Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 24 APRIL 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7j25s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq90h4ffhh)
Australia and New Zealand pause travel bubble

New Zealand has paused its newly opened travel bubble with Australia following a COVID-19 outbreak in its larger neighbour. The decision came after Western Australia announced that the regions of Perth and Peel were entering a three-day lockdown due to a traveller testing positive for the coronavirus. Also in the programme, a global semiconductor shortage has led to suspension of production at a number of carmakers around the world. The BBC’s Will Bain speaks to chipmaker Intel’s corporate vice president for global sales, Shannon Poulin, about why the firm believes the shortfall could last another two years. Also, next month, the independent nation of Somaliland will celebrate its 30th anniversary. The BBC’s Fergus Nicoll speaks to Ismail Ahmed, the founder and Chairman of the digital money transfer company World Remit about the world of international remittances and his home country of Somaliland. Plus, Caitlin Jenner, the Olympic athlete turned transgender reality TV star has thrown her hat into the ring announcing her intention to run for governor of California State. Seema Mehta, a staff writer at the LA Times tells us what to expect of Jenner’s candidacy.

The BBC’s Fergus Nicoll will be joined from Auckland by Sharon Bretkelly, the host of The Detail podcast for Radio New Zealand.

(Picture: The departures board inside the Qantas lounge for the airline to New Zealand out of Sydney's International Airport. Picture credit: James D. Morgan/Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7j5xx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfclsx5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv6k69)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lb9)
Will cricket's bio bubble burst?

Alison Mitchell, Jim Maxwell and Charu Sharma are joined by the number one ranked T20 player in the World Dawid Malan. He discusses his first season in the Indian Premier League after he was chosen by the Punjab Kings, what life is like in the many bio-bubbles that he has experienced and if the IPL is different to what he expected.

Plus they discuss the process of team selection after England abolished the role of chief selector which they have been using for over 100 years.

Photo: Dawid Malan of England poses for a photo with his Player of the Match and Player of the Series awards at the end of the 3rd Twenty20 International between South Africa and England at Newlands Cricket Ground on December 01, 2020 in Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7j9p1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20ds)
Iran's #MeToo

The #MeToo movement is in the spotlight in Iran, where women have been taking to social media to share experiences of sexual harassment and assault. The response was broadly positive, until allegations were made against a popular singer. Soroush Pakzad has been covering the story for BBC Persian.

My Home Town: Sants, Barcelona
Enric Botella of BBC Mundo takes us to the Barcelona neighbourhood of Sants, to chat in the market with his grandmother and grab a beer with a friend.

Mukbang Indian style
Mukbang videos, where people eat large extravagant meals on camera, are usually associated with South Korea. But recently women in rural India have found success making their own videos. BBC Monitoring's Rupsha Mukherjee spoke to two emerging mukbang stars.

The forgotten Chinese survivors of the Titanic
Six Chinese passengers were among the survivors of the Titanic, only to be vilified and refused entry to the United States. Their stories were lost from history, but have been pieced together in a new documentary, The Six. Zhaoyin Feng of BBC Chinese has spoken to the American-born son of one of the six.

Lebanon's Fattoush Index
Lebanon has a new way of measuring the rapidly rising cost of living. It’s called the Fattoush Index - fattoush is a traditional Lebanese salad, as well as a staple for Muslims breaking their fast during Ramadan. BBC Arabic's Carine Torbey explains the findings, and the legend of the origins of this salad.

Image: A woman walks past a mural depicting Iranian national flags in the Iranian capital Tehran.
Credit: -/AFP via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyd)
The first space shuttle mission

On 12th April 1981, the space shuttle Columbia made history becoming the first ever reusable space craft to fly into orbit. It marked the start of a 30-year shuttle programme which revolutionised the history of manned space exploration. Using NASA and BBC archive we tell the story of this historic test flight.
Photo: NASA photo shows the first launching of the space shuttle from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Columbia carried astronauts John Young and Robert Crippen. (AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7jff5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hs8)
What is the cost of climate reform?

It’s been a week of tough talk on climate action. President Biden set out US plans for fighting climate change and called on the industrialised world to join his efforts to dramatically slash carbon emissions this decade. The global shift towards a greener world is transforming the way we work and live, but for many the changes are coming at a steep cost. Fuel taxes have increased the cost of farming, the shutting down of carbon-intensive industries is disproportionately affecting those in low-paid jobs, and while many big businesses have the resources to go green, levies for failing to reduce carbon footprints are increasing costs for many small and medium-size businesses. So how can the burden of a green transition be shared more evenly? Is the world at risk of leaving marginalised communities behind, and - if so - what can be done to minimise any increase in inequality that results from attempts to battle climate change? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7jk59)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcm54k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv6xfp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct2dmh)
The Anti-Vax Files

The rise of India’s ‘Covid quack’

As India struggles with a surge in Covid-19 cases, it is also dealing with a wave of misinformation about the virus and vaccines.

Although now banned from Facebook and YouTube, self-proclaimed nutritionist Biswaroop Roy Chowdhury built his social media stardom by claiming that conventional medicine is almost entirely wrong about coronavirus.

Labelled a dangerous “quack” by his critics, Chowdhury has a track record of spreading outrageous medical falsehoods. He is opposed to all vaccines and even claims AIDS is not caused by HIV.

During the global pandemic he has gained a new audience by spreading conspiracy theories about Covid-19, which he calls “the scandal of the millennium”.

Chowdhury says – contrary to scientific evidence - that masks and lockdowns are harmful and warns that hospital treatment only increases a patient’s chances of dying.

He claims to have “cured” thousands of Covid-19 patients through diet alone and has set up a course where followers can pay to learn his methods. We challenge his bogus claims and uncover new details about the death of one of his followers.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Reha Kansara
Producer: Ed Main
With reporting by: Shruti Menon, BBC Reality Check, Delhi


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2djv)
Will 2021 have more Covid deaths than 2020?

In 2020 there were 1.8 million reported Covid deaths. So far this year, we’ve had 1.2 million. We’re currently seeing around 12,000 deaths a day across the world. But while some areas are seeing falls in numbers, others such as India are seeing a surge.

This week Tim Harford tries to answer the question: Will there be more global deaths this year from Covid 19 compared to last year?


(Families wait in line at the crematorium as the death toll continues to rise in Ghaziabad India, April 22, 2021. Credit: Sakib Ali/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7jnxf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt40hyw25j)
Regional Summit on Myanmar

Regional leaders are due to hold crisis talks in Indonesia with the Burmese general who seized power in February. We hear more about the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) meeting in Jakarta.

Also on the programme, hopes are fading for more than fifty crew members on board an Indonesian submarine which disappeared on Wednesday, but the search goes on; and we hear from the writer of an Oscar-nominated film about black people in the US who die at the hands of the police.

To discuss these stories and more Celia Hatton is joined by Vandana Saxena Poria, a British-born chartered accountant, entrepreneur and management consultant, now based in the city of Pune in India and Emma Beals, international policy analyst and senior advisor at the European Institute of Peace.

(Photo: Members of the presidential security force stand guard at a check point in front of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) secretariat ahead of meeting; Credit: EPA/MAST IRHAM)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7jsnk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt40hyw5xn)
Myanmar General at Regional Summit

The Burmese general who seized power in February is attending a regional summit in Indonesia. Does this mark a tacit acceptance of the coup by Myanmar's neighbours?

Also on the programme: hopes fade for the crew members on board an Indonesian submarine which disappeared on Wednesday; and latest figures show that India has registered nearly a million new coronavirus cases in the past three days alone.

To discuss these stories and more Celia Hatton is joined by Vandana Saxena Poria, a British-born chartered accountant, entrepreneur and management consultant, now based in the city of Pune in India, and Emma Beals, international policy analyst and senior advisor at the European Institute of Peace.

(Photo: Myanmar"s junta chief Senior General Min Aung Hlaing arrives for the ASEAN meeting; Credit: Rusman/Indonesian Presidential Palace/Handout via REUTERS)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7jxdp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt40hyw9ns)
Myanmar coup leader attends summit

The Burmese general who seized power in February's coup, Min Aung Hlaing, is in Jakarta for the Asean summit to discuss the political crisis in Myanmar. The decision to invite him, rather than anyone from Myanmar's democratically-elected government, has been heavily criticised.

Also in the programme: the latest figures show that India has registered nearly a million new coronavirus cases in the past three days alone; and are parents giving their kids enough time and freedom to play outside the home?

To discuss these stories and more, Celia Hatton is joined by Vandana Saxena Poria, a British-born chartered accountant, entrepreneur and management consultant, now based in the Indian city of Pune, and Emma Beals, an international policy analyst and senior advisor at the European Institute of Peace.

(Picture: Protests outside the Association of Southeast Asian Nations secretariat building. Credit: Reuters/Willy Kurniawan)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv78p2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2f2s)
Dr Atul Gawande: Matters of life and death in America

This week’s guest wears many hats. Dr Atul Gawande is a medical doctor, a surgeon and a best-selling author, and has also been an advisor to presidents, including on the Covid pandemic.

Katty Kay of the BBC World Service and Carlos Watson of Ozy Media discuss a wide range of issues with Dr Gawande, including how we should face up to death and dying, and how we should speak to our loved ones about it.

A BBC World Service and OZY Media co-production.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7k14t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5k)
Coronavirus: Sudan

Sudan has recorded only 32,000 cases of coronavirus infections and just 2,300 Covid-19 related deaths so far. It is also rolling out vaccines. But the numbers are thought to be much higher and host Nuala McGovern hears from three women living in the capital, Khartoum, about how their experiences of family and friends dying differs greatly from the official Covid-19 figures. The losses they are witnessing is due in part to the inability of Sudan’s health system to cope.

We also return to intensive care units in the UK, US and South Africa to hear from the specialist doctors who are responsible for patients on ventilators and pain management. Three anaesthetists come together to discuss their changing roles during this pandemic and the emotional toll of often being the last person to have physical contact with a patient - and sometimes a colleague - who dies of Covid-19.

(Photo: Tagreed Abdin Credit: Tagreed Abdin)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv7df6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6m)
I'm Not a Monster

24/04/2021 GMT

An American mother living in the heart of the ISIS caliphate. Her husband an ISIS sniper. Her 10-year-old son forced to threaten the U.S. president in a propaganda video shown around the world. She claims she was tricked into taking her young children to war-torn Syria, but where does her account end and the truth begin? Over four years journalist Josh Baker unravels a dangerous story where nothing is as it seems. From the depths of Raqqa’s infamous torture prison to an elk hunt in Idaho, he uncovers secrets, lies and the lasting consequences.

I’m Not A Monster is the story of one family’s journey from Indiana to the Islamic State group and back.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l18)
Investigating accusations that coverage was excessive

Over the past two weeks there have been a number of programming changes following the news of the death of His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. We hear listeners’ thoughts on whether the balance was right and a senior executive from the World Service answers accusations that coverage was excessive.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7k4wy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0px2sf0kxl)
Derek Chauvin murder conviction: US sport reacts

Former WNBA player Tamara Moore tells us about her relief and hope for the future after a US jury found former police officer Derek Chauvin guilty of George Floyd’s murder this week. Chauvin was filmed kneeling on Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes during his arrest on a street in Minneapolis last year and his death sparked Black Lives Matter protests across the globe. Moore, who is from Minneapolis and coaches men’s college basketball at Mesabi Range College in Virginia, Minnesota, watched the verdict come in alongside her players.

We look at how plans for a proposed European Super League – which was set to include many of the continents biggest football teams – fell apart in just 72 chaotic hours this week. The BBC’s John Bennett explains what happened and we’ll be in Germany to find out why Bundesliga giants Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund had no interest in joining the breakaway. Chris Carline – who is the grandson of the legendary former Liverpool manager Bill Shankly – explains why his family are opposed to the plans.

Georgie Cohen joins us to discuss how her dream of becoming Israel’s first female Skeleton athlete at a Winter Olympics is being driven by the memory of her late grandfather. Georgie’s grandfather, Maurice Cohen, was denied the opportunity to compete at the 1936 Summer Olympics as his team-mates felt it was too dangerous for a Jewish man to compete in Adolf Hitler’s Germany.

Michaela Onyenwere reflects on being drafted number 6 by New York Liberty and how her grandma went viral on WNBA draft night. Onyenwere’s grandmother wore traditional Nigerian dress and danced for the camera’s shouting “I’m Grandma” after Michaela was selected. She also tells us how her father represented Nigeria in track and field at the Olympics and reveals her excitement about moving to New York.

Photo: A banner in honour of George Floyd is seen in right field during the game between the Minnesota Twins and the Pittsburgh Pirates. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7k8n2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcmwmb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv7mxg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f30)
Why is India’s new Covid wave deadlier?

Heart-breaking stories from across India are grabbing headlines the world over. Amid a deadly new wave of Covid infections, the country’s crumbling healthcare system is battling an acute shortage of medical oxygen and hospital beds. The number of fresh cases and deaths continues to set new daily records. India is now reporting more fresh cases everyday than any country has during the pandemic.

What led to the sudden spike when numbers were on a decline in February? And why is the new wave more infectious? In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss what has led to a deadlier new wave of Covid infections in India, and how its impact can be mitigated.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Prof K Srinath Reddy, president, Public Health Foundation of India; Prof Polly Roy, professor of virology, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; Dr Ambarish Satwik, vascular surgeon, Ganga Ram Hospital


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7kdd6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d2g)
Dance Divas: 1988-1998

Sampling technology created new opportunities for producers but raised questions of authenticity and authorship in the industry. Some of the biggest dance music hits of the early '90s used uncredited vocals belonging to Loleatta Holloway, Jocelyn Brown and Martha Wash.

After the Paradise Garage closed, New Jersey’s Zanzibar club became the breaking ground for dance music in the New York area. Abbie Adams had a record store around the corner which became Movin’ Records, introducing the world to the ‘Jersey Sound’.

We also meet legendary talent scout Gladys Pizarro who co-founded Strictly Rhythm. Specialising in an eclectic range of house music, it became the most powerful indie dance record label in the world during the '90s.

Gail Sky King’s career went in a completely sideways direction, as an award-winning composer for Sesame Street, as did recording engineer Carla Bandini Lory.

​Producer: Victoria Ferran

(Photo: Martha Wash. Credit: Mike Ruiz)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7kj4b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5h1hfy)
India Covid: record deaths registered

Hospitals in India are being ravaged by a second wave of Covid-19 with deaths setting new records for a third day running. The government has now pulled in the military to transport oxygen by air.

Also on the programme: the doctors leaving Lebanon for good due to a struggling economy; and British composer Andrew Lloyd Webber pays tribute to songwriter Jim Steinman.

(Photo: A health worker wearing personal protective equipment carries a patient suffering from the coronavirus disease outside the casualty ward at Guru Teg Bahadur hospital in New Delhi, India. Credit: Reuters/Abidi)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7kmwg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t5vpts8m8)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you updates from the day's Premier League fixtures and looks back over a controversial week with the swift announcement and demise of the European Super League.

Lee James is joined by former Chelsea and Netherlands right-back Mario Melchiot, ex-Tottenham defender Jenna Schillaci and Cardiff and Ivory Coast centre-back Sol Bamba to discuss all the big talking points.

Also on the show, Lee James looks back over the last 12 months of the COVID-19 pandemic and how it has caused the most significant disruption to the worldwide sporting calendar in peace-time.

Photo: Robert Sanchez of Brighton & Hove Albion warms up wearing a t-shirt with a message in protest against the European Super League (Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7l3vz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcnqv7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv8h4c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3ct2dmh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 today]


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l81)
The Scottish club that toppled Real Madrid

In the early 1980s, Aberdeen went from Scottish footballing obscurity to the very top of the European game, beating mighty Real Madrid to win the 1983 European Cup Winners' Cup. The sporting fairy-tale made the reputation of Sir Alex Ferguson, before he went on to manage Manchester United. Alex Capstick spoke to former Aberdeen assistant manager Archie Knox and former midfielder Neale Cooper. Neale Cooper died in 2018.

PHOTO: Alex Ferguson and Archie Knox with the European Cup Winner's Cup (Courtesy Aberdeen F.C.)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7l7m3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z6r)
How the NRA became a US political lobbying giant

The origins of the gun lobby in the US. Plus we speak to Prof Robert Spitzer about the power of the National Rifle Association. Also, the mysterious American who killed two men in Pakistan and triggered a diplomatic crisis, the historic trial of the Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann in 1961, the battle to reclaim a Native American sacred lake, and the first space shuttle mission.

Photo: National Rifle Association Holds Its Annual Conference In Dallas, Texas. DALLAS, TX - MAY 05 2018. Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7lcc7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rss)
Actor Tom Cruise

Joining Nikki Bedi are Lisa Dwan, Irish actor and internationally celebrated interpreter of the playwright Samuel Beckett, and from Karachi, Pakistan author and journalist Saba Imtiaz.

Hollywood superstar Tom Cruise explains why he’s made a sequel to his 1980s hit Top Gun

British rapper Testament on reimagining the Greek Myth of Orpheus in a modern record shop

Bollywood actress Sanya Malhotra reveals that she’s finally allowing herself to enjoy the success of her latest movie, Pagglait.

Australian actor Guy Pearce shares his thoughts about playing a controversial Dutch art dealer and British film composer David Arnold explains on why he still gets nervous.

And there’s music from Arts Hour favourite, Madagascan guitarist Modeste Hugues


(Photo: Tom Cruise. Credit: James Devaney/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7lh3c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5h2gdz)
President Biden declares Armenian killings genocide

President Joe Biden has declared that the mass killing of Armenians by Ottoman Turkish forces in the First World War constituted genocide. We hear from a former US ambassador to Turkey, and an advisor to the Turkish President. Also: Indonesia confirms navy submarine sank, and Indian hospitals struggle to cope with escalating coronavirus crisis.

(Photo: A demonstrator holds a poster as people take part in a demonstration to commemorate the 1.5 million Armenians killed in the Ottoman-era slaughter, near the Turkish consulate in Los Angeles, California, USA, 24 April 2021. Credit: EPA/ETIENNE LAURENT)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7llvh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbq)
Creative catharsis with Gazelle Twin

Gazelle Twin, Lucrecia Dalt, Cosey Fanni Tutti and Keeley Forsyth, four artists making truly original music outside of the mainstream, discuss how they use electronics to build different themes in their music, working within and breaking out of their sonic comfort zones, and how making music leads to creative catharsis.

Composer and producer Gazelle Twin explores industrial and avant-garde sounds through her albums, soundtracks and remixes. Her latest record, Deep England, sees her collaborate with electronic drone choir NYX.

Sharing her experiences is Lucrecia Dalt, a sound artist from Columbia now based in Berlin. She draws on influences from her academic background as a civil engineer, encompassing electronics and avant-garde sounds in her compositions. Cosey Fanni Tutti is an English performance artist, author and musician who is known for her ground-breaking band Throbbing Gristle, which she co-founded in 1976. She has released music as a solo artist and as part of the duo Chris & Cosey. Keeley Forsyth is an artist and actress from the north of England, known for starring in many acclaimed film and TV series over the last 20 years. At the start of 2020 she released her atmospheric debut album Debris, in which she explores personal experiences through minimal arrangements and her evocative, intimate vocal.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7lqlm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlbps014l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scdz742s7)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv92w0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdv)
Alexander Nanau: My Oscar nominated film

In 2015, a fire broke out in the Collective nightclub in Bucharest Romania, taking the lives of 64 people and injuring 180 others. Many died from seemingly non-life-threatening injuries in hospital, prompting journalists to investigate claims of corruption in the nation’s health system. The documentary Collective explores the aftermath of those events. We speak to its director, double Oscar nominee, Alexander Nanau.

What are the realities of shooting a film in the West Bank? Farah Nabulsi is the British-Palestinian director of the Oscar-nominated short film, The Present. She shot her film in Bethlehem and at an Israeli checkpoint, often in secret. She shares the risks and challenges involved in this form of guerrilla filmmaking.

Has a book, film or song inspired you to take a certain path in life? Oscar-nominated actor Riz Ahmed reveals the song that has influenced his musical and acting career.

Plus, six years on from #oscarssowhite, the campaign’s founder April Reign gives us a progress and reality check on diversity at the Oscars.


(Photo: Alexander Nanau. Credit: Alex Galmeanu courtesy of Magnolia Pictures)



SUNDAY 25 APRIL 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7lz2w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yv1)
Exponential increase in Indian covid cases

As Covid cases surge almost beyond belief in India, how much is to do with social distancing, and how much to do with the mutations to the original virus?

Ramanan Laxminarayan talks to Roland from Delhi about ways in which the huge second wave could and could not have been predicted and avoided. Suggestions of the latest variant to make the headlines, B1.617, have got virologists such as Ravindra Gupta working hard to identify the clinical significance of the latest combinations of mutations.

In the journal Science, Stephen Chanock of the US Cancer program reports work with colleagues in Ukraine looking at the long footprint of radiation dosing from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, 35 years ago this week. In the first of two papers, they find a definite footprint of radiation damage accounting for the many sad cases of thyroid cancer in people alive in the region at the time. But in another study, they looked at whether any higher level of mutations could be detected in the germlines of children conceived subsequently to parents who had experienced radiation in the disaster. While the parents' own health is often affected, 35 years on, thus far their offspring show no widespread elevated levels of disease, as was commonly expected.

And in the week that the world witnessed a guilty verdict delivered in the trial for the murder of George Floyd in the US, David Curtis of the University of Utah and colleagues report in the journal PNAS a study that suggests the widespread media coverage of acts of racial violence, including deaths at the hands of police, leads to poorer mental health in Black Americans. As the BBC’s Samara Linton reports, the study involved google search data over five years up to 2017, and nearly 2.3 million survey respondents.

Also, most of us don’t like to dwell on our toilet habits, but this week we have gone down the drain to discover what wastewater can tell us about our health.

It’s been more than a year since scientists across the globe started to track the spread of Covid-19, with help from home test results and hospital data. Marnie Chesterton investigates the latest tool in their arsenal: sewage. Listener Kevin has heard how human waste can be monitored to check for virus levels, and wants to know if it can also be used to stop the disease in its tracks?

Although the coronavirus has been discovered in people’s poo, so far there’s little indication it’s actually being spread through the water system. But by taking regular samples from different parts of cities, authorities are now able to accurately predict a local peak weeks before the population shows signs of sickness, then take immediate measures to alert them. In Detroit we hear how environmental engineer Professor Irene Zagoraraki used this method to detect a rare strain of Herpes which doctors didn’t even know was a potential problem.

We talk to Professor Nick Thomson from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, who sequenced the genome of the bacteria that causes cholera, to understand how it has crisscrossed the globe. He discovered that the pandemic currently devastating Yemen actually originated in Asia. It’s a discovery that has changed how the WHO is thinking about this killer disease and could have important implications for vaccination programmes. But our effluent can also pose environmental problems, and Professor Andrew Johnson from the UK’s Centre for Ecology and Hydrology explains there are now as many as 300,000 chemicals that could threaten natural habitats.

While authorities try to test each one individually, he’s concerned they may have different effects when they mix in wastewater, and current monitoring systems don’t take this into account. Not only that, but some of these substances contain silver nanoparticles, which Professor Juliane Filser tells us stick around in soil for ever, threatening organisms and bacteria at the base of the food chain


Image: NurPhoto/Getty Images


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7m2v0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcppt8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv9g3d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2f2s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7m6l4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7mbb8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtp)
India’s Covid resurgence

India recorded the world’s highest daily number of new Covid cases since the pandemic began this week. Earlier in the year, many believed the authorities had brought the Covid outbreak under control. But a crushing new wave along with severe oxygen shortages is straining an already burdened health system. The rapid rise in cases is believed to be partly down to lax safety protocols around a religious festival and state elections, along with a potent new “double mutant” variant. Rajini Vaidyanathan followed the worsening situation.

Chad’s leader Idriss Déby died last week while battling rebels on the country’s border with Libya. Déby faced down regular uprisings during his 30 years in power and his firm grip on the security forces helped shore up his political leadership. His death leaves a vacuum as the country has also been a bulwark against terrorist activity in surrounding countries, deploying forces to assist against Islamist militants in Nigeria, Cameroon and Niger: France, a military ally, also has a significant base in the country and retains a major influence over its former colony.. Andrew Harding looks at the potential impact on security in the region.

Brazil, like India, has been in the grip of a deadly wave of Covid and has recently recorded more than 4000 deaths in one day. Meanwhile President Jair Bolsonaro continues to downplay the gravity of both Covid and its impact – refusing to wear a face mask or use hand gel, and stridently opposing any restrictions or quarantine measures. But, as the pandemic reaches even the most remote parts of Brazil, Richard Lapper takes a look at the political fallout.

At the virtual Climate Summit hosted by the US, President Biden’s administration committed to cutting greenhouse gases in half by 2030 compared to 2005 levels. But perhaps the most surprising promise came before the Summit – with the pledge by the world’s two largest emitters of greenhouse gases – the US and China - to co-operate on the issue. Celia Hatton looks at what the unlikely partnership could achieve.

(Photo: A couple mourn a relative at a crematorium in New Delhi, India. Credit: EPA)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv9pln)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7mg2d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcq21n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv9tbs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2d28)
Don't log off: My life, my world

Alan Dein hears how the pandemic year has affected the life of 19-year-old student Mursalina in Kabul, Afghanistan. She has been studying at home online, but has become increasingly aware of the impact of Covid-19 on the city's poorest people who come knocking on her door for food donations. She also fears for the health of her father who works in a hospital. At the same time, she is keen to keep her young people's group active, promoting education and independence for women in her community.

Producer: Mark Burman and Laurence Grisell

(Photo: Women walk in a street in Kabul. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7mktj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt40hyyz2m)
Iraqi hospital fire

A fire at a hospital treating coronavirus patients in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, has killed more than twenty people and injured dozens. We hear the latest on the story.

The Turkish foreign ministry has summoned the American ambassador to protest against President Biden's decision to recognise the massacre of Armenians a century ago as genocide. What effect will President Biden's move have on US-Turkish relations?; and after India saw record numbers of new Covid infections again today, we hear from a doctor in one of the capital's hospitals.

Joining Celia Hatton on Weekend is Torrey Taussig, a research director in the Project on Europe and the Transatlantic Relationship at the Harvard Kennedy School, and Michael Peel, the European diplomatic correspondent based in Brussels for the Financial Times newspaper.

(Photo: Ibn Khatib hospital after a fire caused by an oxygen tank explosion; Credit: REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7mpkn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt40hyz2tr)
India reaches Covid record

We go to India first, where the daily number of Covid deaths and infections hit new records for the fourth day in a row. We hear from the capital, Delhi, which is the worst affected city.

Also on the programme: President Biden says genocide was committed against the Armenians by the Ottoman Turks. We'll hear reactions from Yerevan and Istanbul; and we'll speak to the woman who wrote the book Nomadland, which has become the most nominated film at the Oscars.

Joining Celia Hatton on Weekend is Torrey Taussig, a research director in the Project on Europe and the Transatlantic Relationship at the Harvard Kennedy School, and Michael Peel, the European diplomatic correspondent based in Brussels for the Financial Times newspaper.

(Health workers in Delhi, wearing personal protective equipment (PPE), carry bodies of people who were suffering from the coronavirus disease; Credit: REUTERS/Adnan Abidi)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7mt9s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt40hyz6kw)
Baghdad hospital blaze kills many

Three days of mourning have been declared in Iraq after a fire engulfed a Baghdad hospital treating coronavirus patients, killing at least twenty three people and injuring dozens more. The fire - reportedly caused by an exploding oxygen tank - tore through an intensive care ward, with patients on ventilators unable to move.

Also in the programme: The number of new Covid cases in India has set another global record; and we look ahead to Sunday night's delayed Oscar ceremony.

Joining Celia Hatton on Weekend is Torrey Taussig, a research director in the Project on Europe and the Transatlantic Relationship at the Harvard Kennedy School, and Michael Peel, the European diplomatic correspondent based in Brussels for the Financial Times newspaper.

(Picture: A medical worker at Ibn Khatib hospital after a fire caused by an oxygen tank explosion. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgvb5l5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfh)
The man taking on fast food

Carlo Petrini is leading a food revolution - one that fights to protect local, traditional ingredients and farming methods in the face of a standardised, industrialised food system.

From a protest against a McDonald's in the heart of Rome, to a network of more than 100,000 members in 160 countries, his Slow Food movement strives for a world where producers are fairly treated and the planet is better protected.

Carlo tells Emily Thomas the story of his life and activism and why he believes that a post-pandemic world offers a profound opportunity for economic, environmental and social change - should we choose to take it.

Producer: Simon Tulett

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Carlo Petrini. Credit: James Leynse/Corbis via Getty Images/BBC)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7my1x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgvb9b9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kwr)
My life as a millennial Yoruba priestess

Beyoncé, mermaids and Satan? Outlook Weekend is in Nigeria looking at the mysteries and misconceptions surrounding the traditional Yoruba religion – and what it takes to be a modern devotee of this ancient faith. Reporter Laeila Adjovi travels to the city of Ibadan to meet one of youngest women to become a traditional Yoruba priestess. Her name is Omitonade and her world is defined by deities, divination and mobile phones. This episode was first broadcast on 20th January 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Omitonade Ifawemimo Egbelade
Credit: Laeila Adjovi


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7n1t1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbn)
Menopause

Why do both whales and women go through it?

If you think you’re too young to learn about the menopause, you’re wrong. Prepare to be both surprised and entertained - and maybe even rendered a kinder son or daughter.

Our understanding of menopause has changed dramatically, and it’s our kindly cousins, the whales that may help explain what it’s for. And Dessa has a heart-to-heart with her dad about her grandmother, exploring the parts of our lives we should share more - generation to generation.


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgvbf2f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2fz2)
Prince belong Vanuatu

Villagers believe Prince Philip is returning to his ancestral home on their Pacific island. In a handful of villages on the island of Tanna, in Vanuatu, he has been revered as an ancestral spirit and son of their mountain god, and they have been waiting for him to return to them, either in person during his lifetime or in spirit form after his death.

The prince never visited the island of Tanna, but letters, photographs and gifts were exchanged over the years and the prince met a delegation of islanders at Windsor Castle in 2007. Tanna elders sent Prince Philip a "nal nal" pig hunting club. He sent them back a picture of himself holding the club, which the villagers cherish. It is thought the religious movement started after the 1974 royal tour of the Pacific, during which the Queen and Prince Philip visited Vanuatu, then known as the New Hebrides.

Presenter: Jo Dwyer

(Photo: Sikor Natuan holds a water damaged portrait of Britain's Prince Philip in a partially built monument to the British royal near the remote village of Yaohnanen. Credit: Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7n5k5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcqsjf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgvbjtk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2d2h)
Gambling: A Sure Bet?

Gambling: A Sure Bet? Kenya

Jonah is a university student, and a gambler. For him it is the only way he can earn a living. He explains why there are so few opportunities for young Kenyans like him and why betting on foreign football matches has become such an attractive and easy way to make money to fund his university studies. Gambling behaviour expert, Dr Heather Wardle, wants tougher laws on gambling but she wonders how that might impact the University students who need the money they earn from betting.

Producer: Lydia Thomas

(Photo: Jonah betting on the Premier League with his friends)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7n999)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1t)
Is the legal cannabis business about to go global?

Changes to the laws governing cannabis use are happening around the world. The number of States in the USA legalising cannabis is increasing rapidly. Uruguay and Canada have legalised it already, and Mexico may soon follow suit.

Tanya Beckett looks at the different models of legalisation and at what might be holding the global cannabis industry back.


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgvbnkp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3ct1gx5)
America’s solitary inmates

Since the pandemic struck, millions around the world have endured lockdowns, with many finding it hard to tolerate long periods indoors. But what if lockdown meant years on end spent entirely alone, in a single room, sometimes no bigger than a large elevator? In many US states, jails and prisons routinely use solitary confinement to enforce discipline and indeed, sometimes to quarantine inmates for health reasons. Officials say it’s essential to ensure safety behind bars. Prisoners can be segregated for serious and violent offences, but also for infringing minor rules. And some have spent decades in isolation, despite the United Nations defining a stretch of more than fifteen days as torture. As one of the most prominent states, New York, now moves to accept the UN limit and reform the use of segregation, Hilary Andersson meets inmates and prison staff to understand what this draconian punishment is like, and what its psychological effects can be upon those affected, who include children as young as thirteen.

Produced for radio by Michael Gallagher

If you have been affected by any of the issues discussed in this programme, you can contact help at Befrienders International: www.befrienders.org

(Image: A juvenile inmate in a cell seen through the door hatch. Credit: Richard Ross)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7nf1f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5h4dc1)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7njsk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl0)
Unravelling the history of knitting

Like many traditional domestic crafts, knitting has experienced a huge surge in popularity in the 21st century, making it fashionable and even radical. But the history of hand knitting is still relatively obscure. The oldest knitted artefacts are Coptic socks found in Egypt dating from the fourth century AD, but although they look like modern-day knitting, they’re actually made using a technique called nalebinding or needle-binding.

So what then are the real origins of knitting? How did it develop into so many different regional patterns, from the famous Fair Isle of Scotland to distinctive Nordic and South American variations?

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss the global history of knitting are Professor Sandy Black of the University of the Arts London, Norwegian textile designer, Annemor Sundbo, and an expert on South American knitting, Cynthia LeCount Samaké.

Produced by Jo Impey for the BBC World Service.

Image: Knitting on Taquile Island, Peru
Image credit: Hadynyah / Getty Images


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2djv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7nnjp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7ns8t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t5vptwf0m)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live League Cup final commentary as Manchester City take on Tottenham Hotspurs.

Delyth Lloyd is joined by South African international Dean Furman and the former Manchester City captain Sylvain Distin to discuss all the big talking points. We'll have reaction to the day's early premier league matches between Wolves and Burnley, and Manchester United v Leeds United.

Elsewhere, we'll review the women’s Six Nations results, women’s Champions League and updates from MMA .

Photo: Manchester City and Tottenham (Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7p4j6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcrrhg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgvchsl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2f2s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7p88b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgl)
India battles second covid wave

As India battles a surge in Covid cases and hospital beds become scarce, Business Weekly hears how social media is helping connect patients with medical help. Several areas of the country have gone back into lockdown. We get reaction from businesses. In Denmark, the authorities have introduced a Corona Pass, which lets the vaccinated attend various events. Our reporter looks at how well it’s working. We look at the online advertising industry as several big companies scale back their digital marketing spend. The suggestion is that they aren’t seeing the returns on investment they perhaps should be, and that data doesn’t always give an accurate idea of success. Could a bubble be about to burst? And is your boss clueless? We hear about a new piece of research from Microsoft which suggests managers aren’t aware of how lockdown has affected their workers. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Empty oxygen cylinders at a hospital in Delhi, Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7pd0g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5h5cb2)
Countries send urgent aid to Covid-stricken India

The United States says it will immediately make available supplies of vaccine-production material to India as it faces a Covid surge.

Also in the programme: A fire at a hospital treating coronavirus patients in the Iraqi capital Baghdad has killed more than eighty people and we talk to one of the fifteen people who have emerged from a French cave after a forty day experiment to see how they coped without any way of telling the time.

(Photo: A patient in an auto-rickshaw waiting to be allowed into a hospital in the city of Ahmedabad. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7phrl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgvcw0z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2djv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7pmhq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlbps2y1p)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scdz76zpb)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgvczs3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kwr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 26 APRIL 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jtq84)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl4dgr6bfd)
Menthol cigarettes could be banned in the US

The FDA is under a court order to respond to a citizens’ petition to ban menthol cigarettes by 29 April. The deadline comes as President Joe Biden is considering whether to force tobacco companies to reduce nicotine in their products to a level that would stop them being addictive. We hear from Jennifer Maloney, a reporter with the Wall Street Journal. The electric sports car maker Tesla will unveil its quarterly results on Monday - they come as the company is trying to reassure Chinese consumers over safety concerns; Kerry Brown, a professor of Chinese Studies at Kings College London, tells us more.

This week the Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi is expected to explain how in order to help combat the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic, the government in Rome will spend as much as 220 billion euros of funding from the European Union's war chest, but is it enough? We get analysis from independent economist, Michael Hughes. The Oscars ceremony is underway in Los Angeles, but this year very few stars are walking along the red carpet, amid coronavirus restrictions; Steven Gaydos, executive editor of Variety Magazine tells us more. Plus, as the world’s big spy agencies in the United States, China, Russia and Europe are embracing technology to beef up their defensive and offensive capabilities, Emma Green, director of Green CDL, a cyber and data protection company tells us to forget Hollywood images of James Bond and think more about complex computer programmes.

(Photo: A pack of menthol cigarettes. Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4j2jj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2d34)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The Martian Mission

What would it take for humans to live permanently on Mars? asks Martin in Weston-super-Mare, UK. The doctors dig into requirements and possibilities of a long-term Martian outpost.
We know that many missions to Mars have failed, for a range of reasons – malfunctions, crashes and even a mix-up between imperial and metric units. Getting to Mars – let alone decelerating from 30,000 miles per hour to a safe landing speed in about seven minutes – is not straightforward. Aerospace engineer Anita Sengupta helped land NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars. She knows first-hand the challenges of putting a robot on the red planet.

But getting robots to Mars is an easier proposition than doing the same for humans. Even if we work out how to survive the radiation exposure on the eight-month journey and the pulverising descent, Mars’ surface isn’t easily habitable. Principal investigator for NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) Bruce Jakosky describes the conditions on Mars: Freezing, with an atmosphere containing mostly carbon dioxide and very little water, and subject to annual global dust storms.

However, this isn’t deterring space agencies and private companies from researching the challenge. The European Space Agency and Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems focussed on finding out the physiological and psychological tolls by selecting six candidates to spend 520 days in a simulated spacecraft and landing module. Diego Urbina explains the personal challenge of taking part in the Mars500 experiment.
Some private company owners have gone even further. As well as making technology based on the current physical conditions, could those constraints themselves be altered? Could Mars be terraformed, or warmed, for easier human survival? Bruce Jakosky shares just what that would take – and compares these requirements with what’s actually available.


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jtv08)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pnxfzj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4j68n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqc)
Is carbon the new calorie?

More companies are rolling out carbon dioxide emission labels on products to help us make greener choices. Unilever, the global consumer goods giant, recently announced it is committing to put carbon footprint information on 70,000 products, while multi-national companies Oatly and Quorn have already started adding labels like this to their packaging.

But this is not the first time companies have tried this. In the 2000s, for example, an international supermarket put carbon labels on hundreds of products, but cancelled the project after a few years.

Why are carbon labels coming back now, and what does this information really tell us? How do you measure the carbon footprint of a product? And will this drive behaviour change and help the environment?

Presenters: Neal Razzell and Graihagh Jackson
Producer: Darin Graham
Researchers: Zoe Gelber and Olivia Noon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jtyrd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4jb0s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l18)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jv2hj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pnxpgs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4jfrx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6f)
Funerals and grief in a pandemic

The extraordinary measures put in place during the Covid-19 pandemic and the Ebola crisis placed restrictions on much of people’s lives, including the rituals and ceremony around death. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women whose work has supported grieving families during a time of crisis.

Lianna Champ is a British funeral director and author of How to Grieve Like a Champ. She’s based in Lancashire, one of the areas worst hit by Covid-19. She always knew she was going to be a funeral director and she started helping out at the local funeral home at 16. She talks about how Covid-19 has transformed funerals, mourning and grief, and why the rituals of death are crucial to our ability to grieve healthily.

Neima Candy is a Liberian public health nurse who coordinated the Red Cross response to the Ebola crisis. She was in charge of organising burial teams made up of volunteers and helped write guidelines for ‘safe and dignified’ funerals that would bring closure to the families and at the same time avoid further spread of the disease.

IMAGE DETAILS
Left: Neima Candy [courtesy Neima Candy]
Right: Lianna Champ [credit Phil Garlington]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jv67n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7z888d)
Covid-19: countries send medical aid to India

A doctor tells us about the latest situation as Delhi's hospitals struggle to cope.

In Australia, Perth goes into lockdown once again after an outbreak of coronavirus cases in a quarantine hotel.

And Nomadland wins best film at this year's Oscars - which are being called the most diverse ever.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jv9zs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7z8d0j)
International aid sent as India's hospitals struggle with Covid spike

Doctors say people are dying like 'fish in the street' because of shortages of oxygen.

A court in Russia is expected to declare organisations with links to jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny, as "terrorist and extremist" bodies.

And Chloe Zhao has made history by becoming the first woman of colour - and only the second woman at all - to win the best director award at the Oscars.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jvfqx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7z8hrn)
Delhi Covid: Patients struggling for breath 'like fish out of water'

We hear from an ICU doctor working in Delhi as hospitals across the country run out of beds

Chloe Zhao becomes only the second woman to win an Oscar for her film Nomadland. Her leading actress Frances McDormand also wins for the film.

And after many months of isolation and lockdown, how difficult will it be for us to learn to socialise again? We'll be speaking with a 'friend specialist' who has some top tips.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jvkh1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5l)
Sir Peter Westmacott: Are we at peak geopolitical risk?

Russian troops are massing on Ukraine’s border, while China and the US are locked in Cold War-style hostility. Cyberwarfare makes states, systems and individuals feel newly vulnerable. Stephen Sackur interviews Sir Peter Westmacott - he was Britain’s Ambassador in Washington, Paris and Ankara. Does he think we are at peak geopolitical risk?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4jxrf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4l)
Covid in paradise

How are small island tourist destinations like the Caribbean island state of Antigua and Barbuda coping with the shutdown of global travel?

Manuela Saragosa speaks to the Antiguan Minister of Tourism Charles Fernandez about the innovative steps his country took to continue welcoming holidaymakers from North America and Europe last year, while keeping them safely contained within their own beachside bubbles.

The pandemic has been devastating for the travel industry more generally, according to Helen McDermott of Oxford Economics. Among those hardest hit are aircrew. Former pilot Matthew Wilson tells how he ended up relocating halfway across the planet to become a gardener after his airline went into liquidation. Meanwhile Jeffrey Goh of the Star Alliance global grouping of major airlines says they urgently need world governments to agree the conditions under which restrictions on travel can finally be lifted.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Mother, child in face masks have fun on sea beach; Credit: Bicho_raro/Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0p)
The siege of Mecca

In 1979 Islamist militants seized control of the Grand Mosque in Mecca, the holiest site in Islam. Hundreds were killed as Saudi security forces battled for two weeks to retake the shrine. The militants were ultra-conservative Sunni Muslims who believed that the Mahdi, the prophesied Redeemer, had emerged and was a member of their group. The BBC's Eli Melki spoke to eyewitnesses who were inside the Grand Mosque during the siege.

Photo: Fighting at the Grand Mosque in Mecca after militants seized control of the shrine, November 1979 (AFP/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jvp75)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4k1hk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq8)
What can we learn from wastewater?

Most of us don’t like to dwell on our toilet habits, but this week Crowdscience has gone down the drain to discover what wastewater can tell us about our health.

It’s been more than a year since scientists across the globe started to track the spread of Covid-19, with help from home test results and hospital data. Marnie Chesterton investigates the latest tool in their arsenal: sewage. Listener Kevin has heard how human waste can be monitored to check for virus levels, and wants to know if it can also be used to stop the disease in its tracks?

Although the coronavirus has been discovered in people’s poo, so far there’s little indication it’s actually being spread through the water system. But by taking regular samples from different parts of cities, authorities are now able to accurately predict a local peak weeks before the population shows signs of sickness, then take immediate measures to alert them. In Detroit we hear how environmental engineer Professor Irene Xagoraraki used this method to detect a rare strain of Herpes which doctors didn’t even know was a potential problem.

Marnie also talks to Professor Nick Thomson from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, who sequenced the genome of the bacteria that causes cholera, to understand how it has crisscrossed the globe. He discovered that the pandemic currently devastating Yemen actually originated in Asia. It’s a discovery that has changed how the WHO is thinking about this killer disease and could have important implications for vaccination programmes. But our effluent can also pose environmental problems, and Professor Andrew Johnson from the UK’s Centre for Ecology and Hydrology explains there are now as many as 300,000 chemicals that could threaten natural habitats.

While authorities try to test each one individually, he’s concerned they may have different effects when they mix in wastewater, and current monitoring systems don’t take this into account. Not only that, but some of these substances contain silver nanoparticles, which Professor Juliane Filser tells us stick around in soil for ever, threatening organisms and bacteria at the base of the food chain.


Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Produced by Marijke Peters for the BBC World Service.

[Image: Sewage outlets. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jvsz9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4k57p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct2dmh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2djv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jvxqf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pnyjpp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4k8zt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jw1gk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jsx)
My mission to save the 'Russian spy whale'

Norwegian fisherman Joar Hesten was fishing for cod in the Arctic when he came across a white whale wearing a harness. He freed the mysterious beluga from the straps, and then saw the harness was labelled ‘Equipment St Petersburg’. Theories started swirling that this whale had escaped the Russian military, which has a history of training marine mammals. Now Joar is on a mission to relocate the whale, called Hvaldimir, to an area with other belugas in the hope that it can integrate into a pod and live in the wild.

The quest has cost Joar emotionally and financially. And, as Joar had previously worked as a whaler for a short time, he says his relationship with Hvaldimir has made him question the practice. In 1986 the International Whaling Commission announced a ban on commercial whaling, but Norway continues to hunt up to 500 minke whales a year - citing cultural reasons.

For now, Joar is looking for support so he can keep his promise to help save Hvaldimir.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Joar with Hvaldimir
Credit: Aleksander Nordahl, DN/D2


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jw56p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pnys5y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4kjh2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jw8yt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv522fsc88f)
India: Black market blamed for oxygen shortages

India has recorded a new global high for daily coronavirus cases for a fifth straight day. As hospitals in Delhi and many other cities run out of beds, people have been forced to find ways to get treatment for sick patients at home. Many have reportedly turned to the black market, where prices of essential medicines and oxygen cylinders have sky-rocketed.

Also in the programme: Russian authorities order that the political offices of opposition leader Alexei Navalny suspend their activities across the country; and we hear about Chloe Zhao, only the second woman and the first woman of colour to be named best director at the Oscars.

(Image: A patient wearing an oxygen mask sits inside an ambulance waiting to enter a Covid-19 hospital for treatment in Ahmedabad, India. Credit: Reuters/Amit Dave)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jwdpy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4krzb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y47wsrhfmts)
Italy eases coronavirus restrictions

Shops and cinemas in Italy are reopening, whilst hospitality venues can now serve outside. Italian celebrity chef Alessandro Borghese runs a restaurant in the northern city of Milan and gives us his reaction to the news. And we find out how Italy plans to spend more than $200bn from a European Union-wide recovery fund with Pietro Reichlin, who is an economist at Luiss University in Rome. Also in the programme, the collapse of Greensill Capital in the UK has drawn attention to the practice of supply chain financing, which Greensill was known for. Charlotte Bancilhon is an associate director at the consultancy BSR, and explains how it actually works. Nirav Choski is chief executive of India's CredAble, which offers such a service. And Alex Yang, associate professor of management science at London Business School discusses steps that can be taken to mitigate the risk of problems with supply chain finance. Plus, a company called Mirriad has developed a technique that enables product placement in archive films and TV shows. Stephan Beringer is chief executive of the firm and tells us how it works.

(Picture: People at a restaurant in Rome. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jwjg2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxglbnbjdj)
Coronavirus conversations: Health anxiety

We bring people together in conversation to share experiences about health anxiety. They explain how the condition has changed their daily life and how they find it much harder to cope during the pandemic.

And with the coronavirus crisis continuing in India, we will speak to people who are forced to find ways to get treatment for sick family members at home.

We will also look at other updates on coronavirus with our regular expert Professor Manfred Green in Israel.

The film, Nomadland has won three Oscars; it is about a woman living in her van after the financial crash. We speak to people who live a nomadic lifestyle with no permanent home.

(Photo: Ronjey Carrey Francis)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jwn66)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxglbnbn4n)
India Covid crisis: Patients struggle at home

Doctors in the Indian capital describe people dying on the streets as infections and deaths reach record numbers again for the fifth day. We hear from people who are forced to find ways to get treatment for sick family members at home.

We also bring people together in conversation to share experiences about health anxiety. They explain how the condition has changed their daily life and how they find it much harder to cope during the pandemic. We also look at the health care system in Myanmar since the military coup in February.

And the film Nomadland has won three Oscars. It's about a woman living in her van after the financial crash. We speak to people who live a nomadic lifestyle with no permanent home.

(Photo: Family members sit next to the burning funeral pyres of those who died from the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at a crematorium in New Delhi, India April 26, 2021. Credit: Adnan Abidi/Reuters)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jwryb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jsx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jwwpg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pnzhnq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4l7yv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n8klhzrht)
2021/04/26 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jx0fl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4lcpz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2d35)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The Hamster Power Hypothesis

"How many hamsters on wheels would it take to power London?" asks Judah from Virginia in the USA. Rutherford & Fry return with engineering, ethics and economics to answer this electric query.

Smart grid engineer Lynne McDonald helps keep the lights on for 8.3 million homes and businesses across London at UK Power Networks. She explains how the kilowatt hours we see on our electricity bills relate to the thousands of gigawatt hours required when thinking about powering the whole of London. In theory, a hamster in a wheel might be able to produce about half a watt of power – enough to run a small LED light bulb.

Whilst the doctors argue the case on the resultant practicalities and ethics of even considering such a scenario – as, for example, the required cubic kilometre stack of hamster habitats would cover Canary Wharf – Royal Veterinary College researcher Zoe Davies points out some biological and anatomical home truths. As an expert in biomechanics currently investigating athletic performance in racehorses, she walks Adam through the impossibilities of using pretty much any animal, bird or insect as a source of power.

There may be one exception though: humans. Veteran lecturer of undergraduate chemistry for biologists and cycling enthusiast, Andrea Sella discusses whether human power might realistically work. We consider what this or other more realistic sources of renewable energy could mean for the future of our national grid.


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jx45q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv522fsd3hb)
India Covid- 19: Patients struggle at home as hospitals fill up

India records a new global high for daily coronavirus cases for a fifth straight day at more than 350 thousand. In the absence of hospitals beds, many turn to the black market to buy essential medicines and oxygen as prices skyrocket.

Also on the programme: a new crackdown on those who work alongside and support the Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny; and we asked if Hollywood has learnt the value of diversity after the 93rd ceremony of the Oscars.

(Photo: A woman is consoled by her relative after her husband died from coronavirus in Ahmedabad, India. Credit: Reuters.)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jx7xv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4lm67)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jxcnz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlpz29p6y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scs7jfqvl)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4lqyc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48q7h34x73)
Italy eases coronavirus restrictions

Shops and cinemas in Italy are reopening, whilst hospitality venues can now serve outside. Italian celebrity chef Alessandro Borghese runs a restaurant in the northern city of Milan and gives us his reaction to the news. Plus, Apple has released it latest software update with a new tool that has forced a confrontation with Facebook over privacy; the BBC's Technology Correspondent Rory Cellan Jones explains the controversy. Also in the programme, the collapse of Greensill Capital in the UK has drawn attention to the practice of supply chain financing, which Greensill was known for. Charlotte Bancilhon is an associate director at the consultancy BSR, and explains how it actually works. Nirav Choski is chief executive of India's CredAble, which offers such a service. And Alex Yang, associate professor of management science at London Business School discusses steps that can be taken to mitigate the risk of problems with supply chain finance. Plus, a company called Mirriad has developed a technique that enables product placement in archive films and TV shows. Stephan Beringer is chief executive of the firm and tells us how it works.

(Picture: People at a restaurant in Rome. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 27 APRIL 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jxm57)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq9crftzgy)
Apple releases controversial software update

Apple has released its latest software update with a new tool that has forced a confrontation with Facebook over privacy; the BBC's Technology Correspondent Rory Cellan Jones explains the controversy. As an international effort is underway to help India as it faces an overwhelming surge in coronavirus cases, we hear how the US, the UK, China, Russia, the European Union Saudi Arabia are among those offering help. Also in the programme, the collapse of Greensill Capital in the UK has drawn attention to the practice of supply chain financing, which Greensill was known for; the BBC's Joshua Thorpe brings us an extended report. Plus, a company called Mirriad has developed a technique that enables product placement in archive films and TV shows; the company's CEO, Stephan Beringer, tells us how it works. And we're joined by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific; Andy Uhler, reporter on the Marketplace programme who's in Austin, Texas and Mehmal Sarfraz, co-founder of The Current PK, who's in Lahore, Pakistan. (Photo of Facebook logo with Apple in the background by Pavlo Gonchar via Getty Images).


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jxqxc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp0bwm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4m35r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2d29)
Don't log off: My life, my world

Alan Dein follows Rohan, a young Jamaican farmer over the past 12 months as he is faced by the twin challenges of drought and the pandemic.

Producer: Mark Burman and Laurence Grissell

(Photo: Rohan crouches among crops. Credit: Craig Headley)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jxvnh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jsx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jxzdm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp0lcw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4mbp0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcv)
Olafur Eliasson: Creating “Life”

The award-winning Danish–Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson is renowned for his work with sculptures, photography and installation art which explores issues around perception, climate and public response. For the past months he’s been working on his next project called “Life”, at the Fondation Beyeler in Switzerland this April and has granted In The Studio special access to follow his creative process.

Olafur is on a mission to ensure that he doesn’t pre-empt his audience’s response to the final work- and that includes not releasing much detail about the project beforehand. But, as reporter Neil McCarthy finds out, it involves a major reconfiguration of the gallery – including removing the famous full-length gallery windows and flooding it with water from the outside lily pond.

Reporter Neil McCarthy talks to Olafur at different stages in the execution of the work and also hears from the gallery’s Director Sam Keller about the technical challenges which will need to be overcome to create a work which poses many questions about the nature of space and environment – and which stays watertight!

Reporter: Neil McCarthy.
Produced by Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service.
Photograph of Olafur Eliasson by Brigitte Lacombe


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jy34r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7zc55h)
US to share 60m of its vaccine doses

The White House say it will make millions of its doses available to other countries - but we hear from a professor of global health who says it still needs to do more.

The US is upping the ante on Ethiopia again - as the conflict in Tigray shows no sign of coming to an end. We'll get a Tigrayan view.

And we hear why Mogadishu in Somalia is seeing its worst political based violence in years.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jy6ww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7zc8xm)
Covid-19: US to share millions of 'hoarded' vaccines

The White House says the vaccines will be released over the coming months after a federal safety review.

With coronavirus cases surging in India, how can the country access the oxygen so many people desperately need?

And with less than 10% of the world's plastic currently recycled, we hear from a scientist who wants to turn plastic into fuel.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jybn0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7zcdnr)
India and Covid-19: what are the lessons?

We go to Kolkata where local media is reporting a positivity rate as high as 50%.

There are reports of intense fighting in Myanmar near the Thai border. We get the latest from our correspondent monitoring the situation there.

And the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, first mentioned a pill that might replace Covid vaccinations last week. We hear from a Glasgow University team which is trialling this type of antiviral flu drug.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jygd4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkq)
The detection dogs tracking poachers and Covid-19

Marlo the labrador is learning how to sniff out Covid-19 in the UK. In Tanzania, Polish hound Thor is on the track of wildlife poachers. We explore how their extraordinary noses are tackling these issues and more around the globe.

Produced and presented by Claire Bates


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4mtnj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jfm)
Does business travel have a future?

Why fly when you can videoconference? After a year of Covid lockdowns, that's the question many business executives are asking themselves.

Manuela Saragosa speaks to one frequent flyer, Juliette Kayyem, who says that after a year of being grounded, she now thinks more about time with her kids, not to mention the carbon footprint of all her air miles. And she's not the only one - business travel consultant Scott Gillespie says corporate travel managers across the planet are now using the opportunity to reassess the financial and climate cost of their entire corporate travel policy.

So should the airlines and travel agencies be afraid? After all, business clients pay the fattest profit margins. We ask Jeffrey Goh, chief executive of the world's biggest airline grouping, the Star Alliance, plus Evan Konwiser of American Express' global business travel agency.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: A woman with a suitcase at the Madrid airport; Credit: Alejandro Martinez Velez/Europa Press via Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x56)
Meeting Osama bin Laden

When the Palestinian journalist Abdel Bari Atwan agreed to go and interview Osama bin Laden in 1996 he was apprehensive. By the time he reached the Al-Qaeda leader's mountain hideout - he was shaken and scared - but what was the man himself really like? Claire Bowes reports.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Osama bin Laden. Credit:AFP/Getty Images


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jyl48)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4mydn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2d35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jypwd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rss)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jytmj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp1fls)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4n5wx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jyycn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw5)
From saving goals to saving lives

In 1989, Canadian ice hockey goaltender Clint Malarchuk was playing for top National Hockey League team the Buffalo Sabres, when he suffered a horrific injury to his neck. Knowing his mother was watching the NHL match on live TV, he staggered off the ice. Luckily Clint survived and within ten days he was back playing for his team - everyone called him a hero. What many didn’t see was the impact the incident had on his mental health. In the following years, the repercussions of that day would take him to one of the darkest moments of his life. Clint’s now written a book called A Matter of Inches: How I Survived the Crease and Beyond.

If you've been affected by anything you heard in Clint's interview, either go to bbc.co.uk/actionline, where you'll find details of organisations offering support, or contact Befrienders Worldwide.

TV commentary of Buffalo Sabres vs St Louis, 22 March 1989, courtesy of Buffalo Sabres.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Goalie Clint Malarchuk of the Buffalo Sabres defends the net during an NHL game in November, 1990
Credit: B Bennett/Getty Images


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x56)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jz23s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp1p31)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4nfd5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2d35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jz5vx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv522fsg55j)
Study suggests Delhi Covid deaths could be double the official figures

There is growing evidence that India has been dramatically under-reporting its Covid fatalities. One report from Dehli suggests figures from crematoria could be double the official government statistics.

Also in the programme: A Myanmar rebel group has captured and destroyed an army post close to the border with Thailand; and how language development in young children has been impacted by the pandemic.

Image: Funeral pyres in a park in Delhi. Credit: Getty Images.


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jz9m1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4nnwf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bc3y9lg0r)
Apple ad tracking row heats up

A software update to Apple devices has led to a big change in the way our data is handled. Users will have to opt in to sharing their personal data across different apps, which makes it more difficult for social networks like Facebook to track their users' activity. The BBC's Jane Wakefield explains the changes, and we get reaction to the move from Austrian privacy activist Max Schrems. Also in the programme, the world's transition towards an electric car future is fuelling a rush for lithium, which is a primary component of the batteries. Chile is one of the world's largest sources of the metal, but as the BBC's Jane Chambers reports from the salt flats of the Atacama Desert, there are concerns big mining companies aren't doing enough to help indigenous communities living nearby. The electric carmaker Tesla revealed in its latest results that it earned $518m in the first three months of 2021 from selling emissions credits to less environmentally friendly carmakers. Jim Holder is editorial director of What Car?, and explains how the scheme works. Plus, the French winemaker Bollinger has bought Ponzi Wines in Oregon in the United States. Etienne Bizot is chief executive of the Bollinger group of companies, and tells us what was behind the acquisition.

(Picture: An iPhone displays the Apple logo. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jzfc5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxglbnff9m)
India grapples second Covid wave

We get more accounts of the situation in India as the country battles a catastrophic wave of coronavirus infections and deaths. As well as hearing from our reporter in the capital Delhi, we hear from volunteers who are stepping up to help people who are trying to find oxygen and other treatments for their family members.

And Turkey has announced the strictest lockdown so far. We speak to our colleague from BBC Turkish to find out what’s behind the recent surge in Covid-19 deaths and infections.

Also our medical expert Dr Isaac Bogoch joins us from Toronto to explain some of today’s other coronavirus stories. You can ask Dr Bogoch a question via our WhatsApp number +447730 751925.

(Photo:A volunteer uses an oximeter to check the oxygen level of a woman in Ghaziabad, India, April 24, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Danish Siddiqui)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jzk39)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxglbnfk1r)
Brazil launches pandemic inquiry

The Brazilian congress is launching an inquiry into the government's handling of the coronavirus pandemic, which has killed almost 400,000 people in the country. The commission could potentially lead to the impeachment of President Jair Bolsonaro, who has been widely criticised for his anti-lockdown, vaccine-sceptic stance. We get the latest developments from our correspondent in São Paulo.

Also we speak to one of our regular health experts, Dr Pedro Hallal, an epidemiologist from the Federal University of Pelotas in the south of Brazil.

And we get more accounts of the situation in India as the country battles a catastrophic wave of coronavirus infections and deaths. We hear from volunteers who are stepping up to help people who are trying to find oxygen and other treatments for their family members. We also look at how the situation in India could impact the rest of the world.

(Photo: Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro, April 22, 2021. Credit: Marcos Correa/Brazilian Presidency via Reuters)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jznvf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x56)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jzslk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp2dkt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4p4vy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n8klj2ndx)
2021/04/27 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0jzxbp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d29)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4p8m2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrx)
Indians tweeting for oxygen

The latest wave of the Covid-19 pandemic affecting India has caused heart-breaking shortages of essential medical equipment across the country. As hospitals run out of beds and basic supplies like oxygen, citizens are turning to sites like Twitter and Instagram to source medicines, exchange knowledge and hold the government accountable. Ananya Bhattacharya from Quartz India explains how social media has influenced the response to the pandemic.


Illegal Brick Kilns in Bangladesh
In Bangladesh, the brick making industry provides thousands of jobs and supports the country’s rapid industrialisation – but the kilns used to make the bricks can be heavily polluting. Laws aim to mitigate the environmental and health impacts, but many brick factories have not implemented these changes. Dr Nina Brooks and her research team at Stanford University have developed an AI model that uses satellite imagery to identify which kilns are operating illegally, and hope that it can be used to encourage more factories to abide by the law.


EU and AI regulation
This week the EU Commission published proposals to ban “AI systems considered a clear threat to the safety, livelihoods, and rights of people” and to increase the legal regulations of biometric data, such as facial recognition software. Technology journalist and independent researcher Dr. Stephanie Hare joins the show live to explain the proposals and their likely impacts in Europe and across the world.

(Image: Instagram)



The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k012t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv522fsh0df)
Observers say India’s COVID-19 deaths hugely under-reported

Indian government figures say nearly 200,000 people have now died from Covid-related causes, but independent observers say figures from cremation grounds could be twice as high, as only Covid deaths registered by hospitals are being counted.

Also on the programme: Protests against last week's military takeover in Chad leave at least five dead; and the Brazilian Senate opens an inquiry into the government's handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

(Photo: A woman suffering from a breathing difficulty due to Covid-19 waits to receive oxygen support in India. Credit: Reuters.)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k04ty)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4pj3b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k08l2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlpz2dl41)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scs7jjmrp)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4pmvg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48q7h37t46)
Google's parent company releases latest results

Alphabet the company that owns Google and Youtube has released its latest quarterly results which show advertising revenue rising at an unexpectedly sharp pace; Mike Issac from the New York Times tells us why. And consumer confidence is up, according to The Conference Board, an independent research group; Kathy Bostjancic from Oxford Economics tells us why. Also in the programme, the world's transition towards an electric car future is fuelling a rush for lithium, which is a primary component of the batteries. Chile is one of the world's largest sources of the metal, but as the BBC's Jane Chambers reports from the salt flats of the Atacama Desert, there are concerns big mining companies aren't doing enough to help indigenous communities living nearby. The electric carmaker Tesla revealed in its latest results that it earned $518m in the first three months of 2021 from selling emissions credits to less environmentally friendly carmakers. Jim Holder is editorial director of What Car?, and explains how the scheme works. Plus, the French winemaker Bollinger has bought Ponzi Wines in Oregon in the United States. Etienne Bizot is chief executive of the Bollinger group of companies, and tells us what was behind the acquisition. (Picture of Google logo on phone by Budrul Chukrut for Getty Images).



WEDNESDAY 28 APRIL 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k0j2b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq9crfxwd1)
US consumer confidence highest since pandemic

Consumer confidence is up, according to The Conference Board, an independent research group; Kathy Bostjancic from Oxford Economics tells us why. Alphabet the company that owns Google and Youtube has released its latest quarterly results which show advertising revenue rising at an unexpectedly sharp pace; Mike Issac from the New York Times tells us why. Also in the programme, the world's transition towards an electric car future is fuelling a rush for lithium, which is a primary component of the batteries. Chile is one of the world's largest sources of the metal, but as the BBC's Jane Chambers reports from the salt flats of the Atacama Desert, there are concerns big mining companies aren't doing enough to help indigenous communities living nearby. Plus, the French winemaker Bollinger has bought Ponzi Wines in Oregon in the United States; Etienne Bizot is chief executive of the Bollinger group of companies, and tells us what was behind the acquisition. And we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the world; in Washington Dante Disparte is the Chief Strategy Officer and Head of Global Policy for Circle, a leading digital financial services firm and in Hong Kong, Shuli Ren is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. (Picture of shoppers via Getty Images).


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k0mtg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp37sq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4q02v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2d2j)
Gambling: A Sure Bet?

Gambling: A Sure Bet? Albania

Albania was plagued by problems caused by gambling; high levels of debt, divorce and suicide triggered the government to ban it. But it did not have the desired effect. Instead the ban sent the industry underground and into the hands of organised criminal gangs. Dr Heather Wardle sets Fatjona Mejdini, a journalist who writes about Albania’s development, the task of investigating the state of gambling in her country and asks whether banning betting can solve the problems caused by it.


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k0rkl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x56)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k0w9q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp3h8z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4q7l3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8g)
Goal 14: Life under water

In 2015 the United Nations announced a radical plan to change the world.

Global leaders drew up a list of 17 "sustainable development goals" to create a blueprint for a better future. The goals cover things like gender equality, health provision, a good education and much more. We've asked 17-year-olds from 17 different countries tell us what they think needs to change if the world is to meet those goals by 2030.

Seventeen-year-old Hereiti File tells how rising sea levels and ocean pollution are affecting life on the Cook Islands in the Pacific Ocean. She takes a trip out to the coral reef and sees first hand the damage that has been done. But she also meets people who are working hard to reverse some of the damage. Her uncle’s job as a fisherman is threatened by a decline in fish numbers so she asks the Prime Minister of the Cook Islands, Mark Brown, what he’s doing to ensure people have enough food and are prepared for a future where some of their islands are uninhabitable.

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producer Phoebe Keane

Project 17 is produced in partnership with The Open University.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k101v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7zg22l)
India's covid crisis

We're taking an in depth look at India's Covid crisis today, as the official death toll passes 200,000. We'll take you to a rural part of Punjab state to speak to our correspondent there.

We'll also find out about some of the efforts made by the Indian diaspora to help friends and relatives back home.

And we'll hear from the US about a case before the Supreme Court, which brings up the question of whether children have freedom of speech - even to criticise life at school - beyond the school gates.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k13sz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7zg5tq)
India's coronavirus deaths pass 200,000

A surge in Covid cases takes the death toll in India past the 200,000 mark. Today the BBC brings you a special day of coverage on India's crisis and what it means for the global fight against the pandemic.

In the US we'll hear from one of the lawyers who believes the killing of black Americans by the police amounts to crimes against humanity. They want the International Criminal Court to be called in.

And has climate change shifted the Earth's axis ? We'll speak to a scientist who says the evidence is clear, the melting of the ice caps is so profound it's shifting the planet's poles.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k17k3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7zg9kv)
An in-depth look at India's Covid crisis

More than 3,000 dead and over 360,000 new cases in the last 24hours - our spotlight today is on India which is the grip of a worsening Covid crisis. We hear from Delhi, Kolkatta and Mumbai.

And wolves are making a comeback in some parts of Europe with sightings reported in countries where they haven't been spotted for a long time. But in the US state of Idaho, a new law means the remaining population of 900 grey wolves is no longer protected.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k1c97)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb3)
Dmytro Kuleba: Has the Russian threat to Ukraine receded?

Stephen Sackur speaks to Ukraine’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Dmytro Kuleba. A few days ago, the Ukrainian Government was pleading for international help to confront the threat of a Russian military offensive from the East, but the feared assault never came. Russia declared its military exercise was over, and began to redeploy its forces. What did Ukraine and the outside world learn from this rattling of Russian sabres?

(Photo: Ukraine’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Dmytro Kuleba, appears via video link on Hardtalk)


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4qqkm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnd)
Changing a city's name

What’s in a name? It’s something that Shakespeare’s Juliet pondered. But what’s in the name of a city? And what are the economic and social costs for a city which opts to change it’s name? Lots have done so down the years – New Amsterdam became New York City and Istanbul became Contantinople. Last year, the residents of Asbestos in Canada choose a new name for their city. And back in February, the South African city of Port Elizabeth became Gqeberha. Matthew Davies speaks to Christian Martin an activist who pushed for that name change, as well as local mayor, Nqaba Bhanga, who strongly resisted it. Business owner, David Stopforth, tells Business Daily that he’s been left counting the cost of the name change to his small print firm. Meanwhile, Andy Marchant from Tom Tom says changing place names is not an altogether easy process for the satellite navigation companies. And Tirthankar Roy, professor of economic history at the London School of Economics, ponders whether part of the essence of a city’s past is lost when it changes its name.


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7g)
The Nairobi US Embassy bombing

In August 1998, more than 200 people were killed in co-ordinated bomb attacks on two US embassies in East Africa. They were among the first major attacks linked to Osama bin Laden and the al-Qaeda network. We hear from George Mimba who was working inside the embassy in Kenya when the bomb detonated.

Photo: Rescue workers at the scene of the Nairobi embassy bombing (AFP/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k1h1c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2d2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4qv9r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k1lsh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k1qjm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp4bhw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4r2t0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k1v8r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyf)
I became a supermodel overnight and didn't know

Lisa Ray was just a teenager when she fell in love with the glamour of 1990s Mumbai. She was dipping her toe into modelling when a serious car crash at home in Canada left her mother paralysed and her tight-knit family reeling. Lisa fled back to Mumbai where an image of her, famously in a red swimsuit, had made her an overnight sensation. Although she was fighting an eating disorder, Lisa immersed herself in the party scene. Meanwhile, Bollywood was calling. She struggled with the dancing, the costumes and the lines – but she loved acting and later starred in independent films, including the Oscar nominated film Water. In 2009, at 37, she was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer and faced gruelling treatment, but she was determined to walk the red carpet again. Lisa has written a book about her life called Close to the Bone.

Humberto Restrepo from Medellin in Colombia is a locksmith by day, but outside his working hours he plays Cupid by writing love letters for other couples. As Outlook's Clayton Conn found out, Humberto has saved many relationships in trouble. This report was first broadcast on 13th November 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Lisa Ray
Credit: Rohan Shrestha


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k1z0w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp4l04)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4rb98)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k22s0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv522fsk22m)
India's devastating surge in coronavirus infections

Today we have a special focus on India's devastating surge in coronavirus infections. At least 200,000 people are dead. We'll hear from the doctors and nurses overwhelmed by the numbers of seriously ill patients.

Also in the programme: a formal investigation into how the British prime minister Boris Johnson paid for a lavish makeover of his Downing Street residence; and the case of a swearing teenager that's gone all the way to the US Supreme Court.


(Picture: An Indian woman walks past oxygen cylinders at a COVID-19 hospital in Kolkata. Credit: EPA/PIYAL ADHIKARY)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k26j4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4rksj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cl916q9ks)
More than 200,000 die of coronavirus in India

The coronavirus crisis has pushed past the grim milestone of 200,000 deaths in India. The BBC's Nikhil Inamdar tells us how the pandemic is causing an exodus of workers out of big cities, and consider the likely impact of the second wave on India's economy. Also in the programme, over the years a number of cities have changed their names. The latest is South Africa's Port Elizabeth, which is now called Gqeberha. The BBC's Matthew Davies explores why cities take this course of action, and asks whether part of the essence of a city's past is lost when its name changes. Plus, Malawi in south-east Africa has ambitious plans to transform its economy, which is currently largely sustained by growing tobacco. Blessings Chinsinga is professor of public administration at the University of Malawi, and discusses how hard it will be for the country to kick the habit.

(Picture: Health workers attend Covid patients in Delhi. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k2b88)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxglbnjb6q)
Coronavirus: India passes 200,000 deaths

After the official number of dead from Covid-19 went beyond 200,000 in India, we'll put the figures into context and examine how accurate they really are. Our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Maria Sundaram, will answer your questions on the reasons behind the surge in cases and how it could have an impact on the rest of the world.

We’ll hear the conversations of Indian families, including those which extend into the diaspora around the world. We’ll listen in to a doctor in Mumbai speak to his cousin in another city previously hard hit by Covid-19: New York. We’ll also find out what’s happening in family WhatsApp groups, including the difficult conversations on politics and misinformation.

BBC journalists in India are covering this story while also dealing with the impact on their own relatives and friends. We’ll bring together three of them to talk about their own experiences.

Picture: The husband of Nanduba Chavda adjusts his wife's oxygen mask as they wait in a car to enter a COVID-19 hospital for treatment in Ahmedabad (Reuters / Amit Dave)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k2g0d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxglbnjfyv)
Coronavirus conversations: Live from Delhi

We're looking at every aspect of India's Covid-19 crisis, with Divya Arya presenting from Delhi and Nuala McGovern from London. After the official number of dead from Covid-19 went beyond 200,000, we'll put the figures into context and examine how accurate they really are. Our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Swapneil Parikh, will answer your questions on the reasons behind the surge in cases and how it could have an impact on the rest of the world.

We’ll hear the conversations of Indian families, including those which extend into the diaspora around the world. We’ll listen in to a doctor in Mumbai speak to his cousin in another city previously hard hit by Covid-19: New York.

BBC journalists in India are covering this story while also dealing with the impact on their own relatives and friends. We’ll bring together three of them to talk about their own experiences.

Picture: A woman suffering from breathing difficulties due to Covid-19 waits to receive oxygen support for free outside a Sikh temple in Ghaziabad, India (Reuters / Adnan Abidi)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k2krj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k2phn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp59gx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4s1s1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n8klj5kb0)
2021/04/28 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k2t7s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2d2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4s5j5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv4)
India’s Covid-19 surge

As India surpasses 200,000 Covid deaths Claudia asks why the surge has been so steep and hears the latest from health reporter Anoo Bhuyan in Delhi. And there's good news of a new Malaria Vaccine showing 75% efficacy. Studio guest Tabitha Mwangi discusses this important breakthrough in the context of a new study from the Lancet Infectious Diseases Journal with the first clinical evidence of drug-resistant malaria mutations gaining foothold in Africa. Plus Caroline Williams on her new book MOVE! which unpicks the science of how movement opens up a hotline to our minds changing the way we think and feel.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Photo: People wait to refill empty oxygen cylinders on 27 April 2021 in New Delhi, India. Credit: Sanjeev Verma/Hindustan Times/Getty Images)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k2xzx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv522fskx9j)
Coronavirus deaths in India pass 200,000

The coronavirus pandemic is continuing its deadly surge in India, which has suffered another day of record fatalities and infections. More than 200,000 people are now confirmed dead, but the real total is thought to be much higher.

Also on the programme: We’ll hear about the six Russian citizens that Bulgaria says may have been involved in a series of explosions at weapons facilities over the last decade; and a look at the bacteria that could help in the fight against microplastics

(Picture: Abhishek Bhardwaj stands after cremating his mother Credit: Reuters)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k31r1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4sf0f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k35h5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlpz2hh14)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scs7jmjns)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4sjrk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48q7h3bq19)
More than 200,000 die of coronavirus in India

The coronavirus crisis has pushed past the grim milestone of 200,000 deaths in India. Mumbai and Delhi have been the cities most affected by the pandemic but there is now a rapid increase in the number of cases in Banglaore and Kolkata. We hear from Dr Randip Ray in Kolkata.

Also in the programme, over the years a number of cities have changed their names. The latest is South Africa's Port Elizabeth, which is now called Gqeberha. The BBC's Matthew Davies explores why cities take this course of action, and asks whether part of the essence of a city's past is lost when its name changes. Plus, Malawi in south-east Africa has ambitious plans to transform its economy, which is currently largely sustained by growing tobacco. Blessings Chinsinga is professor of public administration at the University of Malawi, and discusses how hard it will be for the country to kick the habit.

(Picture: Health workers attend Covid patients in Delhi. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



THURSDAY 29 APRIL 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k3dzf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq9crg0s94)
India Covid: world's worst second wave

A second wave of the coronavirus has overwhelmed parts of India's health system. And it's pushing the medical oxygen supply chain there to breaking point. More than 200,000 people are now confirmed to have died, though the real total is believed to be much higher. Mumbai and Delhi have been the cities most affected by the pandemic but we hear from Dr Randip Ray in Kolkata, where cases are rapidly rising.

Also in the programme, two of the world's biggest technology companies posted their latest earning figures a short while ago. Apple and Facebook both beat analyst expectations, but what about their ad tracking row?

Plus, over the years a number of cities have changed their names. The latest is South Africa's Port Elizabeth, which is now called Gqeberha. The BBC's Matthew Davies explores why cities take this course of action, and asks whether part of the essence of a city's past is lost when its name changes.

And - We go to the city of Liverpool in England, which is launching a series of events this week without social distancing, part of the government’s research programme.

PHOTO: Reuters


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k3jqk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp64pt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k3ngp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k3s6t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp6d62)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4t4h6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfj)
America's 'food apartheid'

Millions of Americans live in so-called ‘food deserts’ - areas where it’s hard to access fresh affordable food. For people who aren’t able to travel to other neighbourhoods to do their food shopping, this might mean microwave meals bought from the local gas station are the only way to feed themselves. Emily Thomas meets two people who live in areas where fresh food is hard to come by in Albany, NY State and St Louis, Missouri. They explain why they reject the term food desert in favour of ‘food apartheid’ - which they say addresses the food system in its entirety, including race.

(Picture: two shopping trollies with food, credit: Getty/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk


Contributors:
Tyrean Lewis, Founder and CEO of Heru Urban Farming
Roni Minter


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k3wyy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7zjyzp)
Biden pitches 'once in a generation investment'

100 days into his term in office the US president has delivered a speech laying out sweeping proposals for jobs, education and social care.

And in the wake of George Floyd’s murder he demanded reform of the criminal justice system.

We'll also hear more about the worsening coronavirus situation in India from a movie star doing their bit to help.

And we investigate how Islamist militants were able to overrun a town in northern Mozambique, causing thousands of people to flee.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k40q2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7zk2qt)
President Biden's sweeping proposals

After 100 days in the White House, Joe Biden has been addressing a joint session of Congress on his vision for America. We'll take a look at his promises for the future.

Environmental commitments mean the days of coal in Europe are limited, but a new report outlines how to turn unemployed miners into sustainable workers.

Later today the Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny will appeal against his conviction in a slander case. We look at how Vladimir Putin has responded to the threat from Navalny and his supporters.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k44g6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7zk6gy)
President Biden's 100 days speech

US President Joe Biden has reached the 100 days milestone in office. He has been addressing Congress in Washington to outline the next steps in his presidency.

A Bollywood hero - we hear from the Indian movie star taking action to help those suffering under the country's coronavirus emergency.

And "Think Different" - an advertising slogan that could describe the ethos of Britain's spies. Many intelligence staff are dyslexic, and this brings advantages for those trying to crack codes.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k486b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1v)
Covid: What went wrong in India?

Earlier this year, India’s ruling party was declaring victory in the fight against Covid-19. Some two months on, India set a global record for the highest number of cases recorded in a single country.

Kavita Puri asks what went wrong.

Image: A queue near a vaccination centre in Mumbai, 26 April 2021 (Credit: Divyakant Solanki/EPA)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4tmgq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j93)
Biden's trillions

The US president announces a massive spending plan for the US economy, with trillions of dollars earmarked for jobs and infrastructure. But is it too ambitious for Republicans to support? Ed Butler speaks to Ryan Heath, senior editor at Politico, and Gordon Hanson, professor of urban policy at Harvard Kennedy School. Hundreds of billions of dollars are also planned for the US's creaking healthcare system. Carer Sharon Tosten and democrat Debbie Dingell explain why it's needed.

(Photo: US President Joe Biden outlines his spending plans to Congress, Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2y)
The battle of Tora Bora

When the Taliban were ousted from power in Afghanistan in 2001, the hunt for Osama bin Laden began in earnest. One American in particular led the search. He was CIA commander, Gary Berntsen, who had been tracking the al-Qaeda leader for years. In December 2001 he ordered a small group of special forces soldiers and Afghan fighters into the White Mountains, close to the border with Pakistan, in the hope of cornering bin Laden in the caves of Tora Bora. But as Gary Berntsen tells Rebecca Kesby, in spite of heavy bombardment bin Laden managed to give them the slip.

(PHOTO: Local anti-Taliban fighters help US special forces in the assault on the White Mountains and Tora Bora cave complex in Afghanistan, December 2001. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k4cyg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx6)
The Battle of Palma

At the end of March, hundreds of militants linked to the Islamic State group overran a small, but strategic coastal town in northern Mozambique. The bloody surprise attack on Palma marked a significant escalation in a shadowy conflict that began in 2017 and has already driven hundreds of thousands of Mozambicans from their homes. Some of the heaviest fighting in Palma centred on a hotel where many foreign workers spent days under siege, before attempting a daring escape. Helicopters and boats were also used to try to rescue those trapped by the militants. For Assignment, Andrew Harding tells the story of Palma’s days of terror.

Produced by Becky Lipscombe

(Image: Mozambican soldiers on a motorbike in the streets of Palma, April 2021. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency/Joao Relvas)


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4tr6v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k4hpl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl1)
The census: A snapshot of life

Anyone who has ever researched their family tree will have most likely come across the census, the process by which every citizen or subject of a country is counted and classified. Data collected by the census, often carried out every ten years, has been invaluable to genealogists, both amateur and professional. And the census has also developed into an essential tool for governments and organisations to plan how and where they focus their investment in public services such as health care and schools.

Inventories of people are known to stretch back to antiquity in places such as Egypt and China, and asked for very basic information for the purposes of tax collection or military service. The modern-day census, however, focuses on questions that touch far more on an individual’s identity and has often been controversial. Now that modern technology makes population data easily accessible in a variety of forms, some are questioning whether there is a need for censuses at all.

Bridget Kendall is joined by Dr Kathrin Levitan, Associate Professor at William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia and the author of A Cultural History of the British Census: Envisioning the Multitude in the Nineteenth Century; sociologist Dr Tukufu Zuberi, the Lasry Family Professor of Race Relations at the University of Pennsylvania and head of the African Census Analysis Project; and data scientist and economist Andrew Whitby, author of The Sum of the People: How the Census Has Shaped Nations from the Ancient World to the Modern Age.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service.

(Photo: Campaigners protest outside the US Supreme Court in 2019 over the inclusion of a citizenship question in the 2020 US Census. Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l82)
Anthony Robles

In March 2011, Anthony Robles won a national college wrestling title in the United States despite being born with only one leg. Relying on upper-body strength and a unique sense of balance, Robles went undefeated throughout the entire season and was voted the outstanding wrestler of the NCAA finals. He also holds the world record for the most pull-ups in one minute. Anthony Robles talks to Ian Williams.

PHOTO: Anthony Robles in action at the 2011 finals (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k4mfq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp77dz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4tzq3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k4r5v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2y)
My mother’s fake name and secret past

American lawyer Justine Cowan grew up in a wealthy neighbourhood of San Francisco; her childhood was full of privilege, with music lessons and horse riding. It was a lifestyle that seemed fitting for Justine's mother Eileen. She was a highly accomplished English woman who'd always spoken about going to boarding school and studying at London's Royal Academy of Music. But after her death, Justine found out that her mother wasn't who she'd claimed to be.

Justine's written a book about what happened called The Secret Life of Dorothy Soames.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: A young Dorothy Soames in May 1941
Credit: Felix Man/Hulton Archive/Getty Images


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k4vxz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp7gx7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4v76c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k4zp3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv522fsmyzq)
India receives an outpouring of solidarity to fight Covid-19

India says it has received an outpouring of solidarity from countries around the world, as it battles a deepening coronavirus crisis. We get an extraordinarily moving and powerful account of India's covid crisis from a prominent journalist who's just lost her father after a desperate search for hospital care.
Also in the programme: We get reaction from Beijing to Joe Biden's address to Congress and how voice-recognition software is preserving the Maori language of New Zealand.

(Photo: Crematoriums are working throughout the night and using empty spaces like parks and car parks to build makeshift funeral pyres. Credit: Reuters)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k53f7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4vgpm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y493yvdr960)
US economy accelerates as recovery continues

In the first three months of 2021 the US economy grew at an annual rate of 6.4%. The figures were released shortly after President Biden outlined his proposals for an infrastructure overhaul for the country to a joint session of Congress. We consider the prospects for the US economy with Marc Goldwein of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. Also in the programme, the BBC's Benjie Guy examines Brazil's palm oil industry, where some believe the pesticides used to produce the commodity are damaging people's health. Plus, to crack down on counterfeits, online auction site eBay is launching a scheme to authenticate high-value trainers on its platform in the UK. We find out more about the move from Courtney Wilkins of the exhibition Sneaker Con, who is also a trainer authenticator.

(Picture: Shoppers queue in New York. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k575c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxglbnm73t)
Biden's spending plan

We'll bring you the five big takeaways from President Biden's speech to Congress, marking his first 100 days in office. We hear conversations about his policies among journalists covering US politics and between voters across the political spectrum.

We return to India to hear more accounts of the situation with coronavirus. We speak to our reporter in the state of West Bengal where people are voting in the final phase of elections, despite the continuing rise of virus cases. And we discuss reports that devastation in many smaller Indian cities, towns and villages has been largely under-reported. We’ll also have our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Emma Hodcroft, to talk through today's headlines on the virus.

And as a new strict coronavirus lockdown begins in Turkey, we gauge the mood of the country which was seen as a success story a year ago but now has the highest infection rate in Europe.

(Photo: U.S. President Joe Biden addresses a joint session of Congress as Vice President Kamala Harris and Speaker of the House U.S. Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) applaud, April 28, 2021. Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Pool via REUTERS)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k5bxh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxglbnmbvy)
India Covid crisis: Virus spreads to remote areas

Our regular medical expert Dr Helena Wimalarathna joins us to look at today’s coronavirus stories, including the situation in India where the world's highest daily number of infections has been recorded. We'll also speak to our colleague in India about reports that devastation seems to spreading to smaller cities and villages.

We'll bring the five big takeaways from President Biden's speech to Congress, marking his first 100 days in office. We hear conversations about his policies among journalists covering US politics and between voters across the political spectrum.

And as a new strict coronavirus lockdown begins in Turkey, we hear from people who have been trying to leave big cities to relative freedom in the countryside and holiday resorts.

(Photo: Family members of COVID-19 victims at a cremation ground in New Delhi, India, 29 April 2021.Credit: IDREES MOHAMMED/EPA)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k5gnm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k5ldr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp86d0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4vyp4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n8klj8g73)
2021/04/29 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k5q4w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4w2f8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3k)
Melting glaciers, warming coffee and a Dragonfly on Titan

When Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins – who passed away this week – looked down on the earth from lunar orbit during those days in 1969, he saw more ice and a smaller liquid ocean than you would see today. Of the 200,000 glaciers outside of the polar and Greenland ice sheets, their melting in the last two decades accounts for about a fifth of the sea level rise we are also seeing. Thus according to a paper published this week in the journal nature by, amongst others Bob McNabb of Ulster University who describes to Roland how and why these numbers are more certain than others before. As fellow earth observation expert Anna Hogg adds, the work synthesises years of data from almost half a million images of glaciers taken from space, and provides our best handle yet on our accelerating loss of this finite and dwindling natural feature.

Researchers at Kew in the UK and in Sierra Leone have rediscovered a species of coffee plant once thought lost. As Marnie Chesterton reports, climate change threatens many coffee crops around the world as the most popular variety – arabica – needs cool high altitude conditions which are going to become more scarce. But after a long and arduous search, the researchers have discovered a more resilient variety that might not only save the morning brew for many, it may even prove agriculturally and even economically transformative for some African economies.

And whilst many of us watch the antics of NASA’s Martian helicopter, Ingenuity, as it whizzes across the distant plains of “Wright’s Field” aerodrome on Mars, some are watching with more trepidation than others. In 6 years’ time, Zibi Turtle, Principle Investigator of NASA’s Dragonfly mission, hopes to launch a much larger octocopter drone to Titan, moon of Saturn. As she describes to Roland, the challenges are huge, not least because dragonfly will carry all its instruments on board as it hops around, finding new landing sites autonomously. And communicating with Earth will take a whopping hour each way.



(Image: The lunar module, carrying Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, ascends back up to the command module with Michael Collins. It is often said that Michael Collins is the only human, living or dead, who is not in this photograph.
Credit: Michael Collins / NASA)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k5tx0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv522fsnt6m)
Russian opposition activist Alexei Navalny appears in court by video-link

Alexei Navalny looked gaunt and thin as he appeared by video in court on a further charge of slander. Meanwhile his supporters have started preemptively closing their regional offices in case volunteers are imprisoned. Also in the programme: Turkey is beginning a new national lockdown as it records the highest Covid-19 infection rate in Europe; and aid has arrived in India to help the country deal with its second wave.

(Photo: Alexei Navalny is seen on screens via video link before a hearing to consider an appeal against an earlier court decision that found him guilty of slandering a Russian World War Two veteran. Credit: Press Service of Babushkinsky District Court of Moscow/Handout via Reuters)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k5yn4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4w9xj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k62d8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlpz2lcy7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scs7jqfkw)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4wfnn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48q7h3flyd)
US economy accelerates as recovery continues

In the first three months of 2021 the US economy grew at an annual rate of 6.4%. The figures were released shortly after President Biden outlined his proposals for an infrastructure overhaul for the country to a joint session of Congress. We consider the prospects for the US economy with Marc Goldwein of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

Today, India again reported record numbers of new cases and deaths. Many of India's largest companies are switching production to try and help the situation. The Tata Group is one of the countries oldest and largest companies. Its steel plant are now concentration on producing oxygen. We hear from Chanakya Chaudhary, the Vice President of Corporate Services.

Also in the programme, the BBC's Benjie Guy examines Brazil's palm oil industry, where some believe the pesticides used to produce the commodity are damaging people's health. Plus, to crack down on counterfeits, online auction site eBay is launching a scheme to authenticate high-value trainers on its platform in the UK. We find out more about the move from Courtney Wilkins of the exhibition Sneaker Con, who is also a trainer authenticator.

(Picture: Shoppers queue in New York. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 30 APRIL 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k69wj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq9crg3p67)
US economy accelerates

President Biden has been speaking at a rally in the US state of Georgia to mark his one hundredth day in office. The US economy grew at an annual rate of 6.4% in the first quarter of the year, after 4.3% in q4 of 2020. And President Biden said he wanted to ensure Americans workers were better paid and more help for those who struggling to make ends meet. We consider the prospects for the US economy with Marc Goldwein of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget and Cary Leahy from Decision Economics.

Today, India again reported record numbers of new cases and deaths. Many of India's largest companies are switching production to try and help the situation. The Tata Group is one of the countries oldest and largest companies. Its steel plant are now concentration on producing oxygen. We hear from Chanakya Chaudhary, the Vice President of Corporate Services.

Also in the programme, the BBC's Benjie Guy examines Brazil's palm oil industry, where some believe the pesticides used to produce the commodity are damaging people's health.

Plus - Mark Zuckerberg has been attending a meme conference organised by Instagram and we hear from Ben Lashes, who manages some of the biggest meme stars making millions out of licensing and non-fungible tokens.

PHOTO: Joe Biden/AFP


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k6fmn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp91lx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4wsx1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tyx)
FC Goa and Dynamo Kyiv's Mircea Lucescu

FC Goa's Brandon Fernandes discusses his team's run in the Asian Champions League and the surge of Covid cases in India. Plus, Dynamo Kyiv's 75 year old coach Mircea Lucescu talks about winning the title. We're also joined by AC Milan player Verónica Boquete.

Picture: Mircea Lucescu head coach of Dynamo Kyiv gives instructions during a UEFA Europa League match against Villarreal and Dynamo Kyiv (Jose Breton/Pics Action/NurPhoto via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k6kcs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k6p3x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4pp9935)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4x1d9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2d33)
France and its faltering relationship with Islam

France is on its way to passing The Bill Comforting the Respect of Republican Principles, one of the most controversial laws of President Macron’s presidency. It aims to fight back against what Emmanuel Macron and his ministers are calling “Islamist separatism”, what he says is an assault by Islamist extremists on the values of the French Republic.

John Laurenson meets people on both sides of this fractious debate. He visits a closed-down Paris school that its head teacher says is an early victim of President Macron’s war against “Islamist separatism” and meets another teacher – also Muslim - who describes her struggle with what she says is religious extremism in the classroom.

John meets an MP and the head of a militant secularist organisation both keen on the law. He also goes to Trappes, a suburb of Paris that many say is a breeding ground for Islamic extremism, and drinks mint tea with a scholar of Islam. He meets an Islamic bookseller called John, goes to the mosque and talks to the mayor, eats a “halal ham” sandwich, meets an inhabitant who says she lives “Islamist separatism” every day and another who says the new law stigmatises Muslims in general and will separate them still further from the non-Muslim people of France.

(Photo: A woman holds a placard reading "Freedom leads all the people" as protesters demonstrate against a bill dubbed as "anti-separatism", in Paris. Credit: Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt/AFP/Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k6sw1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7zmvws)
Israel stampede: Dozens killed at religious festival

At least 44 people have been killed and more than 100 injured in a crush at an orthodox Jewish festival.

Another grim Covid 19 milestone: more than 400,000 people have now died in Brazil. President Jair Bolsonaro has consistently rejected lockdown and social distancing measures.

And we take a look at one of Joe Biden's big new policy plans: to get more money into the hands of parents.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k6xm5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7zmzmx)
Israeli orthodox festival crush: at least 44 dead

Crowds of pilgrims were trying to pass through a new and narrow pathway when some slipped and fell.

Pakistan's government may be on the brink of enforcing a strict lockdown to prevent a similar surge to neighbouring India.

And we visit the Caribbean island of St Vincent where people are struggling to recover from the volcano eruption that displaced thousands from their homes.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k71c9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2lr7zn3d1)
Dozens killed in crush at religious festival in Israel

The local mobile network collapsed because of so much use after the tragedy - leaving many families unable to reach loved ones.

India has had another record day of Covid cases - we'll hear from its neighbour Pakistan where people are worried the situation will get out of control there too

And in Sweden, fertility campaigners say healthcare officials have broken a promise to help more single women get pregnant.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k753f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3csy9d1)
Apollo 11 astronaut - Michael Collins

Fifty years on, what was the significance of the Apollo 11 mission to the moon? Stephen Sackur is in Florida to speak to one of the crew members of the Apollo 11 mission. This year marks the 50th anniversary of one of the most remarkable feats of exploration in the history of humankind, which landed men on the moon. While Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were setting foot on the moon’s surface, Michael Collins was piloting the command module which got them all home.

(Photo: Michael Collins. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4xjct)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j02)
Men and cosmetic surgery

More men have considered cosmetic treatments during the pandemic. Has spending more time at home staring at ourselves in video conferencing made us more worried about our appearance, and have the pressures of ageism in the workplace also had an impact. Ed Butler speaks to psychologist Helena Lewis Smith, and Past President of the American Association of Plastic Surgeons Dr Alan Matarasso about just what’s motivating men to make more changes. Plus, he tries a treatment for himself.

(PHOTO: Ed Butler checking out his frown lines at a cosmetic clinic in London, Credit: BBC)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyf)
The killing of Osama Bin Laden

The US tracked down the al-Qaeda leader to a city in northern Pakistan in May 2011. Special operations troops were sent to capture or kill Bin Laden in a top secret raid in the dead of night. The Americans did not tell their Pakistani allies about the raid beforehand. Gabriela Jones spoke to Nicholas Rasmussen who was in the White House situation room with President Barack Obama and US military chiefs as the raid took place.

Photo: Osama Bin Laden's fortified compound on the outskirts of Abbottabad in north-west Pakistan. Credit: BBC


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k78vk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngt)
Is Apple iOS 14.5 hurting advertisers?

Apple’s long-awaited iPhone software update arrives with new features to block trackers. What effect is it having so far? Plus, how a machine learning startup aims to help doctors detect lung cancer earlier. And former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown warns of a global digital divide. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Zoe Kleinman. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4xn3y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k7dlp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hs9)
Is the EU stifling AI innovation?

The European Commission has published draft proposals that will, if implemented, constitute the most expansive attempt anywhere in the world to regulate the use of artificial intelligence. AI is becoming increasingly commonplace and automating jobs previously done by humans. From the algorithms that decide which social media posts to show you, to help desk chatbots capable of answering your questions, many AI applications make our lives easier and are set to receive fairly ‘light touch’ regulation. Others, such as computer programmes capable of reading thousands of CVs and drawing up a shortlist of job applicants to be interviewed, have been accused of bias and will face extra scrutiny. But under the plan some more controversial technologies could be banned altogether - such as the deployment of real-time facial recognition systems in public spaces. Some in the industry welcome clear rules of the road, but others fear that restrictions will hamstring companies and force innovators to flee. The United States is a global leader in the development of AI and the EU hopes it will adopt similar measures. But industry figures there are warning that Europe’s proposals go too far and would, if mirrored in America, result in China gaining dominance of the sector as it develops similar capabilities - but free from many of the regulations likely in the West. So, which AIs are good, which are bad, and how should they be regulated? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k7jbt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4ppb4b2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4xwm6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tyx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k7n2y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dt)
Reporting India’s Covid-19 crisis

We take a journalist's eye view of reporting the current Covid-19 crisis in India, with stories from Delhi-based team leader Jugal Purohit, BBC Gujarati's Roxy Gagdekar Chhara, BBC Marathi's Anagha Pathak, and Kirti Dubey and Piyush Nagpal of BBC Hindi.

Trade by barter
Nkechi Ogbonna of BBC Lagos describes a market in Cross River State in Nigeria, which works on a trade by barter system. She tells us how it works and who benefits.

Ramadan in Nablus
Nablus, in the occupied West Bank, is famous for its sweet makers, and Ramadan is when they’re busiest. BBC Arabic’s Alaa Daraghme takes us to his home town to share some mouth-watering treats.

BBC Xtra: Ramadan-themed cooking and dialects
Karima Kouah from BBC Arabic's radio show BBC Xtra tells us about some of their Ramadan topics, like favourite recipes shared by social media influencers, and the misunderstandings that can arise when two people speaking different Arabic dialects get together to chat.

Image: Two Delhi residents wearing PPE mourn their relative who died from Covid-19 in April 2021
Credit: Adnan Abidi / Reuters


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k7rv2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4ppbctb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4y43g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k7wl6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv522fsqvwt)
Dozens killed in Israel crush

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has promised to investigate a crush at a crowded religious festival that left dozens of people dead.
At least 45 people were killed and 150 were injured at the all-night Lag B'Omer festival near Mount Meron, which attracted tens of thousands of Orthodox Jews.

Also on the programme: the death toll in Brazil from the Covid pandemic passes 400,000 and in Holland a couple have become the first tenants of a house constructed entirely by a 3D printer.

(Photo: Rescue workers collected the lost belongings of those caught up in the crush. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k80bb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3csy9d1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4yclq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46nmnls8t7)
Apple charged over 'anti-competitive' app policies

Apple has been charged with breaking EU competition rules over how it runs its App Store. It relates in part to a complaint brought two years ago by music streaming service Spotify, as Isobel Asher Hamilton of business website, Insider, explains. Also in the programme, the Eurozone has slipped back into recession, after recording two consecutive quarterly declines in economic activity. The BBC's Andrew Walker brings us the latest picture across Europe, and we also talk to Josh Fontaine, who runs three bars and restaurants in Paris, as France sets out a timeline for reopening. Plus, men seem increasingly to be seeking cosmetic treatments during the pandemic. The BBC's Ed Butler finds out why, and tries a wrinkle-smoothing procedure for himself.

(Picture: The Spotify app shown on an Apple iPhone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k842g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxglbnq40x)
Coronavirus: Brazil passes 400,000 deaths

We continue to bring you developments in the coronavirus crisis in India but also turn our attention back to Brazil. The country has now registered more than 400,000 Covid related deaths and the healthcare system continues to struggle. Our correspondent Mark Lowen joins the programme to answer audience questions and to talk about the stories he's been reporting on during his stay in the country.

Our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University will help us explain the latest Covid-19 research and discussions.

We'll also get the latest on a crush at a religious festival in Israel on the slopes of Mount Meron, where at least 45 people have been killed.

And in the UK a number of sporting bodies and top clubs have begun a four-day boycott of social media today, to highlight the issue of online racial abuse and to put pressure on social media platforms to do more to prevent abusive posts and punish those behind them. We hear from young people in sport about how they are affected by online abuse and racism.

(Photo: Rio de la Paz NGO"s members prepare a ceremony in memory of COVID-19 victims on Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 30 April 2021. The NGO pays tribute to more than 400,000 Brazilian COVID-19 fatalities recorded so far. Credit: Antonio Lacerda/EPA)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k87tl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxglbnq7s1)
Sport social media boycott

Leading British teams and players from sports including football, cricket and rugby have begun a four-day boycott of social media. Some sponsors and European sporting bodies have also joined the protest against abuse and discrimination. They want Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to take stronger action against people who post racist and sexist comment. We hear from sportspeople from ethnic minorities about how they are affected by online abuse and racism.

And as well continuing to bring you developments in the coronavirus crisis in India, we also turn our attention back to Brazil. The country has now registered more than 400,000 Covid related deaths and the health system continues to struggle. Our correspondent Mark Lowen answers audience questions and talks about the stories he’s been reporting on during his stay in the country.

Also we get the latest on a crush at a religious festival in Israel on the slopes of Mount Meron, where at least 45 people have been killed.

(Photo: A logo on an Instagram profile as they take part in a social media boycott. Picture date: Friday April 30, 2021. Credit: Tim Goode/PA Wire)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k8ckq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k8h9v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxf4ppc393)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4yvl7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n8kljcc46)
2021/04/30 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k8m1z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4yzbc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq9)
Why are seeds such different sizes?

When eating a blackberry one day, CrowdScience listener Charles got a tiny seed stuck in his teeth. That got him wondering: why are seeds the size they are? Why does a blackberry have dozens of tiny pips, while a peach has one huge stone right in the middle?

Plant seeds have been around for hundreds of millions of years, so they’ve had plenty of time to shapeshift into wildly different forms: from dust-like orchid seeds to giant coconuts. This evolution has been a long and intricate dance with wind, water and animals; we ask how different kinds of seeds might respond to today’s environmental threats and rapidly changing ecosystems.

And we go in search of the world’s biggest seed, the coco de mer: native to just two remote islands in the Indian Ocean and weighing up to 18kg, how did this seed evolve to be so much bigger than any other?

With Professor Angela Moles, Dr Si-Chong Chen, Marc Jean-Baptiste, Dr Frauke Fleischer-Dogley and Dr Wolfgang Stuppy.


Presented by Marnie Chesterton
Produced by Cathy Edwards for the BBC World Service

[Photo: Different sized fruit seeds. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k8qt3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv522fsrq3q)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k8vk7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3csy9d1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4z6tm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tyx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjhj0k8z9c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlpz2p8vb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scs7jtbgz)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9yr4zbkr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48q7h3jhvh)
Apple charged over 'anti-competitive' app policies

Apple has been charged with breaking EU competition rules over how it runs its App Store. It relates in part to a complaint brought two years ago by music streaming service Spotify, as Isobel Asher Hamilton of business website, Insider, explains. Also in the programme, the Eurozone has slipped back into recession, after recording two consecutive quarterly declines in economic activity. The BBC's Andrew Walker brings us the latest picture across Europe, and we also talk to Josh Fontaine, who runs three bars and restaurants in Paris, as France sets out a timeline for reopening. Plus, men seem increasingly to be seeking cosmetic treatments during the pandemic. The BBC's Ed Butler finds out why, and tries a wrinkle-smoothing procedure for himself. (Picture: The Spotify app shown on an Apple iPhone. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3ct1gx5)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzk9lgv6k69)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzk9yr4xwm6)

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BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjh4r7j25s)

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BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjhj0jtq84)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d5k)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxglbnbjdj)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j4l)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvq90h4ffhh)

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Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172xvq9crg3p67)

Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dgl)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pq8)

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Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct2cbn)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lrx)

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Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2d34)

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Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2d35)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mtp)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mtp)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n5l)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nv4)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nv4)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nv4)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2fz2)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2d33)

I'm Not A Monster 09:32 SAT (w3ct1z6m)

I'm Not A Monster 22:32 SUN (w3ct1z6m)

I'm Not A Monster 03:32 MON (w3ct1z6m)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tcv)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tcv)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1tcv)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2djv)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2djv)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2djv)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2djv)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hbq)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hbq)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2lr7z888d)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172xv2lr7z8d0j)

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