Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 13 MARCH 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlzmnj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpd)
How dangerous are deepfakes?

When a series of chillingly convincing Tom Cruise deepfakes went viral on TikTok this month, it brought home how fast synthetic media technology is evolving. Deepfakes are like photoshop for video – using a form of artificial intelligence called deep learning to create a realistic depiction of fake events. Are we entering an era where AI will let anyone make fake videos of anyone else? What will be the implications for individual dignity and privacy, and the shaping of public opinion and spreading disinformation? How might the technology bring new story-lines to filmmakers and joy to people who can now hear from their deceased relatives? What are the ethics of these developments and how do we regulate the technology as it continues to get better? Ritula Shah and a panel of experts discuss how deep fakes might change the world – for better and worse - and what we need to do now to get ready.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlzrdn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x198ycyrzhk)
The quad: the birth of a new kind of Trans-Pacific Partnership?

President Joe Biden virtually meets with leaders of Quadrilateral Security Dialogue to discuss regional issues. We also hear about the Australian candidate who's looking increasingly likely to be the new head of the OECD. Marketplace USA host Kai Rysdall tells us about how President Trump's tariff war with China and Coronavirus had a big impact on materials and consumer goods moving between the US and Asia and the shipping industries. Also, after months of lockdown, boredom can be the mother of invention, Elizabeth Hotson brings us a special report. Fergus Nicoll is joined by Elizabeth Gwynn reporter for Nine News.

(Photo: President Biden virtually meets Japanese, Indian and Australian leaders Credit: Alex Wong / Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlzw4s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qz)
Fukushima Ten Years Later

Ten years ago the rest of Japan - and then the rest of the world - watched in horror as a huge earthquake, a destructive tsunami and then a nuclear meltdown ravaged the northeast coast of Honshu. Rupert Wingfield Hayes covered it all - and has been back to Fukushima many times since. He reflects on what the early coverage got right and wrong - and how well Japan has managed the post-disaster cleanup. It's going slowly and costing billions - while many evacuees say they've already made new lives elsewhere.

Pascale Harter introduces this and other insights, reportage and analysis from BBC correspondents and writers around the world.

Mayeni Jones reports from Nigeria on how the brutal tactic of mass kidnappings from schools seems to be spreading - and asks whether the media and political furor which erupts after each incident might be fuelling more of these hostage-takings in future.

An insurgency has been raging in northern Mozambique for several years now - but few reporters have been there to see what's going on. Andrew Harding was recently in the town of Pemba - now home to tens of thousands of people driven from their homes by the fighting . He explains some of the factors behind the violence and spends some time with foreign security consultants being called in to back up Mozambican government forces.

And Juliet Rix minds her words in Malta - where the Malti language still echoes with the voices of many peoples who've invaded, settled on and fought over the island over the centuries. Arabic, Italian, French and English have all influenced its grammar and vocabulary as great powers rose and fell. And these days? "Manglish" - a piquant mash-up of Malti and English - can flip from one to another and back again within a single sentence.

(Image: A couple sit on the remains of the bathtub of their house near Fukushima, 2011. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency//Kimimasa Mayama)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46p7f5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhkn)
Haynes: Time to immortalise women’s cricket stars

We reflect on the India/England test match series, discuss the potential of England squad rotation during the Ashes and preview India against New Zealand in the Test Championship final.

Plus the team will be joined by Australia women’s Vice-Captain Rachael Haynes after Cricket Australia announced that they are going to be addressing gender imbalances in the game, including the lack of statues of female cricketers around the country. We also hear what she thinks of women’s Test Cricket versus the shorter format of the game.

Finally we will hear fromTemba Bavuma, who has become the first black African to permanently captain a South Africa side after being appointed their limited-overs skipper.

Photo: Rachael Haynes of Australia celebrates a century during game two of the International Women's One Day International Series between Australia and Sri Lanka at Allan Border Field on October 07, 2019 in Brisbane, Australia. (Photo by Chris Hyde/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlzzwx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjj)
Two to tango

Astor Piazzolla is known as the father of modern tango. The BBC's Valeria Perasso is from Argentina and was born and raised listening to his music. Irena Taranyuk of BBC Ukrainian is a big fan – and dancer - of tango. In the centenary year of Piazzolla’s birth, they discuss his “tango revolution” and its legacy around the world.

Loaves, oil and meat: Iran's lean Nowruz
Queues outside butchers, fights over cooking oil, and buying loaves by the half – all images seen on social media in Iran at a time of year when families would usually be stocking up for Nowruz, the celebration of Spring. Parham Ghobadi of BBC Persian reports on this very visible sign of the ongoing economic crisis in Iran.

The rise and fall of India's fugitive diamond merchant
How did one of the world’s leading fashion jewellers become India’s most wanted man? The story of diamond merchant Nirav Modi from fairytale rise to riches to fugitive accused of fraud, with the BBC’s South Asia Diaspora reporter Gaggan Sabherwal.

Russia’s ice-dancing ballerina
A Russian ballerina in full costume dancing on the frozen sea near St Petersburg caught the world’s attention. Ilmira Bagrautinova chose scenes from Swan Lake to highlight the threat to endangered swans of a proposed port nearby. She told BBC Russian’s Ekaterina Venediktova why that landscape means so much to her.

Image: Couple dancing tango
Credit: Hans Neleman / Getty


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmwd)
The first Indian to win Miss World

Reita Faria was the first Indian to win the Miss World beauty competition in 1966. She was studying medicine in Mumbai when a spur of the moment decision to take part in the contest turned her life upside down. Orna Merchant has been speaking to Reita Faria about her win, and whether she believes there is still a place for beauty contests in the 21st Century.

This programme is a rebroadcast


Photo: Reita Faria wearing the Miss World crown in November 1966. Credit: Staff/Mirrorpix/Getty Images


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm03n1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm07d5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zd)
Coronavirus: Resilience during a year of the pandemic

One year ago, the World Health Organisation announced that Covid19 was spreading across different countries at such an alarming rate that it needed to be classed as a pandemic.

It’s been a challenging year for everyone and host Nuala McGovern shares conversations with people who perhaps don’t always receive public recognition for their work or actions. This includes one of the researchers who helped make the first vaccine to be approved for use around the world and two of the volunteers who took part in successful vaccine trials.

We also hear from supermarket workers in South Africa, the US and the UK about the stress keeping shelves full while working with hundreds of customers - some of whom don’t always respect their jobs or safety during a pandemic.

(Photo: Emma, a supermarket worker in the UK. Credit: Emma)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46plnk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxq)
On 11 November 2019 James Le Mesurier was found dead in a street in Istanbul. He was the latest casualty in a very unusual war – one fought not on the battlefield, but online.

Le Mesurier was a mysterious figure with a taste for the finer things who served in the British Army in several of the world’s hotspots before focusing his energies on war-ravaged Syria from 2014. He co-founded the White Helmets, a Syrian civil defence force who filmed themselves pulling survivors and bodies from the rubble of bombed out buildings.

Soon, the White Helmets - and Le Mesurier - found themselves at the centre of a global race to control the narrative in the Syrian War. In this investigative series Mayday, presenter Chloe Hadjimatheou talks to the people who knew James, including his widow Emma, his ex-wife and former army colleagues, as well as those on the ground in Syria still working as White Helmets today in an effort to piece together James’ story and that of the White Helmets. She speaks to some of the White Helmet’s detractors and follows up accusations about the organisation to try and understand the truth surrounding them.

Chloe Hadjimatheou says: “Making this series has been an extraordinary experience, as listeners will discover. It started out being an investigation into the story of a man with an astonishing life and a mysterious death but it ended up taking me on a bizarre journey down rabbit holes of misinformation. Ultimately this is a story about how truth functions in modern warfare.”


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct24jk)
The Royal Family’s missed chance

It's been a turbulent week for the British royal family following Harry and Meghan's explosive sit-down with Oprah Winfrey. On Thursday, Prince William said the British Royal family is not racist - in his first public response to allegations made in the US television interview, where the Duchess of Sussex claimed her husband had been asked how dark the skin of their first baby might be. Ros Atkins looks at the fallout from the interview and asks if the rift marks a missed opportunity for the Royal family?

(Photo: The Duke and Duchess of Sussex, Harry and Meghan, attend The Endeavour Fund Awards in London on March 5, 2020. Credit: Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm0c49)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7dbwryyqf0)
Family of George Floyd get $27M settlement

The family of George Floyd receive $27M from the city of Minnesota in one the biggest-ever such settlements.

Also, we hear from Mozambique where thousands of civilians are trapped by Islamist militants in the town of Palma in the northern province of Cabo Delgado.

Plus, the US will grant temporary humanitarian protection to Burmese citizens in America as violence grows following last month's military coup.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Samira Rafaele, a Dutch Member of the European Parliament for the social-liberal political party, D66; and Helen Scales, a British marine biologist and writer.

(Picture: George Floyd's brother, Philonise Floyd speaking during the announcement of a settlement against the City of Minneapolis. Credit: EPA)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm0gwf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7dbwryyv54)
Young Nigerians and British colonial rule

Why young Nigerians today may have a more positive view of British colonial rule than their grandparents.

Also, the American city of Minneapolis is to pay $27M to the family of George Floyd to settle a civil rights case.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Samira Rafaele, a Dutch Member of the European Parliament for the social-liberal political party, D66; and Helen Scales, a British marine biologist and writer.

(Picture: Lagos, Nigeria Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm0lmk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7dbwryyyx8)
Jammeh linked to killings of West Africans

Yahya Jammeh, former president of The Gambia has been implicated in the killings of over 50 West African migrants in 2005.

Also, the WHO presents findings of a new report looking at violence against women.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Samira Rafaele, a Dutch Member of the European Parliament for the social-liberal political party, D66; and Helen Scales, a British marine biologist and writer.

(Picture: Gambia's ex-leader Yahya Jammeh appears on state TV to give a brief statement agreeing to step down from office. Credit: AP)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46pywy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m2)
Is Bitcoin here to stay?

Once again, the cryptocurrency Bitcoin is making headlines for rocketing in value. As more companies back it, could it be here to stay? And if so, how is it changing our world? Katty Kay and Carlos Watson look at Bitcoin’s latest price surge and discuss how it and other digital currencies are being adopted around the globe - from the U.S., to Venezuela, to China.

Nathaniel Popper is a New York Times technology reporter and author of Digital Gold: Bitcoin and the Inside Story of the Misfits and Millionaires Trying to Reinvent Money. He’s been following the Bitcoin story for nearly a decade, and explains how it is changing our relationship with money.

Lily Liu is an entrepreneur who has worked with cryptocurrencies for more than five years. In 2018 a company she co-founded was sold to one of the largest cryptocurrency trading platforms for more than $100m. She says companies are backing Bitcoin as an alternative to gold.

A co-production from the BBC World Service and OZY Media.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm0qcp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 today]


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46q2n2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6f)
I'm Not a Monster

13/03/2021 GMT

An American mother living in the heart of the ISIS caliphate. Her husband an ISIS sniper. Her 10-year-old son forced to threaten the U.S. president in a propaganda video shown around the world. She claims she was tricked into taking her young children to war-torn Syria, but where does her account end and the truth begin? Over four years journalist Josh Baker unravels a dangerous story where nothing is as it seems. From the depths of Raqqa’s infamous torture prison to an elk hunt in Idaho, he uncovers secrets, lies and the lasting consequences.

I’m Not A Monster is the story of one family’s journey from Indiana to the Islamic State group and back.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf5s)
The forced detention of a BBC journalist in Ethiopia

The curious case of how BBC Newshour fell victim to a hoax interviewee - listeners ask what systems are in place to prevent this occurring again.
Plus, the disturbing story of the detention of a BBC reporter in Ethiopia's conflict-hit region of Tigray. What happened?

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm0v3t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c9vj8jmxj)
Breaking the coaching glass ceiling - tales from women's elite sport

Former Australia netball coach - Lisa Alexander – and the current England rugby union head coach - Eddie Jones – join the show to discuss Alexander’s desire to coach in the AFL - home of elite men's Aussie Rules. Alexander tells us she’s keen to work in the sport seen as the last bastion of male only coaches in Australia. Jones thinks his friend is courageous in wanting to try something new and they both believe more women will become coaches of men’s teams in the future. They also discuss the value of building relationships with other coaches and what they’ve learned from each other during their twenty year friendship.

Jennifer King tells us how she successfully switched from coaching women’s basketball to working at the highest level of American Football. King made history this year, when the Washington Football Team appointed her the first black female full-time coach in the NFL. King tells us about her career pathway, how she felt the biggest risk she was taking was in leaving behind a successful career coaching basketball and how in her experience, players don’t really care about the gender of their coach.

Kaisy Khademi recalls his remarkable life story and tells us how he hopes to become the first Afghan-British boxer to win a World Title. Khademi and his family fled the Taliban when he was just four years old, and it took them four years to reach England. It’s a tale that involves spending two years in Pakistan, illegal people traffickers, trekking through the jungle and entering England in the back of a refrigerated truck. He became a legal resident in the UK in 2010.

Photo: Australia coach Lisa Alexander talks to her players during a match between the New Zealand Silver Ferns and the Australia Diamonds. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm0yvy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09rlq92)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46qb4b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mk)
Aparna Nancherla and Schalk Bezuidenhout

Brilliant comedians from around the world join Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini to take on the headlines.

This week Jess and Eman are joined by American comedian and writer Aparna Nancherla and South Africa’s hilarious Schalk Bezuidenhout.

They’ll be asking if the pandemic has made us more forgetful, and finding out why pop star Bruno Mars is begging the Grammys to let him perform.

Join Comedians vs the News for the funniest take on the global headlines you’ve heard this week.


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm12m2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6vb)
'My feet felt like a metronome' with Rostam and Santigold

Rostam, Santigold, Dijon and Samantha Urbani discuss whether melody or lyrics come first, how to avoid the temptation to go back to tracks to make alterations, and how naming an album is the last bit of personality you can sprinkle on a project.

Rostam is a Grammy-winning producer, composer, musician, and founding member of the band Vampire Weekend, producing their first three albums. Now a solo artist, he released his debut album Half-Light in 2017, and went on to produce Haim’s Women in Music Pt. III LP, as well as working with the likes of Frank Ocean, Solange, and Carly Rae Jepsen.

Joining him is singer, songwriter and producer Santi White, aka Santigold. She’s released three albums to date, and draws influences ranging from 1980s pop and rock to new age hip-hop.

Dijon is an artist whose reflective, folk-inspired R&B has drawn comparisons to Frank Ocean and Nick Hakim. He began producing music as part of the duo Abhi//Dijon whilst in college before establishing himself as a solo artist.

And finally, Samantha Urbani is an artist, filmmaker, and songwriter who formed the influential DIY indie band Friends. She then moved to LA, where she lent her skills to collaborators including Dev Hynes, Nite Jewel and Zoe Kravitz.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm16c6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy3qczs)
Myanmar coup: The 'battle tactics' used in crackdowns on protests

Violence continues to escalate in Myanmar as security forces hunt and kill the protestors, eight more are shot dead in the streets. We hear from a young protestor in Yangon, determined to continue their fight.

Also in the programme: Twenty-five years since the horrific murder of schoolchildren in the Scottish town of Dunblane, memories of that day don't fade.
And as Italy moves into a Covid-19 lockdown again, a doctor tells us how people are weary of restrictions, and medical staff is exhausted.

(Photo: Human rights groups are calling on Myanmar's military to end it's use of lethal force against civilians. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm1b3b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lpv2pqvrn)
Live Sporting Action

Former West Ham midfielder Nigel Reo-Coker, former Liverpool manager Vicky Jepson and former Wolves and Nigeria midfielder Seyi Olofinjana join Lee James on Sportsworld this Saturday. We’ll have live commentary from the Premier League of Crystal Palace v West Bromwich Albion.

We’ll also keep up-to-date on the latest in European Football including Bayern Munich’s trip to high flying Werder Bremen and Real Madrid’s home game against Elche. Plus the Six Nations returns with 'Le Crunch' as holders England take on France, and leader’s Wales travel to Italy.

Finally to celebrate International Women’s Day on Monday, Sportsworld will be highlighting the trailblazing women who’ve changed sport on and off the field.

Photo: Crystal Palace midfielder Jeffrey Schlupp leaps to win a header against West Bromwich Albion. (Credit:AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm1t2v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09rmkhz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46r5c7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm1xtz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3cszkqc)
The women of Egypt's Arab Spring

The women of Egypt's Arab Spring; the underground abortion network in 1960s America; Greece's champion of the Parthenon Marbles, Melina Mercouri; China’s most powerful 19th-century ruler, and the doctor who was India’s 1966 Miss World.

Photo: Hend Nafea protesting in Tahrir Square in January 2011. (Copyright Hend Nafea)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm21l3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk49)
The Arts Hour with Simon McBurney

Acclaimed theatre director and actor Simon McBurney explores our fragmentation from nature and ourselves and the role arts, culture and storytelling can play in reuniting us.

During this time of Covid-19, we are unable to meet and share experiences. We communicate now on screens and live more in isolation. However this removal from community and from nature has been happening in the West, not just during this pandemic, but for centuries. So is now the time to reflect on those relationships and rethink our place on the planet?

Joining Simon to discuss these issues are the award winning journalist and author Naomi Klein.

Colleen Echohawk, Executive director of the Chief Seattle Club, an organisation which helps the indigenous homeless of that city.

Psychiatrist and thinker Dr Iain McGilchrist, who explains why he feels we’ve become more reliant on the left side of our brains and why that’s not a good thing.

Writer, art historian and filmmaker Nana Oforiatta Ayim on listening to the land in Ghana.

Actor and activist Fehinti Balogun tells us why theatre is the perfect place to highlight issues including climate change.

And filmmaker Takumã Kuikuro who explains why storytelling begins and ends with nature.

Made with Simon McBurney: co-founder and Artistic Director of Complicité

Sound effects by Ben Grant

Producer: Andrea Kidd

Editor: Rebecca Stratford

(Photo: Simon McBurney. Credit: Ali Wright)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm25b7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy3rbyt)
Almost 200 opposition figures are arrested in Moscow

The delegates from across the country were meeting to prepare for municipal elections; instead they ended up posting selfies from inside police vans.

Also on the programme, eight protesters in Myanmar have been shot dead by the security forces. And we go to Bolivia where the former president, Evo Morales, has demanded punishment for the people involved in what he described as a coup against him in 2019. His comment, in a tweet, followed the arrest on sedition charges of the woman who succeeded him.

(Picture: Selfie from inside a Russian Police van. Taken by Maria Kuznetsova)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm292c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wkl4yr26)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fs5q2n111)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46rnbr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2bh0)
Eighteen years in hell

In 1971, Aziz BineBine – a junior officer in the Moroccan army – was ordered to take part in a military exercise. Unbeknown to him, the attack on King Hassan’s summer palace near Casablanca was in fact a coup attempt.

The coup failed – and Aziz, who had never fired a shot, was accused of being part of the plot. He found himself publicly disowned by his father, a devout Islam scholar and close associate of the King. Sentenced to 10 years in jail, Aziz was soon transferred to the dungeon of a secret prison in the Atlas mountains - Tazmamart.

It was what Aziz describes as hell; his cell, furnished only with a concrete bench, was dark and dank, liable to flooding by blocked sewers, shared with scorpions and cockroaches, searing in summer and freezing in winter. Many of his fellow prisoners perished. Aziz was to remain at Tazmamart for 18 years.

But he found astonishing inner resources to survive this hell. Even before entering Tazmamart, he had made an act of complete, unconditional surrender to God, which enabled him to live one day at a time and forget everything else, even any desire to regain his freedom.

Aziz tells the story of his captivity and the faith that sustained him in conversation with John McCarthy, who himself experienced a long imprisonment as a British hostage in Lebanon in the 1980s. Both men were eventually released in 1991.

(Photo: The prison of Tazmamart, a former barracks in the eastern Middle Atlas mountains 60km from the city of Errachidia, Morocco. Credit:: Abdelhak Senna/AFP/Getty Images)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm2dth)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sq1)
Covid-19: One year on

On this edition of Business Weekly, we look at an alternative view of the economic future, a year on from the start of the Coronavirus pandemic. We hear from musicians on different continents who have found different ways to pay the bills when the live venues closed. And we head to Nairobi to meet Josephine, a woman living in an informal settlement, who has recorded a pandemic diary for us. We will also hear from the fishing villages around the Indian Ocean where people in the Seychelles and Maldives are worried the yellow fin tuna stocks are fast depleting. It’s being blamed on a love of sushi in the west. And to finish off, we’ve an insight into a very unusual career that has brought someone a great deal of happiness. Business Weekly is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Photo: Vaccine vials pictured in London, England. Credit: Getty Images)



SUNDAY 14 MARCH 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm2jkm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9r)
Fatoumata Diawara: music, Mali and migration

Malian singer-songwriter Fatoumata Diawara has collaborated with international superstar musicians such as Damon Albarn, Paul McCartney and Cuban pianist Roberto Fonseca alongside her successful career as an actress. Beyond her critical and popular success, her music engages with social issues such as women’s rights, the treatment of migrants and human trafficking. Fatoumata’s most recent album ‘Fenfo’ translates from Bambara as ‘Something to Say’. Fatoumata tells Nawal why she’s chosen to be a voice for the voiceless.

With sold out shows in London, Amsterdam and Nepal, an opera about sex workers, made by sex workers is addressing clichés and tackling stigmas through performance. The Sex Workers Opera aims to portray the reality of their lives without glamourizing it or victimising those involved. Our reporter Constanza Hola speaks to the co-director Alex Etchart and some of the performers about the project.

Armenian-American musician Serj Tankian from the award-winning heavy metal band, System of a Down talks to Nawal about his music and political activism. A new film, Truth to Power charts Serj’s continuing efforts to speak up on behalf of the Armenian people and explores how rock music can be a unique mechanism for rebellion.

Plus: has a book, film or song inspired you to take a certain path in life? The British rock singer Skin from band Skunk Anansie reveals how an unforgettable play influenced her music.

Presenter: Nawal Al-Maghafi



(Photo: Fatoumata Diawara. Credit: Aida Muluneh)


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46rwv0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3cszf5s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm2n9r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3cszky4)
A shooting star parked on your driveway

Last week a fireball lit up the sky of western England. Locals and professionals scoured the countryside for any surviving precious fragments of meteorite, and thanks to them some bits of the earliest solar system are now in London’s Natural History Museum. And as an excited Sara Russell, Merit Researcher in Cosmic Mineralogy tells us, examples of carbonaceous chondrite – the soft, loamy type that fell in Winchcombe – such as this, are a rare and special chunk of luck.

Spotting tsunamis in the ionosphere
Exactly a decade ago the disastrous huge wave caused by an earthquake at sea struck the coast of Japan, causing death and devastating consequences. But could new ways of spotting tsunamis beyond the horizon be, well, just over the horizon? Giovanni Occhipinti of the Paris Geophysics Institute tells Roland Pease about his technique of looking at disruptions in the highest levels of the atmosphere - using the slight twinkle in a beam from a GPS or GNS satellite - to infer that a massive wave may be on its way.

Hacked EMA emails and mRNA vaccine stability
This week a piece in the British Medical Journal provides some insight into how the medical regulatory bodies scrutinised the novel RNA vaccines that were the science marvels of 2020. Investigative journalist Serena Tinari was one of the people who received anonymously a large, though selective, bundle of hacked emails and documents dating back to November copied from the servers of the European Medicines Agency. They make mention of concerns the Agency had over the levels of effective RNA contained in some batches of the industrially produced Pfizer Biontech Covid vaccine compared to the laboratory produced doses. The EMA did subsequently licence the vaccine - the problem having presumably been solved. However, as Serena describes, she was then surprised that the companies and agencies she and the BMJ approached would not tell her what the threshold was for adjudging acceptable levels, given as is well known, the fragility of mRNA and the need to store it carefully. They said it was commercially sensitive. But as RNA researcher Prof Anna Blakney tells Science in Action, there are fascinating reasons why that might simply not be known, and also why precise accuracy likely doesn’t matter too much compared to the better-known clinical efficacy these vaccines continue to demonstrate.

The information superhighway of the body
The Vagus nerve is part of our parasympathetic nervous system, delivering information from all our major organs to the brain stem, and stimulating it can help us switch off our fight or flight response and calm us down. But listener Mags wants to know what science says about its impact on our general wellbeing? Marnie Chesterton learns some deep breathing techniques and discovers how the length of our exhale is closely linked to our heart rate, all of which is important for developing something called vagal tone. Cold water immersion also said to stimulate the Vagus, so Marnie braves a freezing shower, only to discover she needs to get her face wet but keep the rest of her body dry, to avoid what scientists called autonomic conflict, which is when your stress response and calming response are both switched on by the same event. Activating both arms of the nervous system in this way can lead to serious heart problems in some people. New research into the gut-brain axis has shown that the Vagus nerve may be responsible for transporting the so-called happy hormone serotonin, which could have important implications for the treatment of depression. And innovations in electrical stimulation of this nerve means implanted devices may soon be used to treat inflammatory conditions like arthritis.

Image: Meteorite of carbonaceous chondrite found in Gloucestershire, England, UK
Credit: Anonymous


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm2s1w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c1p)
How to make a career comeback

Over 40 million people are recorded as unemployed in India. To add to that, the coronavirus pandemic continues to devastate the jobs sector worldwide. Once you lose your job, finding another in these uncertain times is not easy. The statistics are staggering - but there's also a human story behind each number.

So what are the stories of some of the Indians who found themselves unexpectedly hit by the pandemic? How did they reinvent themselves amid challenging times? What does it take to switch professions? What about the dreams and aspirations that were driving their lives before the pandemic struck? Have they changed?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we hear stories of people who switched careers during the pandemic to stay afloat.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Dipankar Baruah, travel professional-turned-farmer; Ayushi Shrivastava, digital marketing professional; Sunil Suresh, beatboxer, stock trader


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46s4b8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyt)
The truth about obesity and Covid-19

A widely reported study claims that 90% of Covid-19 deaths across the world happened in countries with high obesity rates. While an individual’s risk of death is increased by having a high Body Mass Index, the broader effect on a country’s death rate is not what it seems.


(Photo: Old fashioned scale magnifies a heavy weight. Credit:Getty images)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm2wt0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sq1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm30k4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2ccm)
Coronavirus: Resilience during a year of the pandemic

It has been a year since the Covid-19 outbreak was declared a pandemic. During the past 12 months, BBC OS has been bringing people together in conversation to share their experience of the coronavirus. Nuala McGovern will host a special edition, as she hears from people whose actions and lives have followed an extraordinary path during the year of the pandemic.

Guests around the world talk about how they have coped with bereavement due to the virus. Two daughters and a father in the US discuss their lives after losing their mother, and wife, to the virus. She died while the father was in a coma after contracting the virus.

Also, doctors and nurses in various countries will share how they have got through a year on the medical frontline. Vaccine researchers will talk to those who have volunteered to administer the Covid jab. And supermarket workers, teachers and bus drivers will also reflect on their year working amid the virus.

(Photo: (Left to right) Paige, Russell, Shaye, Judy. Credit: Patrick Rosch)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm3498)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46shkn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2bh0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm381d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7dbwrz1mb3)
Myanmar civilian leaders call for protest to continue

As a new report claims that China is committing genocide against its Uyghur population, we speak to human rights activist Jewher Ilham.

Also, Senator Sarah Hanson-Young on Australia's ‘toxic’ politics;

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Elif Shafak, award-winning Turkish-British author and women's rights activist, and Philippe Sands, international lawyer and professor of law at University College London.

(Picture: Protesters against military coup and detention of elected government members in Yangon, Myanmar. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm3csj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7dbwrz1r27)
Situation in Myanmar is ‘do or die’

The envoy for Myanmar’s civilian government to the United Nations, Dr. Sasa on protests and fate of As Aung San Suu Kyi

Family lawyer of the Turkish-Armenian journalist, Hrant Dink, urges Turkish authorities to open a new investigation on his murder

The Nigerian-British playwright and screenwriter, Theresa Ikoko, speaks to the BBC about her Bafta nominated film 'Rocks', and diversity on screen.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Elif Shafak, award-winning Turkish-British author and women's rights activist, and Philippe Sands, international lawyer and professor of law at University College London.

(Picture: Protesters hold candles as they continue to protest against military coup and detention of elected government members in Yangon, Myanmar. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm3hjn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7dbwrz1vtc)
Situation in Myanmar is ‘do or die’

The envoy for Myanmar’s civilian government to the United Nations, Dr. Sasa speaks to the BBC on protests and fate of Aung San Suu Kyi.

Also, ten years from the start of war in Syria, we bring you a rare account of life in its capital, Damascus.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Elif Shafak, award-winning Turkish-British author and women's rights activist, and Philippe Sands, international lawyer and professor of law at University College London.

(Picture: Protesters in Myanmar. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46svt1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 Outlook (w3cszf18)
The child labourer who became a star of Mexico's food scene

The celebrated chef, nicknamed ‘Fast Eddie’, began picking fruit as an undocumented child in the US. He was deported having served time in prison for selling drugs - after turning himself in. Eduardo Garcia tells Saskia Edwards how he went on to become one of the most successful Mexican restauranteurs. A shorter version of this interview was first broadcast on 25th February 2021.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Presenter and producer: Saskia Edwards

Picture and credit: Eduardo Garcia


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm3m8s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46szk5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Africa Life Clinic (w3ct21g8)
Covid-19 vaccination in Africa

As the roll out of vaccines across Africa gathers pace we look to the future, how vaccination may help ease travel restrictions and ways to convince those still reluctant to get vaccinated. We also look at diabetes, the disease is more common than we might think affecting a wide range of people. With Rhoda Odhiambo, Anne Mawathe and Priscilla Ngethe.
(Picture: Covax shipments of Covid-19 vaccines arrive at the Ivory Coast. Credit: GettyImages)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm3r0x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbg)
Pain

Hurting, pain and suffering might just be some of the most important things that make you who you are. That pain, though, may be almost invisible to those around you.

Suffering is often private and difficult to discuss. You can’t hold your pain up to the light for someone else to examine or drape it around their shoulders to see how it might fit. Yet our experience of pain can change the way we think about ourselves and others.

In an effort to understand how suffering works, Dessa gets burned — literally — and talks pain scales, placebos and the grade school game of sticking gum wrappers to your forehead.

(Image: Child with plaster on knee, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46t399)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2bh0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm3vs1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09rpm65)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46t71f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2cb2)
Under the Canopy

Forests of science and knowledge

Writer Jessica J Lee, sets out to describe the myriad ways that forests operate in our lives and the life of the planet. She outlines the exciting developments that have taken place in our understanding of the ways forests work over recent decades, with science offering radical new ways of recognising these places as communities of mutually supportive trees rather than competitive spaces where individual trees fight one another for survival. She speaks with Peter Wohlleben who is one of the chief communicators of this ‘Wood Wide Web’ idea, and also expert on fungi Merlin Sheldrake about the crucial importance of mycorrhizzal networks in forest life. Jessica also hears from biologist Diana Beresford Kroeger and Haida leader Miles Richardson about how this new science is built on the back of much older, traditional knowledge held within indigenous communities.

Forest sounds appear courtesy of the 'Sounds of the Forest' project

Original musical composition: Erland Cooper

Spells written by Robert Macfarlane and these are read by Maxine Peake and the Bird sisters

Photo credit: Geoff Bird


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm3zj5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4x)
Is Antifa the threat it’s made out to be?

Vivid and sometimes wild claims about the antifascist group Antifa have been circulating in America. Some say that the group participates in widespread violence, while others have argued that it is a small but justified part of their fight against fascism.

Tanya Beckett takes a closer look at what is true and what is exaggeration.

Producer: Nathan Gower


(Members of Antifa protest at a far right Rally in Portland, Oregon USA. Credit: Diego Diaz/ Getty Images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46tbsk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3csz6mk)
The disinformation dragon

Prior to the Hong Kong pro-democracy movement and the Covid 19 pandemic, China’s presence on social media was largely to promote a positive image of its country – trying to ‘change the climate’ rather than seeking to sow confusion and division. But this is changing.

In this investigation for Assignment Paul Kenyon and Krassimira Twigg examine China’s new strategy of aggressively pushing disinformation on social media platforms through the use of ‘wolf warrior’ diplomats, internet bots, ‘the 50-cent army’ of loyal Chinese netizens and a longer term goal of inventing a new type of internet where authoritarian governments can control its users.

Editor: Lucy Proctor

(Image: Checking a smartphone, lit-up against a dark background. Credit:d3sign/Getty)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm4389)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy3t8ww)
London's police criticised over handling of dead woman vigil

London's Metropolitan Police is facing criticism for its handling of Saturday's unauthorised vigil for Sarah Everard, a young woman whose body was found last week and whose death has ignited a national debate about violence against women.
Also on the programme, Ireland becomes the latest country to suspend the use of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine over blood clot concerns; and why isn't North Korea responding to the Biden Administration?
(Picture: Police detain a woman as people gather at a memorial site in Clapham Common Bandstand. REUTERS/Hannah McKay)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm470f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2ccm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm4brk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjww)
BR Ambedkar: The Dalit hero of India

Educate, Agitate, Organise. This was the motto of the Indian scholar BR Ambedkar who led an extraordinary life of activism and achievement. It put him in conflict with many other political forces in his native country, such as the Indian National Congress and Mahatma Gandhi. In India itself, Ambedkar's legacy is widely respected but in other countries he is not so well known. And yet, Ambedkar was not only a leading intellectual of his day, brilliant orator, lawyer, successful politician and an unmatched champion of those suffering the harshest discrimination: he was also someone who rose from a Dalit background to being put in charge of writing the first constitution of independent India. The Dalits are the lowest of the low in the Indian social hierarchy, often considered as being below the lowest caste.

To tell Ambedkar's story Rajan Datar is joined by three distinguished Ambedkar scholars: Sunil Khilnani, professor of politics and history at Ashoka University and author of Incarnations: India in Fifty Lives; Valerian Rodrigues, emeritus professor of political studies at Jawaharlal Nehru University and first Ambedkar chair at Ambedkar University, both in New Delhi, and author of The Essential Writings of B.R. Ambedkar; and Ananya Vajpeyi, associate professor at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies in New Delhi and author of Righteous Republic: The Political Foundations of Modern India.

[Photo: A statue of BR Ambedkar at Rashtriya Dalit Prerna Sthal in Noida, India. Credit: Sunil Ghosh/Hindustan Times via Getty Images]


SUN 15:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh6c)
The Palestinian women's football team

To mark International Women’s Day, Sporting Witness has the story of the founding of the Palestinian women’s football team, who played their first international match in 2005. Many of the players had to overcome hostility from male relatives, as well as the difficulties of day-to-day survival in the occupied West Bank. The Palestinian captain, Honey Thaljieh, talks to Charlotte North about how she found a sense of liberation through sport.

PHOTO: Honey Thaljieh, second right, on a visit to Australia in 2017 (Getty Images)


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm4ghp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lpv2pv050)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary of the North London derby between Arsenal and Tottenham, and we’ll have reaction to the day’s early matches with Southampton facing Brighton and Leicester taking on Sheffield United.

Plus we’ll reflect on the Women’s League Cup Final as Bristol City play Chelsea, while India take on England in the second men’s T20 international.

Photo: Tottenham Hotspur forward Harry Kane and Arsenal's Alexandre Lacazette tussle for the ball during a Premier League match. (Credit: Visionhaus)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm4tr2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09rql56)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46v60g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm4yh6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6vb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm527b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy3v7vx)
Martial law declared after more violence in Myanmar

Security forces opened fire in the Yangon area of Hlaing Tharyar as protesters used sticks and knives. The junta declared martial law in the area after Chinese businesses were attacked. Protesters believe China is giving support to the Burmese military.

Also on the programme there have been serious defeats for Angela Merkel's CDU party in local elections in Germany. And we pay tribute to Thione Seck, a giant of Senegalese music who has died at the age of 66.

(Picture: Property set ablaze in the Yangon area of Hlaing Tharyar Credit: EPA)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm55zg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wkl51mz9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fs5q2qxy4)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46vk7v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dm59ql)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46vnzz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf18)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]



MONDAY 15 MARCH 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnx98qw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdhzn08)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Discovery (w3ct2ccf)
The Life Scientific: Jane Hurst

Mice, like humans, prefer to be treated with a little dignity, and that extends to how they are handled.

Pick a mouse up by its tail, as was the norm in laboratories for decades, and it gets anxious. Make a mouse anxious and it can skew the results of the research it’s being used for.

What mice like, and how they behave, is the focus of Professor Jane Hurst’s research. Much of that behaviour, she’s discovered, can be revealed by following what they do with their noses - where they take them and what’s contained in the scent marks they sniff.

Now William Prescott Professor of Animal Science at the University of Liverpool, Jane has unravelled a complex array of scent signals that underpin the way mice communicate, and how each selects a mate.

Within this heady mix of male scent, she’s identified one particular pheromone that is so alluring to females that she named it Darcin, after Mr Darcy in Pride and Prejudice.

Producer: Beth Eastwood


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnx9dh0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x584cvx9rtr)
Most of Italy to shut down to tackle rising Covid-19 cases

The entire country will be put on lockdown for three days over the Easter weekend. We hear what this will mean for businesses, and speak to Aurelio Gandola, who runs a bar and restaurant on Lake Como. We also get an update from Brazil, where new Covid-19 infections are at their highest rate. We speak to epidemiologist Dr Pedro Hallal.
The music industry's biggest event of the year, the Grammys, get underway this evening in Los Angeles. Our West Coast correspondent Sophie Long has been speaking to the songwriters behind one of the year's biggest hits, BTS's Dynamite.

(Picture: St Peter's Square in Rome. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdhzrrd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnx9j74)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc3b)
Adar Poonawalla: How to vaccinate the world

Stephen Sackur speaks to Adar Poonawalla, the CEO of the biggest vaccine producer in the world, Serum Institute of India. He went all-in on a production deal with Astrazeneca, and for many of us, the jab we get will have been made by him. He’s a super-rich vaccine visionary; is he driven by more than profit?


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdhzwhj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4r)
Afrofuturism: Black women changing the sci-fi scene

Is science fiction too white? Kim Chakanetsa meets two women who are diversifying the genre. They talk about finding inspiration, dealing with rejection, and what Afrofuturism means to them.

N.K. Jemisin is an African-American psychologist and science fiction writer. Her Broken Earth trilogy won the Hugo Award for Best Novel three years in a row. She’s the first and only author to have achieved that recognition. In her latest book, The City We Became, she addresses the legacy of racism in science fiction.

Chinelo Onwualu is a Nigerian writer and the non-fiction editor of Anathema Magazine. She grew up wanting to write science fiction, but struggled to get her voice heard in a largely white and male-dominated world. She talks about the main narratives and themes emerging within African Speculative Fiction.

Produced by Alice Gioia

IMAGE DETAILS:
L: N.K. Jemisin (Credit: Laura Hanifin)
R: Chinelo Onwualu (courtesy of Chinelo Onwualu)


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnx9mz8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj007n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 on Sunday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnx9rqd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbj)
Must our future be cast in concrete?

As the world becomes more populous, experts say we’re likely to use 25 percent more concrete in the next decade. But concrete is also responsible for eight percent of the planet’s greenhouse gas emissions.

There are concerns that the industry isn’t taking its carbon footprint seriously enough. So our climate question this week is: Must our future be cast in concrete?

Guests:
Arpad Horvath, professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of California, Berkley
Professor Karen Scrivener, head of Laboratory of Construction Materials at Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
Anupama Kundoo, professor of architecture at the Potsdam School of Architecture, Berlin, and working architect
Sophia Yan, China correspondent for The Telegraph

Presented by Graihagh Jackson and Neal Razzell
Produced by Alex Lewis
Researched by Zoe Gelber
Edited by Emma Rippon


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj03zs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv75)
How does my mind talk to my body?

This week CrowdScience investigates the information superhighway connecting mind with body. The Vagus nerve is part of our parasympathetic nervous system, delivering information from all our major organs to the brain stem, and stimulating it can help us switch off our fight or flight response and calm us down. But listener Mags wants to know what science says about its impact on our general wellbeing? Marnie Chesterton learns some deep breathing techniques and discovers how the length of our exhale is closely linked to our heart rate, all of which is important for developing something called vagal tone. Cold water immersion also said to stimulate the Vagus, so Marnie braves a freezing shower, only to discover she needs to get her face wet but keep the rest of her body dry, to avoid what scientists called autonomic conflict, which is when your stress response and calming response are both switched on by the same event. Activating both arms of the nervous system in this way can lead to serious heart problems in some people. New research into the gut-brain axis has shown that the Vagus nerve may be responsible for transporting the so-called happy hormone serotonin, which could have important implications for the treatment of depression. And innovations in electrical stimulation of this nerve means implanted devices may soon be used to treat inflammatory conditions like arthritis.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and produced by Marijke Peters for the BBC World Service


Contributors:

Dr Lucy Kaufmann, Adjunct Professor of Neurology, NYU

Mike Tipton, Professor of Human and Applied Physiology, University of Porstmouth

Mark Genovese, Emeritus Professor of Medicine, Stanford University

Dr Karen-Anne McVey Neufeld, Brain Body Institute, McMaster University

[Image credit: Getty Images)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnx9wgj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0ly4t7)
Myanmar demonstrations: dozens of protesters killed

Anti coup protesters face deadly clampdown before former leader Aung San Suu Kyi is due back in court.

We hear from a former senior Ethiopian diplomat in the US about why he decided to resign in protest at what he says are atrocities carried out by government and Eritrean forces in Tigray.

And a World War One tunnel where hundreds of soldiers died is unearthed in Eastern France. We hear why it's now in need of protection.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxb06n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0ly8kc)
39 protesters killed in one of Myanmar's bloodiest days since coup

We go to the country's largest city, Yangon, for an update - where security forces opened fire at the weekend.

Beyoncé breaks the Grammy's record for the most awards ever won by a woman.

And a fan of the Scottish Premiership club Dundee United investigates why his football team's name has become an insult and synonymous with idiocy in Nigeria.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxb3ys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0lyd9h)
Growing international criticism of Myanmar deaths

The army extends its clampdown during the most deadly weekend since the coup - but the protesters refuse to end their demonstrations. Aung San Syu Kyi is due back in court today.

Italy's government is stepping up its pandemic response after a surge in infections. It comes a year after Covid first hit the country hard.

And British politicians are due to vote on a new law that hands the police and home secretary greater powers to control protests. It comes as the police face criticism for their handling of women taking part in a vigil for a murder victim.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxb7px)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj0lz9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7kt)
Has the food industry made Covid worse?

Obesity is a major factor in which countries have the worst Covid-19 death rates, a new report suggests. So could this be a moment of reckoning for food and beverage businesses?

Manuela Saragosa hears from John Wilding, president of the World Obesity Federation, which produced the report. She asks Kate Halliwell, chief scientific officer of the UK’s Food and Drink Federation, what responsibility the industry bears. Sophie Lawrence of fund managers Rathbone Greenbank explains how important obesity is to investors in food and drink companies. Plus, a Covid survivor who was morbidly obese when he went into hospital in March last year, and spent seven weeks in an induced coma, tells us how he has now dramatically changed his lifestyle.

Producers: Laurence Knight, Benjie Guy

(Photo: A tray of fast food - a burger, fries and a drink. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmld)
Paris is Burning

The documentary Paris is Burning was released in 1991 The award winning film showed a glimpse of the thriving underground ballroom and drag scene in New York City in the 1980s and the black and LatinX LGBTQ+ communities at the heart of it. The United States in the 1980s was a difficult place to be different, with homophobia and racism running rife. Pairs is Burning was filmmaker Jennie Livingston’s first documentary and she has been telling Bethan Head about the lengthy process of bringing the film to the screen.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxbcg1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj0qqf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxbh65)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj0vgk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxbly9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl1xccf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj0z6p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv75)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxbqpf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd4k)
Married to a psychopath: My husband’s double life

Mary Turner Thomson’s life took a chilling turn after meeting the “perfect” man online. She had a call from her husband's "other wife" and discovered how life could be stranger than fiction. She tells Emily Webb how she uncovered the incredible truth about Will Jordan's deceit.

Mary became determined not to let others get caught in the "predator's trap" by writing about her experience in her latest book The Psychopath: A True Story.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Mary Turner Thomson and Will Jordan
Credit: Mary Turner Thomson


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmld)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxbvfk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl1xlvp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj16py)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxbz5p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6f14t8)
Myanmar protests: More than 50 people killed on Sunday

Myanmar's military has imposed martial law across more districts around the country following the deadliest day of protests since February's coup. About 50 people were reported killed when troops and police opened fire on protesters in various areas on Sunday. Most deaths were in Yangon.

Also in the programme: Thousands march against sexual assault in Australia; and Beyonce and Taylor Swift make history at the Grammys.

(Photo: Security forces used live rounds against protesters in Hlaing Tharyar. Credit: Reuters)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxc2xt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj1g66)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvcrg50ybj)
Italy faces new coronavirus restrictions

Italy is battling another wave of coronavirus and is tightening restrictions again. Schools and non-essential businesses have been forced to close across more than half the country, including the two biggest regions around Rome and Milan, as the BBC's Mark Lowen explains. Also in the programme, with obesity believed to be a major factor in which countries have the worst Covid-19 death rates, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on whether it could mark a moment of reckoning for food and beverage businesses, in terms of making their products more healthy. Plus, the shortlist for this year’s Oscars has been released. Georg Szalai is international business editor at The Hollywood Reporter, and tells us what this year's selection says about the impact of the pandemic on filmmaking, and progress made towards diversity in the industry.

(Picture: Near empty streets around the Colosseum in Rome. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxc6ny)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2tb5tsxkqs)
Myanmar protests: Military extends martial law

In Myanmar the military has imposed martial law across more districts after the deadliest day of protests since February's coup. Around 50 people were reported killed when troops and police opened fire on protesters. We hear from protesters in the country.

Also, we speak to our coronavirus experts about the concerns over possible side effects of the Oxford-AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine. Germany has become the latest country to suspend the use of the vaccine but the WHO has said there is no link between vaccine and reports of blood clots.

And we continue to look back at a year of the coronavirus pandemic and this week we’ll be playing a conversation with four journalists in India, Brazil, Italy and the US about what it has been like to cover the story and how different governments have handled the pandemic.

(Photo: Demonstrators take cover behind a barricade during an anti-coup protest in Mandalay 15/03/2021. Credit: Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxcbf2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2tb5tsxpgx)
Texas prisons: Families visit for the first time in a year

We hear from people in Texas in the United States who are visiting their family members in prison for the first time in a year - with coronavirus restrictions being eased in the state.

Also, we continue to look back at the year of the coronavirus pandemic and this week we’ll be playing a conversation with four journalists in India, Brazil, Italy and the US about what it has been like to cover the story and how different governments have handled the pandemic.

And we speak to our coronavirus experts about the concerns over possible side effects of the Oxford-AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine. Germany has become the latest country to suspend the use of the vaccine but the WHO has said there is no link between vaccine and reports of blood clots.

(Federal Medical Center (United States federal prison) in Fort Worth, Texas, 12/05/2020. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxcg56)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd4k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmld)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxckxb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl1ybbg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj1y5q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k29wspkcc)
2021/03/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxcpng)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj21xv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2cch)
Patient Zero

It was October 2010 when reports first emerged of a mysterious disease spreading through Haiti. In a hospital in Saint Marc, about an hour north of the country's capital Port-au-Prince, 400 cases of adults with watery diarrhoea had been reported in a single day. On a regular day, there might be four people show up at the hospital with these symptoms.
For the doctors at the hospital, diarrhoea and vomiting pointed to one disease — cholera.

Olivia Willis tells the story of how cholera came to Haiti in the first of a series about disease outbreaks

Picture: Collapsed house, Haiti, Credit: Claudiad/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxctdl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6f2015)
Continue using AstraZeneca vaccine, says WHO

The WHO urges countries not to pause Covid-19 vaccinations, as several major EU countries halt their rollouts of the Oxford-AstraZeneca jab. It says there is no evidence of a link between the vaccine and blood clots. Spain, France, Italy and Germany joined smaller nations in halting vaccinations as a precaution while checks are made.

Also in the programme: The UN special envoy for Syria tells the BBC there's a window of opportunity to end the war ten years after it started; and in the conflict-hit Ethiopian region of Tigray, more than two out of three health centres have been attacked and ransacked, according to the medical charity MSF. Newshour asks Ethiopia's health minister about it.


(Photo credit: EPA)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxcy4q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wxvg8d4k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fsjzcyp3d)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj29f3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172xm9t5tgtpmz)
WHO says there's no link between the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots

The WHO's conclusion came after several European countries have suspended the use of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, including France and Germany. But as the numbers of Covid-19 cases rise in Europe, what will this mean for the vaccine rollout? We speak to epidemiologist Dr Maria Sundaram.
Volkswagen has announced plans to increase its car battery production and charging network across Europe, the US and China. Nikki Gordon-Bloomfield is a tech journalist who specialises in electric vehicles, and was watching VW's announcement.
Also in the programme, with obesity believed to be a major factor in which countries have the worst Covid-19 death rates, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on whether it could mark a moment of reckoning for food and beverage businesses, in terms of making their products more healthy.
Plus, the shortlist for this year’s Oscars has been released. KJ Matthews is an entertainment reporter in Los Angeles, and tells us what this year's selection says about the impact of the pandemic on filmmaking, and progress made towards diversity in the industry.

(Picture: An Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxd1wv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc3b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj2f57)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



TUESDAY 16 MARCH 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxd5mz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxd9d3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1999n85jh0)
WHO says there's no link between the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine and blood clots

The WHO's conclusion came after several European countries have suspended the use of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, including France and Germany. But as the numbers of Covid-19 cases rise in Europe, what will this mean for the vaccine rollout? We speak to epidemiologist Dr Maria Sundaram.
Volkswagen has announced plans to increase its car battery production and charging network across Europe, the US and China. Nikki Gordon-Bloomfield is a tech journalist who specialises in electric vehicles, and was watching VW's announcement.
Also in the programme, with obesity believed to be a major factor in which countries have the worst Covid-19 death rates, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on whether it could mark a moment of reckoning for food and beverage businesses, in terms of making their products more healthy.
Plus, the shortlist for this year’s Oscars has been released. KJ Matthews is an entertainment reporter in Los Angeles, and tells us what this year's selection says about the impact of the pandemic on filmmaking, and progress made towards diversity in the industry.

Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Karen Lema, Reuters bureau chief for the Philippines - who's in Manila, and Tony Nash, chief economist at Complete Intelligence in Houston, Texas.

(Picture: An Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxdf47)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2m)
Using satellite photos to help distribute cash

Togo has found a high-tech way to identify people who need financial help in the pandemic and send them emergency cash, using satellite photos and mobile phones.

Computers search for clues in images, such as the density of buildings, roofing materials and road surfaces. They combine this with data collected before the pandemic to work out how wealthy different areas are and which ones may need financial support.

Produced and Presented by Hannah Gelbart

Picture: Getty Images


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj2sdm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 In the Studio (w3csz1yh)
Fashion designer Iris van Herpen

In May 2019 the musical superstar Björk was performing a series of concerts in New York, entitled Cornucopia. One of the costumes she appeared in was a dress specially created for her by the Dutch designer Iris Van Herpen. Iris is renowned for her fluid designs and pioneering use of techniques such as 3D printing and has dressed many international celebrities. This new dress for Björk will be made of many different parts, blending design, art and science to create something truly unique.

Anik See visits Iris in her Amsterdam studio to observe the garment being created and worked on. We also hear from Björk herself in a special interview for this programme.

Iris has worked with Björk several times before, but with this project, the pressure is on as there’s a tight timescale and logistics to sort out of getting the dress fitted and shipped in time. Anik watches as the different components are made separately and sees the team at work assembling and fitting. As well as being striking, the dress must be able to move in the way Björk requires for the show - and be durable enough to withstand many nights of wear.

Presented by Anik See and produced by Anik See and Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service.

(Image: Fashion designer Iris Van Herpen, credit to: Jean-Baptiste Mondino)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxdjwc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd4k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmld)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxdnmh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct2cpd)
What does the future hold? Covid, women and the US economy

From women in senior management positions, to women-owned start-ups, to low income families, Covid poses difficult questions about how to adapt to an uncertain future. Nada Tawfik explores some of the strategies being adopted by women in the US economy to adjust to a vastly changed economic landscape.

Producer: Philip Reevell

(Photo: Socially distanced black female entrepreneur. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj30ww)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct2cch)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxdscm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0m11qb)
Mozambique terror: children as young as 11 beheaded

Save the Children warn about extreme violence against civilians, including children, in the northern Cabo Delgado province.

Another social media giant strikes a deal over sharing news with an old fashioned media giant in Australia.

And do you know what pickleball is? We're told it's a bit like tennis with planks - and it's apparently a pandemic fitness craze.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxdx3r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0m15gg)
Save the Children: Mozambique terror warning

The international children's charity say that ISIS-linked militants are targeting and beheading children

More European countries suspend the Astra-Zeneca Covid vaccine over fear of blood clots - even though the World Health Organisation says such fears are unfounded

And we hear how a long and painful search continues for many Syrians whose relatives went missing in the 10 year conflict.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxf0vw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0m196l)
Mozambique report highlights extreme violence against children

Save the Children says children as young as eleven have been beheaded when they resisted recruitment by Islamic insurgents.

Why some European countries are suspending the use of the Astra-Zenca vaccine despite the WHO asking them not to.

And Iceland has had 40,000 mini-earthquakes - all in the past few weeks. Are they a warning that a big quake could be about to hit the island?


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxf4m0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj3hwd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8ch)
How the pandemic feeds online trolling

The coronavirus pandemic has changed the way we behave on the internet. Online trolling is on the rise as people turn to social media to take out their lockdown frustrations.

Marie Keyworth hears from Lisa Forte, who used to work for the UK police's Cyber Crime Unit and has faced online abuse herself. Virginia Mantouvalou says that a social media platform shouldn’t be viewed as “safe space” to express whatever views we wish. But isn't one of the points of social media to connect with like-minded people freely? Marie puts that to Will Oremus, a senior writer for tech magazine OneZero.

Our posts and comments can incur the wrath of not just online mobs, but of our employers too. And, as journalist and author Jon Ronson explains, the collective online herd mentality leaves no room for forgiveness, or redemption.

Producer: Sarah Treanor

(Picture: a man holds his head in his hands and looks at his computer in despair. Credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmqx)
Jamaica’s ‘drug lord’

The Jamaican government issued a warrant for the arrest and extradition of the drug lord Christopher Coke, otherwise known as “Dudus” in May 2010. The United States wanted him extradited to face charges of racketeering and bringing drugs and guns into America. Coke controlled an area of the Jamaican capital Kingston, called Tivoli Gardens. Dozens of people in the district he dominated were killed as the police and military stormed the stronghold, even using mortar bombs to try and disperse the gunmen protecting Coke. Human rights attorney Jodi-Ann Quarrie talks to Bob Howard about the events and their impact on Jamaica.
(Jamaican police on patrol after a frenzy of gang and drug violence in Kingston, May 24 2010. Credit: Anthony Foster/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxf8c4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2cpd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj3mmj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 In the Studio (w3csz1yh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxfd38)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxfhvd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl2088j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj3w3s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 Discovery (w3ct2cch)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxfmlj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdl3)
The birthday gift that survived the Holocaust

For her 11th birthday in March 1942, a little girl called Eva Cohn asked her mother Sylvia to send her some of her own poems. At the time, Eva and her sister Myriam were in a Jewish children's home in France, and Sylvia was imprisoned in an internment camp. Separated from her children by the Holocaust, and not knowing when or if she would see them again, Sylvia wrote this inscription in a small shabby exercise book: "to my children... know that your mother loves you." The book contained her own poems, written from memory, some of them detailing the family's experiences in the Holocaust. At the end of the war, Eva finally made it to England to be reunited with her father, her only possessions the clothes on her back, and the book of poems Sylvia had given her. Now nearly ninety, she's had them translated at last. The story of one family in the Holocaust.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Eva with her sisters Myriam and Esther and their mother Sylvia; Eva Cohn; Sylvia's book of poems
Credit: Eva Mendelsson


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmqx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxfrbn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl20hrs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj43m1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 In the Studio (w3csz1yh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxfw2s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6f41qc)
Mozambique insurgency: Children among victims

Aid workers in Mozambique say children as young as eleven are being beheaded by Islamist militants waging a campaign of violence in the north of the country. We speak to the US Ambassador in Maputo.

The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been setting out a new foreign policy, shifting its focus towards the Indo-Pacific region.

Andas a number of European countries suspend the use of Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, we hear from a French doctor about the impact.

(Photo: Thousands have fled their homes and lost their incomes over the last few years. Credit: AFP)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxfztx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj4c39)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlx0mxchg36)
The future of steelmaking

We examine technologies that might lead to greener steel production, and ask who will pay. Professor Veena Sahajwalla of the University of New South Wales in Australia discusses her research into using waste such as car tyres to produce the metal. We hear about Swedish steelmaker SSAB's hydrogen manufacturing process, which is being piloted to produce steel with water as the only by-product. And Alan Knight of steelmaker ArcelorMittal tells us about his company's goal to mitigate carbon emissions through capture and storage of pollutants. Also in the programme, following a policy review the UK is to shift its focus to Indo-Pacific countries such as India, South Korea and Japan. The aim is partly to foster a democratic counterweight to China, and we explore the economic implications with Professor Laura Cleary, director of the consultancy Oakwood International Security. Plus, it's exactly a year since the pandemic forced the lights to go down on London's West End theatres. Nica Burns is co-founder of the Nimax Theatres group, which owns six venues in London including the Vaudeville and Garrick theatres, and explains what life has been like for the theatre industry over the past 12 months.

(Picture: A steel forge. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxg3l1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2tb5tt0gmw)
Coronavirus conversations: Reporting on the pandemic

What has it been like to be a health reporter covering the pandemic? As part of our coronavirus conversations, we bring together journalists from Brazil, India, Germany and the United States to talk about the challenges in covering the pandemic over the past year.

And as vaccine safety experts from the World Health Organization meet to review the Oxford-AstraZeneca jab, after several European countries halted their roll-outs, we hear from our global health experts - who will also be answering your questions.

And we continue to speak with people living in Myanmar, as funerals are held for those killed in the recent crackdown in the South Dagon township of Yangon.

(Photo: A medical worker fills a syringe with the Oxford University/AstraZeneca vaccine, March 16, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Gleb Garanich)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxg7b5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2tb5tt0ld0)
Coronavirus cases spike in India

There has been a sharp rise in coronavirus cases in the Indian states of Maharashtra, Gujarat, Kerala, Punjab, Tamil Nadu and Madhya Pradesh Dr. Swapneil Parikh, the author of The Coronavirus Book, joins us today to bring us the latest developments.

And after several European countries halted their roll-outs of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, our health experts take a look at the evidence and answer questions from our audience.

Also, what has it been like to be a health reporter covering the pandemic? As part of our coronavirus conversations, we bring together journalists from Brazil, India, Germany and the United States to talk about the challenges in covering the pandemic over the past year.

(Photo: Indian traffic policeman performs his duty, wearing a face mask in Mumbai, India, 15 March 2021. Credit: EPA/DIVYAKANT SOLANKI)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxgc29)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdl3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmqx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxggtf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl2177k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj4v2t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k29wssg8g)
2021/03/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxglkk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2cpd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj4yty)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99g)
Is Bitcoin energy use unsustainable?

It seems that the price of Bitcoin cannot stop increasing, but how sustainable is Bitcoin itself? With such huge energy demands to keep Bitcoin mined, are some countries risking the stability of their electricity supplies to take advantage of the Bitcoin boom? Financial economist and founder of the blog “Digiconomist”, Alex de Vries is on the show to answer these questions. He says, in his paper published in the journal Joule, that the entire Bitcoin blockchain network consumes as much energy per year as all data centres across the world.

Access to the internet – affordability and lack of infrastructure still a major barrier
It’s the web’s 32nd birthday, yet its creator Sir Tim Berners-Lee has warned that too many young people cannot connect and that the digital gap has widened during the pandemic. His comments come just after the latest ITU/A4AI report into the affordability of the internet, which found that nearly half of people with 4G coverage are not online as it’s too expensive to connect. A4AI’s Executive Director Sonia Jorge returns to the show to discuss the latest figures. TBL also called for a global push to connect young people. The WebFoundation has announced a list of global web champions, and one of them, Ian Mangenga from South Africa, joins us on the show to talk about her project Digital Girl Africa.

(Hi)Story of a Painting
(Hi)Story of a Painting is a new animated VR series to be premiered at the SXSW Online festival. The five episodes take the viewer on a journey through iconic paintings and tell the stories behind them; the artist’s practice, struggles and successes. The series’ co-creator Gaëlle Mourre, is on the programme to discuss how she created this gaze tech-led immersive experience, and made it safe to view in our own homes during lockdown.

Image: Mining rigs of super computer inside the bitcoin factory ‘Genesis Farming’ near Reykjavik, Iceland
Credit: Photo by HALLDOR KOLBEINS/AFP via Getty Images

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Angelica Mari.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxgq9p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6f4wy8)
Mozambique insurgency: Children “being beheaded” by militants

Aid workers in Mozambique say children as young as eleven have been beheaded by Islamist militants. We hear from Portugal which is sending special forces to help counter the insurgents. Also on the programme, the British government presents a major overhaul of foreign and defence policy, Brazil gets its fourth health minister of the pandemic and is Iceland about to have a major volcanic eruption? (Photo: Thousands in Cabo Delgado have been forced to flee their homes. Credit: BBC News)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxgv1t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wxvgc91n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fsjzd1l0h)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj56b6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmdj4mgl9cb)
Europe still divided over AstraZeneca vaccine suspension

France, Germany, Spain and Italy want further clarification before reinstating the jab, as the European Medicines Agency is expected to give its verdict tomorrow. We speak to Natasha Loder, health policy editor at The Economist.
We examine technologies that might lead to greener steel production, and ask who will pay. Professor Veena Sahajwalla of the University of New South Wales in Australia discusses her research into using old car tyres instead of coal, and Swedish steelmaker SSAB's talks about its hydrogen manufacturing process, while Alan Knight of steelmaker ArcelorMittal tells us about his company's goal to mitigate carbon emissions through capture and storage of pollutants.
Plus, it's exactly a year since the pandemic forced the lights to go down on London's theatres. Nica Burns is co-founder of the Nimax Theatres group, which owns six venues in London, and explains what life has been like for the theatre industry over the past 12 months.

(Picture: A syringe with a vaccine. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxgysy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj5b2b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3csz1yh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 17 MARCH 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxh2k2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk49)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxh696)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1999n88fd3)
European countries still divided over AstraZeneca vaccine suspension

France, Germany, Spain and Italy want further clarification before reinstating the jab. The European Medicines Agency is expected to give its verdict tomorrow, but has said it was "firmly convinced" of the benefits of the AstraZeneca vaccine. We get the latest from Natasha Loder, health policy editor at The Economist.
Chinese tech giant Huawei has recorded its biggest ever annual jump in the number of patents it owns. We discuss how this meets Beijing's call for homegrown innovation.
And as the world begins its St Patrick's Day celebrations, we speak to a pub owner in County Wicklow on the east coast of Ireland, whose business has been closed for a year due to the pandemic.

Rahul Tandon is joined throughout the programme by Alison van Diggelen, a journalist based in Silicon Valley, and Bloomberg journalist Enda Curran in Hong Kong.

(Picture: A syringe with a vaccine. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxhb1b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7v)
Vjosa Osmani: Acting President of Kosovo

The legacy of conflict and hate left behind after the collapse of Yugoslavia is not easily overcome. They know that in Kosovo, which declared independent statehood a dozen years ago but has yet to make a lasting peace with neighbouring Serbia. Right now Kosovo is experiencing a major political shift. Stephen Sackur speaks to the country’s Acting President Vjosa Osmani. She is part of a new generation of young, post-war politicians challenging the old guard of the Kosovar independence struggle. She promises clean government and a fresh start, but can she deliver?


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj5p9q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x88)
Goal 9: Industry, innovation and infrastructure

In 2015 the United Nations announced a radical plan to change the world.

Global leaders drew up a list of 17 "sustainable development goals" to create a blueprint for a better future. Governments agreed to support the goals which cover gender equality, health provision, a good education and much more. We've asked 17-year-olds from 17 different countries tell us what they think needs to change if the world is to meet those goals by 2030.

Jonathan Chu lives in Germany and like many school students all over the world he's found himself studying at home because of the Covid-19 pandemic. But what happens to students who have poor internet connections? Have they been falling behind and losing touch with teachers and other pupils? In the 21st century most countries are trying to provide good internet infrastructure for business, industry and ordinary citizens. But even a rich, developed country like Germany is finding it hard to achieve that goal.

Project 17 is produced in partnership with the Open University

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producer Tim Mansel


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxhfsg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdl3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmqx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxhkjl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct2cb3)
Under the Canopy

Forests of hope and the future

Writer Jessica J Lee, sets out to describe the myriad ways that forests operate in our lives and the life of the planet. In the final part of ‘Under The Canopy’, Jessica looks for stories of hope to set against the headlines depicting the mass deforestation that continues to take place around the world. She speaks with a variety of groups - in Canada, Burkina Faso, Brazil, Germany and Great Britain - who are finding different ways to re-invigorate forests, whether through peaceful protest, re-forestation programmes or internet start-ups. Jessica considers the best ways of re-building the strong, mixed forests that will prove so important in our battle against climate change.

Forest sounds appear courtesy of the 'Sounds of the Forest' project

Original musical composition: Erland Cooper

Spells written by Robert Macfarlane and these are read by Maxine Peake and the Bird sisters

Photo credit: Geoff A Bird


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj5xsz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxhp8q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0m3ymf)
Niger sees dozens killed by militants in the west of the country

Once again Niger sees dozens killed by militants in the west of the country - we get details and the background to the brutal situation for civilians in one of the poorest countries in the world.

Senior US officials arrive in South Korea while the north ups the rhetoric once again - what prospects for diplomacy under Joe Biden?

The EU is set to adopt a vaccine passport to enable international travel this summer and help its tourist dependent countries.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxht0v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0m42ck)
US accuses China of acting aggressively

The United States accuses China of acting aggressively and repressively as the new US Secretary of State, Antony Blinken arrives in South Korea for talks that will centre on how to improve relations with the North.

As vaccine programmes roll out worldwide we'll be hearing about the influential religious groups convincing people to not take a vaccine.

And in the beginning, was there light? Scientists suggest lightening may have provided the spark for life.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxhxrz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0m463p)
Top level US delegation arrives in South Korea

A high level delegation representing the United States President makes it's first visit to South Korea with the US looking for strong backing from his allies in Seoul when it comes to dealing with China.

They're voting in the Netherlands today - the incumbent Mark Rutte is likely to be re-elected and at the heart of the elections: how the government has dealt with the pandemic.

And the sad tale of the rare songbird in Australia, the honeyeater, that has become so threatened that it's started to lose its song.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxj1j3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj6dsh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8p4)
Murdoch at 90: What next for his media empire?

The Australian media mogul Rupert Murdoch is 90 years old this month. Is it time for him to hand over News Corp to the next generation, and will it survive when he does? Ed Butler speaks to leading international media analyst Claire Enders about the financial state of News Corp. Jess Todfield, a former Fox News producer from the early days of the network, explains why he thinks the US channel still has a bright future despite losing viewers. Veteran Australian journalist Hugh Lunn talks about working for Murdoch across the decades. And we hear from the former editor of The Sun and the New York Post, David Yelland, on what it was like working for Rupert Murdoch, and why there may never be another media mogul like him.

(Picture: Rupert Murdoch arrives at the annual Allen & Company Sun Valley Conference; Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images).


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmt5)
Alva Myrdal - the woman who made modern Sweden

In 1982, the Swedish social reformer, writer and diplomat, Alva Myrdal, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her work on nuclear disarmament. She was only the 7th woman in history to win the award, which she received jointly with Mexican diplomat Alfonso Garcia Robles. In the 1930s and 40s, Alva Myrdal had, with her husband Gunnar Myrdal, developed the ideas behind Sweden's famed welfare state which had transformed Sweden into the modern country we know today. She was also the first woman to be given a senior post at the United Nations. Alva Myrdal's daughter Kaj Foelster has been telling Louise Hidalgo about her mother's life and work.

Picture: Alva Myrdal in 1976 on the publication of her book The Game of Disarmament (credit: Keystone/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxj587)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2cb3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj6jjm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x88)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxj90c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2ccm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxjdrh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl2355m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj6s0w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxjjhm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdsw)
Fear and fantasy TV in the siege of Aleppo

Ten years ago, Hatem was a student watching both season one of Game of Thrones and the Syrian revolution unfurl. But when the peaceful protest movement turned into devastating civil war, he wanted to help. Fresh out of medical school and still in his 20s, Hatem became one of the most important doctors in Aleppo. Working in unimaginably terrifying and desperate conditions, he ran the only children's hospital during the siege of 2016. To deal with the daily intensity and horrors of war, he found solace and escapism in his favourite fantasy TV shows.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: A screen showing Game of Thrones
Credit: VASILY MAXIMOV/AFP via Getty Images


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmt5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxjn7r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl23dnw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj70j4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x88)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxjrzw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6f6ymg)
US Secretary of State condemns North Korea during Asia trip

The US Secretary of State, Antony Blinken, has accused North Korea of carrying out systemic and widespread abuses against its own people. He was speaking at the start of talks in Seoul with his South Korean counterpart, Chung Eui-yong. Mr Blinken and the US defence secretary, who's also on the trip, are discussing how to handle the nuclear threat from Pyongyang.

Also on the programme: we discuss the ongoing disruption to the rollout of the AstraZeneca vaccine as several EU countries keep it on hold; and a look at the Australian songbird that’s losing its own call.

(Picture: Antony Blinken, Credit: Reuters)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxjwr0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj780d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxv2mz8nfl)
Philippines targets economic recovery

The Philippines aims for economic recovery after the pandemic ended 21 years of growth. Benjamin Diokno is the governor of the central bank of the Philippines, and explains what role his institution might play towards achieving the goal. Also in the programme, the European Commission has published proposals for a digital Covid vaccine certificate, which will also document coronavirus test results. Mehreen Khan is EU correspondent for the Financial Times, and tells us the European Commission plans to leave it up to member states whether to use the certificate to regulate travel within their jurisdictions. Plus, the abuse of people online, or trolling, is on the rise. The BBC's Marie Keyworth reports on whether cyberspace should be a free speech free-for-all, or regulated to screen out the most offensive individuals.

(Picture: Benjamin Diokno. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxk0h4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2tb5tt3cjz)
Coronavirus: Vaccinating the world's most populous nations

As Brazil's Covid-19 crisis continues, a leading health institute says the country is experiencing a historic collapse of its medical services.

Meanwhile in India, cases are on the rise again with some criticism about the export of vaccines while many Indians still wait for one. We take a closer look at both nations hearing from our correspondents and people living in these countries.

And we continue to hear the conversation between four journalists from around the world who have been covering Covid-19, as we mark one year since the WHO declared the global pandemic.

Picture: A health worker prepares to administer the second dose of Sinovac"s CoronaVac coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine to an elderly citizen, at Tatuquara neighborhood in Curitiba, Brazil March 5, 2021.
Credit: REUTERS/Rodolfo Buhrer


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxk478)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2tb5tt3h93)
Atlanta spa shootings: A community reacts

We hear from the Asian-American community in the Atlanta region, after six Asian women were among the eight people killed in shootings there overnight. No motive has been confirmed but there are fears that people of Asian descent were deliberately targeted. Hate crimes against Asian-Americans have spiked during the coronavirus pandemic. A reporter on the ground will bring us the latest.

We also head to Brazil and India to hear how two of the world's most populous nations are managing outbreaks of Covid-19.

And a year on from the pandemic, four journalists from around the world share their accounts of what's been like reporting and living the story.

(Photo: Crime scene tape is seen outside Aromatherapy Spa after shootings at a massage parlor and two day spas in the Atlanta area, in Georgia, U.S. March 16, 2021.Credit: Chris Aluka Berry/Reuters)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxk7zd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdsw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmt5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxkcqj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl2444n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj7qzx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k29wswc5k)
2021/03/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxkhgn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2cb3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj7vr1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcdc)
Vaccine and blood clots

As further European countries announce precautionary suspension of the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine over fears it may have caused blood clots in a very small number of people, Claudia talks to BBC Health Editor James Gallagher about what the data really tells us about the safety of this vaccine.

Tanzania and Covid. Claudia talks to BBC Africa Correspondent Leila Nathoo about Covid in Tanzania. President Magufuli was one of Africa’s most prominent Covid-19 sceptics, and is now rumoured to have died of the disease himself. Last year he said the disease had been eradicated from Tanzania by three days of national prayer but does Tanzania have a hidden epidemic?

Vaccine Side Effects. Claudia discovers why there seems to be such a difference in how people have reacted to the vaccine, from no side effects at all, to mild flu like symptoms. She looks at how the vaccine triggers an immune response, and why it can’t give you Covid.

Haitians in Chile. Chile has long been a destination for immigrants from other countries in the region because there are more work opportunities. People from places like Venezuela, Bolivia and Peru make up around 8 percent of the 19 million population and the number is growing every year. What’s surprising is that the third biggest group of immigrants in Chile come from the Caribbean country Haiti. Health services are quickly having to learn ways to integrate their new patients who have different approaches to healthcare as Jane Chambers reports.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Alexandra Feachem

(Picture: A vial of AstraZeneca vaccine at Krakow University Hospital, Poland in February 2021. Photo credit: Beata Zawrzel/NurPhoto/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxkm6s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6f7svc)
Blinken warns China against 'coercion and aggression' on first Asia trip

The US Secretary of State Antony Blinken warns China against using “coercion and aggression” during his visit to South Korea. His predecessor Mike Pompeo joins Newshour to discuss this US strategy with China and Russia.

Also on the programme, the head of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen has threatened to withhold coronavirus vaccine exports to countries outside the European Union that don't supply them in a reciprocal way. Dr Veronique Trillet-Lenoir, MEP and member of the the French En Marche Party explains why these remarks could be interpreted as directed to the UK. Plus, an update from Myanmar on the continued violence in the region and we find out why The Millennial Carrasca of Lecina of Spain has won the title of European Tree of the Year

(PIC CREDIT: Getty Images. Antony Blinken in South Korea)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxkqyx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wxvgg5yr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fsjzd4gxl)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj8379)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmfblc2chpq)
Philippines targets economic recovery

The Philippines aims for economic recovery after the pandemic ended 21 years of growth. Benjamin Diokno is the governor of the central bank of the Philippines, and explains what role his institution might play towards achieving the goal. Also in the programme, the head of the European Commission has threatened to restrict coronavirus vaccine exports if third countries do not also allow exports in a reciprocal and proportionate way. Ursula von der Leyen told a news conference this could apply to countries with higher vaccination rates than those in the EU. The UK has said it expects the EU to stand by a prior commitment not to restrict exports; we hear from the French MEP, Veronique Trillet Lenoir. Plus, the abuse of people online, or trolling, is on the rise. The BBC's Marie Keyworth reports on whether cyberspace should be a free speech free-for-all, or regulated to screen out the most offensive individuals.

(Picture: Benjamin Diokno. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxkvq1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj86zf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x88)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



THURSDAY 18 MARCH 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxkzg5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct2ccm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxl369)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1999n8cb96)
EU threatens to restrict coronavirus vaccine exports

The head of the European Commission has threatened to restrict coronavirus vaccine exports if third countries do not also allow exports in a reciprocal and proportionate way. We hear from French MEP, Veronique Trillet Lenoir. Plus, the abuse of people online, or trolling, is on the rise. The BBC's Marie Keyworth reports on whether cyberspace should be a free speech free-for-all, or regulated to screen out the most offensive individuals. And there's good news for theme park fans , particularly if you live in California because Disneyland is reopening... but you're not allowed to scream if you're on a rollercoaster. To get a sense of the excitement, we hear from theme park journalist, Megan Dubosi. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Jeanette Rodriguez from Bloomberg who's in Mumbai and analyst Ralph Silva, based in Toronto. Photo of vaccine via Getty Images


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxl6yf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4y)
Why do Italy’s governments keep collapsing?

After the government of Giuseppe Conte collapsed amid an economic and public health crisis, Mario Draghi has formed Italy’s 65th administration in 73 years. So what are the long-term causes of Italy’s political woes, and does Draghi stand any chance of solving them?

Presenter: Tanya Beckett
Producer: Nathan Gower


(Giuseppe Conte and Mario Draghi during the traditional handover ceremony in Rome. Photo: Andrew Medichini / Getty Images)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj8l6t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrd)
The food that broke through lockdown

On the streets of Bucharest a woman unwraps a package of Chinese pepper ... and falls in love. In Portland Oregon, a family finds a new home - in a farmers market. A food writer opens her front door in London and finds a Chinese banquet waiting for her. On a cold winter’s morning, in a city 10,000 kilometres away from her family, a woman stands and waits for a taste of home.

As part of the BBC World Service festival exploring how the Coronavirus pandemic is reshaping our social lives, Emily Thomas hears four stories of how food can bring us closer together when we’ve never been more distant from one another.

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

(Picture: Two women sit on a bench talking, Credit: Getty/BBC)

Contributors:

Albertina Coacci
Tse Yin Lee
Fuchsia Dunlop
Schlifka Collier


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxlbpk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdsw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmt5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxlgfp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3csz6ml)
Scotland's contested identity

For over three hundred years the union of England and Scotland has held firm through war and poverty but in recent years some people north of the border have asked for a divorce. Elections in May to Scotland’s devolved parliament could return a majority for the ruling Scottish National Party which is seeking a mandate for a second referendum on seceding from the UK. Only seven years ago those wanting independence failed to win a poll on the issue but since then Brexit and the handling of the Covid pandemic have radicalised some voters, especially the young. For Assignment, Lucy Ash visits several communities in Scotland to hear their new arguments for and against the union, and to learn about the differing interpretations of Scottish history, identity and political culture that underpin them. From the east coast city of Dundee which voted so decisively for independence in the last referendum that it was dubbed the “Yes City” she travels to Stirling, the so-called Gateway to the Highlands. Finally, she flies to the isles of Orkney, which have vowed to become independent themselves if the rest of the country does secede from the UK – a sign that the centrifugal forces at work all over Europe could well apply to Scotland itself.

Producer: Mike Gallagher
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Demonstrator, with a Saltire bodysuit and flag, at a Pro-Scottish Independence rally in Glasgow, 05 February 2021. The Scottish National Party has adopted the Saltire as its symbol but Unionists say they have just as much ownership of the country’s blue and white flag, also known as the St Andrew’s Cross. Credit: Reuters)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj8tq2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcdc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxll5t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0m6vjj)
Tanzanian leader John Magufuli dies at 61

The Tanzanian government has announced the death of their president John Magufuli aged 61. He had not been seen in public for two weeks prompting speculation about his health but did the Covid-sceptic die from the virus or heart disease?

The Biden administration's relationship with Russia appears to be going rapidly downhill, with Moscow announcing the withdrawal of their ambassador to Washington.

The Bangladesh Government say that they have a solution to the Rohingya refugee problem: they want to relocate them to an isolated Indian Ocean island.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxlpxy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0m6z8n)
Tanzania announces national mourning for President Magufuli

President John Magufuli of Tanzania has died; speculation about the cause of his death rages on as a Covid-sceptic who shunned mask wearing and failed to introduce a vaccine program for the country.

A reset in relations between Russia and the America: following strong criticism of Russian meddling in US elections, Moscow has recalled its ambassador and President Biden says President Putin is "on notice".

And could a power -sharing deal with the Taliban finally bring peace to Afghanistan, we'll hear the thoughts of former President Hamid Karzai.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxltp2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0m730s)
President Magufuli: Heart condition blamed for death in office

With a two week absence from the public eye, speculation had been growing about the health of President John Magufuli, now the Tanzanian authorities have announced the death of the 61 year old leader due to complications with a heart condition.

The Russian ambassador to Washington has been recalled as a war of words between the USA and Russia escalates.

And we look at the hidden suffering of up to one in ten women - does more need to be done to treat the gynaecological condition endometriosis?


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxlyf6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj99pl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7ym)
Josephine’s story: Starting a business

In the sprawling Nairobi slum of Kibera in Kenya, a single mother of four struggles to survive lockdown. At the beginning of the pandemic, Josephine was working as a cook, but soon lost her job, and when the BBC's Ed Butler spoke to her a year ago her situation was dire.

In this episode, the second of a short series, the small business Josephine started to help feed her family sees faltering success before life in a pandemic gets more complicated again. Also in the programme, we hear from Kibera radio journalist Henix Obuchunju, reacting at the time to the confusion and suspicion of early lockdown measures in Kenya. And Dr John Nkengasong, head of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, looks back and reflects on how those early measures played out.

Producer: Frey Lindsay

(Image: A woman with a face mask walks past graffiti that promotes social distancing, to curb the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, in Kibera, Nairobi, on July 15, 2020. Image credit: YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmnn)
Mars-500 isolation experiment

In 2010, six men were locked inside a simulated spacecraft on earth for 520 days. It was part of an experiment to see how humans would cope if cooped up together for the duration of a potential trip to Mars. The crew were monitored throughout and were treated as if they were on a real mission in space, though the spacecraft was actually housed in a warehouse in Moscow. They even performed a simulated space walk on the surface of Mars. The project was set up by Russia, China and the European Space Agency. Alex Last has been speaking to Diego Urbina (@DiegoU) who took part in the mission.

Photo: The six crew members of the Mars-500 mission. (From Left) Russia Alexey Sitev, France's Romain Charles, Russia's Sukhrob Kamolov, Russia's Alexander Smoleevskiy, Diego Urbina from Italy and China's Wang Yue. (Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxm25b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6ml)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj9ffq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxm5xg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjwx)
Adventures with dentures: The story of dentistry

Until the eighteenth century there were no professional dentists. The only way to deal with a serious case of toothache was to call on the services of blacksmiths, travelling showmen or so-called barber-surgeons, all of whom had a sideline in tooth extraction. But in 1728, French physician Pierre Fauchard published the first complete scientific description of dentistry and he is credited as being “the father of modern dentistry”. His book, Le Chirurgien Dentiste or The Surgeon Dentist, was translated into several languages.

Joining Rajan Datar to discuss the painful and sometimes gruesome history of humans and their teeth are Dr. Scott Swank of the National Museum of Dentistry in Baltimore, US; Rachel Bairsto, Head of Museum Services at the British Dental Association and Professor Dominik Gross of RWTH Aachen University in Germany.

[Image: Detail from Tearer of Teeth or The Tooth Puller by David Ryjckaert III (1612-1661). Credit: David Dyjckaert III / Buyenlarge / Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh6d)
When Col Gaddafi's son played football in Italy's Serie A

In 2003, Italian top-flight side Perugia made a new and unusual signing: Al-Saadi Gaddafi, the son of Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi. It was seen as a publicity stunt by headline-hungry Perugia owner Luciano Gaucci, with Gaddafi making just one Serie A appearance, as a substitute in a win against Juventus in 2004. But Gaddafi made a big impression off the field and was renowned for his playboy lifestyle and outrageous spending habits. Former Perugia teammates Jay Bothroyd and Zeljko Kalac talk to Robert Nicholson about one of modern football's most surreal episodes. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Al-Saadi Gaddafi (centre) training with his Perugia team-mates (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxm9nl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl2622q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj9nxz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 Health Check (w3cszcdc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxmfdq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdcb)
How did this diver cheat death?

British diver Chris Lemons was working on an oil well underwater in the North Sea in Scotland. He was connected to a boat with something called an 'umbilical cord', which also provided him with air and heat. But he ended up getting tangled in the line and was stuck on the sea bed with only five minutes of air left in his tank. A rescue team was over 35 minutes away. How he was able to survive has left medical experts baffled. This interview was first broadcast on 23 April 2019.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: June Christie

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Chris Lemons when he was rescued from the North Sea bed
Credit: Courtesy of Dogwoof


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmnn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxmk4v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl269kz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdj9xf7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxmnwz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6f9vjk)
Europe's vaccine fears

The European Medicines Agency is expected to reveal its findings into safety concerns over the AstraZeneca Covid vaccine. Will its report calm concerns over the jab in Europe?

Also on the programme: Is it time for the Afghan government to share power with the Taliban? And an interview with America's former secretary of state, Mike Pompeo on what the future holds for US foreign policy.

(Photo: Vials of AstraZeneca vaccine are seen in front of a displayed EU (European Union) flag. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxmsn3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjb4xh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlw665rzyh3)
US-China talks in Alaska

The US and China are holding their first high level talks since Joe Biden was inaugurated. Dr Rebecca Harding is an international trade analyst at Coriolis Technologies, and tells us what is likely to be top of the agenda. Also in the programme, the Australian media mogul Rupert Murdoch turns 90 this month, and the BBC's Ed Butler examines his legacy, and the question of whether it's time for him to hand over the reins at News Corp. Plus, on Global Recycling Day, amid predictions that global waste might increase up to 70% by 2050, Ranjit Baxi, president of the Global Recycling Foundation discusses what can be done about it.

(Picture: US and Chinese flags. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxmxd7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2tb5tt68g2)
Tanzania's President Magufuli dies

Tanzania's President John Magufuli has died aged 61. Mr Magufuli had not been seen in public for more than two weeks and rumours had been circulating about his health. The official cause of death given was heart complications, but opposition politicians said last week that he had contracted Covid-19. We'll explain what we know so far and speak to Tanzanians to hear their reactions to the news.

Also, we'll continue answering your questions about the coronavirus pandemic and vaccines. Today we are joined by Dr Rick Malley - a paediatric infectious disease doctor at Boston Children’s Hospital, who specialises in vaccines.

And we'll look at the findings of the European Union’s medicine regulator, who have been reviewing data on whether there is any link between blood clotting and the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid vaccine.

(Photo: Tanzania's President Magufuli addresses members of the ruling CCM at the party's offices on Lumumba road in Dar es Salaam
October 30, 2015. Credit: Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxn14c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2tb5tt6d66)
EU agency: AstraZeneca vaccine is 'safe and effective'

A review by the EU's medicines regulator has concluded the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine is "safe and effective". The European Medicines Agency investigated after 13 EU states suspended use of the vaccine over fears of a link to blood clots. It found the jab was "not associated" with a higher risk of clots. We'll bring you the latest and the reaction to the findings.

Also, Tanzania's President John Magufuli has died aged 61. Mr Magufuli had not been seen in public for more than two weeks and rumours had been circulating about his health. The official cause of death given was heart complications, but opposition politicians said last week that he had contracted Covid-19. We'll explain what we know so far and speak to Tanzanians to hear their reactions to the news.

Also, we'll continue answering your questions about the coronavirus pandemic and vaccines. Today we are joined by Dr Helen Wimalarathna - a Molecular Epidemiologist at the University of Buckingham in the UK.

(Photo: Packages and a vial of AstraZeneca"s COVID-19 vaccine are presented for a pictures at a vaccination centre, temporarily set up in a hall of the fair, amid the coronavirus disease pandemic in Cologne, Germany, March 18, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Thilo Schmuelgen)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxn4wh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdcb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmnn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxn8mm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl2711r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjbmx0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k29wsz82n)
2021/03/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxndcr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6ml)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjbrn4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1w)
International science at sea

In the UK thousands of scientists have signed open letters to the UK government protesting cuts to international funding announced this week. Abruptly and severely, the cuts may end hundreds of international collaborations between UK scientists and colleagues around the world working on health, climate change, disaster resilience, sustainability and many development topics.

Professor Jenni Barclay is a volcanologist at the University of East Anglia, and is one of the organisers of the protest. At the University of Cape Town, Dr Chris Trisos is the director of the Climate Risk Lab at the African Climate and Development Initiative, one of the authors of the IPCC 6th assessment, and has just learned his funding will be terminated, as the UK’s Royal Society must trim its output in this area by two thirds. Professor Otteline Leyser is CEO of UKRI – the UK’s main research funding agency, and will have to work out what will happen to over 900 projects currently under way.

Antarctica Iceberg A74 break away
Earlier this week German Research Vessel Polarstern released images from its remarkable circumnavigation of Antarctica’s latest iceberg, known as A74. This is the largest chunk of ice to break away from this sector of Antarctica since 1971, approaching the same size of Greater London. Dr Autun Purser describes a hair-raising voyage between the narrow gap left between the berg and the shelf, including the first images of life that have spent at least 50 years in total darkness, hundreds of miles from the open sea.

Image: Polarstern between Brunt and iceberg A74, Antarctica
Credit: RalphTimmermann


Presented by Roland Pease
Produced by Alex Mansfield


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxnj3w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6fbprg)
EU agency says AstraZeneca vaccine is 'safe and effective'

After many countries ‘paused’ use of the AstraZeneca vaccine over worries about blood clots, the European Union's drugs regulator has concluded that the vaccine is both safe and effective.

Also on the program, large numbers of unaccompanied children are attempting to cross the border from Mexico to the United States and Spain passes a controversial euthanasia law.

(Photo: Woman getting vaccinated. Credit: EPA)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxnmw0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wxvgk2vv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fsjzd7ctp)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjc04d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmcppww2sr7)
US-China talks in Alaska

The US and China are holding their first high level talks since Joe Biden was inaugurated. Dr Rebecca Harding is an international trade analyst at Coriolis Technologies, and tells us what is likely to be top of the agenda. Also in the programme, the Australian media mogul Rupert Murdoch turns 90 this month, and the BBC's Ed Butler examines his legacy, and the question of whether it's time for him to hand over the reins at News Corp. Plus, on Global Recycling Day, amid predictions that global waste might increase up to 70% by 2050, Ranjit Baxi, president of the Global Recycling Foundation discusses what can be done about it.

(Picture: US and Chinese flags. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxnrm4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjc3wj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



FRIDAY 19 MARCH 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxnwc8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjwx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh6d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxp03d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1999n8g769)
Top US and Chinese officials meet in Alaska

President Biden has promised to be tough with China, but to take a different tack than his predecessor Donald Trump which led to a trade war between both countries; we hear more from Barbara Plett Usher who's reporting from the talks' venue in Alaska. Plus, we discuss the latest coronavirus updates from across the world. And on Global Recycling Day, amid predictions that global waste might increase 70% by 2050, Ranjit Baxi, president of the Global Recycling Foundation discusses what can be done about it. Dozens of people in Taiwan have changed their names to "salmon" to take advantage of a restaurant's sushi promotion deal; we hear more from the BBC's Cindy Sui in Taiwan. Plus, joining us throughout the programme are Jessica Khine, a business development consultant with Absolute Strategy Research in Malaysia and Paddy Hirsch, contributing editor at NPR. (Picture of US and Chinese flags. Picture credit: Getty Images.


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxp3vj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyt)
Stephen King: Are you afraid of the dark?

Millions of readers all over the world are drawn to fiction that explores our fears. Horror sells and no-one does it better or more prolifically than Stephen King. He’s written more than 60 books, sold close to 400 million copies - he is the master manipulator of dark places and the paranormal. If you're not a reader you may have seen the Shining, Carrie, Stand by Me - all films based on his stories. He's been writing for half a century – how has our appetite for fear evolved?


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjch3x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3cszthk)
Cuba's Jorge Corrales and Wolfsburg's Kevin Mbabu

Cuban footballer Jorge Corrales discusses an historic moment for the national team, for the first time foreign-based footballers can now play for Cuba. And the Wolfsburg defender Kevin Mbabu talks about their impressive season so far.

Picture: Jorge Corrales of Cuba leaps over two Mexican players during a match in the 2015 CONCACAF Gold Cup (Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxp7ln)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdcb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmnn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxpcbs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq6)
Uber’s u-turn on drivers

The ride-hailing giant says it will pay UK drivers a minimum wage and other benefits. Will other gig-economy firms be forced to follow suit? Plus how cryptocurrency is a craze in India but faces a government ban. And why using email could make workers “more stupid” through the day. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjcqm5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxph2x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0m9rfm)
US and China clash in first talks of Biden era

Senior American and Chinese officials are in Alaska this morning, as President Biden's administration outlines its foreign policy agenda.

Chinese relations with Canada are also in the spotlight as one of two Canadians accused of spying in China will appear in court today. Michael Spavor's trial is seen as a response to Canada's detention of a senior executive of the Chinese technology company Huawei.

We'll hear from Russia where the government has consistently boasted of the low level of coronavirus deaths, but new evidence is challenging that conclusion.

And we take you to the depths of the Indian Ocean for a unique underwater protest.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxplv1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0m9w5r)
Trade negotiations heat up in Alaska between the US and China

The Biden Administration sits down with Chinese officials to discuss everything from cyber attacks, human rights and trade.

Ten years after the Arab Spring inspired a revolution in Syria, President Assad remains in power, we take a look at the state of the country after years of war.

In the business news we find out about how Paris and many other parts of France are set to go into lockdown again as the country fears a third wave of coronavirus.

And we hear from a village in Mali that has been under siege by jihadists for 5 months.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxpql5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wsj0m9zxw)
Canadian spy trial in China ends without verdict.

Spavor is facing charges of "spying and illegal provision of state secrets abroad" according to the court's statement in Northern city of Dandong. The detention two years ago came days after Canada detained Meng Wanzhou, a senior executive at Chinese tech giant Huawei, on a US warrant.

European authorities make efforts to re-establish confidence in the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine, this comes as France imposes new restrictions due to a rise in infections.

We look at the case for Scottish independence from the United Kingdom.The departure of Britain from Europe has given fresh impetus to calls for separation. But is this enough to severe almost more than 300 years of unity?

And a historic virtual meeting in Colombia as both right wing and left wing militia leader appear before the country's Truth and Reconciliation Committee.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxpvb9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjd6lp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz79t)
Why your boss is incompetent

Why is it that the boss never seems to know what they’re doing? The famous “Dilbert principle” asserts that companies promote incompetent employees into middle management to get them out of the way. But Professor David Dunning, co-creator of the competing “Dunning–Kruger effect”, says there’s more to it than that, specifically that the more incompetent a person is, the more confident they can be. Meanwhile, Kelly Shue, Professor of Finance at Yale, says an even simpler idea, the “Peter Principle” helps to explain why people get promoted beyond their level of competence. And entrepreneur Heather McGregor explains why the incompetence of a former boss led her to buy her own company

Presented by Ed Butler, This is a repeat of a programme first broadcast in June 2020.

(Picture: A woman at her desk. Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmwf)
The dirtiest chess match in history

In 1978, the World Chess Championship between the Soviet champion and convinced communist, Anatoly Karpov, and the dissident and defector, Viktor Korchnoi, turned into one of the most infamous clashes in the history of the game. At a time of peak Cold War tension, the two players traded allegations about yoghurts containing messages, the use of psychics and the mysterious appearance of a meditating yoga cult dressed in orange robes. David Edmonds tells the story of the match through the memories of British grandmaster, Michael Stean,

PHOTO: Anatoly Karpov and Viktor Korchnoi squaring up in 1978 (Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxpz2f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjdbbt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 World Football (w3cszthk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxq2tk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpf)
Why are Asian Americans under attack?

The killing of eight people at a number of massage parlors in Atlanta this week has brought fears that the crimes may have targeted Asian Americans. Six of the people killed were of Asian descent. Although it is not yet clear whether there was a racial motivation in the shootings, they come against a backdrop of a sharp rise in violent attacks against Asian Americans since the start of the pandemic. An elderly Thai immigrant died after being shoved to the ground, a Filipino-American had his face slashed on the subway and a Chinese woman was slapped and then set on fire. These are just some of the thousands of cases reported in the US in recent months. Advocates and activists say they are hate crimes, and often linked to political rhetoric that blames Asian people for the spread of Covid-19. They point to the language used during last year’s election campaign by Donald Trump, who used terms such as the “China virus” and “kung flu”. During his first prime-time address to the nation last week, President Joe Biden denounced the attacks as un-American and urged federal agencies to fight “a resurgence in xenophobia”. Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests as they discuss the causes of these attacks, who is carrying them out and what should be done about them.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxq6kp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl28yzt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjdkv2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxqb9t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjk)
Syria: Two women, ten years on

It has been ten years since the start of the Syrian civil war. The lives of Syrians were turned upside down and many fled the country. BBC correspondent Lina Sinjab tells the contrasting stories of two women - one is still in Damascus and the other now lives in Beirut.

My Home Town: Shovot, Uzbekistan
Candyfloss, dancing in the park, and a secret library: Ibrat Safo of BBC Uzbek takes us to his hometown in north-west Uzbekistan.

Chernobyl forest fires
Forest fires are increasingly in the news around the world. But what happens when the forest is radioactive? Zhanna Bezpiatchuk of BBC Ukrainian has made a documentary called 'Are forest fires unlocking radiation in Chernobyl?', which tells the stories of firefighters who tackled last year's wildfires in the Chernobyl exclusion zone.

Kafeel Khan: the doctor who took on the government
How did an Indian doctor hailed as a hero after a medical emergency become labelled a ‘career criminal’? Khadeeja Arif of BBC Urdu has been following Dr Kafeel Khan from one jail sentence to another, and she tells us what light his story sheds on politics in India today.

‘I am my song’
Afghan women and girls protested in song after a recent announcement that public singing would be banned for girls over the age of 12. After a social media storm of musical protest, the Education Ministry backed down. Zuhal Ahad, women's affairs journalist at BBC Kabul, was among those shocked by the original announcement.

Image: Syrian artist painting mural
Credit: BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxqg1y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl296h2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjdtbb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2cm1)
Five questions on faith with Melinda Gates

As part of the BBC World Service Festival, Razia Iqbal speaks to Melinda Gates, co-founder of the Gates Foundation, the world’s biggest philanthropic organisation.

In a wide ranging discussion, led by five questions sent in by the Heart and Soul audience, Melinda tells Razia how her Catholic upbringing inspired her to try to improve the health and conditions of millions of people of around the world. She goes on to describe how she has had to confront her faith in areas such as contraception and the role of women in order to carry on with her work. Melinda speaks candidly on how recent criticism and misinformation about her and her husband Bill's work with the Covid-19 vaccine rollout has impacted them personally, and gives more details of how they intend to redress the balance between multi-billionaires like them and the poorest people in the world with their pledge to give away the majority of their wealth.


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxqkt2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6fdrfn)
Angry start to US-China talks

The first high-level talks between China and the new US administration have had a bumpy start - as both sides publicly rebuked one another. We get reaction and analysis from both countries.

Also on the programme: As European countries restart using of the AstraZeneca Covid vaccine, we speak to those on the front line of the roll out. And what's Russia's real death toll from Covid-19?

(Photo: China talks in Alaska, 18 March 2021. Pool via Reuters)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxqpk6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjf1tl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltk9qkq7jm)
Parts of France enter fresh Covid lockdown

Twenty-one million people in 16 areas of France begin a new month-long Covid lockdown. The BBC's Hugh Schofield in Paris tells us about the likely impact on businesses in France, and the government's deficit. Also in the programme, there's a new phase of international port diplomacy, where major economic powers are helping to construct ports to help establish commercial and military footholds around the world. The BBC's Ranga Sirilal in Colombo describes India and Japan's assistance to Sri Lanka for a port there. We hear from Cobus Van Staden, senior China-Africa researcher at the South African Institute of International Affairs about a Chinese loan deal for Bagamoyo Port in Tanzania. And Cristina Maza, a freelance journalist who has been covering a deal between Sudan and Russia for military access to Port Sudan on the Red Sea, discusses what is in it for the two sides. Plus, we hear from the chief executive of Australian airline Qantas, Alan Joyce, how he hopes to revive the company's fortunes in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

(Photo: A lone pedestrian walks near the Louvre in Paris. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxqt9b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2tb5tt95c5)
Coronavirus: Your questions to the WHO

We put your questions about the coronavirus to Dr Margaret Harris, a spokesperson for the World Health Organisation. The WHO is an agency of the United Nations with responsibility for international public health. In March 2020 it was the WHO that declared the coronavirus outbreak as a global pandemic. If you have a question for Dr Harris send us a voice message on WhatsApp to +447730 751925.

We will also have the latest from Myanmar where the military have reportedly shot dead at least nine pro-democracy protesters and more people are fleeing the biggest city Yangon. We will also hear about a BBC reporter who has disappeared in the country.

Plus - we find out more about Tanzania's newly sworn-in president, Samia Suluhu Hassan.

(Photo: A laboratory in the DRC last month. Credit: Reuters/ Hereward Holland)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxqy1g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2tb5tt9939)
Coronavirus: Your questions to the WHO

We put your questions about the coronavirus to Dr Margaret Harris, a spokesperson for the World Health Organisation. The WHO is an agency of the United Nations with responsibility for international public health. In March 2020 it was the WHO that declared the coronavirus outbreak as a global pandemic. If you have a question for Dr Harris send us a voice message on WhatsApp to +447730 751925.

We will also have the latest from Myanmar where the military have reportedly shot dead at least nine pro-democracy protesters and more people are fleeing the biggest city Yangon. We will also hear about a BBC reporter who has disappeared in the country.

Plus - we find out more about Tanzania's newly sworn-in president, Samia Suluhu Hassan.

(Photo: A pharmacist prepares a dose of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine in a pharmacy in Paris. Credit: Reuters/Benoit Tessier)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxr1sl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxr5jq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bqcl29xyv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjfjt3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k29wt24zr)
2021/03/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxr98v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjfnk7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv76)
Can space exploration be environmentally friendly?

The space industry, with its fuel-burning rockets, requirements for mined metals and inevitable production of space junk, is not currently renowned for its environmental credentials. Can space exploration ever be truly environmentally friendly? Presenter Marnie Chesterton answers a selection of listeners’ questions on the topic of space environmentalism. She starts by examining the carbon footprint of spaceship manufacturing here on Earth, and asking whether reusable rocket ships such as Space X or Virgin Galactic offer a green route for commuting or tourism in low Earth orbit.

Just beyond our atmosphere, space junk and space debris are multiplying at an exponential rate, jeopardising our communications and mapping satellites, and even putting our access to the wider solar system at risk. As more probes and landers head to the Moon and Mars, what plans are in place to deal with space debris far beyond Earth?

Presented by Marnie Chesterton
Produced by Jen Whyntie for the BBC World Service

[Image: Space Junk. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxrf0z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7v6fflnk)
Brazil's acute Covid crisis

The Brazilian healthcare is overwhelmed, with intensive-care units almost full in most hospitals. The country continues to face devastating numbers of cases and deaths, while President Jair Bolsonaro resists calls for a lockdown. We hear from a hospital doctor in San Paulo and a former health minister who was sacked because of disputes over how to handle the pandemic.

Also in the programme: the investment bank Goldman Sachs is reportedly planning to ease working conditions for junior bankers; and an interview with rich philanthropist Melinda Gates.

(Photo: Protest against Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro and his handling of the COVID-19 outbreak, in Brasilia, REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino)


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxrjs3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wxvgmzry)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fsjzdb8qs)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjfx1h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmbw858hd71)
Parts of France enter fresh Covid lockdown

Twenty-one million people in 16 areas of France begin a new month-long Covid lockdown. The BBC's Hugh Schofield in Paris tells us about the likely impact on businesses in France, and the government's deficit. Also in the programme, there is a new phase of international port diplomacy, where major economic powers are helping to construct ports to help establish commercial and military footholds around the world. The BBC's Ranga Sirilal in Colombo describes India and Japan's assistance to Sri Lanka for a port there. We hear from Cobus Van Staden, senior China-Africa researcher at the South African Institute of International Affairs about a Chinese loan deal for Bagamoyo Port in Tanzania. And Cristina Maza, a freelance journalist who has been covering a deal between Sudan and Russia for military access to Port Sudan on the Red Sea, discusses what is in it for the two sides. Plus, we hear from the chief executive of Australian airline Qantas, Alan Joyce, how he hopes to revive the company's fortunes in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

(Picture: A lone pedestrian walks near the Louvre in Paris. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pccnxrnj7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5tdjg0sm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3cszthk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Africa Life Clinic 09:32 SUN (w3ct21g8)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3csz6mk)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3csz6ml)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6ml)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6ml)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5q5g46p7f5)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5q5g46plnk)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5q5g46pywy)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5q5g46q2n2)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5q5g46qb4b)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5q5g46r5c7)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5q5g46rnbr)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172x5q5g46rwv0)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5q5g46s4b8)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5q5g46shkn)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5q5g46svt1)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5q5g46szk5)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5q5g46t399)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5q5g46t71f)

BBC News Summary 12:30 SUN (w172x5q5g46tbsk)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5q5g46v60g)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5q5g46vk7v)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5q5g46vnzz)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172x5q5tdhzn08)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5q5tdhzrrd)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5q5tdhzwhj)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172x5q5tdj007n)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5q5tdj03zs)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5q5tdj0lz9)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5q5tdj0qqf)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172x5q5tdj0vgk)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5q5tdj0z6p)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5q5tdj16py)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5q5tdj1g66)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5q5tdj1y5q)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5q5tdj21xv)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5q5tdj29f3)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5q5tdj2f57)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5q5tdj2sdm)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5q5tdj30ww)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5q5tdj3hwd)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5q5tdj3mmj)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5q5tdj3w3s)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5q5tdj43m1)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5q5tdj4c39)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5q5tdj4v2t)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5q5tdj4yty)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5q5tdj56b6)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5q5tdj5b2b)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5q5tdj5p9q)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5q5tdj5xsz)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5q5tdj6dsh)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5q5tdj6jjm)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5q5tdj6s0w)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5q5tdj70j4)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5q5tdj780d)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5q5tdj7qzx)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5q5tdj7vr1)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5q5tdj8379)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5q5tdj86zf)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5q5tdj8l6t)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5q5tdj8tq2)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5q5tdj99pl)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5q5tdj9ffq)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5q5tdj9nxz)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5q5tdj9xf7)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5q5tdjb4xh)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5q5tdjbmx0)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5q5tdjbrn4)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5q5tdjc04d)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5q5tdjc3wj)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5q5tdjch3x)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5q5tdjcqm5)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5q5tdjd6lp)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5q5tdjdbbt)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5q5tdjdkv2)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5q5tdjdtbb)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5q5tdjf1tl)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5q5tdjfjt3)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5q5tdjfnk7)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5q5tdjfx1h)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5q5tdjg0sm)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dlzmnj)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dlzrdn)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dlzw4s)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dlzzwx)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm03n1)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm07d5)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm0c49)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm0gwf)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm0lmk)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm0qcp)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm0v3t)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm0yvy)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm12m2)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm16c6)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm1b3b)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm1t2v)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm1xtz)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm21l3)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm25b7)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm292c)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5pc0dm2dth)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm2jkm)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm2n9r)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm2s1w)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm2wt0)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm30k4)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm3498)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm381d)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm3csj)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm3hjn)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm3m8s)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm3r0x)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm3vs1)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm3zj5)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm4389)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm470f)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm4brk)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm4ghp)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm4tr2)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm4yh6)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm527b)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm55zg)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5pc0dm59ql)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172x5pccnx98qw)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172x5pccnx9dh0)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172x5pccnx9j74)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172x5pccnx9mz8)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172x5pccnx9rqd)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172x5pccnx9wgj)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172x5pccnxb06n)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172x5pccnxb3ys)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5pccnxb7px)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5pccnxbcg1)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172x5pccnxbh65)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5pccnxbly9)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172x5pccnxbqpf)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172x5pccnxbvfk)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172x5pccnxbz5p)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172x5pccnxc2xt)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172x5pccnxc6ny)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172x5pccnxcbf2)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172x5pccnxcg56)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172x5pccnxckxb)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172x5pccnxcpng)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172x5pccnxctdl)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172x5pccnxcy4q)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5pccnxd1wv)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxd5mz)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxd9d3)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxdf47)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxdjwc)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxdnmh)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxdscm)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxdx3r)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxf0vw)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxf4m0)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxf8c4)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxfd38)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxfhvd)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxfmlj)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxfrbn)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxfw2s)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxfztx)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxg3l1)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxg7b5)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxgc29)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxggtf)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxglkk)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxgq9p)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxgv1t)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5pccnxgysy)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172x5pccnxh2k2)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5pccnxh696)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5pccnxhb1b)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172x5pccnxhfsg)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172x5pccnxhkjl)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172x5pccnxhp8q)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172x5pccnxht0v)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172x5pccnxhxrz)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172x5pccnxj1j3)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172x5pccnxj587)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172x5pccnxj90c)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172x5pccnxjdrh)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172x5pccnxjjhm)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172x5pccnxjn7r)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172x5pccnxjrzw)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172x5pccnxjwr0)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172x5pccnxk0h4)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172x5pccnxk478)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172x5pccnxk7zd)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172x5pccnxkcqj)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172x5pccnxkhgn)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5pccnxkm6s)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5pccnxkqyx)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5pccnxkvq1)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172x5pccnxkzg5)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5pccnxl369)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5pccnxl6yf)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5pccnxlbpk)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172x5pccnxlgfp)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172x5pccnxll5t)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172x5pccnxlpxy)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172x5pccnxltp2)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172x5pccnxlyf6)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172x5pccnxm25b)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172x5pccnxm5xg)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172x5pccnxm9nl)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172x5pccnxmfdq)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172x5pccnxmk4v)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172x5pccnxmnwz)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172x5pccnxmsn3)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172x5pccnxmxd7)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172x5pccnxn14c)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172x5pccnxn4wh)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172x5pccnxn8mm)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172x5pccnxndcr)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172x5pccnxnj3w)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172x5pccnxnmw0)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172x5pccnxnrm4)

BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxnwc8)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxp03d)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxp3vj)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxp7ln)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxpcbs)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxph2x)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxplv1)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxpql5)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxpvb9)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxpz2f)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxq2tk)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxq6kp)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxqb9t)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxqg1y)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxqkt2)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxqpk6)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxqt9b)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxqy1g)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxr1sl)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxr5jq)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxr98v)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxrf0z)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxrjs3)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5pccnxrnj7)

BBC OS Conversations 05:06 SAT (w3ct19zd)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct19zd)

BBC OS Conversations 04:06 SUN (w3ct2ccm)

BBC OS Conversations 14:06 SUN (w3ct2ccm)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 MON (w3ct19zd)

BBC OS Conversations 10:06 WED (w3ct2ccm)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 THU (w3ct2ccm)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172x2tb5tsxkqs)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2tb5tsxpgx)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172x2tb5tt0gmw)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172x2tb5tt0ld0)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172x2tb5tt3cjz)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2tb5tt3h93)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172x2tb5tt68g2)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2tb5tt6d66)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172x2tb5tt95c5)

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Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct2cbg)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz99g)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf5s)

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Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3k29wspkcc)

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The Cultural Frontline 00:06 SUN (w3cszj9r)

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The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3cszcpd)

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The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3cszky4)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172x7dbwryyqf0)

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When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct21m2)

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WorklifeIndia 02:06 SUN (w3ct1c1p)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x584cvx9rtr)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172xlvcrg50ybj)

World Business Report 22:32 MON (w172xm9t5tgtpmz)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3cszthk)

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