Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 17 APRIL 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxqxky)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq8n6tn8wn)
Raúl Castro steps down

Raúl Castro says he is resigning as Cuban Communist Party leader, ending his family's six decades in power. Mr Castro, 89, told a party congress that he is handing over the leadership to a younger generation "full of passion and anti-imperialist spirit". We get analysis from the BBC's Will Grant. And thousands of people have been demonstrating in Berlin against the lifting of the city's rent cap. Germany's highest court ruled that the Berlin state government had no right to impose the cap. The State Secretary for Housing, Wenke Christoph tells us what she thinks of the court ruling. Plus, the BBC’s Elizabeth Hotson has been finding out how the public is responding to the cautious reopening of non-essential outlets in England this week.(Picture of former Cuban President Raul Castro. Picture by Alexandre Meneghini via Getty Images).


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxr1b2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51tn9b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jfdlg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3ct1lb8)
'Outs' instead of 'wickets'

On this week's Stumped with Alison Mitchell, Jim Maxwell and Sunil Gupta we discuss how plans are in place to overhaul some of the game's most historic terminology.

We speak to the CEO of Warwickshire Cricket Club Stuart Cain on the possibility of staging an exhibition weekend where teams from the Indian Premier League, Pakistan Super League and Caribbean Super League play the Birmingham Bears. He also tells us about a new app designed to allow the safe return of fans.

And the editor of Wisden Cricketers Almanack Lawrence Booth joins us to reveal the cricketer's of the year and how they put the book together in this very tough year.

Photo: Players for the eight teams in The Hundred line up following The Hundred Draft, broadcast live from Sky Studios on October 20, 2019 in Isleworth, England. (Photo by Christopher Lee/Getty Images for ECB)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxr526)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dr)
HRH Prince Philip: the world remembers

The death last Friday of Prince Philip was extensively covered on the BBC's language services. We hear from Peter Okwoche of BBC Africa, Janina Litvinova of BBC Russian and South Asia Diaspora reporter Gaggan Sabherwal about the challenges of the day, and tailoring their coverage for their audiences.

Venezuela's million bolivar note
BBC Mundo's Guillermo Olmo is based in Venezuela, where hyperinflation has left its currency, the bolivar, struggling to keep up. Prices rose so fast that people had to carry backpacks of notes to pay for their shopping. Now a one million bolivar note has been issued, but will it help?

Rwanda's milk bars
Milk bars are a unique feature of Rwandan towns and highlight the popularity of milk in the country. Prudent Nsengiyumva of BBC Great Lakes tells us what makes them so successful, and why milk is so important to Rwandans.

Myanmar's New Year festival
This week would usually see joyful celebrations in Myanmar for Thingyan, the Buddhist New Year festival. But many Burmese boycotted the festival, as part of continuing protests against February’s military coup, as BBC Burmese editor Soe Win Than explains.

My journey to journalism: Dan Ikpoyi, BBC Pidgin
As part of our series into our language service colleagues' routes into their jobs, we hear from Dan Ikpoyi, whose progress from the Lagos slum of Ketu to BBC Pidgin video journalist took a circuitous route through comedy, poetry and bottle top collection.

Image: A captain's cap with message of condolence on flowers outside Windsor Castle
Credit: Chris Jackson/Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyc)
China's 'Kingdom of women'

The Mosuo community in China’s Himalayan foothills is matrilineal, so a family’s ‘bloodline’, inheritance and power is passed down through the female side. There is no such thing as marriage and monogamy is actively discouraged. The women rule and the men don’t mind. Rebecca Kesby has been speaking to Choo Wai Hong, a Singaporean corporate lawyer who came across the community as she travelled through her ancestral homeland of China. She liked it so much she learnt the language and built a house there.
(PHOTO: Mosuo Women. Credit Patrick AVENTURIER/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxr8tb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hs7)
Why is Myanmar’s military killing civilians?

Over 700 people, including children, have now died during pro-democracy protests in Myanmar following a coup on 1 February. Military chief General Min Aung Hlaing has declared a year-long emergency and promised to hold fresh elections at some time in the future. The armed forces of Myanmar are guaranteed a minimum number of seats in the nation’s parliament, retain control over many of the country’s institutions, and profit from a sprawling domestic business empire. But the military says the 2020 vote - which returned the governing NLD party under Aung San Suu Kyi to power with a larger majority – was flawed.

Many politicians, including Ms Suu Kyi, are under arrest. She’s been charged with criminal offences and if found guilty can be barred from contesting future elections. The coup has taken place at a time when Myanmar, also known as Burma, is continuing to battle the coronavirus pandemic, an economic crisis, regional insurgencies and is also facing an international investigation into alleged war crimes over the killing and expulsion of tens of thousands of minority Rohingya people. So, what's behind the military's decision to row back democracy and attack its own citizens? And what can the international community do about it? Join Ritula Shah and guests as they discuss the military in Myanmar.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxrdkg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51v0jq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jfrtv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct2dmg)
The Anti-Vax Files

One woman’s escape from the rabbit hole

Catherine’s family believed in alternative medicine and she grew up in relatively poor, fringe communities that didn’t have much to do with mainstream science or Britain’s national health system. And when social media became a big part of her life, she started believing in all sorts of wild conspiracy theories.

But when she slowly realised that she was being conned by some of the pseudoscientists and charlatans she had put her trust in, she started to turn a sceptical eye on her online sources.

Catherine now lives a quiet life in southern England with her family, gardening and selling clothes at festivals. She also dedicates her free time to spreading reliable information about medicine and science online. It’s a mission that’s become ever more urgent throughout the global pandemic. Her story gives us insight into why people fall victim to anti-vaccine conspiracy theories - and what can help them to get out.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Marianna Spring
Producer: Joseph Martin


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2djt)
How many swimming pools full of vaccine do we need

If we brought together all the Covid 19 vaccine needed for the whole world, how much space would it fill up? An Olympic size swimming pool? We do some back of the envelope sums.

Plus - we look at the increased risk of clots from pregnancy. Last week we looked at the increased risk of getting a clot from taking the combined contraceptive pill and compared it to risk of possible rare clots identified following the Astra Zeneca jab. How does pregnancy compare?


(Swimming pool underwater. Credit: Evgenii Mitroshin/Getty images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxrj9l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt3n7n2xkp)
Russia expels US diplomats following sanctions

Russia is to expel 10 US diplomats in a reciprocal response to sanctions imposed by Washington on Thursday. Russia's foreign minister Sergei Lavrov said Moscow was also tightening restrictions on US diplomats travelling within Russia, as well as the hiring of Russian citizens in US missions.

Also in this hour: The latest from Chicago where demonstrations have been taking place following the fatal shooting of a 13 year old boy by a police officer; and a look at a documentary that claims to shed more light on the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

(Picture: US Embassy in Russia, Credit: EPA)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxrn1q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt3n7n319t)
Ukraine: Fears of invasion mount following Russian troop build-up

Warnings have continued from Ukraine and Western governments that Russia is massing troops in Russian-annexed Crimea and around the eastern Ukraine conflict zone, leading to fears of imminent invasion. The Kremlin has not yet given details, describing the moving of troops across Russian territory as an “internal affair”. We’ll hear the latest from the front line.

Also in this hour: we’ll hear from a former Facebook employee who says that governments are using the platform to manipulate voters without retribution; and musician Mick Jagger talks about the music he’s been making during lockdown.

(Picture: Zelensky in Eastern Ukraine, Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxrrsv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt3n7n351y)
Prince Philip funeral: Royal Family set to gather at Windsor Castle

The funeral of Prince Philip, the late husband of Queen Elizabeth, will take place today at Windsor Castle, west of London. A small group of family members - including his four children and Princes William and Harry - will walk in procession behind his coffin.

Also in this hour: following the announcement of Raul Castro’s plans to step down from office, we reflect on his legacy; and a look at a new authorised biography on American writer Philip Roth.

(Picture: Prince Philip, Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jg427)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2cc8)
How can Americans of colour trust the police?

Katty Kay and Carlos Watson discuss police brutality and shooting cases in the US. What needs to change?
Last year 1127 people were killed by the American police; most of them were shot. People of colour were disproportionately the victims.
Katty and Carlos speak to the civil rights attorney John Burris, who has taken on hundreds of police brutality cases, including most famously the case of Rodney King after he was beaten by LAPD officers in 1991. The second guest is Mecole Jordan-McBride, a community advocacy worker for the Policing Project, which is seeking police reform in Chicago.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxrwjz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2d5j)
Coronavirus: Surviving isolation

The pandemic has caused many people to feel lonely and isolated. For three women, the isolation is as a result of travelling and having to quarantine in hotels on arrival - Michelle in Australia, Amanda in Indonesia and Charlotte in New Zealand. They tell host Nuala McGovern how they are passing the time and share recommendations.

It’s not just people living alone who can feel isolated, of course, and three single parents from the Philippines, the United States and the UK share their experiences - both the highs and lows - of living with their children 24/7. For theatre artist Floyd in Manila, it has resulted in singing regularly with his ten year old son.

(Photo: Michelle Murphy Credit: Michelle Murphy)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jg7tc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6l)
I'm Not a Monster

17/04/2021 GMT

An American mother living in the heart of the ISIS caliphate. Her husband an ISIS sniper. Her 10-year-old son forced to threaten the U.S. president in a propaganda video shown around the world. She claims she was tricked into taking her young children to war-torn Syria, but where does her account end and the truth begin? Over four years journalist Josh Baker unravels a dangerous story where nothing is as it seems. From the depths of Raqqa’s infamous torture prison to an elk hunt in Idaho, he uncovers secrets, lies and the lasting consequences.

I’m Not A Monster is the story of one family’s journey from Indiana to the Islamic State group and back.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3ct1l17)
Uncovering the American mother caught up in Syria

I'm Not a Monster is the story of an American mother living in the heart of the Isis caliphate. We hear your thoughts and talk to the podcast's host.
Plus a listener to The Fifth Floor asks why some interviews seem to come to an abrupt end.

Presenter Rajan Datar
Producer Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxs093)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0pwqj37f9r)
Elladj Baldé - The figure skater trying to change perceptions of his sport

Canadian professional figure skater Elladj Baldé tells us how he’s bringing the sport to a new audience through social media. Videos of Baldé performing unconventional routines to artists including Rihanna and Labrinth, have been viewed millions of times. He was born in Moscow to a Russian mother and a Guinean father and tells us he hasn’t always found it easy to express himself in the sport. Baldé also explains how we was once told to cut his hair to fit in with perceptions of how a figure skater should look and about his hopes for increasing diversity in skating.

Gerda Steyn joins us to reflect on breaking the South Africa national marathon record, which had stood for twenty five years. The 31-year-old confirmed her place at a first Olympic Games, with her performance in Italy last week.

We’re live at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield on the opening morning of the World Snooker Championship. The BBC’s Jamie Broughton brings us the latest action and we hear from the world number three, Neil Robertson. The Australian tells us how a second world title could cement his legacy in the sport and why superstition means he’s keeping his lockdown hair for the tournament.

In the week that marked 100 days to go until the Tokyo Olympics, we speak to New Zealand rugby sevens star Tyla Nathan-Wong. She explains how she battled perceptions about her height and heritage to make it in rugby and how her Chinese grandfather is her inspiration. Nathan-Wong also tells us about chasing the gold medal in Tokyo and why she couldn’t turn down the chance to be featured on postage stamps ahead of the games.

In Sporting Witness – we tell the story of the Spanish hurdler - Maria Jose-Patino - who was forced to quit the sport in the 1980s after a test found she had male chromosomes due to a rare genetic condition. Maria fought a two year legal battle, successfully proving it did not improve her athletic performance. The case is seen as a milestone in the debate around genetic variation in sport.

And the BBC’s Vicki Sparks joins us live from St James Park ahead of the early game in the Premier League between Newcastle United and West Ham United.

(Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxs417)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51vr0h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jgh9m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f2z)
How to build a brand in the VUCA world

For most companies, the pandemic has had far-reaching consequences. Established business models and proof-read plans became irrelevant, while growth reached an abrupt halt.

In this volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous (or VUCA) world, businesses are now seeking to make sense of newer priorities and economic patterns. A recent study of 100 CEOs in India indicates a stronger focus on purpose-led leadership after the pandemic’s business disruption.

But how will this impact business branding and behaviour? Would passive adaptability score higher over aggressive marketing? In this edition, we ask how businesses can build and retain their brands in the VUCA world.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Harish Bijoor, brand and business strategy consultant; Mansi Tripathy, vice president, commercial lubricants, Shell APME; Nithin Kamath, founder & CEO, Zerodha


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxs7sc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d2f)
Dance divas: 1978-1988

Meet the group of pioneering women DJs, producers, vocalists and remixers who were part of the New York underground dance scene from Disco onwards.
Presented by the Queen of Clubland herself, Martha Wash, whose vocals feature on 12 number one Billboard Dance chart hits, to date.

All the women are linked by one nightclub - the Paradise Garage - which alongside underground clubs in Chicago and Detroit would help lay the foundation for modern dance music. Underground DJ's, clubs, and producers were not only important in breaking mainstream hits, they were also a safe haven for LGBTQ+ People of Colour.

We meet Yvonne Turner, Rebecca Mackenzie, Carol Cooper, Gail Sky King and Sharon White who were all Paradise Garage regulars from its opening in the late 70s. We follow their first steps in the music business, after the death of disco.
But in a cut-throat music industry, many women, including Martha, had to fight to get proper credit for their work and recognition for their achievements is long overdue. Now in their 60s, we follow their remarkable stories over several decades, as underground dance music evolved from disco into house, striving for success in an environment which was often hostile to women. At the same time, the NYC underground scene was hit by the Aids crisis, gentrification, and the rise of hip-hop.

Presenter: Martha Wash
Producer: Victoria Ferran

(Photo: Martha Wash. Credit: Mike Ruiz)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxscjh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx58bv3)
Prince Philip: Funeral to celebrate 'unwavering loyalty'

Final preparations are taking place near London for the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh. The ceremony at Windsor Castle will only be attended by 30 people, because of coronavirus restrictions. Buckingham Palace says the ceremony will mark Prince Philip's "unwavering loyalty" to the Queen. His association with the Royal Navy and love of the sea will also be a focus.

Also in the programme: India registers a record number of new coronavirus cases amid concerns the Kumbh Mela religious festival could turn into a "super-spreader" event; and Nasa has selected Elon Musk's SpaceX company to build the lander that will take humans back to the surface of the Moon for the first time in nearly half a century.

(Image: Prince Philip. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 14:00 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jgsmz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:02 The Funeral of HRH the Duke of Edinburgh (w3ct2fyz)
The Funeral of HRH The Duke of Edinburgh

Martha Kearney presents live coverage of the Ceremonial Procession and Service at St George’s Chapel, Windsor, with a commentary team including Clare Balding, Eleanor Oldroyd, Clive Myrie and Allan Little describing the proceedings as the husband and consort of Her Majesty The Queen is laid to rest.

As the event unfolds, there will be contributions from historian Tracy Borman, personal friend Martin Palmer who worked with him for four decades and reflections from BBC Royal Correspondent Jonny Dymond. The Funeral Service is conducted by the Dean of Windsor, the Right Reverend David Conner, with a blessing by the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Reverend Justin Welby.

Technical production is led by Bob Nettles; the outside broadcast engineering team at Windsor is led by Jon Wilson; event editor is Peter Griffiths, James Whitbourn is the producer at St George's Chapel, the programme producer is Graham McMillan and the editor is Karen Dalziel.


SAT 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxsqrw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 16:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fpc)
The day I met Prince Philip

Over his seven decades of service to Queen Elizabeth the Second, to the United Kingdom, her 15 other realms, and to the Commonwealth, Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, met many millions of people. They all have stories to tell about those meetings and in this special programme Winifred Robinson hears some of them.

The stories reflect on the Prince’s many passions, the charities he was involved with, his commitment to individuals and causes and also his support for the Queen and the Commonwealth. We also hear about his sharp wit and sense of humour.

Among those telling their stories of connection with the Prince are Ruth Sim, who introduced him to children with HIV and Aids in Uganda, Paul Boateng, who first saw a young Prince Philip in Ghana when he was a boy in the early 1960s, and Denise Mortimer, who was involved with the Duke of Edinburgh Awards in the Bahamas.

Thai-American Vanda Asapahu in Los Angeles explains how her connection with the Prince led to her meeting the man she would eventually marry, while we hear how a state visit to Canada made the news after one of his famous jokes.

(Photo: HRH Prince Philip enjoying a humorous moment with Ontario Lt.Gov. David Onley and an officer of the Royal Canadian Regiment. Credit: Legislative Assembly of Ontario)


SAT 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxsvj0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 17:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t5hfj0h7t)
Live Sporting Action

Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live FA cup semi final commentary as Manchester City take on Chelsea at Wembley.

Photo: Raheem Sterling Manchester City (Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxt6rd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsr)
Actor Sharon Stone

Actor Sharon Stone shares her difficult relationship with Hollywood and why it’s time for the sisterhood

Filmmaker Lee Isaac Chung tells us about his award winning semi-autobiographical movie Minari

Veteran Indian actor Manoj Bajpayee tells us how Covid 19 is affecting the Hindi film industry

Venezuelan actor Edgar Ramirez explains how his journalist’s toolkit helps him with his roles

The documentary director Garrett Bradley on her film Time, which looks at the US judicial system from the personal perspective.

Saxophonist and composer Branford Marsalis on why the Blues are not always so blue

And joining Nikki Bedi are broadcaster and cultural commentator William Lee Adams and documentary filmmaker Elizabeth Lo, who’ll also be talking about her film Stray.


(Photo: Sharon Stone. Credit: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxtbhj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx599t4)
Global coronavirus death toll passes 3 million

The pandemic continues to ravage populations around the world as more variants appear and spread quickly. Ontario, in Canada, registered a record 4,812 new infections while India's Kumbh festival attracts big crowds amid devastating second Covid wave.

Also on the programme: the last goodbye to the Duke of Edinburgh as his funeral takes place in Windsor Castle; and NASA chooses Elon Musk's company SpaceX to build a spacecraft that they hope will return humans to the Moon this decade.

(Photo: A woman undergoes a free COVID-19 nasal swab test for at-risk people in a bid to curb the rapid spreading of the pandemic. Credit: EPA).


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxtg7n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbp)
Give it some space with Alex Isley

Alex Isley, Tiffany Gouché, India Shawn and Gwen Bunn discuss the creative foundations of songwriting – how has your sound evolved over time? How do you finish a track that you’ve been working on for ages? And crucially, how do you know if a song is actually good?

R&B and soul singer-songwriter Alex Isley grew up surrounded by the musical influences of her father and uncle’s band, the Isley Brothers. Her classical vocal training and jazz background have shaped her three self-written and produced projects, and she has worked with artists including Kendrick Lamar, Moses Sumney, and Brandon Williams.

Three-time Grammy-nominated singer, songwriter and producer Tiffany Gouché's 2015 EP Pillow Talk turned heads across the music industry. She has gone on to collaborate with Terrace Martin, and produced Lalah Hathaway’s acclaimed album Honestly. India Shawn is an LA-based singer-songwriter whose writing credits are as impressive as her vocal performances. She is an in-demand collaborator, having worked with Anderson .Paak, Solange and 6LACK. Gwen Bunn started out as a singer in the church choir in her hometown of Atlanta, going on to set up her label Melody Dungeon Music, and released her debut record Safe Travels in 2017. She has collaborated with the likes of Rapsody, Ty Dolla $ign and Faith Evans.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxtkzs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywkzfg6wjr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sc1pxby5d)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jhy85)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdt)
Nikita Gill and creative renewal

During lockdown, the Irish-Indian poet Nikita Gill created a poetic pandemic time capsule on social media. She shares how she rebuilt hope for herself and her followers, through a daily ritual of writing and sharing.

For Malian singer-songwriter Fatoumata Diawara, music has a revitalising, redemptive power. She has overcome challenging personal circumstances and gone on to collaborate with international superstar musicians such as Damon Albarn, Paul McCartney and fellow Malians, Amadou and Mariam. Fatoumata tells Nawal how music has helped her survive - and how she hopes it can do the same for others.

And, how will we refresh our wardrobes after a year of dressing down in lockdown? For The Cultural Frontline, US fashion editor Lindsay Peoples Wagner opens her post-pandemic fashion look book.

Plus, has a song, a book or a film ever re-energised you and the way you see the world? The acclaimed Turkish author Elif Shafak reveals the work that recharged her creativity.



Presenter: Nawal Al-Maghafi


(Photo: Nikita Gill. Credit: Peace Ofure)



SUNDAY 18 APRIL 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxtth1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1yv0)
Rolling out the vaccines faster

Two weeks ago several G7 leaders called for an international treaty on Pandemic Preparedness for the future. This week 175 prominent leaders called for lifting the IP on vaccine design. And former UK PM Gordon Brown called on the G7 to finance vaccines for the world in the next two months. But are there technical difficulties that limit the pace of manufacture?

Anthony McDonnell is an economist at think tank Centre for Global Development who has been looking at the problem since last year. He suggests, amongst other things, one limit is the human expertise in manufacturing these brand-new technologies, with another being a level of vaccine nationalism that is seeing a lack of exports of components involved in manufacture.

Professor Trudie Lang heads the University of Oxford’s Global Health Network, and looks at health research across the world. She says in most countries there is no lack of public health or infrastructure potential for rolling out the vaccines, if only the supply existed.

The volcano that erupted explosively on St Vincent last week has led to many thousands of people being evacuated. Dr Joan Latchman of the University of West Indies Seismic Research Centre - who has monitored Caribbean volcanos for several decades - describes from Trinidad how the layers of ash mean recovery will take a long time, even if the explosions and pyroclastic dangers subside reasonably soon. Back in The UK, Prof Jenni Barclay and colleagues are examining rocks from the early part of the eruption, before the explosive phase began, to see if there are clues in the microstructure that could provide clues to the future.

And how do our brains so quickly tell a scream of delight from a scream of horror? Or of pain? Prof Sascha Frühholz of the University of Geneva has written in the journal PLOS Biology this week about work looking at how we identify the nature of different human screams. One finding is that we perceive joy quicker than fear.

Grief is universal. It is something almost all of us will go through at some point. And it is something that the people we love will experience when we die.

Grief can be all consuming, it can make everyday tasks like getting out of bed, feel impossible. Which makes listener Oliver from Australia wonder - what is the point? It doesn’t bring what we lost, back.

Why have we evolved to be so affected by loss? Be it the death of a loved one, the end of a relationship or the loss of a job. Does it serve any purpose? Or perhaps it is just the price we pay for being a social species with such strong connections.

(Image: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxty75)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51xk6f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jj9hk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2cc8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxv1z9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d2f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxv5qf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtn)
A dispute in the South China Sea

Stories from the South China Sea, Italy, Pakistan and France.

The South China Sea has long been a hotly disputed region. This week Manila summoned the Chinese Ambassador over what it describes as the “lingering presence” of Chinese boats in its internationally recognised waters. It’s the latest in a three-week spat between the two countries following the amassing of around 200 large ships at Whitsun Reef within the Philippines’ Exclusive Economic Zone. China claims they are fishing vessels, sheltering from bad weather, but the Philippine government say they are militia boats, encroaching on its territory. Howard Johnson explains why this region could become a flashpoint.

In Turin, we join climate activist Greta Thunberg. Greta has gained global notoriety for championing the cause of climate change. Her influence is being described as the Greta effect. And undoubtedly, things are changing: over the last few years, several countries have announced “net zero emissions” by 2050 and the US and China have pledged to make climate change a priority. Joe Myerscough spent time with her in Turin working on a new BBC series and learnt a bit more about the personality behind the public figure.

Covid infections are on the rise again in Pakistan, amid a third wave in the region. The country has once again imposed lockdown restrictions. But there is one young man who has been using the time at home to perfect his impersonation of Charlie Chaplin. Whenever lockdown restrictions are lifted he takes to the streets in his coat tails and bowler hat – to the alarm and entertainment of those on the streets of Peshawar. Rani Singh watched him.

Rule-breaking has been a feature of the long period of restrictions in a number of countries during the pandemic. Like many cities, Parisians have been particularly pained by the closure of their restaurants and brasseries. But for those in the know, there have been some secret arrangements, which recently made headlines in France. Joanna Robertson has been on the trail of the clandestine dinners.

(Image: A Philippine flag on a coast guard boat as they patrol past Chinese vessels on the waters of Whitsun Reef, in the Spratly Islands, Philippines. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency/PCG)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jjjzt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxv9gk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51xxft)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jjnqy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2d27)
Don't log off: My life, my world

Alan Dein follows 25-year-old entrepreneur Fahad in Dhaka, Bangladesh who has to deal with the pressures of running multiple businesses during the pandemic – and has over 200 employees depending on him for their livelihoods.

(Photo: Farhan courtesy of Farhan Wahab)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxvf6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt3n7n5tgs)
China and US make climate change pledge

China and the United States have promised to work together to combat climate change -- despite tensions over a range of other issues. A joint statement issued after a visit to China by the US climate envoy John Kerry said they would address the crisis with the seriousness and urgency it demands.

Also in this hour: We reflect on the life of the late Hubert Faure, one of the members of a French commando team that was involved in the D-Day landings; and a look at a new book that considers the lessons that can be learned from the Cuban Missile Crisis

(Picture: The Gate of Heavenly Peace in Beijing, Credit: Reuters)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxvjyt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt3n7n5y6x)
COVID: Germany sees highest daily rate in three months

Germany has registered its highest daily rate in coronavirus cases in three months. The rise in cases comes as the country prepares to commemorate the deaths of some 79,000 people lost to covid in the last year.

Also in this hour: ahead of the upcoming Earth Summit, we’ll speak to a former Brazilian environment minister about talks underway to protect the Amazon rainforest; and a look at Aden in Yemen and its flourishing rap scene

(Picture: A sign is seen in downtown Timmendorfer Strand, Credit: Reuters/Fabian Bimmer)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxvnpy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt3n7n61z1)
China and US make climate change pledge

China and the United States have promised to work together to combat climate change -- despite tensions over a range of other issues. A joint statement issued after a visit to China by the US climate envoy John Kerry said they would address the crisis with the seriousness and urgency it demands.

Also in this hour: We reflect on the life of the late Hubert Faure, one of the members of a French commando team that was involved in the D-Day landings; and a neuroscientist explains to us the science behind the feel-good effect of hugging.

(Picture: Tiananmen Square, Credit: Reuters/Carlos Garcia Rawlins)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jk0zb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfg)
How to love chillies

Chillies can be hard to love at first, but they are integral to the cuisines of many countries. So what do you do if hot peppers are at the heart of your food culture, but your child can’t stand the heat?

Emily Thomas is joined by three cooks and parents. Each of them grew up in a food culture where chillies are important, but are now bringing up their own children in a country where hot peppers have less significance. We hear why you might want a child to develop a taste for chilli, how young they should be introduced to it, and whether you should ever resort to bribery.

Guests: MiMi Aye, Sunrita Dutta, Mei Li.


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxvsg2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jk4qg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kwq)
Bringing down a dictator

In the late 1990s, lawyer Jacqueline Moudeina took on one of the most important cases in African legal history – the trial of Chad's former dictator Hissène Habré. He's a man who had massacred and tortured his people, including members of Jacqueline’s own family. She was determined to get justice, even if it took decades and meant risking her life. This programme was first broadcast on 3rd February 2019.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Image: Jacqueline Moudeina
Credit: JONAS EKSTROMER/AFP/Getty Images

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxvx66)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbm)
Spooked

Why, when you’re alone, do you sometimes feel like you’re not?

Eager to find signs of life in our surroundings? Eager enough to see faces in clouds, or tweak out when the house creaks at night?

Dessa investigates some of the most mystical, disorienting and disturbing experiences a person can have. She discovers that neuroscience, the study of our brains, might just help explain this big, important chunk of being human.

(Image: Shadow hand on glass, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jk8gl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1fq8)
Three months to save my son's life

Veer is four years old. He has a genetic disorder called Fanconi Anaemia affecting his bone marrow. In 2019, his parents were told they would need to find a lifesaving stem cell donor for him. Doctors estimated that Veer could expect to live for between two to five years before needing a transplant, depending on how quickly his bone marrow depletes. However, after one of Veer’s recent general check-ups, the Doctors said things were deteriorating faster than expected and Veer was only three to six months from needing the transplant. The challenge is to get people to register. Currently, only 2% of the UK’s population are stem cell donors. A donor could come from anywhere around the world but misconceptions about becoming a donor means registrants are low. In the end, all it involves is a procedure similar to giving blood.

Rajeev Gupta follows Veer’s parents as they dramatically ramp up efforts to save their son's life. In this emotional story, we get to know the charming little Veer and his family as they battle limitations placed by the coronavirus pandemic to try and find a match for him. Rajeev hears how Veer’s mum, Kirpa and dad, Nirav have increasingly turned to their Jain faith to help deal with the emotional traumas placed upon the family. Kirpa believes their faith inevitably guides them through this and will help Veer find his match. With exclusive access, this programme follows Veer and his family to what could be a joyous or equally heart wrenching conclusion.

Presenter/producer: Rajeev Gupta

(Photo: Veer. Credit: helpveernow.org)


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxw0yb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51ymxl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jkd6q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct29c0)
Water: Too Much And Not Enough

Solutions

Water is at the heart of many of the most serious ecological crises we face, including the biggest one of all: the climate emergency. Alok Jha shows how water itself may offer solutions to give us hope.

Alok witnesses nuclear fusion in action at an experimental reactor in England. Simple seawater provides the fuel for this futuristic technology that has the potential to solve the world’s energy problems and eliminate fossil fuel power generation.

Meanwhile chemist Fernando Romo walks us through the fascinating science of artificial photosynthesis, which allows humans to mimic plants, drawing carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and storing energy in the process.

But water historian Terje Tvedt cautions that the more reliant human societies become on water technologies, the more vulnerable we make ourselves to changes in the water landscape. An innovative 3D mapping project by activist geographer Hindou Ibrahim shows how technology must be married to grassroots organising and political action if it is to break out of the lab and help secure our water future.

(Photo: Water droplets on a leaf. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxw4pg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 World Questions (w3ct1wff)
The future of work

Life has changed in many ways in the year since the pandemic hit. Countless millions have been forced to work from home, offices have closed, livelihoods have disappeared and videoconferencing and online shopping have made huge inroads into everyday life. What will be the long term impact on the world of work?

Katya Adler explores the future of work with a high level panel facing questions from the public around the world. What will stay changed, what will happen next and what will we miss from the way things were?

The panel:
Nicolas Schmit: EU Commissioner for Jobs and Social Rights
Molly Kinder: David M. Rubenstein Fellow at the Brookings Institution's Metropolitan Policy Programme
Manish Bahl: Senior Director, Centre for the Future of Work at Cognizant, Asia Pacific
Ivan Petrella: Former Director of Argentina 2030. Fellow of the Center for Internet and Society – Harvard University

Producers: Charlie Taylor and Helen Towner
Sound Engineers: Ian Mitchell and Mark MacDonald

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Commuters rushing to work across Reuters Square, Canary Wharf, Credit: Doug Armand/Getty Images)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxw8fl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx5c7r6)
Czech Republic blames Russia for 2014 blast

The Czech Republic will be informing its allies about suspected Russian involvement in a lethal attack on an arms depot in 2014. The men believed to have carried out the assault have been linked to an attempt to poison a former Russian intelligence officer in Britain four years later.

Also in the programme: The impact of the pandemic on Brazil's poor; and we ask what the commitment by China and the United States to work together on climate change means.

(Image: A national flag of Russia flies on the Russian embassy in Prague. Eighteen Russian diplomats were given 48 hours to leave the Czech Republic. Credit: Reuters/David W Cerny/File Photo)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxwd5q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rkz)
One Hundred Years of Solitude: The story of Latin America

Considered to be one of literature’s supreme achievements, One Hundred Years of Solitude by the Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez is reported to be the most popular work of Spanish-language fiction since Don Quixote in the 17th century. Written in 1967, it tells the story of seven generations of the Buendía family, whose patriarch is the founder of a fictional Colombian village called Macondo. But why is it said this novel – which fuses the fantastical and the real – tells the story of Latin America and has given an entire continent its voice?

Joining Bridget Kendall are Ilan Stavans, Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College in Massachusetts, in the United States, and the biographer of Gabriel García Márquez; María del Pilar Blanco, Associate Professor in Spanish American literature at Oxford University, and Parvati Nair, Professor of Hispanic, Cultural and Migration studies at Queen Mary, University of London.

Produced: Anne Khazam

(Photo: Partial view of a mural painting by Oscar Gonzalez and Andrew Pisacane representing passages from One Hundred Years of Solitude at the National Library in Bogota. Credit: Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2djt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxwhxv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxwmnz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t5hfj38ds)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as Manchester United host Burnley.

Delyth Lloyd is joined by South African international Dean Furman to discuss all the big talking points. We'll have reaction to day's early match between Arsenal and Fulham and preview the FA Cup semi final between Leicester City and Southampton with former Leicester striker Steve Claridge and the BBC's football correspondent John Murray.

Elsewhere, we'll review the F1 Grand Prix in Italy, the Monte Carlo Masters Tennis final and get a South Africa perspective on the upcoming Lions Tour.

Photo: Manchester United (Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxwzxc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51zlwm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jlc5r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2cc8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxx3nh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Business Weekly (w3ct2dgk)
Climate crisis: time to talk

The US is making overtures to China about working together to save the planet. On Business Weekly, we hear what concessions each side would like the other to make as they try to put aside their diplomatic differences for the sake of the environment. We also hear from climate activist Greta Thunberg, who tells us what her vision for the future is and what she’d like to see politicians doing. As the cargo ship Ever Given remains in the Suez Canal - this time impounded by the Egyptian authorities - we take a close look at the huge vessels in the shipping industry. At what point do companies have to start thinking about reducing the size of these mega ships? And drone racing is increasing in popularity. One pilot tells us what it’s like to fly drones competitively and whether you can make a living from it. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

Photo: US president Joe Biden pictured with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping (Credit: Getty)


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxx7dm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx5d6q7)
Russia to expel twenty Czech diplomats in escalating row

Czech officials suspect Russian agents were behind a deadly explosion at an arms depot seven years ago. Moscow summoned the Czech ambassador to Russia after the Kremlin denied any involvement.

Also on the programme: the international community warns Russia about the consequences if the opposition leader, Alexei Navalny, dies in jail; and potential insurgent attacks in N’Djamena, Chad’s capital, forces US non-essential staff to leave the country.

(Photo: Russian President Vladimir Putin during a meeting with senior members of the government. Credit: Reuters.)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxxc4r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jlqf4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2djt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxxgww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywkzfg9sfv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sc1pxfv2h)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jlv58)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3ct1kwq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 19 APRIL 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r71kn9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl416ff5tk)
Uefa condemns major soccer clubs signing up to breakaway European Super League

Football authorities in Europe including Uefa and the Premier League have condemned twelve major soccer clubs signing up to a breakaway European Super League. The organisations say that they will ban the clubs – which include Real Madrid, Barcelona, Manchester United and Liverpool - from their domestic leagues if they go ahead with the plans for the mid-week competition. Football finance expert, Kieran Maguire tells us the details. Also in the programme, a spike in COVID infections in Kenya has triggered new travel restrictions with a curfew imposed in Nairobi over the weekend. This follows recent warnings by the head of Africa's Centre for Disease Control that moves by India to delay exports of the Astra Zeneca vaccine could be catastrophic for African countries. Former head of the African Development Bank, Donald Kaberuka explains the impact vaccine nationalism could have on the continent. Plus, Mexico's top broadcaster Televisa and Univision of the US have agreed to a $4.8 billion content merger aimed at launching a Spanish language streaming service to take on the likes of Netflix . Cynthia Littleton, the Co-Editor of Variety magazine tells us more.

(Photo: A soccer game. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtqxxp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct1m7k)
The equal rights stuff

In 1976, Nasa launched a campaign to help recruit the next generation of Astronauts. It was fronted by African-American actress Nichelle Nichols, Star Trek’s Lt. Uhura, as part of an effort to ensure the astronaut corps represented the diversity of the United States.

When they were revealed to the press, the 35 members of the new astronaut group included six women, three African American men and one Asian American man. All were appointed on merit.

The selection of the first women caused quite a stir. As the ‘first mom in space’, Anna Fisher was asked by the press whether she was worried about her child (none of the fathers were asked). There were also jibes about separate restrooms and whether the women would ‘weep’ if something went wrong.

Meanwhile, Nasa’s engineers suggested developing a zero-g makeup kit and the first US woman in space, Sally Ride, was issued with a long string of tampons (joined together like sausages) for a six-day mission.

To mark the 40th anniversary of the first Shuttle launch in April 1981, astronaut Nicole Stott speaks to some of these pioneers and hears how Nasa has since aimed to become a beacon for diversity.

Contributors also include astronaut Charles Bolden, the first African American to head the space agency and – as Nasa prepares to land the first woman on the Moon – its new head of human spaceflight, Kathy Lueders.

(Image: Sally Ride. Credit: Nasa)

Producer: Richard Hollingham


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r71pdf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfc49cp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtr1nt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqb)
What does the world want from the US?

President Biden has invited the world’s major polluters to a summit on Earth Day (April 22nd). It may be the biggest climate summit ever organised by an American leader. On the campaign trail last year, Mr Biden said climate change was his “number one issue.” Now, the pressure is on for him to make a big announcement.

But while the US has rejoined the Paris Climate Agreement, it has no official plan to hit the Paris targets. Frantic work is underway in the US to come up with something that satisfies the President’s lofty campaign rhetoric but can actually get through America’s polarised, gridlocked political system.

Ahead of the summit, The Climate Question is reaching out to climate diplomats and experts from China, Bangladesh, the EU and beyond, to hear what the world expects from the US on climate change.

Presenters: Neal Razzell & Graihagh Jackson
Producer: Jordan Dunbar


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r71t4k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtr5dy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l17)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r71xwp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfc4jvy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtr952)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6d)
How to live alone

Eating ice cream in the early hours, naked dancing and not having to tidy up behind anyone else are just some of the benefits of living alone described by Kim Chakanetsa’s guests on The Conversation this week. Solo living is a rising global phenomenon, tied to increasing economic empowerment of women. It's a trend seen in all countries, including in more traditional, conservative cultures. But it's rarely written about and often overlooked in government strategy. So why are more women choosing to live on their own and what do they enjoy about it?

Hannah Carmichael started the Living Well Alone Project in the UK with her mother Helen. They had both started living on their own, for different reasons, but had found the first months difficult. Looking for advice they found there wasn't much. Hannah says Covid has shone a spotlight on the lives of people who live alone, and there's still much myth-busting needed.

Sreemoyee Piu Kundu based her book Status Single on interviews with 3,500 women who spoke about their experience of single life in India. She has set up an online community where solo women of all ages come together to talk about living alone, single parenthood, financial and social struggles and offer support to each other.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
Left: Hannah Carmichael [credit Carl Fletcher]
Right: Sreemoyee Piu Kundu [courtesy Sreemoyee Piu Kundu]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r721mt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznh3nk)
Russia warned of 'consequences' if Navalny dies

International concern grows after doctors of the Putin critic says he needs urgent medical help.

Could the giant money spinning industry of European football be carved up by some of the top clubs? we get reaction to a planned Super-League.

And why two year olds will have to wear masks in Michigan in the fight against Covid.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r725cy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznh7dp)
Navalny: Concern grows over health of Putin critic

As the US warns Russia of 'consequences' if opposition leader Alexei Navalny dies in prison, we speak to his chief of staff for an update on his health.

As the trial of former Minneapolis policeman Derek Chauvin draws to a close, we look back at the impact of the death of George Floyd.

And very shortly, Nasa will attempt to fly a helicopter over the surface of Mars. The craft - called Ingenuity- could transform the way we explore distant planets.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r72942)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznhc4t)
Navalny could "die within days" if not given medical treatment

Moscow comes under pressure from the US and Europe after doctors express concerns for Navalny's health.

The Kremlin is also facing criticism after evidence emerges that two Russian agents were behind an explosion at an arms dump that killed two people in the Czech republic.

And a quarantine free travel bubble between Australia and New Zealand opens up - with tears of joy as families are reunited.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r72dw6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2f)
James Rebanks: Sustainable food in a growing world

In a special edition of the programme, HARDtalk is in the area known as the Lake District in north-west England. The landscape is beautiful, but is not wild. The fields have been shaped by generations of shepherds and stockmen. Stephen Sackur speaks to James Rebanks, whose farm has been in his family's hands for at least 600 years. In his book - English Pastoral - he advocates for a better kind of farming that is more sustainable and environmentally responsible. But are his ideas compatible with putting affordable food on all of our tables?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtrs4l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4k)
Meeting expectations

Every day 55 million meetings take place in the United States. But just how effective are they at actually getting stuff done? British comedian David Mitchell has been investigating how the meeting evolved and the "meeting-isation" of society.

(Picture: a man boring colleagues during a meeting. Credit: Getty Images.)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0n)
The Eichmann trial

In April 1961, Adolf Eichmann, the Nazi official in charge of concentration camps, was put on trial in Israel.The trial helped reveal the full details of the holocaust in which millions of European jews were killed during World War Two. One of the prosecutors, Gabriel Bach, spoke to Lucy Williamson for Witness History.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

PHOTO: Eichmann in the dock. (AFP/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r72jmb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtrwwq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq7)
Why does grief leave me feeling this way?

Grief is universal. It is something almost all of us will go through at some point. And it is something that the people we love will experience when we die.

Grief can be all consuming, it can make everyday tasks like getting out of bed, feel impossible. Which makes listener Oliver from Australia wonder - what is the point? It doesn’t bring what we lost, back.

Why have we evolved to be so affected by loss? Be it the death of a loved one, the end of a relationship or the loss of a job. Does it serve any purpose? Or perhaps it is just the price we pay for being a social species with such strong connections.

Image: Families Mourn Victims of The Tamaulipas Massacre in Tuilelén, Guatemala
Photo by Josue Decavele/Getty Images

Produced by Caroline Steel and presented by Marnie Chesterton for BBC World Service.


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r72ncg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pdt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgts0mv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct2dmg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2djt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r72s3l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfc5d2v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgts4cz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r72wvq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jsw)
Sin, sexuality and how Beyoncé became a lifeline

Paul Mendez is a British writer, Beyoncé superfan and once devout Jehovah's Witness. Growing up in the Midlands, where his Jamaican grandparents settled, Paul was all about preaching, paradise and playing Monopoly with elderly ladies. But at 17, he was cast out from his congregation. Alone and looking for new friends, life took an unexpected and dangerous turn – but help was to come in an unlikely form. A story of sin, sexual awakening, and the salvation of 90s RnB.

This episode comprises part one and part two of Paul’s interview with Jo Fidgen. Part three will be available in the next edition of Outlook, or you can listen to all parts combined in a single interview on the Outlook podcast.

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Paul Mendez
Credit: Christa Holka

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r730lv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfc5ml3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtscw7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r734bz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5gl3nl)
Jury to hear closing arguments in George Floyd case

The Jury in the George Floyd murder trial will hear the closing arguments before they retire to consider the verdict against the former police office Derek Chauvin. The BBC's Barbara Plett Usher has the latest from Minneapolis where the trial is taking place. Also on the programme, Twelve of Europe's top football clubs say they are launching a breakaway super-league. Its a move that's being widely condemned. Newshour speaks to Simon Kuper, financial times journalist and author of the Football Men and Professor Laura McAllister, a former international player and Deputy Chair of UEFA's Women's Football Committee for their views on the proposals. And NASA has successfully flown a drone on Mars for the first time.

(Image: George Floyd placard. Credit : Anadolu Agency )


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r73833)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtsmch)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y47wfh5nh6y)
European football clubs plan breakaway Super League

We examine the business case behind the creation of a new football European Super League. Guillem Balague is a Spanish football journalist, and tells us why a dozen clubs from England, Spain and Italy are running the risk of upsetting their fans with this new venture. Also in the programme, two people have died in Texas after a Tesla electric car crashed with what police believe was nobody at the wheel. The BBC's Theo Leggett discusses the controversy around what the carmaker likes to call Autopilot, but in fact requires someone to be fully alert in the driving seat at all times. Plus, we ask whether the future of work after the pandemic is likely to stay largely remote for a significant proportion of workers. Brynn Harrington who oversees Facebook's remote working strategy explains why the social network is leaving open the option for its employees to work from home. Nick Bloom is an economics professor at Stanford University who expresses concern that permanent remote working could impact people's chances of getting promoted. And Tushar Agarwal, founder of co-working space Hubble makes the case for greater flexibility in how people work in the future.

(Picture: Liverpool play Real Madrid in the Champions League. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r73cv7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxg72bkcsp)
European Super League

We discuss the controversial plan for a new European football Super League. Six English Premier League clubs are among 12 clubs who have agreed to join the new ESL league. The other founding clubs include Barcelona, Real Madrid, AC Milan and Inter Milan. We’ll explain how the new competition would work and the business model it’s based on and also look at what this would mean for the future of European and domestic competitions.

We also bring together fans and football experts from around the world to reflect the widespread opposition that’s been voiced against the plan. And we hear from those who like the plan and think the games would be exciting ones to watch.

We speak to a doctor in the Indian capital Delhi where a week-long lockdown has been announced after a record spike in coronavirus cases overwhelmed the city’s healthcare system. And we’ll look at today’s other coronavirus stories with our regular expert, Dr Eleanor Murray.

(Photo: Anti Super League banners and Liverpool fans are seen outside Anfield as twelve of Europe"s top football clubs launch a breakaway Super League - Liverpool, Britain - April 19, 2021 Credit: Carl Recine/Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r73hlc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxg72bkhjt)
Closing arguments in Derek Chauvin trial

We'll go live to our correspondent in the city of Minneapolis where the jury has been hearing closing arguments in the trial of Derek Chauvin, the white American policeman accused of killing George Floyd in May last year.

We discuss the controversial plan for a new European football Super League. Six English Premier League clubs are among 12 clubs who have agreed to join the new ESL league. The other founding clubs include Barcelona, Real Madrid, AC Milan and Inter Milan. We’ll explain how the new competition would work and the business model it’s based on and also look at what this would mean for the future of European and domestic competitions. We also bring together fans and football experts from around the world to reflect the widespread opposition that’s been voiced against the plan. And we hear from those who like the plan and think the games would be exciting ones to watch.

Our coronavirus expert, Dr Manfred Green in Israel, will answer some more audience questions about the virus.

(Photo: Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin and his defense attorney Eric Nelson attend closing arguments during Chauvin"s trial for second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd with his defense attorney Eric Nelson in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S. April 19, 2021 in a still image from video. Credit: Pool via REUTERS)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r73mbh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jsw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r73r2m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfc6c1w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtt3c0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n86b66lwz)
2021/04/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r73vtr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dqb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtt734)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2d34)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The Martian Mission

What would it take for humans to live permanently on Mars? asks Martin in Weston-super-Mare, UK. The doctors dig into requirements and possibilities of a long-term Martian outpost.
We know that many missions to Mars have failed, for a range of reasons – malfunctions, crashes and even a mix-up between imperial and metric units. Getting to Mars – let alone decelerating from 30,000 miles per hour to a safe landing speed in about seven minutes – is not straightforward. Aerospace engineer Anita Sengupta helped land NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars. She knows first-hand the challenges of putting a robot on the red planet.

But getting robots to Mars is an easier proposition than doing the same for humans. Even if we work out how to survive the radiation exposure on the eight-month journey and the pulverising descent, Mars’ surface isn’t easily habitable. Principal investigator for NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) Bruce Jakosky describes the conditions on Mars: Freezing, with an atmosphere containing mostly carbon dioxide and very little water, and subject to annual global dust storms.

However, this isn’t deterring space agencies and private companies from researching the challenge. The European Space Agency and Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems focussed on finding out the physiological and psychological tolls by selecting six candidates to spend 520 days in a simulated spacecraft and landing module. Diego Urbina explains the personal challenge of taking part in the Mars500 experiment.
Some private company owners have gone even further. As well as making technology based on the current physical conditions, could those constraints themselves be altered? Could Mars be terraformed, or warmed, for easier human survival? Bruce Jakosky shares just what that would take – and compares these requirements with what’s actually available.


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r73zkw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5glywh)
George Floyd Case: Closing Arguments

We hear the closing arguments from the US city of Minneapolis where the trial of the former policeman Derek Chauvin accused of murdering George Floyd, has been taking place and assess what happens next.

Also on the programme, as the imprisoned Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny is taken to hospital, one of his doctors speaks to us. And football fans go into orbit - enraged over plans for a breakaway European super league.

(Photo: Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin listens as defence attorney Eric Nelson makes closing arguments during Chauvin"s trial for second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota in this courtroom sketch; Credit: REUTERS/Jane Rosenberg)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r743b0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgttgld)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r74724)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlbprjjm3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scdz6nl7r)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgttlbj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48pw6scrm8)
European football clubs plan breakaway Super League

We examine the business case behind the creation of a new football European Super League. Guillaume Ballage is a Spanish football journalist, and tells us why a dozen clubs from England, Spain and Italy are running the risk of upsetting their fans with this new venture. We also speak to lawyer Trevor Watkins about the potential legal challenges to the plan.
Also in the programme, we ask whether the future of work after the pandemic is likely to stay largely remote for many workers. Brynn Harrington oversees Facebook's remote working strategy and explains why the company is allowing its employees to work from home. Nick Bloom is an economics professor at Stanford University who says that permanent remote working could impact people's chances of getting promoted. And Tushar Agarwal, founder of co-working space Hubble, makes the case for greater flexibility in how people work in the future.
Plus, the BBC's arts correspondent Vincent Dowd discusses Marvel Studios' upcoming film, due to be released this autumn, which features an Asian actor in the lead role.

(Picture: Liverpool play Real Madrid in the Champions League. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



TUESDAY 20 APRIL 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r74gkd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq90h41tw3)
Opposition to European Super League gathers momentum

We examine the business case behind the creation of a new football European Super League. Guillaume Ballage is a Spanish football journalist, and tells us why a dozen clubs from England, Spain and Italy are running the risk of upsetting their fans with this new venture. We also speak to lawyer Trevor Watkins about the potential legal challenges to the plan.
The Bank of England is to look at the possibility of launching a digital currency. Several other countries have similar plans, but what exactly is a central digital currency and how does it work? We speak to Josh Lipsky, director of the GeoEconomics Center at the Atlantic Council think tank.
Plus, the BBC's arts correspondent Vincent Dowd discusses Marvel Studios' upcoming film, due to be released this autumn, which features an Asian actor in the lead role.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by Peter Morici, economics professor at the University of Maryland in Washington DC, and by financial professional Jessica Khine in Malaysia.

(Picture: A placard against the ESL. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r74l9j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfc768s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgttykx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2d28)
Don't log off: My life, my world

Alan Dein hears how the pandemic year has affected the life of 19-year-old student Mursalina in Kabul, Afghanistan. She has been studying at home online, but has become increasingly aware of the impact of Covid-19 on the city's poorest people who come knocking on her door for food donations. She also fears for the health of her father who works in a hospital. At the same time, she is keen to keep her young people's group active, promoting education and independence for women in her community.

Producer: Mark Burman and Laurence Grisell

(Photo: Women walk in a street in Kabul. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r74q1n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jsw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r74tss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfc7fs1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtv625)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tct)
Edmund de Waal: Creating a memorial

In The Studio follows internationally acclaimed artist and writer Edmund de Waal as he creates new site-specific work for the Musée Nissim de Camondo, a hidden gem in a quiet corner of Paris.

Once a flourishing household at the centre of Belle Époque Parisian society, the magnificent building and its spectacular collection of French eighteenth-century art became a quiet memorial for the son who was to have inherited it, but who tragically, died in the First World War.

This house and its history holds great meaning for Edmund de Waal. As he recounted in his bestselling memoir The Hare with Amber Eyes, the Ephrussis, a branch of his own family lived on the same street, at the time this grand house was being built, over a century ago.

Edmund de Waal guides us through his creative response to the haunting history of the Camondo family, the last of whom were killed at Auschwitz. We follow him in his studio as he works on a multi-faceted installation for a unique setting, navigates the challenges of creating during lockdown and grapples with the notions of what it means to create a fitting memorial.

Presented and Produced by Edwina Pitman.
Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service.


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r74yjx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznl0kn)
Minneapolis braces itself as jury considers Derek Chauvin verdict

The ex-policeman is accused of killing George Floyd last year, sparking nationwide protests.

We'll be live in India's capital, Delhi where the authorities have announced a week-long lockdown after a record spike in cases.

United Nations officials say there's been a dramatic increase in the number of migrant children stranded in Mexico as they try to reach the United States....we'll hear from the families stuck on the border.



CM - and in Cuba we meet the new boss - and ask how differnt he is from the old boss. He's not called Castro, but what else marks him out?
that's after the latest world news


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r75291)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznl49s)
What's situation with Russian opposition leader, Alexei Navalny?

We get an update after his doctors said he might only have days to live.

Security is ramped up in Minneapolis where the jury in the George Floyd murder trial has retired to consider its verdict.

And we hear from India's capital, Delhi where the authorities have announced a week-long lockdown after a record spike in cases.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r75615)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznl81x)
What message does Xi Jinping have for US?

The Chinese President calls for "more fair and equitable" governance, saying the rules set by one country, or a few countries, should not be imposed on all others - a thinly veiled attack against the US.

The jury in the trial of former US police officer Derek Chauvin - charged with the death of George Floyd - is considering its verdict. We'll bring you the closing arguments they heard.

And we're live in Delhi where the healthcare system is under huge pressure due to the spike in Covid cases. A lockdown has been announced in response.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r759s9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkp)
Pedal power: How bicycles can change lives

This is the story of how one man is trying to transform lives through the power of the humble bicycle.

Many rural communities in rural Africa don’t have access to cars or good roads, which can make it hard to take fresh produce to market or get to school.

But Wyson Lungu wants to change that with an innovative scheme to sell affordable bicycles. We follow him as he delivers a new set of bicycles to excited customers in southern Zambia.

Produced and presented by Richard Kenny

Image: unfoldstories.co.uk


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtvp1p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jfl)
Demille and the gig economy

In 2016 when producer Georgia first met him, Demille was a cycle courier in his early twenties, taking his company to a tribunal over better working conditions. He was fired-up, political, and excited about a case he would go on to win.

For the past five years, Georgia and Demille have been meeting and recording.

Demille’s story is one of being young and trying to stay afloat in the gig economy; of resilience and hope and trying to find control over his city and life.


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x55)
The return of Blue Lake

In 1970, the Republican president Richard Nixon signed a bill returning a sacred lake to the people of Taos Pueblo in New Mexico. The lake, and surrounding land, had been taken from the Taos people in 1906 and turned into a national forest, even though it was central to their centuries-old cultural rituals and beliefs. The return of the lake was the first time the US government had given land back to a Native American community. Louise Hidalgo talks to Laura Harris and her mother LaDonna Harris, who with her senator husband helped the Taos people get the Blue Lake back.

Picture: President Nixon signing the Blue Lake bill in the presence of Taos leaders, 15th December 1970 (Credit: UPI/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r75fjf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d28)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtvsst)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2d34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r75k8k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r75p0p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfc88zy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtw192)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r75srt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw4)
The secret prison book written on toilet paper

Nawal el-Saadawi, the pioneering Egyptian psychiatrist, feminist and writer died last month at the age of 89. Her classic novel Woman at Point Zero tells the true story of a woman sentenced to death for murder. When it was published in 1975, it shocked the establishment and thrust Nawal into the forefront of the fight for women’s rights in the Middle East. Later, when she was a political prisoner, she wrote a memoir in her cell, in secret, using just an eyebrow pencil and toilet paper. She spoke to Jo Fidgen in 2015.

The final part of Jo Fidgen’s interview with Paul Mendez, who went from being a devout Jehovah’s Witness believing homosexuality to be a sin, to becoming a sex worker. He’s now a writer and his debut novel is the semi-autobiographical Rainbow Milk. The full interview with Paul Mendez is also available on the Outlook podcast.

Nizar Ibrahim is a palaeontologist who spends a lot of time digging for dinosaur fossils in the rocks of the Sahara, but the story of his biggest find starts on the streets of an oasis town. While on his way back from a dig in southern Morocco he came across a man with a moustache who had a box of unusual looking dinosaur fossils - they'd been dug up to be sold to tourists. Nizar bought them and then left Morocco, but as time went on he became convinced that the fossils were from a little known carnivorous giant called the Spinosaurus. Nizar was desperate to find the site these fossils came from, but first he needed to find the fossil hunter with the moustache.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Nawal el-Saadawi in her home in Cairo, Egypt, in 2015
Credit: David Degner/Getty Images


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x55)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r75xhy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfc8jh6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtw8sb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2d34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r76182)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5gp0kp)
Chad's President Idriss Déby dies after 'clashes with rebels'

The army in Chad says the long-time president, Idriss Deby, has been killed fighting rebels on the frontline.

Also in the programme: Lawyers for the proposed football European Super League say they have issued injunctions they hope will prevent players or clubs being banned from competition by FIFA or UEFA. And children sent by desperate parents in Central America to the US in search of a better life.

(Photo: Idriss Deby, seen here in 2020, had been in power for 30 years. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r76506)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtwj8l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bbrnzt9dx)
Carbon 'surge' expected in post-Covid energy boom

The International Energy Agency is predicting a major surge in CO2 emissions this year. Laura Cozzi is the IEA's chief energy modeller and lead author of a new report on the subject. Also in the programme, with Johnson & Johnson's Covid-19 vaccine rollout paused in the United States and some other countries amid concerns about possible blood clots, the BBC's Michelle Fleury talks us through the company's latest financial figures. Plus, two trade blocs in sub-Saharan Africa are planning to introduce new currencies, hoping it will boost economic growth by making trade smoother. Edward Kusewa is a financial analyst in Nairobi, and explains the arguments in favour of such a move. Economic commentator Michael Hughes compares the proposals to the European Union's single currency, the Euro. And Ghana-based textile entrepreneur Edwina Assan discusses the disadvantage of using many different currencies for trade.

(Picture: A coal-fired power station in China. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r768rb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxg72bn8ps)
Chad's president dies

We speak to our BBC Africa reporters about the death of Idriss Déby. The army in Chad says he was killed fighting rebels on the battlefield. His death comes hours after provisional election results showed him well on course to win a sixth term in office.

We bring more reaction to the proposal by Europe’s biggest football clubs to create a new “European Super League”. Fans have expressed fury at what they say is an unfair competition. We’ll put comments and questions on the plan to our sports reporter.

And, we're answering again audience questions about the pandemic, today with Dr Isaac Bogoch from the University of Toronto. We also continue our coronavirus conversations and bring together three women in Sudan who talk about the challenges people are facing as they try to make a living and also follow the lockdown restrictions.

(Photo: Chad President Idriss Deby watches a rally in N"Djamena April 15, 2006 Credit: Claire Soares/File Photo/Reuters)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r76dhg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxg72bndfx)
Coronavirus conversations: Sudan

Three women in Sudan talk about how their country has been affected by the pandemic. They all know plenty of people who've been ill or died in the past year, with infections suspected to be much worse than the official figures. They also say many can't afford to buy tests and masks.

We speak to our Africa correspondent about the death of the long-time president of Chad, Idriss Déby. The army in Chad says he was killed fighting rebels on the battlefield. His death comes hours after provisional election results showed him well on course to win a sixth term in office.

We also return to India for the latest updates on the coronavirus pandemic. Dr Swapneil Parikh, an infectious disease researcher at the Kasturba Hospital in Mumbai talks about the situation where he is.

And we bring more reaction to the proposal by Europe’s biggest football clubs to create a new “European Super League”.

(Photo: Tagreed Abdin Credit: Tagreed Abdin)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r76j7l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x55)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r76mzq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfc97yz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtx083)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n86b69ht2)
2021/04/20 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r76rqv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d28)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtx407)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrw)
Malware on mobiles

16% of mobile phones in emerging markets like Brazil Indonesia, South Africa and Thailand are infected with malware, compared to 2.6% globally, according to a new report by the mobile anti-fraud firm Upstream. The company looked at one billion mobile phone transactions in 23 emerging markets covering nearly 840 million users. One mobile device in Brazil tried to make almost 16000 purchases from an app in just one month. CEO of Upstream Dimitris Maniatis explains their findings.


Tech under the ice sheet
The cryoegg, is a small device that monitors the most extreme of environments, streams of ice-cold water flowing under glaciers. It's a rugged device that wirelessly transmits data back to the surface of a glacier from one and a half kilometres below the ice. Dr. Mike Prior-Jones and Dr. Liz Bagshaw from Cardiff University are using the device to monitor glaciers in Greenland.


Indoor Solar Cells
We live in a world with more and more smart devices in our homes and, of course, all of them need electricity. A potential way to supply that power is via the lights we use indoors. A recent paper shows that there are new, environmentally friendly, and safe materials that could help make this a reality. Digital Planet reporter Florian Bohr found out more.





(Image: Getty Images)



The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington

Studio Managers: Bob Nettles and Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r76wgz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5gpvsl)
President of Chad Idriss Deby killed

We hear from Chad where President Idriss Deby has been killed. According to the army, he died of injuries following clashes with rebels in the north of the country.

Also on the programme, Is there legal jeopardy in politicians weighing in on the Chauvin murder trial? And the European Super League, football's glitzy revolution, may be falling apart after just two days.

(Photo: Idriss Deby Itno, President of the Republic of Chad, addresses the 69th United Nations General Assembly at the U.N. headquarters in New York. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r77073)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtxchh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r773z7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlbprmfj6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scdz6rh4v)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtxh7m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48pw6sgnjc)
Plans for football Super League unravel

Plans for a football European Super League appear to be in disarray, after the English football clubs Chelsea and Manchester City said they were planning to withdraw. Reports from Spain suggest Barcelona and Atletico Madrid are also pulling out - forty eight hours after the league's creation was announced. We hear why the League never made business sense.

The International Energy Agency is predicting a major surge in CO2 emissions this year. Laura Cozzi is the IEA's chief energy modeller and lead author of a new report on the subject.

Plus, two trade blocs in sub-Saharan Africa are planning to introduce new currencies, hoping it will boost economic growth by making trade smoother. Edward Kusewa is a financial analyst in Nairobi, and explains the arguments in favour of such a move. Economic commentator Michael Hughes compares the proposals to the European Union's single currency, the Euro. And Ghana-based textile entrepreneur Edwina Assan discusses the disadvantage of using many different currencies for trade.

(Picture: Michael Regan)



WEDNESDAY 21 APRIL 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r77cgh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq90h44qs6)
George Floyd: Jury returns guilty verdicts in Derek Chauvin trial

After less than a day of deliberation, jurors have found Derek Chauvin guilty of all charges over George Floyd's death. The jury returned guilty verdicts of second degree murder, third degree murder and manslaughter. The former police officer was filmed kneeling on Floyd for more than nine minutes during his arrest last May. We look at what this means for reform of the justice system.

Plans for a football European Super League are in disarray after all of the English clubs withdraw, with others from Europe reportedly on the brink of doing the same. But did it ever make business sense?

Plus - we go to India to report on how the country is coping with a surge in coronavirus cases and the emergence of what is thought to be an Indian variant of the virus.

And -two trade blocs in sub-Saharan Africa are planning to introduce new currencies. Will it will boost economic growth by making trade smoother?

PHOTO: George Floyd Mural/AFP


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r77h6m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcb35w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtxvh0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct2d2h)
Gambling: A Sure Bet?

Gambling: A sure bet? Kenya

Jonah is a university student, and a gambler. For him it is the only way he can earn a living. He explains why there are so few opportunities for young Kenyans like him and why betting on foreign football matches has become such an attractive and easy way to make money to fund his university studies. Gambling behaviour expert, Dr Heather Wardle, wants tougher laws on gambling but she wonders how that might impact the University students who need the money they earn from betting.

Producer: Lydia Thomas

(Photo: Jonah betting on the Premier League with his friends)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r77lyr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x55)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r77qpw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcbbp4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgty2z8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8f)
Goal 13: Action on climate change

In 2015 the United Nations announced a radical plan to change the world.

Global leaders drew up a list of 17 "sustainable development goals" to create a blueprint for a better future. The goals cover things like gender equality, health provision, a good education and much more. We've asked 17-year-olds from 17 different countries tell us what they think needs to change if the world is to meet those goals by 2030.

Australia’s most intense bush fire season changed 17-year-old Ashlee’s life. She lives in a town called Mallacoota, in one of the worst hit areas, where many people lost their homes. Images were beamed around the world of people cowering on beaches under a red sky. The bush fire season from 2019-2020 burned through 24 million hectares of land, 3,000 homes were lost. Scientists say the impacts of climate change are contributing to longer and more severe bush fire seasons, so Ashlee wants to find out how her country is being affected and what action is being taken to get global warming under control.

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producer: Phoebe Keane

Project 17 is produced in partnership with The Open University


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r77vg0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznnxgr)
Former Minneapolis police officer found guilty

Derek Chauvin knelt on the knee of the neck of George Floyd for 9 minutes. We look at the law enforcement angle and also hear from a pastor who knew Mr Floyd.

Plans for a European Super League are on the verge of collapse as a massive backlash prompts many clubs involved to withdraw.

And Denmark is planning to introduce vaccine passports to ease coronavirus restrictions.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r77z64)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznp16w)
Derek Chauvin found guilty

The former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is convicted of the murder of George Floyd, the African American man whose death sparked worldwide protests against racism.

Plans for a European Super League are on the verge of collapse as all six English clubs withdraw, just days after the competition was announced

And we hear why Turkey's coronavirus death toll is so low despite being having one of the highest rates of new infections in the world.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r782y8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznp4z0)
Derek Chauvin found guilty of murder

We have more reaction to the murder conviction of former police officer Derek Chauvin for the death of George Floyd.

The extraordinary u-turn by the six UK Premiership clubs who'd said they would join a European Super League - but are now saying they are not. Does it mean the end for the whole idea?

And we look ahead to President Putin's state of the nation address in Moscow later today.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r786pd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb2)
Michael Mann: The new climate war?

President Biden is promising hundreds of billions of dollars to speed up the decarbonisation of the US economy – the White House wants cooperation with China to make good on the Paris agreement on emissions cuts. Stephen Sackur interviews Michael Mann, one of America’s leading climate scientists. He says a new climate war is unfolding. If so, who are today’s biggest climate enemies?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtykys)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnc)
Can Biden woo the world on climate change?

President Biden hosts a virtual summit this week as the US seeks global climate action. But can he convince the rest of the world to go further and faster on cutting carbon emissions when the country has been out of the game for the past four years? Justin Rowlatt asks former US climate envoy Todd Stern and Isabel Hilton, founder of China dialogue. And, in a world where some countries are rolling back protections, can consensus still be found? We hear from the heart of the Brazilian rainforest, where the environmental police say they are losing the war against the loggers. Lisa Viscidi, director of the energy and climate change programme at the Inter-American Dialogue think-tank, says the summit provides an opportunity for Latin American countries.

Photo: Climate protestors in Lyon, France hold up a sign saying 'SOS' (Credit: Getty).


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7f)
The Raymond Davis Incident

In 2011, an American man shot dead two people in the streets of Lahore. The crisis that ensued saw accusations of espionage and US-Pakistani relations brought to the brink. For Witness History, Josephine Casserly tells the extraordinary story of the Raymond Davis incident.


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r78bfj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2d2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtyppx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r78g5n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d2f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r78kxs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcc5x1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtyy65)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r78pnx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyd)
My 30-year fight for justice for my mum

Lee Lawrence was 11 years old when his mother, Cherry Groce, was shot during a police raid on their family home in Brixton, south London. The police had been looking for Lee’s brother, Michael, who didn’t live there at the time. The shooting sparked an uprising in Brixton – where tensions were already high between the many black residents and the overwhelmingly white police - and the event became known as the 1985 Brixton Riots. The police officer who shot Cherry said it was an accident and was acquitted of malicious shooting. For Lee and his family the impact of the incident was devastating - his mother was left paralysed from the waist down and Lee became her carer for the next 26 years. After Cherry died in 2011, he continued to fight for justice for her. Lee has founded an organisation in her memory called the Cherry Groce Foundation, which supports people with mobility issues. A memorial to his mum is about to be unveiled in Brixton. The book Lee has published about his family's experience is called The Louder I Will Sing.


Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Lee Lawrence, founder of the Cherry Groce Foundation
Credit: Smokin Monkey Photography


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r78tf1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfccfd9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtz5pf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r78y55)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5grxgs)
Derek Chauvin found guilty of murder in George Floyd's case

After less than a day of deliberation, jurors have found Derek Chauvin guilty of all charges over George Floyd's death. The former police officer was filmed kneeling on Floyd for more than nine minutes during his arrest last May.

Also on the programme: President Putin makes his annual address to the nation and we hear why Tik Tok is being sued for billions over use of children's data.


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r791x9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtzf5p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4ckxrwy4yy)
EU artificial intelligence rules will ban 'unacceptable' use

Some "unacceptable" uses of artificial intelligence will be banned under new EU rules. Melissa Heikkila is the artificial intelligence correspondent for the Politico website, and talks us through the European Commission's proposals. And we get reaction from Ulf Persson, chief executive of digital intelligence company ABBYY. Also in the programme, India is experiencing a very rapid rise in coronavirus infections, in a second wave of the disease. The BBC's Rahul Tandon explores the causes and implications, and asks whether the country's economy can afford more lockdowns. Plus, the former Children's Commissioner in England, Anne Longfield, is suing the video sharing social network TikTok, alleging the app takes children's personal information, without sufficient warning or consent required by law. Ms Longfield tells us why she's bringing the case, and we get a response to the move from the company.

(Picture: Margrethe Vestager introduces the European AI reforms. Picture credit: Reuters.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r795nf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxg72br5lw)
George Floyd: How is the world reacting?

Derek Chauvin, the former police officer filmed kneeling on George Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes has been convicted of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter. Mr Floyd's death in Minneapolis last year led to global mass protests against racism and police brutality. We'll hear reaction from around the world to the murder conviction and what this means for the Black Lives Matter movement.

Also, in Russia President Putin has given his annual State of the Nation address - accusing other nations of picking on Russia like jackals around a tiger. Meanwhile, the authorities have been taking action to head off planned protests by supporters of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, including detaining some of the activists behind them. We'll bring you the latest on both stories.

And, every day we are joined by a health expert to answer your questions about coronavirus. Today our guest is Dr Maria Sundaram - infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto.

(Photo: People react after the verdict in the trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, at George Floyd Square in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S., April 20, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Octavio Jones)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r799dk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxg72br9c0)
George Floyd: How is the US reacting?

A federal investigation has been launched into policing practices in the city of Minneapolis, a day after one of its former officers was convicted of the murder of George Floyd. Derek Chauvin, the former police officer filmed kneeling on George Floyd's neck for more than nine minutes was convicted of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and manslaughter. We'll hear the conversations and reaction happening in the US.

Also, we return to the situation in Chad where the president has died after being shot in a battle with rebels. Now opposition politicians have rejected the army's appointment of the president's son to take over the country. We'll find out the latest and hear how people inside Chad are feeling about it.

And, every day we are joined by a health expert to answer your questions about coronavirus. Today our guest is Dr Pedro Hallal - an epidemiologist from the Federal University of Pelotas in the south of Brazil.

(Photo: People celebrate at the George Floyd Square after former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all counts in the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, 20 April 2021. Credit: EPA/CRAIG LASSIG)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r79f4p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r79jwt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcd4w2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgtzx56)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n86b6ddq5)
2021/04/21 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r79nmy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2d2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv00xb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv3)
Medical mysteries with neurologist Suzanne O’Sullivan

Claudia Hammond hears stories of medical mysteries from author of Sleeping Beauties and consultant neurologist Suanne O’Sullivan. From the refugee children in Sweden who slept for months to the US Embassy staff in Cuba who fell ill with dizziness, what can cases like these and others from around the world reveal about the mind and body.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Deborah Cohen


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r79sd2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5gsrpp)
Will Derek Chauvin guilty verdict change policing in the US?

It is rare that US police officers are charged over deaths in custody but Derek Chauvin now faces a jail sentence for the killing of George Floyd. The conviction of a police officer for the murder of a black man during an arrest captured on video and watched around the world has been hailed as a watershed moment. Will it create a monumental change in how police operate in America?

Also on the programme: President Putin demands order as protests in Russia demand the release of hunger-striking opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

(Picture: Celebrations in Black Lives Matter Square, Washington, DC. Credit: Getty Images).


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r79x46)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv08dl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7b0wb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlbprqbf9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scdz6vd1y)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv0d4q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48pw6skkfg)
EU artificial intelligence rules will ban 'unacceptable' use

Some "unacceptable" uses of artificial intelligence will be banned under new EU rules. Melissa Heikkila is the artificial intelligence correspondent for the Politico website, and talks us through the European Commission's proposals. And we get reaction from Ulf Persson, chief executive of digital intelligence company ABBYY. Also in the programme, India is experiencing a very rapid rise in coronavirus infections, in a second wave of the disease. The BBC's Rahul Tandon explores the causes and implications, and asks whether the country's economy can afford more lockdowns. Plus, the former Children's Commissioner in England, Anne Longfield, is suing the video sharing social network TikTok, alleging the app takes children's personal information, without sufficient warning or consent required by law. Ms Longfield tells us why she's bringing the case, and we get a response to the move from the company.

(Picture: Margrethe Vestager introduces the European AI reforms. Picture credit: Reuters.)



THURSDAY 22 APRIL 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7b8cl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq90h47mp9)
EU to ban "unacceptable" use of AI

The European Union is set to ban what it calls "unacceptable" uses of artificial intelligence.The European Commission's rules would ban "AI systems considered a clear threat to the safety, livelihoods and rights of people" - we'll bring you all the reaction.
Also on the programme - new US laws about when drones can or cannot fly, and what could it mean for businesses hoping to cash in?
We'll hear from the management guru urging us all to listen a bit more. And the tale of the Italian worker being paid just to turn up, for more than a decade.
The BBC's Fergus Nicoll will be joined throughout the programme from Silicon Valley by Alison van Diggelen, host of the Fresh Dialogues podcast, and from Manilla by Karen Lema - bureau chief for the Reuters news agency.

Picture credit: Reuters.


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7bd3q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcf02z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv0rd3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gx5)
America’s solitary inmates

Since the pandemic struck, millions around the world have endured lockdowns, with many finding it hard to tolerate long periods indoors. But what if lockdown meant years on end spent entirely alone, in a single room, sometimes no bigger than a large elevator? In many US states, jails and prisons routinely use solitary confinement to enforce discipline and indeed, sometimes to quarantine inmates for health reasons. Officials say it’s essential to ensure safety behind bars. Prisoners can be segregated for serious and violent offences, but also for infringing minor rules. And some have spent decades in isolation, despite the United Nations defining a stretch of more than fifteen days as torture. As one of the most prominent states, New York, now moves to accept the UN limit and reform the use of segregation, Hilary Andersson meets inmates and prison staff to understand what this draconian punishment is like, and what its psychological effects can be upon those affected, who include children as young as thirteen.

Produced for radio by Michael Gallagher

If you have been affected by any of the issues discussed in this programme, you can contact help at Befrienders International: www.befrienders.org

(Image: A juvenile inmate in a cell seen through the door hatch. Credit: Richard Ross)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7bhvv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7bmlz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcf7l7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv0zwc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfh)
The man taking on fast food

Carlo Petrini is leading a food revolution - one that fights to protect local, traditional ingredients and farming methods in the face of a standardised, industrialised food system.

From a protest against a McDonald's in the heart of Rome, to a network of more than 100,000 members in 160 countries, his Slow Food movement strives for a world where producers are fairly treated and the planet is better protected.

Carlo tells Emily Thomas the story of his life and activism and why he believes that a post-pandemic world offers a profound opportunity for economic, environmental and social change - should we choose to take it.

Producer: Simon Tulett

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Carlo Petrini. Credit: James Leynse/Corbis via Getty Images/BBC)


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7brc3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznrtcv)
Biden leads new push on climate change

US President Joe Biden has invited 40 world leaders to a virtual Climate Summit. We'll talk to a member of a group of concerned scientists who are calling for more ambition.

As India struggles under the weight of a deadly second wave of coronavirus, a doctor in Mumbai tells us why things have gone so wrong there.

And we hear about another fatal shooting by police in the US of a thirteen year old Latino boy in Chicago. We speak to a photojournalist who has been documenting the Latino community there.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7bw37)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznry3z)
India's record rise in Covid cases

India reports the biggest daily total of new coronavirus infections since the pandemic began.

A big day for the environment as President Joe Biden holds a virtual Climate Summit. He's expected to announce an ambitious emissions target under the Paris Climate Agreement.

Thousands of people have joined unauthorised rallies across Russia to protest the detention of jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny. We have analysis on Vladimir Putin’s next move.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7bzvc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2lczns1w3)
India reports record rise in coronavirus cases

India's hospitals are overwhelmed with Covid patients and the morgues can barely cope with the number of dead. We hear from a doctor and look at why the country is seeing such an exponential rise in cases.

We have a report from Sao Paulo about the rollout of a vaccination programme which people hope will be a turning point in the fight against the virus.

And US President Joe Biden hosts an international climate change conference today - we talk to one of the scientists who say that after the pullout from agreements under Donald Trump, it is time to take action.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7c3lh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1t)
Is the legal cannabis business about to go global?

Changes to the laws governing cannabis use are happening around the world. The number of States in the USA legalising cannabis is increasing rapidly. Uruguay and Canada have legalised it already, and Mexico may soon follow suit.

Tanya Beckett looks at the different models of legalisation and at what might be holding the global cannabis industry back.


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv1gvw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j92)
Is the digital ad market overvalued?

Large companies have slashed their digital marketing budget. Airbnb and Procter & Gamble made such a cut in recent years, after coming to believe the cost doesn’t necessarily translate to increased sales. They follow in the footsteps of eBay who, in 2013, announced it would cease paying for ad sponsorship on Google. Economics professor Steve Tadelis, who led eBay’s research into this, explains how they came to conclude advertising wasn’t worth it. Also in the programme, brand safety advocate and co-founder of Check My Ads Nandini Jammi explains how the modern digital ad market works, and where some doubts lay about its effectiveness. Luke Smith of marketing consultancy Croud says companies need to be clearer in what they want from digital marketing, in order to get the most out of it. But what if the market is overvalued as a whole? Former Google employee Tim Hwang, author of ‘Subprime Attention Crisis’ says we might be looking at an inflated market that could threaten a financial crash online.
Producer: Frey Lindsay.
(Picture credit: Getty Creative)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2x)
How the NRA became a US political lobbying giant

The National Rifle Association represents gun owners in the USA. In 1977 it faced a turning point when its members revolted against the organisation’s leadership to concentrate on political lobbying in Washington. Would the gun lobby in America be as strong as it is, without the 1977 turnabout? Bob Howard talks to John Aquilino, a former NRA spokesman, who was at the historic meeting in Cincinnati, Ohio.


National Rifle Association Holds Its Annual Conference In Dallas, Texas. DALLAS, TX - MAY 05 2018. Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7c7bm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv1lm0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7cc2r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rl0)
Unravelling the history of knitting

Like many traditional domestic crafts, knitting has experienced a huge surge in popularity in the 21st century, making it fashionable and even radical. But the history of hand knitting is still relatively obscure. The oldest knitted artefacts are Coptic socks found in Egypt dating from the fourth century AD, but although they look like modern-day knitting, they’re actually made using a technique called nalebinding or needle-binding.

So what then are the real origins of knitting? How did it develop into so many different regional patterns, from the famous Fair Isle of Scotland to distinctive Nordic and South American variations?

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss the global history of knitting are Professor Sandy Black of the University of the Arts London, Norwegian textile designer, Annemor Sundbo, and an expert on South American knitting, Cynthia LeCount Samaké.

Produced by Jo Impey for the BBC World Service.

Image: Knitting on Taquile Island, Peru
Image credit: Hadynyah / Getty Images


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l81)
The Scottish club that toppled Real Madrid

In the early 1980s, Aberdeen went from Scottish footballing obscurity to the very top of the European game, beating mighty Real Madrid to win the 1983 European Cup Winners' Cup. The sporting fairy-tale made the reputation of Sir Alex Ferguson, before he went on to manage Manchester United. Alex Capstick spoke to former Aberdeen assistant manager Archie Knox and former midfielder Neale Cooper. Neale Cooper died in 2018.

PHOTO: Alex Ferguson and Archie Knox with the European Cup Winner's Cup (Courtesy Aberdeen F.C.)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7cgtw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcg2t4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv1v38)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7cll0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2x)
Singing for my murdered sister helps me heal

In 2015, Nathalie Warmerdam was murdered by her ex-partner. She was one of three victims that day; he also killed two other former partners, Anastasia Kuzyk and Carol Culleton. Basil Borutski was found guilty and sentenced to life in prison in 2017. Now as a way to deal with his grief, Nathalie's brother, opera singer Joshua Hopkins, has released a group of songs, known as a song cycle, in memory of his sister. With words by the writer Margaret Atwood and music by composer Jake Heggie, Joshua says he wants to use his voice to raise awareness about violence against women. To find out how to listen to the song cycle, you can visit: https://songsformurderedsisters.com

When a young Danish man called Patrick Cakirli posted on an online message board in December 2016 he was shocked by the response he received. He was lonely and desperate to make some new friends - but could never have predicted his call would end up uniting thousands of people. His 'March Against Loneliness' became a big event with people including top political figures and celebrities taking part. His interview with Outlook was first broadcast in 2018.

When Judy Avey-Arroyo received a knock on her door and saw a baby sloth, it was love at first sight. She and her husband Luis went on to set up a sloth orphanage from their home in Costa Rica. Sadly, it was to be a labour of love that would take its toll on Luis. Outlook's Clayton Conn went to visit Judy's sanctuary in Limon in 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Joshua Hopkins with his sister Nathalie Warmerdam
Credit: Joshua Hopkins


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7cqb4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcgb9d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv22lj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7cv28)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5gvtcw)
Climate change: US pledges to cut carbon emissions by 50-52%

The US has unveiled a bold emissions target by the end of this decade. This new target, which will be unveiled at a virtual summit of 40 global leaders, essentially doubles their previous promise.

India records the world's highest ever daily increase in Covid-19 cases amid a shortage of oxygen in hospitals; and NASA's Perseverance rover produces pure oxygen from the atmosphere of Mars.

(Photo: US President Joe Biden removes his face mask to speak about the status of coronavirus disease. Credit: Reuters.)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7cytd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv2b2s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y493ll2z4l5)
US plans to halve emissions by 2030

The US has unveiled an updated carbon pledge that will nearly halve its emissions by 2030. The announcement came at a virtual summit on climate at the White House, and Thanu Yakupitiyage of climate action group 350 gives us her response to the news. Avijit Das is chief executive of Eveready, which manufactures small wind turbines in Africa, and discusses what role wind power can play in the future energy mix. And David Waskow, director of the International Climate Initiative at the World Resources Institute in Washington explains what cities need to do to become more environmentally friendly. Also in the programme, there's a meeting at the World Trade Organisation devoted to a proposal from South Africa and India to temporarily waive patent protections on vaccines, in a bid to boost global vaccine supply. South Africa's trade and industry minister Ebrahim Patel makes the case for such a move. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Peter Morgan, examines recent research by Microsoft indicating that many bosses may be oblivious to the number of people who will be looking to move on from their teams once the pandemic is over.

(Picture: President Biden addresses the climate summit. Picture credit: EPA.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7d2kj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxg72bv2hz)
Biden's climate change summit

We focus on President Biden’s virtual climate summit, explaining the basics of climate change and hearing what the 40 leaders taking part in the summit are being urged to do. We also hear a conversation between three young climate activists in Indonesia, South Africa and Australia about what they want to hear from their leaders and what action they think is needed globally. And we are discussing solutions with experts and hearing messages from around the world about what steps people are prepared to take to fight climate change and also hear from a woman who has decided not to have children due to concerns over climate change.

We get more accounts of the coronavirus pandemic in India - the country has recorded the highest-ever daily number of new cases. There’s an acute oxygen shortage and we hear from those who have been posting appeals for oxygen on social media. And a lot of people are asking about “double and triple mutants of the virus” and their possible links to the current surges in India. Our regular medical expert Dr Emma Hodcroft, helps us answer those questions.

(Photo: A video monitor shows President Joe Biden speaking during a virtual international Leaders Summit on Climate, in the East Room of the White House, in Washington, DC, USA, 22 April 2021.Credit: AL DRAGO / EPA)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7d69n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxg72bv683)
OS Conversations: Climate change activists

President Biden opened a major global climate summit with a call to world leaders to step up to the challenge. Mr Biden committed the US to an ambitious target of halving emissions by 2030. We hear a conversation between three young climate activists in Indonesia, South Africa and Australia about what action they think is needed globally. And we discuss solutions with experts and hear messages from around the world about what steps people are prepared to take to fight climate change.

We get more accounts of the coronavirus pandemic in India --the country has recorded the highest-ever daily number of new cases. There’s an acute oxygen shortage and we hear from those who have been posting appeals for oxygen on social media and also speak to a doctor in Mumbai.

We’ll also return to Minneapolis where the funeral of Daunte Wright is taking place today. Mr Wright was killed by a police officer during a traffic stop earlier this month.

(Photo: The White Rebels and Extinction Rebellion DC block 17th Street after dumping cow manure outside the White House on Earth Day to protest U.S. President Joe Biden"s climate plan in Washington, U.S., April 22, 2021. Credit: Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7db1s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7dfsx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfch1s5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv2t29)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n86b6h9m8)
2021/04/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7dkk1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv2xtf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3j)
Exponential increase in Indian covid cases

As Covid cases surge almost beyond belief in India, how much is to do with social distancing, and how much to do with the mutations to the original virus?

Ramanan Laxminarayan talks to Roland from Delhi about ways in which the huge second wave could and could not have been predicted and avoided. Suggestions of the latest variant to make the headlines, B1.617, have got virologists such as Ravindra Gupta working hard to identify the clinical significance of the latest combinations of mutations.

In the journal Science, Stephen Chanock of the US Cancer program reports work with colleagues in Ukraine looking at the long footprint of radiation dosing from the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, 35 years ago this week. In the first of two papers, they find a definite footprint of radiation damage accounting for the many sad cases of thyroid cancer in people alive in the region at the time. But in another study, they looked at whether any higher level of mutations could be detected in the germlines of children conceived subsequently to parents who had experienced radiation in the disaster. While the parents' own health is often affected, 35 years on, thus far their offspring show no widespread elevated levels of disease, as was commonly expected.

And in the week that the world witnessed a guilty verdict delivered in the trial for the murder of George Floyd in the US, David Curtis of the University of Utah and colleagues report in the journal PNAS a study that suggests the widespread media coverage of acts of racial violence, including deaths at the hands of police, leads to poorer mental health in Black Americans. As the BBC’s Samara Linton reports, the study involved google search data over five years up to 2017, and nearly 2.3 million survey respondents.

Image: NurPhoto/Getty Images

Presenter: Roland Pease
Reporter: Samara Linton
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7dp95)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5gwnls)
New US emissions target for a 'decisive decade'

President Biden opens the most important global climate conference for six years, pledging a greater cut in US carbon emissions and appealing to other leaders for decisive action.

Also in the programme: We've got a rare interview with the governing BJP in India on a Covid crisis getting worse by the day; and should solitary confinement in prisons be legal?

(File photo: A coal-fired heating complex in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China. Picture taken November 15, 2019. Credit: Reuters/Muyu Xu/File Photo)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7dt19)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv359p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7dxsf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlbprt7bd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scdz6y8z1)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv391t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48pw6sngbk)
US plans to halve emissions by 2030

The US has unveiled an updated carbon pledge that will nearly halve its emissions by 2030. The announcement came at a virtual summit on climate at the White House, and Thanu Yakupitiyage of climate action group 350 gives us her response to the news. Paula DiPerna of international not-for-profit, the Climate Disclosure Project, tells us how companies have started to adapt ahead of government policy intervention. Avijit Das is chief executive of Eveready, which manufactures small wind turbines in Africa, and discusses what role wind power can play in the future energy mix. Also in the programme, there's a meeting at the World Trade Organisation devoted to a proposal from South Africa and India to temporarily waive patent protections on vaccines, in a bid to boost global vaccine supply. South Africa's trade and industry minister Ebrahim Patel makes the case for such a move. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Peter Morgan, examines recent research by Microsoft indicating that many bosses may be oblivious to the number of people who will be looking to move on from their teams once the pandemic is over.


(Picture: President Biden addresses the climate summit. Picture credit: EPA.)



FRIDAY 23 APRIL 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7f58p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq90h4bjld)
US plans to halve emissions by 2030

The US has unveiled an updated carbon pledge that will nearly halve its emissions by 2030. The announcement came at a virtual summit on climate at the White House, and Thanu Yakupitiyage of climate action group 350 gives us her response to the news. Paula DiPerna of international not-for-profit, the Climate Disclosure Project, tells us how companies have started to adapt their businesses ahead of government policy intervention. Avijit Das is chief executive of Eveready, which manufactures small wind turbines in Africa, and discusses what role wind power can play in the future energy mix.
Following the conviction in Minneapolis of the police officer who murdered George Floyd almost 11 months ago, and the funeral tomorrow in the same city of Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old black man killed by a police officer, we look at policy work and corporate pledges aimed at addressing systemic racism. We hear from Marc Morial, President and CEO of the National Urban League, about the prospects for federal legislation on police reform.
Also in the programme, there's a meeting at the World Trade Organisation devoted to a proposal from South Africa and India to temporarily waive patent protections on vaccines, in a bid to boost global vaccine supply. South Africa's trade and industry minister Ebrahim Patel makes the case for such a move. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Peter Morgan, examines recent research by Microsoft indicating that many bosses may be oblivious to the number of people who will be looking to move on from their teams once the pandemic is over.
The BBC’s Fergus Nicoll will be joined from Hong Kong by Enda Curran, Chief Asia Economics Correspondent for Bloomberg News, from Los Angeles, Nicole Childers, Executive Producer of Marketplace Morning Report on American Public Media, and from Washington, Claire Healy, Director of E3G - Third Generation Environmentalism.
(Picture: President Biden addresses the climate summit. Picture credit: EPA.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7f90t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfchx02)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv3n96)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tyw)
Super League chaos and the coach of Sweden

Reflections on the rapid rise and fall of the proposed European Super League. Plus, Sweden coach Janne Andersson talks about the return of Zlatan Ibrahimović to the national team.

Picture: Tottenham Hotspur fans protest against the European Super League (Clive Rose/Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7fdry)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7fjj2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcj4hb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv3wsg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2fz2)
Prince belong Vanuatu

Villagers believe Prince Philip is returning to his ancestral home on their Pacific island. In a handful of villages on the island of Tanna, in Vanuatu, he has been revered as an ancestral spirit and son of their mountain god, and they have been waiting for him to return to them, either in person during his lifetime or in spirit form after his death.

The prince never visited the island of Tanna, but letters, photographs and gifts were exchanged over the years and the prince met a delegation of islanders at Windsor Castle in 2007. Tanna elders sent Prince Philip a "nal nal" pig hunting club. He sent them back a picture of himself holding the club, which the villagers cherish. It is thought the religious movement started after the 1974 royal tour of the Pacific, during which the Queen and Prince Philip visited Vanuatu, then known as the New Hebrides.

Presenter: Jo Dwyer

(Photo: Sikor Natuan holds a water damaged portrait of Britain's Prince Philip in a partially built monument to the British royal near the remote village of Yaohnanen. Credit: Torsten Blackwood/AFP/Getty Images)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7fn86)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznvq8y)
Dozens injured in East Jerusalem clashes

Hundreds of far-right Jews confronted Palestinian demonstrators at the city's Damascus Gate late on Thursday.

India is struggling to cope with a second wave of Covid-19 - setting tragic records for the number of cases. We hear from a doctor on the frontline.

And the crisis in Myanmar continues - but could a regional summit bring a breakthrough? A member of parliament from Malaysia tells us how Myanmar's neighbours could help.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7fs0b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznvv12)
Violence explodes in East Jerusalem after a week of tension

Police battled to keep far-right Jews and Palestinians apart, but dozens were still injured.

India is collapsing under its latest wave of coronavirus – we’ll hear how health officials are waging a losing battle there against the pandemic.

And lost at sea: international rescuers are in a race against time to find an Indonesian submarine which has been missing for over 24 hours with 53 crew members on board.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7fwrg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2lcznvys6)
Covid-19: Delhi hospitals run out of oxygen supplies

Patients die after a fire breaks out in one hospital while another runs out of oxygen.

The German Chancellor Angela Merkel is appearing in front of a parliamentary committee investigating a business scandal. The latest revelation in the case heard how employees of the company involved removed millions in cash using shopping bags.

And time is running out for the missing Indonesian submarine and its 53 crew members - we'll talk to an expert on the situation.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7g0hl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n11)
Navalny aide Vladimir Ashurkov: Is Putin about to eliminate his most dangerous opponent?

The imprisoned Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny describes himself as a walking skeleton. He’s refusing food in protest at his medical treatment, and thousands of Russians joined protests to show their solidarity. The Kremlin seems intent on destroying Navalny’s movement, irrespective of internal dissent or international condemnation. Stephen Sackur speaks to Vladimir Ashurkov, a key Navalny ally and executive director of his anti-corruption foundation. Is Putin about to eliminate his most dangerous opponent?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv4crz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j01)
Big Data, conspiracy theories and ‘Magical Thinking’

Filmmaker Adam Curtis questions the value of Big Data in society. In his latest BBC series, 'Can't Get You Out Of My Head', Curtis explores "Love, power, money, ghosts of empire, conspiracies, artificial intelligence – and You." Curtis spoke to Business Daily's Ed Butler about how the rise of artificial intelligence, Big Data and targeted advertising have come to shape the way we see our world and caused us to feel helpless within it. He also explains that the psychological experiments which underpin our faith in the effectiveness of such technologies might not be as reliable as once thought, which Curtis says gives us some cause for hope.

Producer: Frey Lindsay.
(Picture credit: Adam Curtis/BBC)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyd)
The first space shuttle mission

On 12th April 1981, the space shuttle Columbia made history becoming the first ever reusable space craft to fly into orbit. It marked the start of a 30-year shuttle programme which revolutionised the history of manned space exploration. Using NASA and BBC archive we tell the story of this historic test flight.
Photo: NASA photo shows the first launching of the space shuttle from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Columbia carried astronauts John Young and Robert Crippen. (AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7g47q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngs)
The big noise in social media

Facebook and Reddit follow Clubhouse into social audio. Does the idea have lasting appeal? Plus, home-made jet suit builder Richard Browning on what’s next for his creation. And why England’s former Children’s Commissioner is taking legal action against TikTok. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online tech editor Leo Kelion. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Stock photo of a woman listening to audio on headphones, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv4hj3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7g7zv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hs8)
What is the cost of climate reform?

It’s been a week of tough talk on climate action. President Biden set out US plans for fighting climate change and called on the industrialised world to join his efforts to dramatically slash carbon emissions this decade. The global shift towards a greener world is transforming the way we work and live, but for many the changes are coming at a steep cost. Fuel taxes have increased the cost of farming, the shutting down of carbon-intensive industries is disproportionately affecting those in low-paid jobs, and while many big businesses have the resources to go green, levies for failing to reduce carbon footprints are increasing costs for many small and medium-size businesses. So how can the burden of a green transition be shared more evenly? Is the world at risk of leaving marginalised communities behind, and - if so - what can be done to minimise any increase in inequality that results from attempts to battle climate change? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7gcqz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfcjzq7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv4r0c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tyw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7ghh3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20ds)
Iran's #MeToo

The #MeToo movement is in the spotlight in Iran, where women have been taking to social media to share experiences of sexual harassment and assault. The response was broadly positive, until allegations were made against a popular singer. Soroush Pakzad has been covering the story for BBC Persian.

My Home Town: Sants, Barcelona
Enric Botella of BBC Mundo takes us to the Barcelona neighbourhood of Sants, to chat in the market with his grandmother and grab a beer with a friend.

Mukbang Indian style
Mukbang videos, where people eat large extravagant meals on camera, are usually associated with South Korea. But recently women in rural India have found success making their own videos. BBC Monitoring's Rupsha Mukherjee spoke to two emerging mukbang stars.

The forgotten Chinese survivors of the Titanic
Six Chinese passengers were among the survivors of the Titanic, only to be vilified and refused entry to the United States. Their stories were lost from history, but have been pieced together in a new documentary, The Six. Zhaoyin Feng of BBC Chinese has spoken to the American-born son of one of the six.

Lebanon's Fattoush Index
Lebanon has a new way of measuring the rapidly rising cost of living. It’s called the Fattoush Index - fattoush is a traditional Lebanese salad, as well as a staple for Muslims breaking their fast during Ramadan. BBC Arabic's Carine Torbey explains the findings, and the legend of the origins of this salad.

Image: A woman walks past a mural depicting Iranian national flags in the Iranian capital Tehran.
Credit: -/AFP via Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7gm77)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfck76h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv4zhm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7gqzc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5gyq8z)
Indian Covid patients dying from oxygen shortage

India has reported the highest number of new Covid cases for the second day in a row, putting immense strains on the health system. Some patients are waiting outside hospitals which are unable to admit them. We hear from the ruling BJP and the main opposition Congress party who say the government is to blame.

Also in the programme; what seems like very good news on an effective malaria vaccine and the jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny calls off his hunger strike.

Photo: Relatives carry the body of a man who died from Covid-19, during his funeral at a graveyard in New Delhi. Credit: REUTERS/Adnan Abidi


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7gvqh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv56zw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46n8d9046d)
Authorities seek Turkish cryptocurrency exchange founder

A hunt is on for the founder of the Thodex cryptocurrency exchange, who has disappeared. Faruk Ozer has apparently fled Turkey and his customers have been unable to log in to their accounts and access their assets. Tayla Bilgic is senior news editor at Bloomberg in Istanbul, and fills us in on the story. Also in the programme, a global semiconductor shortage has led to suspension of production at a number of carmakers around the world. We hear from chipmaker Intel's corporate vice president for global sales Shannon Poulin, why the firm believes the shortfall could last another two years. Plus, a $2.3bn loan from the International Monetary Fund to Kenya has attracted a storm of public protest, amid concern about the country's debt levels, and that the money could be stolen by corrupt officials. Kenyan musician Okoth Vicky tells us why he released the song 'Stop Loaning Kenya' in response to news of the loan. IMF mission chief for Kenya, Mary Goodman, discusses the safeguards the organisation is putting in place to protect the funds. And Kenyan economist Reginal Katzuto explains why the loan is needed in the first place.

(Picture: A Bitcoin - US Dollar exchange chart. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7gzgm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxg72bxzf2)
Coronavirus conversations: Indian doctors

The healthcare system in India is being stretched to breaking point and people are dying because of oxygen shortages. We hear a conversation between two doctors in the capital Delhi and in Mumbai about what they are experiencing in hospitals. We also hear from reporters in the states of Tamil Nadu and West Bengal and speak to our reporter who has been looking at the oxygen shortage.

Dr Megan Murray, professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University, will talk through the latest coronavirus stories and news about a malaria vaccine that has proved to be 77% effective in early trials.

And we'll get updates on the second day of the global climate summit convened by President Biden and play more messages from around the world about what steps people are prepared to take to fight climate change.

(Photo: A man stands next to a notice outside a hospital, amidst the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in New Delhi, India, April 22, 2021. Picture taken April 22, 2021. Creadit: Adnan Abidi/Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7h36r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxg72by356)
India Covid crisis: Deaths and desperation

The healthcare system in India is being stretched to breaking point and people are dying because of oxygen shortages. We hear a conversation between two doctors in the capital Delhi and in Mumbai about what they are experiencing in hospitals. We'll also speak to photographer Danish Siddiqui whose picture of burning pyres at a mass cremation in Delhi went viral.

We’ll look at today’s other coronavirus stories with our regular expert Dr Marc Mandelson in Cape Town, South Africa.

And we'll get updates on the second day of the global climate summit convened by President Biden and play more messages from around the world about what steps people are prepared to take to fight climate change.

(Photo: A mass cremation of victims who died due to the coronavirus disease, is seen at a crematorium ground in New Delhi, India, April 22, 2021. Picture taken with a drone. Danish Siddiqui TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY/Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7h6yw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20ds)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7hbq0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdsfckyp8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv5pzd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n86b6l6jc)
2021/04/23 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7hgg4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv5tqj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq8)
What can we learn from wastewater?

Most of us don’t like to dwell on our toilet habits, but this week Crowdscience has gone down the drain to discover what wastewater can tell us about our health.

It’s been more than a year since scientists across the globe started to track the spread of Covid-19, with help from home test results and hospital data. Marnie Chesterton investigates the latest tool in their arsenal: sewage. Listener Kevin has heard how human waste can be monitored to check for virus levels, and wants to know if it can also be used to stop the disease in its tracks?

Although the coronavirus has been discovered in people’s poo, so far there’s little indication it’s actually being spread through the water system. But by taking regular samples from different parts of cities, authorities are now able to accurately predict a local peak weeks before the population shows signs of sickness, then take immediate measures to alert them. In Detroit we hear how environmental engineer Professor Irene Xagoraraki used this method to detect a rare strain of Herpes which doctors didn’t even know was a potential problem.

Marnie also talks to Professor Nick Thomson from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, who sequenced the genome of the bacteria that causes cholera, to understand how it has crisscrossed the globe. He discovered that the pandemic currently devastating Yemen actually originated in Asia. It’s a discovery that has changed how the WHO is thinking about this killer disease and could have important implications for vaccination programmes. But our effluent can also pose environmental problems, and Professor Andrew Johnson from the UK’s Centre for Ecology and Hydrology explains there are now as many as 300,000 chemicals that could threaten natural habitats.

While authorities try to test each one individually, he’s concerned they may have different effects when they mix in wastewater, and current monitoring systems don’t take this into account. Not only that, but some of these substances contain silver nanoparticles, which Professor Juliane Filser tells us stick around in soil for ever, threatening organisms and bacteria at the base of the food chain.


Presented by Marnie Chesterton and Produced by Marijke Peters for the BBC World Service.

[Image: Sewage outlets. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7hl68)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51q5gzkhw)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7hpyd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv626s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tyw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjh4r7htpj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywlbprx47h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0scdz715w4)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk9lgv65yx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48pw6src7n)
Authorities seek Turkish cryptocurrency exchange founder

A hunt is on for the founder of the Thodex cryptocurrency exchange, who has disappeared. Faruk Ozer has apparently fled Turkey and his customers have been unable to log in to their accounts and access their assets. Tayla Bilgic is senior news editor at Bloomberg in Istanbul, and fills us in on the story. Also in the programme, a global semiconductor shortage has led to suspension of production at a number of carmakers around the world. We hear from chipmaker Intel's corporate vice president for global sales Shannon Poulin, why the firm believes the shortfall could last another two years. Plus, a $2.3bn loan from the International Monetary Fund to Kenya has attracted a storm of public protest, amid concern about the country's debt levels, and that the money could be stolen by corrupt officials. Kenyan musician Okoth Vicky tells us why he released the song 'Stop Loaning Kenya' in response to news of the loan. IMF mission chief for Kenya, Mary Goodman, discusses the safeguards the organisation is putting in place to protect the funds. And Kenyan economist Reginal Katzuto explains why the loan is needed in the first place.

(Picture: A Bitcoin - US Dollar exchange chart. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gx5)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gx5)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gx5)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172xzk976jfdlg)

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BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172xzjgsgxqxky)

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BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjh4r7b8cl)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct2d5j)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxg72bkcsp)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j4k)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvq8n6tn8wn)

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Business Weekly 20:06 SUN (w3ct2dgk)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pq7)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pq7)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pq8)

Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct2cbm)

Deeply Human 22:06 SUN (w3ct2cbm)

Deeply Human 03:06 MON (w3ct2cbm)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lrw)

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Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lrw)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct1m7k)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2d34)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct2d34)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct2d34)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mtn)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mtn)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc2f)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nv3)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nv3)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nv3)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct1fq8)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct2fz2)

I'm Not A Monster 09:32 SAT (w3ct1z6l)

I'm Not A Monster 22:32 SUN (w3ct1z6l)

I'm Not A Monster 03:32 MON (w3ct1z6l)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tct)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tct)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1tct)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2djt)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2djt)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2djt)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2djt)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hbp)

Music Life 15:06 SUN (w3ct1hbp)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2lcznh3nk)

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Outlook 18:06 WED (w3ct1jyd)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3ct1l17)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3ct1l17)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pkp)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3ct1pkp)

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Project 17 04:32 WED (w3ct0x8f)

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Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l3j)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0n86b66lwz)

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Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3ct1l81)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172y0pwqj37f9r)

Sportsworld 17:06 SAT (w172y0t5hfj0h7t)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3ct1lb8)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3ct1rsr)

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The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct2dqb)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct29c0)

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The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p6d)

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The Cultural Frontline 23:32 SAT (w3ct1pdt)

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The Documentary 12:06 SAT (w3ct2d2f)

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The Documentary 05:32 SUN (w3ct2d27)

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The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3ct20dr)

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The Food Chain 08:32 SUN (w3ct1rfg)

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The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rkz)

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The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1hs7)

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When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct2cc8)

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Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3ct1wyc)

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WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f2z)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzl416ff5tk)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1tyw)

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World Questions 12:06 SUN (w3ct1wff)