Radio-Lists Home Now on WS Contact

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 15 MAY 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5vj09)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqb392rwb0)
Indian variant could worsen the Covid-19 pandemic

The World Health Organization has warned that the Covid-19 pandemic's second year is on track to be "far more deadly" than the first. As the spread of the disease in India shows little sign of slowing there are increasing concerns that the so-called Indian variant could prove to be a key factor. We hear from Dr Julian Tang a Consultant Virologist at the Leicester Royal Infirmary. Hong Kong is also trying to cope with a sudden rise in coronavirus cases, some of them involving the Indian variant. We hear from Dr Keiji Fukuda, the Hong Kong  government's Covid 19 advisor. The Bank of England chief economist, Andy Haldane, has suggested there could be inflation in store, as the BBC's Victoria Craig reports. And in the US, inflation is also a concern as we hear from economist Chris Low of FHN Financial. Plus, the BBC's Lucy Burton Plus examines the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on church finances around the world. And we hear from Jamiah Hargins, an entrepreneur in Los Angeles who's trying to get urban dwellers to start up micro-farms in small gardens and spaces in city settings. Plus, one of the signs that normality really has returned will be once we start to go out to things like the theatre. There are signs on Broadway that day may be approaching, as Kai Ryssdal from our sister programme Marketplace, explains. And we're joined throughout the programme by Sarah Knight from ABC in Perth, Australia. (Picture of coronavirus via Getty Images).


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5vmrf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfw79y7qp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8sk00t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lbd)
Bamboo bats, Irish women's cricket and BJ Watling's retirement

Are bamboo bats the future of cricket? We hear from former Thailand Under 19’s player, Doctor Darshil Shah who has co-authored some research outlining the benefits of using bamboo instead of willow.

Plus we are joined by Ireland captain Laura Delany who looks ahead to their upcoming series against Scotland after 18 months without an international match.

The team also discuss the India squad announcement ahead of their upcoming tour of England, BJ Watling's retirement and Pakistan's new parental support policy for players.

Photo: Laura Delany of Typhoons plays a shot watched by Shauna Kavanagh of Scorchers during the Women's Super Series match between Scorchers and Typhoons at Malahide Cricket Club in Dublin. (Photo By Sam Barnes/Sportsfile via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5vrhk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dw)
Mexico's apology to the Mayans

Last week, Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador apologised to the indigenous Mayan people for abuses committed against them since independence. But with elections looming, some are questioning the timing of the apology. The BBC's Lourdes Heredia discusses this historic moment.

Targetting Afghan girls
Zuhal Ahad of BBC Afghan shares her experiences of reporting on the bomb attack outside a girls' school last weekend which left more than 80 dead, many of them schoolgirls. It happened in her childhood neighbourhood in Kabul, which has seen several devastating attacks in recent years.

America's 'green gold rush'
Zhaoyin Feng, who reports from Washington for BBC Chinese, tells us about her trip to Oklahoma to report on the latest frontier in America's so-called marijuana gold rush. It's attracted many Chinese American investors and Chinese immigrant workers.

Saving Kenya's turtles
Kenya's Watamu coast is famous for its wildlife, including four different types of sea turtle. But turtle numbers are declining due to poaching and loss of habitat. Njoroge Muigai of BBC Nairobi visited Watamu recently to meet the people working to save the turtles.

Who becomes an Islamic extremist?
BBC Indonesian's Silvano Hajid investigates the role of social media in recruiting young Indonesians to commit terrorist attacks through the story of a young man called Akbar. He was only 16 years old when he tried to join a group affiliated with so-called Islamic State in Syria.

Image: The festival of Valle del Maiz in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
Credit: Kobby Dagan/VW Pics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyh)
China's Democracy Wall

How a brick wall in Beijing became a beacon for those calling for change. But when Wei Jingsheng posted an essay demanding democracy in 1978, he was arrested and imprisoned for 18 years. He's been telling Rebecca Kesby why he thinks it was worth it.

(PHOTO: BEIJING, CHINA: China's prominent dissident Wei Jingsheng (R) laughs as he talks to reporters at his Beijing apartment 20 September 1993. Wei was arrested again shortly after this and eventually released from prison on medical grounds in 1997. He currently lives in the USA. (credit MANUEL CENETA/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5vw7p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsc)
Ransomware on the rise in the US

A cyber-attack on an oil pipeline in the United States has caused widespread disruption and alarm. The Colonial Pipeline stretches thousands of kilometres from Texas to New Jersey and was shut down as a result of the attack, causing fuel shortages and price spikes on America's East Coast. This is the latest in a long list of recent ransomware attacks on US institutions and infrastructure, where groups have shut down crucial information networks or threatened to reveal trade secrets unless a fee was paid.

President Biden has blamed a group based in Russia for the Colonial Pipeline attack; and while he did not hold Moscow directly responsible, he has blamed it and other nations for conducting cyber-espionage against America on a regular basis. Despite the advanced technological abilities of many US companies, and the investment of millions in digital security, hackers are continuing to find ways to break into government and commercial networks. So who are the hackers and how are their methods evolving? And how can the Biden administration ensure global cooperation in the fight against cyber-crime? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5vzzt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfw79ylz2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8skc86)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1f)
Spitfire: The People’s Plane

Phoenix

The Spitfire factory was a priority target for German bombers. The workers endured raid after raid. If vital Spitfires are going to continue to be built, then a plan is desperately needed.

Presenter: Tuppence Middleton
Producers: Alasdair Cross and Emily Knight
Editors: Chris Ledgard and Kirsten Lass


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2djy)
Explaining maths without Numbers

Tim Harford interviews Milo Beckman - a young mathematician, still in his twenties, who has written a book called ‘Math without Numbers’. Milo explains why he wanted to strip out digits to make it easier to describe the beauty of mathematics.


( Multiple strings of beads / Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5w3qy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt539x6j01)
Air strikes in Gaza: "Everyone is terrified"

Violent clashes between Israeli troops and Palestinians have spread across much of the occupied West Bank, after days of hostility in Gaza. We hear from Gaza poet Mosab Abu Toha.

Also today: Nigeria's kidnapping business; and a growing number of US stars consider a run for political office. Joining Weekend to discuss these and other issues are academic Joana Cook, who studies terrorism and Joe Parkinson, Africa bureau chief for the Wall Street Journal.

(Photo: An air strike in Gaza. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5w7h2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt539x6mr5)
Israeli air strike kills seven people in Gaza refugee camp

Palestinian officials in Gaza say seven people from two families were killed in an Israeli air strike which hit a densely-packed refugee camp, as the conflict entered its sixth day. We speak to Gaza poet Mosab Abu Toha.

Also today: Pakistan struggles to persuade people to take the Covid vaccine; and we explore a book set in a spaceship sometime in the future.

Joining Weekend to discuss these and other issues are academic Joana Cook, who studies terrorism and Joe Parkinson, Africa bureau chief for the Wall Street Journal.

(Photo: Gaza residents among the rubble. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5wc76)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt539x6rh9)
US envoy arrives in Israel

Palestinian officials in Gaza say seven people from two families were killed in an Israeli air strike which hit a densely-packed refugee camp, as the conflict entered its sixth day. The US envoy, Hady Amr, has arrived in Tel Aviv to meet with Israeli and Palestinian leaders, and try to end the fighting.

Also in the programme: China’s first mission to Mars has succeeded in putting a spacecraft safely on the red planet’s surface; and a survivor of a Xinjiang detention camp describes her experience.

(Photo: US Deputy Assistant Secretary for Israel & Palestinian Affairs Hady Amr arrives in Tel Aviv. Credit: US Embassy Jerusalem/Twitter)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8skqhl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6h)
Women fighting wildfires

Large scale wildfires have increasingly made headlines in recent years. Fires have devastated areas of California, Australia, Siberia and the Pantanal that used to be relatively unaffected. We speak to two women helping stop the spread of wildland fires, protecting precious ecosystems, national parks and people's homes.

Being a professional fire fighter is out of the question for Olga Serova who lives in Russia, where women are not allowed to join the profession. However, Olga volunteers with teams that battle wildfires in the national parks outside Moscow and St Petersburg. She tells us why she does it and how people react.

Justine Gude is a Texas Canyon Hotshot in the Los Angeles National Forest. She's one of a team of elite small crews of wildfire fighters – there are about 100 crews in America – who have been trained to deal with fires in remote regions where little logistical support is available. She was one of a team of volunteer experts who flew to Australia to help out firefighting efforts in Melbourne in 2020.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Olga Serova [credit Maria Vasilieva]
R: Justine Gude [credit Santos Gonzalez]


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5wgzb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5n)
Coronavirus: Healthcare workers and burnout

Dr Solelwa Sifumba in Johannesburg, South Africa, recently left the profession after experiencing such chronic anxiety that it even led to her considering taking her own life. She is joined by two fellow doctors in the UK, as they discuss burnout and the mental health challenges of working in constant crisis mode since the pandemic began. They tell host Nuala McGovern about the difficulty in their profession to say they are not ok.

We also talk to two therapists in the United States and UK. They offer their professional view of the situation and discuss potential solutions; and they explain how the challenges for healthcare workers, and doctors, in particular, began long before the arrival of the pandemic.

(Photo: Doctors wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) walk after examining patients inside a Covid-19 care centre and isolation ward facility near a Hospital in New Delhi, India, 10 May 2021 Credit: Idrees Mohammed/EPA)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8skv7q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f8x)
3: Disaster Movie

.“I was terrified.” Panic in Hollywood, careers ruined, the hunt for the culprit. President Obama makes clear who he blames for the Sony hack.
#LazarusHeist

Listen online at bbcworldservice.com/lazarusheist


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1c)
Additional funds to tackle global disinformation

The BBC WS has been given continued additional funding of £94 million from the UK government - we ask how might it be spent and will it affect the BBC’s independence from government interference? Plus as When Katty Met Carlos takes a summer break, we hear your thoughts on the series so far.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5wlqg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0py5lcc0r3)
Does history beckon for Leicester City in the FA Cup Final at Wembley?

Leicester City face Chelsea in the FA Cup Final at Wembley with the Foxes aiming to win the trophy for the first time. BBC Football correspondent John Murray and Peter Trenter, from the Chelsea Supporters Group, join us ahead the game.

The first Black American woman in professional cycling – Ayesha McGowan – tells us her sport needs to change and explains what she is doing to help. McGowan has awarded mini-grants to support nine women of colour to race at next month’s Tour of America’s Dairyland in Wisconsin. She also tells us how she went from seeing riding bikes as simply a mode of transportation to something she could make a career from and how she would love to compete at the women’s Tour de France in 2022.

Great Britain’s Jude Hamer tells us how the new women’s professional wheelchair basketball league will help grow the sport, the realities of playing in mixed sex teams and how she is hoping to win a medal at the Tokyo Paralympics. Hamer and her partner, the rower Lauren Rowles, are both heading to Tokyo and Hamer is keen to win a Paralympic medal at her third attempt.

Hellah Sidibe joins us as he nears the end of his transcontinental run from California to New York. The Mali-born former Major League Soccer Player started his run in March and is doing it to raise funds for a charity that tackles poverty by recycling and reusing old shoes. Sidibe reflects on his early life in Mali when shoes were a scarce resource and tells us how he went from hating running to taking on this challenge.

And in Sporting Witness, we go back to 1989 and one of the most dramatic climaxes to an English football season. On a remarkable night at Anfield, Arsenal with the odds stacked against them, overcame Liverpool to claim the league title.

(Photo: The Emirates FA Cup Trophy is seen inside Wembley Stadium. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5wqgl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfw79zbfv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8sl2qz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f33)
How can India vaccinate its billion?

Earlier this month, India became the first country in the world to report more than 400,000 new coronavirus cases in a single day. And despite being the world's biggest producer of vaccines, the country is facing an acute shortage to meet domestic demand. All Indian adults are currently eligible for a shot, but there are just not enough vaccines to go around.

Access and affordability are two other significant challenges in inoculating a population as large as India's. Although the government is spending $5bn to provide free doses at state-run clinics and hospitals, not everyone is eligible, and the cost of a single shot has massively jumped at private hospitals.

What would it take for India to ramp up production and roll out a successful immunisation programme? In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we look at the road ahead as India tries to vaccinate its billion people.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Dr Sharvil Patel, managing director, Zydus Cadila; Dr Rachna Kucheria, epidemiologist, founder, DocGenie; Shyam Sunder, co-founder, Getjab.in


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5wv6q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fzw)
Marvin Gaye: What’s Going On now

We celebrate the 50th anniversary of the release of Marvin Gaye’s landmark album What’s Going On – describing the events in Marvin’s life that led to him to record such a groundbreaking album, which continues to inspire a new generation of fans. There is no contemporary piece of music which reflects the emotions and concerns of a generation with such powerful emotion. Five decades after its release it continues to make a statement on behalf of a disenfranchised world.

(Photo: Marvin Gaye performing at De Doelen, Rotterdam, Netherlands, 1 July 1980. Credit: Rob Verhorst/Redferns/Getty Images)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5wyyv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv52szfcy8g)
Gaza: Israeli airstrike hits refugee camp

Palestinian officials say at least 14 people have been killed in an Israeli air strike on a densely-populated refugee camp in Gaza. A 5-month-old baby is said to be the only survivor from one family, found beside the body of her mother.

Also on the programme: reaction to the ongoing conflict from Ireland’s representative to the UN; and how have we recorded our pandemic experiences in diaries?

(Picture: A baby that survived an Israeli airstrike Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5x2pz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsw)
Artist Tracey Emin

This week on The Arts Hour, Nikki Bedi is joined by Oscar nominated director Jasmila Žbanić who talks about her latest film Quo Vadis, Aida? and film critic Karen Krizanovich.

British artist Tracey Emin explains why she’s always been a big fan of the Norwegian painter Munch.

Australian writer Liane Moriarty on her novel Big Little Lies that got made into a TV series with an all-star cast.

Canadian director Kari Skogland on her Marvel TV series The Falcon and the Winter Soldier.

Indian composer AR Rahman discusses writing the script rather than the music for his latest movie 99 Songs.

American actor John Hawkes on how he collaborates with directors.

And music from British singer songwriter Rag'n'Bone Man, who recorded his last album in record time, just before lockdown.


(Photo: Tracey Emin. Credit: Nick Harvey/WireImage via Getty Images)


SAT 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5x6g3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 15:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfg)
Young Turkey

World Questions discusses the future of Turkey with young people from across the country.

Jonny Dymond chairs a debate featuring a youthful panel of academics, lawyers and campaigners.

The questioners come from across the country to debate the big issues of the day – unemployment and insecurity, student unrest on university campuses, the rights of women and the LGBT community, foreign policy and freedom of speech.

Producers: Helen Towner and Charlie Taylor
Sound Engineers: Chris Weightman and Ronan Loftus

(Photo: Three young women wear their protective face masks while shopping in Ankara, Credit: Adem Altan/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5xb67)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t6yhs3yy1)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld will be live at Wembley for build-up and commentary of the FA Cup final between Chelsea and Leicester City.

Lee James will be on location and on the programme, he will be joined by former Chelsea and Leicester player Robert Huth as well as FA Cup winners Lauren and Becky Spencer, who have both won the tournament with Arsenal. The panel will build up to the match and we’ll also have the results from the Premier League and European football matches as well as the latest from the Italian Open.

Photo: The FA Cup sits on the pitch surrounded by Arsenal players after the 2020 FA Cup Final. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8sm1q0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 19:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l84)
Arsenal's last-minute championship win

In May 1989, Arsenal won the football league championship in arguably the most exciting finish to a season in English top-flight history. The Gunners needed to beat the legendary 1980s Liverpool side by two goals at Anfield, and managed to scrape a 2-0 victory thanks to a dramatic injury-time winner. It was Arsenal’s first championship since 1971. Alex Capstick talks to their former defender Nigel Winterburn.

PHOTO: Nigel Winterburn celebrates Arsenal's winning goal (Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5xt5r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:06 today]


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5xxxw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv52szfdx7h)
Israel destroys Gaza tower housing foreign media

Israel's military says the tower block housed assets belonging to the Hamas militant group, which has been denied by the building's landlord. In addition, at least 10 people, including eight children, are killed in an Israeli airstrike on a refugee camp in Gaza, officials say. We hear from a neighbour of the family killed in the strike. Hamas responds by firing dozens of rockets at cities in Israel, killing one man near Tel Aviv. We also hear from the international spokesman for the Israeli Defence Forces.

Also on the programme: Myanmar's National Unity Government, made up of politicians opposed to the military coup, calls for outside intervention in the small town of Mindat in Chin State, where a local armed opposition group is fighting the army; and the British sociological study known as Mass Observation which asks people to record a diary entry for one day a year - May the twelfth - putting down their thoughts and feelings however they choose.

(Picture: Mourners carry bodies of Palestinians including members of the Abu Hatab family killed during airstrikes, near the remains of a building destroyed at the Beach refugee camp Credit: Reuters/Mohammed Salem)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5y1p0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbt)
Eurovision! With Conchita Wurst, Duncan Laurence, Daði Freyr and Emmelie de Forest

Emmelie de Forest, Conchita Wurst, Duncan Laurence and Daði Freyr share their experiences of the Eurovision Song Contest, including what makes a winning Eurovision entry, how taking part in the Contest has influenced their music outside of Eurovision, and the personal stories they tell through their songs.

Emmelie de Forest won the Eurovision Song Contest for Denmark in 2013 with her song Only Teardrops. She has gone on to release two albums, and in 2017 she co-wrote the UK’s Eurovision entry Never Give Up on You. She’s joined by 2014’s winner, singer and drag artist Conchita Wurst, who represented Austria with power ballad Rise Like A Phoenix and went on to become a global icon for the LGBTQI+ community.

The Netherlands' Duncan Laurence is the reigning Eurovision champion, winning in 2019 with his self-penned debut single Arcade. Last year, he released his debut album Small Town Boy.

Daði Freyr is a musician and songwriter who will represent Iceland at Eurovision 2021 with the song 10 Years, which he wrote about his wife. He was due to perform at Eurovision last year before the Contest was cancelled due to the pandemic, but his 2020 entry Think About Things became a viral hit on social media and has been streamed more than 75 million times.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5y5f4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywmfhqbgz3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sdhs5gjlr)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8smjpj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdy)
Emel Mathlouthi and artists of the Arab Spring

Ten years on from the Arab Spring, the musician dubbed ‘the voice of the revolution’ has rediscovered her musical roots during lockdown. Emel Mathlouthi talks to Nawal Al-Maghafi about her new found perspective on her home country, the Tunisian Revolution and the song that spread hope.

When the protestors took to the streets of Cairo in 2011 political murals and graffiti soon followed, providing a visual commentary of the Egyptian Revolution. One of the most prominent street artists was Ganzeer, whose murals became emblematic of the protests. He tells us how a particular mural provided a political battleground for local residents.

How has the Arab Spring been reflected through fiction? Yasmine El Rashidi is the Egyptian author of Chronicle of a Last Summer which follows a young girl who lives through the Mubarak regime and 2011 Egyptian Revolution. Mohammed Alnaas’ short story collection Blue Bloods explores the psychological impact of surviving the Libyan Civil War . They join Nawal to discuss processing historic change and trauma through fiction.

Plus finding your voice when your country is in conflict - we speak to a Yemeni photographer about capturing the everyday stories of the people living in a divided nation.


Presented by Nawal Al-Maghafi



(Photo: Tunisian singer Emel Mathlouthi. Credit: Tommy Lindholm/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)



SUNDAY 16 MAY 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5ydxd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yv4)
Covid and clean air

We wouldn’t drink dirty water so why do we put up with polluted air? Researchers are calling for a major rethink on our attitude to air quality. Professor Lidia Morawska, from the Queensland University of Technology, says attention to air quality during the Covid pandemic has shown how levels of airborne disease can be reduced.

Sam Wilson from the UK Medical Research Council, University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research has been investigating genetic mechanisms associated with susceptibility to Covid infection. His team has identified a molecule that detects SARS-COV-2 when it starts to replicate in our cells. However, not all humans have this protective mechanism, which may help explain why some people become very ill with Covid and others have little if any symptoms.

Many Europeans lack this protective molecule, whereas the vast majority of Africans have it. The difference can be seen in cell cultures. However, the lack of diversity in the cells used in experiments worldwide can be a serious problem when looking at genetic differences as Samara Linton reports.

Nuclear material buried beneath the doomed Chernobyl nuclear power plant is becoming more active
Neil Hyatt Professor of Nuclear Materials Chemistry at Sheffield University says it’s a small increase but needs to be monitored.

And There are over 400,000 species of plant on earth, they’re on every continent including Antarctica. But humans only regularly eat about 200 species globally, with the vast majority of our nutrition coming from just three species. Many of the fruits, leaves and tubers that other plants grow are packed full of toxins that are poisonous to us, and would make us very ill if we ate them. But could we take out the poisons and create new, edible crops? That’s what CrowdScience listener Marija wants to know.

Crowdscience dives into this topic, and uncovers the that many crops are poisonous, and why so few plants are eaten globally. Host Anand Jagatia finds that even the modern scientific processes of crop breeding are very slow. But science can now engineer plants at the genetic level by adding, silencing or removing specific genes. This ‘genetic modification’ is hugely controversial but can be highly effective.

Anand finds a man who has spent decades making cotton seeds edible by removing the poisons they naturally produce in their seeds. This GM crop could help fend-off starvation. But sometimes introducing poisons can be as important as removing them, as we find in the genetically modified ‘BT eggplants’ in Bangladesh. The new gene makes the vegetable toxic to a major insect pest, so they are much easier to grow.

But GM crops are not the perfect solution. They have problems of gene escape, can increase the use of environmentally damaging herbicide, and can be open to monopolisation. In some countries, particularly in Europe, GM crops are hugely controversial. Anand finds out whether these concerns stand up to science and looks at the counterpoint in developing countries in Africa, South Asia and elsewhere, where local farmers like Patience Koku in Nigeria have little time for some of the concerns around GM, particularly as they see poor harvests, poverty and starvation as the more pressing problems.

(Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5yjnj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfw7b14ms)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8smwxx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv6)
Is BMI an outdated risk measure?

New research from The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal shows current body mass index [BMI] guidance is outdated and dangerous for people from different ethnic groups. The study’s principal investigator, Dr Rishi Caleyachetty unpicks the global implications of his findings.

Maria Rebollo Polo – WHO lead for Neglected Tropical Diseases in Africa – explains the important task of mapping NTDs like Trachoma.

Plus Khadidiatou Cisse reports from Benin on Trachoma – one of the oldest known infections and a leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide.

And, have our memories really got worse during the pandemic? Professor Catherine Loveday of Westminster University discusses her new research on our memories during lockdown.

Guest: Dr Ann Robinson


Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Female doctor weighing senior patient at medical clinic. Photo credit: Jose Luis Pelaez/Getty Images.)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5yndn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fzw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5ys4s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mts)
Migrant boat tragedy in the Canaries

Stories from The Canary Islands, Brazil, Mexico and Italy.

As the weather improves and the seas become calmer, the number of boats carrying migrants keen to reach Europe’s shores is once again on the rise. But the journey from Africa’s shores to the Spanish owned Canary Islands can be perilous and often ends in tragedy. Around 200 people so far this year have died while trying to reach the Canaries or Spain by sea. Late last month a boat with 24 corpses was found near the island of El Hierro. A total of 59 people had set off together but only three people survived the journey. Bruno Boelpaep met one of them.

In Brazil where the Covid pandemic has taken a terrible toll on the population Congress is conducting an inquiry into the government’s handling of the crisis. President Jair Bolsonaro has repeatedly spoken out against lockdowns and restrictions and has in the past told Brazilians to “stop whining” about the deadly virus. However, Brazil has one of the worst death rates in the world and the President faces criticism at home for failing to procure enough vaccines in time to stem the second wave. Mark Lowen, who’s recently returned from Brazil, reflects on the authoritarianism of President Bolsonaro and the similarities with the leader of another country he knows well.

Mexico’s Sea of Cortez – the Gulf of California – is home to the most critically endangered sea mammal on earth… The vaquita marina’s numbers have dwindled to less than a dozen, according to the latest research. And the most urgent threat to this small porpoise comes from the nets used to catch another threatened species – the totoaba. Fishing for totoaba is illegal in Mexico. But in China they’re believed to have medicinal properties and sell for thousands of dollars on the illicit market… So totoaba fishing in Baja California has continued illegally. Linda Pressly reports from the coastal town of San Felipe.

The Torlonia Marbles are one of the world’s most important collections of marble portrait busts and statues of emperors, gods and goddesses from Ancient Greece and Rome. But for 80 years they were hidden away, gathering dust and of sight – until now. 92 pieces are being shown to the public in an exhibition in Rome. David Willey has been to see them, cleaned and restored to their gleaming former whiteness.

(Image: Spanish coast guard towing a boat, where 24 people were found dead, found adrift off the Canary Islands. Credit: EPA/Ramon de la Rocha)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8sn4f5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5ywwx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfw7b1hw5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8sn859)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2fnt)
Bob Marley: An extraordinary day

Forty years after the death of reggae singer Bob Marley, British writer and dub poet, Benjamin Zephaniah, remembers the day Jamaica came to a standstill for the singer’s funeral.

Bob Marley was laid to rest on the 21 May 1981, 11 days after dying from skin cancer.

The extraordinary day saw the island come together to mourn their most famous son – and to celebrate his life and work. He was more than a singer and writer to the people of Jamaica, he was a national hero and prophet with his beliefs in peaceful resolution and Rastafarian religion.

For days leading up to the funeral, tens of thousands of people filed past his body and on the day, thousands lined the streets of Kingston while the 12,000 capacity National Arena was jam-packed.

The outpouring of emotion on the day was unprecedented in Jamaican history with some comparing it to the kind of atmosphere at JFK or Martin Luther King’s funeral.

As Benjamin recalls with some of the people who were in Jamaica that day, everything stopped - even the Government’s budget statement was delayed by a week on the direction of the new Prime Minister.

The singer’s hits could be heard right across the island as sound systems pumped out songs like No Woman, No Cry, I Shot the Sheriff and One Love. Meanwhile two of his sons danced and the Wailers and the I Three performed.

Among those remembering this extraordinary day – I Three singer Judy Mowatt, reggae musician Michael Ibo Cooper, reporter Robin Denselow and Edward Williams who was a 13-year-old boy living in Kingston at the time.

(Photo: Bob Marley performing at the Brighton Leisure Centre. Credit: Mike Prior/Redferns/Getty Images)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5z0n1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt539x9dx4)
Israel destroys Hamas leader's home in Gaza

Israeli air strikes on targets in Gaza have hit the home of the Hamas chief in the territory, Yehya al-Sinwar. In response Hamas militants fired more rockets at cities in southern Israel.

Also in the programme: As troops in Myanmar are reported to have carried out house-to-house raids after reinforcements entered the town of Mindat, we hear from an activist in the area; and with just over 10 weeks until the Tokyo Olympic Games open, a majority of Japanese people don't want them to happen.

(Photo: Smoke and flames rise after an Israeli airstrike on Gaza City. Credit: EPA/Haitham Imad)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5z4d5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt539x9jn8)
Israeli PM vows to continue Gaza strikes

Israel has bombed the home of the Hamas leader in Gaza as hostilities continue for a seventh day. Palestinian militants have fired rockets into Israeli territory.

Also today: Three more Japanese regions start a state of emergency because of coronavirus; and an online scheme in France allowing people to order musicians to perform live in their houses.

Joining Weekend to discuss these and other issues: Moroccan journalist Aida Alami and Peter Frankopan, professor of global history at the University of Oxford here in the UK.

(Photo: The remains of the multi-storey Al-Jalaa tower, which was home to various media organisations. Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5z849)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt539x9ndd)
Israeli jets carry out more air strikes in Gaza

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu vows to "continue to respond forcefully" to rocket attacks as conflict with Palestinians in Gaza enters a seventh day.

Also today: troops in Myanmar are reported to have carried out raids in a town where there's a rebellion against February's military coup; and we hear a tribute to the first African American man to sing at New York's Metropolitan Opera.

Joining Weekend to discuss these and other issues: Moroccan journalist Aida Alami and Peter Frankopan, professor of global history at the University of Oxford.

(Photo: The site of a direct rocket hit in Ramat Gan, where an Israeli man was killed. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8snmdp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjpv)
Dan Barber: My life in five dishes

In an illustrious career spanning three decades, there’s little that booking-writing, seed-breading, ‘philosopher chef’ Dan Barber has not put his hands to. Celebrated as the poster child of the ‘farm to fork’ movement, he tells Graihagh Jackson how a visit to a wheat farm called into question everything he thought he knew about agriculture and changed his cooking and ethos forever.

Surprisingly though, Dan started life wanting to be a writer not a chef. Through five dishes, we hear how a failed stint as a baker, a baptism of fire in french kitchens and running a company from a mice-infested kitchen eventually won him over to the cause. We learn that an obsession with simplicity and flavour has taken him on a farming odyssey around the world, what coronavirus can teach us about the future of food, and how it all started with a humble dish of scrambled eggs.

If you would like to get in touch please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Chef Dan Barber. Credit: Richard Bolls/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5zcwf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8snr4t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kwv)
The black ballerina who didn't give up

Growing up in London, Julie Felix always dreamed of dancing on the city's most famous stages, but she says she ended up leaving the UK in the 1970s after a ballet company excluded her because of the colour of her skin. Instead, she became a star in the United States with the prestigious Dance Theatre of Harlem, the first classical ballet company to focus on black dancers. Under the tutelage of the great African-American dancer Arthur Mitchell, Julie travelled the world performing for the likes of the singer Prince, Pavarotti and President Ronald Reagan. A book has been written about Julie's life called Brickbats and Tutus. A shorter version of this story was first broadcast on 15th April 2021.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: A montage of photographs from Julie Felix's life
Credit: All photos courtesy of Julie Felix


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5zhmk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbr)
Déjà vu

What if everything you experienced felt like you had already lived it before? Meet the people for whom déjà vu is every day.

It’s that moment when you mix up past and present, the real and the imagined. The moment you can no longer trust your senses; the world is the same, but the experience completely weird. It’s like tasting your own tongue.

So what is going on in the mechanics of your mind?

Welcome to Déjà Ville, a virtual world designed to induce déjà vu in order to understand what happens when memory and our senses, our past and our present, all get scrambled up together.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8snvwy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2fnr)
Cardinal Pell

He was once the third most powerful Catholic in the world, overseeing financial reform at the Vatican. But for Cardinal George Pell, the fall from grace was hard when he was accused, convicted, and imprisoned for sexual abuse in his home country of Australia. It was a huge blow for the Catholic church across Australia.

Abuse victim groups celebrated his conviction, however not everyone was convinced, and a debate began to rage as to the credibility of the accusations levied against him, as well as the fairness of his trial.

Cardinal George Pell always maintained his innocence, and after spending a year in jail, in a startling twist to the story, Australia's highest court overturned his conviction, seven high court judges unanimously ruling.

Today, Cardinal George Pell is back in the eternal city of Rome and living right next to the Vatican. In this Heart and Soul special, Colm Flynn meets Cardinal Pell at his home for a one-on-one extended interview to talk about the accusations that were made against him, the time he spent in prison, and why he decided to return to Rome after his release.

Presenter and producer: Colm Flynn
Executive Producer: Rajeev Gupta

(Photo: Cardinal George Pell is surrounded by Australian police as he leaves the Melbourne Magistrates Court in Australia, 6 October, 2017. Credit: Mark Dadswell/Reuters)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5zmcp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfw7b27by)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8snzn2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct1csg)
Finders Keepers

Finders Keepers: A photograph, a pipe and a skull

Actor and musician Kema Sikazwe is no historical expert. A young Zambian who now lives in northern England, he hasn’t even set foot inside a museum since he was ten years old. All that changes when Kema learns about the movement to return stolen objects back to where they came from. Should these priceless parts of history be returned? And if so, what’s at stake?

Kema measures the scale of the problem on a visit to Newcastle’s Great North Museum. Curator JC Niala shares her experience of seeing a photograph of her grandfather on display in a Kenyan exhibition, and Kema’s father tells him about an ongoing dispute between Britain and Zambia.

Theme music composed by Kema Sikazwe aka Kema Kay

Programme produced by Scattered Pictures


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5zr3t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 World Questions (w3ct1wfg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5zvvy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv52szfgv5k)
Hamas leaders targeted in Israeli airstrikes

It is not clear if the Hamas leader in Gaza, Yahya al-Sinwar, was at home when the IDF attacked. Palestinian officials say 33 people were killed in overnight strikes on Gaza.

Also in the programme: Myanmar's military government sends reinforcements to Mindat, where a group called the Chinland Defense Force has taken up arms; and a plague of mice in New South Wales.

Photo: Diggers clear rubble in Gaza City following fresh Israeli airstrikes. Credit: Reuters.


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k5zzm2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl3)
Ukulele - a history of Hawaii's national instrument

Throughout its 130-year-old history, the ukulele has often been underrated – for many, this tiny four stringed instrument is a musical joke, a plastic toy or a cheap airport souvenir, but in fact, some of the world’s greatest musicians have played and admired it, and it has enduring associations with the struggle for Hawaiian independence since its arrival on the islands from Madeira in the late 19th century. The ukulele is also surprisingly versatile and musicians are forever involved in the challenge of expanding its repertoire, from Bach to ukulele concertos to jazz.

Joining Bridget Kendall to find out more about this deceptively humble instrument is the award-winning musician Brittni Paiva, who’s been described as Hawaii’s pre-eminent ukulele artist; Jim Beloff, the co-founder of Flea Market Music, publishers of some of the first ukulele song books which played a key part in the modern ukulele revival, his forthcoming memoir is UKEtopia: Adventures in the Ukulele World; and Samantha Muir, a classical ukulele musician and composer, who’s doing a PHD at the University of Surrey in the UK to create new works for the classical ukulele repertoire.

Produced by Anne Khazam for the BBC World Service.

[Image: A ukulele sitting on its side on a Hawaiian beach. Credit: McCaig via Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2djy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k603c6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k6073b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t6yhs6vv4)
Live Sporting Action

Delyth Lloyd presents live Premier League commentary from the Hawthorns, as Liverpool look to stay in the race for Champions League qualification against West Bromwich Albion. We look ahead to the match and reflect on the early Premier League games – Crystal Palace v Aston Villa and Tottenham v Wolves.


We'll also discuss the best of the action from across Europe, where the title race in La Liga is set to go right down to the wire, as well as preview the Women's Champions League Final between Chelsea and Barcelona, as Emma Hayes' side bid to win the quadruple.

Photo: West Brom's Conor Gallagher is challenged by Liverpool's Curtis Jones. (Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k60lbq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxfw7b369z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8spym3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2fnr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k60q2v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgp)
Hackers in the pipeline

As the vital Colonial Pipeline in the US comes under cyberattack, Business Weekly hears how vulnerable infrastructure and companies are to being hacked. Plus we take a look at the dirty business of car battery recycling - it’s an increasing health hazard in developing countries, as the lead acid seeps into people, plants and animals. We also hear from religious leaders who explain how the pandemic has affected the spiritual and religious life of their churches. And as the European Super League saga continues, we take a look at the finances driving the clubs’ desire to form a new league. Plus should bamboo be used to make cricket bats? Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Fuel pump in Washington DC, Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k60ttz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv52szfht4l)
Israel Gaza conflict: Netanyahu says strikes to 'continue at full force'

The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has brushed off international appeals for an immediate ceasefire in Gaza, saying that it would take time to restore calm. At least 10 Israelis are reported to have died, while more than 180 Palestinians have been killed by Israeli air strikes on Gaza, (including nearly fifty children).

Also in the programme: In Myanmar, fighters in the state of Chin pulled back from the northwestern town of Mindat after days of assault the country’s junta; and is President’s Biden climate envoy John Kerry too optimistic about the prospects to cut carbon emissions?

(Photo: Palestinian civil defence men search for people in the rubble of a destroyed house after an Israeli airstrike in Gaza City. Credit: EPA).


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k60yl3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8sq9vh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f8x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2djy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjj7k612b7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywmfhqfcw6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sdhs5kfhv)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkbp8sqflm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kwv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 17 MAY 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth552n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl5h8pjs7x)
UK restaurants prepare to open as Covid lockdowns ease

Monday sees another milestone in the reopening of the economy: people in most of the UK will be able to go to a bar or restaurant and eat indoors. But some favourite haunts will no longer be there: over the last year, thousands of establishments have closed, latest surveys indicate. Nonetheless, Patrick Hooykaas, regional director for reservation site The Fork, describes the enthusiasm for a night out the UK public is showing. Also in the programme, Lithium producers are struggling to meet rising demand for the metal, which is used in batteries for computers and electric cars. Chris Berry of commodity analysts House Mountain Partners in Washington D.C., explains how the crunch may cause a spike in prices. And also in the show, we'll hear from economist Michael Hughes about the coming week's economic indicators.

(Picture: Restaurant staff stand outside next to diners in London, England. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2vjc1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2g6b)
Patient zero: Spillover in suburbia

A horse mysteriously falls ill in her paddock, and before long dozens of other horses from her stables are sick. As the horses start to die vicious, painful deaths, their trainer falls into a coma and is placed into intensive care. The race is on to figure out what's making both species sick, and where it came from. What they find will resonate throughout the following decades and might help us uncover the origins of COVID-19.
Olivia Willis tells the story of how it was discovered that a virus carried by a fruit bat was responsible for the horrific deaths. The virus is now named Hendra, for the Brisbane suburb where the outbreak occurred in the 1990s.

An ABC Science Unit. ABC Radio National and BBC World Service co-production.

Producers: Jane Lee, Cheyne Anderson
Senior Producer: Carl Smith
Executive Producer: Joel Werner
Sound Design: Tim Jenkins

Picture: Wild horses, Credit: Phil Copp/Getty Images


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth58ts)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hm7wt1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2vn35)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqg)
Is South Korea a climate villain?

South Korea’s economic development has been the envy of many nations: from war, famine and poverty to one of the richest countries on Earth, all within just a couple of generations. In 1955, gross domestic product was just $64 per capita. Last year, it was $31,000. But this growth was turbocharged by fossil fuels, and has come at a high environmental price. Seventy percent of the power generated in the country comes from fossil fuels and, compared to many rich nations, its commitment to renewables is small. Is South Korea a hero of economic growth or a climate villain? And should developing nations still look to the country as a model to follow?

Joining Neal Razzell and Graihagh Jackson:
Jeffrey Sachs, former UN adviser, and professor at Columbia University
Zeeshan Abedin, economist at the International Growth Centre
Julie Yoon, World Service Language Reporter, Seoul

Producer: Jordan Dunbar
Series producer: Rosamund Jones
Editor: Emma Rippon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth5dkx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2vrv9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Lazarus Heist (w3ct2f8x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l1c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth5jb1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hm8499)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2vwlf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6j)
Women of the Arab Spring

A decade after the uprisings that changed the political landscape of many countries in North Africa and the Middle East, Kim Chakanetsa looks at what impact the Arab uprisings had on the lives of women in Egypt and Syria.

Mona Eltahawy is an Egyptian-American author and commentator. She was at the frontline of clashes between protesters and the military in 2011. Mona is now based in the USA, where she keeps writing about feminism in the Arab world. Her latest book is The Seven Necessary Sins for Women and Girls and her newsletter is called Feminist Giant.

Zaina Erhaim is an award-winning Syrian journalist and filmmaker. Her series of short films, Syria’s Rebellious Women, documented the lives of ordinary women turned activists in the aftermath of the uprisings. Her most recent project, Liberated T, is an advocacy campaign aimed at changing the gender stereotypes around women in the region.

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Zaina Erhaim (courtesy of Zaina Erhaim)
R: Mona Eltahawy (credit: Robert E. Rutledge)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth5n25)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xlq2x)
Israel Gaza conflict enters second week

Gazan officials say Sunday was 'deadliest day' with 42 people killed.

We ask if a rise in antisemitism in the UK is linked to the conflict.

And Taiwan - which has survived the Covid pandemic relatively unscathed up till now - has imposed its toughest restrictions so far, as the island tries to battle a spike in cases.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth5rt9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xltv1)
Gazan officials: Sunday 'deadliest day'

More than 40 people are reported killed in Israel's latest air strikes, while 3,000 rockets are fired at Israel. We hear from a Palestinian mother.

We ask what countries can do against cyber attacks - after the recent incident in which a cyber-criminal gang took a major US fuel pipeline offline.

And some theatres and cinemas reopen tonight as coronavirus rules are relaxed across the UK.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth5wkf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xlyl5)
Israel rejects Gaza ceasefire

Officials in Gaza say they've faced the worst night of bombardment yet with more than 40 killed.

Why are more companies in the US having to pay ransoms after being hacked?

And we hear why teachers are at particular threat of coronavirus in India.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth609k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5p)
Kaja Kallas: Do Nato and the EU have Estonia's back?

When hostility between Russia and the West, is high the Baltic states get nervous. Will membership of the EU and Nato protect Estonia from the possibility of Russian aggression? Hardtalk speaks to Kaja Kallas, the prime minister of Estonia.


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2wcky)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4p)
What happened to driverless cars?

Why hasn't the autonomous car revolution happened yet? A few years ago industry figures were predicting driverless cars would take over our roads by the end of the 2010s, but so far there's no sign of them. Justin Rowlatt speaks to Oliver Cameron from Cruise - a company testing driverless cars on the streets of San Francisco, and to industry analyst Sam Abuelsamid from Guidehouse Insights about the technological and regulatory challenges that still exist. UK transport minister Rachel Maclean explains why governments are enthusiastic about the technology, but need to put safety first.

(Photo: An autonous Cruise car on the streets of San Francisco. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0s)
When Ariel Sharon visited the Al-Aqsa compound

The controversial Israeli opposition leader visited the Al-Aqsa mosque compound in Jersualem's old city in 2000. His appearance was followed by an upsurge in violence between Palestinians and Israelis. Mike Lanchin spoke to an Israeli, and a Palestinian who were there that day.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

(Photo: Ariel Sharon at the compound. Credit: AFP/Getty Images.)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth641p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2whb2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqc)
Could we turn poisonous plants into edible crops?

There are over 400,000 species of plant on earth, they’re on every continent including Antarctica. But humans only regularly eat about 200 species globally, with the vast majority of our nutrition coming from just three species. Many of the fruits, leaves and tubers that other plants grow are packed full of toxins that are poisonous to us, and would make us very ill if we ate them. But could we take out the poisons and create new, edible crops? That’s what CrowdScience listener Marija wants to know.

Crowdscience dives into this topic, and uncovers the that many crops are poisonous, and why so few plants are eaten globally. Host Anand Jagatia finds that even the modern scientific processes of crop breeding are very slow. But science can now engineer plants at the genetic level by adding, silencing or removing specific genes. This ‘genetic modification’ is hugely controversial but can be highly effective.

Anand finds a man who has spent decades making cotton seeds edible by removing the poisons they naturally produce in their seeds. This GM crop could help fend-off starvation. But sometimes introducing poisons can be as important as removing them, as we find in the genetically modified ‘BT eggplants’ in Bangladesh. The new gene makes the vegetable toxic to a major insect pest, so they are much easier to grow.

But GM crops are not the perfect solution. They have problems of gene escape, can increase the use of environmentally damaging herbicide, and can be open to monopolisation. In some countries, particularly in Europe, GM crops are hugely controversial. Anand finds out whether these concerns stand up to science and looks at the counterpoint in developing countries in Africa, South Asia and elsewhere, where local farmers like Patience Koku in Nigeria have little time for some of the concerns around GM, particularly as they see poor harvests, poverty and starvation as the more pressing problems.

Contributors:
Professor Sandra Knapp, The Natural History Museum in London
Professor Julie King, Nottingham University
Professor Keerti Rathore, Texas A&M University
Dr Yousuf Akhond, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute
Professor Matthew Cobb, University of Manchester
Patience Koku, Nigerian Farmer and member of the Global Farmer’s Network
Alliance for Science


Produced by Rory Galloway and presented by Anand Jagatia for the BBC World Service.



Image: Farmer with Fruits. Credit: Arif Hossain, Farming Future Bangladesh.


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth67st)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2wm26)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Spitfire: The People’s Plane (w3ct0t1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2djy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth6cjy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hm8zj6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2wqtb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth6h92)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt0)
What my father wouldn’t tell me

Carol Benjamin's family was perfectly ordinary - until the military took over in Brazil in the 1960s. Her father Cesar, who was just a schoolboy at the time, became an underground revolutionary in the armed uprising against the dictatorship. And when he was captured, Carol’s quiet law-abiding grandmother joined the resistance movement to free him. Years later, Cesar refused to speak about his experiences and Carol grew up trying to fill in the gaps in her family's history, and attempting to understand her father and his silences.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Carol and Cesar Benjamin
Credit: Courtesy of Carol Benjamin and Daza Films


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth6m16)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hm970g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2wz9l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth6qsb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5357qpq2y)
Israel-Gaza conflict enters its second week

The US has called for an immediate end to the violence between Israel and the Palestinians in Gaza, as the conflict enters its second week. The UN now warns of fuel shortages in the region, which could mean hospitals losing power.

Also in the programme: Chileans have voted for leftist political outsiders to rewrite their country’s constitution. And we hear from the family members of India’s schoolteachers, who lost their lives in the COVID crisis ravaging the country.

(Photo: Rescuers in Gaza have spent much of the day searching through the debris of the strikes. Credit: EPA)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth6vjg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2x6sv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y47xwkfs2n9)
British overseas holiday rules eased

British tourists have taken advantage of the easing of lockdown rules on overseas travel. Holidaymakers can now travel to 12 countries and territories without having to quarantine on return, and Paul Dales, chief UK economist at Capital Economics explains the likely economic implications of restrictions being lifted. Also in the programme, the BBC's Michelle Fleury in New York tells us why US telecoms giant AT&T has agreed to combine its WarnerMedia business with Discovery, in a deal to create a new streaming giant. Plus, the BBC's Justin Rowlatt finds out why a much heralded self-driving car revolution has not yet arrived.

(Picture: Passengers wait to board a flight from the UK to Portugal. Picture credit: PA.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth6z8l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxhp4lnz71)
OS Conversations: Palestinian women

As Israel continues air strikes on Gaza and Palestinian militants fire rockets at Israeli cities, we run the first of our conversations this week with people affected by the conflict. Two Palestinian women describe what life is like for people in Gaza a week since the air strikes began. Also, our correspondent in Egypt explains the efforts to broker a truce between the two sides.

Dr Eleanor Murray - assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health - will answer questions about the pandemic, and we hear about the concerns over the Indian variant of the coronavirus in England amid the latest easing of lockdown restrictions.

We also get the latest from Myanmar on reports of violence by the army against civilians - particularly women - in the town of Mindat.

(Photo: Paintings and tableware are seen in the living room of an apartment that was damaged following a rocket attack from Gaza, in Ashdod, Israel May 17, 2021. Credit: Ronen Zvulun/Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth730q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxhp4lp2z5)
Top US Court to hear case on 15-week abortion ban

The US Supreme Court has agreed to hear a challenge to Mississippi's 15-week ban on abortion in a major case that will be closely watched across the US. The verdict could upend the legal right to abortion laid out in the court's 1973 landmark Roe v Wade ruling. Our correspondent in Washington explains the significance of the development.

As Israel continues air strikes on Gaza and Palestinian militants fire rockets at Israeli cities, we run the first of our conversations this week with people affected by the conflict. Two Palestinian women describe what life is like for people in Gaza a week since the air strikes began. Also, our correspondent in Egypt explains the efforts to broker a truce between the two sides.

Professor Manfred Green, a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel, gives the latest information on the global pandemic.

(Photo: The United States Supreme Court Building in Washington, D.C., U.S., May 13, 2021. Credit: Andrew Kelly/Reuters)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth76rv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth7bhz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hm9yh7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2xpsc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n9ndgb6bb)
2021/05/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth7g83)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2xtjh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2g6c)
Patient zero Ticking time bomb

In 2012 doctors in Tennessee started seeing patients with unusual symptoms. It became a race against time to find a diagnosis. A series of investigations revealed that the patients were infected with a fungus that was causing a form of meningitis. But where did they pick up the fungus? Olivia Willis speaks to the public health specialists who worked out what linked the people who succumbed to the infection: it turned out to be a contaminated spinal drug. In the end they discovered that more than 700 people across 20 US states had received the drug and more than 50 died.

An ABC Science Unit. ABC Radio National and BBC World Service co-production.

Producers: Jane Lee, Cheyne Anderson
Senior Producer: Carl Smith
Executive Producer: Joel Werner
Sound Design: Tim Jenkins

Photo: Patient sitting on hospital bed waiting, Credit: Portra Images/Getty


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth7l07)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5357qqk9v)
Gaza: should the US be doing more?

As the war in Gaza enters its second week, we ask what it would take for the violence to stop? The US calls on Israel and the Palestinians to protect civilians . . . but again blocks a UN Security Council statement calling for a ceasefire. We ask a Democratic congressman why, get the long view from one of Israel's most prominent Israeli historians, and hear from a doctor in Gaza, caught amid the destruction.


Also in the programme: the US Supreme Court agrees to hear a case which could overturn the right to an abortion. And two stories from India -- from Gujarat, hit by the worst cyclone in decades, and from Uttar Pradesh where teachers forced to staff polling stations, are now dying from Covid.

(Image: Palestinians walk next to a destroyed building after an Israeli air strike in Gaza City, 17 May 2021/ Credit: EPA/HAITHAM IMAD)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth7prc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2y20r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth7thh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywmss0n41g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sdw1gs5p3)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2y5rw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48rb91hc1m)
British overseas holiday rules eased

British tourists have taken advantage of the easing of lockdown rules on overseas travel. Holidaymakers can now travel to 12 countries and territories without having to quarantine on return, and Paul Dales, chief UK economist at Capital Economics explains the likely economic implications of restrictions being lifted. Also in the programme, the BBC's Michelle Fleury in New York tells us why US telecoms giant AT&T has agreed to combine its WarnerMedia business with Discovery, in a deal to create a new streaming giant. Plus, the BBC's Justin Rowlatt finds out why a much heralded self-driving car revolution has not yet arrived.

(Picture: Passengers wait to board a flight from the UK to Portugal. Picture credit: PA.)



TUESDAY 18 MAY 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth81zr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqbgkd5f9g)
AT&T and Discovery to create new streaming giant

US telecoms giant AT&T has agreed to combine its WarnerMedia business with Discovery, in a deal to create a new streaming giant. Cynthia Littleton, co-editor in chief at Variety in Los Angeles, tells us what implications the merger will have.
A report published by the World Health Organization and the International Labour Organization says that 745,000 people died in 2016 as a result of working long hours - and it's a growing trend. Dr Frank Pega from the WHO explains the connection between long hours and ill health.
And we get an update from the US about how last week's cyber attack on the Colonial oil pipeline is still affecting petrol supplies in some areas.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Mehmal Sarfraz, the Lahore-based journalist and co-founder of the Current website, and by Peter Morici from the University of Maryland in Washington.

(Picture: An AT&T sign. Credit: Getty)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth85qw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmbsq4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2yk08)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2fzs)
Speaking out

London-based broadcaster Edward Adoo and US DJ T Storm team up to discuss the experiences of black people who are stopped and searched in their countries. Together they hear the personal stories of others from all over the world who’ve suffered the humiliation of what many who have been stopped say is apparent racial stereotyping.

They also talk to researchers and policy makers about the psychological trauma suffered by those subjected to stop and search; and also look at arguments for the practice and ask whether its ever fair to stop and search, and host a global discussion on the impact of stop and search policies and their future.

(Photo: Police make an arrest during a 'stop and search' operation on the main Parade day of the Notting Hill Carnival, London. Credit Tolga Akmen/AFP/Getty Images)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth89h0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jt0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth8f74)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmc16d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2yshj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcy)
Ini Archibong: Making the Chair

The designer Ini Archibong has won global recognition for his work with Hermès and Sé and his pieces have been exhibited in galleries across Europe and the USA. He’s known for his designs of luxury items but recently he’s been working on something very different – a partnership with the American design firm Knoll, renowned for its workplace furniture - where Ini has been designing a stackable chair and a table to be used in cafeterias.

Working closely with Ini to make his designs a reality is Knoll’s Executive Vice President of Design, Benjamin Pardo. We follow the discussions between him and Ini over months as they work through the intricacies of making the chair safe and stackable.

The programme begins in 2019 when Imogen Foulkes meets Ini at his home in Switzerland and see how his designs are beginning to take shape. There will be 2 versions of the chair- one with arms and one without. But can what’s in Ini’s head be adapted to the manufacturing processes and the demands of making something like this for a mass market?

As the pandemic takes hold, the process has to be paused – but soon it resumes and, finally, Ini can take delivery of a completed chair ahead of its planned unveiling in the Pavilion of the African Diaspora that he’s designed for the London Design Biennale in June 2021.

Reporter: Imogen Foulkes
Producer: Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service

Photograph of Ini Archibong by Julian Anderson


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth8jz8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xpm00)
Israel Gaza conflict: Biden calls for ceasefire

The US President holds telephone talks with Israeli Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu as the fighting continues.

In India, 200,000 people have been evacuated after a severe cyclone with speeds of around 200km per hour made landfall in the north-west Indian state of Gujurat.

And a campaign is underway to get a South African soldier who fought in the second world war a proper award for bravery.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth8nqd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xpqr4)
President Biden calls for Gaza ceasefire

But the US continues to block a statement from the UN Security council calling for a cessation of violence.

If coronavirus can be spread through ventilation systems, are you safe in the office? That's a question virologists are now pondering around the world.

And could Tyson Fury's fight with undisputed heavyweight champion of the world Anthony Joshua this summer now be in doubt?


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth8sgj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xpvh8)
President Biden calls for Israel/Gaza ceasefire

Over 200 Palestinians have been killed in Gaza, including more than 60 children. Ten people have reportedly died in Israel. We head live to Jerusalem.

We hear from a refugee camp in Greece where coronavirus is widespread and yet there are no vaccines on offer.

And a campaign is underway to get a South African World War 2 soldier the recognition his supporters say he didn't get because of the colour of his skin.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth8x6n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv0v)
Regrowing the rainforest

It has taken him 40 years, but Omar Tello has turned a patch of exhausted farmland in Ecuador back into rainforest. One of his biggest challenges was repairing the soil. His land was so degraded he had to make enough new soil - from unwanted wood shavings and chicken manure - to cover the entire plot. That alone took about 15 years.
He also travelled deep into the Amazon for days at a time, looking for seeds and plants he could rescue. Now his forest is flourishing and the wildlife has returned - it is home to snakes, toucans, monkeys and many other animals. And he is sharing what he has learned to encourage others to protect the rainforests instead of cutting them down.

Presented and produced by Jo Mathys.


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2z8h1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jfq)
Pandemic preparedness

When it comes to pandemic preparedness the United States was once one of the world’s best prepared countries. Today it has one of the world’s worst Covid mortality rates. So what went wrong? The financial journalist and writer Michael Lewis of The Big Short fame, has investigated and has published a book called The Premonition. It’s a real life, deep-dive account of how American public health officials warned about the impending Covid pandemic but were ignored by US authorities. (Picture credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x59)
Striking in South Korea in 1980

There were strikes and student protests across South Korea in May 1980. The military government responded with a brutal crackdown in the city of Gwangju and elsewhere striking workers faced arrest and even torture. Heongjun Park has been hearing from one of those strikers, Bae Ok Byoung, who worked in a factory making wigs in Seoul. She, and the other female employees had gone on strike demanding better working conditions, but after the industrial action ended she was jailed, tortured and then blacklisted for decades. This is a 2 Degrees West production.

Photo: Labour activist Bae Ok Byoung talking to some of the workers at the wig factory in Seoul where she worked in 1980.


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth90ys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fzs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2zd75)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2g6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth94px)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 14:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth98g1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmcwf9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2zmqf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth9d65)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw8)
Dancing behind bars in Burkina Faso

After striking doctors refused to treat his dying son, Agibou Bougobali Sanou was so angry that he was tempted to kill in revenge. Dancing helped to relieve this urge, so he decided to go into a dangerous prison to bring its healing power to criminals, whose lives he also changed. The world renowned dancer and choreographer tells Jo Fidgen his moving story.

Mortiz Simon Geist and Wu Yulu both share a passion for robotics that has taken over their lives. Geist is a German engineer who specialises in making electronic music using robots... involving popcorn and vegetarian sausages. Meanwhile Chinese farmer Wu Yulu has made over sixty 'robot sons' - a pursuit that almost led to divorce. Outlook's Dandan Chen went to meet him in 2017.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Producers: Saskia Edwards and Edgar Maddicot.

Picture: Aguibou Bougobali Sanou with prisoners in Burkina Faso
Credit: Jacob Yisra'el / supplied by Aguibou Bougobali Sanou


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x59)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth9hy9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmd3xk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k2zw6p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2g6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth9mpf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5357qsm01)
Hostilities have resumed between Israel and Palestinian militants in Gaza

The conflict between Israel and Hamas has entered its second week, with air strikes on Gaza and rocket strikes on Israel resuming at first light this morning. Israel has re-closed a main crossing with Gaza after a new barrage of rocket fire from the Palestinian territory into Israel. Matthias Schmale the Director of UNRWA operations in Gaza, the UN's relief agency for Palestinian refugees told Newshour what the situation in Gaza is like.

Also in the programme: The head of Russia’s foreign intelligence service says allegations his agency has been launching cyber attacks against the West are absurd. And the largest nurses’ union in the US has come out against guidance from the Centers for Disease Control saying that vaccinated individuals no longer need to wear face masks.

(Photo: Buildings in Gaza were destroyed in Israeli air strikes early on Tuesday. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth9rfk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv0v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k303py)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bd6r7xwv8)
Call to end oil and gas exploration

The International Energy Agency seeks to end oil and gas exploration to meet climate goals. Laura Cozzi is the IEA's chief energy modeller, and one of the report's lead authors. Also in the programme, this week authorities in the European Union are meeting to finalise plans for a "digital green certificate" to allow the free movement of people to continue in spite of the coronavirus pandemic. Professor Melinda Mills at the University of Oxford has been researching how to make such virus passport systems effective. As parts of the world continue to cautiously reopen after lockdowns, there are widespread reports that it is proving hard to find staff to work in hospitality settings. Karin Kimbrough is chief economist at LinkedIn, and explains that demand is growing for workers in countries that are allowing bars, restaurants and hotels to reopen. Michael Quinn is a bartender and actor in New York City, and tells us why he hasn't felt the need to return to the bar job he had before coronavirus struck. And we hear how recruitment is going for Margot Dumant, who owns six bistros in Paris. Plus, there's a new global requirement for all cargo aircraft to be security screened from July 1st, which means there's been a big jump in demand for sniffer dogs to detect explosives. Eric Hare is chief executive of Global K9 Protection in Alabama, and discusses the implications.

(Picture: An oil well. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth9w5p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxhp4lrw44)
Israel-Gaza: The conflict explained

The conflict between Israel and Gaza continues. Today Israel has carried out more airstrikes in Gaza, and Palestinian militants have fired more rockets into Israel. We'll bring you the latest on the violence there and explain some of the background, history and context. We'll also hear the stories and experiences of how people across Israel and Gaza have been affected by the conflict.

Also, people in India continue to suffer with the effects of the Covid outbreak in the country. So for a week we're going to bring you the account of a man in Delhi as he struggles to find oxygen for his father suffering from Covid-19.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to answer your questions about coronavirus. Today our guest is Dr Isaac Bogoch, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Toronto.

(Photo: Smoke rises following an Israeli air strike on a building, amid a flare-up of Israeli-Palestinian fighting, in Gaza City May 18, 2021. Credit: Mohammed Salem)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlth9zxt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxhp4lrzw8)
OS Conversations: Israeli Jewish women

As Israel continues air strikes on Gaza and Palestinian militants fire rockets at Israeli cities, we hear the second of our conversations this week with people affected by the conflict. Today two Israeli Jewish women in the city of Lod talk about what it's been like for them since the conflict began. We'll also explain some the background and history of the conflict.

Also, people in India continue to suffer with the effects of the Covid outbreak in the country. So for a week we're going to bring you the account of a man in Delhi as he struggles to find oxygen for his father suffering from Covid-19.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to answer your questions about coronavirus. Today our guest is Dr Swapneil Parikh, an infectious disease researcher at the Kasturba Hospital of infectious diseases in Mumbai, India.

(Photo: A burnt vehicle is seen after violent confrontations in the city of Lod, May 12, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Ronen Zvulun)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthb3ny)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x59)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthb7f2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmdvdb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k30lpg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n9ndgf37f)
2021/05/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthbc56)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fzs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k30qfl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls0)
WhatsAppening with pandemic misinformation?

More than 100 million people worldwide have interacted with Covid-19 misinformation since the beginning of the pandemic, according to a new study in PLOS One. We speak to Professor David Nemer, from the University of Virginia, to explain the impact of social media misinformation in Brazil – What’s App’s number one market. As he tells Gareth Mitchell, Covid myths and untruths are spread easily with no consequences to those behind the lies.

Tracking your face online
Dr Stephanie Hare joins live to discuss the implications of AI facial recognition site, PimEyes, affecting privacy and safety. The current lack of regulation allows such software to be used by anyone – and means we are likely to see more services like this emerge in the near future – but are there steps individuals can take to stop AIs recognising their face?

Why PS5 is still out of stock
The pandemic has had wide reaching impacts on the manufacture of computer chips, leading to a shortage of the component used in many devices. This means that 6 months since the release of the PS5 many consumers are still waiting for a device – but that is just one product – cars, mobile devices, and even the 5G roll out are also impacted, with their production delayed.

(Image: Getty Images)



The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington

Studio Manager: Nigel Dix
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthbgxb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5357qtg6y)
Gaza: war and protests intensify

Today has seen the worst violence between Israel and Palestinian militants in Gaza for years. Meanwhile across Israel and the Occupied Territories Palestinians went on strike.

Also in this edition of Newshour: the prime minister of Spain says he will restore order in its territories in North Africa, where thousands of migrants have recently crossed from Morocco; and Russia's spy chief rejects claims his country is engaging in cyber warfare with the West.

(Image: Israeli soldiers man an artillery unit firing into the Gaza strip, May 18, 2021/ Credit: REUTERS/Baz Ratner)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthblng)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv0v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k30yxv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthbqdl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywmss0r0yk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sdw1gw2l6)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k312nz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48rb91l7yq)
Call to end oil and gas exploration

The International Energy Agency seeks to end oil and gas exploration to meet climate goals. Laura Cozzi is the IEA's chief energy modeller, and one of the report's lead authors. Also in the programme, this week authorities in the European Union are meeting to finalise plans for a "digital green certificate" to allow the free movement of people to continue in spite of the coronavirus pandemic. Professor Melinda Mills at the University of Oxford has been researching how to make such virus passport systems effective. As parts of the world continue to cautiously reopen after lockdowns, there are widespread reports that it is proving hard to find staff to work in hospitality settings. Karin Kimbrough is chief economist at LinkedIn, and explains that demand is growing for workers in countries that are allowing bars, restaurants and hotels to reopen. Michael Quinn is a bartender and actor in New York City, and tells us why he hasn't felt the need to return to the bar job he had before coronavirus struck. And we hear how recruitment is going for Margot Dumant, who owns six bistros in Paris. Plus, there's a new global requirement for all cargo aircraft to be security screened from July 1st, which means there's been a big jump in demand for sniffer dogs to detect explosives. Eric Hare is chief executive of Global K9 Protection in Alabama, and discusses the implications.

(Picture: An oil well. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 19 MAY 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthbywv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqbgkd8b6k)
Shell shareholders back plan to reduce carbon emissions

Shell shareholders have backed a plan to reduce carbon emissions to net zero by 2050. We ask Charlie Kronick of Greenpeace whether this goes far enough in tackling climate change targets.
We get an update from India, where one of the most powerful cyclones in decades has killed more than twenty people, and disrupted vaccine centres in Mumbai and power supplies in hospitals.
And in Chicago, we hear how a thousand feral cats have been employed to tackle the city's rat problem, from the director of the Tree House Humane Society which organised the scheme.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Ann Dwyer, editor of Crain's Chicago Business, and by Jyoti Malhotra, editor of national and strategic affairs at The Print website in New Delhi.

(Picture: A worker at an oil plant. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthc2mz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmfpm7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k31fxc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct1csh)
Finders Keepers

Finders Keepers: Icons and empire

Calls for the return of objects, looted from around the world are growing ever louder. Actor and musician Kema Sikazwe travels to London to see the Broken Hill Skull at the Natural History Museum. At the launch of the Return of the Icons campaign, V&A director Tristram Hunt explains how he is responding to Ethiopia’s formal restitution claim. Children’s author, Kandace Chimbiri describes how her writing fills gaping historical hole and French art historian Didier Rykner is convinced that President Macron’s approach, is fundamentally flawed. Should priceless parts of history be returned? And if so, what’s at stake?

Theme music composed by Kema Sikazwe aka Kema Kay

(Photo: Presenter, Kema Sikazwe in front of the Broken Hill Skull (which Zambia is trying to have repatriated from the UK) at the Natural History Museum. Credit: Will Sadler)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthc6d3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x59)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthcb47)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmfy3h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k31pdm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8k)
Goal 17: Partnerships

In 2015 the United Nations announced a radical plan to change the world.
Global leaders drew up a list of 17 "sustainable development goals" to create a blueprint for a better future. The goals cover things like gender equality, health provision, a good education and much more. We've asked 17-year-olds from 17 different countries tell us what they think needs to change if the world is to meet those goals by 2030.

Seventeen-year-old Houssam Mehfara lives in the Lebanese capital Beirut. He wants to become a lawyer, but he’s wondering what future there is for him in Lebanon. His country is stuck in economic and political crisis and Houssam and his friends believe that Lebanon’s sectarian political system is to blame. He asks whether the "partnerships" envisaged under the SDGs can make a difference - what the UN calls all hands on deck - government, NGOs, business, academia and others all working together to bring change. Houssam finds some inspiring examples of partnerships in Lebanon. But despite this, poverty levels have dramatically increased in the last few years and many of Houssam’s friends plan to go abroad. Houssam must decide whether to join them and leave the country he loves.

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producers: Rob Walker and Farah Chaya

Project 17 was produced in partnership with The Open University.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthcfwc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xshx3)
New York prosecutor says Trump inquiry now 'criminal'

Authorities in New York say an investigation into the Trump Organisation is now a criminal probe. We'll find out what it means for the former president from a prominent American legal expert.

More airstrikes overnight in Gaza. We'll be asking could the key to any future ceasefire lie in the hands of a country outside the conflict - not America, but Egypt.

And we'll hear what a generous donation from Leonardo di Caprio to protect the Galapagos islands means to one of the most unusual and distinct habitats in the world.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthckmh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xsmn7)
Violence between Israelis and Palestinians continues

Israeli airstrikes have continued overnight into Gaza with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu saying the bombardment has set the Hamas militia back years. We'll assess the impact the escalating crisis is having on children.

France will today begin moving out of lockdown. Outdoor service will resume at bars and restaurants, and spectators will be allowed back into sports venues. We'll speak to an MP from President Macron's party.

The New York attorney general's office says the investigation into the Trump Organization has moved from a civil to a criminal matter.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthcpcm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xsrdc)
Investigation into Trump Organisation is now a criminal probe

Authorities in New York say an investigation into the Trump Organisation is now criminal, and no longer just a civil probe. We'll find out what it means for the former President from a prominent American legal expert.

As more airstrikes hit Gaza overnight, we'll be asking could the key to any future ceasefire lie in the hands of a country outside the conflict - not America, but Egypt.

And Spain is sending troops to Ceuta, one of its two enclaves in Morocco, after thousands of migrants overcomes the border fences.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthct3r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb6)
Husam Zomlot: Palestine's balance of power

The latest round of conflict between Israel and militant groups in Gaza has left the Palestinian Authority looking sidelined and powerless. Is this a permanent shift in the Palestinian power dynamic? Stephen Sackur speaks to Husam Zomlot, head of the Palestinian Mission to the UK.


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k325d4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnh)
Syria: Failed state or narco-state?

How ten years of conflict have destroyed the country's economy. As Syria prepares for largely symbolic elections to re-elect its President Bashar Al-Assad next week, we look at how ten years of conflict have destroyed the country's economy. Ed Butler looks at the growing evidence that Syria's government is now building its income around a multi-billion dollar trade in narcotics. He speaks to Syrian economist Jihad Yazigi, editor in chief of the online publication The Syria Report, Martin Chulov, The Guardian newspapers' Middle East editor and to Elizabeth Tsurkov, a fellow at the New Lines institute in Washington specialising in the Levant. (Picture credit: A member of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) walks through the debris in the old city centre on the eastern frontline of Raqa on September 25, 2017)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7k)
When Egypt said 'enough'

Under the slogan 'kefaya' which means 'enough' in Arabic, in 2004 Egyptians began protesting in Cairo against the rule of President Hosni Mubarak. The months of demonstrations took place several years before the Arab Spring swept through the region and they drew many people onto the streets for the first time in their lives. Paul Moss hears from Ahmed Ezzat one of a generation of young Egyptians radicalised by the Kefaya movement.

Photo: Standoff between Egyptian riot police and demonstrators demanding an end to the rule of President Hosni Mubarak. May 2005. Credit: AFP via Getty Images.


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthcxvw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct1csh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k32948)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthd1m0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fzw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthd5c4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmgsbd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k32jmj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthd938)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyj)
My forbidden love for a US soldier

Mortada Gzar experienced violence and persecution as a gay teenager under Saddam Hussein's regime. He tells Jo Fidgen how he tried to immerse himself in religion to overcome his feelings, later serving as an imam while studying at university in Baghdad. But during the US-led occupation of Iraq in 2003, he fell deeply in love with an American soldier who was stationed at a checkpoint outside his university. The two men spent years hiding their relationship, and dreamed of one day living openly together in the US. But things didn't go according to plan...

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Mortada Gzar
Credit: Jonathan Reibsome


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthddvd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmh0tn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k32s3s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1ls0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthdjlj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5357qwhx4)
Gaza: France adds ceasefire pressure on Israel

France calls for a UN Security Council resolution as hostilities between Israel and Hamas continue for a tenth day. We discuss the underlying unresolved issues between the two sides, which are a century old, with American Jewish writer Peter Beinart.

Also in the programme: Criminal investigation launched into Trump organisation; and a year since it was the epicentre of the pandemic, New York opens up again.

(Photo: Damages in the aftermath of an Israeli airstrike in Gaza City. Credit: Reuters/ Mohammed Salem)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthdnbn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k330m1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cmcv51rd9)
France eases coronavirus lockdown

France has allowed non-essential shops, museums, and bar and cafe terraces to reopen. Cinemas have also got the green light, and Vincent Erlenbach, who runs Cinema Utopia in Bordeaux gives us his reaction. Also in the programme, ahead of largely symbolic elections in Syria next week, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on how a significant source of foreign currency for the country's ruling elite now comes from the sale of drugs, and in particular a type of amphetamine called Captagon. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Stephanie Hare makes the case for bringing more play into the office.

(Picture: France's President Macron at a cafe. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthds2s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxhp4lvs17)
OS Conversations : Palestinians in Israel

Israel says it has targeted the homes of Hamas commanders, as fighting with Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip enters a 10th day. We've been hearing from different communities impacted by this conflict all week. Today, we speak to two childhood friends of Palestinian heritage who live in Jaffa in Israel. Our BBC World Service Middle East analyst will be on hand to explain some of what they share.

Dr Maria Sundaram an infectious disease epidemiologist in Ontario will answer questions about the pandemic.

And we hear from local people in Spain’s north African enclave of Ceuta where thousands of people from Africa are arriving, hoping to reach Europe.

(Photo: A Palestine protestor throws back a tear gas grenade during an anti-Israel protest, near Hawara checkpoint near Nablus in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, May 18, 2021.
Credit: Reuters/Raneen Sawafta)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthdwtx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxhp4lvwsc)
Thousands of migrants enter Spain's Cueta

Spain has deployed troops after record numbers of migrants entered its north African enclave of Ceuta from Morocco. We hear from some of those affected.

Many countries in Europe are lifting coronavirus restrictions, but some Asian countries are tightening restrictions as cases rise and vaccine rollouts struggle. We look at the global situation with one of our regular coronavirus experts Dr Pedro Hallal, an epidemiologist from the Federal University of Pelotas in the south of Brazil.

Israel says it has targeted the homes of Hamas commanders, as fighting with Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip enters a 10th day. We've been hearing from different communities impacted by this conflict all week. Today, we speak to two childhood friends of Palestinian heritage who live Jaffa in Israel. Our BBC World Service Middle East editor will be on hand to explain some of what they share.

(Photo: A boy resident in Cauta and a Spanish soldier help a migrant near the fence between the Spanish-Moroccan border, after thousands of migrants swam across the border, in Ceuta, Spain, May 19, 2021.
Credit: Reuters/Jon Nazca)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthf0l1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthf4b5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmhr9f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k33hlk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n9ndgj04j)
2021/05/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthf829)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct1csh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k33mbp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv7)
When to have your second vaccine dose?

New evidence for when to have your second Covid vaccine dose; Plus the long awaited results of a 20 year trial into Ovarian Cancer screening and whether picking the disease up early with a simple blood test helps to save lives. And Misophonia – the curious condition where sounds of other people eating can cause anger and panic.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Vials of vaccine for Covid-19 to be administered by injection. Photo credit: A. Martin UW Photography/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthfctf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5357qxc41)
Gaza: no ceasefire yet

The Israeli Prime Minister says his country won't stop bombing Hamas targets in Gaza, as more rockets are fired into Israel. So when will diplomacy kick in? We hear from the Egyptian and the Israeli ambassadors in London.

Also in the programme: the cost of chocolate. A court case in Ivory Coast exposes child labour on cocoa plantations.

And how the US-Russian chill is sweeping through the Arctic. The BBC gains rare access to Russia's northernmost military base.

(Image: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gestures as he shows a slideshow during a briefing to ambassadors to Israel at the Hakirya military base in Tel Aviv, Israel, 19 May 2021/ Credit: EPA/SEBASTIAN SCHEINER / POOL)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthfhkk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k33vty)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthfm9p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywmss0txvn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sdw1gyzh9)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k33zl2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48rb91p4vt)
France eases coronavirus lockdown

France has allowed non-essential shops, museums, and bar and cafe terraces to reopen. Cinemas have also got the green light, and Vincent Erlenbach, who runs Cinema Utopia in Bordeaux gives us his reaction. And after China banned banks and payment firms from providing services related to cryptocurrency transactions, prices dropped heavily. We speak to Glen Goodman, author of the Crypto Trader and Susan Schmidt from Aviva Investors. Also in the programme, ahead of largely symbolic elections in Syria next week, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on how a significant source of foreign currency for the country's ruling elite now comes from the sale of drugs, and in particular a type of amphetamine called Captagon.

(Picture: France's President Macron at a cafe. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 20 MAY 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthfvsy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqbgkdc73n)
A volatile day for cryptocurrencies

After China banned banks and payment firms from providing services related to cryptocurrency transactions, prices dropped heavily. We speak to Glen Goodman, author of the Crypto Trader. Plus, consumer confidence in China has returned so much so that a key area of the vast online shopping market – livestream selling - is expected to double this year in value, to around £200 billion. The BBC's correspondent Robin Brant went to the city of Yiwu, where thousands of hopefuls go to learn the techniques. France has allowed non-essential shops, museums, and bar and cafe terraces to reopen. Cinemas have also got the green light, and Vincent Erlenbach, who runs Cinema Utopia in Bordeaux gives us his reaction. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by markets analyst Ralph Silva in Toronto and Michelle Jamrisko, Bloomberg's senior Asia economy reporter in Singapore. (Picture of Bitcoin via Getty Images).


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthfzk2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmjljb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k34btg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gx9)
Syria’s decade of conflict: Damascus diary

Syrian born reporter Lina Sinjab presents a special series from Assignment’s award winning archive on the 10 years of civil war in her country. In 2013 Lina recorded an audio diary of her final days in Damascus where she was working for the BBC. In this intimate and revealing programme, she combines dramatic scenes and interview material with her own story as she discusses her thoughts, feelings and encounters before she left the country. Ten years on, series producer Lucy Ash interviews Lina on what it felt like to listen back to those stories.

(Image: Lina Sinjab. Credit: Sima Ajalyakin)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthg396)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthg71b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmjv0l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k34l9q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfm)
What's the appetite for gene edited food?

Gene editing could revolutionise agriculture, with some scientists promising healthier and more productive crops and animals, but will consumers want to eat them?

With the first gene edited crops recently approved for sale, Emily Thomas hears why this technology might be quicker, cheaper and more accurate than the older genetic engineering techniques that produced GMOs, and asks whether these differences could make it more acceptable to a deeply sceptical, even fearful public.

Some are not convinced by the claims, and there are concerns that current regulations won't protect consumers or the environment from any potential risks. By putting their faith in technology, have scientists and companies overlooked other simpler solutions to our food security problems?

Producer: Simon Tulett

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: A DNA model on a plate. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)

Contributors:

Jennifer Kuzma, North Carolina State University;
Hiroshi Ezura, University of Tsukuba and Sanatech Seed;
Neth Daño, ETC Group;
Philippe Dumont, Calyxt


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthgbsg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xwdt6)
Calls for a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas

Could a ceasefire between Israel and Hamas be on the cards? President Biden has asked Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for a significant de-escalation. We'll go live to Jerusalem.

US diplomacy is also in action in Iceland where the American and Russian foreign ministers are meeting to discuss a potential meeting between Joe Biden and Vladimir Putin.

In Bangladesh the government's prosecution of an investigative journalist has prompted a strong reaction.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthggjl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xwjkb)
Rockets on Israel and airstrikes on Gaza

US President Joe Biden has called for a de-escalation of the violence between Israel and Hamas. Can this and diplomatic pressure from elsewhere stop the continued attacks?

Vaccine equality is back on the agenda after a campaign group says the pandemic has produced a pharmaceutical boom and created a crop of new billionaires.

And will the Olympics go ahead this year in Japan? There is growing opposition and anger over the games not being cancelled


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthgl8q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xwn9g)
Hopes for a ceasefire in Gaza

US President Joe Biden has called for a de-escalation of the violence between Israelis and Palestinians, with reports that behind the scenes negotiations are making progress. For now the fighting continues, but is a ceasefire within reach? We talk to a former Israeli military commander.

We hear from the women seeking compensation in a French court, after faulty breast implants left them with long term health damage.

And is there a thawing of super power relations in the arctic circle? The US and Russian foreign ministers have met for talks in Iceland.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthgq0v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1y)
Why are murder rates in Chicago so high?

History and geography have conspired to give the city of Chicago an unenviable reputation for guns and gangs, but what will it take to bring the murder rate, which rose 55 per cent last year, down?

Low conviction rates and an unwillingness on behalf of witnesses to give evidence play their part in the problem. But others think the time has come to treat murder like any other deadly disease that afflicts the poor.

Charmaine Cozier examines the reasons for the city’s stubbornly high murder rate and the options to stop the killing.


Produced by Nathan Gower.


(a small flag depicting bullet holes at an anti-gun violence march in Chicago Dec.31 2020. Credit: Kamil Krzaczynski /Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k35297)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j96)
The new inflation threat

Faster price rises are coming as countries recover from the pandemic. But how painful will it be for consumers and the global economy? Mohamed El-Erian, economic adviser and president of Queens' College, Cambridge, thinks central banks are already behind the curve when it comes to keeping inflation in check. Others believe the pandemic's impact on prices is largely temporary. Dana Peterson of the US Conference Board explains why. We also hear from restaurant owner Luke Garnsworthy. Now that England's third lockdown has mostly lifted, customers are itching to spend and he can't find enough staff for his kitchens. But, he says raising prices and wages isn't an option for him.

Picture: stock photo of a sad piggy bank and stack of coins (Credit: Getty)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x31)
Saving the world's wetlands

Iran hosted a meeting to save the world's wetlands in 1971. The Ramsar Convention - named after the village on the Caspian Sea where it was originally signed - is seen as the first of the modem global intergovernmental treaties on the sustainable use of natural resources. Claire Bowes has been speaking to the Belgian representative, Eckhart Kuijken, about the battle by conservationists to interest people and governments in the value of wetlands. He describes how his home country had no planning laws protecting natural landscapes until 1962 - so that many were lost to industry and agriculture.

Photo: Hawizeh Marsh in Iran. Credit: courtesy of the Convention on Wetlands


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthgtrz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k3561c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthgyj3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl4)
The birth of the modern car

The motor car is a feature of contemporary life the world over but when and where did motor vehicles begin? How did we get from the slow, noisy, dangerous, early vehicles of the 19th century to the swish, sleek, practical cars of today? Why did the early electric vehicle – so popular early on and the first car to go faster than a hundred kilometres an hour - suddenly fall out of favour? And who were the early engineers whose major contributions to car design deserve to be better known?
These are some of the questions that Bridget Kendall asks three automotive experts: writer and broadcaster Giles Chapman is the award-winning author of 55 books on car history, culture and design; Larry Edsall also has many automotive books to his name; he has written about cars for many American newspapers and is founding editor at ClassicCars.com; and Gundula Tutt is a leading German restorer of historic vehicles whose work graces many public and private museums. She has a particular interest in the science and technology of car paint and other finishes and is the founding member of the Institute for Automobile Forensics.

[Photo: A restored 1907 veteran car. Credit: RapidEye/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l85)
Maria Mutola - Mozambique's athletics queen

At the 2000 Sydney Olympics, Maria Mutola won Mozambique’s first ever gold medal in the 800 metres. Mutola had long been regarded as the finest female middle-distance runner of her generation, but she had suffered shock defeats at the previous two Olympics. Her exceptionally long Olympic career would continue until Beijing 2008, her sixth games. She talks to Ashley Byrne. The programme is a Made-In-Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Maria Mutola winning her gold medal in Sydney, 2000 (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthh287)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmkp7h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k35fjm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthh60c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k31)
Going to sea to honour my son

Yayi Bayam Diouf's son was a fisherman, until poor catches drove him to pursue a new life in Europe. But on the hazardous crossing from Senegal to the Canary Islands, his boat went down in a storm, and Yayi was left with no body to bury. To feel close to her son, and to honour his wishes as a fisherman, she decided to go fishing herself. First she had to fight her community's patriarchal rules, which forbade women from fishing.

Elli Radinger used to be a divorce lawyer in Germany but she quit her job to pursue a love affair with wolves. From being kissed by a wolf to becoming one of the country’s best-known wolf experts, for 25 years she’s dedicated her life to studying the creatures. First broadcast in 2019.

Outlook's Clayton Conn travels into the mountains near the capital Quito, into a lush garden, to meet Alfredo Pantoja, a man obsessed by orchids. First broadcast in 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Photo: Yayi Bayam Diouf with a photo of her son Alioune
Credit: Finbarr O'Reilly - Alamy


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x31)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthh9rh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmkxqr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k35p0w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthhfhm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5357qzdt7)
Ceasefire hopes between Israel and Hamas

The UN envoy to the Middle East, Tor Wennesland, is in Qatar meeting Hamas leaders based there, while Egyptian mediators are talking to the Hamas leadership in Gaza. A senior advisor to the Israeli Prime Minister, tells Newshour that a ceasefire could be called soon, but it needs to be permanent.

Also, on the programme, the chief executive of TikTok’s parent company Bytedance steps down saying he prefers reading and daydreaming. But is that really the reason he’s going? And a huge slab of ice has broken off from the edge of Antarctica. Is climate change to blame?

(Picture: Children sit on missile in Gaza Credit: EPA )


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthhk7r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k35xj4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4951nc2r0j)
ByteDance chief executive steps down

Zhang Yiming is stepping down as chief executive of TikTok's parent company ByteDance. Mr Zhang says he prefers more solitary activities like reading and daydreaming to running the popular video sharing app, and the BBC's Kerry Allen tells us what's behind the move. Also in the programme, there's been an uptick in inflation around the world as countries recover from the pandemic. Mohamed El-Erian, who is an economic adviser and president of Queen's College, Cambridge, explains why he thinks central banks are already behind the curve. Meanwhile Dana Peterson of the US Conference Board argues that recent price rises will prove to be a temporary phenomenon. Plus, as climate change melts Arctic ice, can exploitation of the region be done sustainably? It's one of the talking points at the Arctic Council meeting which is taking place in Reykjavik today, and Svein Vigeland Rottem of environmental research organisation the Fridtjof Nansen Institute in Oslo discusses the background.

(Picture: TikTok on a smartphone by a ByteDance logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthhnzw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxhp4lynyb)
Israel-Gaza conflict: How is the world reacting?

We bring you the latest on the conflict between Israel and Gaza, and find out how different regions are reacting as hopes for a truce rise. Our correspondents in the Middle East, the US and Europe tell us the developments where they are. And we continue to hear from people in Israel and Gaza affected by the violence.

Also, our health expert joins us to explain the main coronavirus headlines of the day and answer your questions about the pandemic. Today it's the turn of Dr Emma Hodcroft, a molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland.

And we continue to hear the account of a man living in India's capital, Delhi, as he struggles to find oxygen for his father who has Covid-19.

(Photo: A protester holds up a banner during a rally against Israeli military attacks on the Gaza Strip, outside the Israeli embassy in Seoul, South Korea, 20 May 2021. Tensions have escalated between Israel and Gaza following days of violent confrontations between Israeli security forces and Palestinians in Jerusalem, leading to the heaviest offensive in years. EPA/Jeon Heon-Kyun)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthhsr0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxhp4lyspg)
Israel-Gaza conflict: Hopes rise for a truce

We bring you the latest on the conflict between Israel and Gaza with the help of our correspondent in Jerusalem. And as hopes rise for a truce between the two sides, we go the New York to hear what the United Nations has said and its role in calming tensions.

Also, our health expert joins us to explain the main coronavirus headlines of the day and answer your questions about the pandemic. If you want to send a question, you can WhatsApp us on +447730 751925.

And we continue to hear the account of a man living in India's capital, Delhi, as he struggles to find oxygen for his father who has Covid-19.

(Photo: People look out from a building damaged after a rocket fired from the Gaza Strip last week landed nearby, in Petah Tikva, Israel May 20, 2021. Reuters/Nir Elias)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthhxh4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k31)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x31)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthj178)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmln6j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k36dhn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n9ndglx1m)
2021/05/20 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthj4zd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k36j7s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3n)
Robot revolution

A brain-computer interface allows a severely paralysed patient not only to move and use a robotic arm, but also to feel the sensations as the mechanical hand clasps objects . We hear from Jennifer Collinger at Pittsburgh University’s Rehab Neural Engineering Labs. And Nathan Copeland, who has been controlling the robotic arm with his thoughts via a series of brain implants.

Ralph Baric of the University of North Carolina tells us about the development of a multi-component vaccine that would be effective not just against the current coronavirus outbreak and its variants, but also future outbreaks from SARS-like coronaviruses that we don’t even know about yet.

Blood clots, thromboses, have been a problem for a small number of people following Covid vaccination Paul Knöbl, and a team of medics in Vienna have worked out the link between vaccination and clot development. They now have a method to treat such clots – so they should not be fatal.

And how did fungi and plants come to live together? Symbiotic relationships between the two are a key component of the evolution of life. Melanie Rich of the University of Toulouse has been looking at the present day genetic markers which allowed plants and fungi to help each other as they first colonised land millions of years ago.


(Image: Artificial tactile perception allows the brain-computer interface user to transfer objects with a
robotic arm at twice the speed of doing it without the feedback.
Credit: UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences Media Relations)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthj8qj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5357r0814)
Israel and Hamas agree ceasefire

The Israeli security cabinet and Hamas have agreed a ceasefire brokered by Egypt. It comes at the end of a day in which the Palestinian foreign minister and the Israeli ambassador to the UN, accused the other side of "genocide" in the 10 day old conflict between Israel and Hamas.

Also in the programme: Dogs are able to detect Covid-19 in humans with 97 per cent accuracy says study: and the Arctic has warmed three times as fast as the rest of the world according to new research.

(Photo: The sun sets over the Mediterranean Sea off the coast of Gaza City. Credit: Reuters/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthjdgn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k36rr1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthjj6s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywmss0xtrr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sdw1h1wdd)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k36wh5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48rb91s1rx)
ByteDance chief executive steps down

Zhang Yiming is stepping down as chief executive of TikTok's parent company ByteDance. Mr Zhang says he prefers more solitary activities like reading and daydreaming to running the popular video sharing app, and the BBC's Kerry Allen tells us what's behind the move. Also in the programme, there's been an uptick in inflation around the world as countries recover from the pandemic. Mohamed El-Erian, who is an economic adviser and president of Queen's College, Cambridge, explains why he thinks central banks are already behind the curve. Meanwhile Dana Peterson of the US Conference Board argues that recent price rises will prove to be a temporary phenomenon. Plus, as climate change melts Arctic ice, can exploitation of the region be done sustainably? It's one of the talking points at the Arctic Council meeting which is taking place in Reykjavik today, as we hear from the BBC's environment correspondent, Matt McGrath.

(Picture: TikTok on a smartphone by a ByteDance logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 21 MAY 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthjrq1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvqbgkdg40r)
How the Arctic became a sustainable development battleground

As climate change melts Arctic ice, can exploitation of the region be done sustainably? It's one of the talking points at the Arctic Council meeting which is taking place in Reykjavik, as we hear from the BBC's environment correspondent, Matt McGrath. Plus, Zhang Yiming is stepping down as chief executive of TikTok's parent company ByteDance. Mr Zhang says he prefers more solitary activities like reading and daydreaming to running the popular video sharing app, and the BBC's Kerry Allen tells us what's behind the move. A new poll suggests more than 80% of Japanese people want this year’s Tokyo Olympics to be cancelled or postponed. The poll comes amid a sharp resurgence in Covid infections across Japan. From Tokyo, our correspondent Rupert Wingfield Hayes reports. Plus, from Ronald Reagan to Donald Trump, American presidents have found that a sprinkling of Hollywood stardust can help them reach the highest office. And now it seems that a whole host of current stars are considering a move from the movies into politics, as the BBC’s Reagan Morris reports from Los Angeles. And throughout the programme, we're joined by Lien Hoang, a reporter at Nikkei Asia who's based in Ho Chi Minh City, and Andy Uhler a reporter for our colleagues on the Marketplace programme on American Public Media, joins us from Austin, Texas. (Picture of spruce firs via Getty Images).


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthjwg5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmmhff)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k377qk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tz0)
Lille's Jose Fonte and Barça's Ana-Maria Crnogorčević

Jose Fonte looks ahead to the final game of the French season, with Lille on the verge of surprisingly winning the title. And Barcelona's Ana-Maria Crnogorčević looks back on her team's Champions League victory. Heather O'Reilly and Pat Nevin also discuss whether fear is the best motivation for a footballer. Presented by Mani Djazmi.

(Picture: Jose Fonte of Lille OSC in action against Nice. Photo by Sylvain Lefevre/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthk069)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k31)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x31)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthk3yf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmmqxp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k37h6t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2fzt)
Bob Dylan: Born again

Bob Dylan was brought up in a Jewish household in the American Midwest, but kept his faith away from the spotlight of his professional counter-culture persona. That was until the late 1970s when he converted to evangelical Christianity and released an album that shared his born again beliefs with the world.

We join his childhood friend, Louie Kemp, as we delve into why the boy he met at a Jewish summer camp turned to Christianity.

We hear from Regina McCray, his backing singer from the time, who retells the story of her audition where she sang Amazing Grace. She went on to get the job, but little did she know that the song would go on to inspire Dylan’s sound for his next three albums - Slow Train Coming, Saved, and Shot of Love.

We also hear from Australian journalist, Karen Hughes, whose in-depth interview with the singer broke to the world how serious Dylan was about Christianity - and from Swedish doctor and musician, Valdemar Erling, whose accidental discovery of Slow Train Coming has been the foundation of his faith for many years.

Along with live music tracks, archive excerpts from outraged fans and even the sounds of Bob Dylan preaching to his crowds, we hear how Dylan’s often overlooked ‘Gospel Period’ helped people develop a deeper connection to spirituality that is still relevant today, years after the singer-songwriter appears to have turned his back on organised religion altogether.

(Photo: Bob Dylan in concert in Atlanta, Georgia, 1974. Credit: Rick Diamond/WireImage/Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthk7pk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xz9q9)
Israeli-Palestinian ceasefire begins

It brings to an end 11 days of bombardment in which more than 240 people have died, most of them in Gaza.

The Ukrainian president has accused Russia of planning to annex the eastern part of his country. So what's behind his claims?

And we speak to the Ghanaian photographer, James Barnor, now in his 90s, as a major retrospective of his work goes on show in London


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthkcfp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xzfgf)
Gaza/Israel ceasefire: a children's perspective

We hear from Palestinian and Israeli children how the violence has impacted on their lives.

New research has found that patients who are critically ill with Covid in Africa are more likely to die than in any other region in the world.

And can virtual reality exercises really teach healthcare workers empathy to understand their patients' needs?


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthkh5t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2mv1xzk6k)
Israel and Hamas declare truce after 11 days

But how can a long-lasting peace be found between Israel and the Palestinians?

A year on from the murder of George Floyd we've got a special report from one of the US counties with the highest level of civilian deaths at the hands of the police.

And a court in Canada rules that the shooting down of a plane by Iranian security forces last year was an intentional act of terrorism. We'll hear from one of the lawyers representing families.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthklxy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n15)
Vladimir Chizhov, Russia’s Ambassador to the EU

Russia’s relations with the West have been poor for some time but now they have reached a new level of hostility. Since the imprisonment of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, new sanctions have been imposed by both the US and EU. The Ukraine conflict, allegations of cyber attack and covert operations – the list of unresolved issues is growing. Stephen Sackur speaks to Vladimir Chizhov, Russia’s Ambassador to the EU. Is confrontation with the West, President Putin’s strategic choice?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k37z6b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j05)
Lifting the burden of malaria

A new vaccine could help eliminate the disease. What would that mean for African economies?

Manuela Saragosa speaks to the man who led the team behind the new vaccine, which has demonstrated a startling 77% effectiveness in recent drug trials. Adrian Hill of Oxford University's Jenner Institute says it is the culmination of 20 years' work - but how was it all funded?

Research suggests malaria has been one of the biggest factors that historically held back African economies, according to Obinna Onwujekwe, professor of health economics at the University of Nigeria. But the big pharmaceutical companies have had no commercial interest in developing a vaccine, says Els Torreele of University College London.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Mosquito; Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyj)
Fighting forced marriage in war

In 2009 a war crimes trial in Sierra Leone ruled that forced marriage was a crime against humanity. It was the first time a court had recognised that charge. The ruling came in a trial of three rebel leaders for crimes committed during Sierra Leone's civil war. The legal turning point came largely as a result of the testimonies of the women who had been victims. The prosecution argued that forced marriage should be considered a crime against humanity distinct from other forms of sexual violence. Farhana Haider has been speaking to the former chief prosecutor Stephen Rapp about the trials.

Photo: Sierra Leone, repatriated refugees reaching Freetown January 2001 Credit: Ullstein Bild/Getty Images


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthkqp2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngx)
Estonia’s digital society and the pandemic

President of Estonia Kersti Kaljulaid discusses how the wide availability of online government services helped citizens during the lockdown. Plus, how Google hopes a tie-up with Samsung will give its WearOS smartwatch platform a boost. And has Apple compromised too much in its dealings with China?

(Image: Estonia’s President Kersti Kaljulaid, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k382yg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthkvf6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hsd)
China in space

China has successfully landed and operated a rover on the surface of Mars, a feat only previously achieved by the United States. It follows Beijing’s successful robotic mission to the Moon to return lunar samples to Earth and comes just weeks after the launch into orbit of the first module of the country’s very own space station. China only sent its first human into space in 2003, but since then its technological capabilities have multiplied. But so too have the controversies. The mission to launch the space station module resulted in the uncontrolled return to Earth of debris from the Long March-5b rocket used, and a good deal of the ‘space junk’ currently orbiting the planet can be blamed on a Chinese missile test back in 2007. China says it has no intention of taking part in the militarisation of space and that its intentions are purely scientific. The country’s been banned from working with the United States and its partners on the International Space Station, but it is forming new alliances - with Beijing and Moscow agreeing to develop a joint base on the Moon. But what are the ultimate goals of China’s space programme? And as technologies needed to take humans to Mars are developed, are we about to witness a new ‘Space Race’? Paul Henley is joined by a panel of expert guests.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthkz5b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmnl4l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k38bfq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tz0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthl2xg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dx)
I left Gaza, but Gaza did not leave me

Your family is there, your colleagues are there: BBC Arabic’s Shahdi Alkashif explains what it was like to be watching conflict at home in Gaza from the safety of Turkey.

Image: Destroyed house in Jabaliya refugee camp northern Gaza Strip, 20 May 2021
Credit: EPA/HAITHAM IMAD


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthl6nl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmntmv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k38kxz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthlbdq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv5357r29qb)
Israel and Hamas stick to Gaza ceasefire

Both Israel and the Palestinian militant group Hamas have claimed victory after a ceasefire came into effect early on Friday. The truce has ended 11 days of bombardment in which almost 250 people died, most of them in Gaza.

Also on the programme: An independent report into the BBC's handling of Princess Diana's confessional to Martin Bashir, in 1995, has concluded that Mr Bashir deceived the princess to get her to talk; and new research into cloud brightening has given scientists hope for a way of cooling the air and fighting climate change

(Picture: Gaza ceasefire, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthlg4v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n15)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k38tf7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46pqgk3qmr)
Cryptocurrencies continue rollercoaster ride

A slew of cryptocurrencies saw their values plunge over the course of the last week. As they continue their wild rollercoaster ride, we examine the implications and hear why central banks around the world are considering creating their own digital currencies, from banking expert Frances Coppola. Also in the programme, as supplies of petrol and jet fuel have been reaching major cities on America's east coast with the Colonial Pipeline brought back on stream following a ransomware attack earlier in the month, we consider the politics of pipelines. Dr Ellen Wald is senior fellow with the Atlantic Council Global Energy Center and considers the impact a ransom payment made to deal with the hack is likely to have in future similar scenarios. And Neil Chatterjee of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission tells us whether America's pipeline network is fit for purpose. Plus, as the Eurovision Song Contest gears up for this year's competition in front of a live audience in Rotterdam on Saturday, project director Alice Vlaanderen explains how this year's event will differ from previous incarnations.

(Picture: A Bitcoin token in front of a valuation chart. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthlkwz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxhp4m1kvf)
Israel and Hamas claim victory after truce

Both Israel and the Palestinian militant group Hamas have claimed victory after a ceasefire took hold early on Friday. There have been clashes today in Jerusalem between Palestinian worshippers and Israeli police at Al Aqsa Mosque compound. We speak to our regional experts in Egypt and Israel about how the truce was brokered and get reaction from people on both sides.

Our regular coronavirus expert Dr Megan Murray from Harvard Medical School joins us to explain today’s coronavirus stories.

We’ll also talk about an independent report that has found the BBC guilty of covering up what it knew about how journalist Martin Bashir secured his famous interview with Princess Diana in 1995.

(Photo: A Palestinian woman reacts after returning to her destroyed house following Israel- Hamas truce, in Beit Hanoun in the northern Gaza Strip, May 21, 2021. Credit: Mohammed Salem/Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthlpn3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxhp4m1plk)
Israel-Gaza ceasefire

Both Israel and the Palestinian militant group Hamas have claimed victory after a ceasefire took hold early on Friday. There have been clashes today in Jerusalem between Palestinian worshippers and Israeli police at Al Aqsa Mosque compound. We get reaction from people on both sides and look at how the ceasefire is holding.

We hear from Argentina where the government has imposed nine days of strict lockdown after the country reported a record of 39,000 new cases on Wednesday. We also get questions answered about the pandemic by our regular expert, Dr Marc Mendelson in Cape Town, South Africa.

We talk about an independent report that has found the BBC guilty of covering up what it knew about how journalist Martin Bashir secured his famous interview with Princess Diana in 1995.

(Photo: An Israeli soldier gestures as he walks by armoured personnel carriers (APC) near the border between Israel and the Gaza Strip, on its Israeli side, following Israel-Hamas truce May 21, 2021. Credit: Ronen Zvulun/Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthltd7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthly4c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxg7hmpk3m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k399dr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n9ndgpsyq)
2021/05/21 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthm1wh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k39f4w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pqd)
How old are the elements?

You are a star. Literally.
You are a carbon-based life form and those atoms of carbon in the molecules that make up your cells were formed by a nuclear fusion reaction at the heart of long dead stars. That goes for the oxygen in your lungs too. And the red blood cells that carry that oxygen to your tissues? They contain haemoglobin, and nestled at the heart of each molecule is an element (iron) formed by a supernova - the fiery explosion at the death of a star. Your body is a walking, thinking museum of some of the most violent events in the universe.
This, as CrowdScience host Marnie Chesterton discovers, isn’t as special as it sounds. All of the stuff on the earth - the elements that make clouds and mountains and mobile phones – they all have an origin story. CrowdScience tells that story, starting with the big bang and ending with physicists, creating new elements in the lab. Find out the age of the elements and the distance they have travelled to make their current home on earth.
Interviewees:
Dr Dorota Grabowska, Professor Andrea Sella, Dr Chris Pearson, Dr Jacklyn Gates



(Photo: Neutron star. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthm5mm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv5357r34y7)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthm9cr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n15)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k39nn4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tz0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjjlthmf3w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywmss10qnv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sdw1h4s9h)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzkc1k39sd8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48rb91vyp0)
Cryptocurrencies continue rollercoaster ride

A slew of cryptocurrencies saw their values plunge over the course of the last week. As they continue their wild rollercoaster ride, we examine the implications and hear why central banks around the world are considering creating their own digital currencies, from banking expert Frances Coppola. Also in the programme, as supplies of petrol and jet fuel have been reaching major cities on America's east coast with the Colonial Pipeline brought back on stream following a ransomware attack earlier in the month, we consider the politics of pipelines. Dr Ellen Wald is senior fellow with the Atlantic Council Global Energy Center and considers the impact a ransom payment made to deal with the hack is likely to have in future similar scenarios. And Neil Chatterjee of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission tells us whether America's pipeline network is fit for purpose. Plus, as the Eurovision Song Contest gears up for this year's competition in front of a live audience in Rotterdam on Saturday, project director Alice Vlaanderen explains how this year's event will differ from previous incarnations.

(Picture: A Bitcoin token in front of a valuation chart. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gx9)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gx9)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gx9)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzkbp8sk00t)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172xzkbp8skc86)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172xzkbp8skqhl)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172xzkbp8skv7q)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172xzkbp8sl2qz)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SAT (w172xzkbp8sm1q0)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SAT (w172xzkbp8smjpj)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172xzkbp8smwxx)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172xzkbp8sn4f5)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172xzkbp8sn859)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172xzkbp8snmdp)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172xzkbp8snr4t)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172xzkbp8snvwy)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172xzkbp8snzn2)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172xzkbp8spym3)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172xzkbp8sq9vh)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172xzkbp8sqflm)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2vjc1)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2vn35)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2vrv9)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2vwlf)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2wcky)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2whb2)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2wm26)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2wqtb)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2wz9l)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2x6sv)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2xpsc)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2xtjh)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2y20r)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzkc1k2y5rw)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzkc1k2yk08)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzkc1k2yshj)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzkc1k2z8h1)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzkc1k2zd75)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzkc1k2zmqf)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzkc1k2zw6p)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzkc1k303py)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzkc1k30lpg)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzkc1k30qfl)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzkc1k30yxv)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzkc1k312nz)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzkc1k31fxc)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzkc1k31pdm)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzkc1k325d4)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172xzkc1k32948)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzkc1k32jmj)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzkc1k32s3s)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzkc1k330m1)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzkc1k33hlk)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzkc1k33mbp)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzkc1k33vty)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzkc1k33zl2)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzkc1k34btg)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzkc1k34l9q)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzkc1k35297)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzkc1k3561c)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzkc1k35fjm)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzkc1k35p0w)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzkc1k35xj4)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzkc1k36dhn)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzkc1k36j7s)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzkc1k36rr1)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzkc1k36wh5)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzkc1k377qk)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzkc1k37h6t)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzkc1k37z6b)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172xzkc1k382yg)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzkc1k38bfq)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzkc1k38kxz)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzkc1k38tf7)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzkc1k399dr)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172xzkc1k39f4w)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172xzkc1k39nn4)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzkc1k39sd8)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5vj09)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5vmrf)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5vrhk)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5vw7p)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5vzzt)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5w3qy)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5w7h2)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5wc76)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5wgzb)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5wlqg)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5wqgl)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5wv6q)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5wyyv)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5x2pz)

BBC News 15:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5x6g3)

BBC News 16:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5xb67)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5xt5r)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5xxxw)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5y1p0)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172xzjj7k5y5f4)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5ydxd)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5yjnj)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5yndn)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5ys4s)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5ywwx)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5z0n1)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5z4d5)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5z849)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5zcwf)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5zhmk)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5zmcp)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5zr3t)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5zvvy)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k5zzm2)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k603c6)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k6073b)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k60lbq)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k60q2v)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k60ttz)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k60yl3)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172xzjj7k612b7)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjjlth552n)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172xzjjlth58ts)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172xzjjlth5dkx)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172xzjjlth5jb1)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172xzjjlth5n25)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172xzjjlth5rt9)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172xzjjlth5wkf)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172xzjjlth609k)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172xzjjlth641p)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172xzjjlth67st)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjjlth6cjy)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172xzjjlth6h92)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172xzjjlth6m16)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172xzjjlth6qsb)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172xzjjlth6vjg)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172xzjjlth6z8l)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzjjlth730q)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172xzjjlth76rv)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172xzjjlth7bhz)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172xzjjlth7g83)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172xzjjlth7l07)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172xzjjlth7prc)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjjlth7thh)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth81zr)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth85qw)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth89h0)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth8f74)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth8jz8)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth8nqd)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth8sgj)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth8x6n)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth90ys)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth94px)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth98g1)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth9d65)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth9hy9)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth9mpf)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth9rfk)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth9w5p)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172xzjjlth9zxt)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjjlthb3ny)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzjjlthb7f2)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzjjlthbc56)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjjlthbgxb)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjjlthblng)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjjlthbqdl)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjjlthbywv)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172xzjjlthc2mz)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172xzjjlthc6d3)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjjlthcb47)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172xzjjlthcfwc)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172xzjjlthckmh)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172xzjjlthcpcm)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzjjlthct3r)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjjlthcxvw)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjjlthd1m0)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjjlthd5c4)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjjlthd938)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjjlthddvd)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172xzjjlthdjlj)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172xzjjlthdnbn)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172xzjjlthds2s)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172xzjjlthdwtx)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172xzjjlthf0l1)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172xzjjlthf4b5)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172xzjjlthf829)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjjlthfctf)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjjlthfhkk)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjjlthfm9p)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjjlthfvsy)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjjlthfzk2)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjjlthg396)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjjlthg71b)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjjlthgbsg)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjjlthggjl)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjjlthgl8q)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjjlthgq0v)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjjlthgtrz)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjjlthgyj3)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjjlthh287)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjjlthh60c)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjjlthh9rh)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjjlthhfhm)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjjlthhk7r)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjjlthhnzw)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjjlthhsr0)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjjlthhxh4)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzjjlthj178)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172xzjjlthj4zd)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172xzjjlthj8qj)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172xzjjlthjdgn)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjjlthjj6s)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthjrq1)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthjwg5)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthk069)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthk3yf)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthk7pk)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthkcfp)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthkh5t)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthklxy)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthkqp2)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthkvf6)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthkz5b)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthl2xg)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthl6nl)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthlbdq)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthlg4v)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthlkwz)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthlpn3)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthltd7)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthly4c)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthm1wh)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthm5mm)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthm9cr)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjjlthmf3w)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d5n)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxhp4lnz71)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxhp4lp2z5)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxhp4lrw44)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172xxxhp4lrzw8)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172xxxhp4lvs17)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172xxxhp4lvwsc)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172xxxhp4lynyb)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxxhp4lyspg)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172xxxhp4m1kvf)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxhp4m1plk)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j4p)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jfq)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jnh)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3ct1j96)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3ct1j05)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvqb392rwb0)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172xvqbgkd5f9g)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172xvqbgkd8b6k)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172xvqbgkdc73n)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvqbgkdg40r)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dgp)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pqc)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pqc)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pqd)

Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct2cbr)

Deeply Human 22:06 SUN (w3ct2cbr)

Deeply Human 03:06 MON (w3ct2cbr)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1ls0)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1ls0)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1ls0)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2g6b)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2g6c)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct2g6c)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2g6c)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mts)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mts)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n5p)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n5p)

HARDtalk 22:06 MON (w3ct1n5p)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3ct1nb6)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3ct1nb6)

HARDtalk 22:06 WED (w3ct1nb6)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n15)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3ct1n15)

HARDtalk 22:06 FRI (w3ct1n15)

Health Check 02:32 SUN (w3ct1nv6)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nv7)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nv7)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nv7)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2fnr)

Heart and Soul 19:32 SUN (w3ct2fnr)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2fzt)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tcy)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tcy)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1tcy)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2djy)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2djy)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2djy)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2djy)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hbt)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hbt)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2mv1xlq2x)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv2mv1xltv1)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172xv2mv1xlyl5)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172xv2mv1xpm00)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172xv2mv1xpqr4)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172xv2mv1xpvh8)

Newsday 05:06 WED (w172xv2mv1xshx3)

Newsday 06:06 WED (w172xv2mv1xsmn7)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172xv2mv1xsrdc)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172xv2mv1xwdt6)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172xv2mv1xwjkb)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172xv2mv1xwn9g)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172xv2mv1xz9q9)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172xv2mv1xzfgf)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172xv2mv1xzk6k)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172xv52szfcy8g)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172xv52szfdx7h)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172xv52szfgv5k)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172xv52szfht4l)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172xv5357qpq2y)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172xv5357qqk9v)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172xv5357qsm01)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172xv5357qtg6y)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172xv5357qwhx4)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172xv5357qxc41)

Newshour 14:06 THU (w172xv5357qzdt7)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172xv5357r0814)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172xv5357r29qb)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172xv5357r34y7)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3ct1kwv)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3ct1kwv)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jt0)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3ct1jt0)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3ct1jt0)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3ct1jw8)

Outlook 18:06 TUE (w3ct1jw8)

Outlook 03:06 WED (w3ct1jw8)

Outlook 12:06 WED (w3ct1jyj)

Outlook 18:06 WED (w3ct1jyj)

Outlook 03:06 THU (w3ct1jyj)

Outlook 12:06 THU (w3ct1k31)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3ct1k31)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3ct1k31)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l1c)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l1c)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3cszv0v)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3cszv0v)

People Fixing the World 22:06 TUE (w3cszv0v)

Project 17 04:32 WED (w3ct0x8k)

Project 17 11:32 WED (w3ct0x8k)

Project 17 22:32 WED (w3ct0x8k)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l3n)

Science in Action 09:32 FRI (w3ct1l3n)

Science in Action 13:32 FRI (w3ct1l3n)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 05:32 SAT (w3ct0t1f)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 19:32 SAT (w3ct0t1f)

Spitfire: The People’s Plane 10:32 MON (w3ct0t1f)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0n9ndgb6bb)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172y0n9ndgf37f)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172y0n9ndgj04j)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172y0n9ndglx1m)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172y0n9ndgpsyq)

Sporting Witness 19:50 SAT (w3ct1l84)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3ct1l85)

Sports News 23:20 SAT (w172y0sdhs5gjlr)

Sports News 23:20 SUN (w172y0sdhs5kfhv)

Sports News 23:20 MON (w172y0sdw1gs5p3)

Sports News 23:20 TUE (w172y0sdw1gw2l6)

Sports News 23:20 WED (w172y0sdw1gyzh9)

Sports News 23:20 THU (w172y0sdw1h1wdd)

Sports News 23:20 FRI (w172y0sdw1h4s9h)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0py5lcc0r3)

Sportsworld 16:06 SAT (w172y0t6yhs3yy1)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172y0t6yhs6vv4)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lbd)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1ngx)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3ct1ngx)

The Arts Hour 14:06 SAT (w3ct1rsw)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rsw)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3ct1rsw)

The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2dqg)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct2dqg)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct2dqg)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct1csg)

The Compass 02:32 WED (w3ct1csh)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct1csh)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct1csh)

The Conversation 08:32 SAT (w3ct1p6h)

The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p6j)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p6j)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3ct1p6j)

The Cultural Frontline 23:32 SAT (w3ct1pdy)

The Cultural Frontline 04:32 SUN (w3ct1pdy)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3ct1pdy)

The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2fzw)

The Documentary 03:06 SUN (w3ct2fzw)

The Documentary 05:32 SUN (w3ct2fnt)

The Documentary 02:32 TUE (w3ct2fzs)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct2fzs)

The Documentary 20:06 TUE (w3ct2fzs)

The Documentary 10:06 WED (w3ct2fzw)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20dw)

The Fifth Floor 12:06 FRI (w3ct20dx)

The Fifth Floor 18:06 FRI (w3ct20dx)

The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3cszjpv)

The Food Chain 04:32 THU (w3ct1rfm)

The Food Chain 11:32 THU (w3ct1rfm)

The Food Chain 22:32 THU (w3ct1rfm)

The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rl3)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3ct1rl4)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z1y)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3ct1z1y)

The Inquiry 22:06 THU (w3ct1z1y)

The Lazarus Heist 09:32 SAT (w3ct2f8x)

The Lazarus Heist 22:32 SUN (w3ct2f8x)

The Lazarus Heist 03:32 MON (w3ct2f8x)

The Newsroom 02:06 SAT (w172xyxfw79y7qp)

The Newsroom 05:06 SAT (w172xyxfw79ylz2)

The Newsroom 11:06 SAT (w172xyxfw79zbfv)

The Newsroom 23:06 SAT (w172xywmfhqbgz3)

The Newsroom 02:06 SUN (w172xyxfw7b14ms)

The Newsroom 05:06 SUN (w172xyxfw7b1hw5)

The Newsroom 11:06 SUN (w172xyxfw7b27by)

The Newsroom 19:06 SUN (w172xyxfw7b369z)

The Newsroom 23:06 SUN (w172xywmfhqfcw6)

The Newsroom 02:06 MON (w172xyxg7hm7wt1)

The Newsroom 04:06 MON (w172xyxg7hm8499)

The Newsroom 11:06 MON (w172xyxg7hm8zj6)

The Newsroom 13:06 MON (w172xyxg7hm970g)

The Newsroom 19:06 MON (w172xyxg7hm9yh7)

The Newsroom 23:06 MON (w172xywmss0n41g)

The Newsroom 02:06 TUE (w172xyxg7hmbsq4)

The Newsroom 04:06 TUE (w172xyxg7hmc16d)

The Newsroom 11:06 TUE (w172xyxg7hmcwf9)

The Newsroom 13:06 TUE (w172xyxg7hmd3xk)

The Newsroom 19:06 TUE (w172xyxg7hmdvdb)

The Newsroom 23:06 TUE (w172xywmss0r0yk)

The Newsroom 02:06 WED (w172xyxg7hmfpm7)

The Newsroom 04:06 WED (w172xyxg7hmfy3h)

The Newsroom 11:06 WED (w172xyxg7hmgsbd)

The Newsroom 13:06 WED (w172xyxg7hmh0tn)

The Newsroom 19:06 WED (w172xyxg7hmhr9f)

The Newsroom 23:06 WED (w172xywmss0txvn)

The Newsroom 02:06 THU (w172xyxg7hmjljb)

The Newsroom 04:06 THU (w172xyxg7hmjv0l)

The Newsroom 11:06 THU (w172xyxg7hmkp7h)

The Newsroom 13:06 THU (w172xyxg7hmkxqr)

The Newsroom 19:06 THU (w172xyxg7hmln6j)

The Newsroom 23:06 THU (w172xywmss0xtrr)

The Newsroom 02:06 FRI (w172xyxg7hmmhff)

The Newsroom 04:06 FRI (w172xyxg7hmmqxp)

The Newsroom 11:06 FRI (w172xyxg7hmnl4l)

The Newsroom 13:06 FRI (w172xyxg7hmntmv)

The Newsroom 19:06 FRI (w172xyxg7hmpk3m)

The Newsroom 23:06 FRI (w172xywmss10qnv)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1hsc)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3ct1hsd)

The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3ct1yv4)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172xyt539x6j01)

Weekend 07:06 SAT (w172xyt539x6mr5)

Weekend 08:06 SAT (w172xyt539x6rh9)

Weekend 06:06 SUN (w172xyt539x9dx4)

Weekend 07:06 SUN (w172xyt539x9jn8)

Weekend 08:06 SUN (w172xyt539x9ndd)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wyh)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3ct1x0s)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3ct1x0s)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3ct1x0s)

Witness History 03:50 TUE (w3ct1x0s)

Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3ct1x59)

Witness History 12:50 TUE (w3ct1x59)

Witness History 18:50 TUE (w3ct1x59)

Witness History 03:50 WED (w3ct1x59)

Witness History 08:50 WED (w3ct1x7k)

Witness History 12:50 WED (w3ct1x7k)

Witness History 18:50 WED (w3ct1x7k)

Witness History 03:50 THU (w3ct1x7k)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3ct1x31)

Witness History 12:50 THU (w3ct1x31)

Witness History 18:50 THU (w3ct1x31)

Witness History 03:50 FRI (w3ct1x31)

Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3ct1wyj)

Witness History 12:50 FRI (w3ct1wyj)

Witness History 18:50 FRI (w3ct1wyj)

WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f33)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzl5h8pjs7x)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y47xwkfs2n9)

World Business Report 23:32 MON (w172y48rb91hc1m)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172y4bd6r7xwv8)

World Business Report 23:32 TUE (w172y48rb91l7yq)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172y4cmcv51rd9)

World Business Report 23:32 WED (w172y48rb91p4vt)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172y4951nc2r0j)

World Business Report 23:32 THU (w172y48rb91s1rx)

World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172y46pqgk3qmr)

World Business Report 23:32 FRI (w172y48rb91vyp0)

World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1tz0)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1tz0)

World Football 22:32 FRI (w3ct1tz0)

World Questions 15:06 SAT (w3ct1wfg)

World Questions 12:06 SUN (w3ct1wfg)