Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 20 MARCH 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxrs8c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpf)
Why are Asian Americans under attack?

The killing of eight people at a number of massage parlors in Atlanta this week has brought fears that the crimes may have targeted Asian Americans. Six of the people killed were of Asian descent. Although it is not yet clear whether there was a racial motivation in the shootings, they come against a backdrop of a sharp rise in violent attacks against Asian Americans since the start of the pandemic. An elderly Thai immigrant died after being shoved to the ground, a Filipino-American had his face slashed on the subway and a Chinese woman was slapped and then set on fire. These are just some of the thousands of cases reported in the US in recent months. Advocates and activists say they are hate crimes, and often linked to political rhetoric that blames Asian people for the spread of Covid-19. They point to the language used during last year’s election campaign by Donald Trump, who used terms such as the “China virus” and “kung flu”. During his first prime-time address to the nation last week, President Joe Biden denounced the attacks as un-American and urged federal agencies to fight “a resurgence in xenophobia”. Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests as they discuss the causes of these attacks, who is carrying them out and what should be done about them.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxrx0h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1999n8k43d)
US-China talks end

The first face to face meeting between the new US administration and top Chinese officials has ended in Anchorage, Alaska. US officials say two days of talks with their Chinese counterparts have been tough and direct. We hear from the BBC's State Department correspondent Barbara Plett Usher who's in Anchorage. And Alan Joyce the boss at Qantas tells us he's firmly in favour of Covid vaccination for all passengers, to restore confidence in the travel industry. Meanwhile, Rupert Murdoch, the Australian media mogul is 90 years old this month, so what's his legacy? We have an extended report from the BBC's Ed Butler. And Marketplace host Kai Ryssdal interviews Illinois state comptroller Susana Mendoza about the challenges of funding a state during a pandemic. Plus, Manchester United have agreed a new shirt-sponsorship with the global technology company TeamViewer. As we hear from Aaron Paul at BBC Sport, it's believed to be worth around $325m over five years and is the most lucrative sponsorship deal to be struck by any sports team in the world during the past year. And we're joined throughout the programme by Peter Ryan, ABC's Senior Business Correspondent in Sydney. (Photo: The Chinese delegation led by Yang Jiechi. Credit: Frederic J Brown/Getty Images).


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxs0rm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9r0)
New limitations for Hong Kong

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

The Chinese government can now appoint more legislators in Hong Kong, further limiting how many the voters can elect. For some, this is the final straw signalling the end of the ‘one country, two systems’ promise, agreed when Britain handed Hong Kong back to China in 1997. Beijing had agreed to protect the independent judiciary and free speech there for 50 years. Danny Vincent has heard from some Hong Kongers taking up Britain’s offer of visas to start a new life in the UK.

Ten years on since the conflict in Syria began and more than 380,000 people have been killed, over half of the population has been uprooted. The city of Raqqa, in the north, has experienced every twist and turn of the war from attacks by government forces to militant group Islamic State sweeping through the country. But Leila Molana-Allen has found the inhabitants are refusing to wait until the conflict is over to rebuild their city.

In Australia this week, tens of thousands of people turned out at protests across the country against the sexual abuse and harassment of women. They were motivated by reports which surfaced recently, of sexual assault centred around Australia’s parliament. Many protesters feel the government’s response to the allegations has been inadequate, as our correspondent Shiamaa Khalil has heard.

And the Hollywood film Nomadland has, this week, been nominated for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actress at the Oscars. It’s about the growing community of so-called van-lifers in North America. The film focuses on a woman who opts for life on the road. Sally Howard has been to meet some of the real women who have done just that, and heard about what inspired them to do it, and what keeps them going.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head
Editor: Jasper Corbett


(Image: Supporters of pro-democracy activists hold up their phone flashlights as a prison van, carrying the activists, leaves West Kowloon Magistrates’ Courts in Hong Kong. Credit: Reuters/Tyrone Siu)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjgd10)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhkp)
Meet Afghanistan cricket's latest star

We speak to Hashmatullah Shahidi who became the first Afghanistan player to score a Test double century. He tells us how it felt, discusses the rise of Afghanistan cricket and praises his team mate and number one T20 bowler in the world Rashid Khan.

Plus cricket commentator Mark Nicholas reveals which milestone has been named the greatest ever moment to happen at Lord's.

And we hear from Australian cricket star Ellyse Perry who has signed for the Birmingham Phoenix and will take part in the inaugural Hundred competition.

Photo: Hashmatullah Shahidi of Afghanistan celebrates victory during the ICC Cricket World Cup 2019 Warm Up match between Pakistan and Afghanistan at Bristol County Ground on May 24, 2019 in Bristol, England. (Photo by Harry Trump-ICC/ICC via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxs4hr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjk)
Syria: Two women, ten years on

It has been ten years since the start of the Syrian civil war. The lives of Syrians were turned upside down and many fled the country. BBC correspondent Lina Sinjab tells the contrasting stories of two women - one is still in Damascus and the other now lives in Beirut.

My Home Town: Shovot, Uzbekistan
Candyfloss, dancing in the park, and a secret library: Ibrat Safo of BBC Uzbek takes us to his hometown in north-west Uzbekistan.

Chernobyl forest fires
Forest fires are increasingly in the news around the world. But what happens when the forest is radioactive? Zhanna Bezpiatchuk of BBC Ukrainian has made a documentary called 'Are forest fires unlocking radiation in Chernobyl?', which tells the stories of firefighters who tackled last year's wildfires in the Chernobyl exclusion zone.

Kafeel Khan: the doctor who took on the government
How did an Indian doctor hailed as a hero after a medical emergency become labelled a ‘career criminal’? Khadeeja Arif of BBC Urdu has been following Dr Kafeel Khan from one jail sentence to another, and she tells us what light his story sheds on politics in India today.

‘I am my song’
Afghan women and girls protested in song after a recent announcement that public singing would be banned for girls over the age of 12. After a social media storm of musical protest, the Education Ministry backed down. Zuhal Ahad, women's affairs journalist at BBC Kabul, was among those shocked by the original announcement.

Image: Syrian artist painting mural
Credit: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmwf)
The dirtiest chess match in history

In 1978, the World Chess Championship between the Soviet champion and convinced communist, Anatoly Karpov, and the dissident and defector, Viktor Korchnoi, turned into one of the most infamous clashes in the history of the game. At a time of peak Cold War tension, the two players traded allegations about yoghurts containing messages, the use of psychics and the mysterious appearance of a meditating yoga cult dressed in orange robes. David Edmonds tells the story of the match through the memories of British grandmaster, Michael Stean,

PHOTO: Anatoly Karpov and Viktor Korchnoi squaring up in 1978 (Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxs87w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxsd00)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zf)
Coronavirus: Reporting Covid-19

During the last year hundreds of people across the globe have shared their experiences on the programme about living during a pandemic. This time, we view this challenging situation through a journalist’s lens.

Reporters from India, Brazil, the United States, Italy, South Africa, Rwanda and New Zealand share, with host Nuala McGovern, what it’s like to work on possibly the most important story of their careers.

They reveal the difficulties of obtaining accurate information, the influence of governments, and how they now deal with misinformation. They also talk about the challenges of telling a story that people often don’t want to hear, about personal abuse on social media inlucding death threats.

(Photo: Healthcare workers from Prague Ambulance Service transport a Covid-19 patient to Semily Hospital after transfer from overloaded Ceska Lipa Hospital, Czech Republic, 18 March 2021. Credit: Martin Divisek/EPA)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjgr8d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Trending (w3ct2dmb)
The Anti-Vax Files

How anti-vax went viral

Scientists say only a vaccine will really get us out of the Covid-19 pandemic. So why has the anti-vaccine movement grown stronger than ever over the last year?
In the first episode of this new series, BBC Trending and a team of disinformation reporters will investigate how hardcore anti-vaccine activists have used social media to spread their message far and wide, capitalising on fear and mistrust to advance their own agendas.
We’re not talking about legitimate medical debate or questions that people have about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines. No, we’re talking about completely debunked conspiracy theories – that the vaccines contain microchips in order to track everyone who takes them, that they will make you infertile or are poisonous, or that they will alter your DNA.
Exclusive research by BBC Monitoring shows just how popular far anti-vaccine material has spread on Facebook and Instagram. With the help of some of the world’s leading researchers, we investigate how these posts increase vaccine hesitancy and find out how some fringe activists are turning their online efforts into real-world action.
Presenter: Mike Wendling


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct24jl)
What happened with the AstraZeneca vaccine?

Some of the European Union's biggest nations have restarted their roll-out of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine after the medicines regulator concluded it was safe and effective. Ros Atkins considers how a vaccine initially hailed as a "gamechanger", has ended up in the middle of a scientific and political storm.

(Photo: A medical worker holds a vial of theAstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine at a school gym in Tirana. Credit: Gent Shkullaku/Getty)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxshr4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7dc818qw0v)
Coronavirus infections surge in Europe

France and Poland both go back into lockdown today as Europe faces a rise in coronavirus cases. Infections are also rising fast in Germany, with Chancellor Angela Merkel warning it's likely the country will need to re-impose measures.

Also in the programme: How to create a safe space for women and the 150th anniversary of the Paris Commune.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are: Baroness Arminka Helic, member of the House of Lords, the Upper House of the British parliament from the governing Conservative Party and John Kampfner, British broadcaster, journalist and writer.

(Picture: Paris faces a month-long lockdown. Credit: EPA)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxsmh8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7dc818qzrz)
France and Poland impose new lockdown measures

France and Poland have reintroduced partial lockdowns as both countries battle a sharp rise in Covid infections. Some 21 million people in France are affected, while in Poland shops, hotels and sporting facilities are closed.

We look at the fallout from the AstraZeneca vaccine suspensions with Italy's top virologist Roberto Burioni; and the BBC's disinformation team looks at anti-vaccination content on social media.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are: Baroness Arminka Helic, member of the House of Lords, the Upper House of the British parliament from the governing Conservative Party and John Kampfner, British broadcaster, journalist and writer.

(Photo: The Old Town in the Polish capital Warsaw has been almost deserted in recent days. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxsr7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7dc818r3j3)
Europe faces surge in coronavirus cases

Countries in Europe are facing a crisis due to a surge in the number of coronavirus infections and a shortage of the vaccines that can mitigate the spread of the disease. We speak to WHO’s Maria Van Kerkhove on AstraZeneca safety concerns in some countries.

Also in the programme: How to deal with disinformation on social media and we hear from the lead actress of a Bosnian film which tells the story of the Srebrenica massacre, nominated for an Oscar.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are: Baroness Arminka Helic, member of the House of Lords, the Upper House of the British parliament from the governing Conservative Party and John Kampfner, British broadcaster, journalist and writer.

(Picture: Paris goes into a partial lockdown. Credit: EPA/IAN LANGSDON)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjh3hs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m3)
Feeling good?

How can we feel good again? It goes without saying that it’s been a tough year, but as things start to open up again, can Americans regain some sense of positivity, or has the traditional idea of American optimism been changed forever?

Dr Cicely Horsham Brathwaite is a therapist and career coach. Many of her clients are African American, and she says the constant discussions around racism add an extra layer of stress and anxiety to an already impossible year. She says getting involved in activism, volunteering and reading positive stories about your community can help.

Adam Grant is an organizational psychologist and author of the new book Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don’t Know. He argues this may be time for us to change our attitudes.

A co-production from the BBC World Service and Ozy Media.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxsvzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 today]


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjh77x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6g)
I'm Not a Monster

20/03/2021 GMT

An American mother living in the heart of the ISIS caliphate. Her husband an ISIS sniper. Her 10-year-old son forced to threaten the U.S. president in a propaganda video shown around the world. She claims she was tricked into taking her young children to war-torn Syria, but where does her account end and the truth begin? Over four years journalist Josh Baker unravels a dangerous story where nothing is as it seems. From the depths of Raqqa’s infamous torture prison to an elk hunt in Idaho, he uncovers secrets, lies and the lasting consequences.

I’m Not A Monster is the story of one family’s journey from Indiana to the Islamic State group and back.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf5t)
Is news about the USA too prominent?

Do news and features from the US overly dominate output on the BBC World Service? We hear listeners views - for and against. And the commissioner responsible for many of the programmes you hear responds. Plus, how the podcast Mayday, which tells the extraordinary yet tragic story of the man who organised the White Helmets, captivated listeners.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxszqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3cb6sl9sjc)
“I’ve proved the people I care about right” – Josh Nisbet on making it as the shortest player in the A-League.

Josh Nisbet is the shortest player in the A-League, standing at 160 centimetres tall or just under 5 feet and 2 inches. He tells us about how he dreaded getting his height taken as a child and how a team in Spain suggested he take growth hormone as a teenager. He also recalls making his debut for the Central Coast Mariners alongside Usain Bolt and tells us of his hopes of playing for Australia.

The UK's first female Muslim referee - Jawahir Roble - joins us to look ahead to the female only taster session she’s running for aspiring referees on Saturday. The session – which will be held via Youtube - will see women from all over the world take part. Roble tells us what participants can expect, how she deals with sexism on the pitch and how becoming a referee can help empower women and girls.

British Bangladeshi - Ruqsuana Begum - tells us about her remarkable life story, which includes becoming a kick boxing world champion, an arranged marriage that ended in divorce, a battle with depression, training in secret and her move into boxing.

In Sporting Witness – we tell the incredible story of when Italian football club, Perugia, shocked the world by signing Al-Saadi Gaddafi, the son of the Libyan dictator Colonel Gaddafi.

Former India cricketer Snehal Pradhan joins us ahead of the decisive Twenty20 International between Virat Kohli’s side and England.

And the BBC’s Mark Scott is at the Vitality stadium ahead of Bournemouth’s game against Southampton in the FA Cup.


Photo-Josh Nisbet.
Credit- Getty Images.


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxt3gs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl2cvwx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjhgr5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21ml)
Live audience special with Enissa Amani and Anuvab Pal

In a special programme for the World Service Festival, this week’s Comedians vs The News is recorded in front of a live virtual audience.

Hosts Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini will be joined by super star German comedian Enissa Amani and India’s hilarious Anuvab Pal and they’ll be hearing from the show’s very funny listeners.

Jess and Eman will be hearing your stories from Turkey, Australia, Mexico, Canada and many other countries, and asking: what’s made you laugh this year?


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxt76x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6vc)
You are what you make with Ibeyi and Kindness

Music Life this week joins the World Service Festival and brings together a truly global gathering. Ibeyi talks to Kindness, Charlotte Day Wilson, and Nai Palm from the band Hiatus Kaiyote about their first emotional dealings with art, why they create, and celebrating culture and ancestors.

Ibeyi are French Cuban duo Naomi and Lisa-Kaindé Díaz, currently based in Paris. They weave together everything from jazz and gospel to hip-hop and soul, pushed through a modern electronic filter and have released two albums to date: their self-titled debut, and Ash.

Joining them is cinematic pop and soul producer and artist Adam Bainbridge, aka Kindness. They’ve produced for the likes of Blood Orange, Solange and frequent collaborator Robyn. Charlotte Day Wilson is a Canadian R&B singer-songwriter who’s released three EPs to date and has worked with the likes of Daniel Caesar, River Tiber, and BadBadNotGood. And Nai Palm from the band Haitus Kaiyote is a Grammy-nominated future soul vocalist and guitarist from Melbourne, Australia. Only six months after the band formed, they collaborated with Q-Tip from A Tribe Called Quest, and their second album Choose Your Weapon took them all over the musical spectrum.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxtbz1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6fhjlm)
New lockdowns in Europe

Millions of Europeans are adjusting to a new coronavirus lockdown, with a third wave taking hold a year after the first one struck. Paris is once again in lockdown and drivers clogged the roads out of the city to beat the midnight deadline. Poland is also imposing a three-week lockdown to counter the spread of the British variant.

Also in the programme: after weeks of speculation Olympic organizers have banned international spectators from attending the Games in Tokyo later this year because of the coronavirus pandemic; and an "African Regime Gone Bad", Michaela Wrong on Paul Kagame's Rwanda.

(Photo: Parisians wait to board trains as Paris enters its third lockdown. Credit: Reuters/Gonzalo Fuentes)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxtgq5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lq6c0j0ch)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld will be discussing all the big talking points from the Premier League and FA Cup quarter-finals, with former West Ham midfielder Nigel Reo-Coker, ex-Wolves and Nigeria player Seyi Olofinjana and former Liverpool manager Vicky Jepson joining Lee James.

We’ll also be chatting all things Women's Super League and catching up with football across the rest of Europe.

We’ll also hear a special hour celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Fight of the Century between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier at Madison Square Garden.

And can anyone stop Lewis Hamilton from winning a record-breaking eighth World Championship? We’ll analyse the potential title contenders in our 2021 Formula One season preview.

Photo: Manchester City's Vincent Kompany lifts the 2019 FA Cup. (Credit: NurPhoto via Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxtypp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl2dq3t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjj9z2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxv2ft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Documentary (w3ct2ccs)
World of Wisdom: Breathe

Eckhart Tolle, Dr Shefali Tsabary and Sister Dang Nghiem offer advice to members of the public from across the world as they explore life-lessons in this series of two programmes. The last year has brought challenges like no other year, leading to dramatic personal changes all over the world. People struggle to endure the restrictions, or to cope with grief, or perhaps they wonder suddenly see their life in a new way.

In a series of intimate conversations presented by Nuala McGovern, people ask for guidance on anxiety, recovering from illness, children’s screen dependence and how to learn from lockdown.

Producer: Charlie Taylor
Assistant producer: Ruth Edwards

Image credit: Getty Images


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxv65y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk4b)
The Arts Hour Virtually on Tour in Stockholm

The Arts Hour takes a virtual visit to Stockholm, with live music and comedy, a live audience and leading filmmakers all joining Nikki Bedi to discuss how Swedish artists are responding to the pandemic.

Soul star Seinabo Sey performs two songs in special arrangements and reveals her theory on the success of Swedish pop exports.

Actor and comedian Björn Gustafsson gives his insider guide to Stockholm’s essential cultural locations, the underground Metro, an apartment interior and the arena where Sweden chooses it’s Eurovision Song Contest entry.

Actor Evin Ahmad talks about crossing borders while filming starring roles in two new drama series last summer in Sweden, Ukraine and Lithuania.

‘Sit down’ comedy from Johan Glans explores what it means to be Swedish, especially during the pandemic.

Contemporary folk singer Sara Parkman on the blend of ancient hymns and electronica in her music and performs for us with her band.

Film director Ruben Östlund discusses his most ambitious film to date, starring Woody Harrelson and shot during lockdowns last year in Sweden, in Greece and at sea on board a yacht that once belonged to Aristotle Onassis.


(Photo: Ruben Ostlund, credit: Tobias Henriksson; Sara Parkman, credit: Frida Edlund; Seinabo Sey; Johan Glans, credit: Robert Eldrim; Evin Ahmad, credit: Johan Bergmark)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxv9y2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6fjhkn)
Delayed Tokyo 2020: No overseas spectators at Olympics

Japan has decided to ban people from overseas from travelling to Tokyo to watch this summer's Olympic and Paralympic Games, because of coronavirus. The International Olympic Committee said it was disappointed with the decision -- but safety had to be the first priority. It means the games will this year mostly be a television event.

Also on the programme: The latest as Turkey announces it is to pull out of a convention that protects women from violence; and in the wake of a spate of attacks targeting Asian Americans, we look at the history of their struggles as a minority.

(Picture: Toyko 2020 sign, Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxvfp6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wxvgqwp1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fsjzdf5mw)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjjsyl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2cm1)
Five questions on faith with Melinda Gates

As part of the BBC World Service Festival, Razia Iqbal speaks to Melinda Gates, co-founder of the Gates Foundation, the world’s biggest philanthropic organisation.

In a wide ranging discussion, led by five questions sent in by the Heart and Soul audience, Melinda tells Razia how her Catholic upbringing inspired her to try to improve the health and conditions of millions of people of around the world. She goes on to describe how she has had to confront her faith in areas such as contraception and the role of women in order to carry on with her work. Melinda speaks candidly on how recent criticism and misinformation about her and her husband Bill's work with the Covid-19 vaccine rollout has impacted them personally, and gives more details of how they intend to redress the balance between multi-billionaires like them and the poorest people in the world with their pledge to give away the majority of their wealth.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxvkfb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sq2)
Vaccine wars in Europe

As rows continue in Europe over the safety and supply of the Oxford AstraZeneca Covid-19 Vaccine, on Business Weekly we ask how much of the argument is over genuine safety concerns and how much is political? We also take a look at the pandemic within a pandemic: obesity. It’s the second highest risk factor for Covid mortality. But, how much of the blame should lie at the door of the food industry? Will a renewed focus on health change what we eat and drink? Plus, governments around the world are trying to build back better and greener from the Coronavirus pandemic. We have a special report on the steel industry, which is being pressured to become more environmentally friendly. And the Oscars are #notsowhite this year – we take a look at the nominees. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Doctor with blue protection medical gloves holding a vaccine bottle in front of a French flag, Getty Images)



SUNDAY 21 MARCH 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxvp5g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9s)
The art that changed me during the pandemic

As part of the BBC World Service festival, South African comic Tumi Morake speaks to global stars and listeners about the art that’s inspired them during lockdown.

The actor Dr. John Kani is an icon to many in South Africa and beyond. He is best known from his work in films such as Black Panther and The Lion King, and plays such as Sizwe Banzi Is Dead. When Covid-19 first broke out, he still had two weeks left in a sold-out London run of Kunene and the King, his play about the legacy of apartheid. He tells Tumi how its sudden cancellation affected him and how his passion for South African jazz has kept him going during lockdown.

At the start of the pandemic, artist and activist Rose McGowan relocated to Mexico, which also happens to be the home of her favourite artist, Frida Kahlo. She reveals how Frida’s paintings have helped her heal from the trauma of Hollywood fame, and how they’ve inspired her to pick up her paintbrush once again.

While many comedians have been kept away from the stage for the past year, comic Rose Matafeo was lucky enough to perform stand-up in her native New Zealand. She shares the challenges of writing and performing stand-up during the pandemic, and how a literary classic has given her hope for a glittering post-pandemic social life.

Plus we hear from our listeners in Cuba, Uganda, Vietnam and beyond about the art that has changed them during the pandemic.


Presented by Tumi Morake

Produced by Lucy Wai




(Photo: Rose Matafeo. Credit: Andi Crown; John Kani. Credit: Ruphin Coudyzer; Rose McGowan. Credit: @rosemcgownarts; Tumi Morake. Credit: Kevin Mark Pass/Blu Blood Africa)


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjk1fv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Trending (w3ct2dmb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3cszf5t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxvsxl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3cszky5)
International science at sea

In the UK thousands of scientists have signed open letters to the UK government protesting cuts to international funding announced this week. Abruptly and severely, the cuts may end hundreds of international collaborations between UK scientists and colleagues around the world working on health, climate change, disaster resilience, sustainability and many development topics.

Professor Jenni Barclay is a volcanologist at the University of East Anglia, and is one of the organisers of the protest. At the University of Cape Town, Dr Chris Trisos is the director of the Climate Risk Lab at the African Climate and Development Initiative, one of the authors of the IPCC 6th assessment, and he has just learned his funding will be terminated, as the UK’s Royal Society must trim its output in this area by two thirds. They speak about the repercussions to Roland Pease.

Antarctica Iceberg A74 break away
Earlier this week German Research Vessel Polarstern released images from its remarkable circumnavigation of Antarctica’s latest iceberg, known as A74. This is the largest chunk of ice to break away from this sector of Antarctica since 1971, approaching the same size of Greater London. Dr Autun Purser describes a hair-raising voyage between the narrow gap left between the berg and the shelf, including the first images of life that have spent at least 50 years in total darkness, hundreds of miles from the open sea.

Are the space junk and carbon footprint issues of extra-terrestrial endeavours solvable?
The space industry, with its fuel-burning rockets, requirements for mined metals and inevitable production of space junk, is not currently renowned for its environmental credentials. Can space exploration ever be truly environmentally friendly? Marnie Chesterton answers a selection of listeners’ questions on the topic of space environmentalism. She starts by examining the carbon footprint of spaceship manufacturing here on Earth, and asking whether reusable rocket ships such as Space X or Virgin Galactic offer a green route for commuting or tourism in low Earth orbit.

Just beyond our atmosphere, space junk and space debris are multiplying at an exponential rate, jeopardising our communications and mapping satellites, and even putting our access to the wider solar system at risk. As more probes and landers head to the Moon and Mars, what plans are in place to deal with space debris far beyond Earth?


Image: Polarstern between Brunt and iceberg A74, Antarctica
Credit: RalphTimmermann


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxvxnq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c1q)
How to train your brain

All of us keep learning new things all the time. It could be learning to speak in public, a technical skill, a new language, finding a square root, or playing the guitar - our minds continuously evolve with new information.

But is there a way to train the brain to learn things faster, and reduce the effects of stress that come with modern lifestyles? And if you knew what time of the day your performance peaks, would you plan your day differently? How important is cognitive fitness to our physical and emotional well-being?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we delve deeper into our minds and discover ways to improve brain agility.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Anoop Kumar, emergency physician, mind-body strategist; Vidita Vaidya, neuroscientist, professor, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research; Neelakantha Bhanuprakash, fastest human calculator, founder, Exploring Infinities


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjk8y3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyv)
Deciding when to suspend a vaccine

Many countries recently decided to suspend the use of the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine over fears it was increasing the risk of blood clots. The European Medicines Agency and the WHO called on countries to continue using the vaccine but regulators in individual countries opted to be cautious, waiting for investigations to take place. But why? Tim Harford explores the risks of blood clots and weighing up whether it was necessary to suspend using the vaccine.

(Photo: A man receives a dose of the Covid-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre in France, February 2021. Credit: Fred Tanneau/Getty Images)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxw1dv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sq2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxw54z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2ccn)
Coronavirus: Reporting Covid-19

It’s a year since Covid-19 was declared a pandemic. Many of us around the world have felt the impact and many of us have been learning on a daily basis about the development of the coronavirus. BBC OS has been bringing people together each day, in conversation, to share their experience of the pandemic.

For news organisations this has been one of the biggest stories of a generation; one that has touched and affected so many, in so many places. In a special edition, Nuala McGovern speaks with journalists in various countries who have spent every working day of the past year reporting on the coronavirus. She discusses the challenges of documenting the unrelenting nature of the virus; presenting the scientific facts and addressing misinformation and misunderstanding.

(Photo: Intensivist doctor and chief of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Intensive Care Unit (ICU) ward Flavia Machado gives support to doctor Daniere Tomotani after a patient died at Hospital Sao Paulo in Sao Paulo, Brazil March 17, 2021. Credit: Amanda Perobelli/Reuters)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxw8x3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9r0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjkn5h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2cm1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxwdn7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7dc818trxy)
More Sydney areas to evacuate over major flooding risk

The Premier of New South Wales in Australia has described the flooding in parts of Sydney as a once in fifty year event. Gladys Berejiklian said another four thousand people may be asked to leave their homes.

Also in the programme: Helen Zia, a leading figure in the Asian American community speaks to us about hate crime in the United States; and an experiment in Covid-safe music festivals in The Netherlands.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are: Lance Price, broadcaster, writer and political commentator and Dr Chandrika Kaul, a reader in Modern History at the University of St Andrews in Scotland.

(Photo: Volunteers making and providing free sandbags to residents in New South Wales, Australia. Credit: EPA/Dean Lewins)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxwjdc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7dc818twp2)
Europe protests amid surge in coronavirus cases

Tens of thousands of protesters have taken to the streets in Germany, UK and other European countries to demand an end to coronavirus restrictions. Some governments have tightened restrictions following a rise in the numbers of deaths and cases.

Also in the programme: A decline in global fertility rates due to the pandemic and the historical roots of Nowruz, the Persian New Year.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are: Lance Price, broadcaster, writer and political commentator and Dr Chandrika Kaul, a reader in Modern History at the University of St Andrews in Scotland.

(Picture: Protests against coronavirus restrictions in Germany. Credit: REUTERS/Thilo Schmuelgen)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxwn4h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7dc818v0f6)
More Sydney areas to evacuate over flooding

The Premier of New South Wales in Australia has described the flooding in parts of Sydney as a once in fifty year event. Gladys Berejiklian said another four thousand people may be asked to leave their homes.

Also in the programme: how Census Day in the UK is raising questions of identity; and protests in Poland against logging in a primeval forest.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are: Lance Price, broadcaster, writer and political commentator and Dr Chandrika Kaul, a reader in Modern History at the University of St Andrews in Scotland.

(Photo: The swollen Parramatta river in Sydney, Australia. Credit: EPA/Dan Himbrechts)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjl0dw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 Outlook (w3cszf19)
My Mormon mum, my gay rights hero

Growing up, Dustin Lance Black didn't think he'd be able to open up about his sexuality to his loved ones. His family was conservative – and Mormon. But when he was a teenager, a speech by the openly gay politician Harvey Milk allowed him to imagine a very different life for himself. Lance never forgot that speech, and years later, when he became a screenwriter, he decided to make a film about Milk. Lance went on to win an Oscar for that film. He told Outlook’s Emily Webb that a lot of his success is down to his mum, and he's written a book about his life called Mama's Boy. This interview was first broadcast on 26th June 2019.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Asya Fouks

Picture: Anne and Dustin
Credit: Dustin Lance Black


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxwrwm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9r0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjl450)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Africa Life Clinic (w3ct21g9)
Combatting mental illness

In Nigeria we meet someone who finds that swimming can help alleviate her depression and we discuss how self-esteem as well as diet can impact a new mothers’ ability to breastfeed. With Pricilla Ngethe , Milly Akeyo and Charles Mgbolu.
(Picture: mother and baby in hospital. Credit: GettyImages)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxwwmr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbh)
Lying

Why lying is a milestone for toddlers but a slippery slope for you.

High-stakes lies have all sorts of consequences: perjurers are imprisoned and slanderers are sued. But when your co-worker asks your opinion on his new haircut, a little lie feels obligatory. You lie much more than you’re probably aware of - is that a bad thing?

Dessa finds out why lying can be a dangerous habit. She discovers whether polygraph machines really work, and why a professor of psychology rejoiced when his three-year-old son fibbed on a hidden camera.

Deeply Human is about why you do what you do. It really is!


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjl7x4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2cm1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxx0cw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl2grt0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjlcn8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2cb3)
Under the Canopy

Forests of hope and the future

Writer Jessica J Lee, sets out to describe the myriad ways that forests operate in our lives and the life of the planet. In the final part of ‘Under The Canopy’, Jessica looks for stories of hope to set against the headlines depicting the mass deforestation that continues to take place around the world. She speaks with a variety of groups - in Canada, Burkina Faso, Brazil, Germany and Great Britain - who are finding different ways to re-invigorate forests, whether through peaceful protest, re-forestation programmes or internet start-ups. Jessica considers the best ways of re-building the strong, mixed forests that will prove so important in our battle against climate change.

Forest sounds appear courtesy of the 'Sounds of the Forest' project

Original musical composition: Erland Cooper

Spells written by Robert Macfarlane and these are read by Maxine Peake and the Bird sisters

Photo credit: Geoff A Bird


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxx440)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct2f7f)
World of Wisdom: Love

Eckhart Tolle, Dr Shefali Tsabary and Sister Dang Nghiem offer advice to members of the public from across the world as they respond to the challenge of the pandemic. In a series of intimate pone explore more life-lessons in this series of two programmes. In a series of intimate one to one conversations presented by the BBC’s Nuala McGovern, for the BBC World Service Festival they explore life-lesson on recovering from trauma, coping with kids in lockdown, personal growth after bereavement and learning to love yourself.

Producer: Charilie Taylor
Assistant producer: Ruth Edwards

Image credit: Getty Images


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxx7w4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6flfhq)
Australia floods

About 1000 people in the western suburbs of Sydney have been urged to evacuate their homes so far today. Dams have overflowed and some houses have been swept away. More rain is forecast for days to come.

Also on the programme: a best selling crime novelist and a former policewoman discuss how to make the streets safe for women; and an asteroid almost a kilometre in diameter will pass close to earth today.

(Picture: House swept away in the Australian floods. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxxcm8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2ccn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxxhcd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjwx)
Adventures with dentures: The story of dentistry

Until the eighteenth century there were no professional dentists. The only way to deal with a serious case of toothache was to call on the services of blacksmiths, travelling showmen or so-called barber-surgeons, all of whom had a sideline in tooth extraction. But in 1728, French physician Pierre Fauchard published the first complete scientific description of dentistry and he is credited as being “the father of modern dentistry”. His book, Le Chirurgien Dentiste or The Surgeon Dentist, was translated into several languages.

Joining Rajan Datar to discuss the painful and sometimes gruesome history of humans and their teeth are Dr. Scott Swank of the National Museum of Dentistry in Baltimore, US; Rachel Bairsto, Head of Museum Services at the British Dental Association and Professor Dominik Gross of RWTH Aachen University in Germany.

[Image: Detail from Tearer of Teeth or The Tooth Puller by David Ryjckaert III (1612-1661). Credit: David Dyjckaert III / Buyenlarge / Getty Images]


SUN 15:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh6d)
When Col Gaddafi's son played football in Italy's Serie A

In 2003, Italian top-flight side Perugia made a new and unusual signing: Al-Saadi Gaddafi, the son of Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi. It was seen as a publicity stunt by headline-hungry Perugia owner Luciano Gaucci, with Gaddafi making just one Serie A appearance, as a substitute in a win against Juventus in 2004. But Gaddafi made a big impression off the field and was renowned for his playboy lifestyle and outrageous spending habits. Former Perugia teammates Jay Bothroyd and Zeljko Kalac talk to Robert Nicholson about one of modern football's most surreal episodes. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Al-Saadi Gaddafi (centre) training with his Perugia team-mates (Getty Images)


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxxm3j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lq6c0m4rv)
Live Sporting Action

Delyth Lloyd presents live commentary of the FA Cup quarter-final between Leicester City and Manchester United at the King Power Stadium. Delyth will be joined by the former United striker Dwight Yorke.

We'll also reflect on Sunday's other quarter-final, as Chelsea host Sheffield United, as well as West Ham-Arsenal in the Premier League, Tottenham-Bristol City in the Women's Super League, and the rest of the action across Europe.

Photo: Leicester City's Marc Albrighton in action against Luke Shaw of Manchester United. (Credit: Leicester City FC via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxxzbx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl2hqs1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjmbm9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21ml)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxy331)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6vc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxy6v5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6fmdgr)
Surprise US official visit to Kabul

The American defence secretary, Lloyd Austin, makes an unannounced visit to Afghanistan but won't be drawn on whether US troops will leave, as planned, by May. We hear from Kabul about the reasons behind his trip.

Also on the programme : news from Australia where unprecedented flooding has left thousands homeless in New South Wales; and we hear about the life and times of the Egyptian feminist, Nawal Al Saadawi who has died at the age of 89.


(Photo: Afghanistan"s President Ashraf Ghani meets U.S. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin; Credit: Presidential Palace/Handout via REUTERS)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxybl9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wxvgtsl4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fsjzdj2jz)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjmpvp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxygbf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjmtlt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf19)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]



MONDAY 22 MARCH 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy72fbq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntrsm3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Discovery (w3ct2cch)
Patient zero: something in the water

It was October 2010 when reports first emerged of a mysterious disease spreading through Haiti. In a hospital in Saint Marc, about an hour north of the country's capital Port-au-Prince, 400 cases of adults with watery diarrhoea had been reported in a single day. On a regular day, there might be four people show up at the hospital with these symptoms.
For the doctors at the hospital, diarrhoea and vomiting pointed to one disease — cholera.

Olivia Willis tells the story of how cholera came to Haiti in the first of a series about disease outbreaks

Picture: Collapsed house, Haiti, Credit: Claudiad/Getty Images


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy72k2v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x584r472xfl)
Thousands evacuated from homes in Australia as floods worsen

Thousands of Australians are set to be evacuated from their homes as severe flooding in the Sydney area worsens - our correspondent Phil Mercer brings us the latest. Also on the programme; Saudi Arabia's state-run oil giant Aramco posts a huge loss in profits.And we speak to the silversmiths behind some of sport's most iconic trophies.

Picture Credit: EPA


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntrxc7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy72ntz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc3c)
Baroness Minouche Shafik: What do we owe each other?

The idea of a social contract between the individual and the state is a staple of political philosophy. But what happens when that contract is threatened by forces beyond the control of any government, like a climate crisis or, right now, a global pandemic? Stephen Sackur speaks to Baroness Minouche Shafik, director of the London School of Economics and former top official at the World Bank. Is humanity capable of collective action to meet global challenges?


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nts13c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4s)
Women running restaurants

Two award winning chefs talk to Kim Chakanetsa about how they've adapted to restrictions because of the Covid-19 pandemic. They discuss the pressures it's put on their business and the continuing importance of food and their restaurant staff in their lives.

Ana Roš won two Michelin stars after transforming her family restaurant Hisa Franko into a globally renowned dining destination in Slovenia. As a young woman she was a member of the Yugoslavia alpine ski youth team and learned to cook when she and her husband took on his family's restaurant. Ana first worked as a waitress before finding her signature style in the kitchen after the chef left.

Amninder Sandhu is known for setting up the first gas-free restaurant kitchen in India, making a name for herself with unconventional, slow-cooked dishes rooted in traditional techniques. The former head chef at Arth restaurant in Mumbai, she was planning to open a new restaurant when the pandemic hit and instead has set up a home delivery service.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
L: Ana Roš (credit Pablo Cuadra/Getty Images)
R: Amninder Sandhu (courtesy Amninder Sandhu)


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy72sl3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nts4vh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 on Sunday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy72xb7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbk)
Climate justice in the courtroom

A Peruvian farmer is suing a German fossil fuel company, the city of Baltimore has filed a lawsuit against 26 oil and gas firms, and a Polish coal mining company was taken to court by its own shareholders. Activists, investors and everyday people are increasingly pursuing climate litigation as a means to exert pressure on companies and shift our societies onto a more sustainable trajectory. But success is far from assured.

Our climate question this week is: Can companies be held accountable for climate change?

Guests:
Saúl Luciano Lliuya - Peruvian farmer
Florence Goupil - freelance journalist
Rupert Stuart Smith - DPhil candidate at the University of Oxford researching climate change litigation and attributing climate change damages to individual emitters
Sophie Marjanac - climate accountability lead at Client Earth

Presented by Graihagh Jackson and Neal Razzell
Produced by Zak Brophy
Researched by Dearbhail Starr and Olivia Noon
Mixed by Tom Brignell
Edited by Emma Rippon


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nts8lm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv76)
Can space exploration be environmentally friendly?

The space industry, with its fuel-burning rockets, requirements for mined metals and inevitable production of space junk, is not currently renowned for its environmental credentials. Can space exploration ever be truly environmentally friendly? Presenter Marnie Chesterton answers a selection of listeners’ questions on the topic of space environmentalism. She starts by examining the carbon footprint of spaceship manufacturing here on Earth, and asking whether reusable rocket ships such as Space X or Virgin Galactic offer a green route for commuting or tourism in low Earth orbit.

Just beyond our atmosphere, space junk and space debris are multiplying at an exponential rate, jeopardising our communications and mapping satellites, and even putting our access to the wider solar system at risk. As more probes and landers head to the Moon and Mars, what plans are in place to deal with space debris far beyond Earth?

Presented by Marnie Chesterton
Produced by Jen Whyntie for the BBC World Service

[Image: Space Junk. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7312c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8xq9f2)
Miami beach curfew over 'spring break chaos'

Officials extend a state of emergency for three weeks saying overwhelming crowds of visitors are spreading chaos and disorder. So has Spring Break become a super-spreader event?

More flood misery in Australia as once in a century conditions create havoc. We'll hear from a resident.

And we report from the Rio Grande river - as more and more children try to cross to make it to the United States.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy734th)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8xqf56)
Miami beach 'state of emergency' over spring break

An 8pm-6am curfew will remain in effect until at least 12 April after crowds pour into beach resort.

Thousands of Australians are evacuated from their homes as severe flooding in the Sydney area worsens.

And dismay and anger in Turkey after the country’s President withdraws from the Istanbul Convention which seeks to prevent, prosecute and eliminate domestic violence.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy738km)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8xqjxb)
Turkish lira tumbles as bank governor sacked

The value of Turkey's currency fell by as much as 14% after President Erdogan sacked the country's central bank governor - a man credited for pulling the lira back from historic lows.

In Germany, Chancellor Angela Merkel and regional leaders are due to meet to discuss coronavirus restrictions as cases surge.

And the iconic bright red British telephone box is getting a helping hand: we find out about a plan to preserve them now they're no longer often used.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy73d9r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntsrl4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7kv)
How to stay alert

Strategic napping, the right lighting, a cup of coffee, or just popping a pill? Business Daily's Laurence Knight looks at the many strategies for staying sharp in the office.

Natalie Dautovich of the US National Sleep Foundation explains why smartphones are the enemy, while neuropsychologist Barbara Sahakian discusses the rising popularity of "smart drugs" such as Modafinil and Ritalin. Laurence also heads to the Nats air traffic control centre in Swanwick to find out how workers there keep their focus while handling some of the busiest airspace on the planet.

Repeat of a programme first broadcast in 2016

(Photo: Woman working late in an office drinking coffee; Credit: DragonImages/Thinkstock)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmlf)
The Ulster Workers' Strike

An early attempt at power-sharing in Northern Ireland ended after protestant workers went on strike and bomb attacks killed dozens in the Republic of Ireland in 1974. Matt Murphy has been hearing from Austin Currie, the former SDLP politician, about the events of that time.

Photo: Dr Ian Paisley addresses a mass gathering of supporters, in the Protestant Shankhill Road area of Belfast in 1974. The Ulster Workers' Council declared that "everything stops at midnight" in an attempt to bring down Northern Ireland's power-sharing executive brought about by the Sunningdale Agreement. Credit: PA.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy73j1w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntswb8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy73mt0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntt02d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3ct2dmb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy73rk4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvcphz8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntt3tj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv76)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy73w98)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd4l)
The child spy and her secret agent parents

For Sue-Ellen Kusher, nee Doherty, growing up in the suburbs of Brisbane was far from normal. Both her parents worked for the Australian Secret Intelligence Organisation, ASIO, and in the early days of their marriage, they brought up their three children to be part of the family business. It was the 1950s during the Cold War, and Russian and Chinese communists were regarded as enemies. Sue-Ellen and her siblings would collect information about anyone suspicious - tracking number plates and going to political rallies. And most importantly of all, they learnt to keep secrets and never ask questions. Then when she was 17 her father Dudley, who she idolised, died very suddenly. At least, that's what she was told. He was a man who'd often disappeared on missions - and she was to spend many years waiting for him to return and wondering whether her mother was keeping from her the biggest secret of all.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: The Doherty family during the 1956 Olympics with Russian defectors Vladimir and Evdokia Petrov (L-R Vladimir Petrov, Joan Doherty, Mark Doherty, Evdokia Petrov, Sue-Ellen Doherty and an unidentified ASIO officer)
Credit: Sue-Ellen Kusher


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmlf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7401d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvcprgj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nttc9s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy743sj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z86gqt9f3)
US trial confirms the AstraZeneca vaccine is safe

The vaccine was 79% effective at stopping symptomatic Covid disease and 100% effective at preventing people from falling seriously ill. We’ll hear from one of the vaccine’s creators from Oxford University. Also: the EU has agreed to place sanctions on China over its treatment of ethnic minorities; and the WHO’s representative in Yemen tells us about the dire health crisis in the country.

(Photo: Vials labelled "Astra Zeneca COVID-19 Coronavirus Vaccine" and a syringe in front of a displayed AstraZeneca logo. Credit: REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo).


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy747jn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nttlt1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvd3qgt2yc)
US AstraZeneca Covid vaccine trial confirms efficacy

A US trial of the Oxford AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine showed it is safe and effective. Linda Bauld is professor of public health at the University of Edinburgh, and discusses the implications. Also in the programme, we have an in-depth report examining the dangers involved in ship demolition, as well as new efforts to hold shipping companies to account. Plus, two spacecraft have been launched on a Soyuz rocket from the Tokyo-headquartered company Astroscale to try and demostrate a means of cleaning up space debris. Kate Arkless Grey is a space writer who explains how the process will work.

(Picture: A vial of AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy74c8s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2tbk33pqbm)
Coronavirus: Europe's third wave

As a new wave of Covid-19 infections sweeps across Europe, Germany is expected to extend lockdown restrictions into April. We hear from our correspondent in Berlin amid reports that Germans are growing weary of restrictions and frustrated with the slow vaccine rollout.

We also look at the situation in Estonia; the small north European country has registered the highest Covid-19 infection rate in the world per capita.
We’ll be hearing from some Italians about how they are coping with the third lockdown that was imposed a week ago.

And our regular coronavirus expert Dr Eleanor Murray answers more audience questions about the virus and looks at the latest research into the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid vaccine.

And we go to Tanzania, where thousands of people have gathered in the capital Dodoma to pay their last respects to President John Magufuli who died last week.

(Photo: Medical staff takes care of a COVID-19 patient at the intensive care unit of the University Hospital in Essen, Germany, 22 March 2021. Credit: EPA/FRIEDEMANN VOGEL)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy74h0x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2tbk33pv2r)
Coronavirus conversations: Italy’s return to lockdown

With Italy returning to lockdown just over a year after the first one there was announced – we’ve been speaking with Italian parents to hear how they are coping and what has changed from their first lockdown to now.

Germany and France has also seen figures shoot up. We speak to our Europe correspondent about the resurgence in coronavirus cases in the continent and about a row over Covid vaccine supplies between the European Union and the UK.

Our coronavirus expert, Dr Manfred Green in Israel, explains the latest trial that has found the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine highly effective against stopping asymptomatic Covid and at preventing serious disease.

And we look at the devastating floods in Australia where thousands of people have been evacuated across the New South Wales with more heavy rain forecast.

(Photo: Piazza Navona during the new lockdown for emergency of the Coronavirus Covid-19 pandemic in Rome, Italy, 15 March 2021. Credit: EPA/ANGELO CARCONI)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy74ls1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd4l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmlf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy74qj5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvcqgy9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntv2sk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k2p53gpz6)
2021/03/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy74v89)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntv6jp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2ccj)
Patient zero: the December transplant

Three transplant patients died within a week of each other in Melbourne in December 2006 and alarm bells started ringing. One of the patients was Karen. When she got a phone call from the hospital offering her a kidney transplant, it seemed like a lucky break. But things didn't go according to plan. Olivia Willis tells the story of how doctors discovered that one donor had transmitted a mystery virus to these patients. These tragic cases changed the way that transplantation was done in Australia.

Produced by James Bullen, Cheyne Anderson and Joel Werner of ABC

Picture: TEM of Arenavirus, Credit: Callista Images/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy74z0f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z86gqv4n0)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy752rk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79x93s1jrd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fsx7pqtq7)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntvg0y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172xm9tk2slv7t)
US AstraZeneca Covid vaccine trial confirms efficacy

A US trial of the Oxford AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine showed it is safe and effective. Linda Bauld is professor of public health at the University of Edinburgh, and discusses the implications. Also in the programme, we have an in-depth report examining the dangers involved in ship demolition, as well as new efforts to hold shipping companies to account. Plus, two spacecraft have been launched on a Soyuz rocket from the Tokyo-headquartered company Astroscale to try and demostrate a means of cleaning up space debris. Kate Arkless Grey is a space writer who explains how the process will work.

(Picture: A vial of AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy756hp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc3c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntvks2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



TUESDAY 23 MARCH 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy75b7t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkqd)
The History Hour

The hunt to find the Jamaican drug lord wanted for extradition to the United States, the six men trapped in a simulated space ship for a year and a half, the mother of the Swedish welfare state, the New York drag scene of the 1990s and a classic cold war chess match which was much more than just a game.

With Max Pearson

(Jamaican police on patrol after a frenzy of gang and drug violence in Kingston, May 24 2010. Credit: Anthony Foster/Getty Images)


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy75fzy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x199nxkyp2v)
Western countries sanction China over Uighur rights abuses

Several Western governments introduced sanctions on Chinese officials for human rights abuses against Uighur Muslims. China responded with its own retaliatory sanctions, while denying the allegations. We discuss whether this could escalate into a full trade war with Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland, and Michelle Jamrisko, Bloomberg’s Senior Asia Economy Reporter. Meanwhile, Miami Beach is to extend a state of emergency after large crowds on the US city’s party strips raised concerns about the spread of coronavirus, and women's sport takes a big leap forward in Britain as the BBC and Sky pick up the rights to broadcast football games. (Photo credit: Reuters)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy75kr2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2n)
How to reuse a demolished building

Is it possible to construct a new building, just by reusing materials from homes and offices that have been knocked down?

That’s the dream of a pioneering Swiss architect Barbara Buser, who trains specialist treasure hunters to track down everything from window frames to steel beams for her buildings.

People Fixing the World finds out about her latest project, which is made of 70% reused material. We ask whether Barbara’s approach, which has a much lower carbon footprint than building with new material, can take off around the world.

Presenter and producer: Charlotte Horn

Image: Barbara Buser’s building K118 (Copyright: Martin Zeller)


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntvy0g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcr)
Arash – Making music in the sun

The singer/songwriter Arash Labaf is a global superstar, having racked up billions of views for hits like “Boro Boro” and “She Makes Me Go”. He’s in demand as a collaborator with artists like Marshmello, Shaggy and Snoop Dogg, he’s a TV personality as well and he’s won numerous awards.

Arash’s roots are Persian- he was born in Iran although his family left for Sweden when Arash was a boy and he stayed living there until recently. A few years ago he moved to Dubai, but he’s continually looking for ways to incorporate his heritage into his music. One way he does so is by singing in Farsi, his mother tongue, on most of his songs.

Georgia Tolley follows Arash in Dubai as he works on his music. She meets Arash’s longtime collaborators, producer Robert Uhlmann and his brother Henrik who’s Arash’s manager, and hears how Arash creates songs and draws on his rich cultural background.

Presented by Georgia Tolley
Produced by Georgia Tolley and Emma Kingsley for the BBC World Service


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy75ph6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd4l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmlf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy75t7b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct29bw)
A constitutional conversation

How do you solve a problem like America? A land where speech is free - but hate rules the airwaves. A land of opportunity - where 40 million people live in poverty. A land of democracy - where the majority of Americans are under-represented in national government.

On 6 January we saw the flaws of the constitution in full view, a constitution which – according to one leading academic “gets close to a failing grade in terms of 21st-Century notions on democratic theory".

Award winning journalist Brian Palmer asks if the near sacred text is fit for modern governance. Does the electoral college deliver adequate representation for everybody? Do check and balances place too great a strain on good governance? Is the Constitution key to solving America’s ills?

Producer: Glyn Tansley

(Photo: The US Capitol building in Washington, D.C. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntw5hq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct2ccj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy75xzg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8xt6b5)
Niger attack: 100 villagers killed

The killings come less than a week after gunmen killed 58 people in the same region.

A gunman kills 10 people - including a police officer - after a stand-off for several hours at a supermarket in the US state of Colorado.

And what's behind Iceland's success in becoming the first country in Europe to virtually rid itself of Covid-19?


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy761ql)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8xtb29)
US mass shooting: 10 dead in grocery store

A journalist gives us his reaction to the Boulder shootings: "I'm 25 years old and I have already covered 4 mass shootings".

A leading charity questions why foreign aid is being cut to Yemen when children caught up in the fighting there are dying in their thousands.

And the world’s largest refugee camp - housing Rohingya people in Bangladesh - has caught fire, destroying the temporary homes of thousands.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy765gq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8xtftf)
Germany: Angela Merkel announces new lockdown

Germany shuts down for three weeks as the number of cases rise. Is one issue the slow pace of vaccine rollout?

Also EU leaders meet this week to consider whether Covid-19 vaccines produced in Europe should stay within the bloc.

And another mass shooting in the United States: Ten people, including a police officer, have been killed by a gunman in the city of Boulder, Colorado.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7696v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntwnh7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8cj)
Could China pull the plug on coal?

A letter sent to the Bangladeshi government suggests that Beijing may be clamping down on the biggest source of carbon emissions.

Justin Rowlatt speaks to the journalist who got the scoop - Jagaran Chakma of the Daily Star newspaper in Bangladesh. His nation is one of dozens of developing countries that need to build up their power sector, and had been looking to China to finance new coal-fired power stations under the Belt and Road initiative - something the letter pointedly said that Beijing would no longer do.

So could China be preparing to take a much harder line against coal than advertised - at home as well as abroad? And what does it all mean for the big Cop 26 climate negotiations due later this year? Justin speaks to researcher Rebecca Ray of Boston University, former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, and former United Nations climate negotiator Christiana Figueres.

Producers: Szu Ping Chan; Laurence Knight

(Picture: Street vendors and customers gather at a local market outside a state owned coal fired power plant in Huainan, China; Credit: Kevin Frayer/Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmqy)
Banksy’s first street art mural

World-renowned street artist Banksy started spray-painting the walls of his home city of Bristol in the 1990s. It is widely believed that his first large mural was a piece called Mild, Mild West painted on a wall next to a record shop. Jim Paine owned the shop and has been telling Bethan Head how he played a pivotal role in getting Banksy to do the artwork in the first place.


(Graffiti street art, entitled Mild, Mild West, by British street artist Banksy, is pictured on the side of a building in Bristol, south west England, on May 8, 2019.. Credit: Geoff Caddick/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy76dyz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct29bw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntws7c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy76jq3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk4b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy76ng7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvcsdwc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntx0qm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 Discovery (w3ct2ccj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy76s6c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdl4)
Abandoned at sea for three years

Long stretches at sea are part of life for a merchant seaman so when Indian marine engineer Vikash Mishra accepted a job on a cargo ship in the Gulf, he expected a lengthy period away from his young family. But a few months became years after Vikash's employer ran out of money. They abandoned the broken-down ship, called the Tamim Aldar, 20 miles off the coast of Dubai. Vikash and his crewmates were trapped on the leaky vessel without much in the way of food, fuel or electricity, so they had to learn to survive. When all hope seemed lost, they would make a perilous attempt to reach land. Vikash Mishra and Reverend Andy Bowerman of the Mission to Seafarers speak to Outlook's Kevin Ponniah.

How miner Bruce Edwards successfully married two of his passions - opera and caves in Australia. Outlook reporter Jacquie Mackay went to see one of Bruce's productions in the Capricorn Caves in the Australian town of Rockhampton. This interview was first broadcast in 2016.

The inside story of #Gamergate. American games developer Zoe Quinn became the target of an online hate campaign after an ex wrote a long bitter blog post about them. In 2017, the computer programmer told Jo Fidgen how their life changed because of the trolling.


Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Vikash Mishra
Credit: Vikash Mishra


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy76wyh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvcsncm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntx86w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy770pm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z86gqx6b6)
UK falls silent to remember Covid victims

The UK has marked one year since the announcement of its first coronavirus lockdown. It has marked the first anniversary by holding a minute's silence to remember those who have died from Covid-19. The country's top nurse takes time to reflect on the past year.

Also on the programme: the crisis engulfing Australian politics in the wake of new sex tapes that have surfaced; and how the common cold might boot out Covid-19.

(Picture: At the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow, staff stood outside to reflect. Credit: PA Media.)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy774fr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntxhq4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlx105p8lq1)
Germany imposes strict Easter coronavirus lockdown

Germany will impose a near complete halt over Easter, in response to a coronavirus surge. Current lockdown restrictions have also been extended by three weeks, and David Meves, owner of Club Michel restaurant in Frankfurt, tells us about the impact it will have on his business. And Erika Solomon of the Financial Times discusses whether this is likely to be the last lockdown for the country. Also in the programme, the BBC's Justin Rowlatt explores whether China is on the verge of taking a tougher stance against coal, both at home and abroad. Plus from Delhi, the BBC's Arunoday Mukharji reports on the rise of the electric motorbike.

(Picture: Stacked tables and chairs outside a Munich restaurant. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7785w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2tbk33sm7q)
Coronavirus conversations: Brazil’s doctors under pressure

Brazil has the world's second-highest number of Covid-related deaths - only behind the US. Last week, the country's leading health institute Fiocruz warned of a historic collapse of Brazil's health service. We hear a conversation between doctors in the country to hear how they are coping.

And much of Europe continues to struggle to contain the growing numbers of Covid-19 cases. Germany has extended its coronavirus lockdown for three more weeks, while the French president Emmanuel Macron has warned of an impending "explosion" in Covid-19 hospital admissions. We hear the latest from across the continent

We are joined again by our regular health experts to talk through the latest coronavirus headlines. If you have questions about Covid-19 or any of the vaccines, please send it in to us via WhatsApp at +447730 751925.

(Photo: Health worker Debora Castro da Silva treats a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) positive patient at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Hospital Sao Paulo in Sao Paulo, Brazil March 17, 2021. REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy77cy0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2tbk33sqzv)
US shooting: Gunman kills 10 at Colorado grocery store

We hear the latest from from the city of Boulder, Colorado where a gunman has killed 10 people, including a police officer, following an hours-long stand-off at a grocery market.

And much of Europe continues to struggle to contain the growing numbers in Covid-19 cases. Germany has extended its coronavirus lockdown for three more weeks - while the French president Emmanuel Macron has warned of an impending "explosion" in Covid-19 hospital admissions. We hear from our BBC reporters across the continent to get the latest.

And we are joined again by our regular health experts to talk through the latest coronavirus headlines. If you have questions about Covid-19 or any of the vaccines, please send it in to us via WhatsApp at +447730 751925

(Photo: Store staff are led away from an active shooter at the King Soopers supermarket in Boulder Picture taken March 22, 2021. Michael Ciaglo/USA TODAY NETWORK via REUTERS)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy77hp4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdl4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy77mf8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvctcvd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntxzpn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k2p53klw9)
2021/03/23 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy77r5d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct29bw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nty3fs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99h)
AI chatbot takes witness statements

Court cases can collapse due to unreliable witness statements. These are often taken some time after the crime has happened – but what if it was possible to take a witness statement very quickly using AI chatbots? Dr Julia Shaw is on the programme discussing her latest research into using an AI chatbot in reporting harassment in the workplace. Not only are statements taken more quickly, they are done better by a machine than a person, as people can interrupt, misinterpret, judge or incorrectly record statements. The AI chatbot sticks to a script and allows the witness to do the same.

Machine learning to understand Tinnitus
AI is helping to advance research into tinnitus, a condition often described as a ringing, buzzing or hissing in the ears, which affects up to 1 in 5 adults. Clinicians currently have no objective means of diagnosing tinnitus and must rely on the accounts of people living with the condition. But machine learning algorithms, combined with brain imaging techniques, are allowing scientists to develop a clinical tool to measure tinnitus objectively. Anthea Lacchia reports.

Women’s Engineering Society Prize
Shrouk El-Attar describes herself as an Electronics Engineer, a bellydancer, an LGBTQ+ campaigner and refugee. She is the winner of the WES Prize IET Young Woman Engineer of the Year Award, to add to a multitude of prizes she has already received. She’s helped design a pelvic floor trainer - a treatment for incontinence - and is redesigning the breast pump to allow women to express their milk much more easily and quietly. Gareth finds out what inspires her and more about the tech she designs.

The programme was presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.

Image: AI chatbot
Credit: tadamichi/iStock Getty Images

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz and Emil Petrie


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy77vxj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z86gqy1k3)
US officials question AstraZeneca data

US authorities will review the AstraZeneca vaccine and not rely solely on data provided by the company. Professor Jason Schwartz says it's likely to be a very good vaccine, but information published by AstraZeneca about its efficacy may have contained outdated information.

Also in the programme: Exit polls show Benjamin Netanyahu's Likud party leading in Israel elections and could a new discovery challenge the long established theories of physics?

(Picture: A doctor vaccinates a client with AstraZeneca"s Covid-19 vaccine. Credit: EPA/Piroschka van de Wouw)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy77znn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79x93s4fnh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fsx7ptqmb)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntyby1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmdjhwscfz5)
Black families in Chicago to receive reparations in historic first

Sixteen black families living in a suburb of Chicago are to be given twenty-five thousand dollars each, in the first reparation for housing discrimination ever carried out in the United States. The families live in Evanston – an area that has pledged to distribute ten million dollars over a decade. Robin Rue Simmons, the Alderman of Evanston’s Fifth Ward who led the campaign, discusses how this is just the beginning of a broader reparations movement for African Americans as restitution for centuries of slavery and discrimination.Today, Gamestop posted the 9th consecutive quarter sales loss. However its e-commerce sales jumped 175% in the last quarter. Joe Saluzzi of Themis Trading tells us why the company did not live up to expectations. Also in the programme, the BBC's Justin Rowlatt explores whether China is on the verge of taking a tougher stance against coal, both at home and abroad. Plus from Delhi, the BBC's Arunoday Mukharji reports on the rise of the electric motorbike.

(Picture: Alderman Robin Rue Simmons. Picture credit: Getty Images/Kamil Krzaczynski.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy783ds)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntygp5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 24 MARCH 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7874x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk4b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy78bx1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x199nxl1kzy)
Gamestop posts 9th consecutive quarter sales loss

Gamestop has posted its 9th consecutive quarter sales loss. However its e-commerce sales jumped 175% in the last quarter. Wall Street Journal’s technology reporter Sarah Needleman talks us through the rise of Gamestop and why the company has not lived up to expectations. Sixteen black families living in a suburb of Chicago are to be given twenty-five thousand dollars each, in the first reparation for housing discrimination ever carried out in the United States. The families live in Evanston – an area that has pledged to distribute ten million dollars over a decade. Robin Rue Simmons, the Alderman of Evanston’s Fifth Ward led the campaign. She discusses how this is just the beginning of a broader reparations movement for African Americans as restitution for centuries of slavery and discrimination. Also in the programme, the BBC's Justin Rowlatt explores whether China is on the verge of taking a tougher stance against coal, both at home and abroad. Plus from Delhi, the BBC's Arunoday Mukharji reports on the rise of the electric motorbike.
Joining us to discuss these stories and more is Jyoti Malhotra, Editor of National & Strategic Affairs website, The Print in Delhi and Marketplace reporter Andy Uhler in Austin, Texas.

(Picture: Gamestop store in Jackson Heights, New York. Picture credit: Reuters.)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy78gn5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7w)
Regina Ip Lau Suk-yee: Is the concept of ‘one country, two systems’ dead?

It seems the Biden Administration is putting greater emphasis on human rights issues in its already fraught relationship with China. Will that prompt Beijing to think twice about the crackdown on pro-democracy activism in Hong Kong? Stephen Sackur interviews Regina Ip, Chair of the New People’s Party, member of Hong Kong’s Legislative Council and one of Beijing’s most loyal backers in the territory. Is the concept of ‘one country, two systems’ dead?

(Photo: Regina Ip appears via video link on Hardtalk)


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntytxk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x89)
Goal 10: Reducing inequality

In 2015 the United Nations announced a radical plan to change the world.

Global leaders drew up a list of 17 "sustainable development goals" to create a blueprint for a better future. Governments agreed to support the goals which cover gender equality, health provision, a good education and much more. We've asked 17-year-olds from 17 different countries tell us what they think needs to change if the world is to meet those goals by 2030.

Seventeen-year-old Monet Wimbish lives in the US city of Baltimore. She hopes to go to university and become a nurse. But as an African American student, born in a low income neighbourhood, she knows she faces many challenges if she is to finish her education and get a good job. Monet takes us on a tour of Baltimore and investigates why there are such starkly different outcomes – in terms of health, education and income - for those from poor black neighbourhoods. She ends her journey by meeting the city’s new mayor and asks him whether these inequalities can be reduced by 2030.


Project 17 was produced in partnership with The Open University.

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producers: Rob Walker and Mary Rose Madden

With thanks to Writers in Baltimore Schools and to Rejjia Camphor for help with production.


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy78ld9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdl4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy78q4f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct29bx)
Water: Too Much And Not Enough

How water shaped us

Journalist Alok Jha argues that if humans are to survive and thrive for the rest of the 21st Century we must urgently transform our relationship with water. To change that relationship, we first need to understand how the relationship evolved. Alok looks at cultural history to understand how water shaped our deepest psychology.

Alok finds that our relationship with water – always struggling for a balance between too much and not enough – fundamentally influenced the religious and spiritual worldviews of early civilisations. And we still feel the effects of this in our attitudes towards water today.

Alok uncovers a dark and compelling story of child sacrifice in 15th-Century Peru, hears how the water landscapes of Mesopotamia and Scandinavia shaped very different religious beliefs, and learns that many Islamic teachings about water have been echoed by modern science hundreds of years later.

(Photo: Waterfall in a rainforest near Palenque, Mexico. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntz2dt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy78twk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8xx378)
Biden team asks for more help stopping irregular migration from Mexico

Senior Biden Administration officials have gone to Mexico City for urgent talks on ways to stem the flow of Central American migrants crossing into the US -- in particular unaccompanied children; more trials in Hong Kong of campaigners involved in pro-democracy demonstrations; and we have a report on the Afghan TV station which has seen four young women employees killed in just the past few months.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy78ymp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8xx6zd)
Israel's Netanyahu short of majority in exit polls

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is predicted to fall short of securing the seats needed to form a new government in Israel's fourth election in two years, according to exit polls; senior Biden Administration officials have gone to Mexico City for urgent talks on ways to stem the flow of Central American migrants crossing into the US -- in particular unaccompanied children; and Egypt's Suez Canal has been blocked by a large container ship that ran aground in the narrow channel.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy792ct)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8xxbqj)
US and Mexico discuss why so many children are arriving at the US border

Senior Biden Administration officials have gone to Mexico City for urgent talks on ways to stem the flow of Central American migrants crossing into the US -- in particular unaccompanied children; how the big political standoff between China and the EU over Beijing's treatment of the Uighurs can become quite personal; and Egypt's Suez Canal has been blocked by a large container ship that ran aground in the narrow channel.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7963y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntzkdb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8p5)
The rise of food delivery apps

How the growth in food delivery apps could change the restaurant industry forever. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Moe Tkacik from the American Economic Liberties Project about threat posed to restaurants by the dominance of platforms like DoorDash, Uber Eats and Deliveroo. Collin Wallace, former head of innovation at GrubHub, explains why these platforms continue to expand despite never making a profit. Food writer Jonathan Nunn discusses the breakdown of the relationship between customers and restaurants, and what that could mean for the future of the industry. And restaurateur Charlie Mellor tells us why his experience with delivery apps led him to set up his own rival platform.

(Photo: an Uber Eats delivery rider, Credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmt6)
The woman who got America talking about sex

Dr Ruth Westheimer first became popular on a radio show in New York in the early 1980s. Her frank and open approach to giving advice on all sorts of different questions about sex soon made her a TV personality too.

Photo: Dr Ruth Westheimer. Credit: Getty Images


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy799w2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct29bx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntzp4g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x89)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy79fm6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Questions (w3cszt65)
Covid-19 and information

World Questions tackles the global issue of Covid-19: not just the disease itself but the information surrounding the pandemic. What should we have known and what questions should have been asked? Sharing information - and understanding the basis of the decisions of the scientists and the politicians - has never been more important or more difficult. So, do we always get the best information? How do we interpret the science and the policies that goes with it? And how does the world’s media respond to a pandemic? How have any of us - politicians, health experts and journalists - communicated with the public?

As we try and get to grips with the best way to share information about what is really happening, what’s the best way to deal with “fake news” – is it a major force or a distraction from the crisis? And what’s the best counter to it? Attack it, understand it, or ignore it? In our digital world, can it ever be eradicated or regulated?

The BBC’s Media Editor, Amol Rajan, is joined by four leading experts from around the world and members of the public with their questions.

The panel:

Nick Pickles: Senior Director, Public Policy Strategy and Development, Twitter.
Zeynep Tufekci: Sociologist and writer
Eliot Higgins: Investigative journalist, founder of Bellingcat
Margaret Harris: Spokesperson for the World Health Organisation

Producers: Helen Towner and Charlie Taylor
Studio Engineers: Ronan Loftus and Duncan Hannant

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: A protester holds a placard that says Fake News Is The Real Virus. Credit: Stanton Sharpe/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images)


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy79kcb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvcw9sg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65ntzxmq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy79p3g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdsx)
From classical piano to rock stardom in Japan

Yoshiki is one of Japan's biggest stars. Although he started as a classical pianist, he went on to become an extraordinary drummer who transformed the music scene in Japan with his wild performances and over-the-top outfits. It all began in the 1980s when he founded the band X Japan and spawned a whole new style. They have fans all over the world, have sold more than 30 million records and have won many awards. This month Yoshiki received Japan's prestigious Medal of Honor for his support of frontline medical workers during the Covid 19 pandemic. This interview was first broadcast on 1st March 2017.

Khano Llaitul and his wife Rosita met and fell in love thanks to a rather unusual musical instrument called the jaw harp. Khano is part of Chile's largest indigenous group - the Mapuche, and he's also a talented metalworker and silversmith. He tells reporter Jane Chambers how he and Rosita met when he made a very special jaw harp for her.

If you ever find yourself in the coastal city of Zadar in Croatia, and you happen to stand and listen by the sea, you might hear strange but beautiful harmonic sounds coming from the water. They are made by a sea organ - a giant instrument powered by the waves. In 2019 reporter Marta Medvesek went to meet the man who created it - Croatian architect Nikola Bašić.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Yoshiki from X Japan on stage during Coachella Music and Arts Festival in 2018
Credit: Rich Fury/Getty Images for Coachella


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy79svl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvcwk8q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv053z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x89)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy79xlq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z86gr0379)
Seven-year-old shot dead in Myanmar violence

A seven-year-old girl has been shot dead in Myanmar, becoming the youngest known victim in the crackdown following last month's military coup. We’ll hear from the Burmese historian Thant Myint-U about the country’s future. Also in the programme: despite predictions by Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that he’s won, exit polls are showing yet another inconclusive result in Israel’s elections; and as France endures a third wave of Covid infections, doctors are deeply concerned the government has ignored their expertise.

(Photo: Khin Myo Chit, the seven-year-old who was killed in Myanmar; Credit: Khin Myo Chit’s family).


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7b1bv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv0dm7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxvfx91t1f)
Suez Canal blocked by container ship

The Suez Canal, which carries 10% of global trade, has been blocked by a container ship. Sal Mercogliano is an expert in maritime history at Campbell University in North Carolina, and discusses the implications of the incident. Also in the programme, Germany's government has outlined a plan for how to pay for its unprecedented support for workers and companies during the pandemic. Peter Bofinger is a prominent German economist, and used to sit on the country's Council of Economic Experts, and tells us what damage coronavirus has done to Europe's largest economy. The BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on the growth in food delivery apps over the past year, and what it all means for restaurants. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Peter Morgan, asks what new skills workers returning to the office after working from home, are likely to bring.

(Picture: A container ship blocks the Suez Canal. Picture credit: EPA.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7b52z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2tbk33wj4t)
Myanmar protests: Hundreds of people released from custody

In Myanmar more than 600 people who were detained after last month's military coup have been released from prison. Over 2000 people have been arrested since Myanmar's elected government was ousted by military forces. In the city of Mandalay, a funeral was held for a seven year old girl who was shot dead when her home was raided by security forces. We'll bring you the latest developments on both stories and the situation across Myanmar.

Also, each day here on OS we talk to people from different parts of the world to find out how the pandemic has impacted their lives. Today we're going to speak to two mothers, to hear how their families have been sharing domestic responsibilities during the pandemic.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer your questions. Today our guest is Dr Maria Sundaram, infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto.

(Photo: Journalists wait outside the Insein Prison in Yangon, Myanmar, 24 March 2021. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7b8v3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2tbk33wmwy)
EU plans for tougher controls on vaccine exports

The European Commission has proposed tougher controls on Covid vaccine exports after it accused AstraZeneca of failing to honour its contract to supply EU countries. The export controls are most likely to affect countries that have higher vaccination rates than the EU, such as the UK and US. We'll explain what this will mean across the world.

Also, each day here on OS we talk to people from different parts of the world to find out how the pandemic has impacted their lives. Today we're going to speak to two mothers, to hear how their families have been sharing domestic responsibilities during the pandemic.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer your questions. Today our guest is Dr Pedro Hallal, epidemiologist from the Federal University of Pelotas in Brazil.

(Photo: A vial of AstraZenecas coronavirus vaccine in Madrid, Spain, March 24, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Sergio Perez)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7bdl7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdsx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7bjbc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvcx8rh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv0wlr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k2p53nhsd)
2021/03/24 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7bn2h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct29bx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv10bw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcdd)
Can the common cold prevent Covid?

Claudia talks to her guest Dr Ann Robinson about a new study from the University of Glasgow in the UK that suggests the virus that causes the common cold can effectively boot the Covid virus out of the body's cells. Some viruses are known to compete in order to be the one that causes an infection and researchers have discovered that it appears cold-causing rhinovirus trumps coronavirus. The benefits might be short-lived but rhinovirus is so widespread it could still help to suppress Covid.

Mental Health in Covid frontline health and social care workers. Claudia hears from Dr Talya Greene about a new study showing that nearly 60% of health and social care workers working in the UK during the first wave of Covid have suffered from either anxiety, depression or post traumatic stress disorder. What can we learn from the impact of Covid on the mental health of hospital and social care staff in order to help build resilience for future traumas.

Azeezat Olaoluwa reports from Nigeria looking at something that affects many women in Africa: uterine fibroids. These are non cancerous growths that develop in or around the womb. It’s a medical condition that affects black women more than any other race, making it an unavoidable health condition for a large percentage of black women.

Heart Surgeon Dr Reinhard Freidl talks to Claudia about his new book “The Beat of Life” about why, to him, the heart is so much more than just a pump, and why being broken hearted is a recognised medical condition.

Image: Woman blowing her nose
Credit: LaylaBird/Getty Images


Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Alexandra Feachem


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7brtm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z86gr0yg6)
India halts vaccine exports

India has suspended all major exports of the AstraZeneca Covid vaccine after a surge in infections. As the EU also tightens controls on shipments of the jab, we ask how the restrictions could affect the global supply of vaccines.

Also on the programme: A huge container ship has run aground in Egypt's Suez Canal - blocking one of the world's most important shipping routes; And could a quick saliva test help detect concussion injuries in sport?

(Photo: A nurse displays a vial of AstraZeneca"s COVISHIELD vaccine, at a medical centre in Mumbai, India, January 16, 2021. REUTERS/Francis Mascarenhas)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7bwkr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79x93s7bkl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fsx7pxmjf)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv17v4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmfbymd4n9k)
India halts vaccine exports

India has placed a temporary hold on all exports of the Oxford-AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine. We speak to Prashant Yadav from the Centre for Global Development about what's causing the squeeze and what it could mean for the global vaccination effort. The Suez Canal, which carries 10% of global trade, has been blocked by a container ship.LoriAnn Larocco, the author of Trade War - Containers Don't Lie: Navigating the Bluster explains the global ramifacations of the blocakge. Also in the programme, The BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on the growth in food delivery apps over the past year, and what it all means for restaurants. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Peter Morgan, asks what new skills workers returning to the office after working from home, are likely to bring.

(Picture: A woman watches as a healthcare worker fills a syringe with a dose of COVISHIELD, the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine manufactured by Serum Institute of India. Picture Credit: Reuters)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7c09w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv1cl8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x89)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



THURSDAY 25 MARCH 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7c420)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 World Questions (w3cszt65)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Wednesday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7c7t4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x199nxl4gx1)
India halts Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine exports

India has placed a temporary hold on all exports of the Oxford-AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine. We speak to Prashant Yadav from the Centre for Global Development about what's causing the squeeze and what it could mean for the global vaccination effort. The Suez Canal, which carries 10% of global trade, has been blocked by a container ship.LoriAnn Larocco, the author of Trade War - Containers Don't Lie: Navigating the Bluster explains the global ramifacations of the blocakge. Also in the programme, The BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on the growth in food delivery apps over the past year, and what it all means for restaurants.

Joining us to discuss these topics and more are Les Williams, professor of engineering at the University of Virginia, USA and Rebecca Jones, Bloomberg's Melbourne bureau chief in Australia

(Picture: A woman watches as a healthcare worker fills a syringe with a dose of COVISHIELD, the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine manufactured by Serum Institute of India. Picture Credit: Reuters)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7cck8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4z)
Are ‘killer robots’ the future of warfare?

Could humans ever trust machines with the power to make life or death decisions on the battlefield? And have we already begun to?

Advances in artificial intelligence are slowly creeping into almost every aspect of the world, including warfare. Suzanne Kianpour explores the technology, fears and even potential advantages of developing autonomous weapons.

Producers: Nathan Gower and Viv Jones


(Mock-up of the IAI Harop Drone, a loitering munition. Credit: Aviation-images.com/Getty Images)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv1qtn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrf)
Should the US abandon tipping?

President Biden has pledged to scrap the 'tipped wage' in the US - a salary system where diners effectively subsidise waiters' wages.

It's a move that's divided restaurant staff across the country. Tamasin Ford hears from those who want a higher minimum wage and an end to a system they argue makes servers vulnerable to discrimination and harassment. On the other hand, some staff are outraged because, they say, the changes could wipe out their chance to make double or even triple their hourly wage in tips.

With the coronavirus pandemic wreaking havoc on the hospitality industry, restaurant owners too are wondering whether now is the time for a shake-up, and also how customers might react.

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: A waitress writes notes on a pad. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)

Contributors:

Saru Jayaraman, president of One Fair Wage USA;
Dr Michael Lynn, professor of services marketing at Cornell University, New York;
Xian Zhang, co-owner of Cafe China and Birds of a Feather, New York;
Joshua Chaisson, president of the Restaurant Workers of America and a waiter in Portland, Maine


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7ch9d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdsx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmt6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7cm1j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3csz6mm)
Shipping’s dirty secret

The shipping industry is worth millions to the world economy and we depend on it for most of our goods. Assignment lifts the lid on the dangerous and polluting world of shipbreaking and investigates why ships once owned by UK companies end their lives on beaches in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

(Image: Bangladeshi labourers and docked ships at a shipbreaking yard. Credit: Farjana Khan Godhuly/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv1z9x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcdd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7cqsn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8y004c)
EU leaders to discuss boosting vaccine supplies

EU leaders are due to discuss plans to tighten controls on coronavirus vaccine exports, as the third wave of the pandemic gathers strength; we go to Bangladesh to get the latest on a fire at a Rohingya refugee camp which has killed 15 people and displaced thousands; and one of football's most flamboyant characters is returning to his national team at the age of 39 - find out who it is.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7cvjs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8y03wh)
EU leaders meet to decide if they should back export controls on Covid vaccines

EU leaders are due to discuss plans to tighten controls on coronavirus vaccine exports, as the third wave of the pandemic gathers strength; we have a report from an Australian town which has been particularly badly hit by flooding; and we'll give you the latest on the giant cargo ship blocking the Suez Canal.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7cz8x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8y07mm)
Covid-19: EU leaders to discuss boosting vaccine supplies

European Union leaders are to hold virtual talks on how to boost coronavirus vaccine supplies, as a third wave of the pandemic gathers momentum; while many countries are eagerly trying to get their hands on more vaccines there is also still a lot of disinformation about them, some of it spread with a rather sinister agenda as we'll hear; and Pope Francis has ordered pay cuts for cardinals and other clerics as the Vatican battles to balance its books during the pandemic.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7d311)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv2g9f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7yn)
Josephine’s story: Debt

Josephine is a single mother of four in Kibera, the sprawling slum in Nairobi, Kenya. At the beginning of the pandemic she was working as a cook, but soon lost her job, and when the BBC's Ed Butler spoke to her a year ago her situation was dire.

In this episode, the third of a short series about Josephine and Kibera, we'll hear how Josephine's efforts to feed her family during the Coronavirus pandemic were further imperilled by a different virus, malaria. We'll also hear how the cost of her food stall, hospital bills and her children's needs sent Josephine further into debt. Local organiser Kennedy Odede describes how in fact consumer debt has rocketed in Kibera during the pandemic, and Judith Tyson of the ODI explains what impact that will have long-term. After all that, a final calamity befalls Josephine's small business.

Producer: Frey Lindsay.

(Picture: A local artists makes and sells face masks made from cloth in the Kibera slum, Nairobi, on April 14, 2020. Picture credit: TONY KARUMBA/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmnp)
South Africa takes on big pharma

At the end of the 1990s, tens of millions of people across Africa had been infected with HIV and in South Africa hundreds of thousands of people were dying from AIDS. People were demanding cheaper drugs, but the big pharmaceutical companies didn’t want to play ball. They took the South African to court over the right to import cheap drugs in a case which would last three years and which would pit the big pharmaceutical companies against Nelson Mandela and the rainbow nation. Bob Howard talks to Bada Pharasi, a former negotiator at South Africa’s department of health.

SANDTON, SOUTH AFRICA - JUNE 17: HIV/AIDS activists demonstrate in front of the American consulate on June 17, 2010. Credit: Photo by John Moore/Getty Images.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7d6s5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6mm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv2l1k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7dbj9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjwy)
The One Thousand and One Nights

The One Thousand and One Nights are a collection of fantastical stories of flying carpets, magic and genies whose ancient origins go back to the 7th century or earlier. The tales are told by Scheherazade who uses the power of storytelling night after night to stop her Sultan husband from beheading her.

These highly influential stories were brought to the West in the 18th century, when more tales like Aladdin and Ali Baba were said to have been added by the French translator, and it has continued to evolve over the centuries. Rajan Datar and guests explore why these stories became so popular around the world and what they mean to us today.

Joining Rajan is Wen Chin Ouyang, Professor of Arabic at SOAS in London; Dr Sandra Naddaff, senior lecturer in Comparative Literature at Harvard University; and the Iranian TV producer Shabnam Rezaei.

[Photo: Sand Sculpture depicting 1001 Nights of Sheherazade. Credit: Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh6f)
Fighting for women's boxing

In the 1980s, the American boxer, Gail Grandchamp, launched a long campaign for the right to take part in amateur competitions in the USA. Representing herself and raising money through part-time jobs, Gail was eventually successful in 1992 - blazing a trail for women boxers the world over. She spoke to Rebecca Kesby in 2016.

PHOTO: Gail Grandchamp squaring up (The Berkshire Eagle)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7dg8f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvcz6pk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv2tjt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 Health Check (w3cszcdd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7dl0k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdcc)
The architect who lost his sight but gained a vision

Chris Downey was always an intensely visual person - he was an architect working in California, a baseball coach and an avid cyclist. But at the age of 45 he went blind very suddenly after doctors discovered a tumour on his optic nerve. Chris used his creative skills to navigate the now unfamiliar world around him and as he adapted to his new normal he began to gain a new vision for designing spaces to suit a broader range of experiences. His firm is called Architects for the Blind.

Freddy Mamani has changed El Alto, a city in the Bolivian Andes. He's an architect, possibly the most famous in the country. His extraordinarily bold, brightly-coloured buildings in geometric designs dominate the city. Some people say they look like flamboyant spaceships. But they're more than simply striking constructions. They're about his roots, and his desire to revitalise indigenous culture. Jane Chambers reports. This interview was first broadcast in May 2018.

Toshiko Mori is a Japanese architect, founder of Toshiko Mori Architect and Professor at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. She is the first woman to be tenured there. Growing up in Japan, she witnessed the country’s recovery after World War Two. She tells Kim Chakanetsa that she firmly believes that architecture can transform communities, and that crises are an opportunity to build better places. This interview was first broadcast as part of a discussion on The Conversation on 26th October 2020.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Chris Downey's hands reading an embossed architectural drawing
Credit: Fogg Studio


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmnp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7dprp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvczg5t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv3212)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7dtht)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z86gr304d)
Covid-19: EU virtual vaccine summit

The third wave of coronavirus infections will dominate a virtual EU summit where leaders are discussing how to increase vaccine production and tighten export controls. We hear from a senior Finnish minister.

A special report from Nagorno Karabakh, the disputed region in Azerbaijan, which last year was mired in a bloody conflict with Armenia; an Azeri family return to the region.

Also, we will about Turkey's relationship with China, and whether President Erdogan is more interested in money than speaking out over Uighers, who have relied on his support in the past.

(Photo credit: EPA)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7dy7y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv39jb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlw6kg2s32y)
Suez Canal remains blocked by container ship

Efforts continue to move a container ship that is blocking the Suez Canal. We find out why it is proving such a challenge from Guy Platten, secretary general of the International Chamber of Shipping. Also in the programme, retailer H&M faces a backlash in China after expressing concern about Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang. Emily Feng is Beijing correspondent for the US public broadcaster NPR, and tells us how H&M got caught up in a diplomatic row between China and the west over allegations of forced labour. Plus, with US president Joe Biden pledging to decriminalise cannabis at a federal level in the country, catching up with a growing number of individual states, we find out about the companies lining up to take advantage. Amanda Jones is chief executive of California-based firm Kikoko, which sells products infused with some of the active ingredients found in cannabis, and explains pandemic-induced anxiety has been good for business. Consultant psychiatrist Dr Marta di Forti at King's College London discusses concerns about the potential effect of cannabis on mental health. And we meet Boris Jordan, executive chairman of the biggest-selling cannabis company in the US, Curaleaf, who has been described by Forbes magazine as "the only pot billionaire".

(Picture: The Ever Given. Picture credit: Reuters.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7f202)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2tbk33zf1x)
EU leaders discuss boosting Covid vaccine supplies

European Union leaders have met for a virtual summit as tensions grow over Covid vaccine supplies. The bloc has already warned it could ban exports of the Oxford-AstraZeneca jabs to places like the UK amid claims current arrangements are slowing down its vaccine rollout. We get the latest developments from our correspondent and speak to journalists from France and Italy about Europe’s vaccine problems and third wave of coronavirus in the continent.

We’ll also be hearing from our resident coronavirus expert, Dr Emma Hodcroft who’ll answer your most pressing questions on the pandemic. She’ll also be updating with the latest research on the virus, including a UK study suggesting that middle-aged women experience the most severe “long Covid” symptoms.

And as we continue to look at how the pandemic has changed people’s lives, today we hear from two people who after losing their jobs became homeless. Edward in the US had to sleep in the New York subway and trains stations and Walter spend five months homeless in South Africa, including living on Cape Town’s famous Table Mountain.

And we’ll be learning about the traffic jam in the Suez Canal that’s caused a backlog of 150 ships in the world’s most vital maritime route. Dislodging the 400 metre-long ship is proving difficult.

(Photo: Vials labelled "AstraZeneca coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine" placed on displayed EU flag are seen in this illustration picture
24/03/2021. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7f5r6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2tbk33zjt1)
Coronavirus conversations: Homeless

We hear from two people who became homeless in the midst of the pandemic. Edward and Walter both lost their jobs after Covid-19 hit. Edward slept in New York trains stations and Walter on the streets of Cape Town – even for a stint, on the famous Table Mountain.

European journalists will tell us about the Covid vaccine supply issues plaguing the continent as cases surge. EU leaders are discussing restricting vaccine exports to countries like the UK with better jab coverage. It comes amid a row with AstraZeneca over shortfalls in vaccine deliveries.

And we speak to a Toronto-based doctor who has shared some shocking pictures on social media of the damaged lungs of two young people infected with Covid-19. Dr Kashif Pirzada says he’s worried about young people who are taking risks by going into crowded places without realising how the virus could affect them.

Our China media analyst explains a backlash retail giants Nike and H&M are facing in China after they expressed concern about the alleged use of forced Uighur labour in the production of Xinjiang cotton.

(Photo: Walter Nyanmugama. Credit: Walter Nyanmugama )


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7f9hb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdcc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmnp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7ff7g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvd05nl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv3shv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k2p53rdph)
2021/03/25 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7fjzl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6mm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv3x7z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1x)
Science on the side of a new volcano

Sightseers and social media scrollers have flocked to the slopes of Fagradalsfjall, a volcano erupting 40 kilometres west of the Icelandic capital Reykjavik. Having produced less than 1 square kilometre of lava this eruption could be deemed relatively minor, allowing bystanders to get up close and personal. Among the hubbub, you might also spot Dr Evgenia Ilyinskaya from University of Leeds, just one of the researchers measuring and observing the event from an alarmingly small distance. Her interest is more in the invisible toxic gases and trace elements being emitted from one of the deepest magma eruptions in recent times than the more cinematic molten rock.

This week scientists working on results from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN announced intriguing evidence (NB “evidence” – not yet a definite discovery) of physics beyond our current understanding. Everything we can detect directly in the universe is made from a few basic building blocks, fundamental particles. These particles are governed by four universal fundamental forces. Our best understanding of these forces and particles are sewn together in the Standard Model of particle physics. Since the 1970s this model has been able to explain most of our experimental results, but not all. Professor Gudrun Hiller from Technische Universität Dortmund has been theorizing as to what sort of experiments might lead to evidence of where the model might be incomplete. And this week, she has reason to feel a little bit proud. As she and her fellow member of the LHCb consortium, Harry Cliff, explain, a mysterious asymmetry in the way certain quarks – beauty quarks – have been seen to decay could be pointing at a deeper, more sophisticated, picture of the nature of the universe. Theorists are theorizing all around the world: could this be a new class of particle called a “leptoquark” that mediates a whole new type of force?

The new results have been submitted for publication in the journal Nature, but have also been made public online in what is known as a “preprint”. Science publication has, for hundreds of years, been governed by peer-review. This process has prevented the wider community of scientists from accessing new scientific reports and papers unless vetted by a smaller number of fellow experts in the field. But this hasn’t been the case for all disciplines. “Preprints”, uncorrected proofs, have for some decades played a role in the publication process of physics and mathematics. In these fields, on the whole, lives are not at risk if mistakes get through to publication, but over the past year the practice of posting proofs to preprint servers is now common in the biomedical and life sciences, to accommodate the deluge of research being conducted on Covid-19. Might this be a problem? Or could it demonstrate the value of preprints? A new paper from Jonny Coates (also a preprint) and colleagues has looked at whether much changes on a biomedical or life-science preprint as it travels through peer-review towards conventional publication.

Image: Lava flows from Fagradalsfjall volcano in Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland
Credit: Kristinn Magnusson/mbl.is

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7fnqq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z86gr3vc9)
Coronavirus: EU urges unity during key vaccine summit

EU leaders will decide whether to approve proposals to toughen export controls. Such controls could affect supply to the UK, where Prime Minister Boris Johnson has warned against imposing "blockades".

Also on the programme: Russian opposition leader, Alexei Navalny, accuses the prison authorities of torturing him by depriving him of sleep; and we hear what Joe Biden has said on his first White House news conference as US president.

(Photo: European Council President Charles Michel speaks during a video conference during the EU summit in Brussels, Belgium. Credit: EPA).


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7fsgv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79x93sb7gp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fsx7q0jfj)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv44r7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmcq255vyc2)
Huge container ship remains stuck in the Suez Canal

The Ever Given remains wedged across the canal despite attempts to pull it free. We ask Angus Blair, professor of practice at the American University of Cairo's Business School, how this will affect Egypt, as well as international shipping,
Also in the programme, the heads of the three biggest tech giants have been answering politicians' questions at a hearing in the US. We get analysis from Issie Lapowsky, senior reporter at protocol.com.
Plus, as US president Joe Biden pledges to decriminalise cannabis at federal level, we find out about the companies lining up to take advantage. Amanda Jones is chief executive of California-based firm Kikoko, which sells products infused with some of the active ingredients found in cannabis, and explains how pandemic-induced anxiety has been good for business. Consultant psychiatrist Dr Marta di Forti at King's College London discusses concerns about the potential effect of cannabis on mental health. And we meet Boris Jordan, executive chairman of the biggest-selling cannabis company in the US, Curaleaf, who has been described by Forbes magazine as "the only pot billionaire".

(Picture: The Ever Given, Picture credit: Getty Images)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7fx6z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv48hc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



FRIDAY 26 MARCH 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7g0z3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjwy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh6f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7g4q7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x199nxl7ct4)
US tech bosses grilled over disinformation

The heads of Facebook, Google and Twitter have been questioned by US politicians - in the first hearing since the storming of the US Capitol in January. We speak to Issie Lapowsky, senior reporter at protocol.com, about how such platforms might be regulated in future.
The Ever Given container ship remains wedged across the Suez Canal despite attempts to pull it free. We ask Angus Blair, professor of practice at the American University of Cairo's Business School, how this will affect Egypt's economy and about the impact on international shipping.
Plus, we analyse what President Joe Biden said during his first official press conference.

Fergus Nicoll is joined throughout the programme by political reporter Erin Delmore in New York and by Patrick Barta, the Wall Street Journal's Asia Enterprise Editor, in Bangkok.

(Picture: Facebook, Twitter and Google logos. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7g8gc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyv)
Jean-Claude Juncker: Is Covid an unprecedented test of EU cohesion?

The Covid-19 pandemic has presented the European Union with an unprecedented test of its cohesion and competence. Right now, the scorecard looks decidedly mixed, with many member states facing a third wave of infection while, the vaccination rollout lags far behind that in post-Brexit Britain. Stephen Sackur speaks to the former president of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker. He once bemoaned a loss of collective EU libido, but is the problem getting worse?


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv4mqr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3cszthl)
Mergers, managers and Romania's Liga 2

Metaloglobus București player Ovidiu Herea joins us to discuss an incredible end to the Romanian Liga II season. And the CEO of Belgian's Pro league Pierre Francois talks about the possibility of a joint Dutch/Belgian league.

(Photo: Ovidiu Herea challenges Edin Dzeko during a UEFA Cup match in 2008. Credit: Stuart Franklin/Bongarts/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7gd6h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdcc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmnp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7ghym)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq7)
Why Intel will make chips for its rivals

The tech giant says it aims to rebalance world chip supply from Asia to the US and Europe. Plus, what can President Biden do about hackers backed by Russia and China? And is crowdtasking the next part of the gig economy to face calls for better workers’ rights? Presented by Joe Tidy, with BBC tech reporter Cristina Criddle. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv4w70)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7gmpr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8y2x1g)
EU says AstraZeneca must 'catch up' on its vaccine deliveries

With vaccine supplies still low and Covid infection rates soaring in much of mainland Europe, EU leaders stopped short of explicitly backing controversial proposals by the European Commission to expand vaccine exports that could have applied to the UK. We get the reaction of the former head of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker.

We're live in India where farmers are holding another nationwide strike against the government's reform proposals.

And we go to Tanzania where President John Magufuli is to be buried today in his ancestral home of Chato in the North West of the country.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7grfw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8y30sl)
EU stops short of extra Covid vaccine export controls

The European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen warned AstraZeneca that it must catch up with vaccine deliveries to the EU before exporting doses elsewhere. An expert in medical supply chains gives her reaction.


We speak to the Nigerian professor who helped secure the return of one of the Benin bronzes.


And paintings you can smell. We'll hear from the Dutch museum which is creating odours to go with some of their grand master paintings.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7gw60)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wsw8y34jq)
Ethiopia says Eritrea to withdraw troops from Tigray

The Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed earlier this week acknowledged for the first time that Eritrean troops crossed the border after months of denial. We have reaction.

European Union leaders agreed at a summit on Thursday to step up production of COVID-19 vaccines in Europe and improve the rollout of inoculations across member states. We speak to a Belgian MEP who is the European Parliament's Trade co-ordinator.

And we find out about the damage to wildlife brought on by the floods in Australia.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7gzy4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv5c6j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz79v)
Nigeria's kidnapping industry

Since December, more than 600 students have been abducted from schools in north-west Nigeria, highlighting a worrying development in the country's kidnap-for-ransom crisis. We'll hear from the father of a returned schoolgirl, about the agony of not knowing what's happened to them. But it's not just schoolgirls. Nigeria is subject to a full-blown kidnapping industry, as Ikemesit Effiong of SBM Intelligence explains. And as the government denies it is paying ransoms, and calls grow for the crisis to be brought under control, Bulama Bukarti of the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change explains just why it's so hard to combat the kidnappers.

Producer: Frey Lindsay

(Picture credit: A woman whose 2 daughters were kidnapped by gunmen cries at her home in Zamfara State, northwest of Nigeria, February, 2021. Image Credit: KOLA SULAIMON/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmwg)
The fight against slavery in Mauritania

Mauritania has a long history of slavery – and a long history of struggle against it. Since the 1960s, slaves and their descendants have campaigned to end this practice, which is deeply embedded in Mauritanian society. In this Witness History, Josephine Casserly hears the story of Brahim Bilal Ramdhane, who was born into slavery in the 1960s and is now a prominent abolitionist.


People hold a banner reading "No to slavery" during a demonstration against discrimination in Nouakchott on April 29, 2015. Credit: AFP via Getty Images


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7h3p8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv5gyn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 World Football (w3cszthl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7h7fd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpg)
Covid mutants: What are the risks?

A year into the Covid crisis, German Chancellor Angela Merkel this week announced her country was facing what amounts to ‘a new pandemic’. “The mutation from Great Britain has taken over,” she warned. “It is clearly more lethal, more contagious, and contagious longer.” Even in countries where attempts to vaccinate the population are continuing at pace, the threat from mutant variants that have shown a greater ability than the original pathogen to evade vaccines is threatening any recovery. The US Centers for Disease Control this week warned that variants now dominate cases in California, and that increased air travel for spring break - combined with a rise in the number of states easing mask and social distancing mandates - may result in another surge. The UK hopes to curb the spread of variants as part of its roadmap to reopening, but in the last week an adviser to Boris Johnson’s government warned that any return to international travel was “unlikely” given the threat new mutations pose. So how long will Covid variants rule our lives and what can be done to curb their influence? Paul Henley is joined by a panel of experts.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7hc5j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvd23ln)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv5qfx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7hgxn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjl)
Remembering a Zulu king

King Goodwill Zwelithini, who died two weeks ago, led the Zulu people for fifty years, gaining both praise and criticism for the way he ruled. Pumza Fihlani of BBC Africa went to his funeral and discusses the significance of the Zulu king.

Ukraine's Eurovision entry
This year's Eurovision entry from Ukraine sounds like a super modern dance track. But the lyrics are a traditional folk song, sung to usher in spring. Roman Lebed of BBC Ukrainian tells us more.

Nepal’s women masons
BBC Marathi’s Mayuresh Konnur has visited Nepal’s Gurkha district, near the epicentre of the 2015 earthquake, to meet some of the country’s new female masons enlisted to help rebuild the country.   

Egypt's mother of feminism remembered
Nawal El Saadawi was one of the most outspoken feminists in the Arab world, fearlessly commenting on religion, sex and FGM. The BBC's Sally Nabil joins us in the week after her death to discuss her life and legacy.

Sri Lankan babies sold abroad for adoption
The Netherlands has suspended adoptions from abroad after uncovering violations in how they were arranged. The BBC's Saroj Pathirana has spoken to birth mothers in Sri Lanka and adoptees in the Netherlands, now grown up and trying to discover their origins.

Image: Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini, dressed in traditional Zulu warrior outfit in August 2000
Credit: RAJESH JANTILAL/AFP via Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmwg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7hlns)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvd2c2x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv5yy5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct29c1)
Creating life after death

Everyone tells five-year-old Shira Malka she looks just like her dad. She has his green eyes. But she’s never met him, because he died seven years before she was born. Shira was conceived through posthumous reproduction, where a child is created from the frozen sperm or eggs of a person who has died. The practice is banned in some places, tightly restricted in others. But Israel - a country that leads the world in assisted reproduction - is testing the boundaries on allowing this new method of family creation.

Shira is a one of a small but growing number of children to be born through posthumous reproduction in Israel over the last two decades. Her grandmother, Julia Pozniansky describes how she struggled for seven years to fulfil her son’s dying wish to father a child and leave her a grandchild. She was helped by Irit Rosenblum, a family lawyer who specialises in these cases and has even created a legal tool document she called the ‘Biological Will’ that enables people to express their wishes about becoming a parent after death. Shira’s mother, Liat Malka discusses why posthumous reproduction was a good alternative for her to anonymous sperm donation. Irit is adamant that the state should be removing barriers to the practice and instead allowing those who die, and their bereaved loved ones, to continue their legacy. But the practice does have its critics and has generated headlines and national debate. Israeli bioethicist Vardit Ravitsky - professor at the University of Montreal and the President of the International Association of Bioethics - explores the ethical arguments on both sides of the issue, and describes how Israeli culture and Jewish tradition have allowed the country to become ‘a unique pressure cooker for allowing reproduction’. She debates the subject with the fiercest critic she knows - her son.

Producer/presenter: Viv Jones
Editor: Penny Murphy

(Photo: Shira and Liat Malka, courtesy of the family)


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7hqdx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z86gr5x1h)
Ethiopia: PM says Eritrean forces to withdraw from north

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed says neighbouring Eritrea will withdraw its forces from the northern region of Tigray. Eritrean troops have been accused of carrying out killings and atrocities in the region. Mr Abiy has faced growing pressure to end the conflict in Tigray, started in November when he sent in national troops, ostensibly to quell separatist forces there.

Also in the programme we hear from an exiled Burmese journalist on how she live-tweeted the coup and six months after the war in Nagorno Karabakh we have a special report from there.

(Picture: The conflict has left Tigray's population in dire need of humanitarian aid. Credit: AFP).


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7hv51)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv66ff)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltknzwhd4g)
Coronavirus: EU stops short of vaccine export ban

EU leaders stopped short of banning Covid-19 vaccine exports amid a row with AstraZeneca. Natasha Loader from The Economist explains why relations between the vaccine manufacturer and the EU have become so protracted. And the BBC's Jayne McCubbin has visited a plant in Wales filling vials of vaccine for AstraZeneca to find out more about the production process. Also in the programme, Bangladesh marks 50 years of independence today, and the country is now the second biggest garment exporter in the world. We take a closer look at the industry there, and Vidya Ambrin Khan tells us about the factory she runs that was set up by her father in the 1970s, and reflects on the impact of the Rana Plaza building collapse in 2013, in which more than 1,000 garment workers died. Sajid Amit researches international development at the University of Liberal Arts in Bangladesh, and discusses the role government support played in establishing Bangladesh's garment dominance. And we hear from Rubana Haq, president of the Bangladesh Garment Makers Association, what impact the coronavirus pandemic has had on the sector. Plus, now China has formalised a five year tariff plan on Australian wine, we examine the likely impact on the country's wine exporters with Tony Battaglene, chief executive of Australian Grape and Wine.

(Picture: A needle in a vial of AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7hyx5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2tbk3429z0)
Coronavirus conversations: Midwives

As part of our regular series of Coronavirus conversations, we speak to three midwifes in the US, Nigeria and Romania to find out how the last year has been for them and what has changed in the delivery room.

And we continue to track the spread of the coronavirus around the world, and today we look at the situation in France. The number of virus cases continues to rise there and health experts fear that the country is not doing enough to curb the rise. We ask our reporter why the current lockdown restrictions are not working. We also speak to our specialist misinformation reporter who’s been investigating why France is one of the most vaccine sceptical countries in the world.

We also look in-depth at the migrant crisis on the US Southern border; Ros Atkins explains why after the change of policy by Biden presidency, unaccompanied children are not being turned back.

(Photo: Midwife holding a newborn baby. Credit: BBC)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7j2n9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2tbk342fq4)
Kenya reintroduces lockdown measures

Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta has banned all inland travel in and out of five counties, including the capital Nairobi, to stop a surge of Covid-19 cases. The sale of alcohol in the areas has also been banned. Kenya’s Covid-19 positivity rate has jumped from 2% to 22% between January and March. We speak to our reporter in Nairobi and a doctor in Mombasa. We also hear from regular people across the country.

And as part of our regular series of Coronavirus conversations, we speak to three midwifes in the US, Nigeria and Romania to find out how the last year has been for them and what has changed in the delivery room.

We also look in-depth at the migrant crisis on the US Southern border; Ros Atkins explains why after the change of policy by Biden presidency, unaccompanied children are not being turned back.

(Photo: Kenya's president Uhuru Muigai Kenyatta, 12 December 2020. Credit: Dennis Sigwe/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7j6df)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmwg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7jb4k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqqvd32kp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv6pdy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k2p53v9ll)
2021/03/26 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7jfwp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv6t52)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv77)
Do animals use medicine?

Animals experience all the colds, stomach pains, headaches, parasites, and general illnesses that humans do. But unlike us, animals can’t just grab a painkiller off the shelf at the supermarket to cure it. They don’t have a pharmacy to browse… or at least, not the sort that we’d recognise.

Listener Andrew Chen got in touch to ask whether animals use any kind of medicine themselves. After all, our own drugs largely come from the plants and minerals found in wild habitats. So perhaps animals themselves are using medicines they find in nature.

Presenter Anand Jagatia speaks with the primate researcher who stumbled across a chimp chewing on a bitter leaf 35 years ago, Professor Mike Huffman, whose observations opened up a whole new field of research. We discover why plants contain the medicinal compounds they do, and how butterflies with brains no bigger than a pin-head are still able to select and use medicine to protect their young.

We think of medicine as a human invention - but it turns out that we’ve learnt a lot of what we know from copying the birds, bugs and beasts.

Presented by Anand Jagatia
Produced by Rory Galloway


Image: Chimp eating. Credit: Getty Images


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7jkmt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z86gr6r8d)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7jpcy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79x93sf4cs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fsx7q3fbm)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv71nb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmbwmfl8jtw)
Coronavirus: EU stops short of vaccine export ban

EU leaders stopped short of banning Covid-19 vaccine exports amid a row with AstraZeneca. Natasha Loader from The Economist explains why relations between the vaccine manufacturer and the EU have become so protracted. And the BBC's Jayne McCubbin has visited a plant in Wales filling vials of vaccine for AstraZeneca to find out more about the production process. Also in the programme, Bangladesh marks 50 years of independence today, and the country is now the second biggest garment exporter in the world. We take a closer look at the industry there, and Vidya Ambrin Khan tells us about the factory she runs that was set up by her father in the 1970s, and reflects on the impact of the Rana Plaza building collapse in 2013, in which more than 1,000 garment workers died. Sajid Amit researches international development at the University of Liberal Arts in Bangladesh, and discusses the role government support played in establishing Bangladesh's garment dominance. And we hear from Rubana Haq, president of the Bangladesh Garment Makers Association, what impact the coronavirus pandemic has had on the sector. Plus, now China has formalised a five year tariff plan on Australian wine, we examine the likely impact on the country's wine exporters with Tony Battaglene, chief executive of Australian Grape and Wine.

(Picture: A needle in a vial of AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pcqy7jt42)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q65nv75dg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3cszthl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Africa Life Clinic 09:32 SUN (w3ct21g9)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3csz6mm)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6mm)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6mm)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5q5tdjgd10)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5q5tdjgr8d)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5q5tdjh3hs)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5q5tdjh77x)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5q5tdjhgr5)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5q5tdjj9z2)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5q5tdjjsyl)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172x5q5tdjk1fv)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5q5tdjk8y3)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5q5tdjkn5h)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5q5tdjl0dw)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5q5tdjl450)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5q5tdjmbm9)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5q5tdjmtlt)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172x5q65ntrsm3)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5q65nv1cl8)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5q65nv1qtn)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5q65nv1z9x)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5q65nv2g9f)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5q65nv2l1k)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5q65nv48hc)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5q65nv4mqr)

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BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5pccnxrs8c)

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BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5pccnxvp5g)

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BBC News 00:00 THU (w172x5pcqy7c420)

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BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172x5pcqy7jpcy)

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