Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 27 MARCH 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7jxw6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpg)
Covid mutants: What are the risks?

A year into the Covid crisis, German Chancellor Angela Merkel this week announced her country was facing what amounts to ‘a new pandemic’. “The mutation from Great Britain has taken over,” she warned. “It is clearly more lethal, more contagious, and contagious longer.” Even in countries where attempts to vaccinate the population are continuing at pace, the threat from mutant variants that have shown a greater ability than the original pathogen to evade vaccines is threatening any recovery. The US Centers for Disease Control this week warned that variants now dominate cases in California, and that increased air travel for spring break - combined with a rise in the number of states easing mask and social distancing mandates - may result in another surge. The UK hopes to curb the spread of variants as part of its roadmap to reopening, but in the last week an adviser to Boris Johnson’s government warned that any return to international travel was “unlikely” given the threat new mutations pose. So how long will Covid variants rule our lives and what can be done to curb their influence? Paul Henley is joined by a panel of experts.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7k1mb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x199nxlb8q7)
Suez Canal blockage causes backlog in the Red Sea

The Ever Given container ship has been stuck since Tuesday despite efforts to move it, and a backlog of ships waiting to pass through it continues to grow. Rose George travelled along the Suez Canal when researching her 2013 book 'Ninety Percent of Everything' and tells us more about the world of container shipping.
We hear from Dorothy Brown, a law professor at Emory University, whose book 'The Whiteness of Wealth: How the Tax System Impoverishes Black Americans — And How We Can Fix It' explains how America's tax system is weighted towards white people.
Also in the programme, as Bangladesh marks 50 years of independence, we take a closer look at its garments industry. Vidya Ambrin Khan tells us about the factory she runs that was set up by her father in the 1970s, and reflects on the impact of the Rana Plaza building collapse in 2013, in which more than 1,000 garment workers died. And we hear from Rubana Haq, president of the Bangladesh Garment Makers Association, what impact the coronavirus pandemic has had on the sector.

Fergus Nicoll is joined throughout the programme by Sharon Brettkelly of Radio New Zealand.

(Picture: The Ever Given container ship from above. Picture credit: Maxar Technologies)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7k5cg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9r1)
Poland’s rainbow families under threat

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

In Poland, the government is trying to make it impossible for same-sex couples to adopt children, by closing a loophole which allowed people to apply as single parents. The move is part of a growing, government-backed crusade against the rights of sexual minorities which puts the country at odds with the European Union. President Andrzej Duda has condemned gay rights campaigners for promoting an ideology he described as “more dangerous than communism” and many Poles are afraid says Adam Easton.

Next Joel Greenberg goes to the polls in Israel, where people voted in a general election this week - their fourth such vote in two years. Neither Benjamin Netanyahu nor his challengers secured a governing majority in parliament. Some analysts say the stalemate is further alienating many Israelis from what they see as a dysfunctional political system.

Racism and physical attacks against Asians in the United States have been fuelled by the coronavirus pandemic. How is California – where the largest population of Asian Americans live – coping with the recent spike in hate crimes?

Finally as Venezuelans struggle through the country’s economic collapse, Vladimir Hernandez in Nairobi reflects on the troubled Latin American country’s diaspora. He tells us how those who left in search of a better future are staying connected to home – and what it feels like to get a text message in the middle of the night when you feel powerless to help.


(Poster depicting the Virgin Mary with a rainbow halo – Polish LGBT activists were found not guilty of offending religious feelings over the painting. Credit: Reuters/Kacper Pempel)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv7jmv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhkq)
Can Kapil Dev’s stardust lift Indian golf?

On this week’s episode, Alison Mitchell, Charu Sharma and Jim Maxwell speak to one of the greatest Indian cricketers of all time, Kapil Dev, about his new role on the board of the Professional Golf Tour of India, and his hopes for creating golf's version of T20 cricket. The team relive the fairytale story of Sri Lanka's win at the Cricket World Cup, 25 years on. And in honour of David "Bumble" Lloyd having a street named after him in his hometown, we talk about the streets and buildings in India and Australia, which have been named after legendary cricketers.

Photo: Former cricketer Kapil Dev in action during an interview about the upcoming film based on 1983 Cricket World Cup. (Credit: Hindustan Times via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7k93l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjl)
Remembering a Zulu king

King Goodwill Zwelithini, who died two weeks ago, led the Zulu people for fifty years, gaining both praise and criticism for the way he ruled. Pumza Fihlani of BBC Africa went to his funeral and discusses the significance of the Zulu king.

Ukraine's Eurovision entry
This year's Eurovision entry from Ukraine sounds like a super modern dance track. But the lyrics are a traditional folk song, sung to usher in spring. Roman Lebed of BBC Ukrainian tells us more.

Nepal’s women masons
BBC Marathi’s Mayuresh Konnur has visited Nepal’s Gurkha district, near the epicentre of the 2015 earthquake, to meet some of the country’s new female masons enlisted to help rebuild the country.   

Egypt's mother of feminism remembered
Nawal El Saadawi was one of the most outspoken feminists in the Arab world, fearlessly commenting on religion, sex and FGM. The BBC's Sally Nabil joins us in the week after her death to discuss her life and legacy.

Sri Lankan babies sold abroad for adoption
The Netherlands has suspended adoptions from abroad after uncovering violations in how they were arranged. The BBC's Saroj Pathirana has spoken to birth mothers in Sri Lanka and adoptees in the Netherlands, now grown up and trying to discover their origins.

Image: Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini, dressed in traditional Zulu warrior outfit in August 2000
Credit: RAJESH JANTILAL/AFP via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmwg)
The fight against slavery in Mauritania

Mauritania has a long history of slavery – and a long history of struggle against it. Since the 1960s, slaves and their descendants have campaigned to end this practice, which is deeply embedded in Mauritanian society. In this Witness History, Josephine Casserly hears the story of Brahim Bilal Ramdhane, who was born into slavery in the 1960s and is now a prominent abolitionist.


People hold a banner reading "No to slavery" during a demonstration against discrimination in Nouakchott on April 29, 2015. Credit: AFP via Getty Images


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7kdvq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7kjlv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zg)
Coronavirus: Homelessness

The coronavirus has changed almost everyone’s lives and for some losing their jobs has led to homelessness. Edward in the United States had to sleep in the New York subway and train stations before finding help from a mission, while Walter spent five months homeless in South Africa - even for a stint, on the famous Table Mountain.

Italy is facing the prospect of another total shutdown, little more than a year after it became the first country in Europe to introduce a national lockdown. Host Nuala McGovern hears how families in Rome are approaching the renewed restrictions.

Nuala also considers the future workplace and how the pandemic has been good for robots. Two robotics experts in Denmark and Switzerland discuss why they believe the increasing use of robots doing jobs in the future is to be welcomed rather than feared - especially when it comes to reducing infection from Covid-19.

(Photo: Walter Nyanmugama. Credit: Walter Nyanmugama )


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv7ww7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct2dmc)
The Anti-Vax Files

France’s misinformation fight

France is one of the most vaccine sceptical countries in the world. A recent poll suggests just 40% of French people intend to take a Covid-19 vaccine, but what's fuelling the doubt?

We meet the superstar doctor whose anti-authoritarian zeal has inspired an army of devotees, and the conspiracy obsessed shaman with a huge following on social media.

Plus, the activists staging a fightback. “Marie” runs a pro-vaccine Facebook group aimed at countering disinformation but wants to remain anonymous following a string of death threats. And Tristan Mendes France works with the team behind “Conspiracy Watch”, a site that keeps a close eye on the spread of toxic information online.

Presenter: Mike Wendling
Reporter: Marianna Spring
Producer: Sam Judah


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct24jm)
Joe Biden's border challenge

As a presidential candidate, Joe Biden promised a more humane approach to migration on the US-Mexico border. But right now, more than 17,000 unaccompanied children are being held in migration facilities. Ros Atkins considers the challenge facing the Biden administration

(Photo: Dareli Matamoros, a girl from Honduras, holds a sign asking President Biden to let her in during a migrant demonstration demanding clearer United States migration policies. Credit: Guillermo Arias/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7knbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7dcm9lj0mp)
Myanmar's military leader justifies coup

The leader of Myanmar's military regime has used an annual armed forces parade to defend its seizure of power.

Also, after months of denial, Ethiopia's Prime Minister admits to the presence of Eritrean troops in its northern Tigray region.

Plus, President Biden condemns an electoral law in the state of Georgia as a clear attempt to stop Black people from voting.

And France salutes the humble baguette, giving it status as a key part of its cultural heritage.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Verashni Pillay, a South African journalist and founder of the Explain news portal; and David Robert Grimes, an Irish physicist, cancer researcher and science author.

(Picture: Myanmar's junta chief, General Min Aung Hlaing, presides over a parade on Armed Forces Day in Naypyitaw. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7ks33)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7dcm9lj4ct)
South Africa's fight against coronavirus

The South African government's former chief medical advisor, Professor Salim Abdool Karim, on his country's bid to fight the coronavirus.

Also, Myanmar's military regime has used an annual military parade marking Armed Forces Day to defend its seizure of power and to give a stark warning to protesters.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Verashni Pillay, a South African journalist and founder of the Explain news portal; and David Robert Grimes, an Irish physicist, cancer researcher and science author.

(Picture: South African scientist, epidemiologist, Professor Salim Abdool Karim. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7kwv7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7dcm9lj83y)
Several killed in protests in Myanmar

Latest reports suggest that several protesters have been killed in Myanmar as the regime uses an annual military parade marking Armed Forces Day to defend its seizure of power, and to give a stark warning to protesters.

Also, what impact might a withdrawal of Eritrean troops from the Ethiopian region of Tigray have on the conflict there?

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Verashni Pillay, a South African journalist and founder of the Explain news portal; and David Robert Grimes, an Irish physicist, cancer researcher and science author.

(Picture: Smoke rises over Thaketa township in Yangon, as security forces continue to crackdown on protests against the military coup. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv883m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m4)
#MeToo today with Rose McGowan

It was in 2017, with numerous allegations against Harvey Weinstein, that #MeToo went viral around the world.

One of the most outspoken people was the actress Rose McGowan, who accused Weinstein of raping her. A number of other women also accused the disgraced movie producer. He was found guilty of rape and sentenced to 23 years in prison in February 2020.

Katty Kay and Carlos Watson speak to Rose McGowan about her personal story, and what drove her to speak out and “fight the system.” They also discuss what more needs to be done to prevent sexual abuse – of girls and women, and of boys and men.

A co-production from the BBC World Service and OZY Media.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7l0lc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 today]


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv8cvr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6h)
I'm Not a Monster

27/03/2021 GMT

An American mother living in the heart of the ISIS caliphate. Her husband an ISIS sniper. Her 10-year-old son forced to threaten the U.S. president in a propaganda video shown around the world. She claims she was tricked into taking her young children to war-torn Syria, but where does her account end and the truth begin? Over four years journalist Josh Baker unravels a dangerous story where nothing is as it seems. From the depths of Raqqa’s infamous torture prison to an elk hunt in Idaho, he uncovers secrets, lies and the lasting consequences.

I’m Not A Monster is the story of one family’s journey from Indiana to the Islamic State group and back.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf5v)
Listeners react to the 'virtual' arts festival

Listeners tell us what they think of The Arts Festival programmes on the BBC World Service and the commissioning editor reveals what lessons were learned.
Plus, good news for fans of The Newsroom - two of the show’s missing daily editions return!

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7l4bh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3cbl1x2y46)
From tackling strikers to tackling cancer – Rebekah Stott’s off pitch challenge

We hear from New Zealand and Brighton defender Rebekah Stott in the week she started chemotherapy for Stage 3 Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Stott tells us she’s undergone IVF treatment to give her the option of having children in the future, given the severity of the treatment she’s facing. She tells us about having learned of her diagnosis while in hotel quarantine in Australia and discusses her plans to take control of the situation by shaving off her hair for charity. Stott is hopeful of playing again for Brighton in January and reveals her aim to play in the 2023 World Cup on home soil.

We look at the rise in violence against Asians and Asian Americans in the United States during the Coronavirus pandemic. Cynthia Choi from the group, Stop Asian American and Pacific Island Hate, and Tim Kawakami from the Athletic join us to discuss the situation. Tim has written a column entitled “The Attacks on Asian Americans are attacks on us all,“ and he explains the significance of basketball star Jeremy Lin speaking out on the issue. Cynthia’s group was formed in 2020 at the height of the pandemic, and they documented almost 4,000 hate crimes against their community in the past 12 months.

American football cornerback Josh Norman joins us to discuss his charitable works and whether he has a future in the NFL. Norman – who played for the Carolina Panthers in Super Bowl 50 – is currently a free agent, having spent last season with the Buffalo Bills. He’s raised over a million dollars to open a youth centre in his hometown in South Carolina. In addition to his work at home, he raised money to support business hit by the covid pandemic in Buffalo and visited camps housing migrant children at a detention centre in Dallas.

The BBC’s Jennie Gow joins us on the opening weekend of the new Formula One season, and former England defender Lindsay Johnson joins us as Manchester United’s women’s team prepare to make club history playing on the hallowed Old Trafford turf for the first time.

Photo: Canberra United and Sydney FC players pose with a banner supporting New Zealand defender Rebekah Stott ahead of her treatment for cancer. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7l82m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvd50hr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv8mc0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mm)
Ray Badran and Sikisa

Brilliant comedians from around the world join Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini to take on the global headlines.

This week, Jess and Eman are joined by Australian comedian Ray Badran and British stand-up Sikisa.

They’ll be finding out why Barbados wants to split up with the British Queen and asking why kangaroos have been swimming through Sydney.



(Photo: Ray Badran, credit: Tom Wilkinson; Sikisa, credit: Adrian Tauss/Swiss Chocolate Pictures)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7lctr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6vd)
The disappearing album with Eyedress, Dâm-Funk, Jessica Pratt and Low Leaf

Eyedress, Dâm-Funk, Low Leaf and Jessica Pratt discuss how the toughest times they’ve been through inspired their music, how horror films influence their sounds, and the most special moments in their careers.

Eyedress is a musician and producer, born and raised in Manilla in the Philippines, and now based in LA. His sound encompasses everything from synth-pop to R&B and shoegaze.

The ‘modern funk’ king Damon Riddick, aka Dâm-Funk, is a musician, vocalist and producer who blends everything from P-Funk to computer-game inspired soundtracks. He’s released a number of critically acclaimed albums, and collaborated with the likes of Tyler the Creator, Snoop Dogg, and Christine & the Queens.

Low Leaf is a multi-instrumentalist, vocalist, composer and producer. Classically trained in piano as a child, her Filipino roots and DIY recordings fuse traditional and digital sounds. She’s a self-taught producer and can play the guitar and harp.

And Jessica Pratt is a Folk artist, whose acoustic guitar melodies and voice are a truly special thing. She’s toured the world with artists like Real Estate and Julia Holter, and has released three studio albums thus far.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7lhkw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z86gr8p6g)
Myanmar: bloodiest day of coup yet

Security forces in Myanmar are reported to have killed at least sixty people amid tense confrontations on Armed Forces Day. We hear from a protester detained for three weeks and recently released from prison.

Also in the programme: vaccine sceptics in France and have we seen the coldest storm cloud ever?

(Picture: Detail of a demonstrator's tattoo showing Aung San Suu Kyi during a protest against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar, 27 March. Credit: EPA)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7lmb0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lqkmb94zb)
Latest from AFCON Qualifiers and previewing Tokyo 2020 again

John Bennett and the Sportsworld team look back on the Premier League season so far, who will come out on top in the Women's Champions League and the favourites for the European Championships.

Plus, Sportsworld brings you two special documentary's about how Sri Lanka won the 1996 World Cup. Members from the victorious squad recall their favourite memories from that unexpected victory. And what next for Tokyo 2020, we bring an expert panel together to preview the Olympic and Paralympics for second time.


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7m39j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvd5vqn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv9gkx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7m71n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Evidence (w3ct2czw)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

Mental health and the pandemic

Year two of the pandemic, and in tandem with rising rates of illness, death, acute economic shock and restrictions on everyday life, mental health problems have risen too.

Claudia Hammond and her panel of global experts answer listeners’ questions about the pandemic of mental illness and distress, and find out which groups have been hardest hit.

Children and young people were at low risk from the virus itself, but their lives have been upended as societies have locked down. Older people too have suffered loneliness and isolation as they have tried to keep themselves safe.

What does the evidence show about the true scale of suffering, and what can we learn from other countries about the best way to support those in real distress and bolster resilience within communities?

Claudia hears from Giulia in Brazil about her struggles with anxiety and from Mohsen in Tehran, Iran, about the techniques he is using to cope with anxiety and depression following the serious illness of himself and his family from the virus.

Her global panel of experts includes Dr Lola Kola, a mental health specialist and Assistant Director at the WHO Collaborating Centre at the University of Ibadan in Nigeria, one of the authors of a major review of the mental health impacts of the pandemic in low and medium income countries published last month in Lancet Psychiatry; Andrew Steptoe, Professor of Psychology and Epidemiology at University College London in the UK, leading the UK Social Study, the world’s largest study into the mental health impact of the pandemic during the longest enforced isolation in living history; Cathy Creswell, Professor of Developmental Clinical Psychology at the University of Oxford in the UK, is head of the Co-Space Study, tracking how parents and children are coping during this pandemic; and Steven Taylor is a clinical psychologist and professor at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. Steven specialises in anxiety disorders, and just before the pandemic, he published a book, called The Psychology of Pandemics.

Production team: Fiona Hill, Samara Linton and Maria Simons
Editor: Deborah Cohen
Technical support: Giles Aspen and Bob Nettles

Picture: Young men wearing protective mask to Protect Against Covid-19, Credit: Visoot Uthairam/Getty Images


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7mbss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk4c)
Film-maker Chloe Zhao

Film-maker Chloe Zhao explains how she developed her Oscar-nominated movie Nomadland and the character of Fern played by Frances McDormand.

Coming 2 America’s Eddie Murphy on why he can’t seem to stay out of the movie make-up chair.

Da 5 Bloods scene-stealing actor Delroy Lindo talks about the moment he knew he wanted to be an actor.

Indian actor Pooja Bhatt and director Alankrita Shrivastava discuss their hit TV series Bombay Begums.

Jamaican writer Kei Miller reveals how his poetry reflects his multiple identities.

British Bengali singer Joy Crookes marks the 50th anniversary of Bangladesh with a classic Bengali song.

And Nikki Bedi talks to Nigerian film-maker Desmond Ovbiagele about his award-winning film The Milkmaid, which explores the human cost of religious extremism; and to film critic Rhianna Dhillon.

(Photo: Chloe Zhao. Credit: Amanda Edwards/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7mgjx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z86gr9n5h)
Myanmar sees deadliest violence since coup began

The lethal crackdown came as protesters defied warnings and took to the streets on the annual Armed Forces Day. We'll hear from the UN's special rapporteur on human rights in Myanmar, Tom Andrews. Also in the programme: Islamist militants have seized the town of Palma in northern Mozambique, the country's army has reportedly withdrawn from the town; and we'll go back to one woman we spoke to at the start of the UK's lockdown about how the past year affected her addiction.

(Photo: A demonstrator flashes the three-finger salute during a protest against the military coup in Mandalay, Myanmar, 27 March 2021. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7ml91)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79x93sj18w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fsx7q6b7q)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv9ykf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct29c1)
Creating life after death

Everyone tells five-year-old Shira Malka she looks just like her dad. She has his green eyes. But she’s never met him, because he died seven years before she was born. Shira was conceived through posthumous reproduction, where a child is created from the frozen sperm or eggs of a person who has died. The practice is banned in some places, tightly restricted in others. But Israel - a country that leads the world in assisted reproduction - is testing the boundaries on allowing this new method of family creation.

Shira is a one of a small but growing number of children to be born through posthumous reproduction in Israel over the last two decades. Her grandmother, Julia Pozniansky describes how she struggled for seven years to fulfil her son’s dying wish to father a child and leave her a grandchild. She was helped by Irit Rosenblum, a family lawyer who specialises in these cases and has even created a legal tool document she called the ‘Biological Will’ that enables people to express their wishes about becoming a parent after death. Shira’s mother, Liat Malka discusses why posthumous reproduction was a good alternative for her to anonymous sperm donation. Irit is adamant that the state should be removing barriers to the practice and instead allowing those who die, and their bereaved loved ones, to continue their legacy. But the practice does have its critics and has generated headlines and national debate. Israeli bioethicist Vardit Ravitsky - professor at the University of Montreal and the President of the International Association of Bioethics - explores the ethical arguments on both sides of the issue, and describes how Israeli culture and Jewish tradition have allowed the country to become ‘a unique pressure cooker for allowing reproduction’. She debates the subject with the fiercest critic she knows - her son.

Producer/presenter: Viv Jones
Editor: Penny Murphy

(Photo: Shira and Liat Malka, courtesy of the family)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7mq15)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sq3)
Traffic jam in the Suez

As a giant container ship gets stuck in the Suez canal, we examine at the vital role the waterway plays in global shipping. We also hear from Chicago, where reparations are being made to black residents after years of segregation. African Americans have lost thousands in personal wealth due to the policy of redlining. Our chief environment correspondent investigates a leaked letter from China - suggesting it's preparing to embark on greener policies. And we’ll be talking space junk with astrophysicist Becky Smethurst.

Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Szu Ping Chan.

Picture: The Ever Given container ship pictured in the Suez Canal, Egypt (Credit: PA)



SUNDAY 28 MARCH 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7mts9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Science Hour (w3cszky6)
Science on the side of a new volcano

Sightseers and social media scrollers have flocked to the slopes of Fagradalsfjall, a volcano erupting 40 kilometres west of the Icelandic capital Reykjavik. Having produced less than 1 square kilometre of lava this eruption could be deemed relatively minor, allowing bystanders to get up close and personal. Among the hubbub, you might also spot Dr Evgenia Ilyinskaya from University of Leeds, just one of the researchers measuring and observing the event from an alarmingly small distance. Her interest is more in the invisible toxic gases and trace elements being emitted from one of the deepest magma eruptions in recent times than the more cinematic molten rock.

This week scientists working on results from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN announced intriguing evidence (NB “evidence” – not yet a definite discovery) of physics beyond our current understanding. Everything we can detect directly in the universe is made from a few basic building blocks, fundamental particles. These particles are governed by four universal fundamental forces. Our best understanding of these forces and particles are sewn together in the Standard Model of particle physics. Since the 1970s this model has been able to explain most of our experimental results, but not all. Professor Gudrun Hiller from Technische Universität Dortmund has been theorizing as to what sort of experiments might lead to evidence of where the model might be incomplete. And this week, she has reason to feel a little bit proud. As she and her fellow member of the LHCb consortium, Harry Cliff, explain, a mysterious asymmetry in the way certain quarks – beauty quarks – have been seen to decay could be pointing at a deeper, more sophisticated, picture of the nature of the universe. Theorists are theorizing all around the world: could this be a new class of particle called a “leptoquark” that mediates a whole new type of force?

The new results have been submitted for publication in the journal Nature, but have also been made public online in what is known as a “preprint”. Science publication has, for hundreds of years, been governed by peer-review. This process has prevented the wider community of scientists from accessing new scientific reports and papers unless vetted by a smaller number of fellow experts in the field. But this hasn’t been the case for all disciplines. “Preprints”, uncorrected proofs, have for some decades played a role in the publication process of physics and mathematics. In these fields, on the whole, lives are not at risk if mistakes get through to publication, but over the past year the practice of posting proofs to preprint servers is now common in the biomedical and life sciences, to accommodate the deluge of research being conducted on Covid-19. Might this be a problem? Or could it demonstrate the value of preprints? A new paper from Jonny Coates (also a preprint) and colleagues has looked at whether much changes on a biomedical or life-science preprint as it travels through peer-review towards conventional publication.

Animals experience all the colds, stomach pains, headaches, parasites, and general illnesses that humans do. But unlike us, animals can’t just grab a painkiller off the shelf at the supermarket to cure it. They don’t have a pharmacy to browse… or at least, not the sort that we’d recognise.

Listener Andrew Chen got in touch to ask whether animals use any kind of medicine themselves. After all, our own drugs largely come from the plants and minerals found in wild habitats. So perhaps animals themselves are using medicines they find in nature.

Anand Jagatia speaks with the primate researcher who stumbled across a chimp chewing on a bitter leaf 35 years ago, Professor Mike Huffman, whose observations opened up a whole new field of research. We discover why plants contain the medicinal compounds they do, and how butterflies with brains no bigger than a pin-head are still able to select and use medicine to protect their young.

We think of medicine as a human invention - but it turns out that we’ve learnt a lot of what we know from copying the birds, bugs and beasts.


Image: Lava flows from Fagradalsfjall volcano in Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland
Credit: Kristinn Magnusson/mbl.is


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7myjf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvd6pyk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nvb9st)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyw)
In praise of Covid Data

It’s over a year since a global pandemic swept the world which caught many countries unprepared. In the beginning, one key problem was that the authorities and the public wanted data on how bad the problem was - how many cases of Covid 19 were there? How many tests were being carried out? How many people were in hospital?

On this week’s programme we talk to Clare Griffiths from the UK’s coronavirus dashboard and Alexis Madrigal from the Atlantic Magazine’s Covid Tracking Project in the US.



(A Coronavirus Data and Surveillance Dashboard displayed on a computer screen. Credit: Paul Hennessy /Getty Images)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7n28k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sq3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7n60p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 The Coronavirus and Your Money (w3ct2cm2)
The coronavirus and your money

After a year of lockdowns and Covid restrictions, Manuela Saragosa and Devina Gupta take a global look at jobs, pay and financial wellbeing. They look at the support packages from governments around the world and revisit some of those who spoke to the programme a year ago. How have they fared in the past 12 months?

Presenter: Manuela Saragosa and Devina Gupta
Producer: Rumella Dasgupta


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7n9rt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvd725y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nvbp16)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct29c1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7nfhy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7dcm9llssn)
Global condemnation of killings in Myanmar

International condemnation of the killing of civilians by the military in Myanmar.

Also, the authorities in Beijing have reacted angrily to a coordinated move by the EU, UK, Canada, and the US to impose sanctions, citing the mass arbitrary detention of a million ethnic Uighurs.

Plus, seven years on from the abduction of schoolgirls from the Nigerian town on Chibok by the Islamist militant group, Boko Haram, we speak to the author of a new book, ‘Bring Back Our Girls’, on the story of the kidnapped girls.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other stories are Victoria Rubadiri, senior presenter on Citizen TV in Kenya; and Emaddedin Badi, a Libyan analyst and Non-Resident Fellow at the Atlantic Council.

(Picture: A protester at a demonstration against the military coup in Myanmar in central London. Credit: Tayfun Salci/ZUMA Wire/REX/Shutterstock)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7nk82)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7dcm9llxjs)
Kenya registers a new surge in COVID-19 cases

Kenya has been hit by a new surge of coronavirus cases, as the President describes the death rate as 'devastating'.

Also, we hear from San Marcos in Guatamala, where many are fleeing extreme poverty, drought, and hunger for the US border.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other stories are Victoria Rubadiri, senior presenter on Citizen TV in Kenya; and Emaddedin Badi, a Libyan analyst and Non-Resident Fellow at the Atlantic Council.

(Picture: Biomedical engineers pack a consignment of AstraZeneca in Nairobi, Kenya. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7np06)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7dcm9lm18x)
Myanmar condemned for killings

International condemnation for Myanmar's military rulers over the killing of dozens of anti-coup protesters.

Also, the trial of Derek Chauvin, the policeman charged with killing George Floyd last year, begins in the US, but will it be a fair one?

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other stories are Victoria Rubadiri, senior presenter on Citizen TV in Kenya; and Emaddedin Badi, a Libyan analyst and Non-Resident Fellow at the Atlantic Council.

(Picture: Protesters at a peaceful demonstration against Myanmar's military coup at Trafalgar Square in London. Credit: Pietro Recchia/SOPA Images/REX/Shutterstock)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nvc18l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 Outlook (w3cszf1b)
Spain's fearless barnacle-hunting sisters

Isabel and Susana González hunt percebes, also known as gooseneck barnacles. They're rather ugly crustaceans that can fetch thousands of dollars per kilogram at auction. To collect them, the González sisters must traverse slippery rocks along the Spanish coastline where they risk falling and drowning. Many hunters have lost their lives doing this job.

But this isn't the only danger the sisters have faced in their line of work. When they began there was a lot of discrimination against women, including the fact that they could only catch three kilograms per day, while men had a quota of five. This system was regulated by an association. The sisters figured the only way to achieve equality was to become part of the management of the association. But when Susana ran for the presidency, she faced death threats. Still, they managed to revolutionise their whole industry. This episode was first broadcast on 1st of September 2019.

Reporter: Pablo Esparza Altuna
Producer: Saskia Edwards

Picture: Isabel González collecting barnacles
Credit: Pablo Esparza Altuna


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7nsrb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9r1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nvc50q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Africa Life Clinic (w3ct21gb)
Working with disability

In Senegal there are a range of measures to help people living with disabilities enter the workforce, however overcoming attitudes is still a major issue. And we look at the impact of shoes on our physical health, it’s not just feet but bones and joints in the legs and spine that can be affected by our footwear. With Khadidiatou Cisse, Saida Swaleh and Priscilla Ngethe.
(Picture: Coumba Mbengue. Credit: Life Clinic TV)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7nxhg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbj)
Sex

Most female mammals schedule their sex life into just the couple of days of when they’re fertile. So why do humans do it whenever the mood strikes? (Well, in theory, at least.)

To find out, Dessa explores stinky t-shirt tests, and all sorts of things we’d better not mention here. Parental discretion is strongly advised.

Deeply Human is about why you do what you do. It really is!

(Image: Metronome with ticking heart, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nvc8rv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct29c1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7p17l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvd7snq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nvcdhz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct29bx)
Water: Too Much And Not Enough

How water shaped us

Journalist Alok Jha argues that if humans are to survive and thrive for the rest of the 21st Century we must urgently transform our relationship with water. To change that relationship, we first need to understand how the relationship evolved. Alok looks at cultural history to understand how water shaped our deepest psychology.

Alok finds that our relationship with water – always struggling for a balance between too much and not enough – fundamentally influenced the religious and spiritual worldviews of early civilisations. And we still feel the effects of this in our attitudes towards water today.

Alok uncovers a dark and compelling story of child sacrifice in 15th-Century Peru, hears how the water landscapes of Mesopotamia and Scandinavia shaped very different religious beliefs, and learns that many Islamic teachings about water have been echoed by modern science hundreds of years later.

(Photo: Waterfall in a rainforest near Palenque, Mexico. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7p4zq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Evidence (w3ct2czw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7p8qv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z86grcgcf)
Army chiefs worldwide condemn Myanmar military

Defence chiefs from twelve countries, including the US, Britain, South Korea and Japan, have condemned Myanmar for its use of force against unarmed civilians. We hear defiance from a young protestor in Yangon.

Also in the programme: Mozambique attack latest; and Suez, the artery of the global shipping trade.

(Picture: Tribute and protest signs outside the Embassy of Burma in London. Credit: EPA)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7pdgz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Coronavirus and Your Money (w3ct2cm2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7pj73)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjwy)
The One Thousand and One Nights

The One Thousand and One Nights are a collection of fantastical stories of flying carpets, magic and genies whose ancient origins go back to the 7th century or earlier. The tales are told by Scheherazade who uses the power of storytelling night after night to stop her Sultan husband from beheading her.

These highly influential stories were brought to the West in the 18th century, when more tales like Aladdin and Ali Baba were said to have been added by the French translator, and it has continued to evolve over the centuries. Rajan Datar and guests explore why these stories became so popular around the world and what they mean to us today.

Joining Rajan is Wen Chin Ouyang, Professor of Arabic at SOAS in London; Dr Sandra Naddaff, senior lecturer in Comparative Literature at Harvard University; and the Iranian TV producer Shabnam Rezaei.

[Photo: Sand Sculpture depicting 1001 Nights of Sheherazade. Credit: Getty Images]


SUN 15:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh6f)
Fighting for women's boxing

In the 1980s, the American boxer, Gail Grandchamp, launched a long campaign for the right to take part in amateur competitions in the USA. Representing herself and raising money through part-time jobs, Gail was eventually successful in 1992 - blazing a trail for women boxers the world over. She spoke to Rebecca Kesby in 2016.

PHOTO: Gail Grandchamp squaring up (The Berkshire Eagle)


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7pmz7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lqkmbd5mk)
Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7q06m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvd8rmr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nvdch0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7q3yr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6vd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7q7pw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z86grdfbg)
Dozens dead after militant assault in Mozambique

The area has been under attack by Islamist militants since Wednesday. There are reports that hundreds of others have been rescued. Also: defence ministers from twelve countries have issued a rare, joint statement condemning military violence in Myanmar; and we’ll hear about the new mixed martial arts champion who started out in a sand quarry in Cameroon.

(Photo: militants seen around Palma, Mozambique Credit: BBC)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7qcg0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nvdqqd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7qh64)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 The Newsroom (w172x79x93sly5z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 23:20 Sports News (w172x3fsx7q974t)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nvdvgj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf1b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]



MONDAY 29 MARCH 2021

MON 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8q3ts)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172xzl2ydh2r01)
Efforts to unblock the Suez Canal continue

Efforts to refloat a grounded ship blocking the Suez Canal continue; with hundreds of vessels waiting to use the waterway, Madhav Durbha, vice president of supply chain strategy at Coupa, takes us through the financial implications of the incident. The European Union will hold a conference this week to consider funding economic recovery in Syria, but can Brussels compromise on the influence of Russia and Iran? We speak to Natasha Hall at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington DC. And Rachel Beckett, the country manager for Farm Africa in Uganda describes efforts to encourage the employment of more women across Uganda's coffee industry. (Picture of the Ever Given in the Suez Canal by Ahmed Hasan via Getty Images).


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwdh35)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Discovery (w3ct2ccj)
Patient zero: The December transplant

Three transplant patients died within a week of each other in Melbourne in December 2006 and alarm bells started ringing. One of the patients was Karen. When she got a phone call from the hospital offering her a kidney transplant, it seemed like a lucky break. But things didn't go according to plan. Olivia Willis tells the story of how doctors discovered that one donor had transmitted a mystery virus to these patients. These tragic cases changed the way that transplantation was done in Australia.

Produced by James Bullen, Cheyne Anderson and Joel Werner of ABC

(Picture: TEM of Arenavirus, Credit: Callista Images/Getty Images)


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8q7kx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmdsvk5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwdlv9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbl)
What can we do about climate migration?

Bangladesh is a country that is exceptionally vulnerable to climate change. With a low elevation and high population density, as well as poor infrastructure and an economic reliance on farming, it is naturally susceptible to extreme weather.

The intensification of conditions due to climate change means more people are being driven from their homes and land by sea level rises, storms, cyclones, drought, erosion, landslides, flooding and salinisation of the land. It's estimated that by 2050, one in every seven people in Bangladesh will become a climate migrant.

But Bangladesh is far from being alone. Across South Asia, it’s estimated that more than 40m people will be displaced; worldwide, the figure runs into the hundreds of millions.

Climate migration is coming. The question is, what are we going to do about it?

Guests:
Akbar Hossain - reporter, BBC Bengali Service
Qasa Alom - presenter, BBC Asian Network
Dr Tasneem Siddiqui - founding chair of Refugee and Migratory Movements Research Unit in Bangladesh
Dr Kanta Kumari Rigaud - lead environmental specialist at the World Bank

Presented by Graihagh Jackson and Neal Razzell
Produced by Alex Lewis
Researched by Zoe Gelber
Edited by Emma Rippon


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8qcb1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwdqlf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 Trending (w3ct2dmc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 03:50 Over to You (w3cszf5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8qh25)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmdt31f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwdvbk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p69)
How to focus

Have you ever been so absorbed in an activity that you lost track of time? Experiencing moments of intense focus is something most of us can relate to; but did you know you can train for it? Kim Chakanetsa discusses tips and best practice with two women whose careers demand their absolute concentration.

Lorraine Huber is a Freeride World Champion and a mental strength coach. Freeriding is a discipline that involves skiing off-piste and performing acrobatic jumps on natural terrains. For Lorraine, being able to shut-out the world around her and perform at her best is a matter of life or death.

Kalena Bovell is the assistant conductor of the Memphis Symphony Orchestra and the only African-American/Hispanic orchestra conductor in the United States. When she is on the podium, she needs to be able to focus for hours, while working with a big group of musicians in front of a public. To excel in her job, she had to learn to master the art of intense focus.

Produced by Alice Gioia.

MUSIC DETAILS: Extract from Kalena Bovell’s international debut with Chineke! Orchestra. The performance was recorded at Southbank Centre's Royal Festival Hall in London, UK.

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Lorraine Huber
R: Kalena Bovell [credit Cabrillo Festival]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8qlt9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95q4nv1)
Myanmar: Protests continue after bloody weekend

More than 100 people were killed by security forces on Saturday, including children.

The trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer accused of murdering George Floyd, has its opening statements today.

And the financial support Australia has offered to help businesses and people cope during the pandemic ends today. What will be the economic impact?


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8qqkf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95q4sl5)
Myanmar: military open fire at funerals

We get the latest from Myanmar as over a hundred people are killed by the security forces over the weekend.

The huge container ship that's blocked the Suez Canal for a week has been refloated.

And we go to the Netherlands where some football fans were allowed back in a stadium at the week-end. Social distancing and a negative Covid test were required - so what was the atmosphere like?


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8qv9k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95q4xb9)
Suez Canal container ship refloated

More than 400 ships are still stuck behind the ship waiting to continue their journeys.

We'll hear from Myanmar where families are burying their dead following a brutal escalation in violence over the weekend. Yesterday the military opened fire at a funeral.

And the story of the mother who kept her racial identity a secret even from her own family - born as an African American in Louisiana, but marrying and living as a white woman in Ohio. Her daughter tells us her story.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8qz1p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5g)
Marina Abramović: A remarkable career pushed to the limits

Much of the art we love is presented via a medium - be it a canvas, a recording or celluloid. Stephen Sackur interviews Marina Abramović, an artist whose primary resource is her own body. In the course of a remarkable career, the world's most famous and garlanded performance artist has pushed herself to the very limits of physical endurance and stirred intense reaction from audiences confronting her eye to eye. Her art and life are one; so what do they tell us?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwfbb2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j4g)
Palm oil politics

An EU ban on the vegetable oil's use in biofuel has upset Indonesia and Malaysia. Meanwhile critics say it will only worsen the problem of tropical deforestation by palm oil farmers.

Manuela Saragosa looks at this most divisive of commodities, and moves to ban it impact the smallholder farmers behind almost half of global production. Sustainability researcher Gernot Klepper of the Kiel Institute explains why he thinks the European position is irrational, while Indonesian palm trade journalist Bhimanto Suwastoyo says palm growers could simply switch to markets in India and China where buyers care much less about deforestation.

Meanwhile Greenpeace's Grant Rosoman explains why the environmentalist group is so sceptical about existing certification schemes, while Tiur Rumondang of the Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil - the biggest such scheme - defends their work.

Producers: Laurence Knight, Joshua Thorpe

(Picture: A farmer carries palm oil fruit at a plantation in Malaysia; Credit: STR/AFP/GettyImages)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0k)
Anorexia nervosa

The American singer, Karen Carpenter, died in 1983 of anorexia nervosa. She was one half of a world famous brother and sister duo called The Carpenters. She was aged just 32. Up until then anorexia nervosa had often been referred to in the media as the "slimmer's disease". Skinny celebrities were seen as both beautiful and successful and anorexia was somewhat glamorised. Claire Bowes has been speaking to Dr Pat Santucci, a psychiatrist who helped set up the world's first national organisation dealing with eating disorders, the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Eating Disorders, known as ANAD. Dr Santucci says wherever western culture has an influence, you will find anorexia nervosa.

Photo: courtesy of Science Photo Library


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8r2st)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwfg26)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv77)
Do animals use medicine?

Animals experience all the colds, stomach pains, headaches, parasites, and general illnesses that humans do. But unlike us, animals can’t just grab a painkiller off the shelf at the supermarket to cure it. They don’t have a pharmacy to browse… or at least, not the sort that we’d recognise.

Listener Andrew Chen got in touch to ask whether animals use any kind of medicine themselves. After all, our own drugs largely come from the plants and minerals found in wild habitats. So perhaps animals themselves are using medicines they find in nature.

Presenter Anand Jagatia speaks with the primate researcher who stumbled across a chimp chewing on a bitter leaf 35 years ago, Professor Mike Huffman, whose observations opened up a whole new field of research. We discover why plants contain the medicinal compounds they do, and how butterflies with brains no bigger than a pin-head are still able to select and use medicine to protect their young.

We think of medicine as a human invention - but it turns out that we’ve learnt a lot of what we know from copying the birds, bugs and beasts.

Presented by Anand Jagatia
Produced by Rory Galloway


Image: Chimp eating. Credit: Getty Images


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8r6jy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9t)
JaQuel Knight: The man behind Beyoncé’s Single Ladies dance

Many of us like to copy the dance moves we see on screen, but award-winning choreographer, JaQuel Knight in the United States, is on a mission to copyright the sequences that he has devised, and encourage others to do the same. You may have watched and tried to imitate his work. He created the steps for Beyoncé's performance of Single Ladies.

For the award-winning poet and dancer Tishani Doshi, sometimes words aren’t enough to convey the power of the female body, or the anger she feels when it’s violated. It’s then that her poetry ‘demands choreography.’ She tells Nawal how she fuses verse and movement to embody the message of her writing.

How do you go viral in the time of coronavirus? Quang Dang is a Vietnamese dancer and choreographer, who went viral a year ago with a video that made a public health campaign about hand-washing look like fun. Now he’s made a new video, exclusively for the BBC #WSDanceChallenge, imagining the freedom he hopes we’ll all enjoy when we step into the post-Covid world.

And French choreographer Marion Motin shares what inspires her steps - hip hop, life on the street and the French film, La Haine.

Presenter: Nawal Al-Maghafi
Producers: Paul Waters, Kirsty McQuire, Lucy Collingwood, Nancy Bennie, Oliver Jarvis

(Photo: Choreographer JaQuel Knight. Credit: Jake Green.)


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwfktb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct2dmc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8rb92)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmdty8b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwfpkg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8rg16)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jss)
Secrets & Lies: Lives destroyed online

It's secrets and lies season here on Outlook and we have two stories from our archive about the way lies and fake news online can wreak havoc in our offline lives.

Monika Glennon is a Polish-born estate agent living in the US. One morning she got a frantic call from a colleague: an explicit post had been written about Monika, claiming she had an affair with a client and that she was a ‘homewrecker’. The story was fabricated, but as it became the first hit when you googled her name, Monika began to lose business, fell into a depression, and even feared for her safety. Who was behind the post? She tells Jo Fidgen her terrifying story.

Rema Rajeshwari is an Indian police officer. In 2018, rumours of child kidnappers and violent murders spread throughout her district via messaging apps. Locals were scared and started forming mobs and attacking strangers. Rema had an unorthodox solution: traditional storytelling, inspired by her grandmother. She told Outlook’s Emily Webb how she used storytelling to combat fake news.


Do you have a story about how a secret or lie changed a life? It could be something that happened to you or someone close to you, or it could just be an amazing story you heard. If so, we'd love to hear about it. Record a short voice memo or write an e-mail and send it to us at outlook@bbc.com. If your story is about someone you know, just make sure they're ok with you telling us about it.


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8rksb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmdv5rl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwfy1q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv77)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8rpjg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcj7nv2)
Hundreds flee from brutal conflict in Mozambique

Dozens of people are dead following an attack by Islamist militants on a town in northern Mozambique, according to officials. Newshour speaks to Lionel Dyck, who runs the Dyck Advisory Group, taken on by the government of Mozambique to fight the militants. The Ever Given container ship that's been blocking the Suez canal for six days is finally freed. Richard Meade, Managing Editor of Lloyd's List, a news service for the maritime industry explains it will take months to clear the backlog. Also on the programme, on day one of the high profile trial of Derek Chauvin, the former police officer accused of murdering George Floyd last May, the BBC's North America Correspondent Aleem Maqbool reports from Atlanta on the lasting impact the killing has had across America. And, on the 150th anniversary of the Royal Albert Hall, Newshour hears about some of the most famous and quirkiest events that have taken place at the iconic venue.

(Photo: militants seen around Palma, Mozambique Credit: BBC)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8rt8l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwg5jz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172y47vbp7b1df)
Credit Suisse and Nomura warn of hedge fund hit to profits

Switzerland's Credit Suisse and Japan's Nomura have seen their shares take a sharp fall after warning they could face losses of billions of dollars. The two large banks lent money to crisis-hit US investment fund, Archegos Capital, which was forced to liquidate billions of dollars’ worth of shares last Friday. We hear from Financial Times Correspondent Ortenca Aliaj for an update on the situation and financial lawyer Mark Berman discusses whether the crisis will have wider ramifications. Also in the programme, the European Union’s recent ban of palm oil in biofuel for vehicles has angered top producing nations Indonesia and Malaysia. The BBC's Manuela Saragosa explains the politics of the vegetable oil. Plus, as the pandemic has led to a re-think of the working day, the BBC’s Peter Morgan looks at the practice of an afternoon nap and if it’s time to refresh our attitudes towards sleeping on the job.

(Picture of the Credit Suisse building / Credit: Reuters)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8ry0q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxf48d6xz5)
George Floyd: Derek Chauvin trial begins

The trial of Derek Chauvin, the white American policeman accused of killing George Floyd, is starting on Monday in the city of Minneapolis. The death of Mr Floyd sparked protests in the US and around the world over police brutality and racism. We bring you the latest developments from the trial with the help of our correspondent.

Also, we go to Egypt where authorities say a giant cargo ship stuck across the Suez Canal has been freed. The ship had blocked all trade from passing through for almost a week.

And we continue to hear from people affected by the coronavirus pandemic. Today we connect to single parents in the Philippines, the US and the UK to find out how they've juggled home-schooling, parenting and working from home.

(Photo: Protesters and activists march the day before opening statements in the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin, who is facing murder charges in the death of George Floyd, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S. Credit: Reuters/Octavio Jones)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8s1rv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxf48d71q9)
Coronavirus conversations: Single parents

Every day on OS we speak to people affected by the coronavirus pandemic in different ways. Today we connect to single parents in the Philippines, the US and the UK to find out how they've juggled home-schooling, parenting and working from home.

Also, we bring you the latest developments on the trial of Derek Chauvin, the white American policeman accused of killing George Floyd. Mr Chauvin was recorded kneeling on the neck of Mr Floyd for more than nine minutes. The incident sparked protests in the US and around the world over police brutality and racism.

And we're joined by our health expert of the day to go through the main coronavirus lines of the day and answer your questions about the pandemic. If you have a question you want to ask, send us a WhatsApp message on +447730 751925.

(Photo: Shari Ryness and her 7-year-old daughter. Credit: Shari Ryness)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8s5hz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jss)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8s983)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmdvx7c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwgnjh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n73j7w52g)
2021/03/29 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8sf07)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwgs8m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2cck)
Patient zero: Coronavirus and contact tracing

Today’s episode is about the history we’re still living. From Melbourne to Munich, Lombardy to Wuhan and all the way back again, this episode is about what happened when we faced those first coronavirus cases. Where things went well, where they didn’t, and where contact tracing was effective — and whether there’s anything we could have done to stop it.

Presented by Olivia Willis of ABC Australia.

(Picture: Coronavirus particles spreading in a crowd of people, Credit: Peter Howell/Getty Images)


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8sjrc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcj8j1z)
Murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin begins

Opening arguments have been presented in the trial of the police officer accused of murdering George Floyd in 2020. The death of George Floyd, a black man, after he was restrained by policeman Derek Chauvin, sparked the nationwide protests of the Black Lives Matter movement. We hear the latest from the trial and from George Floyd's family, and ask a legal expert to unpick today's events.

Also in the programme: the container ship wedged in the Suez Canal is finally dislodged; the plight of Syrian refugees in Lebanon; and, on the 150th anniversary of the Royal Albert Hall in London, a leading conductor explains the magic of the space.

(Photo: Prosecutor Jerry Blackwell makes opening arguments in the trial of Derek Chauvin. Credit: Reuters)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8snhh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n5g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwh0rw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 The Conversation (w3ct1p69)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8ss7m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywk7wt62sl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sbb58b4f7)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwh4j0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48nsdv19sr)
Credit Suisse and Nomura warn of hedge fund hit to profits

Switzerland's Credit Suisse and Japan's Nomura have seen their shares take a sharp fall after warning they could face losses of billions of dollars. The two large banks lent money to crisis-hit US investment fund, Archegos Capital, which was forced to liquidate billions of dollars’ worth of shares last Friday. We hear from Financial Times Correspondent Ortenca Aliaj for an update on the situation and financial lawyer Mark Berman discusses whether the crisis will have wider ramifications. Also in the programme, the European Union’s recent ban of palm oil in biofuel for vehicles has angered top producing nations Indonesia and Malaysia. The BBC's Manuela Saragosa explains the politics of the vegetable oil. Plus, as the pandemic has led to a re-think of the working day, the BBC’s Peter Morgan looks at the practice of an afternoon nap and if it’s time to refresh our attitudes towards sleeping on the job. (Picture of a Credit Suisse branch in Geneva / Credit: Fabrice Coffrini via Getty Images).



TUESDAY 30 MARCH 2021

TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8t0qw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq7xp5qd1l)
Credit Suisse and Nomura warn of hedge fund hit to profits

Switzerland's Credit Suisse and Japan's Nomura have seen their shares take a sharp fall after warning they could face losses of billions of dollars. The two large banks lent money to crisis-hit US investment fund, Archegos Capital, which was forced to liquidate billions of dollars’ worth of shares last Friday. We hear from Financial Times Correspondent Ortenca Aliaj and financial lawyer Mark Berman. The US says it could impose 25% tariffs on British exports to the US after the UK levied a digital services tax on major technology companies; we get the details from Steven Overly, Global Trade and Economics Reporter at the Politico website. Also in the programme, the European Union’s recent ban of palm oil in biofuel for vehicles has angered top producing nations Indonesia and Malaysia. The BBC's Manuela Saragosa explains the politics of the vegetable oil. Plus, as the pandemic has led to a re-think of the working day, the BBC’s Peter Morgan looks at the practice of an afternoon nap and if it’s time to refresh our attitudes towards sleeping on the job. And we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the world; Alexis Goldstein, financial reform advocate in Washington DC, and Jasper Kim, Professor at Ewha University and director at Center for Conflict Management in Seoul, South Korea. (Picture of a Credit Suisse branch in Geneva / Credit: Fabrice Coffrini via Getty Images).


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8t4h0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmdwrg8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwhhrd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct2crt)
Women dying for work

Karoshi, or death from overwork, has been common in Japan for decades. It is often seen as part of ‘salary man’ culture where men commit themselves above all else to their employer. However little is ever said about women who die from Karoshi. Now the plight of women is coming more into focus following high profile deaths and signs more women are suffering.

Yoshie Matsumoto examines how an overwork culture is affecting women in Japan. She hears from the parents of journalist Miwa Sado who died at the age of 31 after putting in more than 150 hours in overtime a month. She also hears from the mother of 24-year-old Matsuri Takahashi who had been working 20 hours a day.

Pressure on women to achieve in life is multi-faceted in Japan. It’s not just about climbing the corporate ladder but also about upholding traditions still expected of women including managing the home, prioritising male domestic needs and rearing children responsibly.

Yoshie hears how people contacting the national Karoshi hotline has jumped dramatically during Covid-19 with the number of women calling almost doubling. The pandemic has seen some women take on multiple jobs just to make ends meet and cover their basic costs.

The Government is attempting to change the overwork culture by introducing a shorter working week but is the commitment to work ethic too engrained in Japanese culture? Meanwhile Yoshie finds out how some companies are developing their own ways of combatting overwork by introducing napping rooms.

If you have been affected by the issues raised in this programme and you'd like to talk someone, there is information available by going to help.befrienders.org


(Photo: Yukimi Takahashi beside her daughter Matsuri’s shrine at her home in Mishima. Credit: Makiko Segawa)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8t874)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jss)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x0k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8tcz8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmdwzyj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwhr7n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcq)
RSC: The Bard, the theatre and a pandemic

With a star studded cast including David Tennant and Noma Dumezweni, and a backstage team featuring Artistic Director Greg Doran and Deputy Artistic Director Erica Whyman - In The Studio presents the tale of the Royal Shakespeare Company...

In March 2020, Covid-19 brought the curtain down on productions from this major British theatre organisation. The annual million plus ticket sales of the RSC’s shows in Stratford-upon-Avon, London’s West End and touring productions all over the world dried up overnight - threatening the organisation’s future.

The BBC’s Karl Bos has been following the RSC over several months to find out how they are adapting to the ‘new normal’ - moving their huge international education programmes online and finding innovative ways to keep performing in a digital space. All the while, waiting for news on a crucial government loan that will affect the shape of the organisation.

Shakespeare himself was no stranger to pandemics - the theatres were closed for long stretches in his lifetime due to the plague. We'll hear how the Great Bard's words have helped these theatre makers make it through a difficult year and how they've been plotting ways to get back onstage amidst constantly changing restrictions.

Presented by Karl Bos
Produced by Karl Bos and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Image
The Royal Shakespeare Theatre auditorium - Peter Cook (c) RSC
Noma Dumezweni as Calpurnia in Julius Caesar, 2009 - Photo by Ellie Kurttz (c) RSC
David Tennant as Hamlet in Hamlet, 2008 - Photo by Ellie Kurttz (c) RSC


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8thqd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95q7kr4)
UN rapporteur on Myanmar: situation is 'horrible, tragic, outrageous"

A powerful interview with the UN rapporteur on human rights in Myanmar. Will the world take action?

Witnesses have been speaking in the trial of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd. We'll have the latest from Minnesota.

And more on the campaign to encourage Africans to volunteer to give blood and to accept transfusions.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8tmgj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95q7ph8)
George Floyd death trail: day 1 update

We hear about the prosecution and defence arguments in the trial of Derek Chauvin after a day of televised testimony.

The government of Jair Bolsonaro is in crisis in Brazil as he replaces six ministers. The reshuffle comes as the country continues to suffer record levels of coronavirus deaths.

And the BBC has seen video footage which appears to show Thai police forcing refugees back across the border from Thailand into Myanmar.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8tr6n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95q7t7d)
What came out of first George Floyd trial testimonies?

We have a roundup of the first day of the closely watched trial of Derek Chauvin, accused of the murder of George Floyd in Minnesota.

Global leaders deliver a message 'no one is safe, until everyone is safe', as they call for a global response to future pandemics.

And a nation is insulted. Criticism of the Italian poet Dante in a German newspaper sparks a culture clash with national pride at stake.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8tvys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkl)
Watching out for Gran with help from her toaster

As many countries contemplate the best way to care for an ageing population, a common question is how to support the elderly to continue living in their own homes for as long as possible. One idea is to monitor their use of home appliances, such as kettles and ovens.

Advocates say NILM – non-intrusive load monitoring – offers family and carers an insight into a person’s daily life without invading their privacy. It could even be used to track or help diagnose long-term health conditions.

Reporter William Kremer road-tests the technology with his own parents and finds out about a NILM project in Japan.

Picture: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwj775)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jfh)
Hydroelectric power in focus after disaster in India

In February a devastating flash flood in India's northern state of Uttarakhand killed at least 70 people and trapped workers in underground tunnels. We'll hear from locals who witnessed the horrific events, as well as Uttarakhand journalist Kavita Upadhyay about how the news spread among the community. Indian geologist Dr Kalachand Sain explains exactly what happened that caused the flood, and Dave Petley, professor of geography at the University of Sheffield explains how climate change played a role. Now, in the wake of the disaster, India's strategy to bring more clean energy to the country through hydroelectric dams is coming into focus, with fears the projects are affecting the delicate balance of the Himalayan ecology. Himanshu Thakkar, coordinator of the South Asia Network on Dams, Rivers and People, explains why the dams should not have been near Himalayan glaciers to begin with,and what could have been done better to warn those near the disaster. Sunita Narain, director of the Centre of Science and Environment in Delhi argues, however, that development is needed in the Himalayas but it needs to be done responsibly. And we close with Amitabh Pande, who warns that the Himalayas are a precious resource to India, and should be treated with care.

(Picture: the entrance of Tapovan tunnel following a flash flood in Uttarakhand state, India. Picture credit: JALEES ANDRABI/AFP via Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x52)
When the prisoners ran the prison

In March 1973 guards went on strike at Walpole maximum security prison in the US state of Massachussetts, and the prisoners took over. For the next three months the inmates, organised in the National Prisoners Reform Association, ran daily life in the prison. They were helped by a group of outside observers, drawn from members of the community. Mike Lanchin has been hearing from the organiser of the observer teams, Rev. Ed Rodman, about his memories of this unique, but ultimately doomed, experiment in prison reform.

(Photo credit: The Boston Globe)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8tzpx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2crt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwjbz9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 Discovery (w3ct2cck)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8v3g1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8v765)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmdxv5f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwjlgk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8vby9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw1)
Secrets & Lies: What my parent hid from me

We're delving into the Outlook archive to bring you stories about parents who kept shocking secrets from their children.

In April 1997 a woman dressed as a nurse walked into a Cape Town hospital and left with a new born baby. The baby's name was Zephany Nurse - that child would not discover her true identity for another 17 years. This story was presented by Mpho Lakaje. Miche Zephany's book about her experience is called Zephany, Two Mothers One Daughter.

As a film-obsessed gay teenager, Wes Hurley was thrilled to move to the US from Russia. But his mother’s new husband was moody and homophobic. He told Outlook's Saskia Edwards how they ended up bonding, after a surprise revelation. Wes made a film about his life, co-directed by Nathan Miller, called Little Potato.

And if all this sharing of secrets has got you thinking about a story in your own life, we'd love to hear it. Write to us, or send a short voice memo to outlook@bbc.com. The secret could be about you or someone you know, or it could just be a fantastic tale you heard. If your story is about someone you know, just make sure they're ok with you telling us about it.


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x52)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8vgpf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmdy2np)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwjtyt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 Discovery (w3ct2cck)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8vlfk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcjbkr5)
China imposes new ‘patriotic’ electoral rules for Hong Kong

Beijing imposes radical overhaul to tighten control over the territory’s political system by cutting directly elected seats in parliament. Pro-Beijing lawmaker Regina Ip told Newshour the new legislation will not prevent opposition candidates from being elected while critics warn it will mean the end of democracy.

Also in the programme: Leaders of more than twenty countries are calling for a global treaty to help prepare for future pandemics. What difference will it make? And cabinet reshuffle in Brazil as Covid deaths soar.

(Photo: A Chinese national flag and a Hong Kong flag fly outside the Legislative Council in Hong Kong. Credit: Reuters).


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8vq5p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwk2g2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4b9nw1gvld)
Latex gloves seized by US authorities

Amid forced labour concerns, latex gloves by Top Glove are being seized by US authorities. Phil Robertson is deputy Asia director of the campaigning organisation Human Rights Watch, and explains allegations about the Malaysian company's labour practices. Meanwhile, Rosey Hurst, director of UK-based consultant Impactt, which had been brought in by Top Glove to advise on measures for improving policies and practices, and according to the company found "no systemic forced labour", gives us their perspective. Also in the programme, we get a profile from Reuters journalist Lawrence Delevingne of Bill Hwang, the billionaire behind Archegos Capital Management, which is the loss-making hedge fund that led to the sale of billions of dollars in shares at the end of last week. Plus, in the wake of February's hydroelectric disaster in India's northern state of Uttarakhand, the BBC's Rahul Tandon explores the causes of the event, and asks whether India's approach to economic development in the Himalayas needs a rethink.

(Picture: A Top Glove production line. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8vtxt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxf48d9tw8)
Coronavirus conversations: Children and Covid-19

We hear from two mothers whose teenage children have suffered from persistent symptoms, months after testing positive for Covid-19. We’ll also get a specialist in paediatric infectious diseases to explain what is known about children and coronavirus.

The World Health Organisation has released its report on the origins of the Covid pandemic, concluding that the virus probably jumped from animals to humans through another animal. We’ll look at the main findings in the report with our reporters.

And, we'll be answering audience questions about the pandemic with Dr Isaac Bogoch from the University of Toronto.

And we'll talk about a controversial pair of shoes; Nike is suing an art collective after it released new trainers --made out of modified Nike trainers-- that contain a drop of human blood in the soles.

(Photo: This undated transmission electron microscope image shows SARS-CoV-2, also known as novel coronavirus, the virus that causes COVID-19, isolated from a patient in the U.S. Credit: NIAID-RML/Handout via REUTERS)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8vyny)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxf48d9ymd)
George Floyd: Derek Chauvin trial resumes

We speak to our correspondent in the city of Minneapolis where the murder trial of the former policeman Derek Chauvin continues. Mr Chauvin is accused of killing George Floyd by kneeling on his neck for more than nine minutes. He denies the charges.

We’ll also hear about a case in Mexico that have parallels with George Floyd’s death. Four police officers have been arrested over the death of a Salvadoran refugee who died after being held facedown by police on a street.

We’ll look at today’s coronavirus stories with one of our regular experts, Dr Swapneil Parikh in India.

We also hear from two mothers whose teenage children have suffered from persistent symptoms, months after testing positive for Covid-19. We’ll also get a specialist in paediatric infectious diseases to explain what is known about children and coronavirus.

(Photo: Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin sits in front of a picture of George Floyd displayed during Chauvin"s trial for second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S., March 29, 2021 in this courtroom sketch from a video feed of the proceedings. Credit: Jane Rosenberg/File Photo/Reuters)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8w2f2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x52)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8w656)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmdyt4g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwkkfl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n73j7z1zk)
2021/03/30 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8w9xb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2crt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwkp5q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrs)
China’s online restrictions increase

The Chinese government’s highly restricted approach to online freedom of expression has intensified during the COVID pandemic – not surprising maybe, but the implication of this on Chinese citizens and countries across Asia is significant. That’s one of the findings of research published by Chatham House. Harriet Moynihan, from the International Law Programme at Chatham House, is one of the authors of the paper and joins us on the show.

Cellulose Electronic Thread
For electronic textiles to enter the market on a large scale they need to be sustainable. Now scientists at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden have developed thread made from conductive cellulose, which can be threaded through a sewing machine. The sewn garments can even be washed in a machine. Sustainable wearable tech would massively reduce electronic waste and could also lead to better healthcare monitoring eg blood pressure or heart rate of the person wearing the smart clothes. Sozan Darabi explains how they developed the thread and how she had to use her sewing skills to create the outfits.

Evil Corp – the board game of tech giants
Fancy becoming a tech billionaire who can save the world? Well you can by playing a new board game called “Evil Corp”. The game allows you to play as one of 6 Evil CEO billionaires intent on accruing billions of dollars and start-ups. The aim is to “Save the World, No Matter the Cost”. The games’ inventor Alfie Dennon says he wants us to think about the power tech tycoons have over our everyday lives online, in how we shop, work and play.

Image: Chinese flag displayed on laptop screen, plus smartphone with block symbol displayed
Credit: Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producers: Emil Petrie and Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8wfng)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcjcdz2)
Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro shuffles cabinet as Covid pressure grows

Brazil's far-right President Jair Bolsonaro has replaced six cabinet ministers as his popularity plummets over his handling of the pandemic. Brazil’s health service is reported to be on the brink of collapse as the country battles a deadly second wave. More than 300,000 people have died of Covid-19 in Brazil, with more than 12 million confirmed cases.

Also on the programme: a special investigation into war crimes in Libya; and the violence in Myanmar spreads from the towns to the villages, with military strikes from the air.

(Photo: Protest against President Bolsonaro in Brasilia, Brazil, 30th March 2021 Credit: EPA/Joedson Alves)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8wkdl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 People Fixing the World (w3ct1pkl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwkxnz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 In the Studio (w3ct1tcq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8wp4q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywk7wt8zpp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sbb58f1bb)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwl1f3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48nsdv46pv)
Latex gloves seized by US authorities

Amid forced labour concerns, latex gloves by Top Glove are being seized by US authorities. Phil Robertson is deputy Asia director of the campaigning organisation Human Rights Watch, and explains allegations about the Malaysian company's labour practices. Meanwhile, Rosey Hurst, director of UK-based consultant Impactt, which had been brought in by Top Glove to advise on measures for improving policies and practices, and according to the company found "no systemic forced labour", gives us their perspective. Also in the programme, we get a profile from Reuters journalist Lawrence Delevingne of Bill Hwang, the billionaire behind Archegos Capital Management, which is the loss-making hedge fund that led to the sale of billions of dollars in shares at the end of last week. Plus, in the wake of February's hydroelectric disaster in India's northern state of Uttarakhand, the BBC's Rahul Tandon explores the causes of the event, and asks whether India's approach to economic development in the Himalayas needs a rethink.

(Picture: A Top Glove production line. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



WEDNESDAY 31 MARCH 2021

WED 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8wxmz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq7xp5t8yp)
Latex gloves seized by US authorities

Amid forced labour concerns, latex gloves by Top Glove are being seized by US authorities. Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director of the campaigning organisation Human Rights Watch, explains the allegations about the Malaysian company's labour practices. UK-based consultant Impactt was brought in by Top Glove. Their director, Rosey Hurst, says they found "no systemic forced labour". US and British regulators have been in discussions today with market players who lent to Archegos Capital Management, the loss-making hedge fund that led to the sale of billions of dollars in shares at the end of last week. We hear from the FT's Ortenca Aleea, who has been following the story. Plus, in the wake of February's hydroelectric disaster in India's northern state of Uttarakhand, the BBC's Rahul Tandon explores the causes and whether India's approach to economic development in the Himalayas needs a rethink. And, who told Volkswagen that an April Fools joke should be made on March 30th? An electric vehicle-inspired name change in the US to 'Voltswagen' turns out to be a joke. But will the German car company have the last laugh?

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Amanda Fischer, policy director at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, in DC. And Simon Littlewood, author and broadcaster, in Singapore.

(Picture: A Top Glove production line. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8x1d3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmdzncc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwldnh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct29by)
Water: Too Much And Not Enough

Water as a resource

Journalist Alok Jha shows how the way we are using freshwater has made it a precious finite resource. And it’s a resource on the edge of collapse. By 2050, over half the world’s population will live in a water-scarce region. But rather than working together to manage crucial water supplies, powerful states are manoeuvring to control the remaining stocks for themselves.

Beginning with one family’s well drying up in the desert of Arizona, and following the story all the way to political tensions in the Middle East, Alok argues that we need to recognise water as the most important shared resource in the world and take advantage of its cross-border nature to encourage international cooperation.

(Photo: The Jordan river on mountainside. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8x547)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jw1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x52)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8x8wc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmdzwvm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwln4r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8b)
Goal 11: Sustainable cities

In 2015 the United Nations announced a radical plan to change the world.

Global leaders drew up a list of 17 "sustainable development goals" to create a blueprint for a better future. Governments agreed to support the goals which cover gender equality, health provision, a good education and much more. We've asked 17-year-olds from 17 different countries tell us what they think needs to change if the world is to meet those goals by 2030.

Seventeen-year-old Elvis Bonam lives in a slum called Agbogbloshie in Ghana's capital city, Accra. The settlement is close to a huge rubbish dump. It is crowded and noisy and Elvis has to pay to use a rickety bridge over a lagoon to get to school because there are few paved roads in Agbogbloshie. He shows us round his home and tries to find out how cities can be made more sustainable.

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producer: Joe Kent

Project 17 is made in partnership with The Open University.


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8xdmh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95qbgn7)
Germany limits the use of AstraZeneca jab

Germany will now be limiting the use of AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine for people below sixty because of risk of blood clots. We hear from an epidemiologist who thinks it is an extremely dangerous move - for Germany and the world.

Brazil faces further turmoil as its military chiefs step down. President Jair Bolsonaro struggles to contain a leadership crisis amid growing numbers of coronavirus cases.

Also how is Somalia coping without a national blood bank?

And we'll hear about the anger in Mexico after the death in police custody of a Salvadorian woman.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8xjcm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95qbldc)
Germany suspends the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine for people under 60

The German government is suspending vaccinations of people under the age of 60 with the British-made AstraZeneca vaccine after 31 cases of blood clots have been discovered in younger women receiving the jab.

The World Health Organisation presents its report on the origins of the pandemic... but even its own head says further investigations are needed to rule out the involvement of a Wuhan laboratory.

US President Biden will reveal details of his new economic package later... he's under pressure to include further stimulus cheques.

And the EU is to give Greece funding to build five new refugee camps in the Aegean islands. But the decision is causing a stir among locals and refugees.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8xn3r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95qbq4h)
German authorities recommend AstraZeneca vaccine for over 60 only

Germany limits the use of AstraZeneca coronavirus jab for people below sixty because of risk of blood clots. We hear from an epidemiologist who thinks it is an extremely dangerous move - for Germany and the world.

Libya's civil war has finally came to a halt with a the establishment of a unity government, but with peace comes the exposure of the war's ugly secrets....

In Australia the country's largest phone company faces a massive fine for misselling services to indigenous consumers.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8xrvw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n9z)
Erika Lust: Can porn be feminist?

Porn is one of the biggest drivers of internet traffic and a generator of vast amounts of money, but also an industry in a state of flux. The biggest online porn platforms have been accused of profiting from criminality and abuse. Stephen Sackur interviews Erika Lust - pornographer, feminist and entrepreneur. Is there such a thing as ethical porn?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwm448)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1jn8)
Feminist cities

Why do so many women still feel unsafe walking the streets of our cities? We take a look at the idea of a feminist city. What is it and what could it look like? And where in the world are they getting it right? Since the murder of Sarah Everard in South London in March, women all over the UK took to social media to discuss their experiences of walking the streets. And the lengths they go to stay safe. The 33 year old was walking home from a friend’s house in the evening she was murdered. The killing touched women all over the country - and even further afield. But what if women didn’t fear being out on the streets? Tamasin Ford speaks to Leslie Kern, the author of Feminist City: Claiming Space in a Man-Made World and to Sara Ortiz Escalante, a member of Col·lectiu Punt 6 (Collective Point 6), a cooperative of architects, sociologists in Barcelona in Spain who have worked in more than 120 towns and cities around the world with just one aim in mind - to put a feminist perspective on everything they do. Plus she speaks to Ellen Woodsworth, the co-chair and founder of Women Transforming Cities International in Canada, an organisation aimed at making cities better places to live for women and girls. Plus she speaks to entrepreneur Dr Kalpana Viswanath, co-founder & CEO of Safetipin, an app that uses data mapping tools to make public spaces safer for women.
(Picture credit: Ruben Earth, Getty Creative)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7b)
Mrs Thatcher’s ground-breaking Soviet TV interview

How Mrs Thatcher shook up the Soviet media with a landmark interview in Moscow in 1987 focusing on nuclear disarmament. It was broadcast unedited and helped bring in the era of “glasnost.” Bob Howard talks to Boris Kalyagin, one of the three Soviet journalists who interviewed the British prime minister.


Margaret Thatcher, circa 1993. copyright Jeff Overs / BBC


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8xwm0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct29by)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwm7wd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8y0c4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Coronavirus and Your Money (w3ct2cm2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8y438)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf0r2j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwmhcn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8y7vd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1jy9)
Secrets & Lies: The undercover operatives

In this episode of Outlook's Secrets and Lies series we're revisiting two astonishing stories from our archive about life undercover.

As a young woman Ieva Lesinska was faced with an agonising choice. To renounce her father as a traitor, or defect to the US and leave behind everything she knew in Latvia. Ieva says it was like she was living in a spy movie, and a film has now been made about her life, it's called: 'My Father, the Spy.'

Anas Aremeyaw Anas is a trained lawyer-turned-investigative reporter in Ghana, and a frequent presenter of the BBC's Africa Eye. In his nearly 20 years working undercover, he's exposed judges taking bribes for a not-guilty verdict; top football officials for fixing matches; sex-trafficking rings; organ-harvesting operations. To do so, he had to disguise himself as a psychiatric patient, as a janitor in a brothel and even as a rock in a barren landscape. His work has led to numerous convictions, but his methods are sometimes dangerous and controversial.


Do you have a fantastic story involving a secret or a lie? We'd love to hear about it. Record a short voice memo or write an e-mail and send it to us at outlook@bbc.com. If your story is about someone you know, just make sure they're ok with you telling us about it.


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8yclj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf0zks)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwmqvx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Digital Planet (w3ct1lrs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8yhbn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcjfgn8)
Brazil’s political crisis deepens as defence chiefs resign

Brazil registers a record number of Covid deaths as President Jair Bolsonaro struggles to contain a political crisis that could spark a constitutional standoff.

Also in the programme: BBC's China correspondent relocates from Beijing to Taiwan following threats and pressure from the Chinese authorities; and the European Space Agency is calling all potential astronauts.

(Photo: A handout photo made available by Agencia Brasil shows Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro (L) about to shake hands with the Army's General Edson Leal Pujol (C) during a ceremony in Brasilia, Brazil on 23 August 2019 (reissued 30 March 2021). Credit:EPA/Antonio Cruz/Agencia Brasil)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8ym2s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n9z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwmzc5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172y4cjtyylq4f)
Deliveroo shares drop 30% on stock market debut

Deliveroo shares have fallen on its stock market debut after a number of major UK investors expressed concerns about its gig economy worker model. We hear from Sophie Lund-Yates at investment company Hargreaves Lansdown about what this means for the food delivery app service. Also in the programme, a new World Economic Forum report reveals that the pandemic has delayed efforts to achieve gender equality by a generation. Managing Director of WEF, Saadia Zahidi tells us what gender parity means to her. Plus, the BBC’s Tamasin Ford looks at the idea of a ‘feminist city’ – what it is, how it looks and where in the world is getting it right.

(Picture of a Deliveroo worker / Picture credit: Getty Images)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8yqtx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxf48ddqsc)
Coronavirus conversations: Should Mumbai go into lockdown?

As Covid-19 cases surge in India, we take a closer look at one of the worst hit cities, Mumbai in Maharastra. Two locals give us their take on whether or not a new lockdown should be put in place.

We also hear about the political fallout in Brazil where Jair Bolsonaro is facing the biggest crisis of his presidency after the heads of the army, navy and air force all quit and the country recorded its highest daily Covid-19 death toll. We get insight from the BBC team in the country and hear from those affected.

And joining us is our regular health expert Dr Maria Sundaram, an infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto. She will answer all the latest questions from our global audience about the pandemic.

(Photo: Health worker collects a swab sample from a woman during a rapid antigen COVID-19 testing campaign, on a street in Mumbai
Credit: Francis Mascarenhas/Reuters)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8yvl1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxf48ddvjh)
Coronavirus: Brazil's political fallout

Our regular medical expert, Dr Pedro Hallal in Brazil discusses the latest situation with the pandemic, as the country records its highest daily death toll. We also hear about the political fallout in Brazil where Jair Bolsonaro is facing the biggest crisis of his presidency after the heads of the army, navy and air force all quit. BBC Brasil tell us more.

We bring you conversation between people living in Mumbai about a possible lockdown. The city is the state capital of Maharashtra in India and has seen a steady rise in covid-19 cases.

And we continue to be across events in Minneapolis at the trial of Derek Chauvin, the former police officer charged with the murder and manslaughter of George Floyd last year. Mr Chauvin denies both charges.

(Photo: Demonstrators takes part in a protest against Brazil"s President Jair Bolsonaro and his handling of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Brasilia, Brazil. Credit: Reuters/Ueslei Marcelino)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8yzb5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1jy9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8z329)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf1q1k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwngbp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n73j81ywn)
2021/03/31 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8z6tf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct29by)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwnl2t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv0)
Covid vaccines for children

Vaccine hesitancy and Covid vaccines for Children. Claudia talks to paediatrician Dr Robert Jacobson of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA about issues of Covid vaccine hesitancy and why this issue may grow as Covid vaccines become available for children. As trials on children as young as 6 months get underway, and vaccination for children likely to be available, in some countries, from the summer/early autumn, why is vaccinating children against Covid important and what can be done to help parents overcome any hesitancy they might have?

New Test to predict pre-term labour. Every year, around 15 million babies in the world are born too early. In countries such as Malawi, Pakistan and Indonesia, more than 15% of babies are premature. Not all survive and some of those that do have disabilities, which might have been preventable with simple care. The question is how to predict which pregnant women might go into labour too early. Reporter Madeleine Finlay investigates a new test using the vaginal microbiome to predict which mums might be most at risk.

The first 1000 days. Claudia talks to Professor Monica Lakhanpaul about the critical first 1000 days of a baby's life and a new exhibition that hopes to highlight this key period in a child’s development. Claudia also talks to her about the idea of Reverse Innovation: lessons that richer countries can learn from poorer countries when it comes to health. We’re much more used to it being the other way round, but there are now many projects that are using techniques and ideas learnt from middle and lower income countries in providing health support to communities in the UK and other higher income countries.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Alexandra Feachem

(Picture: A young boy who has just been vaccinated. Photo credit: D.Jiang/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8zbkk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcjg9w5)
European regulator says Astra Zeneca vaccine shouldn’t be restricted

The executive director of the European Medicines Agency, Emer Cooke, says there's no reason for countries to limit the use of the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine after Germany suspended its use in the under-sixties because of concerns it could cause rare blood clots. We speak to a haematologist who says more research needs to be done into the possible link.

Also in the programme: the military in Mozambique say they are carrying out an operation to re-take the northern city of Palma, attacked by Islamist militants last week; and President Joe Biden presents his two trillion-dollar package aiming to reshape America’s economy.

(Photo: A health worker injects a dose of the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine against Covid-19. Credit:EPA).


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8zg9p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n9z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwntl2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x8b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8zl1t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywk7wtcwls)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sbb58hy7f)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwnyb6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48nsdv73ly)
Biden unveils spending plan worth trillions

US President Joe Biden has unveiled the details of a spending plan aimed at re-igniting America's economic growth. It aims to upgrade its crumbling infrastructure and tackle climate change. We get reaction from the BBC's Anthony Zurcher in Washington DC. Also in the programme, a new World Economic Forum report reveals that the pandemic has delayed efforts to achieve gender equality by a generation. Managing Director of WEF, Saadia Zahidi tells us what gender parity means to her. Plus, the BBC’s Tamasin Ford looks at the idea of a ‘feminist city’ – what it is, how it looks and where in the world is getting it right.

(Picture: US President Joe Biden. Credit: Getty Images)



THURSDAY 01 APRIL 2021

THU 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8ztk2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq7xp5x5vs)
Biden unveils spending plan worth trillions

US President Joe Biden has unveiled the details of a spending plan aimed at re-igniting America's economic growth. We analyse what exactly it will be spent on, and where the money will come from. Food delivery app Deliveroo's shares have fallen on its stock market debut after a number of major UK investors expressed concerns about its gig economy worker model. We hear what this means for the company from Sophie Lund-Yates at investment company Hargreaves Lansdown.

The French President Emmanuel Macron has put mainland France back into lockdown for four weeks from Saturday. He also plans to offer the vaccine to all adults by the end of the summer. Meanwhile the new Director General of the World Trade Organisation has urged pharmaceutical companies to make enough Covid vaccine for everyone in the world or hand over the technology to developing countries. Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala spoke to the BBC's economics editor Faisal Islam. Plus, Tamasin Ford looks at the idea of a ‘feminist city’ – what it is and where in the world is getting it right.

All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the world: Sushma Ramachandran, columnist with the Tribune in Delhi and Mitchell Hartman from Marketplace, in Portland Oregon.


(Picture: US President Joe Biden. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y8zy96)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf2k8g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwp9kl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3ct1gx2)
Namibia: The price of genocide

More than a century after its brutal colonisation of Namibia, including what it now accepts was the genocide of the Herero and Nama peoples, Germany is negotiating with the country’s government to heal the wounds of the past. The eventual deal may set a precedent for what other nations expect from former colonisers. But how do you make up for the destruction of entire societies? Germany has agreed to apologise - but Namibia also wants some form of material compensation. What should that be, and who should benefit? Namibians are now divided about how the talks are being conducted - and some in the country’s German-speaking minority, descendants of the original colonists, question the very idea of compensation. Tim Whewell travels to Namibia to ask how far full reconciliation - with Germany, and within the country - is possible.

Producer and presenter: Tim Whewell
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: Laidlaw Peringanda at the Swakopmund Genocide Memorial. Credit: Tim Whewell/BBC)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9021b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1jy9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x7b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y905sg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf2srq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwpk1v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfd)
A year in the life of a Chinese restaurant

Anti-Asian hate has surged since the coronavirus outbreak, and some of the most common targets have been Chinese food businesses.

Tamasin Ford speaks to three people who’ve witnessed the rise of Sinophobia first hand and seen it damage not only their livelihoods, but also their families.

They explain why they’re not prepared to stay silent, as was often the case for previous generations, and how they plan to use food in the fight against racism and ignorance.

Producers: Simon Tulett and Sarah Stolarz

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: A person holds a sign during a rally against anti-Asian hate in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Credit: Kerem Yucel/AFP/Getty/BBC)

Contributors:

Patrick Mock, manager of 46 Mott bakery in New York;
John Li, owner of Dumpling Shack, London;
Ying Hou, owner of ShanDong MaMa, Melbourne


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y909jl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95qfckb)
HK: pro-democracy activists have been found guilty of unauthorised assembly

A group of well known pro-democracy activists are convicted in Hong Kong - in a trial which is likely to have major consequences for their cause. We'll get the reaction of a prominent politician there.

Ukraine is struggling as the pandemic bites. Kiev's mayor is pleading with people to follow the rules - as we will hear live from the city.

US President Joe Biden has set out a two trillion dollar plan to boost the economy, improve infrastructure and fight climate change. Our business reporter in Los Angeles will examine that ambitious agenda.

And we'll hear why electric cars have led to a rush to mine in the depths of the ocean - and what sort of impact that is having on our environment.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y90f8q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95qfh9g)
Courts find activists guilty in Hong Kong

A court in Hong Kong has found seven leading pro-democracy campaigners, including the media tycoon Jimmy Lai, guilty of taking part in an unauthorised protest two years ago.

In India where the pandemic is surging in several states – officials say the situation is going from bad to worse, can an effective widespread vaccine roll out mitigate this?

Uzbekistan prepares to criminalise same-sex relationships.

And the shock sports result of the year, four-time winners of the Football World Cup, Germany, beaten at home by North Macedonia in a qualifying match for next year’s competition.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y90k0v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95qfm1l)
Hong Kong activists convicted in relation to 2019 protests

Courts in Hong Kong find a number of opposition politicians guilty of "unauthorised assembly" - the sentence is yet to come, but the verdict has already caused strong reaction: the full interview with former Democratic leader Emily Lau.

Over a year into the Coronavirus pandemic, could Africa play a role in vaccine manufacturing? We'll speak to the former British Prime Minister Tony Blair.

And "a system no longer rigged against members of ethnic minorities" - that's the finding of a report on race relations here in the UK, but not everyone agrees.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y90nrz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1q)
How will the concussion issue affect the future of sport?

Concussion is now a powder-keg issue in world sport, as concerns deepen about the potential links to brain disease.

The long-term effects of careers spent making and taking heavy tackles are being revealed in ever-increasing detail, but the risks are not exclusive to so-called full contact sports.

Some governing bodies have sprung into action, implementing new rules and safety measures. But others turn a blind eye.

So, we’re asking – how will the concussion issue affect the future of sport?

Presenter: Paul Connolly
Producer: Stefania Okereke

(Image: Concussive brain injury. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwq11c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1j8z)
Josephine's story: Bouncing back

Josephine is a single mother of four in Kibera, the sprawling slum in Nairobi, Kenya. At the beginning of the pandemic she was working as a cook, but soon, like many Kibera residents, lost her job, and when the BBC's Ed Butler spoke to her a year ago her situation was dire.
In this final episode in the series, Josephine looks to the future, and how she might retrain herself to find new ways to put food on the table. We’ll also hear from Kibera community organiser Kennedy Odede, how Josephine’s is just one of thousands of stories in the township. Dr John Nkengasong, head of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, tells us of his concerns about East Africa’s ability to recover from the virus, given the unequal rollout of vaccines. But Kennedy Odede says we should not underestimate the resilience of Kibera residents.

Producer: Frey Lindsay.

Special thanks to Henix Obuchunju of Pamoja FM in Nairobi.

(Picture: Josephine and her family. Picture credit: Josephine Muchilwa)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2t)
Kidnapped on an orchid hunt

In March 2000, two young English travellers, Tom Hart-Dyke and Paul Winder, were kidnapped by Colombian guerrillas while attempting to cross the notoriously dangerous Darien Gap region on the border with Panama. Hart-Dyke is a gardener who was on a mission to collect orchids, and he survived a nine-month ordeal by building a nursery in the cloud forest and planning his own dream garden for the family castle back home in Kent. He talks to Simon Watts.

PHOTO: Tom Hart-Dyke (l) with Paul Winder shortly after their release (Press Association)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y90sj3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwq4sh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y90x87)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3ct1rkx)
Pauline Viardot: 19th-Century diva

While the name of Pauline Viardot may be unfamiliar to many, in her lifetime she was one of the most celebrated performers in Europe. Her interpretation of Orpheus in a revival of Gluck’s opera made the writer Charles Dickens weep, and the novelist George Sand said that whenever she heard Pauline Viardot sing, nothing else mattered. In addition to her vocal talents, Pauline Viardot dazzled in high society. She knew almost everybody who came to define 19th Century European culture, thanks to the regular salon she held with her husband in their Parisian townhouse. Acclaimed poets, musicians, composers, artists and even royalty would come to take tea, listen to music, network, perform and share ideas.

Alas there are no recordings of her magnificent voice, even though her later years coincided with the beginning of the recording industry. But today Pauline Viardot’s legacy is being rediscovered as a composer, with works that were performed at her salons reaching new audiences.

Bridget Kendall is joined by Hilary Poriss, associate professor of music history at Northeastern University in Boston who is writing a monograph on Pauline Viardot to be published by the University of Chicago Press; Patrick Barbier, emeritus professor at the West Catholic University in Angers, and author of a biography of Pauline Viardot and her sister; and Richard Langham Smith, who has published widely on 19th and early 20th Century French music and is currently research professor at the Royal College of Music in London.

Producer: Fiona Clampin


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3ct1l7y)
Ghana's runaway sprinters

In 1990, two of Ghana’s most talented sprinters, Gus Nketia and Laud Codjoe, escaped from their national team’s accommodation at the Commonwealth Games in Auckland. The pair had made friends in New Zealand and wanted to flee from a country with an increasingly repressive government. They were helped by an extended Maori family, who hid them in the New Zealand backcountry and helped them apply for citizenship. Gus Nketia later became the New Zealand record-holder at 100 metres. Tom Roseingrave reports. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Gus Nketia (l) in the year 2000 (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9110c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf3mzm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwqd8r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y914rh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2t)
Secrets & Lies: Lives lived in shame

It's Secrets and Lies season on Outlook and we're revisiting some of the most fascinating stories from our archive on the theme. In this episode we hear about secrets borne out of shame.

When Gail Lukasik was growing up in the US, she'd always wondered about her mother's quirky habits. For instance, she always wore a light foundation before she went to bed. Years later Gail would discover that this had been one of her mother's attempts to hide the fact that she was actually multiracial and had 'passed' as white her whole life. Gail wrote a book about her story, White Like Her: My Family's Story of Race and Racial Passing. She spoke to Emily Webb in 2019.

Stanley Underhill is a British priest who—at 91—came out as gay. He spent his whole life facing prejudice because of his sexuality but says that for the first time in his life, he's comfortable in himself. He’s written a book about his life called Coming out of the Black Country. He spoke to Emily Webb in 2019.

Do you have a fantastic story involving a secret or a lie? We'd love to hear about it. Record a short voice memo or write an e-mail and send it to us at outlook@bbc.com. If your story is about someone you know, just make sure they're ok with you telling us about it.


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y918hm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf3wgw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwqms0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 Health Check (w3ct1nv0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y91d7r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcjjckc)
WTO chief says 'Covid vaccine manufacturers should work with poorer countries'

The head of the WTO has urged the makers of vaccines to do more to make their jabs available to developing countries.

Also in programme: a court in Hong Kong has found seven leading pro-democracy campaigners guilty of taking part in an unauthorised rally two years ago. And Brazil March Covid death toll tops 60'000.

(Photo: J & J Vaccine. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y91hzw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwqw88)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172y492hs4mprn)
Vaccine makers 'should work with poorer countries'

WTO head Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala calls for a rethink by companies over coronavirus vaccines. She urges pharmaceutical firms involved to make enough for everyone in the world, or voluntarily hand their technology to developing countries, citing AstraZeneca's deal with India's Serum Institute. We hear from Dr Okonjo-Iweala, and examine the issues raised with BBC economics correspondent Andrew Walker. Also in the programme, baseball returns to New York's Yankee Stadium today, and on Friday the curtain will rise once again at some theatres on Broadway, as the BBC's Samira Hussain in the city explains. Plus, on the 30th anniversary of the first edition of World Business Report, Fergus Nicoll looks back on three decades of coverage of the global economy.

(Picture: A coronavirus vaccination in India. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y91mr0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxf48dhmpg)
Hong Kong protesters convicted

Seven prominent pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong have been found guilty of "unlawful assembly". We'll explain the story with the help of BBC Chinese. And we'll hear the conversation in the city about the impact of changes to rights and freedoms.

We’ll get your coronavirus questions answered by our regular medical expert, Dr Emma Hodcroft. Her specialism is tracking variants around the world, so one of the things we’ll talk about is the detection of a mutation, similar to the one first found in South Africa, but this time in Brazil.

And we’ll hear the experience of a group of doctors in Mexico on the front line of the pandemic. At the start of the week, the Mexican Health Ministry published data suggesting the real number of Covid-19 deaths could be more than 60% higher than the official count.

(Photo: Former lawmakers Lee Cheuk-yan and Cyd Ho talk to reporters outside the West Kowloon court buildings in Hong Kong after the guilty verdict. Credit: JEROME FAVRE/EPA)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y91rh4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxf48dhrfl)
Coronavirus conversations: Mexican doctors

We speak to three doctors working on the Covid front line in Mexico after government data suggested deaths from the virus could be more than 60% higher than the official count. They talk about the emotional strain of doing their job and the number of people who are dying at home.

Seven prominent pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong have been found guilty of "unlawful assembly". We'll explain the story with the help of BBC Chinese. And we'll hear the conversation in the city about the impact of changes to rights and freedoms.

And we’ll hear football fans from North Macedonia celebrating their national men’s team’s extraordinary win against 4-time world champions, Germany. It’s the first time the Germans have lost a World Cup qualifying match since 2001.

(Photo: Dr Dolores Niembro Credit: Dolores Niembro)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y91w78)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y91zzd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf4lyn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwrc7s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n73j84vsr)
2021/04/01 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y923qj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3ct1gx2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwrgzx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3f)
Post-Covid outcomes after release from hospital

After last year’s first wave of covid-19 in the UK, individuals who had been discharged after hospitalisation suffered higher rates of coronary and respiratory disorders, and even diabetes subsequently over 140 days. As Dr Ami Banerjee of University College London explains, out of 48,000 cases, patients who had had acute covid-19 were four times more likely to be readmitted and 8 times more likely to die. Ami’s team suggests in their paper published in the British Medical Journal that diagnosis, treatment and prevention of post-covid syndrome needs an integrated approach.

In France, researcher Xavier Montagutelli describes how his team has observed that unlike the original virus, some of the newer Variants of Concern can infect mice in laboratories. They do not show serious illness, but nevertheless host the virus in their lungs. Whilst infection is unlikely in natural environments and not yet observed in the wild, it does show how the viral variants can extend the host range, perhaps leading to more opportunities for mutation. But this finding, posted as a pre-print, also perhaps represents an avenue for deeper gene-specific research that has not so far been possible.

Over in Colombia, Monica Carvalho of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute describes her team’s findings regarding the origins of the diversity and habitat of rainforests in south America. Looking at leaf fossils and pollen grains from 60 million years ago, they have found significant differences between the forests of the dinosaurs, and the ones we see today. As they write in the journal Science, it all changed when the Chixulub meteor hit the Gulf of Mexico and the global lights went out. The rainforests that grew back were simply not the same.

But much further back in time, some billion years ago, the forests of the world that were changing the chemistry and making seas inhabitable allowing complex multicellular life, consisted of pencil-lead sized algae quietly photosynthesizing in the shallows of an ocean in what is today remote Canada. Katie Maloney of University of Toronto Mississauga spotted fossils of just these when out on a field trip in Yukon territory. Publishing in Geology Magazine this week, her eagle-eyed finds shed light on this crucial epoch in life history of which there are scant fossilized remains.

Image: Rainforest canopy
Credit: Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y927gn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcjk6s8)
UN urges families of Myanmar staff to leave country

Families are urged to leave due to the security situation, as Myanmar's deposed leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, is charged with violating the country's official secrets act. We speak to the UN Resident Co-ordinator for Myanmar. Also: will France's forthcoming lockdown flatten the third wave of the virus? And the girlfriend of George Floyd - the black American whose death sparked protests across the world - takes the stand in the trial of the white police officer accused of murdering him.

(Photo: A fire burns on the street during a protest against the military coup, in Mandalay, Myanmar April 1, 2021. Credit: Reuters)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y92c6s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Inquiry (w3ct1z1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwrqh5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 The Food Chain (w3ct1rfd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y92gyx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywk7wtgshw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sbb58lv4j)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwrv79)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48nsdvb0j1)
Vaccine makers 'should work with poorer countries'

WTO head Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala calls for a rethink by companies over coronavirus vaccines. She urges pharmaceutical firms involved to make enough for everyone in the world, or voluntarily hand their technology to developing countries, citing AstraZeneca's deal with India's Serum Institute. We hear from Dr Okonjo-Iweala, and examine the issues raised with BBC economics correspondent Andrew Walker. Also in the programme, baseball returns to New York's Yankee Stadium today, and on Friday the curtain will rise once again at some theatres on Broadway, as the BBC's Samira Hussain in the city explains. Plus, on the 30th anniversary of the first edition of World Business Report, Fergus Nicoll looks back on three decades of coverage of the global economy.

(Picture: A coronavirus vaccination in India. Picture credit: Getty Images.)



FRIDAY 02 APRIL 2021

FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y92qg5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172xvq7xp602rw)
Record Covid deaths in Brazil

Old graves are being emptied in São Paulo because of the soaring number of deaths from Covid-19. Large parts of the country are in a critical situation. We get the latest from the BBC's Will Grant. Big clothing brands have cancelled orders because of declining sales during the pandemic. This has left manufacturing companies around the world with no buyers and workers they can't afford to pay. We hear from the general secretary of the International Apparel Foundation, Matthijs Crietee. Limited baseball crowds returns to the New York's Yankee Stadium today, and on Friday the curtain will rise once again at some theatres on Broadway, as the BBC's Samira Hussain in the city explains. Also on the show, fancy a $540 meal on a stationary plane? You can, in Japan. Plus, Microsoft's voice assistant, Cortana, is being retired And, on the 30th anniversary of the first edition of World Business Report, Fergus Nicoll looks back on three decades of coverage of the global economy.

All this and more discussed with our two guests on opposite sides of the world: Alison Van Diggelen, host of the green interview series Fresh Dialogues. In San Francisco. And Robin Harding, Tokyo Bureau Chief for the Financial Times.


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y92v69)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf5g5k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnws6gp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3ct1tys)
Bayer Leverkusen's woes and Gambia's hero

Bayer Leverkusen's director of football Simon Rolfes explains the decision to sack their coach and their plans for the future. Gambia's Assan Ceesay reflects on the historic goal which earned his country a place at the Africa Cup of Nations for the very first time.

Picture: Nadiem Amiri of Bayer Leverkusen looks dejected after losing the Bundesliga match against Hertha BSC (Boris Streubel/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y92yyf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3ct1k2t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3ct1x2t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y932pk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf5pnt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwsfyy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2d31)
Pope Francis in Iraq: The historic pilgrimage

The world watched on as Pope Francis embarked on what he called a pilgrimage to the Middle East, a journey that could possibly be the Holy Father's legacy. Despite worries of the Covid pandemic and the real threat of a terrorist attack, Pope Francis became the first pontiff in history to visit Iraq. Standing among rubble and ruins in the devastated city of Mosul where ISIS took root and threatened to behead him, Pope Francis proclaimed "hope is more powerful than hatred, that peace more powerful than war."

In this programme Colm Flynn travels on the papal flight to Iraq to talk to Iraqi Christians and Muslims who have come out to welcome Pope Francis to their nation. The programme will bring you behind the scenes on a papal trip, and let you experience real moments with the Iraqi people who hope that the Pope's visit will bring long-lasting healing and peace to their land.

Presenter and Producer: Colm Flynn

Additional audio supplied by EWTN
Picture credit: Colm Flynn /EWTN


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y936fp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95qj8gf)
BBC investigation suggests Ethiopian military behind Tigray massacre

Footage studied by BBC Africa Eye appears to show unarmed men being shot and their bodies thrown off a cliff edge.

We hear from a democracy activist in hiding as the military in Myanmar continue to kill civilians in large numbers.

And is working from home coming to an end? That's what one major global company is saying.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y93b5t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95qjd6k)
Taiwan: Dozens feared dead after train derails inside tunnel

Rescuers are trying to reach four carriages that are "badly damaged". The train was carrying 350 people.

A BBC Africa Eye investigation suggests that the Ethiopian military were behind a massacre in Tigray.

And why is Russia building-up its military power on the border with Ukraine? We’ll go live to Kiev for analysis.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y93fxy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172xv2k95qjhyp)
Taiwan crash: rescuers struggle to reach injured

The country's rail company says 36 people are known to have died, and dozens injured.

Myanmar's deposed leader Aung San Suu Kyi had already been accused of breaking covid rules and illegally possessing walkie talkies - now she's been charged with violating the country's official secrets act.

And the story of the Italian businessman who tried to fake his own kidnapping for financial gain, but ended up as a prisoner of a jihadist group for three years.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y93kp2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n0y)
Sir Vartan Melkonian: From Beirut street child to the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

Sir Vartan Melkonian began his life as an Armenian refugee in Lebanon, spending his early years in an orphanage outside Beirut, followed by living rough on the streets for many years. He is now a renowned musician, conductor and composer. Stephen Sackur hears his remarkable story.


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwsxyg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3ct1hzy)
How to complain

In this programme, Elizabeth Hotson looks at the art of demanding good service. From dealing with customer services to having conversations with chatbots, we’ll be giving some practical tips for getting what you want. Whilst some people love making their voices heard, Dr. Robin Kowalski, professor of psychology at Clemson University in South Carolina explains why some people’s personalities make complaining a nightmare. Meanwhile, Sabine Benoit, Professor of Marketing at Surrey Business School looks at the customer services conundrum inherent in many food delivery apps. Imogen Butler-Cole, a trainer in communications skills at RADA Business gives practical advice on how to prepare physically and psychologically for making a complaint and author Alison Edgar explains why effective complaining is all about adapting your approach to different situations. (Picture of two people shouting, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3ct1wy9)
Black Jesus

On Easter Sunday 1967 the Reverend Albert Cleage renamed his church in Detroit the Shrine of the Black Madonna. He preached that if man was made in God's image there was little chance that Jesus was white as most of the world's population is non-white. Reverend Cleage also pointed to the many depictions of black madonnas all over the world throughout history. Claire Bowes has been speaking to his daughter Pearl Cleage, a writer and activist, about her father's belief in black representation and self-determination.

Photo: Black Madonna and Child courtesy of BLAC Detroit.
Archive: Thanks to the Chicago History Museum and WFMT for the Studs Terkel Radio Archive.


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y93pf6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngp)
The future of computing

The CEO of ARM on why its new chips focus on security and artificial intelligence. Plus we hear about two exciting projects to bring quantum computing out of the lab. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: ARM chief executive Simon Segars, credit: Getty Images).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwt1pl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y93t5b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3ct1hs5)
What is the US plan for Africa?

US special operations forces have agreed to help “support Mozambique's efforts to prevent the spread of terrorism and violent extremism”, with dozens of people reported killed during an Islamist attack in the north of the country this week. Joe Biden’s Secretary of State Anthony Blinken and other members of the global coalition against the Islamic State militant group have warned of a “serious and growing threat” from radical Islamists across Africa. But American’s interests in the region don’t end with security. Over recent years China has been extending its economic and military presence there and critics of Donald Trump’s presidency claim he failed to prioritise Africa policy - symbolised by the fact he didn’t visit during his 4 years in office. So, if the Biden administration is re-engaging with Africa, what does that mean? What should the priority be for US foreign policy across the continent? And what does China’s growing influence mean for America’s diplomatic credibility in the region? Paul Henley is joined by a panel of expert guests.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y93xxg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf6jwq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwt95v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 World Football (w3ct1tys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y941nl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dp)
The men making money from migrants

The sinking of a boat carrying illegal migrants across Lake Van in Turkey last year caused shockwaves in Afghanistan. Many of the passengers were Afghans, and while more than 60 bodies were recovered, others remain missing. BBC Afghan’s Hafizullah Maroof decided to investigate, telling the story of one of the victims, and gaining rare access to the people trafficker responsible for his journey.

An algorithm for the perfect biryani
Even throughout lockdown boredom, Aparna Alluri of BBC Delhi steered clear of cooking a biryani, a notoriously complex balancing act of meat, rice and spices. That is, until she found a cookbook that demonstrated how to do it with an algorithm rather than a recipe. She joins us to share her results.

The end of Vietnam's love affair with karaoke?
BBC Vietnamese recently ran a story about the possible banning of karaoke in Ho Chi Minh City. Karaoke is hugely popular in Vietnam, so who better to turn to to find out what's gone wrong than Bui Thu of BBC Vietnamese in Bangkok.

The deep-rooted tradition of dowry in Pakistan
BBC Urdu has been asking what happens to young Pakistanis who turn their backs on dowry. As reporter Sarah Atiq explains, there is huge pressure to conform, despite the financial burden and some cases of torture and even death when demands fail to be met.

Image: People trafficking has made 'Elham Noor' a wealthy man
Credit: 'Elham Noor'


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3ct1wy9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y945dq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf6scz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwtjp3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Science in Action (w3ct1l3f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9494v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcjm8gg)
UN Security Council condemns civilian deaths in Myanmar

The United Nations Security Council issued a statement to say it "strongly condemned" the deaths of hundreds of civilians in Myanmar. We'll hear from a doctor in Yangon about what he's seen. Also: at least 48 people have died in a train crash in Taiwan; and we'll hear about the new home for the most stolen piece of art of all time, the Ghent Altarpiece.

(Photo: Relatives and friends react during the funeral procession of Ko Zaw Latt,18, who was allegedly shot dead a day earlier in an anti-coup protest in Mandalay, Myanmar. Credit: EPA/STRINGER)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y94dwz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n0y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwts5c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172y46m5lbnpcw)
Are vaccine passports a Covid solution?

The idea of coronavirus vaccination passports is catching on in some countries. We examine the arguments for and against their introduction with Professor Melinda Mills of the University of Oxford, and the BBC's Adrienne Murray talks us through Denmark's digital vaccine passport scheme, Coronapas, which will come into use there next week. Also in the programme, the US economy added almost a million new jobs in March, though employment remains well below pre-pandemic levels, as the BBC's Samira Hussain explains. We have an extended report about the prospects for industrialisation of the cocoa sector in Ghana, which is the world's second largest exporter of the commodity. Nana Aduna is a cocoa farmer whose Ohene Cocoa company offers eco-tours to develop the business, and is keen to expand into cocoa processing. Alan Kyerematen, Ghana's minister of trade and industry, discusses the country's plans for the sector. And Ekow Dontoh, Bloomberg commodities reporter, assesses those plans. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson considers the most effective way to make a complaint.

(Picture: Coronavirus vaccine and a syringe on a passport. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y94jn3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172xxxf48dljlk)
OS Conversations: Afghan women

We hear about the security fears among women in Afghanistan after several killings of female journalists and health care workers. The peace deal between the government and the Taliban is also threatening to roll back women's rights in the country. Three women in the public eye talk about how women's lives are affected by violence and insecurity.

BBC Persian Service explains the sharp rise in coronavirus cases in Iran, with fears of a possible fourth wave. Iranian authorities have urged people to stay indoors on the last day of the Persian New Year Holiday today.

And we look in-depth the impact of the pandemic in France where the nation prepares for another lockdown. Ros Atkins explains why France has reached this point, looking at the politics, vaccine hesitancy and the leadership of President Macron.

Our regular expert Megan Murray from Harvard Medical School explains some of today’s other coronavirus stories.

(Photo: Afghan women shout slogans during a rally to mark International Women"s Day in Herat, Afghanistan, 08 March 2021. Credit: JALIL EZAYEE/EPA)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y94nd7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172xxxf48dlnbp)
Coronavirus in Brazil: Sao Paulo's surging burials

Brazil's health service has been pushed to the brink as coronavirus cases continue to climb. Some 66,570 people died of Covid-19 in March, more than double the previous monthly record. We hear some of the messages we've received from Brazil and speak to the BBC Monitoring about Covid-19 misinformation in the country.

We also look in-depth the impact of the pandemic in France where the nation prepares for another lockdown. Ros Atkins explains why France has reached this point, looking at the politics, vaccine hesitancy and the leadership of President Macron.

And we get questions answered on the coronavirus by our regular expert, Dr Marc Mendelson in Cape Town, South Africa.

We hear about the security fears among women in Afghanistan after several killings of female journalists and health care workers. Three women in the public eye talk about how women's lives are affected by violence and insecurity.

(Photo: A gravedigger wearing a protective suit handles pieces of an old damaged coffin during exhumations to open space on cement graves as new burials are suspended, except private deposits and children, at Vila Nova Cachoeirinha cemetery. April 1, 2021. Credit: Amanda Perob/Reuters)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y94s4c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3ct20dp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3ct1wy9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y94wwh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172xyxcpmf7hvr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwv84w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172y0n73j87rpv)
2021/04/02 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y950mm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3ct1ngp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwvcx0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3ct1pq5)
If a tree falls in a forest… does it make a sound?

If a tree falls in a forest, and no-one is there to hear it, does it make a sound? This is an age-old debate that listener Richard and his family have been arguing about for years. Can CrowdScience settle it once and for all?

Caroline Steel speaks to experts in hearing, biology, philosophy, physics and sound design, which takes her to some unexpected places.

Professor Stefan Bleek is an expert in psychoacoustics who says that sounds only exist in our heads.
Dr Eleanor Knox and Dr Bryan Roberts are philosophers that make her question if anything exists outside our own perception. Professor Lilach Hadany wonders if it’s limited to humans and animals - could other plants hear the falling tree too?
And Mat Eric Hart is a sound designer who says that sound is subjective – it’s always tangled up with our own interpretations.

Things get truly weird as we delve into the strange implications of quantum physics. If there is such a thing as reality, doesn’t it change when we’re there to observe it? Does the tree even fall if we aren’t there?

Presented by Caroline Steel
Produced by Anand Jagatia for the BBC World Service

Image: Fallen Tree. Credit: Getty Images


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y954cr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172xv50mcjn3pc)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y9583w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 HARDtalk (w3ct1n0y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwvmd8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Football (w3ct1tys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172xzjg1y95cw0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 The Newsroom (w172xywk7wtkpdz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 23:20 Sports News (w172y0sbb58pr1m)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172xzk8hnwvr4d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Business Report (w172y48nsdvdxf4)
Are vaccine passports a Covid solution?

The idea of coronavirus vaccination passports is catching on in some countries. We examine the arguments for and against their introduction with Professor Melinda Mills of the University of Oxford, and the BBC's Adrienne Murray talks us through Denmark's digital vaccine passport scheme, Coronapas, which will come into use there next week. Also in the programme, the US economy added almost a million new jobs in March, though employment remains well below pre-pandemic levels, as the BBC's Samira Hussain explains. We have an extended report about the prospects for industrialisation of the cocoa sector in Ghana, which is the world's second largest exporter of the commodity. Nana Aduna is a cocoa farmer whose Ohene Cocoa company offers eco-tours to develop the business, and is keen to expand into cocoa processing. Alan Kyerematen, Ghana's minister of trade and industry, discusses the country's plans for the sector. And Ekow Dontoh, Bloomberg commodities reporter, assesses those plans. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson considers the most effective way to make a complaint.

(Picture: Coronavirus vaccine and a syringe on a passport. Picture credit: Getty Images.)




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Africa Life Clinic 09:32 SUN (w3ct21gb)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3ct1gx2)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3ct1gx2)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3ct1gx2)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5q65nv7jmv)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5q65nv7ww7)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5q65nv883m)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5q65nv8cvr)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5q65nv8mc0)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5q65nv9gkx)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5q65nv9ykf)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5q65nvb9st)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5q65nvbp16)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5q65nvc18l)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5q65nvc50q)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5q65nvc8rv)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5q65nvcdhz)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5q65nvdch0)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5q65nvdqqd)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5q65nvdvgj)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwdh35)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwdlv9)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwdqlf)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwdvbk)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwfbb2)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwfg26)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwfktb)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwfpkg)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwfy1q)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwg5jz)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwgnjh)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwgs8m)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwh0rw)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172xzk8hnwh4j0)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172xzk8hnwhhrd)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172xzk8hnwhr7n)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172xzk8hnwj775)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172xzk8hnwjbz9)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172xzk8hnwjlgk)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172xzk8hnwjtyt)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172xzk8hnwk2g2)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172xzk8hnwkkfl)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172xzk8hnwkp5q)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172xzk8hnwkxnz)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172xzk8hnwl1f3)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172xzk8hnwldnh)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172xzk8hnwln4r)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172xzk8hnwm448)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172xzk8hnwm7wd)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172xzk8hnwmhcn)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172xzk8hnwmqvx)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172xzk8hnwmzc5)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172xzk8hnwngbp)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172xzk8hnwnl2t)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172xzk8hnwntl2)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172xzk8hnwnyb6)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172xzk8hnwp9kl)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172xzk8hnwpk1v)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172xzk8hnwq11c)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172xzk8hnwq4sh)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172xzk8hnwqd8r)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172xzk8hnwqms0)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172xzk8hnwqw88)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172xzk8hnwrc7s)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172xzk8hnwrgzx)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172xzk8hnwrqh5)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172xzk8hnwrv79)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172xzk8hnws6gp)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172xzk8hnwsfyy)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172xzk8hnwsxyg)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172xzk8hnwt1pl)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172xzk8hnwt95v)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172xzk8hnwtjp3)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172xzk8hnwts5c)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172xzk8hnwv84w)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172xzk8hnwvcx0)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172xzk8hnwvmd8)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172xzk8hnwvr4d)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7jxw6)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7k1mb)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7k5cg)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7k93l)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7kdvq)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7kjlv)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7knbz)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7ks33)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7kwv7)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7l0lc)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7l4bh)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7l82m)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7lctr)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7lhkw)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7lmb0)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7m39j)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7m71n)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7mbss)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7mgjx)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7ml91)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5pcqy7mq15)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7mts9)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7myjf)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7n28k)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7n60p)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7n9rt)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7nfhy)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7nk82)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7np06)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7nsrb)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7nxhg)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7p17l)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7p4zq)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7p8qv)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7pdgz)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7pj73)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7pmz7)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7q06m)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7q3yr)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7q7pw)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7qcg0)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5pcqy7qh64)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8q3ts)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8q7kx)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8qcb1)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8qh25)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8qlt9)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8qqkf)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8qv9k)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8qz1p)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8r2st)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8r6jy)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8rb92)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8rg16)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8rksb)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8rpjg)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8rt8l)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8ry0q)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8s1rv)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8s5hz)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8s983)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8sf07)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8sjrc)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8snhh)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172xzjg1y8ss7m)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8t0qw)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8t4h0)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8t874)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8tcz8)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8thqd)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8tmgj)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8tr6n)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8tvys)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8tzpx)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8v3g1)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8v765)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8vby9)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8vgpf)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8vlfk)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8vq5p)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8vtxt)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8vyny)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8w2f2)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8w656)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8w9xb)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8wfng)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8wkdl)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172xzjg1y8wp4q)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8wxmz)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8x1d3)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8x547)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8x8wc)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8xdmh)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8xjcm)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8xn3r)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8xrvw)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8xwm0)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8y0c4)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8y438)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8y7vd)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8yclj)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8yhbn)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8ym2s)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8yqtx)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8yvl1)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8yzb5)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8z329)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8z6tf)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8zbkk)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8zg9p)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172xzjg1y8zl1t)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172xzjg1y8ztk2)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172xzjg1y8zy96)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172xzjg1y9021b)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172xzjg1y905sg)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172xzjg1y909jl)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172xzjg1y90f8q)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172xzjg1y90k0v)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172xzjg1y90nrz)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172xzjg1y90sj3)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172xzjg1y90x87)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172xzjg1y9110c)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172xzjg1y914rh)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172xzjg1y918hm)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172xzjg1y91d7r)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172xzjg1y91hzw)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172xzjg1y91mr0)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172xzjg1y91rh4)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172xzjg1y91w78)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172xzjg1y91zzd)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172xzjg1y923qj)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172xzjg1y927gn)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172xzjg1y92c6s)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172xzjg1y92gyx)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y92qg5)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y92v69)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y92yyf)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y932pk)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y936fp)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y93b5t)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y93fxy)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y93kp2)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y93pf6)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y93t5b)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y93xxg)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y941nl)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y945dq)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y9494v)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y94dwz)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y94jn3)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y94nd7)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y94s4c)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y94wwh)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y950mm)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y954cr)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y9583w)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172xzjg1y95cw0)

BBC OS Conversations 05:06 SAT (w3ct19zg)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct19zg)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172xxxf48d6xz5)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172xxxf48d71q9)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172xxxf48d9tw8)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172xxxf48d9ymd)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172xxxf48ddqsc)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172xxxf48ddvjh)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172xxxf48dhmpg)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172xxxf48dhrfl)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172xxxf48dljlk)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172xxxf48dlnbp)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3ct1j4g)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3ct1jfh)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3ct1jn8)

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Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x199nxlb8q7)

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Business Weekly 23:06 SAT (w3ct0sq3)

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Comedians Vs. The News 11:32 SAT (w3ct21mm)

Comedians Vs. The News 19:32 SUN (w3ct21mm)

CrowdScience 09:32 MON (w3cszv77)

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Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct2cbj)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3ct1lrs)

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Discovery 01:32 MON (w3ct2ccj)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2cck)

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From Our Own Correspondent 02:06 SAT (w3csz9r1)

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HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3ct1n5g)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3ct1n5g)

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Health Check 20:32 WED (w3ct1nv0)

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Heart and Soul 22:32 SAT (w3ct29c1)

Heart and Soul 05:32 SUN (w3ct29c1)

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I'm Not A Monster 09:32 SAT (w3ct1z6h)

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I'm Not A Monster 22:32 SUN (w3ct1z6h)

In the Studio 04:32 TUE (w3ct1tcq)

In the Studio 11:32 TUE (w3ct1tcq)

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More or Less 02:50 SUN (w3ct0pyw)

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More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pyw)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6vd)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172xv2k95q4nv1)

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Outlook 08:32 SUN (w3cszf1b)

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Outlook 12:06 MON (w3ct1jss)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf5v)

Over to You 03:50 MON (w3cszf5v)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3ct1pkl)

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Project 17 04:32 WED (w3ct0x8b)

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Ros Atkins on ... 05:50 SAT (w3ct24jm)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3ct1l3f)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172y0n73j7w52g)

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Sporting Witness 15:50 SUN (w3cszh6f)

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Sports News 22:20 SAT (w172x3fsx7q6b7q)

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Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3cbl1x2y46)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172x3lqkmb94zb)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhkq)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3ct1ngp)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk4c)

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The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct0xbl)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct0xbl)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct29bx)

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The Conversation 04:32 MON (w3ct1p69)

The Conversation 11:32 MON (w3ct1p69)

The Conversation 22:32 MON (w3ct1p69)

The Coronavirus and Your Money 04:06 SUN (w3ct2cm2)

The Coronavirus and Your Money 14:06 SUN (w3ct2cm2)

The Coronavirus and Your Money 10:06 WED (w3ct2cm2)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3cszj9t)

The Documentary 02:32 TUE (w3ct2crt)

The Documentary 09:06 TUE (w3ct2crt)

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The Evidence 19:06 SAT (w3ct2czw)

The Evidence 12:06 SUN (w3ct2czw)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3cszjjl)

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The Food Chain 04:32 THU (w3ct1rfd)

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The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjwy)

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The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3ct1z1q)

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The Newsroom 11:06 SAT (w172x7bqqvd50hr)

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The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3cszcpg)

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The Science Hour 00:06 SUN (w3cszky6)

Trending 05:32 SAT (w3ct2dmc)

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Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172x7dcm9lj0mp)

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When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct21m4)

When Katty Met Carlos 18:32 SAT (w3ct21m4)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3cszmwg)

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World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172xzl2ydh2r01)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172y47vbp7b1df)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3ct1tys)

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