Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 10 APRIL 2021

SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lyrz3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq88yhw48t)
Prince Philip and The Commonwealth

Politicians and public figures across the world have paid tribute to Prince Philip, following his death at the age of 99. We hear from Nigel Vardy, mountaineer and assessor for the The Duke of Edinburgh's Award and Professor Philip Murphy, Director of the Institute of Commonwealth Studies at the University of London's School of Advanced Study. Plus we're joined throughout the programme by Colin Peacock of Radio New Zealand and Peter Ryan from the ABC in Sydney.

(Picture: HRH The Prince Philip. Credit: Reuters).


SAT 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6n47h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:32 The Documentary (w3ct2fn4)
HRH Prince Philip: His work with charity

Kate Humble looks at the impact Prince Philip made on the world through his work with international charities. She learns how the Duke of Edinburgh's Award championed youth achievement, and how he promoted conservation of the environment through his work with the World Wildlife Fund for Nature.

Photo: The Duke of Edinburgh attends a reception for The Duke of Edinburgh Gold Award holders Edinburgh, Scotland, 2016 Credit: Getty Images


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lywq7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wr1hph)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6n7zm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2fn6)
HRH Prince Philip: Links with the armed forces

Jonny Dymond looks back at Prince Philip's links with the armed forces, and his time as an officer in the Royal Navy. He tells the story of the Duke of Edinburgh's lifelong love of the sea, and his service during World War Two.

Photo: Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, at a service to mark the 200th anniversary of Nelson's victory at Trafalgar in London, UK 2005 Credit: Getty Images


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lz0gc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fn2)
HRH Prince Philip: A celebration of a life

Buckingham Palace has announced the death of Prince Philip, the husband of Queen Elizabeth II. He was 99 years old. Tuppence Middleton presents a celebration of his life, and looks back through the BBC archive to find out more about the projects and causes to which he was dedicated.

Photo: Prince Philip in 2015 Credit: PA


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lz46h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hs6)
Why is Russia massing troops near Ukraine?

The security situation in eastern Ukraine is flaring up again, seven years into a simmering conflict between Moscow and Kyiv that started with Russia's annexation of Crimea in 2014. Increased numbers of Russian armed forces have been moved to the region, Ukraine says two of its servicemen were killed earlier this week, and Moscow is blaming Ukraine for the death of a five-year-old in a reported explosion in a region controlled by Russian-backed separatists. The European Union is ‘severely concerned’ about the situation and the United States has put its troops in Europe on high alert. So why is Russia massing forces near Ukraine now? Is it a test for new US President Joe Biden and – if so – could it exacerbate tensions between the old Cold War rivals? What do events tell us about the intentions of Russia’s President Putin and Ukraine’s President Zelensky? Join Ritula Shah and guests as they discuss the latest escalating tensions between Ukraine, Russia and the West.


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lz7ym)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wr1vxw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6nm70)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct2dmf)
The Anti-Vax Files

Targeting Germany’s youth

The Querdenken (in English, “lateral thinking”) sprung up last summer – it’s Germany’s anti-vaccine, Covid-denying, anti-lockdown movement, and it’s created a new crop of social media figures.
The baseless conspiracy theories they spread have got more extreme over time – and one man in particular has use parents’ worries about the impact of lockdown on their children as a vehicle for false narratives.
Samuel Eckert, a former evangelical preacher, runs a private Telegram group for under-18s called ‘Samuel Eckert Youngsters’. There are more than 300 children involved, all aged between 10-17, despite Telegram only being open to those aged 16 and above.
Eckert says the group is for Covid-sceptic children to meet and support each other. An inside source tells us that the children adore Eckert, post selfies with him - and some even refer to him as “father”.
But the children involved have also been exposed to far-right content, and some have been bullied for their views. What really goes on inside Germany’s secret Telegram group for Covid-sceptic teens?

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Jessica Bateman
Producer: Reha Kansara


SAT 05:50 More or Less (w3ct2djs)
Clot risks: The Pill versus the vaccine

The Astra Zeneca Covid 19 jab remains in the headlines because some regulators have concluded that it may raise the risk of a very rare type of blood clot, albeit to a risk that is still very low. In the past few weeks a number of countries have said they will limit its use to older age groups. But people are drawing comparisons to the contraceptive pill which is well-known to increase the risk of clots and asking why this level of risk is tolerated. Is this comparison fair?

Tim Harford speaks to Professor Frits Rosendaal from the University of Leiden in the Netherlands and Susan Ellenberg, professor of biostatistics at the University of Pennsylvania.


(Young women wear face masks to prevent the spread of coronavirus. Credit: Getty images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lzcpr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt38zb9ryv)
Prince Philip dies aged 99

His Royal Highness Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh and husband of Queen Elizabeth II of England has passed away aged 99.

Also in the programme: A volcano on the island of St Vincent has forced thousands to evacuate their homes and ethnic rebel groups in Myanmar have joined protesters opposed to February's military coup.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other stories are Ulrike Guerot, a German-born writer and professor of European Politics at the Danube University, in Krems, Austria; and Michael Carlson, a US-born writer and broadcaster based in the UK.

(Photo: HRH Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip. Credit: EPA)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lzhfw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt38zb9wpz)
Prince Philip dies aged 99

His Royal Highness Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh and husband of Queen Elizabeth II of England has passed away aged 99.

Also in the programme: Find out how lockdowns have led to a better view of the night sky and an update from elections in Greenland.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other stories are Ulrike Guerot, a German-born writer and professor of European Politics at the Danube University, in Krems, Austria; and Michael Carlson, a US-born writer and broadcaster based in the UK.

(Photo: HRH Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lzm60)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt38zbb0g3)
Prince Philip dies aged 99

His Royal Highness Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh and husband of Queen Elizabeth II of England has passed away aged 99.

Also in the programme: A volcanic eruption on the island of St Vincent forces thousands to flee their homes and controversy over 'the sofagate' diplomatic scandal.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other stories are Ulrike Guerot, a German-born writer and professor of European Politics at the Danube University, in Krems, Austria; and Michael Carlson, a US-born writer and broadcaster based in the UK.

(Photo: HRH Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip. Credit: EPA)


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lzqy4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fn2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lzvp8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172y0pwc7sg8px)
The world of sport remembers Prince Philip

The former England cricket captain David Gower, the BBC’s racing commentator John Hunt, the five time Paralympic champion Hannah Cockroft and Andrew Counsell from British Carriage Driving reflect on Prince Philip’s life through his love of sport. The Duke of Edinburgh passed away at the age of 99 this week. Gower recalls his many meetings with Prince Philip, while Cockroft tells us just how much she gained by completing the Duke of Edinburgh Award. Andrew Counsell discusses how Prince Philip internationalised the sport of carriage driving and John Hunt informs us of the Grand National’s plans to mark his passing.

Maddie Phaneuf joins us to discuss how she balances life as an Olympic Biathlete and an environmental advocate. The American tells us she’s come under heavy criticism on social media for her stance on climate change and explains how poor air quality can affect an athlete. Phaneuf is hoping the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing could act as a catalyst for China to clean up their air.

In Sporting Witness - we go back to the 1982 football World Cup and the first - and only - appearance by Kuwait. The Kuwaitis made a big impression at the tournament in Spain, because they had of the most memorable mascots in sporting history.

The BBC’s John Murray joins us to reflect on the first two rounds of the Masters at Augusta National and the BBC’s John Bennett joins us live from the Etihad Stadium ahead of Manchester City’s game against Leeds United in the Premier League.


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6lzzfd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wr2ldn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6pbps)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 WorklifeIndia (w3ct2f2y)
How can India's economy handle new lockdowns?

India is facing an alarming surge in coronavirus cases, a dangerous second wave that’s threatening to again derail both lives and livelihoods. Hard lockdowns last year battered its economy, and fresh restrictions and regional lockdowns to contain the surge are making many wonder what an economic recovery is going to look like.

Many millions have lost their jobs over the last year, or seen their incomes dip. Is this a temporary phase? Recent estimates have raised India's growth forecast for this year to higher-than-expected, at over 12%. But how severely will the fresh wave affect recovery? How much of it depends on the rate of vaccinations? And how badly will the new curbs, curfews and lockdowns affect consumer sentiment?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss what can be done for India's economic recovery.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Gurcharan Das, author, commentator; Geeta Goel, country director, Michael & Susan Dell Foundation; Deep Kalra, founder & CEO, MakeMyTrip


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m035j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d2d)
The other caliphate

For five brutal months in 2017 the black flag of so-called Islamic State fluttered over a captured city, and thousands of lives were destroyed. But rather than Iraq or Syria, this was a reality in Marawi, in the Philippines.

Anna Foster travels to the heart of a devastated community - still off-limits to most - where ruined buildings cut through with shrapnel and bullet-holes are all that’s left of a once-thriving city.

Five years on reconstruction is slow, and a generation of battle-scarred children are vulnerable. Without permanent homes or schools, they risk being lured by the promise of a better life through violent extremism. How is that very real threat being tackled?

Anna questions the fighters about why they laid siege to their home city in search of an Islamic caliphate, and traces the story of a wanted woman,. Ellen Barriga, who secretly left the Philippines for Syria, and joined the Islamic State group there.

Anna also visits one of the country’s toughest jail wings - a place few get to see - which holds the men behind some of the country’s most devastating attacks. There, in a special classroom, novel work is being done to quell their extremism through education.

(Photo: Destroyed house and car in Marawi, Philippines. Credit: Jewan Abdi)


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m06xn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmvh678)
Gun salutes across UK pay tribute to Prince Philip

The UK holds a 41 gun salute at noon in honour of Prince Philip, Queen Elizabeth’s husband.

Also in the programme: fears are growing that violence in Myanmar will devolve into an all-out civil war; and is French wine in peril after a freak spring frost?

(Photo: Members of the 105th Regiment Royal Artillery fire a gun salute to mark the death of Britain's Prince Philip, husband of Queen Elizabeth, at Edinburgh Castle, Britain on 10 April 2021. Credit: Andrew Milligan/Pool via Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m0bns)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t54566zdl)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as the champions Liverpool host Villa at Anfield.

Lee James is joined by former Chelsea and Netherlands right-back Mario Melchiot, ex-Tottenham defender Jenna Schillaci and Cardiff and Ivory Coast centre-back Sol Bamba to discuss all the big talking points.

We'll have reaction to the day's early match between Manchester City and Leeds United.

Elsewhere, we'll have live coverage of horse racing's pinnacle event with the Grand National at Aintree, we'll have the latest from the Masters in Augusta and we'll bring you up to date with the Women's Six Nations.

Photo: Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp and his Villa counterpart Dean Smith (Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m0tn9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wr3fmk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6q5xp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mp)
Daliso Chaponda and DeAnne Smith

Comedians from around the world join Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini for a funny take on the global headlines.

This week, Jess and Eman are joined by brilliant Malawian comedian Daliso Chaponda and hilarious American stand-up DeAnne Smith.

They’ll be finding out how people in the UK feel about vaccine passports and asking how on earth a French man failed a French test in Canada.

Join #ComediansvstheNews for the funniest take on the global headlines you’ve heard this week.


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m0ydf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3ct1z6p)
The women who reclaimed the night

We hear from the women who started "Reclaim the Night" marches in the north of England in 1977 - a time when a serial killer nicknamed the Yorkshire Ripper was murdering women. The women felt police were policing their behaviour rather than that of men by instructing them to stay home at night. We speak to Hallie Rubenhold author of The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper for a comparison of the treatment and expectations of women in the 19th and 20th century. Plus we go to Mexico and the neuropsychologist who met and discovered the motivations behind the country's first female serial killer - a famous woman wrestler - who strangled old women. It's 30 years since the Russian city of Leningrad voted to abandon the name of the leader of the Russian revolution - Vladimir Lenin - and to return to its historic name of St Petersburg and we hear the famous British naturalist and broadcaster David Attenborough remembering his first visit to the tropics of West Africa. Finally, we bring you the remarkable story behind the discovery of the jet stream –the high speed air currents which profoundly affect our environment all-round the globe.

Photo: women taking part in a Reclaim the Night march. Credit: BBC







Photo:women taking part in a Reclaim the Night march. Credit: BBC


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m124k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsq)
Actor Jodie Foster

Actor and director, Jodie Foster, on her first time playing a living real-life person in The Mauritanian.

Turkish author Elif Shafak tells us how difficult writers are to live with.

We hear from Emerald Fennell, the British writer and director of Promising Young Woman, a film which makes the audience consider their own complicity when it comes to sexual assault.

Oscar-winning screenwriter, Aaron Sorkin, reveals the inspiration for his sharp dialogue.

Lollywood actor, Adnan Siddiqui, tells us about Turki Lala, a new historical drama co-production between Turkey and Pakistan.


And Nikki Bedi talks to Ghanaian author and academic, Peace Adzo Medie, about her novel, His Only Wife; and to broadcaster and critic Bilal Qureshi.

Presenter: Nikki Bedi
Producer: Paul Waters

(Photo: Jodie Foster. Credit: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic via Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m15wp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmvj569)
Prince Charles pays tribute to his father, the Duke of Edinburgh

Buckingham Palace says the Duke of Edinburgh, who died on Friday aged ninety-nine, will be laid to rest on Saturday, at St George’s chapel in Windsor Castle. The royal ceremonial funeral will be scaled back because of coronavirus restrictions.

Also on the programme: Rights groups in Myanmar have accused the military of killing dozens of people in Bago town, in the centre of the country; and the Irish prime minister, Micheal Martin, warns on the anniversary of the Good Friday Peace Agreement against a "spiral back" into sectarian conflict in Northern Ireland.

(Photo: The Duke of Edinburgh in summer 2020. Credit: Getty Images.)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m19mt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbn)
'I was told I was too much' with will.i.am and Lady Leshurr

will.i.am, Static & Ben El, Lioness and Lady Leshurr take a deep dive into beatmaking, how to collaborate with other artists, and the best way of writing a song - from getting ideas down with a pen and paper, to just getting on the mic and seeing what happens.

Hip Hop innovator, songwriter and producer will.i.am has released eight records over 22 years with the Black Eyed Peas, which he formed in 1995. He has released four albums as a solo artist and is one of the world’s most in-demand producers, having worked with everyone from Rihanna, Lady Gaga, and Miley Cyrus, to rock legends U2.

Joining will.i.am are Static & Ben El, an Israeli pop duo who formed in 2015. They have amassed close to half a billion streams and have worked with the likes of J Balvin, Pitbull and Flipp Dinero. Lioness is a grime MC from south-east London whose mixtapes have gained support from hip-hop legend Rick Ross. She has featured on tracks with Ghetts, Toddla T and fellow guest Lady Leshurr. Born and raised in Birmingham, UK, Lady Leshurr dropped her first mixtape at the age of 14 and turned heads with her Queen’s Speech freestyle series. Her accolades include a MOBO Award in 2016 and a spot on the 2020 Queen’s Birthday Honours list, as well as collaborations with the likes of Lethal Bizzle, Krept & Konan, and Labrinth.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m1fcy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywkm54fqxx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sbpflkskk)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6qsnb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pds)
After Hu Bo

The author and film-maker, Hu Bo, was due a dazzling career. He had graduated from the Beijing Film Academy and successfully pitched at the FIRST International Film Festival, where he won the mentorship of Hungarian director Bela Tarr. From there, his first feature film, An Elephant Sitting Still, came into existence with a confidence of vision and honesty of message that is rare to find in more experienced directors. Yet, on the cusp of greatness, Hu Bo tragically killed himself, leaving a gap at the forefront of Chinese creativity. His contemporaries must take up the burning questions facing Chinese artists without him.

This programme asks what it is like to be a film-maker in China today, and explores where certain pressures, expectations, and freedoms can be found. We hear about the making of Hu Bo’s first film from those who knew him. We discover the global audience for Chinese independent film and learn from those who try to bring these films to a wider audience. We discover other artists in China who are reflecting on the same themes as Hu Bo, finding creativity in the everyday. And we ask where next for a film industry that is set to overtake Hollywood at the box office in the near future.

Presenter: Yuan Ren.
Producer: Leonie Thomas

(Photo: Yuan Ren, with kind permission)



SUNDAY 11 APRIL 2021

SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m1nw6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3ct1ytz)
On the trail of rare blood clots

On Wednesday the EU’s EMA and UK’s JCVI announced a suspected correlation between vaccination and an extremely rare type of blood clot. Prof Sabine Eichinger is a co-author of a new paper suggesting a link with vaccination or the immune response to Covid vaccination and suggests the name VIPIT for the condition. One of her patients died at the end of February having presented with a rare combination of symptoms – blood clots and a low blood platelet count. Sabine tells Roland the dots they have managed to join in the story so far.

Scientists at Fermilab in the USA posted four papers and announced an exciting development in particle physics that might lift the curtain on science beyond the Standard Model. Their measurement of something known as g-2 (“gee minus two”, just fyi), by measuring with phenomenal accuracy the magnetic properties of muons flying round in circles confirms a 20-year old attempt at a similar value by colleagues at Brookhaven. At the time, it was breathtaking but suspicious. Muons, rather like heavy electrons, don’t quite behave as the Standard Model might have us believe, hinting at fields and possibly particles or forces hitherto unknown. Dr. Harry Cliffe – a member of the LHCb team who found something similarly weird two weeks ago - describes the finding and the level of excitement amongst theorists worldwide.

Superfans around the world have learned to speak fluent Klingon, a fictional language originating from Star Trek. In a quest to understand the science behind these languages often dismissed as gobbledygook, Gaia Vince has been speaking to some of the linguists responsible for creating these languages. It’s time for her to relax the tongue, loosen those jaw muscles and wrap her head around the scientific building blocks embedded in language and what languages like Klingon tell us about prehistoric forms of communication.


Also, gossip often has negative connotations, but does it get a bad rap? Might it serve a useful function and should we think of gossiping as an advanced social skill rather than a personality defect? CrowdScience listener Jayogi thinks it might be useful, and has asked CrowdScience to dig into the reasons why we find it so hard to resist salacious stories.

Datshiane Navanayagam meets a scientist who views gossip as a key evolutionary adaption - as humans started to live in bigger cooperative groups, gossiping was a way of bonding and establishing acceptable group behaviour as well as cementing reputations of trustworthiness.

Datshiane heads to the local park to catch some real gossiping in action and finds out that whilst people like to gossip they don’t consider themselves gossipers.

Datshi asks a team of scientists what information we are most keen to share and glean in these interactions and if there is such a thing as ‘good’ and ‘bad’ gossip. She hears that in some group settings – like in the workplace - gossip can enhance cooperation and limit free-riders, but that it can also have a more self-serving dark side.

Datshiane finds out if our stone-age gossipy minds are fit to operate in the world of mass communication and social media – is our fixation on celebrities related to our being hard wired to gossip?


Image: Platelets, computer illustration. Credit: Sebastian Kaulitzki /Science Photo Library via Getty Images


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m1smb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wr4dll)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6r4wq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2cc7)
Is America beating the pandemic?

America’s Covid-19 vaccination programme is progressing at a staggering pace and states are beginning to reopen. But the country also tops world rankings when it comes to deaths from the virus. As worrying new variants emerge, could they now undermine America’s progress?

Across the US, communities of colour have been impacted disproportionately by the pandemic. Despite that, vaccinations of Black and Hispanic Americans have lagged. One person who’s trying to change that is retired clinical social worker, Cynthia Finch, in eastern Tennessee. By keeping an ever-expanding list of people in her community who want vaccines, she’s helped facilitate thousands of jabs. “We have created an access for our people of colour to get into the lines”.

Dr. Michael Osterholm is one of the world’s leading epidemiologists. In early 2020 he raised the alarm over the severity of the incoming pandemic. Now he’s warning that if the US doesn’t help vaccinate lower income countries quickly, it will continue to be impacted by dangerous new variants of Covid-19. “I have said for the past few months, that I thought the darkest days of the pandemic were still ahead of us… we are not out of the danger zone yet with this virus on a global level”.


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m1xcg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m213l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtm)
Rwanda and the opposition

Stories from Rwanda, Myanmar and Romania.

This month marks the 27th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide. It was during a matter of weeks in April 1994 that more than 800 000 men, women and children from the Tutsi ethnic group were slaughtered, along with Hutus who refused to join in.

President Paul Kagame, whose rebel forces invaded Rwanda and drove out the killers, has long been heralded by the West for his leadership since then. He focussed on reviving the economy and setting up a system for truth and reconciliation. But Mr Kagame’s own reputation as liberator and moderniser has become tarnished by allegations of a brutal silencing of his critics both at home and abroad. Michela Wrong follows the story of the trial of one opposition figure, former hero, Paul Rusesabagina, who once helped shelter Tutsis and Hutus fleeing the genocidaire in his Hotel Mille Collines – and how he was brought from his home in exile in the US, back to Kigali.

(This broadcast has been updated to reflect that the FLN refers to the National Liberation Front – a Rwandan militia)

In Myanmar, the coup at the beginning of February led to widespread demonstrations in cities across the country, from all levels of society. A clampdown ensued by the military rulers, killing more than 500 people, many of them women and children. But the campaign of civil disobedience, including a nationwide walk out in government workplaces and key industries, has hit the economy hard and has also starved the military junta of crucial revenue. The resolve of the protestors is unwavering, reports Ben Dunant, and the military’s initial victory early in February may yet prove to be a pyrrhic one.

And in Romania, we visit Europe’s last remaining leprosarium. Near the Danube and the Black Sea Coast, it’s a place of isolation for people with leprosy, also known as Hansen’s disease. Our correspondent Nick Thorpe has made several journeys to this community and was last there a year ago, just before it was even further isolated by coronavirus lockdowns. He recounts his last visit, and the people he met, with whom he has stayed in touch.

(Image: Paul Rusesabagina arrives at Nyarugenge Court of Justice in Kigali, Rwanda, on October 2, 2020. Credit: Simon Wohlfahrt/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6rdcz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pds)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m24vq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wr4rtz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6rj43)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Documentary (w3ct2d26)
Don't log off: My life, my world

Alan Dein follows Margaret in Uganda, who cares for nine children orphaned by Aids and who has HIV herself. Told through interviews and her own smartphone recordings, it’s an inspiring story of hope and resilience as Margaret deals with lockdown and the loss of loved ones.

(Photo: Margaret playing a drum, with kind permission)


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m28lv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172xyt38zbdnvy)
Tributes flow in for Prince Philip

Prince Charles, heir to the throne of England has said the royal family are deeply grateful for the messages of support from around the world after the death of his father, the Duke of Edinburgh.

Also in the programme: We look into the reasons behind rare blood clots linked to the AstraZeneca jab and vaccine misinformation in Germany.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other stories are Rosamund Urwin, media and technology correspondent for the Sunday Times magazine in the UK and Kai Kupferschmidt, a contributing correspondent for Science magazine in Berlin.

(Photo: The Duke of Edinburgh in summer 2020. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m2dbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172xyt38zbdsm2)
What role did Prince Philip play?

The historian, Sir Simon Schama speaks about the role Prince Philip played for the British Monarchy. The Duke of Edinburgh passed away on Friday.

Also in the programme: The difficulty faced by those going through pregnancy during the pandemic; and how a Brexit-driven exodus of EU workers is affecting the UK.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other stories are Rosamund Urwin, media and technology correspondent for the Sunday Times magazine in the UK and Kai Kupferschmidt, a contributing correspondent for Science magazine in Berlin.

(Picture: A tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh in central London; Credit: Kirsty O'Connor/PA Wire)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m2j33)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172xyt38zbdxc6)
Prayers of remembrance for Prince Philip

The Duke of Edinburgh's death has prompted prayers of remembrance at Sunday church services around the world. The senior bishop of the worldwide Anglican communion, the Most Reverend Justin Welby, will lead a remembrance service at Canterbury Cathedral in the UK.

Also in the programme: How the WHO has missed its vaccine distribution target and the story of a soldier living with untreated PTSD has been made into a feature film.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other stories are Rosamund Urwin, media and technology correspondent for the Sunday Times magazine in the UK and Kai Kupferschmidt, a contributing correspondent for Science magazine in Berlin.

(Photo: The Duke of Edinburgh in summer 2020; Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6rwch)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rff)
Portion distortion

Serving sizes have increased dramatically in recent decades. It’s happened so subtly that many of us simply don't realise, but it’s having a serious impact on our health and our planet. So, how can we reverse it?

Emily Thomas learns how food manufacturers and clever marketers have nudged us into buying ever larger portions, leveraging ultra cheap ingredients and our own psychology. We hear that the phenomenon is so pervasive it’s also crept into the home, where many of us have lost any concept of what an appropriate portion is.

Given the increasing awareness of the poor health and environmental outcomes linked to overconsumption, we find out what regulators and companies are doing to shrink portions back to a more sustainable size, and ask whether the real answer might lie in a fundamental shift in the way we all value food.

Producer: Simon Tulett

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: A woman drinking from a giant coffee cup. Credit: Getty/BBC)

Contributors:

Pierre Chandon, professor of marketing and director of the INSEAD Sorbonne University Behavioural Lab, Paris;
Theresa Marteau, director of the behaviour and health research unit at Cambridge University;
Denise Chen, chief sustainability officer at Melco Resorts & Entertainment, Hong Kong.


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m2mv7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3ct1mtm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6s03m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3ct1kwp)
Secrets and Lies: China’s dissident cartoonist

Badiucao is one of China's most famous dissident cartoonists. His art is political and provocative - from poking fun at powerful Chinese figures like President Xi Jinping, to capturing the final days of Nobel Laureate Liu Xiaobo. For years, Badiucao operated in secrecy: he moved into exile in Australia, and wore a mask at public events to conceal his identity. In 2018 he planned his first ever solo exhibition in Hong Kong, but how would the Chinese authorities take it?

Do you have a fantastic story involving a secret or a lie? We'd love to hear about it. Record a short voice memo or write an e-mail and send it to us at outlook@bbc.com. If your story is about someone you know, just make sure they're ok with you telling us about it.

Presenter and producer: Maryam Maruf
Secrets & Lies series producer: Fiona Woods
Music: Joel Cox


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m2rlc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbl)
Mirror, Mirror

Why symmetry attracts.

Our ideas of what’s beautiful are tied to symmetry. If it looks beautifully symmetrical, it’s beautiful, right? Why? What’s so compelling about faces that are the same on both sides on that nose in the middle?

So to study symmetry we dive into the world of asymmetry – where things are different! And we introduce you to a professor who studies right- and left-handedness, a graphic designer who explains the appeal of a bit of asymmetry and a woman who grew up with a distinctly asymmetrical face – and who ended up in a very surprising profession as a result.

(Image: Striking Dahlia, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6s3vr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2d2b)
Modern Midrash

For thousands of years Jews have sought to understand the Bible, with all its inconsistencies and contradictions, through “midrash”. Midrash is a combination of interpretation and teaching based on the written texts of the Old Testament that tell the story of the ancient Hebrews, from the creation of the world, through God making his covenant with Abraham, the Exodus from Egypt, the destruction of Jerusalem, the Temple and the exile to Babylon.

As what it means to be Jewish has changed over the millennia, Jews have used midrash to re-interpret their identity in the world. In this edition of “Heart and Soul,” Michael Goldfarb searches through the ancient texts for clues to what it is to be Jewish in the 21st Century. He looks for modern midrash in conversations with a rabbi, an archaeologist, a Jewish Studies professor, a psychoanalyst, and a composer who is writing musical midrash for each part of the Torah, the five books of Moses. They talk about the historical truth of the Bible, and can midrashic interpretation help find meaning in the Holocaust, and even these days of the pandemic.


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m2wbh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wr5h9r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6s7lw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct29bz)
Water: Too Much And Not Enough

Ecological crises

Journalist Alok Jha argues that if humans are to survive and thrive for the rest of the 21st Century we must urgently transform our relationship with water.

Many of the serious geopolitical tensions over water as a resource that we looked at in the previous episode of this series are rooted in worsening ecological crises. In this episode, Alok shows how the global water crisis is inextricably linked to the climate crisis – and how neither can be dealt with alone.

In Bangalore, we hear how incredible pollution levels led to a lake catching fire, before revealing how local water management decisions play into the global groundwater emergency. Then former Nasa scientist Jay Famiglietti provides a satellite perspective on the problem, showing how water disasters are both a result of the climate crisis and help fuel it.

Back on earth, we hear what this means for Hindou Ibrahim’s pastoralist cattle herder community living on the edge of the rapidly shrinking Lake Chad, and Alok puts water lobbyist Maggie White on the spot to ask why water is not the urgent global priority it should be for leading politicians and policymakers.

(Photo: Aerial photo of the Lake Chad, in the Bol region, 200km from Chad capital city N'Djamena. Credit: Sia Kambou/AFP/Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m302m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1r)
Why has Peru had such a bad pandemic?

Peru has suffered one of the highest excess death levels in the world. The government failed to take account of the structure of society and the needs of its people in its response to the pandemic. A culture of corruption and political turmoil are persistent themes that have led to an underfunded health system and a lack of focus how Peruvian people would be able to cope during the dark months of a deadly pandemic. Instead vast numbers of casual workers lost their jobs and started to trek home, taking the virus with them. Also remote communities were cut off by the freeze on transport and unable to get access to vital medical supplies, amid a dwindling supply of oxygen to treat them. We take a look at what lies beneath Peru’s terrible experience during the pandemic.

Presenter: Tanya Beckett
Producer: Nathan Gower

(Peruvians protest at a political rally, March 25, 2021. Credit: Ernesto Benavides/Getty Images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6scc0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3ct1gx3)
Denmark: Goodbye to mink

Can Denmark's mink industry rise again? Denmark was the world's top producer of mink for the luxury market. Last year a coronavirus variant was found in the animals, and transmitted to people. There was a fear the variant - Cluster 5 - might interfere with the efficacy of any vaccine developed for humans. So in November, the Danish government ordered a cull of all 17 million farmed mink. But questions have continued to be asked about the decision to effectively end production. Was it driven by an anti-fur, political agenda? Was the science reliable? For Assignment Linda Pressly and Danish journalist, Rikke Bolander, meet some of those with skin in the game. What are the chances of a revival of Denmark's mink business?

Producers/presenters: Linda Pressly and Rikke Bolander
Editor, Bridget Harney

(Image: A mink in a cage on a Danish fur farm. Credit: Mads Claus Rasmussen/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m33tr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmvl34c)
India registers another record high in Coronavirus infections

India has registered another record increase in coronavirus infections, with the daily tally crossing 150'000 cases, and more than 800 deaths. We talk to an epidemiologist in India who says this is partly due to new variants and mutations of the virus.

Also in the programme: Doubts about Chinese vaccines expressed by a top Chinese official and sixty years on – the remarkable story of the first man in space.

(Demand for jabs has gone up as India battles a second wave of infections. Credit: EPA)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m37kw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Forum (w3ct1rky)
Rabindranath Tagore: The Bard of Bengal

So prodigious was the polymath Rabindranath Tagore, there’s a saying in Bengal that one lifetime is not enough to consume all of his work. Poet, playwright, thinker, activist, educator, social reformer, composer, artist… the list of his talents is long. Today his name is known all over India and Bangladesh; children recite his poetry at school and his legacy lives on in many different ways.

When he became the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913, Tagore was feted for a time by American and European literary figures who saw in him someone who embodied Western preconceptions of a mystic Oriental sage. As a result of his newfound fame outside India, Tagore travelled widely and exchanged ideas with many celebrated world leaders and thinkers from Einstein to Gandhi. Today Tagore’s thoughts on education and his stance vis-à-vis the natural world and our relationship to the environment are seen as remarkably forward-looking.

Rajan Datar is joined by Kathleen O’Connell, retired lecturer in South Asian Studies from the University of Toronto and the author of Rabindranath Tagore: the Poet as Educator; the writer Aseem Shrivastava who lectures on Tagore and his ecological thought at Ashoka University in Delhi; and Chandrika Kaul, Reader in Modern History at the University of St Andrews, who’s published widely on imperial and modern India.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service.

[Photo: Rabindranath Tagore. Credit: Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images]


SUN 14:50 More or Less (w3ct2djs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m3cb0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 Music Life (w3ct1hbn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:06 on Saturday]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m3h24)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172y0t5456b3sy)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as Tottenham host Manchester United.

Delyth Lloyd is joined by South Africa international Dean Furman to discuss all the big talking points ahead of the game.

We'll also bring you reaction to the day's early matches as Burnley face Newcastle and West Ham take on Leicester.

And we'll have the latest from Augusta with the final round of the Masters taking place.

Photo: Manchester United manager Ole Gunnar Solskjaer and his Tottenham counterpart Jose Mourinho (Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m3v9j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxd1wr6g8s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6t6kx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct2cc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m3z1n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2fn2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m42ss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50zmvm23d)
Iranian nuclear facility hit by 'act of terrorism'

Iran's atomic agency says that its Natanz nuclear facility has been hit by what it called a terrorist act. Iranian nuclear officials have said that there was a problem with the electrical network at the facility, which is key to the country's uranium enrichment programme.
Also on the programme: India experiences a surge in Covid-19 cases; and a Moscow gastronomic landmark closes after serving up luxury for 120 years.

(Photo: Satellite image of Natanz enrichment facility 29th June 2020. Credit: Maxar Technologies)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m46jx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6tkt9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6k)
I'm Not a Monster

10/04/2021 GMT

An American mother living in the heart of the ISIS caliphate. Her husband an ISIS sniper. Her 10-year-old son forced to threaten the U.S. president in a propaganda video shown around the world. She claims she was tricked into taking her young children to war-torn Syria, but where does her account end and the truth begin? Over four years journalist Josh Baker unravels a dangerous story where nothing is as it seems. From the depths of Raqqa’s infamous torture prison to an elk hunt in Idaho, he uncovers secrets, lies and the lasting consequences.

I’m Not A Monster is the story of one family’s journey from Indiana to the Islamic State group and back.


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct2djs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgf6m4b91)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywkm54jmv0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sbpflnpgn)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8vy6tpkf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]



MONDAY 12 APRIL 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx8f1g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl3ny3n16q)
US car production hit by semi-conductor shortage

Ford and General Motors will both curtail production from this week, as they struggle to cope with a shortage of semi-conductors which are used in technology like anti-lock brakes. We get the latest from Michelle Krebs, an executive analyst with Cox Automotive.
After several nights of violence in Belfast, will foreign investors be put off from Northern Ireland? We speak to Allison Morris of the Belfast Telegraph.
And we mark 60 years since Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin completed the first manned space flight. Astrophysicist Dr Becky Smethurst explains the significance of this historic achievement.

(Picture: A sign with the Ford logo. Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976hys9v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct1m7j)
Lithium: Chile’s white gold

The Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2019 was awarded to John Goodenough, Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino "for the development of lithium-ion batteries." These rechargeable batteries are in our phones, and in our laptops. And they will be the batteries powering electric vehicles which we are being urged to use in place of ones fuelled by gasoline and diesel. Jane Chambers finds out how the element lithium has become so important in the world today. She lives in Chile, where lithium is called the country’s white gold, as it is the source of much of the world’s supply. Jane travels to the Atacama Desert and visits the SQM mine where lithium is evaporated out of huge brine lakes.

She talks to Professor Clare Grey of Cambridge University about her research into improving the efficiency of lithium ion batteries. And Dr Paul Anderson of Birmingham University explains what needs to be done for more lithium to be recycled.

Editor: Deborah Cohen

Picture: Lithium plant in Atacama Desert, Chile, Credit: SQM


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx8jsl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51c4rv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976hyx1z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct2dq9)
Is it time to ditch the plough?

Cities, money, roads, beef burgers and telephones, in fact pretty much all of human civilisation as we know it, would probably not exist were it not for one simple invention. The plough.
This humble yet revolutionary tool enabled us to cultivate vastly greater amounts of food than our hunter gatherer forefathers giving rise to villages, cities and empires.
But it has come at a cost. Nearly 10,000 years of cultivated agriculture have released billions of tonnes of carbon from the soil into the atmosphere. Just within the EU, it’s estimated 5% of current greenhouse gas emissions come from agricultural soils. That’s more than aviation and shipping combined.
Around the world an increasing number of farmers are adopting new methods without the plough to restore soil health and lock more carbon into the ground.
But some scientists are questioning whether the potential for carbon sequestration into the soil is being over hyped.
What’s more, for millennia the plough has been a crucial ally in boosting yields and in the coming decades we are going have to produce lots more food to feed the growing global population
So the Climate Question is; Is it time for us to ditch the plough?


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx8njq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976hz0t3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3ct1l16)
Exposing those who promote vaccine disinformation

The Anti-Vax Files is a programme that sets out to uncover and challenge disinformation around vaccines. Listeners quiz the editor of BBC Trending.
Plus can a cliff-hanger be in bad taste? A listener in the US believes Business Daily did exactly that.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx8s8v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51cd83)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976hz4k7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6c)
Women who love insects

Insects have been around for more than 350 million years, longer than dinosaurs and flowering plants. We are vastly outnumbered by them – there are approximately 1.4 billion insects for every person on earth. And although we tend to treat them with disdain, they are absolutely essential to our survival. Kim Chakanetsa talks all things buzzing, crawling and flying with two insect enthusiasts who have made a career out of their love for bugs.

Dr Jessica L Ware is a Canadian-American entomologist specialising in dragonflies and damselflies. She’s the first African-American associate curator in invertebrate zoology at the American Museum of Natural History in New York and the vice-president of the Entomological Society of America. A single mother and an adventurer, she has travelled the world following dragonflies and she is passionate about diversifying the scientific community.

Dr Carolina Barillas-Mury was born in Guatemala and spent her life studying mosquitoes to understand how they transmit malaria. She heads the Mosquito Immunity and Vector Competence Section at the National Institutes of Health - one of the world's foremost medical research centres - and she believes the way to fight malaria is to work with, and not against, mosquitoes.

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE DETAILS
Left: Carolina Barillas-Mury (courtesy of Carolina Barillas-Mury)
Right: Jessica L Ware (credit Sallqa-Tuwa Stephanita Bondocgawa Maflamills)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx8x0z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qbpz1q)
Volcano hit Island braces for further eruptions

The Caribbean island of St Vincent has been covered in thick clouds of ash after its volcano erupted.

The charity, Save the Children, has warned that millions of people in Somalia will face malnutrition this year.

And an historic win in the Master's Golf Tournament - Hideki Matsuyama has become the first Japanese man to win a major title.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx90s3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qbq2sv)
Covid-19: England eases restrictions after strict lockdown

Prime Minister Boris Johnson appeals to the public to 'behave responsibly' as hairdressers, non-essential shops and outdoor food outlets reopen.

We'll speak to the Prime Minister of the Caribbean Island of St Vincent. As the volcano there continues to erupt, he'll tell us about the challenges facing his people.

And remembering the man who went into space for the very first time sixty years today.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx94j7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qbq6jz)
"The glorious 12th": England eases its strict Covid lockdown

Hairdressers and non-essential shops will reopen after being shut for months with cases currently at low levels.

Why is Denmark hoping to revoke resident permits for dozens of Syrian refugees?

And we hear how the people of St Vincent are coping after its volcano erupted last Friday.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx988c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5j)
Tsitsi Dangarembga: Are better days coming for Zimbabwe?

Zeinab Badawi interviews playwright, novelist and filmmaker Tsitsi Dangarembga, one of Zimbabwe’s most influential and acclaimed cultural figures. Arrested for her political activism, she says her art gives her a platform to call for change. Is she optimistic about her country's future? What are the prospects for better days in Zimbabwe, when every day is a struggle?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976hzmjr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4j)
Telegram in the spotlight

After becoming the most downloaded non-gaming app earlier this year, Telegram messaging app has amassed half a billion users – a quarter of WhatsApp’s and rising. Owned by the elusive Russian exile Pavel Durov, Telegram has been used to coordinate global protest movements - from Belarus to Iran and Hong Kong. It’s also been accused of tolerating the extremist channels behind ISIS and the Capitol Hill riots.

But in its home country, Russia, misogyny appears to be permitted on the platform. Ivana Davidovic hears from women who worried for their safety when their personal information, including addresses and workplace details, were posted on Telegram channels, subjecting them to threats.

Professor Megan Squire from Elon University in the US tells how she also received threats following her research into far-right groups on the platform, and about her fears that those groups might only get bigger if Telegram proceeds with plans to pay content creators.

Digital security expert Raphael Mimoun looks under the app’s bonnet, explaining whether its privacy promises to users are up to scratch. And journalist Max Seddon profiles the founder and CEO Pavel Durov.


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0m)
The US Supreme Court's first woman justice

In 1981, Sandra Day O'Connor became the first woman judge to be appointed to the US Supreme Court. She was nominated by newly-elected Republican president Ronald Reagan, who'd made the pledge to appoint a woman part of the campaign that led to his landslide victory. Justice O'Connor served for 24 years and had the decisive vote in many landmark cases. Her friend and former law clerk, Ruth McGregor, has been talking to Louise Hidalgo.

Picture: Sandra Day O'Connor is sworn in at the Senate confirmation hearing on her selection as a US Supreme Court justice, September 1981 (Credit: Keystone/Consolidated News Pictures/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx9d0h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dq9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976hzr8w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq6)
Why do we gossip?

Gossip often has negative connotations, but does it get a bad rap? Might it serve a useful function and should we think of gossiping as an advanced social skill rather than a personality defect? CrowdScience listener Jayogi thinks it might be useful, and has asked CrowdScience to dig into the reasons why we find it so hard to resist salacious stories.

Presenter Datshiane Navanayagam meets a scientist who views gossip as a key evolutionary adaption - as humans started to live in bigger cooperative groups, gossiping was a way of bonding and establishing acceptable group behaviour as well as cementing reputations of trustworthiness.

Datshiane heads to the local park to catch some real gossiping in action and finds out that whilst people like to gossip they don’t consider themselves gossipers.

Datshi asks a team of scientists what information we are most keen to share and glean in these interactions and if there is such a thing as ‘good’ and ‘bad’ gossip. She hears that in some group settings – like in the workplace - gossip can enhance cooperation and limit free-riders, but that it can also have a more self-serving dark side.

Datshiane finds out if our stone-age gossipy minds are fit to operate in the world of mass communication and social media – is our fixation on celebrities related to our being hard wired to gossip?

Presenter: Datshiane Navanayagam
Producer: Melanie Brown

[Image: Gossiping people. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx9hrm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3ct1pds)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976hzw10)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct2dmf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct2djs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx9mhr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51d7h0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976hzzs4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx9r7w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jsv)
The break-up that cost me my voice

Shirley Collins grew up in a folk music-loving family in Sussex, England, during World War Two, and announced her intention to become a folk singer when she was still just a teenager. Her career would lead her to record music with her sister Dolly; to record folk songs in America with legendary song collector Alan Lomax, and to become a key figure in the 'folk revival' of the 1960s and 1970s. But the trauma of a painful break-up cost Shirley her singing voice - "sometimes I would open my mouth and nothing would come out", she remembers - and led to a heartbreaking decision: "I walked away from music for years. I felt I had no option." Shirley did all sorts of jobs to support her children, and avoided even listening to music sometimes - it made her too sad. Then one day, the musician David Tibet, a huge fan, got in touch and begged Shirley to try to sing again. Shirley tells Emily Webb the story of a voice lost and found again.


Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Shirley Collins circa 1963
Credit: Brian Shuel/Redferns via Getty


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx9w00)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51dgz8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j078d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgx9zr4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx4sz1r)
Iran vows revenge for Natanz attack

The Israeli Prime Minister - Benjamin Netanyahu - has reiterated that Israel will not allow Iran to obtain nuclear weapons capability -- a day after an attack on a nuclear facility in Iran, which Tehran has blamed on Israel. Mohammad Marandi, a political analyst in Tehran, told Newshour the attack will have an impact on the talks about the possible return of the US to JCPOA.

Also in the programme: how young people opposing the military coup in Myanmar are organising themselves amid brutal military crackdowns; and former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown on global Covid vaccines.

(Photo: A number of new generation Iranian centrifuges on display. Credit: EPA/IRAN PRESIDENT OFFICE)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxb3h8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j0grn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y47w26vwbm3)
England lockdown restrictions ease

Pubs, restaurants, beauty salons and non-essential shops reopened today with the easing of lockdown restrictions across England. We hear from the heart of London’s shopping district and the BBC’s Elizabeth Hotson who has been speaking to customers at a London pub. Also, the new President of Tanzania, signed a billion dollar crude oil pipeline deal in Uganda yesterday. A spokesperson for the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, Gilbert Makore tells us why this is a significant deal for the two nations. Plus, the BBC’s Ivana Davidovic gives us the lowdown on Telegram, the most downloaded non-gaming app this year.

(Picture: Shoppers queuing outside the Primark in Stoke-on-Trent / Credit: Getty Images)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxb77d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfvt0s75v)
Coronavirus conversations: Quarantine hotels

As a result of the pandemic many countries have brought in a hotel quarantine system, whereby people arriving from abroad have to isolate, in a hotel, for a period of time - that can range from a few days, up to 14 days. We hear a conversation between people who are currently staying in quarantine hotels in Indonesia, Australia and New Zealand.

And China's top disease control official has said the efficacy of the country's Covid vaccines is low. We’ll hear about the vaccination process in China from the BBC Monitoring team and also learn more about the broader procedures in place to combat the spread of the virus in China. With Chile being one of the countries to be using one of the Chinese vaccines, we hear the conversation in the country about its usage.

(Picture: Charlotte, a teacher from Australia originally but living in New Zealand with her partner. Quarantining at a hotel in New Zealand Credit: Charlotte)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxbbzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfvt0sbxz)
Minnesota: Daunte Wright shot dead by police

We’ll be hearing from Minnesota where police have fatally shot a black man in a traffic stop in the US city of Brooklyn Center, just north of Minneapolis. We’ll be returning to people in the area who we spoke to after the killing of George Floyd last year.

China's top disease control official has said the efficacy of the country's Covid vaccines is low. We’ll hear more about the vaccination process in China from a BBC regional specialist and also learn more about the procedures in place to combat the virus in China. With Chile being one of the countries to be using one of the Chinese vaccines, we hear the conversation in the country about its usage.

And, as a result of the pandemic many countries have brought in a hotel quarantine system, whereby people arriving from abroad have to isolate, in a hotel, for a period of time - that can range from a few days, up to 14 days. We hear a conversation between people who are currently staying in quarantine hotels in Indonesia, Australia and New Zealand.

(Picture: A demonstrator confronts police during a protest after police allegedly shot and killed a man, who local media report is identified by the victim's mother as Daunte Wright, in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, U.S., April 11, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Nick Pfosi)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxbgqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jsv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxblgs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51f6g1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j0yr5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n7v1wfg94)
2021/04/12 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxbq6x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct2dq9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j12h9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1m7k)
The equal rights stuff

In 1976, Nasa launched a campaign to help recruit the next generation of Astronauts. It was fronted by African-American actress Nichelle Nichols, Star Trek’s Lt. Uhura, as part of an effort to ensure the astronaut corps represented the diversity of the United States.

When they were revealed to the press, the 35 members of the new astronaut group included six women, three African American men and one Asian American man. All were appointed on merit.

The selection of the first women caused quite a stir. As the ‘first mom in space’, Anna Fisher was asked by the press whether she was worried about her child (none of the fathers were asked). There were also jibes about separate restrooms and whether the women would ‘weep’ if something went wrong.

Meanwhile, Nasa’s engineers suggested developing a zero-g makeup kit and the first US woman in space, Sally Ride, was issued with a long string of tampons (joined together like sausages) for a six-day mission.

To mark the 40th anniversary of the first Shuttle launch in April 1981, astronaut Nicole Stott speaks to some of these pioneers and hears how Nasa has since aimed to become a beacon for diversity.

Contributors also include astronaut Charles Bolden, the first African American to head the space agency and – as Nasa prepares to land the first woman on the Moon – its new head of human spaceflight, Kathy Lueders.

(Image: Sally Ride. Credit: Nasa)

Producer: Richard Hollingham


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxbtz1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx4tt8n)
Alexei Navalny faces force-feeding in jail

CLARIFICATION: This programme contains a report on so called ‘powerships’ in South Africa. In the report Zeynep Harezi, MD of Karpoweships says, “We will be operating our powerships with natural gas, liquified natural gas. That is 50% less emissions than coal, 30% less emissions than liquid fuels, so it’s the cleanest form of THERMAL electricity.” The word thermal was erroneously omitted from the report.

Friends of the jailed Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny say the authorities are threatening to force-feed him. Mr Navalny is on hunger strike to demand better medical care while in prison.

Also in the programme: Brazil's intensive care wards are increasingly caring for people under 40 as the country's Covid crisis rages on; and police in Minnesota release bodycam footage from the officer who shot and killed a 20 year-old black man.

Image: Alexei Navalny in February 2021. Credit: Reuters


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxbyq5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j19zk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxc2g9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywkzffrd08)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sc1pwwfmx)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j1fqp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48phyglm0f)
England lockdown restrictions ease

Pubs, restaurants, beauty salons and non-essential shops reopened today with the easing of lockdown restrictions across England. We hear from the heart of London’s shopping district and from a pub garden near Reading.
Also in the programme, the new President of Tanzania has signed a billion dollar crude oil pipeline deal in Uganda. Gilbert Makore of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative tells us why this is a significant deal for the two nations.
Plus, the BBC’s Ivana Davidovic gives us the lowdown on Telegram, the messaging app - and the most downloaded non-gaming app this year.

(Picture: A man drinking a pint of beer / Credit: Getty Images)



TUESDAY 13 APRIL 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxc9yk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq8n6t8p88)
England lockdown restrictions ease

Pubs, restaurants, beauty salons and non-essential shops have reopened with the easing of lockdown restrictions across England. We hear from the heart of London’s shopping district and from a pub garden near Reading.
The e-commerce giant Alibaba has been accused of anti-competitive practices and fined more than $2.5 billion by Chinese regulators. We discuss what this will mean for the future of the company.
Also in the programme, the BBC’s Ivana Davidovic gives us the lowdown on Telegram, the messaging app - and one of the most downloaded non-gaming apps this year.
And the BBC's arts correspondent Vincent Dowd tells us what the organisers of this year's Baftas are doing to improve diversity across the awards.

Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Nisha Gopalan, editor for Bloomberg News in Asia, in Hong Kong, and Les Williams from the University of Virginia, in Arlington, Virginia.

(Picture: A man drinking a pint of beer / Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxcfpp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51g1ny)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j1sz2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2d27)
Don't log off: My life, my world

Alan Dein follows 25-year-old entrepreneur Fahad in Dhaka, Bangladesh who has to deal with the pressures of running multiple businesses during the pandemic – and has over 200 employees depending on him for their livelihoods.

(Photo: Farhan courtesy of Farhan Wahab)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxckft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jsv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxcp5y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51g956)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j21gb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcs)
Celeste Mountjoy, aka Filthyratbag

Best known by her alias Filthyratbag, 21 year old artist Celeste Mountjoy’s brightly coloured line-drawn illustrations and phrases are at once confessional and relatable, humorous and heart-breaking. Their appeal, as her 439k Instagram followers testify, extends far beyond Celeste’s native Melbourne.

From partying and relationships to mental illness and social media vanity, the artist’s satirical observations about everyday life encapsulate her experience as a Generation Z’er and young woman, navigating today’s world.

In 2020, as work began on new illustrations, reporter Rosa Ellen met up with Celeste to find out what makes her tick, how she creates her artwork…and why her alias is Filthyratbag.

Presented and Produced by Rosa Ellen
Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxcsy2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qbsvyt)
Police and protesters clash in Minnesota

Police and protesters have clashed for a second night in Minneapolis amid anger over the fatal shooting of a black man.

In India one of the world's largest religious festivals takes place under the shadow of coronavirus, as the country registers the second highest number of cases globally.

And we hear from Papua New Guinea, where spiralling tribal violence is being driven by poverty and modernity.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxcxp6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qbszpy)
Tension in Minneapolis after fatal shooting of a black man

Riot police have fired tear gas and stun grenades at protesters. The fatal shooting of a black man by a police officer in the US city of Brooklyn Center in Minnesota was an accident, the police say.

India overtakes Brazil in its coronavirus cases. But millions still gather to take a dip in the Ganges river at a religious festival.

And in a rare admission, China's top disease control official says the efficacy of the country's Covid vaccines is low. What does that mean for the vaccine programme?


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxd1fb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qbt3g2)
Angry protests in Minnesota over fatal shooting of a black man

The fatal shooting of a black man by a police officer in the US city of Brooklyn Center in Minnesota was an accident, the police say. We'll get reaction from there on that incident.

Japan's cabinet has approved a controversial plan to flush treated water from the Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea.

And Brazil steps up its vaccination programme after coronavirus cases continue to soar. But many say it is too late.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxd55g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkn)
Shred it yourself: The DIY plastic recyclers

Machines to shred, melt and mould waste plastic are popping up in workshops around the world - from the UK to Malaysia, Kenya to Mexico.

The project is being led by an organisation called Precious Plastic. They put designs for the devices online for anyone to download and build themselves.

More than 400 teams around the world are now taking on the challenge of plastic waste using these machines, making everything from sunglasses to plastic bricks in the process.

Presented and produced by Tom Colls

Image: Precious Plastic


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j2jfv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jfk)
A conversation with Greta

The world’s most famous climate activist has just turned 18 and is as uncompromising as ever.

In an extended interview, Justin Rowlatt asks Greta Thunberg how she intends to continue campaigning, now that she is back in school and living under lockdown at her family home in Stockholm.

Before the pandemic, the Swedish environmentalist had spent several months travelling around America in an electric vehicle lent to her by Arnold Schwarzenegger. A TV documentary crew shadowed her as she visited scientists, entrepreneurs and victims of wild fires, while also attending climate conferences and protesting.

She tells us what she learned, and why she believes the climate emergency is more dire than ever before.

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Greta Thunberg at home in a video conference with Justin Rowlatt)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x54)
How a worm helped explain human development

After the discovery of the double-helix structure of DNA in the 1950s, South African biologist Sydney Brenner was searching for a model animal to help him tease out the genes involved in human behaviour and human development from egg to adult. Brenner chose a tiny nematode worm called caenorhabditis elegans (c.elegans for short), whose biological clockwork can be observed in real time under a microscope through its transparent skin. The worm has since been at the heart of all sorts of discoveries about how our bodies work and fail. Sue Armstrong has been speaking to people who knew and worked with Sydney Brenner.

This programme is a Ruth Evans Production.

Photo: the c. elegans worm. Credit: Science Photo Library


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxd8xl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j2n5z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct1m7k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxddnq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3ct1rsq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxdjdv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51h4d3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j2wp7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxdn4z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw3)
The bowl of porridge that changed my life

When Elizabeth Nyamayaro was eight years old a severe drought hit her small Zimbabwean village. She was saved from starvation by a local United Nations aid worker, who gave her a bowl of porridge after finding her collapsed on the ground. It was an experience that made Elizabeth determined that one day she too would work for the UN. It was a difficult road, but she eventually made it to one of the top jobs in the organisation. She campaigned for global gender equality, and launched one of the UN’s most successful social media campaigns ever, HeForShe.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Elizabeth Nyamayaro
Credit: Behind the Cause


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x54)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxdrx3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51hcwc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j345h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct1m7k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxdwn7)
TITLE

The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx4wvyv)
Covid-19 surge in India

Officials in India have authorised the Russian coronavirus vaccine, Sputnik V, as India struggles to curb a surge in new cases. Covid-19 cases are rising and railway carriages are again being used to accommodate patients.

We have a report from Brazil where the numbers of infections are also surging.

More clashes in Minneapolis as a young black man is shot dead by police.

And a report from South Africa about the Bafta-winning Netflix documentary "My Octopus Teacher" that focuses on a film-maker who befriends an octopus.


(Photo: Covid-19 patient in India. Credit:Getty Images)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxf0dc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j3cnr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4bbddp14t2)
Fukushima wastewater to be released into ocean

Japan says it will run out of storage and the water will be treated and diluted to ensure radiation levels are below those set for drinking water. However, the local fishing industry has strongly opposed the move, as have China and South Korea. Oceanographer, Dr Simon Boxall discusses the potential environmental impact of these plans. Also, Twitter has announced plans to open its Africa headquarters in Ghana. Software developer Regina Honu tells us what makes the country an attractive destination. Plus, the BBC’s Justin Rowlatt meets environmental activist Greta Thunberg to talk about what difference the pandemic has made to the fight against climate change.



(Picture: Workers during the clean-up during the aftermath of the Tsunami / Credit: AFP)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxf44h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfvt0w42y)
Coronavirus: Johnson & Johnson vaccine latest

We hear all the developments with the Covid-19 vaccine from Johnson & Johnson. The company have said it's going to delay the rollout of its vaccine in Europe, and is reviewing cases of extremely rare blood clots in a small number of people who've received the jab. US health officials earlier called for a pause on Johnson & Johnson's single-dose vaccinations, after six people there developed a rare disorder involving blood clots.

We listen in on the conversations being had by people in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota after police said Daunte Wright was shot and died after an officer mistook her gun for a Taser during a traffic stop and about 40 people were arrested just north of Minneapolis in a second night of unrest.

And a Dutch woman who is holidaying on a Greek island as part of a trial for Covid-safe tourism has sent us all an audio postcard about what's going on.

Picture: Vials with a sticker reading, "COVID-19 / Coronavirus vaccine / Injection only" and a medical syringe are seen in front of a displayed Johnson ^ Johnson logo Credit: REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo/File Photo


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxf7wm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfvt0w7v2)
Minnesota: Daunte Wright shooting

We reflect the conversations being had by people in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota after police said Daunte Wright, a 20 year old African American, was shot and died after an officer mistook her gun for a Taser during a traffic stop. In a courtroom just a few miles away, ex-police officer Derek Chauvin is on trial, charged with murdering George Floyd in May last year. About 40 people have been arrested just north of Minneapolis following a second night of unrest. We get the latest from our reporter on the ground.

Also we are joined by our colleague from BBC Brasil to hear the latest on the pandemic in the country.

And we get all your questions answered on the latest coronavirus issues with the help of one of our regular health experts. If you want to send a question or an audio message to the programme please do on Whatsapp to +447730751925

(Picture: A person lights a candle during a vigil following the fatal police shooting of 20-year-old Black man Daunte Wright in Minnesota, in Washington, U.S., April 12, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxfcmr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x54)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxfhcw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51j3c4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j3vn8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n7v1wjc67)
2021/04/13 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxfm40)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j3zdd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrv)
Overcoming internet shutdowns in Myanmar

Internet shutdowns continue in Myanmar and now two new reports show the impact these have had. Top10VPN estimates these have cost the country’s economy more than $1bn, while cybersecurity firm Recorded Future Inc. has confirmed how people are still trying to connect with each other using Bluetooth and messaging apps like Bridgefy as well as accessing the dark web. Samuel Woodhams, Digital Rights Lead from Top10VPN, is on the show to tell us what they’ve observed.

Vietnam water salinity app
The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) has launched an app in Vietnam to help rice farmers save their crops. High salt levels in the water channels between fields can now be monitored remotely and results sent to farmers’ mobile phones. High salt levels can destroy an entire annual rice crop so the app is significantly improving yields. Kisa Mfalila, Regional Climate and Environment Specialist for Asia and the Pacific region at IFAD, explains how the app works.

Computer Modelling of the Canon of English Literature
The Canon of English Literature – the books that are considered to be worthy of studying - are overwhelmingly written by white men, with books written by female novelists often considered less literary in comparison. Now, a new project “Novel Perceptions: Towards an Inclusive Canon” aims to use computer modelling to investigate the public’s reading preferences. It's led by Professor Sebastian Groes from the University of Wolverhampton, who has just launched a Reader Review survey asking for responses to 400 recent novels. The novels will also undergo computer analysis that will look at sentence length, vocabulary and grammar difficulty to see if an algorithm can identify a best seller.

(Image: Getty Images)



The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Nigel Dix
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxfqw4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx4xq5r)
US and Russia trade accusations over Ukraine

US President Joe Biden has phoned Russia's President Putin to stress support for Ukraine's territorial integrity, amid concerns about Russian troops on the border. What is Moscow's strategy and what can the West deliver?

Also in the programme: President Biden is to withdraw US forces from Afghanistan by September 11th; and the US drugs regulator is recommending suspending the use of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine because six recipients out of nearly seven million have developed rare blood clots.


(Photo: Russian units have been on exercises in Russian-annexed Crimea. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxfvm8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j46wn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxfzcd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywkzffv8xc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sc1pwzbk0)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j4bms)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48phygphxj)
Fukushima wastewater to be released into ocean

Japan says it will run out of storage and the water will be treated and diluted to ensure radiation levels are below those set for drinking water. However, the local fishing industry has strongly opposed the move, as have China and South Korea. Oceanographer, Dr Simon Boxall discusses the potential environmental impact of these plans. Also, Twitter has announced plans to open its Africa headquarters in Ghana. Software developer Regina Honu tells us what makes the country an attractive destination. Plus, the BBC’s Justin Rowlatt meets environmental activist Greta Thunberg to talk about what difference the pandemic has made to the fight against climate change.

(Picture: Workers during the clean-up during the aftermath of the Tsunami / Credit: AFP)



WEDNESDAY 14 APRIL 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxg6vn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq8n6tcl5c)
Johnson & Johnson delays vaccine rollout in Europe

Johnson & Johnson has decided to delay the rollout of its vaccine in Europe after authorities in the US raised fears over a possible link to blood clots. We speak to Krishna Udayakumar, a professor of medicine and director of the Duke Global Health Innovation Center in North Carolina.
The ride-hailing app Grab plans to list its shares in the US, which would make it worth almost $40 billion - the largest ever listing by a southeast Asian company. It's already merged with a special purpose acquisition company, or SPAC, to enable the listing. Crystal Tse from Bloomberg in New York explains what SPACs are and why they've been growing in popularity.
Plus, as drone racing is becoming increasingly popular, we speak to Nicholas Horbaczewski, founder of the professional Drone Racing League.

Vishala Sri-Pathma is joined throughout the programme by political reporter Erin Delmore in New York and by Lien Hoang, reporter at Nikkei Asia, in Ho Chi Minh City.

(Picture: Johnson & Johnson vaccine / Credit: Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxgbls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51jyl1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j4pw5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct29c0)
Water: Too Much And Not Enough

Solutions

Water is at the heart of many of the most serious ecological crises we face, including the biggest one of all: the climate emergency. Alok Jha shows how water itself may offer solutions to give us hope.

Alok witnesses nuclear fusion in action at an experimental reactor in England. Simple seawater provides the fuel for this futuristic technology that has the potential to solve the world’s energy problems and eliminate fossil fuel power generation.

Meanwhile chemist Fernando Romo walks us through the fascinating science of artificial photosynthesis, which allows humans to mimic plants, drawing carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and storing energy in the process.

But water historian Terje Tvedt cautions that the more reliant human societies become on water technologies, the more vulnerable we make ourselves to changes in the water landscape. An innovative 3D mapping project by activist geographer Hindou Ibrahim shows how technology must be married to grassroots organising and political action if it is to break out of the lab and help secure our water future.

(Photo: Water droplets on a leaf. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxggbx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x54)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxgl31)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51k629)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j4ycf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8d)
Goal 12: Responsible consumption

In 2015 the United Nations announced a radical plan to change the world.

Global leaders drew up a list of 17 "sustainable development goals" to create a blueprint for a better future. Governments agreed to support the goals which cover gender equality, health provision, a good education and much more. We've asked 17-year-olds from 17 different countries tell us what they think needs to change if the world is to meet those goals by 2030.

Singapore imports 90% of its food and 744,000 tonnes of this ends up as food waste. Seventeen-year-old Shan wants to find out what might be some of the solutions.

"I really had my eyes opened to just the sheer scale of food wastage within Singapore. I hope that this can serve as a symbol and an inspiration for young people and for everyone out there to play their part and contribute as well as they can to tackling issues related to sustainability for a better tomorrow and for a better future for all of us."

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producer: Joe Kent and Nick Marsh

Project 17 is produced in partnership with the Open University


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxgpv5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qbwrvx)
Electoral reforms in Hong Kong

Hong Kong’s Parliament is debating electoral reforms which will end the territory’s remaining independence from China.

South Africa and the European Union have joined the United States in temporarily suspending the rollout of the Johnson & Johnson Covid jab, after reports of rare blood clotting.

And American troops will leave Afghanistan in September. What will it mean for the country? We speak to a photographer who has been documenting US war against the Taliban.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxgtl9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qbwwm1)
Hong Kong debates a series of electoral reforms

Beijing says the new laws will ensure only “patriots” can rule. We have reaction to the changes to who can govern.

The United States, South Africa and European Union say they will temporarily stop the rollout of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine - after reports of rare blood clotting.

And we return to Minneapolis where tensions are still high after the death of yet another black man shot by the police.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxgybf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qbx0c5)
Hong Kong debates new rules to restrict candidates

China is making further changes to Hong Kong's electoral system. Hundreds of pages of new legislation are being discussed by the Legislative Council.

The US announces it will withdraw troops from Afghanistan by September 11th - 20 years on from the attacks on the World Trade Center. We have reaction from a former Afghan minister.

And one hundred days to go to the Tokyo Olympics - the hosts are adamant the games will go ahead. But with Covid cases high and the pace of vaccination slow, many in Japan doubt it's a good idea.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxh22k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb1)
Serj Tankian: System of a Down frontman on activism and music

Serj Tankian is the frontman of world-renowned rock band System of a Down, but is also an arch advocate for his family’s homeland, Armenia. His passionate views on genocide, war and corrupt governance have won him millions of fans and numerous enemies. What matters more to him: the politics or the music?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j5fby)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jnb)
Boom time for scammers

During the Coronavirus pandemic, people have been spending more time at home, and online, than ever before. This has given online scammers a golden opportunity to find new victims. And it’s worked. We’ll hear from Danielle in Illinois, who was caught up in just such a scam and lost thousands of dollars from her savings. And she’s not the only one. Craig Jones, Director of Cyber Crime at Interpol, describes the rise they’ve seen in all types of online scams during the pandemic. But why does lockdown make us more vulnerable? Dr. Stacey Wood, professor of psychology at Scripps College in California, breaks down how different demographics are made more vulnerable in their own ways. And if you or a loved one do get targeted by a scammer, Amy Nofziger at the American Association of Retired Persons Fraud Watch Network explains what to do.

Presenter: Tamasin Ford.
Producers: Clare Williamson and Frey Lindsay.
(Picture credit: Vasily Pindyurin via Getty Creative)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7d)
Fighting for Castro at the Bay of Pigs

On April 17 1961 a group of Cuban exiles launched an invasion of communist-ruled Cuba in a failed attempt to topple Fidel Castro. After 72 hours of fighting many of the invaders were captured or killed. Gregorio Moreria was a member of the local communist militia who fought against the US-backed invaders. He was injured and briefly captured during the fighting. He spoke to Mike Lanchin for Witness History in 2016.

(Photo: Members of Castro's militia during the US-backed Bay of Pigs invasion. Credit: Three Lions/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxh5tp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct29c0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j5k32)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxh9kt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct2d2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxhf9y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51l196)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j5slb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxhk22)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyc)
Searching for a serial killer from my bedroom

Paul Haynes’ search for an elusive serial killer started when he was out of work and had to move back to his childhood home; this soon took over his life and became a full-time occupation. He then teamed up with the crime writer Michelle McNamara who came up with the name 'Golden State Killer.' He told his story to Emily Webb.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Paul Haynes
Credit: Sabrina O’Callaghan


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxhnt6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51l8sg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j612l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxhskb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx4zrvy)
US says troops to leave Afghanistan by 11 September

US President Joe Biden is set to announce that American troops will leave Afghanistan by 11 September. A former Afghan diplomat tells us it's a mistake.

The Iranian president, Hassan Rouhani, says the decision to boost the country's uranium enrichment programme was a response to an Israeli attack on one of its nuclear facilities.

And, 100 days until the Tokyo Olympics - we will hear why many people in Japan don't want the games!

(Photo credit: Getty Images)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxhx9g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j68kv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4ckkhl50c3)
Coinbase prepares for $100 billion listing

America's biggest crypto-currency trading platform, Coinbase, begins trading on the Nasdaq exchange in New York today. John Ethan Detrixhe, Future of Finance reporter for Quartz.com joins us to share his insights on what to expect. The BBC’s Rob Young spoke to the President of Coinbase, Emilie Choi, ahead of trading - she told us that the firm was taking a long term view. Plus, Bernie Madoff, the financier convicted of orchestrating the largest Ponzi scheme in history, has died in a US federal prison; we get analysis from Russ Mould of investments company, AJ Bell. Also in the programme, the US House of Representatives will discuss legislation which could see reparations paid to the descendants of slaves. Spokesperson for the National African American Reparations Commission, Dr. Ron Daniels tells us if this is good news for campaigners. Plus, as crowd-funding has become a global phenomenon we hear from the CEO of its biggest platform, Tim Cadogan.

(Picture: The Coinbase logo for an US cryptocurrency exchange platform is seen on a smartphone screen with a Nasdaq logo in the background. / Credit: Pavlo Gonchar/Getty Images)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxj11l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfvt0z101)
US troops in Afghanistan

US President Joe Biden is expected to announce that American troops will leave Afghanistan by 11th September. With concerns about a surge in militant violence we hear a conversation between Afghan women about the future of their country.

We hear from our BBC teams in India about new restrictions to try to stop the spread of Covid-19 in the state of Maharashtra. We also continue to get updates on the situation with the pandemic in other states across India.

And we are joined by one of our regular health experts to answer your questions on coronavirus. Today we welcome Dr Maria Sundaram, infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto, Canada.

(Photo: Afghan Army soldiers secure a military base that was previously in use by the US soldiers, in Haska Meyna district of Nangarhar province, Afghanistan Credit: GHULAMULLAH HABIBI/EPA)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxj4sq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfvt0z4r5)
Coronavirus: India new restrictions

India has seen its highest daily spike of coronavirus cases. We hear from our BBC teams in Maharashtra which has just brought in new restrictions to try to stop the spread of Covid-19. We also continue to get updates on the situation with the pandemic in other states across India.

US President Joe Biden is expected to announce that American troops will leave Afghanistan by 11th September. With concerns about a surge in militant violence we hear a conversation between Afghan women about the future of their country.

And we welcome back our regular health expert - Dr Pedro Hallal an epidemiologist from the Federal University of Pelotas in the south of Brazil. He will be looking at the latest issues relating to the global coronavirus pandemic. If you have a question for him send us a message on whatsapp on +447730 751925.

(Photo: Indian people and migrant workers stand in queue as they wait for their respective trains outside the Lokmanya Tilak Terminus, in Mumbai, India Credit: DIVYAKANT SOLANKI/EPA)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxj8jv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxjd8z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51m087)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j6rkc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n7v1wm83b)
2021/04/14 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxjj13)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct29c0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j6w9h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv2)
Chile’s vaccine roll out

Claudia and guest Professor Matthew Fox from Boston University discuss the latest Covid-19 research this week – and there’s plenty of it! There’s new data on the variant first found in the UK, plus efficacy data just out comparing the immune responses to the AstraZeneca and Pfizer vaccines. And news from India of a so called ‘double mutant’ where two variants come together. Meanwhile the big vaccine news in the US is that they have temporarily suspended the Johnson and Johnson vaccine, so much to discuss!

Plus, despite an acclaimed vaccine roll out Chile is experiencing a second wave of Covid infections. This has led some to claim that vaccine roll outs aren’t making the difference we all hoped or that it’s the type of vaccine being used. Jane Chambers reports and finds that it’s more complicated – as ever!

And David and Barbara got in touch with the BBC about a treatable condition that can be easily confused with dementia - Normal pressure Hydrocephalus.

Finally, a study from Japan on the risk of dementia and – surprisingly - whether it has anything to do with whether there are pavements nearby.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Erika Wright

(Picture: Health workers give the Sinovac vaccine against Covid-19 at a vaccination centre in Santiago, Chile. Photo credit: Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxjms7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx50m2v)
Biden: US to withdraw troops from Afghanistan

President Biden says after 20 years of military engagement in Afghanistan, it is time to end America's longest war. He says all US troops will leave the country by the 11th of September.

Also in the programme: Denmark stops administering the AstraZeneca vaccine amid concerns over blood clots; and Bernie Madoff, the man behind one of the biggest ever financial frauds, has died in prison in the US.

Image: A US soldier in Afghanistan. Credit: Getty Images.


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxjrjc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1nb1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j73sr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxjw8h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywkzffy5tg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sc1px27g3)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j77jw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48phygsdtm)
Coinbase prepares for $100 billion listing

America's biggest crypto-currency trading platform, Coinbase, begins trading on the Nasdaq exchange in New York today Paul Vigna of the Wall Street Journal explains just what the company does to make it quite so highly valued. The BBC’s Rob Young spoke to the President of Coinbase, Emilie Choi, ahead of trading - she told us that the firm was taking a long term view. Plus, Bernie Madoff, the financier convicted of orchestrating the largest Ponzi scheme in history, has died in a US federal prison We hear from the son of one Madoff's victims, who took their own life after losing everything. Also in the programme, as crowd-funding has become a global phenomenon we hear from the CEO of its biggest platform, Tim Cadogan.

(Picture: The Coinbase logo for an US cryptocurrency exchange platform is seen on a smartphone screen with a Nasdaq logo in the background. / Credit: Pavlo Gonchar/Getty Images)



THURSDAY 15 APRIL 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxk3rr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq8n6tgh2g)
Coinbase launches $100 billion listing

America's biggest crypto-currency trading platform, Coinbase, begins trading on the Nasdaq exchange in New York today. John Ethan Detrixhe, Future of Finance reporter for Quartz.com joins us to share his insights and we hear from the President of Coinbase, Emilie Choi. Paul Vigna of the Wall Street Journal explains what the company does to make it so highly valued. Plus, Bernie Madoff, the financier convicted of orchestrating the largest Ponzi scheme in history, has died in a US federal prison. We hear from the son of one Madoff's victims, who took their own life after losing everything. Also on the programme, the US House of Representatives will discuss legislation which could see reparations paid to the descendants of slaves. Dreisen Heath from Human Rights Watch tells us if this is good news for campaigners. Plus, as crowd-funding has become a global phenomenon we hear from the CEO of its biggest platform, Tim Cadogan.

Joining us throughout the programme are Alexis Goldstein, an activist and financial reform advocate in Washington and Stefanie Yuen Thio, Joint Managing Partner at TSMP Law in Singapore.

(Picture: The Coinbase logo for an US cryptocurrency exchange platform is seen on a smartphone screen with a Nasdaq logo in the background. / Credit: Pavlo Gonchar/Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxk7hw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51mvh4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j7ls8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gx4)
Sexual healing in the Israeli military

Soldiers returning from the line of duty with injuries affecting sexual performance are universal to all militaries around the world, but Israeli psychologist Dr Ronit Aloni set about making hers the only nation that offers a unique therapeutic approach to restoring the sexuality of their troops as a matter of course: surrogate partner therapy (SPT), or sexual surrogacy. After studying the niche treatment in the US in the early nineties, Dr Aloni conducted studies, lobbied the government and met with religious leaders in order to make this therapy, considered fringe and often taboo in other nations, available to those who need it via Ministry of Defense funding. But why is Israel alone in this? The therapy is best described as traditional psychotherapy combined with intimate sexual therapy with a surrogate lover, in every form that can mean, and it was Dr Aloni’s dogged belief in its life-changing benefits for her clients that caused her to pursue provision for the troops. For Assignment, Yolande Knell tells the story of that policy through Dr Aloni’s work and her Tel Aviv clinic, the work of surrogate partner Seraphina, and two military veterans who have accessed the service: one of the first to be offered it on the Defense Ministry’s time in the late nineties, and one a conscripted young man paralysed by his injuries who after years of begging for death, says the therapy “restored his humanity.”

Producer: Philip Marzouk
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Hand being held in a gesture of comfort. Credit: PeopleImages via Getty)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxkc80)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxkh04)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51n2zd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j7v8j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfg)
How to love chillies

Chillies can be hard to love at first, but they are integral to the cuisines of many countries. So what do you do if hot peppers are at the heart of your food culture, but your child can’t stand the heat?

Emily Thomas is joined by three cooks and parents. Each of them grew up in a food culture where chillies are important, but are now bringing up their own children in a country where hot peppers have less significance. We hear why you might want a child to develop a taste for chilli, how young they should be introduced to it, and whether you should ever resort to bribery.

Guests: MiMi Aye, Sunrita Dutta, Mei Li.


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxklr8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qbzns0)
Minneapolis ex-policewoman charged over killing of black motorist

We go to Minneapolis to get the reaction of the founder and CEO of the Center For Economic Inclusion to the charge of second-degree murder facing the ex police officer who shot Daunte Wright.

Could the key ingredient in magic mushrooms - and the psychedelic effect this produces when consumed - help people suffering from depression? We speak to a doctor who specialises in this area.

And we look into a study in Rwanda which has found resistance to anti-malarial drugs is growing in Africa for the first time.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxkqhd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qbzsj4)
America prepares to announce sanctions against Russia

The US sanctions would target more than 30 Russian entities and be a retaliation for cyber-attacks aimed at the US, including alleged interference in the 2020 presidential elections. We get the latest.

We find out about treatment being offered to the military in Israel whose injuries have affected their sex life.

And a new study says the active ingredient in LSD and Magic Mushrooms is good for depression. We speak to an expert in this field.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxkv7j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qbzx88)
US poised to impose sanctions on Russia

America prepares to announce sanctions against Russia for meddling in the US election and for its role in Ukraine. We hear from Kiev on the build-up of Russian troops at the border.

Also as the US plans to withdraw its military from Afghanistan, a BBC reporter visits a Taleban controlled area and asks locals whether life has changed.

And we hear about the strike by doctors at a major hospital in Sierra Leone after one of the physicians there was assaulted by senior officials.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxkyzn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1s)
Is Africa the new power base for the Islamic State group?

Since Islamic State’s hold on Iraq and Syria has weakened in recent years the group has sought to expand into new territories, including Africa.

IS insurgents have reportedly killed thousands, including children, and displaced thousands more in Mozambique, Mali, and Somalia, among other territories across the continent.

It is believed that IS franchises its brand to local militant groups, providing support, claiming responsibility for deadly attacks, all while spreading its influence in these new territories.

Charmaine Cozier asks if Africa is a new power base for the Islamic State group?


Producer: Paul Connolly


(Al-Shebab fighters, an Islamist insurgent group in Somalia. Credit: Mohamed Abdiwahab/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j8b81)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j91)
President Biden and his strategy for China

Will the US President continue with an increasingly hostile attitude towards China? Or does economic common sense demand that Washington should back off from Beijing? Ed Butler asks Diana Choyleva of Enodo Economics, and he chairs a debate between David Sacks of the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington DC and Kishore Mahbubani, a distinguished fellow at the National University of Singapore.

(Picture: US President Joe Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping. Credit: Getty Images.)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2w)
The vultures saved from extinction

South Asian vultures started dying in huge numbers in the 1990s but no one knew why. They were on the verge of extinction before scientists worked out what was killing them. Bob Howard has been hearing from Munir Virani of the Peregrine Fund, who discovered that the vultures’ livers were being damaged when they fed on the carcasses of cattle which had been treated with a widely-used painkiller.

White-backed vultures in their enclosure at the Vulture Conservation Centre run by World Wide Fund for Nature-Pakistan (WWF-P) in Changa Manga. September 20, 2017. Credit: ARIF ALI/AFP via Getty Images


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxl2qs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j8g05)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxl6gx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rkz)
One Hundred Years of Solitude: The story of Latin America

Considered to be one of literature’s supreme achievements, One Hundred Years of Solitude by the Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez is reported to be the most popular work of Spanish-language fiction since Don Quixote in the 17th century. Written in 1967, it tells the story of seven generations of the Buendía family, whose patriarch is the founder of a fictional Colombian village called Macondo. But why is it said this novel – which fuses the fantastical and the real – tells the story of Latin America and has given an entire continent its voice?

Joining Bridget Kendall are Ilan Stavans, Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College in Massachusetts, in the United States, and the biographer of Gabriel García Márquez; María del Pilar Blanco, Associate Professor in Spanish American literature at Oxford University, and Parvati Nair, Professor of Hispanic, Cultural and Migration studies at Queen Mary, University of London.

Produced: Anne Khazam

(Photo: Partial view of a mural painting by Oscar Gonzalez and Andrew Pisacane representing passages from One Hundred Years of Solitude at the National Library in Bogota. Credit: Raul Arboleda/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l80)
The athlete who changed the rules on sex tests

In the 1980s, the Spanish hurdler Maria-Jose Patiño was forced to quit athletics after a sex test revealed she had male chromosomes due to a rare genetic condition called Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome. Often facing hostile press coverage, Patiño fought a two-year battle to change the international rules – successfully proving that her chromosome pattern did not improve her athletic performance and that her body was the same as any other woman’s. Patiño was allowed to compete again in female athletics and her case is now seen as a milestone in the continuing controversy over genetic variation in sport. Maria-Jose Patiño talks to Jo Casserly.

PHOTO: Maria-Jose Patiño in the 1980s (Personal Collection)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxlb71)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51ny69)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j8phf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxlfz5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2w)
I was told I was the wrong colour to be a swan

Growing up in London, Julie Felix always dreamed of dancing on the city's most famous stages, but she says she ended up leaving the UK in the 1970s after a ballet company excluded her because of the colour of her skin. Instead, she became a star in the United States with the prestigious Dance Theatre of Harlem, the first classical ballet company to focus on black dancers. Under the tutelage of the great African-American dancer Arthur Mitchell, Julie travelled the world performing for the likes of the singer Prince, Pavarotti and President Ronald Reagan. A book has been written about Julie's life called Brickbats and Tutus.

American environmentalist Molly Burhans calls herself a "park ranger nun". A devout Catholic, she's also a ground-breaking cartographer who's mapped all the land holdings of the Catholic Church so that they can be used for environmental and social justice purposes.


Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: A montage of photographs from Julie's dancing career
Credit: Courtesy of Julie Felix


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxlkq9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51p5pk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j8xzp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxlpgf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx52ns1)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxlt6k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j95gy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y49379s5zzb)
Greensill inquiry reveals government rules need urgent reform

A key U.K. government adviser has called for urgent reform of the rules on ministers and top officials taking jobs with private firms. Opposition politicians have accused the government of sleaze following revelations that a former Prime Minister and civil servants have been involved in paid lobbying. We get an update from Whitehall Editor for the Financial Times, Sebastian Payne. Also, the European Court of Justice has upheld a ban on electric pulse fishing, a practice which environmental campaigners strongly oppose. Frédéric Le Manach, Scientific Director of the environmental group BLOOM explains why activists are celebrating this court ruling. Plus, we hear from the Director for Africa at the International Monetary Fund, Abebe Aemro Selassie. He tells us how the short term future may look for Africa amid the publication of the IMF’s spring economic outlook for the region.

(Picture: Whitehall sign / Credit: Getty Images)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxlxyp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfvt11xx4)
Coronavirus conversations: Hospitalised for months

Two people talk about what it was like being hospitalised for months with Covid-19 and what their recovery has been like.

Also, India has registered a daily total of more than 200,000 new coronavirus cases for the first time. As media reports suggest that health care systems in some states are overwhelmed, we continue to hear from journalists in different parts of the country to find out about the situation where they are.

And after the news that US forces will be leaving Afghanistan in September, we speak to our correspondent who has been to the Taliban-controlled territory.

(Photo: Medical staff treating Covid-19 patient, April 14, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Kacper Pempel)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxm1pt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfvt121n8)
US sanctions against Russia

We speak to our correspondent in Washington and a BBC Russian Service reporter about the US sanctions against Russia in retaliation for alleged interference in last year's US presidential election.

Two people explain what it was like being hospitalised for months with Covid-19 and what the recovery has been like.

We also speak to our reporter in Brazil about data showing that 1,300 babies have died of complications from Covid-19 in the country.

And after the announcement that US forces will be leaving Afghanistan in September, we speak to our correspondent who has been to the Taliban-controlled territory.

(Photo: US President Joe Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House, in Washington DC on 14 April 2021. Credit: Andrew Harnik/POOL/EPA)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxm5fy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxm962)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51px5b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j9ngg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n7v1wq50f)
2021/04/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxmdy6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976j9s6l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3h)
Rolling out the vaccines faster

Two weeks ago several G7 leaders called for an international treaty on Pandemic Preparedness for the future. This week 175 prominent leaders called for lifting the IP on vaccine design. And former UK PM Gordon Brown called on the G7 to finance vaccines for the world in the next two months. But are there technical difficulties that limit the pace of manufacture?

Anthony McDonnell is an economist at think tank Centre for Global Development who has been looking at the problem since last year. He suggests, amongst other things, one limit is the human expertise in manufacturing these brand-new technologies, with another being a level of vaccine nationalism that is seeing a lack of exports of components involved in manufacture.

Professor Trudie Lang heads the University of Oxford’s Global Health Network, and looks at health research across the world. She says in most countries there is no lack of public health or infrastructure potential for rolling out the vaccines, if only the supply existed.

The volcano that erupted explosively on St Vincent last week has led to many thousands of people being evacuated. Dr Joan Latchman of the University of West Indies Seismic Research Centre - who has monitored Caribbean volcanos for several decades - describes from Trinidad how the layers of ash mean recovery will take a long time, even if the explosions and pyroclastic dangers subside reasonably soon. Back in The UK, Prof Jenni Barclay and colleagues are examining rocks from the early part of the eruption, before the explosive phase began, to see if there are clues in the microstructure that could provide clues to the future.

And how do our brains so quickly tell a scream of delight from a scream of horror? Or of pain? Prof Sascha Frühholz of the University of Geneva has written in the journal PLOS Biology this week about work looking at how we identify the nature of different human screams. One finding is that we perceive joy quicker than fear..



(Image: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxmjpb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx53hzy)
Afghanistan: 'We have won the war, America has lost', say Taliban

The White House has insisted that it can keep an eye on any terror threats from Afghanistan without having troops there, after President Biden announced a withdrawal.
Also in the programme: The sex therapist working with Israel's wounded soldiers to help with their sexual healing and how Jade and money fuel conflict in Myanmar.

(Photo:One resident told the BBC people are frightened into obeying the local Taliban. Credit: BBC)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxmnfg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jb0pv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxms5l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywkzfg12qk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sc1px54c6)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jb4fz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48phygw9qq)
US announces new sanctions on Russia

The US has announced sanctions against Russia in response to what it says are cyber-attacks and other hostile acts. Russia and Ukraine analyst Orysia Lutsevych explains how significant these new moves are. Also, the European Court of Justice has upheld a ban on electric pulse fishing, a practice which environmental campaigners strongly oppose. Frédéric Le Manach, Scientific Director of the environmental group BLOOM explains why activists are celebrating this court ruling. Plus, is your career impacted by starting a new job workign remotely, we have an extended report.

(Picture: US Embassy in Moscow/ Credit: EPA)



FRIDAY 16 APRIL 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxn0nv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq8n6tkczk)
US imposes new sanctions on Russia

The US has announced sanctions against Russia in response to what it says are cyber-attacks and other hostile acts. Russia and Ukraine analyst Orysia Lutsevych explains how significant these new moves are.

Plus, are you suffering from zoom fatigue, we speak to the author of a new study into just way video conferencing is so exhausting. And, is your career impacted by starting a new job workign remotely, we have an extended report.

Joining us throughout the programme are Ann Dwyer, editor of Crain’s Chicago Business, in Chicago and Jyoti Malhotra, journalist and author in New Delhi.

(Picture: US Embassy in Moscow/ Credit: EPA)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxn4dz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51qrd7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jbhpc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tyv)
Norway's protests and Brazilian publicity stunts

Norway coach Ståle Solbakken discusses his team's recent protest against human rights abuses. And we hear from the Brazilian social media celebrity who has signed a professional contract with Rio de Janiero club Resende.

Picture: Norway's players pose with t-shirts reading "Human rights, on and off the pitch" in support of migrant workers building World Cup venues in Qatar for the 2022 finals (JORGE GUERRERO/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxn853)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxncx7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51qzwh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jbr5m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1fq8)
Three months to save my son's life

Veer is four years old. He has a genetic disorder called Fanconi Anaemia affecting his bone marrow. In 2019, his parents were told they would need to find a lifesaving stem cell donor for him. Doctors estimated that Veer could expect to live for between two to five years before needing a transplant, depending on how quickly his bone marrow depletes. However, after one of Veer’s recent general check-ups, the Doctors said things were deteriorating faster than expected and Veer was only three to six months from needing the transplant. The challenge is to get people to register. Currently, only 2% of the UK’s population are stem cell donors. A donor could come from anywhere around the world but misconceptions about becoming a donor means registrants are low. In the end, all it involves is a procedure similar to giving blood.

Rajeev Gupta follows Veer’s parents as they dramatically ramp up efforts to save their son's life. In this emotional story, we get to know the charming little Veer and his family as they battle limitations placed by the coronavirus pandemic to try and find a match for him. Rajeev hears how Veer’s mum, Kirpa and dad, Nirav have increasingly turned to their Jain faith to help deal with the emotional traumas placed upon the family. Kirpa believes their faith inevitably guides them through this and will help Veer find his match. With exclusive access, this programme follows Veer and his family to what could be a joyous or equally heart wrenching conclusion.

Presenter/producer: Rajeev Gupta

(Photo: Veer. Credit: helpveernow.org)


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxnhnc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qc2kp3)
Chicago releases video of police shooting teenager

Graphic bodycam footage shows the moment 13-year-old Adam Toledo is shot in a dark alley, apparently with his hands in the air.

We go to Hong King where pro democracy activist Jimmy Lai is appearing in court.

And we hear about the problems facing South Africa's avocado farmers.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxnmdh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qc2pf7)
Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai awaits sentencing

Jimmy Lai is one of Hong Kong's most prominent pro-democracy activists. He is due to be sentenced for his role in anti-government protests. We have a report from the BBC’s Danny Vincent who has had exclusive access to Mr Lai over the past six months since his arrest.

We go live to Iraq which is in the grips of its worst wave of the Covid pandemic.

And we're in Mogadishu to hear about the tensions there after the president extended his term by two years.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxnr4m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2l0qc2t5c)
Footage of Chicago police shooting a teenager is released

A 13-year-old boy was shot dead by police in Chicago in March, they have now released the bodycam footage. We find out what happened and the reaction to this.

The funeral of His Royal Highness, The Duke of Edinburgh, will take place on Saturday. We hear about the plans for the service.

And we hear from the team behind a new ultra white paint that could help fight climate change and keep us cool all at the same time.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxnvwr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n10)
Silvia Foti: When truth trumps family loyalty

Stephen Sackur interviews Silvia Foti, an American writer whose grandfather was a Lithuanian man hailed as heroic patriot who paid with his life resisting the Soviets. But according to his granddaughter, Jonas Noreika was no hero - he had the blood of thousands of Jews on his hands. She’s chosen to speak out, angering many in Lithuania. What happens when truth trumps family loyalty?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jc754)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j00)
A part-time return to the office?

A hybrid model mixing home working with office time is being favoured by major companies. But critics worry it will create divisions in the workplace. Small business owner and columnist Gene Marks explains why managing remote workers presents such a challenge, and Darren Murph from GitLab, a tech firm of 1,300 employees and no office, tells us why having a mix of home and office work could be the worst of both worlds. Economist Nicholas Bloom discusses the risk of discriminating between workers who choose to spend more or less time in the office, and remote working expert Kate Lister tells us why companies will have to offer flexible working to attract employees in the future.

(Photo: A man works at home on his bed, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyc)
China's 'Kingdom of women'

The Mosuo community in China’s Himalayan foothills is matrilineal, so a family’s ‘bloodline’, inheritance and power is passed down through the female side. There is no such thing as marriage and monogamy is actively discouraged. The women rule and the men don’t mind. Rebecca Kesby has been speaking to Choo Wai Hong, a Singaporean corporate lawyer who came across the community as she travelled through her ancestral homeland of China. She liked it so much she learnt the language and built a house there.
(PHOTO: Mosuo Women. Credit Patrick AVENTURIER/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxnzmw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngr)
The global workforce

Tech founder Phil Libin tells us why he’s doing away with offices for good and no longer advertising jobs with a location. Plus, is China reigning in its tech giants after Alibaba is given a $2bn fine for market abuse. And the AI tech that helps people with impaired speech interact with voice-activated devices. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with senior BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Stock photo of a woman working behind a laptop computer, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jcbx8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxp3d0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hs7)
Why is Myanmar’s military killing civilians?

Over 700 people, including children, have now died during pro-democracy protests in Myanmar following a coup on February 1st. Military chief General Min Aung Hlaing has declared a year-long emergency and promised to hold fresh elections at some time in the future. The armed forces of Myanmar are guaranteed a minimum number of seats in the nation’s parliament, retain control over many of the country’s institutions, and profit from a sprawling domestic business empire. But the military says the 2020 vote - which returned the governing NLD party under Aung San Suu Kyi to power with a larger majority – was flawed. Many politicians, including Ms Suu Kyi, are under arrest. She’s been charged with criminal offences and if found guilty can be barred from contesting future elections. The coup has taken place at a time when Myanmar, also known as Burma, is continuing to battle the coronavirus pandemic, an economic crisis, regional insurgencies and is also facing an international investigation into alleged war crimes over the killing and expulsion of tens of thousands of minority Rohingya people. So, what's behind the military's decision to row back democracy and attack its own citizens? And what can the international community do about it? Join Ritula Shah and guests as they discuss the military in Myanmar.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxp744)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51rv3d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jcldj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tyv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxpbw8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dr)
HRH Prince Philip: the world remembers

The death last Friday of Prince Philip was extensively covered on the BBC's language services. We hear from Peter Okwoche of BBC Africa, Janina Litvinova of BBC Russian and South Asia Diaspora reporter Gaggan Sabherwal about the challenges of the day, and tailoring their coverage for their audiences.

Venezuela's million bolivar note
BBC Mundo's Guillermo Olmo is based in Venezuela, where hyperinflation has left its currency, the bolivar, struggling to keep up. Prices rose so fast that people had to carry backpacks of notes to pay for their shopping. Now a one million bolivar note has been issued, but will it help?

Rwanda's milk bars
Milk bars are a unique feature of Rwandan towns and highlight the popularity of milk in the country. Prudent Nsengiyumva of BBC Great Lakes tells us what makes them so successful, and why milk is so important to Rwandans.

Myanmar's New Year festival
This week would usually see joyful celebrations in Myanmar for Thingyan, the Buddhist New Year festival. But many Burmese boycotted the festival, as part of continuing protests against February’s military coup, as BBC Burmese editor Soe Win Than explains.

My journey to journalism: Dan Ikpoyi, BBC Pidgin
As part of our series into our language service colleagues' routes into their jobs, we hear from Dan Ikpoyi, whose progress from the Lagos slum of Ketu to BBC Pidgin video journalist took a circuitous route through comedy, poetry and bottle top collection.

Image: A captain's cap with message of condolence on flowers outside Windsor Castle
Credit: Chris Jackson/Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxpgmd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51s2ln)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jctws)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxplcj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx55kp4)
Pro-democracy activists sentenced in Hong Kong

Several Hong Kong activists have been given jail or suspended sentences for their roles in a peaceful protest in 2019. We hear from two of them, lawyer Albert Ho and media tycoon Jimmy Lai, who spoke to our reporter Danny Vincent while he was still a free man.

Also in the programme: the babies dying of Covid-19 in Brazil; and a surprising report about the birth of Britain's late Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, whose funeral will be held on Saturday.

(Photo: Pro-democracy activists Albert Ho and Yeung Sum leave the court in Hong Kong. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxpq3n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jd2d1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46mx3z6zlk)
Berliners protest after German court scraps rent cap

Thousands of people have been demonstrating in Berlin against the lifting of the city's rent cap. Germany's highest court ruled that the Berlin state government had no right to impose the cap. The State Secretary for Housing, Wenke Christoph tells us what she thinks of the court ruling. Also, China experienced a record economic rebound between January and March, compared with the same period a year earlier. The BBC’s Shanghai correspondent Robin Brant tells us how China’s coronavirus response played a role in this growth story. Plus, the BBC’s Elizabeth Hotson has been finding out how the public is responding to the cautious reopening of non-essential outlets in England this week.

(Picture: People take part in a protest march against the Federal Constitutional Court's ruling on Berlin's rent cap law in Berlin. / Credit: Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxptvs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfvt14tt7)
Hong Kong: Beijing critics sentenced

In Hong Kong the pro-democracy media tycoon Jimmy Lai has been sentenced to 14 months in prison after being found guilty of unauthorised assembly. Other veteran campaigners had their sentences suspended. We hear from reaction to the story and find out more about who these campaigners are.

The BBC's India correspondent Yogita Limaye joins us to look in depth at the situation with coronavirus in the country. With oxygen shortages, crematoriums operating day and night and a growing black market for medication we continue to hear from journalists across India about how different states are coping with the pandemic.

And we go to Chicago to hear the conversations being had in the city after Chicago police released graphic footage of an officer shooting dead a 13-year-old Latinx boy in a dark alley.

(Photo: Media mogul Jimmy Lai (C) is escorted out of a Correctional Services Department vehicle and into the Court of Final Appeal in Hong Kong, China, 09 February 2021. Credit: EPA/JEROME FAVRE)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxpylx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxfvt14ykc)
Coronavirus: India

The BBC's India correspondent Yogita Limaye joins us to look in depth at the situation with coronavirus in the country. With new curfews, oxygen shortages, crematoriums operating day and night and a growing black market for medication we continue to hear from journalists across India about how different states are coping with the pandemic.

We have the latest news from Cuba where Raul Castro is expected to step down as the head of the Communist Party of Cuba. Mr Castro and his late brother, Fidel Castro, have been in power since the 1959 revolution.

And we go to Chicago to hear the conversations being had in the city after Chicago police released graphic footage of an officer shooting dead a 13-year-old Latinx boy in a dark alley. We learn who Adam Toledo was and what life is like in the Little Village neighbourhood on the Chicago's west side.

(Photo: A health worker takes a nasal swab sample of a woman to test for COVID-19 at Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus railway station in Mumbai, India, 16 April 2021. Credit: EPA/DIVYAKANT SOLANKI)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxq2c1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxq635)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxdf51st2f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jdkck)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n7v1wt1xj)
2021/04/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxq9v9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jdp3p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq7)
Why does grief leave me feeling this way?

Grief is universal. It is something almost all of us will go through at some point. And it is something that the people we love will experience when we die.

Grief can be all consuming, it can make everyday tasks like getting out of bed, feel impossible. Which makes listener Oliver from Australia wonder - what is the point? It doesn’t bring what we lost, back.

Why have we evolved to be so affected by loss? Be it the death of a loved one, the end of a relationship or the loss of a job. Does it serve any purpose? Or perhaps it is just the price we pay for being a social species with such strong connections.

Image: Families Mourn Victims of The Tamaulipas Massacre in Tuilelén, Guatemala
Photo by Josue Decavele/Getty Images

Produced by Caroline Steel and presented by Marnie Chesterton for BBC World Service.


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxqflf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv51bx56dx1)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxqkbk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n10)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jdxly)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tyv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjgsgxqp2p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywkzfg3zmn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sc1px8189)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk976jf1c2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48phygz6mt)
Berliners protest after German court scraps rent cap

Thousands of people have been demonstrating in Berlin against the lifting of the city's rent cap. Germany's highest court ruled that the Berlin state government had no right to impose the cap. The State Secretary for Housing, Wenke Christoph tells us what she thinks of the court ruling. Also, China experienced a record economic rebound between January and March, compared with the same period a year earlier. The BBC’s Shanghai correspondent Robin Brant tells us how China’s coronavirus response played a role in this growth story. Plus, the BBC’s Elizabeth Hotson has been finding out how the public is responding to the cautious reopening of non-essential outlets in England this week.

(Picture: People take part in a protest march against the Federal Constitutional Court's ruling on Berlin's rent cap law in Berlin. / Credit: Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j4j)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172xvq88yhw48t)

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Comedians Vs. The News 18:32 SAT (w3ct21mp)

Comedians Vs. The News 23:32 SUN (w3ct21mp)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3ct1pq6)

CrowdScience 13:32 MON (w3ct1pq6)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3ct1pq7)

Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct2cbl)

Deeply Human 22:06 SUN (w3ct2cbl)

Deeply Human 03:06 MON (w3ct2cbl)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lrv)

Digital Planet 09:32 WED (w3ct1lrv)

Digital Planet 13:32 WED (w3ct1lrv)

Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct1m7j)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct1m7k)

Discovery 09:32 TUE (w3ct1m7k)

Discovery 13:32 TUE (w3ct1m7k)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3ct1mtm)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3ct1mtm)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n5j)

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HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3ct1n10)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nv2)

Health Check 09:32 THU (w3ct1nv2)

Health Check 13:32 THU (w3ct1nv2)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct2d2b)

Heart and Soul 04:32 FRI (w3ct1fq8)

I'm Not A Monster 22:32 SUN (w3ct1z6k)

I'm Not A Monster 03:32 MON (w3ct1z6k)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tcs)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tcs)

In the Studio 22:32 TUE (w3ct1tcs)

More or Less 05:50 SAT (w3ct2djs)

More or Less 14:50 SUN (w3ct2djs)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct2djs)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct2djs)

Music Life 22:06 SAT (w3ct1hbn)

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The Forum 14:06 SUN (w3ct1rky)

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The History Hour 19:06 SAT (w3ct1z6p)

The Inquiry 12:06 SUN (w3ct1z1r)

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The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3ct1hs6)

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The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3ct1ytz)

Trending 05:32 SAT (w3ct2dmf)

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Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172xyt38zb9ryv)

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When Katty Met Carlos 02:32 SUN (w3ct2cc7)

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Witness History 08:50 MON (w3ct1x0m)

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Witness History 08:50 WED (w3ct1x7d)

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Witness History 18:50 WED (w3ct1x7d)

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Witness History 08:50 THU (w3ct1x2w)

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Witness History 18:50 THU (w3ct1x2w)

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Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3ct1wyc)

Witness History 12:50 FRI (w3ct1wyc)

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WorklifeIndia 11:32 SAT (w3ct2f2y)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzl3ny3n16q)

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World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172y4bbddp14t2)

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World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172y4ckkhl50c3)

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World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172y46mx3z6zlk)

World Business Report 23:32 FRI (w172y48phygz6mt)

World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1tyv)

World Football 11:32 FRI (w3ct1tyv)

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