteh
Sound mix: James Beard
Production coordinator: Gemma Ashman
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Children running in Raqqa, 2019. Credit: Abood Hamam)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrkpqk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrktgp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwnffy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc85r2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfr)
The school that food built

When chef Jamie Oliver launched a campaign to improve British school meals, it inspired one headteacher to take things much further.

Charlton Manor Primary School, in south London, now grows its own produce, keeps bees and chickens, and has a restaurant aiming for a Michelin star. Head Tim Baker has also overhauled the teaching curriculum to put food centre stage - from learning about fair trade banana growers in geography lessons to slicing pizzas to help with fractions.

Tamasin Ford speaks to teachers and students to find out how they did it, and asks whether this could act as a model for how to teach our children about food's impact on our health and the planet.

Producer: Simon Tulett

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Students Sarah and Vaidas in the garden at Charlton Manor Primary School)

Contributors:

Students at Charlton Manor Primary School;
Joe Grollman, teaching chef;
Nick Shelley, gardener;
Flavio Hernandez, head chef;
Tim Baker, headteacher;
Kim Smith, TastEd and City, University of London;
Dennis Hollywood, teacher


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrky6t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2p946007k)
Hong Kong police arrest pro-democracy Apple Daily editor

The editor-in-chief and four other executives of pro-democracy newspaper Apple Daily have been arrested on suspicion of violating the national security law.
Apple Daily is owned by media mogul Jimmy Lai, who was also arrested and jailed on a string of charges. We get the latest from Hong Kong and speak to a friend of Jimmy Lai's.

President Biden and President Putin have held their long awaited summit, but what has come out of it? We hear from someone who's been in meetings with President Putin, while he worked with the former US Secretary of State, John Kerry.

And the former President of Ivory Coast, Laurent Gbagbo, is returning to his country today after standing trial in The Hague for crimes against humanity and being acquitted on all charges. We have a report on where this leave the reconciliation process in the country.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrl1yy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2p94603zp)
Raid and arrests of pro-democracy journalists in Hong Kong

We have reaction to the arrests in Hong Kong of senior journalists at the pro-democracy newspaper Apple Daily - can the paper survive?

The first crew for China’s new space station has blasted off for the country's longest crewed mission to date. Three astronauts will spend three months in the Tianhe module. We find out about the aim of the mission.

And what's the atmosphere in Ivory Coast ahead of the return today of the former president Laurent Gbagbo. He was acquitted of crimes against humanity which he had been charged with at the ICC, following the electoral violence in 2011.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrl5q2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2p94607qt)
Arrests at Hong Kong's pro-democracy Apple Daily

Can the pro-democracy Hong Kong paper survive these latest arrests? Mark Simon is an advisor to Jimmy Lai, the jailed media mogul who owns the paper.

In a landmark in China's space programme three astronauts are starting a three-month space mission - we find out the latest.

And what does the return home today of Ivory Coast's former president Laurent Gbagbo, after his acquittal at the ICC for crimes against humanity during the post-election violence in 2011, mean for the country?


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrl9g6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z22)
Could Covid-19 have come from a lab leak?

For the last year discussions about the origins of Covid-19 have divided people all over the world. Some say it came from nature and others believe it could have escaped from a lab. The idea of a lab accident was originally dismissed as a conspiracy theory but it’s starting to gain attention all over again.

Now President Biden has given the US intelligence service 90 days to try and investigate the virus's origins further.

Many still believe the virus jumped to humans from animals but some say that we need to be open minded until we have all of the data.

But could Covid-19 really have come from a lab?


Presenter: Kavita Puri
Producer: Olivia Noon
Researcher: Kirsteen Knight

(Virus research in a lab. Tek Science/Getty images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc8nql)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j9b)
Game over for test cricket?

Do audiences, sponsors and broadcasters still have the patience for five-day matches? Or is the future now with the shorter one-day and Twenty20 formats?

Rahul Tandon speaks to Geoff Allardice, general manager of cricket for the International Cricket Council, about his hopes that the inaugural World Test Championship final this year will reinvigorate traditional long-form cricket, as well as Lalit Beriwala, director of the major cricket sponsor Shyam Steel, one of the tournament's major sponsors.

But the world's biggest cricketing nation, India, has moved firmly over to the faster-moving - and more profitable - three-hour T20 matches. We hear from cricket writer Sharda Ugra, player-turned-commentator Deep Dasgupta, and sports business analyst Mudar Patherya.

(Picture: Indian batsman Virat Kohli leaves the field after being dismissed in a test match against New Zealand; Credit: Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x35)
The Trabant

The iconic East German car dominated the roads of communist Central Europe for decades. The Trabant was made out of resin and cotton waste, had a two-stroke engine and its design remained virtually unchanged for thirty years. Johannes Dell has been hearing from legendary German designer Karl Clauss Dietel who worked for years to make improvements to the Trabant - but his innovations were never implemented.

(Photo: a Trabant 601. Credit: BBC)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrlf6b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc8sgq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrljyg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl8)
Falconry: The history of hunting with birds of prey

The practice of hunting with birds of prey is thought to stretch back thousands of years. In early nomadic societies, falconry was used to hunt animals to provide food and clothing in places such as the steppes of Central Asia. As the practice spread, falconry evolved into a pastime that attracted the elite of European society, reflected in the extensive iconography of noblemen and women and their falcons. Today falconry is found in more than 90 countries around the world.

At its core remains the importance of the relationship between falconer and the bird of prey, a bond unlike any other between man and beast.

But although falconry has been classed as intangible cultural heritage by UNESCO, there are challenges to its survival. And some argue that falconry itself is exploitative.

Rajan Datar is joined by the president of the International Association for Falconry, His Excellency Majid al-Mansouri; Adrian Lombard, Chair of the South African Falconry Association; art historian Anne-Lise Tropato, the first Falconry Research Fellow at New York University Abu Dhabi, and social anthropologist Sara Asu Schroer who's researched the relationships between falconers and birds of prey through fieldwork in Britain and Europe.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service

[Image: Emirati Ali Mansouri trains a falcon in the Liwa desert. Credit: KARIM SAHIB/AFP via Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l89)
Football's Coming Home

In June 1996, an England team led by Paul Gascoigne went on an impressive run as hosts of the European championships – with the terrace anthem “Football’s Coming Home” becoming the soundtrack for a summer of national euphoria. But the tournament would end in English tears when future national manager Gareth Southgate missed the decisive penalty in an agonising semi-final shoot-out against Germany. Alex Capstick talks to England midfielder Darren Anderton about how the country embraced a team previously best known for its boozy off-field antics.

PHOTO: Paul Gascoigne celebrating a famous goal against Scotland (Neil Munns/PA)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrlnpl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwp8nv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc90yz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrlsfq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k35)
A top Iranian chess umpire and her impossible decision

As the only female Category-A International Arbiter in Asia, Shohreh Bayat has represented Iran at chess tournaments all around the world. That position came with a big responsibility and a lot of rules as to what she could and could not do and more importantly, wear.

In Iran, the law requires women to wear modest "Islamic" clothing. This requirement was extended to those representing the country abroad and although many women wear the hijab by choice, it was not something Shohreh felt comfortable or agreed with.

The highlight of Shohreh’s impressive career came at the start of 2020 when she travelled to Shanghai for the Women’s World Chess Championship. It was during this tournament that a photo appeared in the Iranian media appearing to show Shohreh not wearing a hijab. That photo led to an ultimatum and what would be the biggest and most difficult decision of her career.

A fake wedding, a double life and forged documents. In 2013 investigative journalist Benita Alexander was making a documentary about 'super-surgeon' Paolo Macchiarini and his pioneering synthetic organ transplants. The pair quickly fell in love and Benita was swept into a whirlwind romance. Paolo proposed, but the fairytale soon began to unravel when she discovered that the extravagant star-studded wedding he told her he was planning was all a lie. But the fake wedding was just the beginning.

Picture: Shohreh Bayat
Credit: Getty Images

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrlx5v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwpj53)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc98g7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nvc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrm0xz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv54mb0307l)
Hong Kong cracks down on pro-democracy paper

The future of Hong Kong's main pro-democracy news outlet, Apple Daily, is in doubt after the police arrested its most senior editors and froze its bank account. The authorities said some of the newspaper's reporting had broken the national security law.

Also on the programme; we’ll get reaction to the meeting of President Biden and President Putin; and we speak to the International Criminal Court’s new Chief Prosecutor Karim Khan QC

(Picture: Police arrive at the Apple Daily offices Credit: Getty Images)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrm4p3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc9hyh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y496hqm6bfw)
Arrests at Hong Kong's Apple Daily

Several senior figures have been arrested at Hong Kong's pro-democracy paper Apple Daily. We get reaction to the developments from Hong Kong investor Alan Zeman of the Lan Kwai Fong Group, and Selina Cheng, who is a senior reporter with Hong Kong Free Press. Also in the programme, a slim majority of countries at the UN's shipping agency, the International Maritime Organisation, have voted in favour of a package of measures that will require companies to reduce their carbon intensity in the coming years, but will allow overall emissions to keep rising. Critics have dismissed the plans as not being ambitious enough, and we find out more from Simon Bergulf, regulatory affairs director at the world's largest shipping company, Maersk. The BBC's Adam Easton brings us the latest in a dispute between the Czech Republic and Poland over water shortages said to be caused by a coal mine in Poland. Plus, with the popularity of one-day and Twenty20 cricket formats on the rise, we ask whether it is game over for the five day test match version of the game.

(Picture: Apple Daily's chief operations officer is arrested. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrm8f7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxk46w28cp)
Mandatory vaccinations

We’ll discuss mandatory vaccinations and hear from a nurse in the US who has been suspended by her employer over her refusal to have Covid vaccine. She is part of the group of medical workers at Houston Methodist Hospital, who are challenging their suspension in court. She explains her concerns over Covid vaccines.

As ever, we’ll also speak to one of our regular coronavirus experts, Dr Emma Hodcroft, to get her take on today’s other headlines on the virus.

And we play the final part in our series of conversations with Iranians ahead of tomorrow’s presidential elections. Today, Rana Rahimpour from BBC Persian speaks to three people who all lost family members in the Ukrainian plane crash in January 2020. Iran said it unintentionally shot down the passenger jet but the relatives are calling for an explanation on the government’s handling of the crash.

Picture: A nurse prepares a syringe with a dose of the AstraZeneca (Vaxzevria) vaccine Credit: EPA/NARONG SANGNAK


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrmd5c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxk46w2d3t)
OS conversations: Ukraine Iran plane crash

We play the final part in our series of conversations with Iranians ahead of tomorrow’s presidential elections. Rana Rahimpour from BBC Persian Service speaks to three people who all lost family members in the Ukrainian plane crash in January 2020. Iran said it unintentionally shot down the passenger jet but the relatives are calling for explanation on the government’s handling of the crash.

The former President of Ivory coast – who was charged and later acquitted of crimes against humanity over election violence - returns to the country today. Laurent Gbabgo still has an immense support in the country and we hear what kind of welcome awaits for him.

We’ll discuss mandatory vaccinations and hear from a nurse in the US who has been suspended by her employer over her refusal to have Covid vaccine.

Our regular medical expert Dr Helena Wimalarathna joins us to look at today’s other coronavirus stories.

(Photo: Members of the International Red Crescent collect bodies of victims around the wreckage (debris) after a Ukrainian plane carrying 176 passengers crashed near Imam Khomeini airport in Tehran early in the morning on January 8, 2020, killing everyone on board. Credit: ABEDIN TAHERKENAREH/EPA)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrmhxh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrmmnm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwq7mw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmc9zy0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nc3gqqhgz)
2021/06/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrmrdr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcb3p4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3s)
Doubling Earth’s energy imbalance

Nasa scientists have observed that the Earth’s energy imbalance has doubled in just 15 years. As greenhouse gas atmospheric concentrations have risen, so too has the difference between the total amount of energy being absorbed from the sun, and the total amount being reradiated back into space. Meanwhile, as we all heat up, scientists at the LIGO Gravitational Wave Observatory have managed to do something very cool with their mirrors. Such is the precision with which the detectors have been engineered, they have managed to effectively reduce the temperature of one of the big 10kg reflectors to such an extent that it betrays its quantum state, as if it were simply one big subatomic particle. So what? Roland Pease finds out.

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield

(Photo: Giant sun in the horizon. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrmw4w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv54mb03vgh)
First crew blasts off to new China space station

China has launched three astronauts into orbit to begin occupation of the country's new space station. It will be China's longest crewed space mission to date and the first in nearly five years. But is that achievement dimming the prospects for the US Space Agency? We speak to former NASA chief and former astronaut Charles Bolden.

Also in the programme: The former president of Ivory Coast Laurent Gbagbo, has returned home after nearly a decade overseas during which he was cleared of crimes against humanity; and Zambia declares three weeks of mourning to honour the independence leader Kenneth Kaunda, who has died at the age of 97.

(Photo: Chinese astronauts (L-R) Tang Hongbo, Nie Haisheng, and Liu Boming wave during a departure ceremony before their launch to begin occupation of the country's new space station. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrmzx0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcbc5d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrn3n4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywp7v91f63)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sgb3r5gtr)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcbgxj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48ssc9wn68)
Arrests at Hong Kong's Apple Daily

Several senior figures have been arrested at Hong Kong's pro-democracy paper Apple Daily. We get reaction to the developments from Hong Kong investor Alan Zeman of the Lan Kwai Fong Group, and Selina Cheng, who is a senior reporter with Hong Kong Free Press. Also in the programme, a slim majority of countries at the UN's shipping agency, the International Maritime Organisation, have voted in favour of a package of measures that will require companies to reduce their carbon intensity in the coming years, but will allow overall emissions to keep rising. Critics have dismissed the plans as not being ambitious enough, and we find out more from Simon Bergulf, regulatory affairs director at the world's largest shipping company, Maersk. The BBC's Adam Easton brings us the latest in a dispute between the Czech Republic and Poland over water shortages said to be caused by a coal mine in Poland. Plus, with the popularity of one-day and Twenty20 cricket formats on the rise, we ask whether it is game over for the five day test match version of the game.

(Picture: Apple Daily's chief operations officer is arrested. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 18 JUNE 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrnc4d)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqcxmnkqg3)
US Supreme Court rejects Trump-backed challenge to Obamacare

The US Supreme Court has rejected a Trump-backed challenge by Republican-led states to former President Barack Obama's healthcare overhaul. Amy Lotven, a senior editor at InsideHealthPolicy.com, gives us the latest developments from the US.

Also, we hear why a rejection by Nasa helped motivated China to build its own space station, with Dr Megan Argo, a Lecturer in Astrophysics at the University of Central Lancashire in northern England. Plus what happens when you go in for a sandwich and come out with a bag of weed?

With the popularity of one-day and Twenty20 cricket formats on the rise, we ask whether it is game over for the five day test match version of the game. Hayley Woodin is executive editor of Business in Vancouver, and joins us for commentary throughout the programme along with Timothy Martin, Korea bureau chief for the Wall Street Journal.

(Photo: Protesters hold placards with words Save ACA. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrngwj)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwr2vs)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcbv4x)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tz4)
Euro 2020: Ronaldo's records and Eriksen's collapse

We hear from the Finland captain Tim Sparv, who was on the pitch when Christian Eriksen suffered a cardiac arrest. Portugal's Jose Fonte pays tribute to his record-breaking team-mate Cristiano Ronaldo. And Sweden coach Janne Andersson explains why he is not a fan of the format for Euro 2020.

Picture: Cristiano Ronaldo of Portugal celebrates victory over Hungary at Euro 2020 (Alex Pantling/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrnlmn)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrnqcs)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwrbc1)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcc2n5)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2d31)
Pope Francis in Iraq: The historic pilgrimage

The world watched on as Pope Francis embarked on what he called a pilgrimage to the Middle East, a journey that could possibly be the Holy Father's legacy. Despite worries of the Covid pandemic and the real threat of a terrorist attack, Pope Francis became the first pontiff in history to visit Iraq. Standing among rubble and ruins in the devastated city of Mosul where ISIS took root and threatened to behead him, Pope Francis proclaimed "hope is more powerful than hatred, that peace more powerful than war."

In this programme Colm Flynn travels on the papal flight to Iraq to talk to Iraqi Christians and Muslims who have come out to welcome Pope Francis to their nation. The programme will bring you behind the scenes on a papal trip, and let you experience real moments with the Iraqi people who hope that the Pope's visit will bring long-lasting healing and peace to their land.

Presenter and Producer: Colm Flynn

Additional audio supplied by EWTN
Picture credit: Colm Flynn /EWTN


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrnv3x)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2p9462x4n)
Kenneth Kaunda - the Founding Father of Zambia has died

Zambia is in mourning for its first post-independence leader of the country and African icon, Kenneth Kaunda.

In Hong Kong, a verdict is expected in the trial of eight men accused of attacking pro-democracy protesters.

President Biden has signed into law a bill creating a US public holiday to mark the end of slavery.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrnyw1)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2p94630ws)
African liberation icon Kenneth Kaunda dies at 97

Tributes pour in following the death of an African elder statesman, Kenneth Kaunda, one of the leaders of Africa's liberation struggle who has died at 97.

More than 80 million people have now been displaced by war and persecution, that's according to the UN High Commissioner for refugees.

Iranians go to the polls today with just four candidates left in the race for the job as president.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrp2m5)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2p94634mx)
Some 80m people displaced by war and persecution, says UN

UN refugee agency says 80m people are displaced by war and persecution across the world, rising for the ninth year in a row.

One of Africa's true icons - Zambia's founding president Kenneth Kaunda or KK - has died at the age of 97 in Lusaka.

And why Lebanon's army is close to bankruptcy.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrp6c9)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n19)
Johan Lundgren, EasyJet CEO: Can his business model survive Covid and climate change?

No industry has been hit harder by the global pandemic than aviation. Cross-border travel is either banned or constrained by tests and quarantines across much of the world. And, in a time full of uncertainty and insecurity, who wants to travel for either business or pleasure? Stephen Sackur speaks to Johan Lundgren, CEO of EasyJet, Europe’s second biggest budget airline. Can his business model survive the double whammy of Covid and climate change?

(Photo: Johan Lundgren in the Hardtalk studio)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcckmp)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j09)
China's birth rate problem

After decades of restrictions, China's leaders want women to have more children. But will a 'three-child' policy prevent a decline in China's population?

Ed Butler speaks to Professor Stein Emil Vollset from the University of Washington School of Medicine about the dramatic population declines expected in many countries including China. China demographics expert Yong Cai explains why the declining birth rate will be difficult to reverse. And author and journalist Mei Fong tells us why the one-child policy of the past will make it even harder for Chinese authorities to promote larger families in the future.

(Photo: A nurse holding a baby at an infant care centre in Yongquan, in Chongqing municipality, in southwest China; Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyn)
China's 'Economic Miracle'

Since the 1980s China has witnessed massive economic growth. It’s become known as the 'world’s factory'. The driving force behind much of it has been a vast migrant workforce of millions of people, many from the countryside. But at what cost to village life and rural communities? Rebecca Kesby has been speaking to writer Liang Hong about her experience of leaving the Chinese countryside, and why she is determined to document the lives of those living through seismic change.

(PHOTO:


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrpb3f)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh1)
Web creator to sell source code as an NFT

Sir Tim Berners-Lee surprises observers by using the latest tech craze to raise funds for charity. Plus, we visit the Founders Forum ClimateTech Summit to hear entrepreneurs’ ideas for tackling the environmental emergency. And will wearable health devices one day be replaced by implanted sensors? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with senior BBC tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Sir Tim Berners-Lee with NFT graphics, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmccpct)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrpfvk)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsj)
China's global project has a new rival

At their annual summit in Britain this year, the group of seven industrialised nations, or G7, has agreed to an infrastructure development plan for developing countries. The Build Back Better World – or B3W – is seen as an alternative to the multi-trillion dollar Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) launched by China about a decade ago. The BRI has been a relatively easy source of funding for power plants, mining, road building and a range of other development projects, and more than 100 countries have partnered with Beijing as part of the scheme. But these projects are not without controversy and there are questions about China's long-term intentions in the countries taking part.

The White House says its plan is not about confronting China, but about providing a better and more transparent alternative that reflects the democratic values of the countries involved. But critics say that without a consistent China policy across its member states the G7 plan is bound to face difficulties. What exactly is B3W trying to achieve and how will it benefit the developing world? Will it compete or compliment China's BRI? Can the G7 strategy be as consistent as China's? And how open will developing countries be to accepting the promotion of Western values? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrpklp)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkws5ky)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmccxw2)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tz4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrppbt)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f1)
Finding treasure inside a whale

A group of Yemeni fishermen recently found a sperm whale carcass floating in the Gulf of Aden, with $1.5 million dollars' worth of ambergris inside its belly. Afra Ahmed of BBC Arabic is from Aden, and tells us about the fishermen, ambergris and memories of Aden.

The hit Turkish TV shows tackling mental health
Turkish TV dramas are famous for their sweeping historical and romantic themes, but in recent years, several top shows have focussed on mental health issues. Dilay Yalcin of BBC Monitoring is a fan and explains the appeal.

Words in the news - watermelons and sea snot
Sometimes words in the news jump out and grab your attention. This week the BBC's Kennedy Gondwe tells us why watermelons have become political in Zambia, and Onur Erem of BBC Turkish elucidates the murky waters of the Sea of Marmara, covered in 'sea snot'.

The problem with women’s underwear in Pakistan
Many Pakistani women have problems buying underwear. It can be expensive, uncomfortable, and embarrassing to buy, often from male market traders. Even talking about it is taboo. Saher Baloch of BBC Urdu tells us about one man who is trying to change things.

Emiliano Mundrucu: Brazil’s forgotten anti-racism pioneer
The first known legal action against racial segregation in the United States was taken in 1834, by a black Brazilian immigrant. BBC Brasil’s Mariana Schreiber shares the story of Emiliano Mundrucu, and asks why this ground-breaking pioneer has been forgotten in both Brazil and the USA.

Image: Yemeni fisherman on the beach with boats in Aden
Credit: BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrpt2y)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwsf26)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcd5cb)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrpxv2)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv54mb05x4p)
Iranians vote in presidential poll marred by bans

Dissidents and some reformists have called for a boycott, saying the barring of several contenders left Mr Raisi with no serious competition.

Also in the programme: Japan's chief Covid-19 advisor said having no fans would be the least risky option, days before the organisers of the Tokyo Olympics decide whether to allow spectators into events; and we hear what a newly found species of ancient giant rhino looked like.

(Photo: An Iranian woman holds a document after voting during presidential elections at a polling station in Tehran. Credit: Reuters).


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrq1l6)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n19)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcddvl)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46r5jt7b23)
Dispute over fans at Tokyo Olympics

An official report says having no spectators at the games is the 'least risky' option. Amid concern about the risks associated with coronavirus, Robin Harding, Tokyo bureau chief of the Financial Times talks us through the arguments on both sides. Also in the programme, ByteDance, the parent company of social media app TikTok has seen its earnings more than double in 2020. Chris Stokel-Walker is a journalist and author of TikTok Boom, and explains the success of the service. We have an in-depth report on reductions to government international aid budgets in some parts of the world. Chiku Lweno who works in Tanzania for the charity Children in Crossfire tells us about the impact on her organisation of a cut in support from UK aid. Susanna Moorehead of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development makes the case for boosting aid spending. And Ben Harris-Quinney of the UK conservative think tank the Bow Group argues that the British government should spend its money closer to home. Plus, we meet a doggy day care specialist who has seen a surge in interest for her services, as people who bought dogs during lockdown start returning to work.

(Picture: An Olympic rings display in Tokyo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrq5bb)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxk46w558s)
OS conversations: Ovarian cancer

One of the big conversations this week has been the response to the announcement by CNN anchor Christiane Amanpour that she has ovarian cancer. More
than three million people have watched the video she posted on her Twitter feed. We speak to two women - in India and in the US - with their own experiences of ovarian cancer.

Liberian rebel commander, Alieu Kosiah, has been found guilty of committing multiple war crimes in the 1990's. Our correspondent will give more details.

Our regular coronavirus expert Dr Megan Murray from Harvard Medical School will answer some audience questions about the pandemic.

President Biden has made Juneteenth, which commemorates the end of slavery in America, a federal holiday. We hear reaction from African Americans.

(Photo: Marlene Looney and colleagues. Credit: Marlene Looney)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrq92g)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxk46w590x)
Covid in Africa: Concern over surge in infections

Many countries in the African continent are seeing a rise in coronavirus infections. We hear about the situation in Uganda and in South Africa

One of the big conversations this week has been the response to the announcement by CNN anchor Christiane Amanpour that she has ovarian cancer. More than three million people have watched the video she posted on her Twitter feed. We speak to two women - in India and in the US - with their own experiences of ovarian cancer.

Iranians have been voting to elect a new president, with all but one of the four candidates regarded as hardliners. We'll hear more from BBC Persian Service.


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrqdtl)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20f1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrqjkq)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxhpkwt4jz)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcdwv3)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nc3gqtdd2)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrqn9v)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1nh1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcf0l7)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqj)
Does my equator look big in this?

Scales don’t come planet-sized, so answering a question from David in Ghana may require some ingenuity, after all, calculating the weight of the Earth is a huge task.
Using a set of weighing scales and a 400 year-old equation, Marnie Chesterton attempts to find out just how much the Earth weighs and is it getting heavier or lighter over time?
But how would a planet gain or lose mass? Which tips the scales: meteorites falling from space or gases constantly escaping from our atmosphere?
And does the answer have any implications for the future of Earth? Could the atmosphere eventually run out?

Contributors:
Anuradha TK, former project director at ISRO
Matt Genge, geologist at Imperial College London
Jon Larsen, researcher at the University of Oslo
Anjali Tripathi, astrophysicist
Ethan Seigel, journalist and astrophysicist

Presented by Marnie Chesterton.
Produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service.

[Image: Earth on scales. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrqs1z)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv54mb06rcl)
Newshour

Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrqwt3)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n19)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcf82h)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tz4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjl1wrr0k7)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywp7v94b36)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sgb3r8cqv)
Sports News

BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkdhmcfctm)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48ssc9zk3c)
Dispute over fans at Tokyo Olympics

An official report in Japan calls for spectators at this summer's Olympics to be banned. Amid concern about the risks associated with coronavirus, Robin Harding, Tokyo bureau chief of the Financial Times talks us through the arguments on both sides. Also in the programme, ByteDance, the parent company of social media app TikTok has seen its earnings more than double in 2020. Chris Stokel-Walker is a journalist and author of TikTok Boom, and explains the success of the service. We have an in-depth report on reductions to government international aid budgets in some parts of the world. Chiku Lweno who works in Tanzania for the charity Children in Crossfire tells us about the impact on her organisation of a cut in support from UK aid. Susanna Moorehead of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development makes the case for boosting aid spending. And Ben Harris-Quinney of the UK conservative think tank the Bow Group argues that the British government should spend its money closer to home. Plus, we meet a doggy day care specialist who has seen a surge in interest for her services, as people who bought dogs during lockdown start returning to work.

(Picture: An Olympic rings display in Tokyo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gxf)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gxf)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gxf)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkd4c1nlg5)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkd4c1nypk)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkd4c1p9xy)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkd4c1pfp2)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkd4c1pp5b)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172xzkd4c1qjd7)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkd4c1r43w)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkd4c1rhc8)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkd4c1rqvj)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkd4c1rvln)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkd4c1s6v1)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkd4c1sbl5)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzkd4c1sgb9)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkd4c1sl2f)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkd4c1tk1g)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkd4c1tx8v)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkd4c1v10z)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkdhmbz3sd)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkdhmbz7jj)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkdhmbzc8n)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172xzkdhmbzh0s)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzkdhmbzz09)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172xzkdhmc02rf)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172xzkdhmc06hk)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkdhmc0b7p)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkdhmc0kqy)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkdhmc0t76)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkdhmc196q)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkdhmc1dyv)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkdhmc1ng3)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkdhmc1s67)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkdhmc24fm)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkdhmc2cxw)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzkdhmc2vxd)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkdhmc2znj)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkdhmc374s)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkdhmc3gn1)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkdhmc3q49)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzkdhmc463t)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzkdhmc49vy)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzkdhmc4kc6)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkdhmc4p3b)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkdhmc51bq)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkdhmc58tz)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkdhmc5rth)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172xzkdhmc5wkm)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkdhmc641w)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkdhmc6ck4)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkdhmc6m1d)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkdhmc730x)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzkdhmc76s1)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkdhmc7g89)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkdhmc7l0f)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkdhmc7y7t)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkdhmc85r2)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkdhmc8nql)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzkdhmc8sgq)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkdhmc90yz)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzkdhmc98g7)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzkdhmc9hyh)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkdhmc9zy0)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzkdhmcb3p4)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzkdhmcbc5d)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkdhmcbgxj)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkdhmcbv4x)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkdhmcc2n5)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzkdhmcckmp)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172xzkdhmccpct)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkdhmccxw2)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzkdhmcd5cb)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzkdhmcddvl)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzkdhmcdwv3)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172xzkdhmcf0l7)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172xzkdhmcf82h)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkdhmcfctm)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmfz3fn)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmfz75s)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmfzbxx)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmfzgp1)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmfzlf5)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmfzq59)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmfztxf)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmfzynk)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmg02dp)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmg064t)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmg09wy)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmg0fn2)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmg0kd6)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmg0p4b)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmg153v)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmg18vz)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmg1dm3)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmg1jc7)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmg1n3c)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172xzjkpmg1rvh)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg20br)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg242w)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg27v0)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg2cl4)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg2hb8)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg2m2d)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg2qtj)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg2vkn)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg2z9s)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg331x)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg36t1)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg3bk5)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg3g99)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg3l1f)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg3psk)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg45s2)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg49j6)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg4f8b)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg4k0g)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172xzjkpmg4nrl)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjl1wr8rj0)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172xzjl1wr8w84)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172xzjl1wr9008)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172xzjl1wr93rd)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172xzjl1wr97hj)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172xzjl1wr9c7n)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172xzjl1wr9gzs)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172xzjl1wr9lqx)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172xzjl1wr9qh1)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172xzjl1wr9v75)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjl1wr9yz9)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172xzjl1wrb2qf)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172xzjl1wrb6gk)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172xzjl1wrbb6p)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172xzjl1wrbfyt)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172xzjl1wrbkpy)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzjl1wrbpg2)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172xzjl1wrbt66)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172xzjl1wrbxyb)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172xzjl1wrc1pg)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172xzjl1wrc5fl)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172xzjl1wrc95q)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjl1wrcdxv)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrcnf3)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrcs57)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrcwxc)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrd0nh)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrd4dm)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrd84r)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrdcww)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrdhn0)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrdmd4)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrdr48)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrdvwd)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrdzmj)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrf3cn)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrf73s)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrfbvx)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrfgm1)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrflc5)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrfq39)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrftvf)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrfylk)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrg2bp)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrg62t)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjl1wrg9ty)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrgkb6)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrgp2b)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrgstg)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrgxkl)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrh19q)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrh51v)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrh8sz)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrhdk3)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrhj97)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrhn1c)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrhrsh)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrhwjm)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrj08r)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrj40w)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrj7s0)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrjcj4)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrjh88)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrjm0d)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrjqrj)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrjvhn)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrjz7s)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrk2zx)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjl1wrk6r1)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrkg79)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrkkzf)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrkpqk)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrktgp)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrky6t)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrl1yy)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrl5q2)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrl9g6)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrlf6b)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrljyg)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrlnpl)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrlsfq)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrlx5v)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrm0xz)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrm4p3)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrm8f7)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrmd5c)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrmhxh)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrmmnm)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrmrdr)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrmw4w)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrmzx0)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjl1wrn3n4)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrnc4d)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrngwj)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrnlmn)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrnqcs)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrnv3x)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrnyw1)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrp2m5)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrp6c9)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrpb3f)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrpfvk)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrpklp)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrppbt)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrpt2y)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrpxv2)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrq1l6)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrq5bb)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrq92g)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrqdtl)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrqjkq)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrqn9v)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrqs1z)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrqwt3)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjl1wrr0k7)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d5s)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxk46vsknd)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxk46vspdj)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxk46vwgkh)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172xxxk46vwl9m)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172xxxk46vzcgl)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172xxxk46vzh6q)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172xxxk46w28cp)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxxk46w2d3t)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172xxxk46w558s)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxk46w590x)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j4t)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jfv)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jnm)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1j9b)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j09)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqckcbwgrc)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqcxmn90qt)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqcxmncxmx)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqcxmngtk0)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqcxmnkqg3)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dgt)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqh)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pqh)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pqj)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1ls4)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1ls4)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1ls4)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct1m7t)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2g8y)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct2g8y)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2g8y)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mtx)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mtx)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszbyt)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3cszbyt)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3cszbyt)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1nbb)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1nbb)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3ct1nbb)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n19)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n19)

HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3ct1n19)

Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nvb)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nvc)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nvc)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nvc)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2g6s)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2g6s)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2d31)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1td2)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1td2)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1td2)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dk2)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2dk2)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2dk2)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2dk2)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hby)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hby)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2p945q9j8)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv2p945qf8d)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172xv2p945qk0j)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172xv2p945t6fc)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172xv2p945tb5h)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172xv2p945tfxm)

Newsday 05:06 WED (w172xv2p945x3bg)

Newsday 06:06 WED (w172xv2p945x72l)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172xv2p945xbtq)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172xv2p946007k)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172xv2p94603zp)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172xv2p94607qt)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172xv2p9462x4n)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172xv2p94630ws)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172xv2p94634mx)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172xv5481phjpt)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172xv5481pjhnv)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172xv5481plflx)

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Newshour 21:06 WED (w172xv54mb00ykd)

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Newshour 21:06 THU (w172xv54mb03vgh)

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Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172xv54mb06rcl)

On the Podium 04:32 WED (w3ct2g6k)

On the Podium 11:32 WED (w3ct2g6k)

On the Podium 22:32 WED (w3ct2g6k)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kwz)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3ct1kwz)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jt4)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct1jt4)

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Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k35)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3ct1k35)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k35)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1h)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l1h)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pky)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pky)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3ct1pky)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l3s)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l3s)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3ct1l3s)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 05:32 SAT (w3ct0t1k)

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Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172y0t8dl179w4)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lbj)

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The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2dql)

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The Lazarus Heist 09:32 SAT (w3ct2f91)

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WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f37)

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