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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 29 MAY 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tdt6z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqbttqb5jp)
Biden unveils $6 trillion budget plan

US President Joe Biden has unveiled a $6 trillion budget plan. The BBC's North America business correspondent Michelle Fleury explains what he wants to spend it on, and how he going to pay for it. Police trying to halt illegal mining in Brazil's Amazon have allegedly been attacked by miners – who then went on to set indigenous homes on fire. We get the latest from of Ana Carolina Alfinito Vieira of Amazon Watch Brazil. Also in the programme, we have an in depth report on a water dispute between Ethiopia and its neighbours over a huge hydro-electric dam it is building on the Nile. Plus, a new app called Bugs Matter, launched in the UK by charity Buglife, is trying to get a picture of insects' prevalence by asking people to count the number of dead ones they find on their car after a journey. We hear from Buglife director Paul Hetherington.

All this and more discussed with our guest throughout the show, Sharon Bretkelly, co-host of Newsroom's daily podcast, The Detail, who's in Auckland, New Zealand.


(Picture: US President Joe Biden outside the White House. Credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tdxz3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxglryhjyc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf397h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbg)
India’s Cricketing Jem

On this week’s episode, Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Jim Maxwell speak at length to one of the brightest stars of women's cricket - the India and Mumbai all-rounder Jemimah Rodrigues. Plus, we'll hear from the former England all-rounder Arran Brindle and her 12-year-old son Harry who have made history this week by becoming the first mother and son to score a century partnership in a men's club match.

(Image: India's Jemimah Rodrigues plays a shot during the first Twenty20 international women's cricket match between New Zealand and India in Wellington on February 6, 2019. Credit: MARTY MELVILLE/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tf1q7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dy)
First days of freedom in Yuma

Yuma, a small city in the middle of the desert in Arizona, is receiving an overwhelming number of asylum seekers who have crossed the US border from Latin America. BBC Mundo's Patricia Sulbaran follows the journey of one particular family, from their first "free" days after they were released from detention until reunited with family in Miami. 

Belarus plane forced landing
Confusion and shock surrounded the forced landing of a Ryanair flight in Minsk this week, and the subsequent detention of passenger, and Belarussian opposition journalist, Roman Protasevich. Vitaliy Shevchenko of BBC Monitoring has been following how the story has been reported in the region.

Myanmar coup: a Nepali view
It’s four months since the military coup in Myanmar. For the BBC’s Media Action team in Yangon it meant a sudden halt to their programming, and for producer Dipak Bhattarai the events brought back memories of another coup in 2005, in his home country of Nepal.

MHT: São Paulo
We join Thomas Pappon of BBC Brasil for a trip to his home town of São Paulo to check out the record stores and visit the Japanese quarter.

Image: Adrian and Veronica Meza with their children
Credit: Angelica Casas/BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyk)
The Tulsa Race Massacre

Greenwood was a flourishing and prosperous black neighbourhood of Tulsa, often referred to as Black Wall Street. But in May 1921, a white mob descended on the district, destroying homes, businesses and lives. In this Witness History, Josephine Casserly talks to historian John W. Franklin, of Franklin Global, about the story of his grandfather, Buck Franklin, who survived the massacre.
The words of Buck Franklin are voiced by Stefan Adegbola.

Image: An African-American man with a camera examining the ashes of a burned-out block after the Tulsa Race Massacre. Credit: Oklahoma Historical Society/Getty Images


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tf5gc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsf)
Why is corporate America getting political?

This week Exxon Mobil saw a board revolt over its stance on climate change. One of the energy giant's biggest shareholders supported rival directors to successfully replace two Exxon board members with more green-friendly candidates. This reflects a growing trend across the United States of corporations and investors being more willing to take a stand on climate, race and other social issues. Following the new and restrictive voter laws in Georgia, Major League Baseball pulled its All Star Game from the state. Nike announced a fund to help Black communities during the Black Lives Matter protests. While these moves are being welcomed by many activists and politicians, there's also been a backlash from those saying CEOs should focus on serving customers and not get involved in debates. So, what's behind corporate America's desire to delve into issues not necessarily linked to their companies' bottom line? Ritula Shah and a panel of experts discuss why corporate America is wading into politics.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tf96h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxglryhx5r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf3ngw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1h)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

Makeshift factories

Amid the smouldering ruins of the Spitfire factory, a new strategy emerges: instead of building the plane in one factory, it will be built piece by piece in garages, workshops and laundries.

Presenter: Tuppence Middleton
Producers: Alasdair Cross and Emily Knight
Editors: Chris Ledgard and Kirsten Lass


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk0)
The Seaspiracy “virtually empty ocean” claim

Popular Netflix documentary Seaspiracy has sparked a lot of debate recently, including some controversy over some of the claims the documentary makes and the numbers behind them. One of the most striking is that: “if current fishing trends continue we will see virtually empty oceans by the year 2048.” Although overfishing is a global problem, we take a look and find that this scenario is unlikely.


(French trawler off the coast of Ouistreham, northwestern France. Photo: Charly Triballeau /Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tfdym)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt5tvjrt6q)
President Biden unveils budget proposal

President Biden unveils proposals for next year’s budget on the same day Republicans in the US Senate block a proposal to create a commission to investigate the violence on Capitol Hill in January.

Also in the programme; we hear from Colombia after four people are killed during anti-government demonstrations; and in a landmark case a Dutch court has ruled that oil giant Shell must substantially cut its greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.

Joining Julian Worricker on the programme is Catherine Fieschi, a political scientist and founder and executive director of the Counterpoint political research and advisory organisation and Toby Cadman, Barrister and co-Founder of Guernica 37, a specialist barrister's chambers in the field of international human rights.

(Photo: U.S. President Joe Biden speaks as he visits Joint Base Langley-Eustis with first lady Jill Biden, in Hampton, Virginia. Credit: REUTERS/Ken Cedeno)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tfjpr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt5tvjrxyv)
US imposes fresh sanctions on Belarus

After European leaders agreed to sanctions earlier this week, the US has followed suit and announced further sanctions. We speak to Franak Viacorka, Senior Advisor to Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya, the exiled Belarus opposition leader and Viola von Cramon, German member of the European Parliament and a rapporteur on Belarus, about where Belarus goes from here.

Also in the programme; India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi faces growing criticism over his handling of COVID-19; and we bring you the build up to the UEFA Champions League Final between Chelsea and Manchester City.

Joining Julian Worricker on the programme is Catherine Fieschi, a political scientist and founder and executive director of the Counterpoint political research and advisory organisation and Toby Cadman, Barrister and co-Founder of Guernica 37, a specialist barrister's chambers in the field of international human rights.

(Photo: Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko speaks with Russian President Vladimir Putin during their meeting in Sochi, Russia. Credit:EPA/MIKHAEL KLIMENTYEV/SPUTNIK/KREMLIN POOL)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tfnfw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt5tvjs1pz)
Belarus facing fresh sanctions

Nearly a week after journalist Roman Protasevich was arrested in Minsk, international pressure is continuing to mount on Belarus. European leaders began the week by announcing sanctions, the country is now facing fresh sanctions from the US.

Also in the programme; President Biden announces his budget proposal for next year and a ‘lost library’ of manuscripts belonging to the Bronte family is discovered and put up for auction.

Joining Julian Worricker on the programme is Catherine Fieschi, a political scientist and founder and executive director of the Counterpoint political research and advisory organisation and Toby Cadman, Barrister and co-Founder of Guernica 37, a specialist barrister's chambers in the field of international human rights.

(Photo: Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko delivers a speech in Minsk, Belarus. Credit: Press Service of the President of the Republic of Belarus/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. MANDATORY CREDIT/File Photo)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf40q8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6k)
Sweet honey and queen bees

Vital for the planet's health, bees are a key part of pollinating the world's fruits, flowers and crops. And beekeeping seems to be growing in popularity, even the Queen B, Beyoncé, has bee hives in her garden. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women about what ignited their passion for bees and honey.

South African, Mokgadi Mabela was only interested in her father's bees because she thought they could make her money. She sold the honey to colleagues in her office in Pretoria. When demand became too great for her father and his network he suggested she start some hives of her own. She set up a family company Native Nosi, producing honey and other bee by-products for South Africa and beyond.

Dr Agnes Tyburn grew up in Martinique where her grandfather kept a couple of bee hives. When she was doing her PhD in Organic Chemistry at Cambridge University in the UK she decided it would be nice to try beekeeping herself, despite not having a garden. She’s now set up Bee Sitter – offering online support, practical advice, mentoring and bee keeping courses.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
(L) Mokgadi Mabela
(R) Agnes Tyburn


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tfs60)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5q)
Coronavirus: Getting Covid after vaccination

Vaccines are seen as a way out of the coronavirus pandemic; a way to stop transmission and have fewer patients in hospital. Host Nuala McGovern shares different experiences of vaccination and hospitalisation.

For some who have been vaccinated, infection is still possible, but hospitalisation is expected to be less likely. Two guests describe their reactions to getting a positive test, after having Covid jabs, and how the virus affected them.

We consider too those who are hesitant about the Covid vaccine, despite the dangers of catching the disease. We hear what led to a change of mind and agreement to get vaccinated.

And covid patients, who had been treated in hospital for several months, tell us how the mental toll and isolation at times was as challenging as their physical symptoms.

(Photo: A Tunisian teacher receives the Pfizer vaccine against COVID-19, 25 May 2021. Credit: EPA/Mohamed Messara.)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf44gd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f8z)
5: Superdollars

The Smoking Dragon, a fake wedding and a divorce party. And lots of counterfeit money. The FBI go undercover.
#LazarusHeist

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/lazarusheist


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1f)
Reporting recent grim events in the Middle East

Events in the Middle East have been making grim headlines recently. We talk to a senior programme editor and ask how the BBC World Service navigates through the sensitive area of editorial balance. And what are the dangers faced by BBC journalists and correspondents in reporting?

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tfwy4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0pyx3zx9ys)
Back to the future for the Indy 500

We take a glimpse into the past, present and the future, of one of the world’s most famous motor races. The Indianapolis 500, form parts of the sports "Triple Crown" and it takes place on Sunday.

We discuss the upcoming Champions League final taking place in Porto.

And we hear from Welshman Harry Cromwell, he is a family man and a fisherman who is hoping to surf his way straight to the Olympics.

(Photo by Brian Spurlock/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tg0p8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxglryjmnj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf4cyn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f35)
How is Covid impacting India’s children?

With nearly 470 million children, India has the world’s largest child population. Campaigners say millions of them have been seriously impacted by the pandemic, including their access to medical care, food, shelter, schooling, and even means of livelihood.

Many are facing severe mental trauma due to confinement and isolation at home, and a recent study says 577 were orphaned in less than two months during the second wave of the pandemic. Many children have also caught the virus, but thankfully complications have been rare.

The scale of the problem is daunting, but what can be done to ensure that children’s lives are not thrown into chaos? We discuss Covid’s impact and solutions needed to protect India’s children.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Sudarshan Suchi, CEO, Save the Children, India; Dr Indu Khosla, paediatric pulmonologist, SRCC Children’s Hospital; Akanksha Singh, parent


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tg4fd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g6t)
Hip-hop and healing: Commemorating Tulsa

A century ago, one of the worst episodes of racial violence in US history took place - the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

Greenwood was a prosperous and thriving district, nicknamed 'Black Wall Street' because it was a mecca for Black entrepreneurs and businesses. On Memorial Day 1921, a young shoe-shiner, Dick Rowland, was wrongly accused of attacking a white girl in an elevator - a charge she would quickly recant.

But after a sensationalist newspaper report, a mob gathered outside the courthouse. Violence broke out, many of the white mob were deputised and given arms. During the evening of 31 May 1921 and 1 June, 35 square blocks of Greenwood were looted and burned to the ground. The true extent of the massacre will never be known, but the Red Cross at the time estimated up to 300 residents lost their lives, over 1200 homes were destroyed. Property damage totalled almost $2 million.

Since the massacre was declared a 'riot', insurance claims were rendered invalid but miraculously many in the community managed to rebuild.

Jerica D Wortham is an author, poet, and publisher, born and raised in Greenwood. Jerica invites us to witness how the community is marking the centennial.

Fire In Little Africa is a multimedia project uniting local hip-hop artists. Now signed to Motown, their album is a personal response not only to the massacre, but to Greenwood today and their vision for its future. It is about community healing but also a reawakening of Black Wall Street, reclaiming the entrepreneurial spirit of their ancestors.

We also meet two community elders preparing works for The Greenwood Art Project, an initiative of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission and part of Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge. They experienced the rebuilding of Greenwood and the destructive impact of ‘urban renewal’ policies. Two local poets Crystal Carter and Sterling Matthews share their responses, alongside Jerica’s own poem A Love Letter To Greenwood.

(Photo: Hip-hop artists from the Fire In Little Africa project which commemorates the Tulsa Race Massacre centenary. Credit: Ryan Cass)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tg85j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv53jj1y7h4)
Belarusian opposition leader calls for global protests

The Belarusian opposition leader, Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, calls for protests worldwide following detention of journalist Roman Protasevich on the first anniversary of the arrest of her husband.

Also in the programme: Mali names coup leader as interim president; and how to rebuild Gaza without benefiting Hamas?

(Photo: Belarusian opposition leader Svetlana Tichanovskaya during a protest. Credit: EPA/JEROEN JUMELET).


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tgcxn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g9w)
The Tulsa tragedy that shamed America

Alvin Hall tells the story of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, one of the worst episodes of racial violence in US history. In the early 20th Century, Tulsa was a wild west town which became a boom city. But the oil capital of the world was also home to the thriving and prosperous district of Greenwood - nicknamed 'Black Wall Street' by Booker T Washington - because it was a mecca for Black entrepreneurs. Several were millionaires in today's money and and figured out ways to prosper during segregation, creating profitable businesses for Greenwood’s 10,000 residents who couldn’t spend their money with white businesses downtown.

On 30 May, a young Black shoe shiner Dick Rowland, was wrongly accused of attacking a white elevator operator Sarah Paige (the girl later recanted her story). This was the trigger, on 31 May and 1 June, for an armed white mob to loot and burn Greenwood, in a violent 16-hour attack.

Many estimate up to 300 Black citizens were killed. Over 1200 homes were destroyed, every church, hotel, shop, and business was completely wiped off the map. Almost $4 million in insurance claims were filed, but never paid since the city designated it a ‘riot'.

Alvin examines the role of the local media in stoking up racial tension, the influence of the Ku Klux Klan, and how city officials instigated a cover up, while trying to prevent Greenwood's Black community from rebuilding so they could take the land. They resisted however, working and living initially in tents, and by the 1940s Greenwood was twice as prosperous, though this was ultimately short-lived.

Archival interviews by kind permission of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Oklahoma State University, Voices of Oklahoma oral history podcast, and White Plains Public Library NYC.

Made in collaboration with the Tri-City Collective - producers of Focus: Black Oklahoma on Tulsa Public Radio.

(Photo: Greenwood district burned in the race massacre, Tulsa, Oklahoma, June 1921. Credit: Universal HIstory Archive/Universal Images Group/Getty Images)


SAT 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tghns)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 15:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsy)
Author Jhumpa Lahiri

Joining Nikki Bedi from Princeton, New Jersey is author Jhumpa Lahiri to discuss her latest novel Whereabouts, and film critic Anna Bogutskaya is in the studio.

American comedian and actor Seth Rogen explains why great comedy doesn’t always need to age well.

The Nigerian musician Femi Kuti reveals his father Fela’s unique approach to music education.

Graphic novelist Alison Bechdel talks about the pitfalls of putting her family and relationships into her work.

Sound artist and composer Jason Singh reveals the secret sounds of plants.

And there’s music from UK trip-hop band Morcheeba inspired by diving in Thailand, and Chinese musician Cheng Yu and her ensemble Silk Breeze.


(Photo: Jhumpa Lahiri. Credit: Dominique Charriau/WireImage via Getty Images)


SAT 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tgmdx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t7p1dp84q)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld Saturday will have live coverage of the third all English Champions League final between Manchester City and Chelsea in Porto, Portugal.

Lee James will bring the build up and be joined by former City player Darius Vassell and former Chelsea player Mario Melchiot.

Eddie Newton, who was part of the Chelsea coaching staff during the 2012 Champions League triumph, will be the third member of the Sportsworld team. We’ll also have an in depth look into the rise of Ngolo Kante and Riyad Mahrez.

Photo: A giant inflatable UEFA Champions League trophy in the host city venue of Porto ahead of the UEFA Champions League Final. (Credit: AMA/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tgvx5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxglrykgwf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf575k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l86)
Enith Brigitha - First black swimmer to win an Olympic medal

In 1976, Dutch swimmer Enith Brigitha blazed the trail for future black swimmers by becoming the first ever black athlete to win an Olympic medal in swimming. Curaçao-born Brigitha took home bronze medals in the 100 and 200-metres freestyle from the Montreal Olympic Games. Most of the swimmers Enith lost to were East Germans who - it was later revealed - had benefited from a state-sponsored doping programme. Enith Brigitha talks to Dan Hardoon. The programme is a Whistledown Production for the BBC World Service.


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tgzn9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Evidence (w3ct2g9f)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

Sharing Vaccines – what’s gone wrong?

The lofty ambition of the global community was that across the globe, those with the highest risk of losing their lives to this virus should be vaccinated first. With 99% of deaths coming in the over fifties, the plan was that everybody in this age group should be inoculated.

But that’s not what has happened. Vaccine supply is in crisis and in Africa, a continent of over 1.2 billion people, only around 20 million Africans have been vaccinated, with only 35 million vaccines landing so far on the continent.

It’s been called “vaccine apartheid” and “a moral outrage” but as South Asia, South America find themselves again, in the eye of the virus storm, largely unvaccinated Africa fears the next wave is heading for them.

Can vaccine nationalism be overcome and scare supply be fairly distributed?

It’s a question that very much concerns Claudia Hammond’s expert panel: Gagandeep Kang, Professor of Microbiology at the Christian Medical College in Vellore, India, Dr Yodi Alakija, co-chair of the African Union’s Vaccine Delivery Alliance for Covid-19, Professor Andy Pollard from the Oxford Vaccine Group who led the clinical trials for the Oxford/Astra Zeneca (or Covishield) Vaccine and Professor Peter Hotez, Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine in Houston and co-director of the Texas Children’s Hospital Centre for Vaccine Development in the USA.
Produced by: Fiona Hill, Hannah Fisher and Maria Simons
Studio Engineers: Jackie Marjoram and Tim Heffer

Picture: Vaccination, India, Credit: Hindustan Times/Getty Images


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2th3df)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 today]


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2th74k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv53jj1z6g5)
Mass grave of 215 children found in Canada

A mass grave containing the remains of 215 children has been found in Canada at a former residential school set up to assimilate indigenous people. We'll hear from a native Canadian tribal chief and the Canadian Heritage Minister.

Also in the programme: people across Brazil are demonstrating against the far-right president, Jair Bolsonaro, over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic; and the impact of the pandemic on pilgrimages to Lourdes.


(Picture: The Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia once housed 500 children Credit: Reuters)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2thbwp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbw)
Bullied for making music with Will Joseph Cook, dodie, Boys World and Alfie Templeman

Will Joseph Cook, Olivia and Queenie from Boys World, dodie, and Alfie Templeman discuss whether they share their creative processes on social media, overcoming industry stigma for being an 'internet artist', and finding strength in being who you are.

Will Joseph Cook is a singer-songwriter and self-taught producer from Kent, England. He signed with Atlantic Records when he was 17, and released his debut album Sweet Dreamer in 2017. His second record, Something to Feel Good About, came out on his own label, Bad Hotel, earlier this year.

Queenie and Olivia are two of the five members of breakthrough girl group Boys World, all of whom were discovered after posting their covers of songs to social media. They have since moved into a house together in LA, and have just released their debut EP While You Were Out.

Singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist dodie launched her career performing piano and ukulele covers online, and has gone on to release 3 EPs and collaborate with former Music Life host Jacob Collier. She recently released her debut album, Build a Problem.

Alfie Templeman is a singer-songwriter and producer who released his debut EP, Like an Animal, in 2018. He cites Carlton, the English village where he was raised, as one of his biggest inspirations, and has just released the mini-album Forever Isn't Long Enough.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2thgmt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywn51bws5s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sf79t0ttf)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf5tx6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf0)
Black Lives Matter: Art after George Floyd

This week, a year since the death of George Floyd and the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement, writers and artists reflect on the impact of those events.

After George Floyd’s death, thousands of people took to the streets calling for change and an end to systemic racism. US Politician and voting rights activist Stacey Abrams has been working to bring about that change. She’s also an acclaimed author who has written her first political thriller, While Justice Sleeps. Reflecting on events of the last year, Stacey Abrams tells Sherri Jackson how storytelling is the common thread through her work and a powerful tool in politics.

During the Black Lives Matter protests of 2020, statues representing slavery and oppression were torn down and murals started going up in the US and all over the world. From the Kibera settlement in Nairobi, Kenya and the highways of Sao Paulo, Brazil, we hear why street artists near and far from the States have taken up the cause of Black Lives Matter and made it their own.

Hailing from Ferguson, Missouri, Grammy award winning jazz trumpeter Keyon Harrold ‘s powerful ‘MB Lament’ responded to the 2014 death of Michael Brown in his home town. In the wake of George Floyd’s death, Keyon Harrold has spoken out against racial injustice and turned to music to process trauma and pay tribute. Keyon speaks to Sherri about using jazz as a language when words fail him.

And how do we talk about racism and anti-racism to children? Jason Reynolds, poet, author and the US National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, explains how he tackles difficult subjects through his writing for teenagers.

Presented by Sherri Jackson


(Photo: Kenyan mural artist Allan Mwangi, also known as Mr.detail.seven, paints a graffiti mural in the Kibera settlement in Nairobi, Kenya. Credit: GORDWIN ODHIAMBO/AFP via Getty Images)



SUNDAY 30 MAY 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2thq42)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yv6)
Nyiragongo Eruption

The latest Nyiragongo eruption was not entirely unexpected, the volcano’s lava lake inside the crater had been building up for years. Local volcanologists say it was only a matter of time before an eruption occurred. The big concern was where the flank of the volcano would be breached as the city of Goma rests under the volcano and there are potential fissures even within the town.
However there are still questions over the effectiveness of seismic monitoring in the area, North Kivu. The Goma observatory has been unable to carry out this work due to a lack of funding. And monitoring is further complicated by the region’s long running civil war, with rebel groups often camped around the volcano.
We hear from Dario Tadesco and Cindy Ebinger. Who have both been monitoring developments.

Cyclone Yass was the second Cyclone to hit India within a week. Are these events becoming more common and are they related to rises in global temperatures? Climatologist Roxy Koll has been monitoring the situation.

Greenland’s pristine glaciers might not be so pristine. Jemma Wadham from Bristol university and her team have found unexpectedly high levels of Mercury in meltwaters - similar to those from industrial pollution. They say research now needs to focus on the impact for wildlife and people in the Arctic region.

And the elusive Sowerby’s beaked Whale doesn’t travel very much despite pockets of the species being found across the Atlantic. Kerri Smith has been researching this species, which is rarely seen alive. Using samples from whales beached or caught accidentally she was able to build up a picture of their distribution.

As millions more of us move to live in densely populated cities, we almost inevitably face living in closer proximity to our neighbours. Neighbour noise can certainly be a source of annoyance – but could it even be damaging to our health?

Increasing evidence suggests that unwanted noise can cause sleep deprivation, distraction and annoyance, as presenter Anand Jagatia finds out. He discovers that noise annoyance has a small but significant impact on our wider health – including our cardiovascular system – but that annoyance is not necessarily down to sound alone. Factors such as perception of the neighbourhood and relationships with our neighbours also play a part.

CrowdScience has examined living with unwanted noises before, and we revisit our trip to the acoustics lab at the University of Salford in Manchester, UK. Here, we meet the researchers and engineers investigating the best ways to make our homes more pleasant for our ears whilst still maintaining the ‘buzz’ of city life.

(Image: Getty images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2thtw6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxglrylfvg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf664l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv8)
Is kindness contagious?

The kind boss who transformed their employee's mental health – Natalie and Gillian share their amazing story with Claudia Hammond. And new research finds kindness really is contagious - Alison van Diggelen hears from scientists in California that kindness really does spread. Plus guest professor Monica Lakhanpaul discusses vaccine effectiveness against the variant first identified in India and addresses ethical questions of vaccinating children. Plus new science on how mammals breathing through their bottoms could be a future solution to oxygenating human blood without risking the lung damage caused by ventilators.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Photo: A boy protects his younger brother from the rain with an umbrella. Credit: Estersinhache fotografía/Getty Images)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2thymb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g6t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tj2cg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtv)
Instability on the Myanmar-Thai border

Stories from Myanmar, Goma, Belarus and Australia.

On the Thai Myanmar border, the local Karen people are trying to seek refuge from a battle between the Mynamar military and Karen insurgents. There have been widespread protests across Myanmar, since the military coup in February, with more than 700 people killed. In rural areas, several rebel militias – most formed by ethnic minorities – which have been resisting the military for decades are renewing their fight. Laura Bicker visited the border between Thailand and Myanmar and found a community under siege.

In Belarus the brazen actions of the country’s president, Alexander Lukashenko, caught even the most seasoned diplomats off guard. A Vilnius-bound Ryanair flight 4978 was forced to land in Minsk last Sunday, under the auspices that there was a bomb on the aircraft. Western powers looked on in disbelief as it transpired that the incident in fact amounted to a state-backed hijacking of an aircraft in order to detain a dissident blogger. James Landale reflects on the ramifications.

Mount Nyiragongo in the Democratic Republic of Congo is one of Africa’s most active volcanoes. Last weekend it erupted causing thousands to flee their homes and killing at least 30 people. Seventeen villages were destroyed by the lava and residents were left dealing with both tragedy and displacement, as aftershocks continued throughout the week. In recent days a further evacuation was ordered amid concerns about the presence of magma under the city of Goma and in Lake Kivu. Olivia Acland describes leaving the city where she lives.

Relations between China and Australia have deteriorated in recent years. Beijing has imposed punitive tariffs on Australian goods, including wine, beef and rock lobsters. There have been several tipping points but Canberra’s allegations around the origins of the pandemic have brought matters to a head. Shaimaa Khalil went to visit a South Australian winery that is grappling with the impact of souring relations.

(Image: Villagers carry their luggage back to Mae Sam Laep village in Mae Hong Son, Thailand. Credit: BBC News/Wasawat Lukharang)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf6fmv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tj63l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxglrylt2v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf6kcz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2g6f)
Reaching back to Hands Across America

On 25 May 1986, 6.5 million people did the impossible; they joined hands to form the world’s longest human chain, from New York to Los Angeles. But far from being a simple stunt, Hands Across America was raising money to fight hunger and homelessness in the world’s richest country. Did it succeed?

Aleks Krotoski was 11 years old when she stood in the sunshine between her mother and a stranger and held their hands for those 15 minutes 35 years ago. She speaks with the organisers, the people who participated, and the people who received the donations, and discovers that Hands Across America didn’t just feed the hungry, but led the social networking revolution a well.

(Photo: People join hands at the Hands Across America benefit event aiming to raise money for local charities, New York City, 25 May 1986. Credit Barbara Alper/Getty Images)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tj9vq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt5tvjvq3t)
Anti-Bolsonaro protests take place across Brazil

Protests have taken place across Brazil in opposition to President Jair Bolsonaro’s management of the Covid-19 crisis. The country has suffered over 450,000 coronavirus deaths.

Also in the programme; French President Emmanuel Macron has warned that France may withdraw its troops from Mali if it moves towards Islamist radicalism; and Colombian President Ivan Duque has extended the deployment of military forces in the country with anti-government protests continuing.

Joining Julian Worricker on the programme is Shrabani Basu, Indian-born author and journalist based in the UK and Han Dorussen, professor of government at the University of Essex.

(Photo: A demonstrator holds a banner reading, "Bolsonaro virus out", during a protest against the president in Brasilia. Credit: REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tjflv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt5tvjvtvy)
Nationwide protests held in Brazil

Tens of thousands of protestors have taken to the streets to protest against President Jair Bolsonaro’s handling of the Covid-19 crisis. Protestors have been demanding the impeachment of President Bolsonaro. Brazil has the world’s second largest covid death rate.

Also in the programme, the controversial Turkish tourism video as the country tries to encourage visitors to return after coronavirus restrictions and all the fallout from the UEFA Champions League Final between Chelsea and Manchester City.

Joining Julian Worricker on the programme is Shrabani Basu, Indian-born author and journalist based in the UK and Han Dorussen, professor of government at the University of Essex.

(Photo: Policemen are seen in a checkpoint before a protest against Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro in Brasilia. Credit: REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tjkbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt5tvjvym2)
France could withdraw troops from Mali

French President Emmanuel Macron has stated that France could withdraw troops from Mali if the nation moves towards Islamist radicalism. The country has just experienced its second military coup in 9 months. President Macron stated that France would not support countries with no democratic legitimacy.

Also in the programme; Colombia’s President Ivan Duque has extended the deployment of military forces as anti-government demonstrations continue and the centenary of the Tulsa Race Massacre.

Joining Julian Worricker on the programme is Shrabani Basu, Indian-born author and journalist based in the UK and Han Dorussen, professor of government at the University of Essex.

(Photo: French President Emmanuel Macron speaks during a press conference with South African President Cyril Ramaphosa. Credit: EPA/Themba Hadebe / POOL)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf6xmc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfn)
Do we need to talk about ‘ultra-processed food’?

The Food Chain delves into the world of ‘Ultra-Processed Food’ - a term coined in Brazil that has been provoking debate around the world.

Ultra Processed Food is a term that encompasses a broad range of common products from industrialised bread to breakfast cereals to chocolate bars. A growing body of evidence points to an association between their consumption and negative health outcomes including obesity, over-eating, depression, heart disease, and type-2 diabetes. Countries like Brazil are so concerned they are recommending people avoid UPFs all together. But in some of the world's most developed economies these foods make up, up to 80% of our diets, whilst the public understands very little about them.

Emily Thomas speaks to representatives from the food industry and people at the forefront of the science into UPFs to try to find out whether this is just another dietary buzzword that muddies the waters when it comes to improving the nation’s diets - OR whether it’s something we should ALL be talking about.

(Picture; Cookie talking in chocolate chips, Credit: BBC/Getty)

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Gyorgy Scrinis: Associate professor of Food Politics and Policy, University of Melbourne
Maria Laura Louzada: Assistant professor, Department of Nutrition at the University of Sao Paulo
Kevin Hall: Senior investigator, National Institutes of Health, Maryland
Kate Halliwell: Chief Scientific Officer, Food and Drink Federation, UK


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tjp33)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf71ch)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kwx)
My big fake wedding: uncovering an outlandish deception

A fake wedding, a double life and forged documents. In 2013 investigative journalist Benita Alexander was making a documentary about 'super-surgeon' Paolo Macchiarini and his pioneering synthetic organ transplants. The pair quickly fell in love and Benita was swept into a whirlwind romance. Paolo proposed, but the fairytale soon began to unravel when she discovered that the extravagant star-studded wedding he told her he was planning was all a lie. But the fake wedding was just the beginning...

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Andrea Kennedy
Producer: Mariana Des Forges

Picture: Paolo Macchiarini and Benita Alexander
Credit: Courtesy Benita Alexander, Instagram @loveconned


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tjsv7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 The Assignment Interview (w3ct2gb2)
Milton Nkosi: The apartheid child who changed Africa’s story

As a child of Soweto, apartheid South Africa’s most notorious black township, Milton Nkosi could easily have become an embittered adult; in June 1976 he witnessed the Soweto uprising in which white police brutally suppressed protests by black schoolchildren, leading to many deaths. Yet, as apartheid began to collapse in the early 1990s, Milton found himself drawn into TV journalism; enabling him to question his former tormentors and helping viewers around the world to see the moral case for change. So began a career that took him from translator and fixer to producer and eventually, the head of bureau for the BBC’s news operation in South Africa, where he then sought to diversify coverage of a fast-changing continent.

As Milton explains in this conversation with Owen Bennett-Jones, his humble beginnings turned out to be an asset: Among his childhood neighbours in Soweto were anti-apartheid activists including Nelson Mandela’s wife and children, many of whom would become valuable contacts. However, after the transition to democracy in 1994, Milton also had to ask uncomfortable questions of some of them, as claims of corruption emerged within the ANC government. Moral dilemmas such as this defined his working life: Is it even possible to be an impartial reporter when your subject might be a close associate? For Milton, the issues need to be seen in context. As he points out: “Nobody can ever justify apartheid based on the mistakes of the post-apartheid leaders”.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf753m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g93)
George Floyd: One year on

A year after George Floyd's death, what positives and negatives can Black Christians take away from the tragic series of events that unfolded?

In the year since, many black Christian groups have been at the forefront of large protests across the US. Leaders, the media and people from all communities have engaged in conversations about the future of race relations in United States. In addition, churches and church leaders began to work together to understand, to learn, and instigate change. But has the Church gone far enough and what part can and should Christians, both black and white, play in bringing together communities and tackling racism.

Professor Robert Beckford hosts a discussion featuring Revd. Minister Elijah McDavid III from The Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church in Minnesota, Dr. Love Sechrest who is Vice President for Academic Affairs at Columbia Theological Seminary and Dr Richard Land, President of Southern Evangelical Seminary in Charlotte and former faith advisor to President George W. Bush.

Producers: Rajeev Gupta and Emb Hashmi

(Photo: A mural painted by artist Kenny Altidor depicting George Floyd is unveiled on 13 Jul 2020, Brooklyn, New York City/ Credit: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tjxlc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxglrymjkm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf78vr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct1csj)
Finders Keepers

Finders Keepers: A house that came home

What chance do communities have of getting looted artefacts back, and what lessons do the world's museums need to learn? Stijn Schoonderwoerd and Wayne Modest describe how the Netherlands are trying to decolonise their museums. Maori elders Sir Hirini Moko Mead and judge Layne Harvey led a successful campaign for the return of a sacred tribal meeting house, stolen over a hundred years before - what can others learn from their experience?


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tk1bh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Evidence (w3ct2g9f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tk52m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv53jj214d7)
Netanyahu opponents in talks to replace him

Coalition talks are underway in Israel, which could see Benjamin Netanyahu ousted as prime minister. But the main opposition leader, Yair Lapid, is running out of time to form a new government with a right-wing party. We will have the latest.

Regional leaders in West Africa are meeting to decide how to respond to the military coup in Mali - the second in less than a year - so why is the coup leader invited?

Also, the pressure facing opposition activists in Belarus.

(Photo: Benjamin Netanyahu has dominated Israeli politics for a generation. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tk8tr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl5)
Machiavelli, master of power

Over five hundred years ago, dismissed diplomat Niccolò Machiavelli produced his most famous work, The Prince. Written on the fringes of the Italian city of Florence, the book has long been read as a priceless guide to power and what holding it truly involves. But who was the man behind the work? Why did he claim that a leader must be prepared to act immorally? And why did the name of this one-time political insider become a byword for cunning and sinister strategy?

Rajan Datar explores the life and impact of Machiavelli’s The Prince with writer and scholar Erica Benner, historian professor Quentin Skinner, and journalist and novelist David Ignatius.

[Image: Circa 1499, Niccolò Machiavelli. Credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tkdkw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tkjb0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t7p1ds51t)
Live Sporting Action

Delyth Lloyd and guests will reflect on the 2021 European Champions League Final between Manchester City and Chelsea in Porto, as well as looking ahead to a Division 1 Féminine title decider between Olympique Lyonnais and Paris Saint-Germain on the penultimate weekend of the season.

We'll also discuss the Giro d'Italia as the Grand Tour reaches a conclusion and look ahead to the start of the French Open, including speaking to one of the hottest properties in the men's game - 22-year-old Norwegian prodigy Casper Ruud.

Photo: A general view inside Court Suzanne Lenglen as the court is covered during a rain delay at the 2019 French Open. (Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tkwkd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxglrynhjn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf87ts)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g93)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tl09j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgr)
Breakthrough in the fight against malaria

Whilst the world's attention has been on covid-19, there's been a major breakthrough in the fight against malaria. We speak to the man whose team in Oxford has found an effective vaccine for the disease. Mice have over-run parts of Australia ruining crops and testing sanity. We learn about the effect this plague of rodents is having on the rural economy. Plus we hear why Amazon has bought the iconic MGM Studios - and what it means for both Amazon customers and cinema lovers. Plus, our reporter heads to San Francisco to hear how the city’s Chinatown has coped with both Covid-19 and an increase in anti-Chinese race hate crime. As shops are boarded up and tourists stay away, what plans are there to rejuvenate this historic area? Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Mosquitoes in a test tube, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tl41n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv53jj223c8)
Israeli right-wing leader plans to oust Benjamin Natanyahu

The former Israeli Defence Minister Naftali Bennett says he will take his far-right Yamina party into a coalition government with opposition leader Yair Lapid, whose centrist party came second to Mr Netanyahu's party in elections in March.

Also in the programme: how gangs in Venezuela have taken over neighbourhoods in the capital, Caracas, as the country's president Nicolas Maduro abandons basic government functions; and thousands of government supporters hold rallies in Ethiopia.

Photo: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (L) and his far-right rival Naftali Bennett. Credit: PA Media.


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tl7ss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Assignment Interview (w3ct2gb2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf8m25)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f8z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjjz2tlcjx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywn51bzp2w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sf79t3qqj)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcdtf8qt9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kwx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 31 MAY 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3qg9b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl66tb32gl)
Who owns the Covid-19 vaccine?

Informal talks continue at the World Trade Organisation on whether to waive Covid-19 vaccine patents, as developing countries call for more equity in the vaccines' distribution. Dr. Ingrid Katz of the Harvard Global Health Institute explains why waiving patents could help save more lives in the developing world, and also aid the global economy. But Arthur Appleton professor of International Law and partner with trade law firm Appleton Luff, says we should expect significant legal challenges to such a liberalisation. Also in the programme, the European Commission vice-president Margaritis Schinas will outline a new vision for the EU's Schengen area. Koert Debeuf of the EU Observer sets out the challenges the area will face in the future. And we'll conclude this edition with a view from economist Michael Hughes about the recovery on stock markets around the world, and Jeff Collins, chief economist of business services platform Coupa talks about the recovery they are seeing in their e-commerce data.

(Image credit: Getty Creative)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qdtkq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2g6d)
Patient zero: Back from the brink

A six-year old boy in Papua New Guinea woke up one day in 2018 and was suddenly unable to stand up. Less than a year later, children in three other Asia Pacific nations were experiencing the same alarming symptoms.

A disease that had been thought to have been eradicated from this region 18 years before was back -- and it appeared to be spreading.
Olivia Willis tells the story of how doctors discovered that these children who developed paralysis had in fact contracted polio.

Producers: Jane Lee, Cheyne Anderson
Senior Producer: Carl Smith
Executive Producer: Joel Werner
Sound Design: Tim Jenkins

An ABC Science Unit. ABC Radio National and BBC World Service co-production.

Picture: Child receiving a polio vaccination from health worker at a mobile clinic on a street in Mount Hagen in the Western Highlands, Credit: Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3ql1g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz17t60q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qdy9v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqj)
Should we ‘dim the sun’ to save the planet?

Scientists agree that cutting carbon emissions as soon as possible is key to tackling global warming. But as emissions continue to rise, some are now calling for more research into measures that could be used alongside decarbonisation, including – controversially – what’s known as ‘solar geoengineering’ technologies.

One idea being considered is spraying light-reflecting particles into the atmosphere to temporarily cool down the earth. It may sound far-fetched, but the idea is based on naturally observed effects following volcanic eruptions. Scientists are now asking whether we could mimic those effects to avoid the worst climate impacts.

But research into this technology is not without opposition. A recent solar geoengineering experiment in Sweden got cancelled following a fierce backlash from indigenous and environmental groups. Many say tampering with the climate in this way is too risky to ever try in the real world.

So how does solar geoengineering work? What are the risks? And will we ever have to use it?

Contributors:
Elizabeth Kolbert, staff writer at the New Yorker and author of Under a White Sky
Asa Larrson-Blind, Vice-President of the Saami Council
Raymond Pierrehumbert, Halley Professor of Physics at the University of Oxford
David Keith, Professor of Applied Physics and Public Policy at Harvard University


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3qpsl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Assignment Interview (w3ct2gb2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qf21z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f8z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3qtjq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz17tfhz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qf5t3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6l)
Sold into sex work

Over 79% of the world's trafficking victims are subject to sexual exploitation, and an overwhelming number of them are women and girls. Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women who not only survived and escaped that experience, but have gone on to change laws and create support networks for fellow survivors.

Shandra Woworuntu was a successful Indonesian banking analyst but lost her job when her firm ran into trouble. She applied for a job in a Chicago Hotel for six months to tide her family over - but when she arrived she was handed over to a trafficking ring. After months of forced sex work, she was able to escape her kidnappers by jumping out of a bathroom window. She went on to successfully prosecute her traffickers in court, and is now a campaigner against trafficking. She is the founder of Mentari USA, a non-profit organisation which helps survivor reintegrate with society.

Hungarian Timea Nagy grew up as the daughter of a strict policewoman, but became trapped in a trafficking circle after applying to become a baby-sitter in Toronto. Hours after her arrival, she was forced into sex work. Timea escaped home to Hungary after three months, but later returned to Canada to indict her traffickers. She has gone on to train police in Canada helping trafficking victims, as well as educating the financial sector on its role in preventing modern slavery. She is the founder of Timea's Cause, a for-profit organisation which employs survivors.

Produced by Rosie Stopher

IMAGE
(L) Shandra Woworuntu, credit Calvin Voon
(R) Timea Nagy


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3qy8v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklk509l)
Netanyahu: 'coalition is threat to Israel's security'

Israel's right-wing leader Bennett backs a deal to oust Prime Minister Netanyahu. The proposed coalition would include parties from the right, left and centre of Israeli politics.

We go to Canada to get reaction after the discovery of the bodies of 215 indigenous children at the site of a former school.

And scientists say it's possible to live to the very ripe old age of 150... but would we really want to?


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3r20z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklk541q)
Is this the end for Netanyahu?

The leader of an ultra-nationalist party starts coalition talks with the centre-left in a bid to set up a new government for Israel.

Today is the centenary of what is considered to be the worst racist massacre in US history. We speak to a relative of one woman who documented the day's events.

And should patents on COVID vaccines be suspended for the duration of the pandemic? That's a question the WTO will be consideting today.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3r5s3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklk57sv)
Israel: could left/right coalition oust Netanyahu?

Parties from all sides of the Israeli political spectrum hold talks on setting up a national unity government - in a bid to oust Benjamin Netanyahu.

Preparations are underway to rapidly relocate hundreds of Afghans who worked for the British military and the government. There are fears for their safety as international troops prepare to leave the country.

And Democrats in the Texas House of Representatives block what they say would have been one of the most restrictive voting laws in the United States through a dramatic last minute walk out.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3r9j7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5r)
Doug Gurr: Advocating for planet Earth

Stephen Sackur speaks to the new director of London’s world-renowned Natural History Museum, Doug Gurr. They still love their ancient fossils here, but the real focus now is on the fragile future of our planet. Has this become a museum on a mission?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qfnsm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4r)
Family tree DNA data crack cold cases

In the US - but increasingly in other countries too - cold case murder, sexual assaults, and unidentified person cases once thought unsolvable are being cracked thanks to the proliferation of public genetic databases. But with this success come deep worries for our DNA data.
Ivana Davidovic talks to Brett Williams, the CEO of Verogen - the owner of GEDMatch consumer DNA database - about their business decision to cooperate with the police, privacy concerns and new opportunities opening up in countries like Mexico and Vietnam.
We also hear from Tina Franke, whose daughter Christine Franke was murdered in Florida in 2001. She speaks of her relief at the unexpected progress in the investigation after almost two decades.
Professor Andrew MacLeod tells us about his project - in conjunction with King's College London - to harness forensic genealogy to identify perpetrators of sexual violence in the aid industry.
And law professor Natalie Ram explains the pioneering legislation being brought in the US state of Maryland designed to regulate the industry much more tightly.

PHOTO: Forensic scientist collecting evidence/Getty Images


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0v)
The war on drugs

The first 'war on drugs' was launched by US President Richard Nixon in 1971. He described drug abuse as a 'national emergency' and asked Congress for nearly four hundred million dollars to tackle the problem. Claire Bowes spoke to one of Nixon's policy advisors, Jeffrey Donfeld, about an approach to drugs which he describes as more 'find them and help them' than 'find them and lock them up'. And how he convinced the President to roll out a nationwide programme of methadone treatment for heroin addicts.

This programme is a rebroadcast

Photo: US President Richard Nixon (BBC)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3rf8c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qfsjr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqf)
Is my neighbour’s noise harming my health?

As millions more of us move to live in densely populated cities, we almost inevitably face living in closer proximity to our neighbours. Neighbour noise can certainly be a source of annoyance – but could it even be damaging to our health?
Increasing evidence suggests that unwanted noise can cause sleep deprivation, distraction and annoyance, as presenter Anand Jagatia finds out. He discovers that noise annoyance has a small but significant impact on our wider health – including our cardiovascular system – but that annoyance is not necessarily down to sound alone. Factors such as perception of the neighbourhood and relationships with our neighbours also play a part.
CrowdScience has examined living with unwanted noises before, and we revisit our trip to the acoustics lab at the University of Salford in Manchester, UK. Here, we meet the researchers and engineers investigating the best ways to make our homes more pleasant for our ears whilst still maintaining the ‘buzz’ of city life.
Contributors:

Contributors:
Professor Charlotte Clark, St George’s University of London
Professor Trevor Cox, University of Salford Manchester
Professor Bill Davies, University of Salford Manchester
Dr Mags Adams, University of Central Lancashire (formerly University of Salford Manchester, at time of recording)

Produced by Jen Whyntie and presented by Anand Jagatia for the BBC World Service.


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3rk0h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pf0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qfx8w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2dk0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3rnrm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz17v8qw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qg110)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3rshr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt2)
Nxivm ‘sex cult’ part one: How my daughter became trapped

In 2011, the former Dynasty actor Catherine Oxenberg and her 19-year-old daughter India took a course from the self-help organisation Nxivm (pronounced Nexium). It was a pivotal experience for India as she had been struggling to find a career and Nxivm seemed to offer her purpose. She ended up working for them as a coach and moving away from her mother. What India didn’t know was that Nxivm was in fact a dangerous cult. Eventually she would be trapped in a secret subgroup, which was really a sex-trafficking ring operated by the cult leader, Keith Raniere.

Ray Holman, the Trinidadian master of the steelpan, describes how he revolutionised steelpan performance. (This interview was first broadcast in 2016)

Shaku Myoshin isn't your average Buddhist monk. For a start, he has long hair, tied in a ponytail. But that's not the reason he's called the 'Funky Monk'. He goes by the name of Tatsumi and is known as Japan's beatboxing monk. (This interview was first broadcast in 2017)

The interview with India and Catherine Oxenberg is part one of Cult Behaviour, a mini-series from Outlook exploring how a cult can manipulate a person’s sense of reality, and what it can take to break free. Part two, which explores the next stage of India and Catherine’s story is available here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3ct1jwb. Or you can listen to both these episodes combined on the Outlook podcast.

Picture: Catherine and India Oxenberg, with Catherine's mother Princess Elizabeth of Yugoslavia on the left
Credit: Courtesy Starz Entertainment


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3rx7w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz17vj74)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qg8j8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3s100)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv53wsc809m)
Netanyahu warns coalition is a 'danger' to Israel

Israel's PM Benjamin Netanyahu warns that a proposed unity government aimed at replacing him would be a danger to the country's security. We profile ultra-nationalist Naftali Bennett who wants to unseat the Prime Minister.

Also in the programme: European politicians are angry about reports that the Danish intelligence services helped the US to spy on European allies; and why not many Chinese women will take up a new right to have three children.

(Photo: Leader of the Yemina party, Naftali Bennett, delivers a political statement in the Knesset, the Israeli Parliament, announcing he will form a government with Yair Lapid to oust Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Credit: EPA/ Yonatan Sindel/ pool)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3s4r4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qgj0j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y47ym32bcvz)
China reduces limits on having children

China tries to increase its population by allowing 3 children per couple. We learn about why, for decades China a one-child policy, which was introduced in 1979. The BBC's China correspondent Stephen McDonnell has been talking to young people about their attitudes to having children, and we hear what has fuelled concerns that China will grow old before it gets wealthy. Stuart Gietel-Basten is a professor of social science and public policy at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. India’s economy shrunk in the past financial year, and fears continue that it will bear more bad news as the current coronavirus wave tears through the country. The BBC's Arunoday Mukharji in the capital Delhi gives us an update from the ground. In the United States - and increasingly in other countries too - cold case murder, sexual assaults, and unidentified person cases that were once thought unsolvable are being cracked thanks to public genetic databases. But with this success come deep worries for our DNA data. The BBC's Ivana Davidovic has an extended report on ongoing controversies over genetic databases. Finally, hybrid work is leading to fears for the future of city centres, as office blocks clear out in favour of working from home. But do empty offices spell trouble for businesses? Our workplace commentator Pilita Clark has been finding out.

(Image: A parent walking with one child in Beijing. Copyright: Frank Mataka/ Getty Images)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3s8h8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjdp778fq)
China allows couples to have three children

China has announced that it will allow couples to have up to three children. The previous limit was two children. We speak to our China media analyst about the reaction and hear from people in China who are planning to have children.

We'll look at the coronavirus situation in Vietnam where the government plans to carry out mass testing in Ho Chi Minh City in response to a new cluster linked to a religious mission. Our regular coronavirus expert Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University School of Public Health will explain what is known about a new “hybrid variant” of coronavirus detected in Vietnam.

We’ll play a conversation between a doctor and a medical student in Tunisia where coronavirus restrictions have been eased although the country has the highest reported Covid-related deaths per capita of any country in Africa.

And Naomi Osaka has been warned that she could face disqualification from the French Open tennis tournament over her refusal to attend press conferences. We hear how people have been reacting to the story.

(Photo: People ride scooter carrying children in Beijing, China, 12 May 2021. Credit: WU HONG/EPA)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3sd7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjdp77d5v)
Coronavirus conversations: Tunisia

We continue to hear from people affected by the pandemic and today go to Tunisia where lockdown restrictions have been eased despite the fact that the country has the highest reported Covid-19-related deaths per capita of any country in Africa. A doctor and a medical student talk about their experiences during the pandemic.

Professor Manfred Green, a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel will give the latest information on the virus and explain a new “hybrid variant” of coronavirus detected in Vietnam.

China has announced that it will allow couples to have up to three children. The previous limit was two children. We speak to our China media analyst about the reaction and hear from people in China who are planning to have children.

And 100 years since a race massacre in Tulsa, Oklahoma , we’ll explain the significance of the event.

(Photo: Fadi Benaissa Credit: Fadi Benaissa)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3shzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3smqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz17w7px)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qh001)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nbcy2whk0)
2021/05/31 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3srgs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qh3r5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2g7g)
Patient zero: First outbreak

“Aboriginal people had a name for it... they called it ‘Devil Devil’...”

In 1789, a disease tore through Aboriginal communities around Sydney Cove, or Warrane, leaving dead bodies floating in the harbour, and scattered along the shorelines. The evidence points to this being smallpox, but there’s still debate
over how it got to Australia. Was it an accidental import with the arrival of European ships? Did it come from trading with other peoples in the region? Or was it deliberately introduced as a form of germ warfare?

In this episode, Olivia Willis and Nakari Thorpe ask Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people about this catastrophic moment in their history, and hear how their ancestors survived a cocktail of diseases they’d never before encountered.

Producers: Jane Lee, Cheyne Anderson
Senior Producer: Carl Smith
Executive Producer: Joel Werner
Sound Design: Tim Jenkins

Patient Zero is a production of ABC Science, Radio National, and the BBC World Service


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3sw6x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv53wsc8vjj)
Texas Democrats walk out over 'discriminatory' voting bill

A walkout by Democratic Party lawmakers in the US state of Texas has killed a voting law promoted by Republicans that was widely criticised as discriminatory against people of colour.
Also in the programme: WHO renames UK and other variants with Greek letters and Brazil is to host football's Copa America in two weeks' time despite its own dire Covid situation, after the pandemic forced the tournament to be moved from Argentina.

(Photo: Critics say the proposed law disproportionately affects voters from ethnic minorities. Credit: Reuters)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3szz1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qhc7f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3t3q5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnj9n6f84)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfll3bgws)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qhgzk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48s1tp1n89)
First broadcast 31/05/2021 22:32 GMT

The latest business and finance news from around the world, on the BBC.



TUESDAY 01 JUNE 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3tc6f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqc630qqj4)
China allows three children in major policy change

China will allow families with three children after a sharp fall in birth rates. Stuart Gietel-Basten is a professor of social science and public policy at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and explains why the policy is needed.
In the US cold case murder, sexual assaults and unidentified person cases that were once thought unsolvable are being cracked thanks to public genetic databases. But with this success come deep worries for our DNA data. The BBC's Ivana Davidovic has an extended report on ongoing controversies over genetic databases.
And a new phenomonen called The Phil Collins Effect has been identified by researchers, and explains the sudden resurgence in popularity of music artists, companies and brands. We speak to Andre Spicer, one of the professors behind the study.
Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland in Washington, and by Karen Lema, Philippines bureau chief for Reuters, in Manila.

(Picture: A woman holding a baby. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3tgyk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz17x2xt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qhv6y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2g6v)
Globalisation in reverse

Globalisation is about open trade, open doors and open borders. It is the way that Asia has grown its economy for the better part of the last half century. But the pandemic and tensions between the US and China have seen globalisation go into reverse - with many now saying it hasn’t benefited everyone. One of the biggest beneficiaries of globalisation has been Singapore. But the city-state is now an increasingly lonely voice calling for economies to stay open. It is being forced to reinvent itself and find new ways to grow its trade dependent and global economy. What lessons does Singapore – so often the canary in the coal mine for global economic trends - have for the rest of us?

Join Karishma Vaswani as she explores that question and many others in a wide-ranging interview with Singapore’s Prime Minister, Lee Hsien Loong.


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3tlpp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3tqft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz17xbf2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qj2q6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td0)
Cristina Iglesias: To the lighthouse

A derelict lighthouse, an island only accessible by boat and the rhythm and sound of water - all these are crucial components in the latest artwork being unveiled this June by the Spanish installation artist and sculptor Cristina Iglesias. She has won international acclaim for her work transforming public spaces and her latest project takes this further by remaking the lighthouse as a sculptural site.

The lighthouse is on St Clara Island, in the area of San Sebastian, Spain, where Cristina was born. She is transforming the interior of the building and adding water to recreate the impression of waves. It is a process that is full of complications with complex engineering and structural logistics.

Reporter Kristina Zorita travels with Cristina by boat to the island for a day to find out how she and a team of specialists work on creating the wave effects. Will the timings of the water sequences work as Cristina has imagined?

Reporter : Kristina Zorita
Producer: Emma Kingsley

(Photo: Cristina Iglesias. Credit: Jose Luis López de Zubiria)


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3tv5y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklk7x6p)
Peru more than doubles Covid deaths after review

Peru now has the highest number of deaths in the world in relation to the size of its population.

100 years on - we'll hear from the survivors of the worst race massacre in US history about a day they can never forget

And we'll have the latest on the new outbreaks of coronavirus in Vietnam...as inbound international flights to the capital city Hanoi are suspended.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3tyy2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklk80yt)
Copa America to be hosted by Brazil

The prestigious Copa America moves from Argentina to Brazil with just two week's notice.

We'll hear why the Chinese authorities have given up on the one child policy...and the two child policy...and now say they'll allow families to have three children.

And today is International Farhud Day: marking the 80th anniversary of a pogrom in Iraq, in which an estimated 180 Jews were killed by a pro-Nazi Iraqi mob. We'll hear what it's like to be Jewish in Iraq today.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3v2p6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklk84py)
Peru more than doubles Covid death toll to 180,000

Using 'excess deaths' means Peru now has the highest death rate per capita in the world.

100 years on - we'll hear from the survivors of the worst race massacre in US history about a day they can never forget.

And we'll head to the city that's been dubbed "the sinkhole capital of Europe" - with more than a hundred of them opening up every year.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3v6fb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkw)
Turning the desert green

The Sinai desert in Egypt is a dry, barren place where not much grows. But Ties van der Hoeven has come up with a scheme to turn it into a green and fertile land. It’s a plan on a huge scale which involves dredging a lake, restoring ecosystems, and even bringing back rain to the desert. He’s been inspired by a successful project to restore the Loess Plateau in China. But could it work in the Middle East?

Produced and presented by Richard Kenny.

Picture: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qjkpq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jfs)
Are dating apps disastrous for women?

Are dating apps disastrous for women? Tamasin Ford speaks to writer and podcast hot Shani Silver about why, after 10 years on dating apps, she quit them for good. A dating app user explains how she would never have met a companion without dating apps and Nancy Jo Sales, author of Nothing Personal, My Secret Life in the Dating App Inferno who argues dating apps are addictive and pose a massive challenge for mental health.


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5c)
The killing of Pablo Escobar

The Colombian drug trafficker, once one of the richest men in the world, was shot dead by police in December 1993. He had been on the run from the authorities for over a year. Jordan Dunbar has been speaking to Elizabeth Zilli who worked for the US Drug Enforcement Agency in Colombia and who helped track down Pablo Escobar.

Photo: Colombian forces storm the rooftop where drug lord Pablo Escobar was shot dead on 2nd December 1993. (Credit:Jesus Abad-el Colombiano/AFP/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3vb5g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g6v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qjpfv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2g7g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3vfxl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3vknq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz17y5mz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qjxy3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3vpdv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwb)
Nxivm 'sex cult' part two: The fight to free my daughter

When Catherine Oxenberg realised that her daughter India had been indoctrinated by the cult Nxivm (pronounced Nexium) and coerced into a sex-trafficking ring, she tried to do everything to rescue her and bring down the cult leader Keith Raniere.

Ever since he can remember, Hak-Min Kim has been obsessed with electronic gadgets. Growing up in North Korea, he would fix appliances for his neighbours and they called him 'Repair Boy.' But his love of all things electronic would land him in jail after he was caught watching a TV show banned by the regime. Hak-Min first spoke to Outlook in 2017.

The interview with India and Catherine Oxenberg is part two of Cult Behaviour, a mini-series from Outlook exploring how a cult can manipulate a person’s sense of reality, and what it can take to break free. Part one, which explores how India and Catherine got involved in Nxivm is available here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3ct1jt2. Or you can listen to both these episodes combined on the Outlook podcast.

Picture: India Oxenberg
Credit: Courtesy Starz Entertainment


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3vt4z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz17yf47)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qk5fc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2g7g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3vxx3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv53wscbx6q)
Olympic athletes start to arrive in Japan

The first international athletes have arrived in Japan for the Tokyo Olympics - which are due to open on July the 23rd after being postponed last year. Public opinion remains firmly against holding the games and many doctors think it's a bad idea.


Also in the programme: Martin Griffiths, the UN's outgoing Special Envoy to Yemen, tells us about his latest efforts to mediate a ceasefire; Malaysia has gone into total lockdown to combat Covid-19; and can Vietnam repeat its earlier success in containing the virus with more infectious variants now causing a surge?


(Image: The Australian women’s softball team is the first squad to arrive in Japan some 50 days before the Tokyo Olympics, June 1st 2021 / Credit: EPA Wires)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3w1n7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qkdxm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bdy8wh61y)
Environmental concerns over fish export in West Africa

Environmental campaigners warn that exports of fish products from West Africa are depriving millions of people of food and work. We'll look at why the industry is so controversial with Dr Ibrahimé Cissé, Senior Campaigner at Greenpeace Africa. Mountain rescuers have questioned the accuracy of using a location app called What 3 Words, which assigns words to unmappable areas. Emergency services are citing dozens of examples where the wrong address was given to their teams. William Gold is a volunteer for the Brecon Mountain Rescue Team in Wales and tells us of his experiences.

(Image: West African fish exporters. Credit: Henri BaFoulage/ Getty Images)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3w5dc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjdp7b5bt)
Naomi Osaka: Reaction

Athletes from across the world of sport have offered their support to Naomi Osaka, who pulled out of the French Open due to mental health concerns - but some have also questioned her decision. We ask athletes, sports journalists and a sports psychologist about the pressures athletes face in sport, and what Osaka’s withdrawal means for tennis.

Also, in the US over half of the adult population has now had a Covid vaccine. In turn more than 20 states have lifted their mask mandates. We hear a conversation with two fully vaccinated people who still want, and choose to wear their masks.

And our medical expert Dr Isaac Bogoch joins us from Toronto to explain some of today’s other coronavirus stories. We look at why Peru has more than doubled its Covid death toll - and why coronavirus cases are rising in many South East Asian countries.

(Photo: Naomi Osaka. Credit: Steven Paston/PA Wire.)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3w94h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjdp7b92y)
Coronavirus conversations: The mask mandate

In the US over half of the adult population has now had a Covid vaccine. In turn more than 20 states have lifted their mask mandates. We hear a conversation with two fully vaccinated people who still want, and choose to wear their masks.

Also athletes from across the world of sport have offered their support to Naomi Osaka, who pulled out of the French Open due to mental health concerns - but some have also questioned her decision. We ask athletes, sports journalists and a sports psychologist about the pressures athletes face in sport, and what Osaka’s withdrawal means for tennis.

And we’ll go live to Tulsa in Oklahoma – where President Biden is arriving to mark the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre.

(Photo: People wearing protective face masks, May 27, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Sarah Meyssonnier.)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3wdwm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3wjmr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz17z4m0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qkwx4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nbcy2zdg3)
2021/06/01 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3wncw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g6v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2ql0n8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls2)
WhatsApp v Indian government

India has brought in stringent new laws that WhatsApp says will force it to break its end-to-end encryption. In a social media chat that’s been forwarded by multiple users, the new rules require the person who originated and shared that message, to be traced. And that’s a big problem for WhatsApp, a service that’s built itself around privacy. Gareth talks to Mishi Choudhary of the Software Freedom Law Centre about the regulations and the potential impact beyond India.

After the new zombie heist film, Army of the Dead, had wrapped, the lead actor, Chris D’Elia, who played the part of an all-action helicopter pilot, was digitally removed from the movie, after he found himself the subject of serious allegations, which he denies. Edited in was Tig Notaro, another actor. Maxim Thompson explains how this remarkable cut and paste job was done.

There’s a new way of driving a games controller, answering a phone or reading a text, using the inside of your ear. It works because many of us, without even realising it, can control a tiny muscle in our ear called the tensor timpani. Roland Pease has been trying out this prototype technology with Nick Gompertz, director of Earswitch



(Image: An advertisement from WhatsApp seen in a newspaper at a stall in New Delhi. Credit: Sajjad Hussain /AFP via Getty Images)



The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.

Studio Manager: Nigel Dix
Producer: Deborah Cohen


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3ws40)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv53wsccrfm)
Two contrasting pictures of covid

We hear a tale of two countries Peru & the United Kingdom, one where the death figures have doubled and another where there have been NO deaths for the first time.

Also on the programme, the racist massacre no-one talked about for most of last century - Remembering Tulsa, one hundred years on; And the campaigners in Serbia who are trying to shine a light on their country's environmental problems.

(Photo: Cemetery in Peru with Covid victims; Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3www4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2ql84j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1td0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3x0m8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnj9n9b57)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfll3fcsw)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qlcwn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48s1tp4k5d)
Are inflation worries justified?

What's behind the rise in inflation across the US and Eurozone? We hear from Jason Furman, the Aetna Professor of Economic Policy at both Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard University. And Ebay has partially severed its ties to Paypal. The changes mean that while eBay buyers can still pay with PayPal, sellers will be paid straight into their bank accounts; we speak to Owen Thomas, senior editor at media company Protocol. Plus, many walkers and other adventurers use the 'What 3 Words' location app and it's used by many emergency services. But mountain rescuers have questioned the app's accuracy, citing dozens of examples where the wrong address was given to their teams. So what can be done about it? We hear from the app's chief executive, Chris Sheldrick. And after months of working from home, are power lunches back on the menu? The BBC's Victoria Craig finds out. (Picture of dollars flying away. Picture via Getty Images).



WEDNESDAY 02 JUNE 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3x83j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqc630tmf7)
Are inflation worries justified?

What's behind the rise in inflation across the US and Eurozone? We hear from Jason Furman, the Aetna Professor of Economic Policy at both Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard University. Are the economy and racism linked? That's the focus of a conference this week in the US - we hear from the president of the Minneapolis Federal Reserve, Neel Kashkari. And Ebay has partially severed its ties to Paypal. The changes mean that while eBay buyers can still pay with PayPal, sellers will be paid straight into their bank accounts; we speak to Owen Thomas, senior editor at media company Protocol. Plus, many walkers and other adventurers use the 'What 3 Words' location app and it's used by many emergency services. But mountain rescuers have questioned the app's accuracy, citing dozens of examples where the wrong address was given to their teams. So what can be done about it? We hear from the app's chief executive, Chris Sheldrick. And after months of working from home, are power lunches back on the menu? The BBC's Victoria Craig finds out. And we're joined throughout the programme by Nicole Childers, executive producer of Marketplace Morning Report in Los Angeles and Jasper Kim of Ewha University in Seoul. (Picture of dollars flying away. Picture via Getty Images).


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3xcvn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz17zztx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qlr41)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2g7h)
Automation Nation

Machines: What they do now that they did not do before

Technology has complemented our work since the invention of the wheel, but we may finally be approaching a point where automation stands to replace some human jobs entirely. Economist Dr Daniel Susskind explores how automation is affecting work in the United States, from fully automated restaurants to driverless trucks, and hears from the people whose livelihoods are being affected. A world without work could be a utopia, but without the correct policy to ensure people still have incomes and a sense of purpose, it could look more like a nightmare.

Daniel discovers just how advanced the field of robotic is becoming with a visit to the Oxford Robotics Institute, before heading to the US to hear how automation is already everywhere you look.

He delves into the surprising history of automation in supermarkets, from the first forays of the 1930s to the fully automated shops we are starting to see today, and hear how the advancement of artificial intelligence has brought us to this point.

Finally, we visit the Tyson Manufacturing Research Centre to hear how in America’s enormous meatpacking industry robots are increasingly doing work that until very recently could only be done by humans.

Producer: Ned Carter Miles


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3xhls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x5c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3xmbx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz1807b5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qlzm9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6h)
Ines Boubakri

Tunisian Ines Boubakri won bronze in fencing in Rio after a thrilling comeback in her final bout. Crippled with back and knee pain, she dug deep to claim the medal and become the first North African and first Arab woman to win a medal in fencing. It was the culmination of a lifetime proving other people wrong.

Ines reveals the secrets behind her success and how she controls her aggression when duelling, a crucial element to her success.

She also talks about her other passion, fashion, and how alongside her sporting career she is promoting equal rights for women, particularly in the Arab world.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3xr31)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklkbt3s)
India ramps up vaccination programme

India says it's ramping up its coronavirus vaccination programme but is it too late for one of the countries worst hit by Covid-19? We'll hear from a journalist who's travelled across the country speaking to people caught up in it.

Brazil says it has agreed to host South America's biggest football tournament - the Copa America - despite criticism over soaring rates of coronavirus.

And we'll hear about the growing number of attacks on journalists and human rights activists in Pakistan.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3xvv5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklkbxvx)
Israel coalition deadline looms

Opposition politicians in Israel have until midnight tonight to form a coalition ending Benjamin Netanyahu's twelve years in office.

We'll speak to Pakistan's climate change minister about the impact of global warming on his country.

And why is the US action movie star Steven Seagal joining a Russian political party?


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3xzl9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklkc1m1)
India says it is ramping up vaccination rates

India says it's ramping up the coronavirus vaccination programme but is it too late for one of the countries worst hit by Covid-19? We'll hear from a journalist who's travelled across the country speaking to people caught up in it.

Time is ticking in Israel - unless a new coalition is formed by midnight local time tonight, the country could be on its way to a 5th round of elections.

And we'll hear about how space junk might pose a threat to the international space station.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3y3bf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb8)
John Nkengasong: Can Africa meet its vaccination targets?

Africa appears to have been relatively spared in the pandemic so far, but plans to have at least 30% of the continent's populations vaccinated by the end of 2021 seem far away. Hardtalk speaks to John Nkengasong, the director of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qmglt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnk)
The death of the petrol station

The rise of electric vehicles could see traditional service stations closing across the planet over the next two decades, and replacing pumps with fast chargers is unlikely to save them.

Justin Rowlatt speaks to one entrepreneur hoping to profit from the rollout of EV chargers in every home and parking space, Erik Fairbairn of Pod Point. Meanwhile Isabelle Haigh, head of national control at the UK's National Grid, explains why she is confident they can meet the electricity demand from all these new vehicles.

Across the Atlantic, another entrepreneur - Sanjiv Patel of National Petroleum - says the writing is clearly on the wall for his chain of 25 gas stations in California - but maybe not for a while yet. But could he turn them into restaurants or use them to hold séances? That's the fate of one petrol station in Leeds that is now an arts centre. We hear from its owner, Jack Simpson.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Abandoned gas station along old Route 66 in the California desert; Credit: Lynne Rostochil/Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7m)
When Peru mistook missionaries for drug traffickers

In April 2001 the Peruvian Air Force mistakenly shot down a small passenger plane as it flew over the Amazon jungle. The Peruvians believed the aircraft was carrying drugs. Onboard was a group of American missionaries. Mike Lanchin spoke to Jim Bowers, who survived the crash, but whose wife and baby daughter were killed.

This programme is a rebroadcast

Photo: The missionary plane shot down by the Peruvian Air Force lies in shallow waters of the Amazon River. (Photo by Newsmakers)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3y72k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2g7h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qmlby)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3ybtp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2g6t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3ygkt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz1812k2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qmtv6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3yl9y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyl)
The perilous world of a ‘cult deprogrammer’ – part one

Rick Alan Ross was selling and restoring cars when his grandmother’s Jewish nursing home was secretly infiltrated by a Christian group that tried to convert her. Rick started investigating, which lead him to a career as a world-renowned cult intervention specialist, or cult deprogrammer. Now, he helps people leave destructive cults or controversial groups and movements. His work can be demanding, problematic and perilous.

Örlygur Hnefill Örlygsson is an Icelandic space obsessive who was surprised to discover that American astronauts did their lunar training in Iceland in the 1960s. He began researching the history and created a museum dedicated to their stories. (This interview was first broadcast in 2017)

By day, Roberto Antezana works as a technician at an observatory in Santiago – processing data sent to him by eminent astronomers from around the world. But by night he indulges his other passion – astrophotography – taking images of the moon, stars and solar systems. He holds the South American world record for long distance photography and will go to some extreme lengths to get the right shot. (This interview was first broadcast in 2017)

The interview with Rick Alan Ross is part of Cult Behaviour, a mini-series from Outlook exploring how cults can manipulate a person’s sense of reality, and what it can take to break free. The next part of Rick’s interview will be available here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3ct1k33. Or you can listen to both these episodes combined on the Outlook podcast.

Picture: Man with 'the end of the world is nigh' placard
Credit: Getty Images


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3yq22)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz181b1b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qn2bg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3ytt6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv53wscft3t)
Israeli opposition says coalition close

Israel's opposition leaders say that after intense negotiations, they're now closer to forming a coalition that would oust the prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu. However, the politician at the centre of the effort, Yair Lapid, is yet to finalise a deal with a key figure, the far-right faction leader Naftali Bennett.

Also in the programme: US President Joe Biden suspends oil and gas drilling leases in Alaska and allegations of media censorship in Pakistan.

(Picture: Israel's Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu. Credit: Reuters)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3yykb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qn9tq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cn3csm1lz)
Sinking ship sparks environmental concerns

Sri Lanka faces an environmental crisis after a ship that caught fire off the coastline sinks – the BBC’s Ranga Sirilal gives us an update on what is one of the country’s worst marine disasters, and Lloyd’s List editor Richard Meade tells us the economic and financial implications. Sales of books have been booming during lockdown; we speak with the founder of Bloomsbury publishers, Nigel Newton, and ask how sustainable such a bumper year for books is. The rise of electric vehicles could see traditional service stations closing across the planet over the next two decades, and replacing pumps with fast chargers is unlikely to save them. The BBC’s Justin Rowlatt has an extended report on what this means for garage owners, and the landscape of our countries, if electric charging stations become the norm. And finally, the International Festival in Edinburgh is back on – famous for comedy, the festival was cancelled for the fist time in 73 years due to the coronavirus pandemic. Executive director Francesca Hegyi tells us about the logistics and challenges of moving the festival outdoors this year.

(Image: Smoke billows from the Singapore-registered container ship MV X-Press Pearl as it's towed away from the coast of Colombo. Photo by Ishara S. Kodikara via Getty Images) )


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3z29g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjdp7f27x)
Ship carrying oil sinks off Sri Lanka

A cargo ship carrying hundreds of tonnes of oil has sunk off the coast of Sri Lanka after being on fire for almost two weeks. The Sri Lankan and Indian navies had worked together to try and put out the fire and stop the ship from breaking up and sinking. There are now fears of an environmental disaster caused by hundreds of tonnes of oil in the ship's fuel tanks, as well as chemicals and plastics on board. We speak to a journalist in Sri Lanka's capital, Colombo.

Also, we go to Japan to hear the views of two doctors on whether the Olympics, set to take place on 23rd July in Tokyo, should go ahead. Polling shows that about 60% of Japan's population don't want them to take place, or at least want them delayed, amid concerns about coronavirus infection rates.

And Dr Maria Sundaram, infectious disease epidemiology at ICES Ontario in Toronto, joins us to answer your questions about the coronavirus pandemic. If you have a question to ask, WhatsApp us on +447730 751925.

(Photo: Singapore-registered container cargo vessel, MV X-Press Pearl, on the 9 nautical miles northwest of Colombo port in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Credit: EPA/Sri Lankan Air Force media handout)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3z61l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjdp7f601)
Coronavirus: Should the Tokyo Olympics go ahead?

We go to Japan to hear the views of two doctors on whether the Olympics, set to take place on 23rd July in Tokyo, should go ahead. Polling shows that about 60% of Japan's population don't want them to take place, or at least want them delayed, amid concerns about coronavirus infection rates.

Also, we get the latest on a cargo ship that has sunk off the coast of Sri Lanka after being on fire for almost two weeks. The ship was carrying hundreds of tonnes of oil in its fuel tanks, as well as chemicals and plastics on board. There are fears this could lead to an environmental disaster and devastate marine life.

And Dr Maria Sundaram, infectious disease epidemiology at ICES Ontario in Toronto, joins us to answer your questions about the coronavirus pandemic. If you have a question to ask, WhatsApp us on +447730 751925.

(Photo: A security guard stands at a building entrance of the National Training Center (NTC) in Tokyo, Japan. Credit: EPA/Franck Robichon)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3z9sq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3zfjv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz1821j3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qnst7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nbcy329c6)
2021/06/02 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3zk8z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2g7h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qnxkc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv9)
Black Fungus epidemic in India

Could over the counter Steroids be driving the Black Fungus epidemic in India? Claudia talks to Dr Awadhesh Singh from the GD Hospital and Diabetes Institute in Kolkata who explains the link between Steroid use and the shocking surge in cases of this deadly disease. Guest Matt Fox from Boston University discusses mass Covid testing in Vietnam and a trial of mask wearing in Bangladesh, plus the renaming of Covid variants using the Greek alphabet. And bestselling author Dr Jen Gunter on her new book The Menopause Manifesto – own your health with facts and feminism!

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: A doctor inspects a patient for mucormycosis inside a dedicated ward at MMG hospital in Ghaziabad, India. Photo credit: Sakib Ali/Hindustan Times/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3zp13)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv53wscgnbq)
A coalition of opposition parties has been formed in Israel

After days of frantic negotiations in Israel, a coalition of opposition parties has been formed to oust the Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu from power. It still needs approval from the Knesset. Also in the programme: Hong Kong's museum dedicated to the Tiananmen Square massacre has been closed over alleged licensing and hygiene breaches; and we'll hear from the International Booker Prize winners, David Diop and translator Anna Moschovakis.

(Photo: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu delivers a statement with president-elect Isaac Herzog at the Knesset, Israel's parliament, in Jerusalem. Credit: EPA/RONEN ZVULUN / POOL)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3zss7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qp51m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 On the Podium (w3ct2g6h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc3zxjc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnj9nd72b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfll3j8pz)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qp8sr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48s1tp7g2h)
Sinking ship sparks environmental concerns

Sri Lanka faces an environmental crisis after a ship that caught fire off the coastline sinks – Lloyd’s List editor Richard Meade tells us the economic and financial implications. Online retailer Etsy has bought second hand shopping app Depop for $1.6 billion. We get the reaction of Elizabeth Paton, consumer business correspondent at the New York Times. Sales of books have been booming during lockdown; we speak with the founder of Bloomsbury publishers, Nigel Newton, and ask how sustainable such a bumper year for books is. The rise of electric vehicles could see traditional service stations closing across the planet over the next two decades, and replacing pumps with fast chargers is unlikely to save them. The BBC’s Justin Rowlatt has an extended report on what this means for garage owners, and the landscape of our countries, if electric charging stations become the norm. And finally, the International Festival in Edinburgh is back on – famous for comedy, the festival was cancelled for the fist time in 73 years due to the coronavirus pandemic. Executive director Francesca Hegyi tells us about the logistics and challenges of moving the festival outdoors this year.

(Image: Smoke billows from the Singapore-registered container ship MV X-Press Pearl as it's towed away from the coast of Colombo. Photo by Ishara S. Kodikara via Getty Images)



THURSDAY 03 JUNE 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc4050m)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqc630xjbb)
Sinking ship sparks environmental concerns

Sri Lanka faces an environmental crisis after a ship that caught fire off the coastline sinks – Lloyd’s List editor Richard Meade tells us the economic and financial implications. Online retailer Etsy has bought second-hand shopping app Depop for $1.6 billion. We get the reaction of Elizabeth Paton, consumer business correspondent at the New York Times. Huawei has launched its own mobile operating system in a bid to break away from reliance on Google's Android. We hear more from Ian Sherr of CNET News, in Washington DC. The rise of electric vehicles could see traditional service stations closing across the planet over the next two decades, and replacing pumps with fast chargers is unlikely to save them. The BBC’s Justin Rowlatt has an extended report on what this means for garage owners, and the landscape of our countries, if electric charging stations become the norm. Plus, sales of books have been booming during lockdown; we speak with the founder of Bloomsbury publishers, Nigel Newton.

All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite side of the world. Lori Ann LaRocco, senior editor of guests for CNBC, in New Jese. And Jyoti Malhotra,editor, National & Strategic Affairs, The Print website, in Dehli.

(Image: Smoke billows from the Singapore-registered container ship MV X-Press Pearl as it's towed away from the coast of Colombo. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc408rr)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz182wr0)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qpn14)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gxc)
Syria’s decade of conflict: Syria's secret library

Syrian born reporter Lina Sinjab presents a special series from Assignment’s award winning archive on the 10 years of civil war in her country.

This week an extraordinary story from 2016, reported by Mike Thomson, about a secret library stored in the basement of a crumbling house in the besieged Syrian town of Darayya. The library was home to thousands of books rescued from bombed-out buildings by local volunteers, who daily braved snipers and shells to fill its shelves.

In the town gripped by hunger and death after three years without food aid, Mike Thomson revealed how this literary sanctuary proved a lifeline to a community shattered by war. And now, 10 years on, Mike brings Lina up to date on the fate of some of those volunteers.

Produced by Michael Gallagher and additional research and translation by Mariam El Khalaf.

(Image: 14 year-old Chief Librarian Amjad in the Secret Library, Credit: Daraya Council Media Team)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc40dhw)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc40j80)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz183478)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qpwjd)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfp)
Inside the mind of a kitchen gadget

Meet the unsung heroes of your kitchen drawers.

When you hold a vegetable peeler or potato masher, do you ever think about the person behind it?

We celebrate chefs and cookbook writers - but what about the people who make the tools that make it all easier?

Emily Thomas meets three product designers who explain the thinking behind the everyday objects we keep in our kitchens. We’ll hear about accessibility and segregation - but also art and beauty. Welcome to the philosophy of kitchen gadgets.

Contributors: Dan Formosa, Scott Jarvie, and Gavin Reay.


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc40n04)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklkfq0w)
Israeli opposition parties agree to form government

We head to Israel where it looks like Benjamin Netanyahu's 12 years in power is about to end.

With just 50 days to the start of the Olympics we ask if the event can still go ahead, amid growing opposition.

Ands we hear about the bite club in Australia which you can only join if you have been attacked by a shark.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc40rr8)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklkfts0)
Israeli politicians form coalition to remove Netanyahu

Eight opposition parties in Israel have reached an agreement to form a new government that would end Benjamin Netanyahu's 12-year tenure as prime minister. We’ll go live to Jerusalem.

We report on an environmental catastrophe in Sri Lanka and how a sunken ship is threatening to destroy the bottom of the sea.

And a special report from India where cases of black fungus in Covid patients is on the rise.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc40whd)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklkfyj4)
Israeli parties form coalition to oust Netanyahu

Is time finally up for Israel's great survivor Benjamin Netanyahu? If a multi-party coalition formed against him gets approval in the Knesset, his 12-year reign as Israel's longest serving Prime Minister is over.

Pope Francis has made changes to Roman Catholic Church law to criminalise sexual abuse. What difference does it make and why now - we'll try to answer those questions.

And it's 50 days to go to the Tokyo Olympics - the first athletes are arriving, the organisers insist they will take place, but the question over the wisdom of holding in the middle of a pandemic are not going away.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc4107j)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z20)
Do we need more nuclear power to help deal with climate change?

In November 2020, Britain will host the next UN Climate Change Conference, otherwise known as COP 26. Some 200 countries will come together to try to speed up attempts to make the world carbon neutral by the middle of the century.

But many countries are already struggling to ramp up renewable energy sufficiently to meet their greenhouse emission reduction targets. So is there another answer out there?

Around a tenth of the world's electricity is generated by nuclear reactors. Global generation has slowed in recent years after the nuclear accident in Fukushima a decade ago prompted governments to take a more cautious stance.

But with the urgent need to reduce carbon emissions, many prominent environmentalists are now taking another look at nuclear energy.

Tanya Beckett asks if nuclear energy can helps us transition away from fossil fuel power.

Produced by Soila Apparicio.


(Exhaust plumes from cooling towers at the coal-fired power station at Jaenschwalde Germany. Credit: Sean Gallup /Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qqchx)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j98)
Lebanon sinks further into crisis

The World Bank has declared Lebanon's to be "enduring a severe and prolonged economic depression" and said it is one of the worst economic crises since the mid-19th century. As fuel and food supplies dry up, and cash reserves dwindle, Lebanese economic columnist and former bank executive Dan Azzi warns "Armageddon" could be just around the corner for the country. Meanwhile Diana Menhem, economist and managing director of advocacy group Kulluna Irada, explains how the country's economic got into such a state. And we'll also hear from Joumana Saddi Chaya, of the lighting design and manufacturing company PSLab and Aline Kamakian, owner of the restaurant Mayrig in Beirut, on trying to run different businesses amid the increasing chaos.

Producer: Frey Lindsay

(Picture: People queue with their cars to buy fuel in Beirut, Lebanon on June 01, 2021. Picture credit: Wassim Samih Seifeddine/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x33)
Afghanistan's poppy problem

Laila Haidari set up Kabul's first independent drug rehabilitation centre in 2010. Having helped her own brother to quit his heroin addiction she wanted to help others. More than 80% of the world's illegal opium and heroin comes from Afghanistan. International criminal groups have exploited years of warfare and lawlessness to expand production, but the insecurity has also led to poverty and increased drug addiction inside Afghanistan. Laila Haidari explains to Rebecca Kesby how local people have been affected.

(PHOTO: An Afghan farmer harvests opium sap from a poppy field in the Surkh Rod district of Nangarhar province in 2018. The US government has spent billions of dollars on a war to eliminate drugs from Afghanistan, but the country still remains the world's top opium producer. (Credit NOORULLAH SHIRZADA/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc413zn)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qqh81)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc417qs)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl6)
X-rays: New ways of seeing

The discovery of X-rays by the German scientist Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895 was nothing short of ground-breaking, opening up a new era in medicine. For the first time, doctors could see inside the human body without the need for surgery, and diagnose many more living patients.

X-rays had major implications for physics as well, allowing scientists to study the structure and arrangement of molecules. Within wider society, they inspired artists to explore what these new rays could tell us about the representation of reality. It wasn’t long before X-rays were being used to scan baggage, in airport security and even in shoe shops to measure feet before exposure to radiation was properly understood. Huge strides in X-ray technology have given us the type of modern scans that are used today to detect conditions such as cancer.

Joining Bridget Kendall are Drs Adrian Thomas and Arpan Banerjee, both radiologists who’ve collaborated on publications about the history of X-rays, and artist Susan Aldworth who’s used brain scans in her work to investigate the nature of identity.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service

[Image: Cogito Ergo Sum 3. Credit: Used with kind permission of the artist, Susan Aldworth]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l87)
Denmark's shock Euros win

In June 1992, Denmark’s top footballers were relaxing on the beach when they received an urgent call to take part in the Euro 92 tournament. The Danes had failed to qualify for the championship, but were now needed as replacements for Yugoslavia, a country that no longer existed because it had descended into civil war. In a surprise to everyone, including themselves, Denmark then went on to win the tournament, defeating Holland and West Germany on the way. Will Yates talks to midfielder John Jensen, who scored one of the Danish goals in the final. The programme is a Whistledown Production, first broadcast in 2016.

(Photo: The Danish team celebrate. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc41cgx)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz183zg5)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qqqr9)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc41h71)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k33)
The perilous world of a ‘cult deprogrammer’ – part two

Rick Alan Ross is a world-renowned cult intervention specialist, also known as a cult deprogrammer. He helps people leave destructive cults or controversial groups and movements. But it’s work that can be demanding, problematic and perilous – especially if interventions don't go to plan.

Leanor Espinoza is one of the last living speakers of the indigenous Mexican language Kiliwa. She’s formed an unlikely partnership with a man known as ‘long face’ to try to preserve the her language and culture from extinction.

The interview with Rick Alan Ross is part of Cult Behaviour, a mini-series from Outlook exploring how a cult can manipulate a person’s sense of reality, and what it can take to break free. The previous part of Rick’s interview, which explores how he became a cult deprogrammer, is available here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3ct1jyl. Or you can listen to both episodes combined on the Outlook podcast.

Picture: Rick Alan Ross
Credit: Courtesy Starz Entertainment


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc41lz5)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz1846yf)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qqz7k)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc41qq9)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv53wscjq0x)
Far-right politician set to become Israeli Prime Minister

Naftali Bennett, the leader of the New Right party in Israel, will lead a proposed new government for two years, before giving way to his coalition partner Yair Lapid - provided the government survives that long.

Also in the programme: The Tokyo 2020 chief says the delayed Olympic games will "100%" go ahead in July; and Sri Lanka fears hundreds of tonnes of oil could leak from a stricken cargo ship off the Port of Colombo

Photo: Naftali Bennett (L) and his coalition partner Yair Lapid. Credit: Yesh Atid party handout.


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc41vgf)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z20)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qr6qt)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y495s5zn176)
Staff at Britain's biggest retailer Tesco edge towards equal pay

Thousands of current and former Tesco workers have had their legal argument in their fight for equal pay upheld. We speak with the BBC’s Emma Simpson to hear the details. Lebanon is no stranger to hardship; from the wreckage of its civil war to the world's largest ever non-nuclear explosion happening at its port, the country has not had an easy ride. Lebanon’s economic and financial crisis could rank as one of the three most severe the world has seen in the last century and a half. The BBC's Ed Butler has an extended report. The rollercoaster ride for American stocks continues as cinema chain AMC offers free popcorn to investors – the BBC’s Samira Hussain in New York tells us more about the trading frenzy. And finally, it’s been billed as an e-wallet that will give people a seamless way to access public and private services – but what about the privacy pitfalls? We speak with Julie Dawson, the Director of Regulation and Policy at the digital wallet and ID app Yoti.

(Image: Customers enter Tesco Express on Bow St. Photo by Michael McNerney/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc41z6k)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjdp7hz50)
Tokyo 2020 president: Olympics will go ahead

Tokyo 2020 President Seiko Hashimoto has told the BBC she is “100%” certain Olympics will go ahead. We hear reaction from athletes who are preparing to compete in the Games.

Also, we get the latest from Israel where opposition parties have agreed to form a new government that would end Benjamin Netanyahu’s 12-year tenure as prime minister. We'll explain the significance of the agreement.

And we continue to bring together people facing the coronavirus pandemic with shared experiences. Today we’ll hear from two Australian cousins, one stuck in Kenya because of travel restrictions and the other one in Melbourne where a lockdown has been extended by another week.

(Photo: Seiko Hashimoto, President of the Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee, delivers a speech during an unveiling event of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Credit Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc422yp)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjdp7j2x4)
Coronavirus conversations: Lockdown in Melbourne

The Australian state of Victoria has extended a coronavirus lockdown in the capital Melbourne for a second week. We hear from two cousins from Australia, one stuck in Kenya because of travel restrictions and the other one in Melbourne living through the lockdown.

Also, we get the latest from Israel where opposition parties have agreed to form new unity government. We’ll explain the significance of the agreement that would end Benjamin Netanyahu’s 12-year tenure as prime minister.

And our regular vaccine expert, Dr Rick Malley, explains why Bahrain will start giving “Pfizer boosters” six months after people had full Sinopharm vaccination.

(Photo: Grace and Emily. Credit: Kylie Iva Photography)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc426pt)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc42bfy)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz184yf6)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qrpqb)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nbcy35689)
Sport Today

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc42g62)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gxc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qrtgg)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3q)
Zoonotic hotspots and where to find them

Researchers map where the riskiest areas are for viruses to jump from bats into humans. Also, synthetic bacteria with unnatural DNA, and the origin of the humble watermelon.

David Hayman of Massey University in NZ and colleagues have published in the journal Nature Food a study highlighting areas of the world where zoonotic transmission of coronaviruses are most likely to occur between humans and bats of the type most suspected of being the origin of the current SARS CoV2 virus. There are a lot of hotspots combining fragmented forest, livestock farming, human habitation, and populations of horseshoe bats. It is, as he says, just part of the evidence suggesting a natural origin in the areas of northern south-east Asia and southern China.

Jason Chin, Wes Robertson and team at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology have been tinkering with their work on synthetic organisms. By rewriting the dictionary of DNA itself, their new molecular alphabet is able to encode far more elaborate and innovative functions than even nature has ever produced. Publishing this week in the journal Science, their latest bacterium is even capable of being completely immune to viral infection. But as they describe, this could be just the start of what the new technology could deliver in terms of new materials and medicines.

Meanwhile, Susanne Renner has been tracking down some of human beings’ earliest genetic engineering. The selection and breeding of various fruits to produce sweet, sweet watermelon was long suspected to have originated in Africa, the question was where and when? Using a combination of genetic sequencing, ancient Egyptian art, and early modern paintings, she describes to Roland how what we now know as Sudan likely played a part in the story.


(Image: Horseshoe bat Credit: Getty Images)


Presented by Roland Pease
Produced by Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc42ky6)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv53wsckk7t)
A new era for US-Israel relations

We hear from senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment and former State Department Middle East analyst, Aaron David Miller as Israeli opposition parties reach an agreement to form a new government that would end Benjamin Netanyahu's 12-year tenure as prime minister. Yair Lapid, leader of the centrist Yesh Atid party, announced an eight-faction coalition had been formed. Under a rotation arrangement, the head of the right-wing Yamina party, Naftali Bennett, would serve as prime minister first before handing over to Mr Lapid.

Also on the programme: Denmark plans to defy EU norms and deport its asylum-seekers to a 'third country' while their claims are processed, we hear the reaction; President Biden agrees that the time has come for more global sharing of Covid vaccines and why Nasa thinks the planet Venus finally deserves closer inspection.

(Photo: US Department of Defence Secretary Austin welcomes Israeli Defence Minister Gantz to the Pentagon Credit: European Press photo Agency)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc42ppb)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z20)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qs1yq)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc42tfg)
BBC News

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnj9nh3zf)
The Newsroom

The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfll3m5m2)
Sports News

BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qs5pv)
BBC News Summary

The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48s1tpbbzl)
Staff at Britain's biggest retailer Tesco edge towards equal pay

Thousands of current and former workers at Tesco, Britain's biggest retailer, have had their argument upheld, in their fight for equal pay between men and women. We speak with the BBC’s Emma Simpson to hear the details. Finance ministers from the G7 - the group representing seven of the world's wealthiest nations - are meeting on Friday and Saturday in the UK - a week ahead of the full G7 Summit. Top of the agenda is global corporation tax reform, as we hear from Richard Partington, the Guardian's Economics Correspondent. The rollercoaster ride for American stocks continues as cinema chain AMC offers free popcorn to investors – the BBC’s Samira Hussain in New York tells us more about the trading frenzy. Also in the programme: Lebanon is no stranger to hardship; from the wreckage of its civil war to the world's largest ever non-nuclear explosion happening at its port, the country has not had an easy ride. Lebanon’s economic and financial crisis could rank as one of the three most severe the world has seen in the last century and a half. The BBC's Ed Butler has an extended report.

(Image: Customers enter Tesco Express on Bow St. Photo by Michael McNerney/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)



FRIDAY 04 JUNE 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc431xq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqc6310f7f)
G7 finance ministers prepare to meet

Finance ministers from the G7 are meeting on Friday and Saturday in the UK - a week ahead of the full G7 Summit. Top of the agenda is global corporation tax reform, as we hear from Richard Partington, the Guardian's economics correspondent. Thursday has been a day of prolonged argument over foreign travel in the UK. Portugal has been removed from the government's so called 'green list'. The Canary Islands, the Spanish territory off the coast of north-west Africa, was hoping to be added to the list, but missed out. We speak to their head of global tourism safety, Cristina del Rio Fresen. Also in the programme: Lebanon is no stranger to hardship; from the wreckage of its civil war to the world's largest ever non-nuclear explosion happening at its port, the country has not had an easy ride. Lebanon’s economic and financial crisis could rank as one of the three most severe the world has seen in the last century and a half. The BBC's Ed Butler has an extended report.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Paddy Hirsch, contributing editor at National Public Radio, in Los Angeles and Rachel Pupazzoni, business reporter for the ABC, in Perth, Western Australia.

(Picture: Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak meets with U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, on the eve of the G7 Finance Ministers meeting, on June 3, 2021 in London, England. Credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc435nv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz185sn3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qsjy7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tz2)
Venezia promoted and Copa America on the move

Venezia FC's Harvey St Clair discusses the unique nature of football in Venice, following the club's promotion to Serie A. Also on the programme, Peru's assistant coach Nolberto Solano talks about the last minute decision to move the Copa America to Brazil.

Picture: Venezia FC goalkeeper Niki Maenpaa celebrates being promoted to Serie A (Nicolo Zangirolami/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc439dz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x33)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc43f53)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz18614c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qssfh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2g6w)
The schools that chain boys

For 18 months reporter Fateh al-Rahman al-Hamdani filmed inside 23 Islamic schools, or khalwas, across Sudan for a BBC News Arabic investigation. He uncovered systemic child abuse, with boys as young as five years old routinely chained, shackled and beaten by the “sheikhs”, or religious men in charge of the schools. The investigation also found evidence of sexual abuse.

We visit some of the nearly 30,000 Sudanese khalwas, where children are taught to memorise the Koran. The schools receive money from the government and private donors both in Sudan and around the world. Because they charge no fees, many families consider them an alternative to mainstream education, especially in remote villages that may not have government-run schools. Students board there, only returning home for the holidays.

We meet two 14-year-old boys, Ismail and Mohamed Nader, who were beaten so badly at one khalwa that doctors worried they might not survive, and hear how their families decide to take legal action. We join Fateh as he confronts the sheikh in charge of the school where they were assaulted. And we hear what Sudan’s new transitional government has to say about reforming khalwas.

Presented by Paul Bakibinga, narrating the words of Fateh al-Rahman al-Hamdani.

Photo: A young boy with his feet shackled and chained. Credit: Jess Kelly/BBC)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc43jx7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklkjlxz)
Hong Kong democracy campaigner detained

A prominent Hong Kong democracy campaigner has been detained on the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre. There's no official commemoration of the event in the city this year -- but some say they'll continue to mark it.

The UN Security Council has been warned of the growing risk of a massive oil spill from an old, decaying tanker off the war-torn coast of Yemen.

And we are in Ethiopia where Eritrean forces have begun to withdraw from the Tigray region.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc43nnc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklkjqp3)
Hong Kong vigil organiser arrested

Authorities in Hong Kong have banned activities to mark the 32nd anniversary of the Tiananmen massacre in China and a leading human rights activist has been arrested.

Nepal now has one of the highest Covid-19 infection rates in the world. There's a lack of oxygen and the Prime Minister said they desperately need vaccines. We have a special report from Kathmandu.

Israel’s newly agreed coalition sees an Arab Israeli party make history by joining the ruling coalition. We'll get reaction from an Arab Israeli group seeking greater political representation.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc43sdh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2nklkjvf7)
Tiananmen vigil leader arrested in Hong Kong

A vigil leader in Hong Kong has been arrested as thousands of police are ready to enforce a ban on Tiananmen anniversary protests.

We'll hear about the old rusted tanker off the coast of Yemen that threatens environmental disaster.

The US is donating 19 million doses of vaccine to Covax - but are the world's richest countries doing enough to help the poorer ones in this way?


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc43x4m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n17)
Tom Kerridge: Has the pandemic changed the way we eat?

How long will it take the hospitality business to recover from the pandemic, and is there a new recognition of the link between our food and our health? Stephen Sackur speaks to British chef Tom Kerridge.

(Photo: Tom Kerridge sits in his restaurant with Stephen Sackur)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qt8f0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j07)
A Chinese immigrant living the American Dream

Mei Xu is a Chinese American entrepreneur who made it big in the US setting up a global candle business. She grew up in Chairman Mao's communist China but was educated at an elite school where she was learnt English with the aim of becoming a diplomat. That was until the pro-democracy, student protests of Tiananmen Square in 1989. After that she managed to get a passport out China and went to the USA where she set up he multi-million dollar business. What does her story tell us about the state of the American economy and the growth of China as an economic superpower?


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyl)
How Switzerland defeated its heroin epidemic

In the 1990s, Switzerland decided to tackle one of Europe's worst drugs epidemics by trying radical new policy ideas including providing safe-injection rooms for addicts and even prescribing pure heroin. The new strategy dramatically cut overdoses, HIV infections and the number of new users, and in 2008 the Swiss voted in a referendum to enshrine the changes permanently in law. Zak Brophy talks to Andre Seidenberg, a Swiss doctor who worked with addicts for decades, and to former Swiss president Ruth Dreifuss, who campaigned for the change in policy.

PHOTO: Drug addicts in a disused railway station in Zurich in the 1990s (Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc440wr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngz)
Huawei pins hopes on HarmonyOS

The Chinese giant launches its own smartphone and connected device operating system after the US blocked access to key Google Android tech. Will China be a big enough market for it to become established? Plus, how machine learning is helping to improve the monitoring of Parkinson’s Disease symptoms. And the debate over plans by the National Health Service in England to open patients’ local medical records to researchers and planners. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Huawei smart watch running HarmonyOS with the company logo behind it, Credit: Huawei)


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qtd54)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc444mw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsg)
Israel divided

Israel will soon have its first new prime minister in over 12 years if a freshly formed coalition holds. Benjamin Netanyahu is the country's longest serving leader, but in recent years he’s presided over an increasingly fractious political system. In a recent speech Israel’s largely ceremonial president repeated his warning that the country's population has evolved into four unique groups, often attending separate schools and living in separate communities. Israel’s had four elections in two years and there’s talk of another before the end of 2021. Mr Netanyahu has been criticised from the right for failing to stop rockets being fired into Israel by the Palestinian group Hamas, and is accused from the left of encouraging extremist nationalists. But internationally he’s forged new alliances with Middle Eastern countries through the Abraham Accords, successfully persuaded the United States to pull out of the Iran nuclear deal, and celebrated the moving of the US embassy to Jerusalem. After 15 years of leadership by the man they call ‘Bibi’, Israel is at a crossroads - but where will it go next? Are the religious and cultural divisions making the country ungovernable? What changes are needed in order to encourage the formation of more stable governments? And what could such changes mean for the country’s Arab minority? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc448d0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz186wc8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qtmnd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tz2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc44d44)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dz)
Visiting Russia’s Arctic military base

Russia's northernmost military base, in the remote archipelago of Franz Josef Land, demonstrates its ambitions for the Arctic, as melting ice opens up new opportunities. The BBC Moscow news team were given rare access to the base, and Liza Shuvalova tells us what she saw there.

Venezuela and Trinidad
Between the 1960s and 90s, many people from the island of Trinidad made the 11 kilometre sea crossing to Venezuela in search of better lives. Today, the migration has reversed, with Venezuelans heading to Trinidad and Tobago. BBC Mundo’s Norberto Paredes tells us more about long-standing bonds between these two countries.

Saving Kenya's turtles
Watamu, on the Kenyan coast, is famous for its wildlife, including four species of sea turtle. But turtle numbers have declined due to poaching and habitat loss. Njoroge Muigai of BBC Nairobi visited Watamu to meet the people working hard to save them.

What two new buzzwords tell us about broken dreams in China
Chinese internet users have been using two buzzwords – which translate as “lying flat” and “involution” – to express growing frustration with competitiveness and powerlessness. Fan Wang of BBC Chinese explains the economic changes behind these terms.

My journey to journalism: Shekiba Habib
As part of our occasional series about our language service colleagues' routes into their jobs, we hear from Shekiba Habib of BBC Afghan. She was studying in Kabul to be a doctor, the career she had always dreamed of, when the arrival of the Taliban changed everything.

Image: Russia's Arctic military base in the Franz Josef Land archipelago
Credit: BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc44hw8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz1873vj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qtw4n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc44mmd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv53wscmly0)
Hong Kong: Tiananmen activist arrested on anniversary

Thousands of police are patrolling the streets of Hong Kong to stop people commemorating the anniversary of the 1989 massacre in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. Chow Hang-tung, a leading pro-democracy activist who helps organise the annual vigil, has also been detained.

Also in the programme: Another video is released of the detained Belarusian blogger, Roman Protasevich - we'll hear from an American senator who has just met opposition leaders in the region; and the swimmer from Myanmar who has given up his chance of glory at the Tokyo Olympics to protest against the military coup.

(Image: Vice-chairwoman of Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China, Chow Hang-tung. Credit: Reuters//Lam Yik)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc44rcj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n17)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qv3mx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46qg05p0vf)
Tax shake-up on the table at G7 meeting

Finance Ministers from some of the world's biggest economies are meeting in London, and on the table discussions for a major shake-up of how companies are taxed globally.
We hear from Tove Maria Ryding from European Network on Debt and Development for her take on the plans.
Also on the programme, the BBC's Mike Johnson takes an extended look at the issue of where our plastic recycling waste, really ends up.
We'll ask whether supersonic passenger air travel is really set to make a return, with the help of Professor Keith Hayward from the UK's Royal Aeronautical Society.
And we're in the front row as Nigerian musicians finally get back in front of a live audience again.

Image: Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak welcomes Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Matthias Corman to the G7 Finance Ministers Meeting. Credit: Steve Reigate/ AFP/ Getty Images)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc44w3n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjdp7lw23)
Coronavirus: Nepal

Nepal has one of the highest Covid-19 infection rates in the world, caused largely by a spread of cases from neighbouring India. We speak to our correspondent there and hear from doctors about the situation in hospitals amid a shortage of oxygen and beds. We also look into reports of a new "Nepal mutation" and what we know about it.

Our coronavirus expert of the day, Dr Megan Murray from Harvard School of Public Health, joins us to go through some of the other main coronavirus lines of the day and answer listener questions about the virus.

And we hear from transgender athletes in the US, as Florida becomes the latest state to ban trans women from female sports.

We go to Mexico to hear about the violence during the election season. Dozens of candidates have been killed since the campaigning began.

(Photo:A woman holds on to the oxygen cylinders for a patient after refiling them at a factory, amidst the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) surge as India"s outbreak spreads across South Asia, in Kathmandu, Nepal May 9, 2021. Credit: Navesh Chitrakar/File Photo/Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc44zvs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxjdp7lzt7)
Coronavirus conversations: Transgender athletes

We speak to transgender athletes in the US, as Florida becomes the latest state to ban trans women from female sports.

Also, Nepal has one of the highest Covid-19 infection rates in the world, caused largely by a spread of cases from neighbouring India. We speak to our correspondent there and hear from doctors about the situation in hospitals amid a shortage of oxygen and beds.

We speak to coronavirus expert Prof Marc Mendelson to talk through the latest coronavirus stories and answer audience questions.

And a BBC investigation that has revealed widespread allegations of abuse against female officers in the Afghan police force. We speak to our reporter who worked on the story.

(Photo: A selfie of Robin. Credit: Robin Caulfield)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc453lx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc457c1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxgz187vb9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qvlmf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0nbcy3835d)
2021/06/04 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc45c35)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qvqck)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqg)
What is the point of menstruation?

It's a topic that's taboo in many cultures, yet it's also something nearly every woman experiences – on average upwards of 400 times throughout her life: menstruation.

Responding to a flood of questions from our CrowdScience listeners, Marnie Chesterton seeks to unpack how periods affect women physically, mentally and societally.

Why did humans evolve to have periods when fewer than two percent of mammals share our experience of menstrual cycles? Is it really a good use of our limited energy reserves? What can the little Egyptian spiny mouse teach us about PMS symptoms? We hear why periods may reduce the number of faulty embryos that implant and how more menstrual cycles may even increase our chances of developing certain types of cancer.

Finally, as the number of periods a woman has over the course of her life has more than quadrupled since the pre-industrial era, Marnie asks: Do we really still need to have them?
Contributors:
Dr Nadia Bellofiore, Hudson Institute of Medical Research at Monash University
Dr Deena Emera, Buck Institute
Lameck Kiula, Jambo for Development
Sally King, Menstrual Matters & King's College London
Dr Diana Mansour, New Croft Centre & Newcastle University

Presented by Marnie Chesterton
Produced by Sam Baker and Melanie Brown for the BBC World Service


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc45gv9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv53wscng4x)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc45llf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n17)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qvyvt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tz2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjkbc45qbk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywnj9nl0wj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sfll3q2j5)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkcs2qw2ly)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48s1tpf7wp)
Global minimum tax tops Europe ministers meet

Finance ministers from across Europe meet for the G7 summit in London to discuss a global minimum tax rate – we speak with the European Network on Debt and Development’s Tove Maria Riding. The Turkish government will ban the import of many kinds of plastic waste, after revelations that it was being burned or dumped on Turkish beaches and roadsides. The BBC’s Mike Johnson has an extended report on the effects on the country’s environment. Almost two decades after Concorde’s final flight, United Airlines invests in 15 planes capable of travelling at twice the speed of modern airliners – we speak with Professor Keith Hayward, a fellow at the Royal Aeronautical society about the feat. And finally, Nigerian musician Ade Bantu and his band are back performing for the first time since the pandemic – we find out how the Afropolitan genre of music will return post-pandemic, and what its messages will be.

(Image: Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak welcomes Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Matthias Corman to the G7 Finance Ministers Meeting. Credit: Steve Reigate/ AFP/ Getty Images)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gxc)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkcdtf397h)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d5q)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j4r)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1ls2)

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From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mtv)

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HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n5r)

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Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nv8)

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Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2g93)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2g93)

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In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1td0)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1td0)

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More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2dk0)

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On the Podium 04:32 WED (w3ct2g6h)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1f)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l1f)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pkw)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pkw)

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Spitfire: The People’s Plane 05:32 SAT (w3ct0t1h)

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Spitfire: The People’s Plane 10:32 MON (w3ct0t1h)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0nbcy2whk0)

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Sports News 23:20 SAT (w172y0sf79t0ttf)

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Sportsworld 16:06 SAT (w172y0t7p1dp84q)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lbg)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1ngz)

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The Arts Hour 15:06 SAT (w3ct1rsy)

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The Assignment Interview 10:06 SUN (w3ct2gb2)

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The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2dqj)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct1csj)

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The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p6k)

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The Cultural Frontline 23:32 SAT (w3ct1pf0)

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The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2g6t)

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The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rl5)

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The Lazarus Heist 09:32 SAT (w3ct2f8z)

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The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1hsf)

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Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wyk)

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WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f35)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzl66tb32gl)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1tz2)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1tz2)

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