Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 06 MARCH 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn496h1p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpc)
Can Biden reset US Saudi Arabia relations?

It took President Joe Biden more than a month to schedule a phone call with King Salman of Saudi Arabia, a contrast to his predecessor Donald Trump, who chose the kingdom as his first foreign destination after the election. Even though Saudi Arabia is considered a key ally in a volatile region, Mr Biden took a tough stance on the kingdom during his campaign. He promised to end the sale of offensive weapons used in Saudi Arabia's war in Yemen, and accused its crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, of directly ordering the killing of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Mr Biden also pledged to restart nuclear talks with Iran, and further reduce America's dependence on fossil fuels, putting Washington at odds with the political and economic priorities of Riyadh. Now, as his administration looks for a reset of relations, what are the friction points in the decade old alliance between the two countries? Will a push for recalibration encourage Saudi Arabia to seek out new alliances at the expense of the United States? And can US policies succeed in the region by antagonising one of the leading countries in the Muslim world? Join Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn496lst)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x198l3mztwq)
US economy adds 380,000 jobs

The US economy added 380,000 jobs in February, well ahead of economists' expectations, but millions remain out of work because of the virus. We'll get reaction to the latest figures - as well as a report from the BBC's Michelle Fleury on how women have been particularly badly hit in the jobs market during the pandemic. And Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal speaks to the owner of a beauty bar whose microbusiness has struggled in the pandemic.

Throughout the week we've been examining the impact of the pandemic on workers' mental health, and today the BBC's Szu Ping Chan reports on what makes for a happy and satisfying career. We also have a look at the Australian reaction to Italy blocking its order of the AstraZeneca vaccine from leaving the EU.

Plus, the US band Kings of Leon is releasing its latest album today, but it has also chosen to issue it as a tradeable digital token, which is being described as a bit like the digital currency Bitcoin. Alex Hern is technology editor of The Guardian, and dicusses whether this marks a genuine breakthrough in how artists can earn money, or just a triumph of marketing to get people talking about the new release.

Joining the BBC's Rahul Tandon is journalist Karen Percy from Melbourne, Australia

(Picture: A person walks past a closed tourism near Times Square in New York, New York, USA. Picture Credit: EPA)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn496qjy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qy)
Crises in the Caucasus

The cities of Yerevan and Tbilisi have recently been roiled by mass demonstrations, police sieges and rancorous rhetoric. Both Armenia and Georgia are living through tumultuous days as political rivals plot, scheme and deride their opponents by a multitude of means. The BBC's Reyhan Demytrie reveals what it's like to try and cover two complex constitutional crises at once.

Pascale Harter introduces her report, and more insight and analysis from correspondents, journalists and writers around the world.

As the Pope visits Iraq, Lizzie Porter describes a recent, and far more sombre ceremony recently held in the formerly Yazidi agricultural village of Kocho. This was the site of one of the so-called Islamic State's worst massacres as its fighters rampaged through the border between Syria and Iraq; now there are attempts to rebury the dead they threw into mass graves with more dignity. But for survivors who fled the area, and are now tentatively trying to remake their lives nearby, there's still little sense of security and living conditions are harsh

Voters in Peru traditionally set little faith in politicians - but the country's recent 'vaccine-gate' scandal has taken public trust in the ruling class to a new low. Dan Collyns reveals the backlash after a scandalous leak revealed that many of the country's most influential people had received their Covid vaccinations unusually early - and in some cases, despite voluble denials that they'd ever jump the queue.

In Iceland, the response to the pandemic has been rather more orderly - though that's obviously a little easier to achieve on an island nation with around 350,000 people. Tira Shubart explains how it's managed the pandemic and its impact on tourism -and explores some possible roots of its pragmatic and science-based approach.


(Image: Opposition supporters hold a rally in Yerevan, Armenia. Credit: Reuters/Artem Mikryukov)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwx2tb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhkm)
England in a spin – Trescothick to the rescue

We speak to one of the best English batsmen against spin, Marcus Trescothick, on what England have been doing wrong against India. Plus he reacts to his appointment as England’s elite batting coach.”

And almost a year to the day since 86,000 people were at the MCG to watch Australia women win the T20 World Cup, we speak to Angela Pippos, the producer of a new Amazon Prime documentary ‘The Record’, which documents Australia’s rise to the top.

Photo: Marcus Trescothick of Somerset raises his bat after reaching his century during day one of the LV County Championship match between Northamptonshire and Somerset at The County Ground on May 8, 2007 in Northampton, England. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn496v92)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjh)
Life in a Kurdish military camp

BBC Arabic's Namak Khoshnaw was given unfettered access to film in a military camp of Komala, the Revolutionary Party of Iranian Kurdistan, in Iraqi Kurdistan for his film Escape from Iran. Komala has become a magnet for young Iranian Kurds prepared to risk everything to leave their homeland and train as Peshmerga fighters. We find out about the challenges of filming it, the people fleeing Iran, and the memories it brought back for Namak, himself a former refugee.

Reciting the Koran
Nourin Mohamed Siddig was a Nigerian Koranic reciter who died recently. He found popularity on social media and sang in a unique African style, rather than the more usual Middle Eastern way. We hear from Ahmed Ambali of BBC Yoruba and Reem Fatthelbab of BBC Arabic, about the different ways of singing the Koran and why it’s important to keep them.

Selling the Amazon
A wealthy farmer, looking for investment opportunities in the Amazon. That was BBC Brazil’s Joao Fellet's assumed identity for almost a year, after he discovered “traders” illegally selling rainforest plots on Facebook Marketplace. From Sao Paulo to the Amazon, to Brazil's Supreme Court, Joao shares the “behind the scenes” of his epic report.

Russian prison colonies
Notorious Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny has been sentenced to 2 years imprisonment and it's rumoured he may spend them in penal colony ‘Number 2’. Oleg Boldyrev of BBC Russian explains the differences between prison and penal colonies, and what life in a penal colony might entail.


Image: Trainee graduating at Komala training camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
Credit: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmwc)
Churchill's 'Iron Curtain' speech

In March 1946, the UK's former wartime leader, Winston Churchill, gave a historic speech which would come to symbolise the beginnings of the Cold War. Churchill had lost power following a crushing election defeat in Britain in 1945. Encouraged by the US President Harry Truman, Churchill agreed to give a speech on world affairs at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri. But why did the speech have such an impact. Alex Last hears from the historian Prof David Reynolds of Cambridge University, author of The Kremlin Letters: Stalin's wartime correspondence with Churchill and Roosevelt.

Photo: Winston Churchill at the podium delivering his "Iron Curtain" speech, at Westminster College in Fulton Missouri, 5th March 1946 (PA)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn496z16)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4972sb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zc)
Coronavirus: War and Covid trauma

We hear from two US veterans who served during the war in Vietnam about the similarities between their experiences and the trauma experienced by many during the pandemic.

Covid vaccines are bringing renewed hope across the world when it comes to Covid-19 but thousands of people are continuing to die from the disease on a daily basis. The emotional toll of losing loved ones is being felt by so many around the world. Three people struggling with grief - from Bangladesh, Sweden and the United States - share their experiences.


(Photo:Marsha Four with her father. Credit: Marsha Four)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwxg1q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxp)
On 11 November 2019 James Le Mesurier was found dead in a street in Istanbul. He was the latest casualty in a very unusual war – one fought not on the battlefield, but online.

Le Mesurier was a mysterious figure with a taste for the finer things who served in the British Army in several of the world’s hotspots before focusing his energies on war-ravaged Syria from 2014. He co-founded the White Helmets, a Syrian civil defence force who filmed themselves pulling survivors and bodies from the rubble of bombed out buildings.

Soon, the White Helmets - and Le Mesurier - found themselves at the centre of a global race to control the narrative in the Syrian War. In this investigative series Mayday, presenter Chloe Hadjimatheou talks to the people who knew James, including his widow Emma, his ex-wife and former army colleagues, as well as those on the ground in Syria still working as White Helmets today in an effort to piece together James’ story and that of the White Helmets. She speaks to some of the White Helmet’s detractors and follows up accusations about the organisation to try and understand the truth surrounding them.

Chloe Hadjimatheou says: “Making this series has been an extraordinary experience, as listeners will discover. It started out being an investigation into the story of a man with an astonishing life and a mysterious death but it ended up taking me on a bizarre journey down rabbit holes of misinformation. Ultimately this is a story about how truth functions in modern warfare.”


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct24jj)
The Saudis and the superpower

Joe Biden promised to be tough on Saudi Arabia. But this week, he stopped short of punishing the kingdom's crown prince despite US intelligence holding him responsible for the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Ros Atkins looks at the President's first foreign policy test, and the Washington-Riyadh alliance.

(Photo: Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, arrives at the Algiers International Airport in December, 2018. Credit: Ryad Kramdi/AFP)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4976jg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7dbjhn5kt5)
Pope Francis to meet powerful Shia cleric in Iraq

Pope will discuss inter-faith relations on the second day of his historic trip.

Also, Shaharzad Akbar, chair of the Afghanistan Independent Human Right Commission, on the reasons behind the surge of violence in her country.

And United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights asks Ethiopia to allow independent experts to investigate alleged human rights violations in Tigray region.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Charlotte Leslie, director of the Conservative Middle East Council, an organisation which promotes greater understanding of the Middle East amongst parliamentarians in the UK; and Christos Christou, president of Médecins Sans Frontières, or 'Doctors Without Borders', the international humanitarian non-governmental organisation.

(Picture: President Barham Salih of Iraq meets Pope Francis in Baghdad, Iraq. Credit: Mandatory Credit: REX/Shutterstock)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn497b8l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7dbjhn5pk9)
China sets out its post pandemic rise

As National People's Congress starts in Beijing, we'll talk China's economic post-pandemic economic plan and the fortunes of China’s Communist Party, turning one hundred this year.

Also, Pope Francis will discuss inter-faith relations on the second day of his historic trip to Iraq.

And another day of protests in Myanmar as demonstrators demand democracy.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Charlotte Leslie, director of the Conservative Middle East Council, an organisation which promotes greater understanding of the Middle East amongst parliamentarians in the UK; and Christos Christou, president of Médecins Sans Frontières, or 'Doctors Without Borders', the international humanitarian non-governmental organisation.

(Picture: The National People's Congress in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. Credit: CHINE NOUVELLE/SIPA/REX/Shutterstock)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn497g0q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7dbjhn5t9f)
WHO warns of more possible waves of Covid-19

As the World Health Organisation appeals for no let-up in the fight against Covid-19, we hear from Prof. Andrew Pollard one of the scientists behind the Oxford vaccine.

Also in the programme: the story of three trailblazing female journalists who covered the Vietnam War and how they have inspired generations of war reporters.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Charlotte Leslie, director of the Conservative Middle East Council, an organisation which promotes greater understanding of the Middle East amongst parliamentarians in the UK; and Christos Christou, president of Médecins Sans Frontières, or 'Doctors Without Borders', the international humanitarian non-governmental organisation.

(Photo: Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO) attends a news conference. Credit: Reuters).


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwxt93)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m1)
Why local newspapers matter

In the last 15 years, America has lost around 25% of its local and regional newspapers. Many others have shrunk dramatically in size. This has led to an increasing number of so-called “news deserts” across the US. There is growing evidence that this has a detrimental impact on local democracy, as well as the local economy.

Emily Brindley is a 25-year-old reporter on the country’s longest continuously published newspaper, the Hartford Courant, in Connecticut. The paper has recently lost dozens of newsroom staff, as well as its physical newsroom, and is set to be taken over by a hedge fund that is notorious for making swingeing cuts.

Penelope Abernathy started her career in local journalism, before moving to the business side of newspapers, including working for the New York Times and helping it expand nationally and internationally. She has written a number of reports on the state of local media in the US.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn497krv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 today]


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwxy17)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6d)
I'm Not a Monster

06/03/2021 GMT

An American mother living in the heart of the ISIS caliphate. Her husband an ISIS sniper. Her 10-year-old son forced to threaten the U.S. president in a propaganda video shown around the world. She claims she was tricked into taking her young children to war-torn Syria, but where does her account end and the truth begin? Over four years journalist Josh Baker unravels a dangerous story where nothing is as it seems. From the depths of Raqqa’s infamous torture prison to an elk hunt in Idaho, he uncovers secrets, lies and the lasting consequences.

I’m Not A Monster is the story of one family’s journey from Indiana to the Islamic State group and back.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf5r)
Behind-the-scenes of BBC Africa’s leading investigation team

Is a disproportionate amount of time given over to stories from the US? One listener shares his views US focused programmes. Plus, Africa Eye specialises in reports from across the continent. But what makes the team tick? We go behind-the-scenes.

And Comedians vs The News - we asked listeners to give the second series a second chance. They tell us whether producers have got it right this time!

Presenter Rajan Datar
Producer Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn497phz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c9h7yrh9p)
Conquering the high seas - From landlocked Thirsk to rowing world records

Jasmine Harrison joins Sportshour to reflect on making history as the youngest woman to row solo across the Atlantic Ocean. The 21-year-old completed the trip from the Canary Islands to the Caribbean in 70 days, 3 hours and 48 minutes. She tells us about capsizing twice, a close encounter with a drilling ship, being at one with nature and how she burnt her hand at the end of her journey.

United States Olympic Gold medal winning ice hockey player Hilary Knight tells us about playing in the first Women's professional game to be held at New York's famed Madison Square Garden. She also discusses the difficulties of making a living in the sport and looks ahead to next year’s Winter Olympics.

Brendan Lawlor discusses his hopes of becoming the 'Tiger Woods of disability golf' and how he wants to set up a disability golf tour. The 23 year-old made history by becoming the first disabled golfer to play on the European Tour. He was born with a hole in his heart as well as the rare limb-limiting condition Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome, which means he stands at 4ft 11in.

John Gunning of the Japan Times tells us about the impact of the covid-19 pandemic on amateur sumo wrestling, and how the first national “Sumo Technique Tournament” is helping to plug the gap. Children and sumo clubs across Japan were invited to submit video entries in categories including: Japan’s most beautiful shiko (foot stomp) and Japan’s best “Air Sumo”, which sees one person battle an imaginary opponent.

We get the latest from day three of the final Test between India and England in Ahmedabad, and the BBC’s Juliette Ferrington looks ahead to the early game in the Premier League, as Burnley host Arsenal.

Photo: Record breaking rower Jasmine Harrison celebrates crossing the finishing line in Antigua. (Credit: Atlantic Campaigns)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn497t83)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1ftkp7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwy5jh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mj)
Basketmouth and Munya Chawawa

Brilliant comedians from around the world join Jess Salomon and Eman El- Husseini to take on the headlines.

This week Jess and Eman are joined by Nigerian superstar comedian Basketmouth and British social media sensation Munya Chawawa. They’ll be finding out why Nigerians are fuming about the ban on crypto currencies and asking if the UK will be having too much fun when pubs and clubs re-open this summer.

Join Comedians vs The News for the funniest take on the global headlines you’ve heard this week.


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn497y07)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6v9)
Don't run away from pressure with Caroline Polachek, Perfume Genius, Jlin and Oneohtrix Point Never

Caroline Polachek, Perfume Genius, Jlin and Oneohtrix Point Never discuss their links to poetry, and how they find harmony between competing elements in songs.

Caroline Polachek is a pop and avant garde musician, record producer, writer and singer, who broke through in 2008 with her band Chairlift. She’s now releasing music under her own name, and counts Lady Gaga, Charli XCX, and Taylor Swift as fans.

Mike Hadreas, better known as Perfume Genius, is an art-pop singer who addresses topics such as sexuality, domestic abuse, and his personal battle with Crohn’s disease in his music.

Experimental electronic producer Jlin has worked with the likes of previous Music Life host Max Richter, Holly Herndon, St Vincent and Björk, and her latest record deals with issues such as “history, mythology, imprisonment, culture wars, and a clash of civilizations”.

Finally, Brooklyn-based musician, soundtrack composer, and producer Daniel Lopatin works under the name Oneohtrix Point Never, and has collaborated with Iggy Pop, Anohni, Nine Inch Nails, David Byrne, and FKA Twigs.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4981rc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nsy7cy)
Pope Francis and Iraq's top Shia religious leader call for unity

Pope Francis has discussed the safety of Iraq's Christian minority with one of Shia Islam's most powerful figures, on his landmark trip to the country.

Danish authorities tell dozens of Syrian refugees they must return home because Damascus and the surrounding area is safe.

And one of the men behind the Oxford–AstraZeneca vaccine reflects on comments by politicians in europe which called into question the vaccines effectiveness in tackling Covid-19.

(Photo: Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani with Pope Francis on Saturday. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4985hh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lpgtcyq4t)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as Sheffield United host Southampton at Bramall Lane.

Lee James is joined by former West Ham midfielder Nigel Reo-Coker, ex-Wolves and Nigeria international Seyi Olofinjana and former Liverpool manager Vicky Jepson to discuss the big talking points.

We'll have reaction to the day's early game between Burnley and Arsenal.

Elsewhere, we'll bring you the latest from day three of the final men's Test match between India and England in Ahmedabad and the European Indoor Athletics Championships in Poland.

Photo: Sheffield United manager Chris Wilder and Southampton counterpart Ralph Hassenhuttl (Getty Images)






Photo:


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn498nh0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fvdx4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwz0rd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn498s74)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 Assignment (w3csz6mj)
A year of Covid

In March 2020 the UK was gearing up to face the Covid-19 pandemic. Cases were increasing rapidly and by the end of month the country was in full lockdown with medics facing their toughest ever test. A group of doctors and nurses in intensive care units recorded audio diaries for the BBC which illustrated the true scale of the professional and personal challenge they faced. The UK was to become one of the worst hit countries for Covid-19 deaths in Europe. One year on – in the midst of a second wave - and a third lockdown - reporter Jane Deith revisits some of those doctors and nurses for Assignment to find out how they’re surviving the biggest challenge of their careers.

Producer: Rob Cave

(Photo: A nurse attends to a patient on a Covid-19 ward at Milton Keynes University Hospital, amid the spread of the coronavirus disease, 20 January, 2021. Credit: Toby Melville/Reuters)


SAT 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwz4hj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:32 Global Questions (w3ct1pxp)
Global Questions

Vaccine Apartheid

While the west bought billions of vaccines quickly and cheaply, some people argue a global vaccine apartheid is unfolding with less wealthy nations missing out on adequate supplies. There are predictions that sub-Saharan countries, for example, will have to wait until 2024, and end up paying more. More advanced nations like the UK and the US, it is argued, only pay lip service to the slogan ‘no one is safe until everyone is safe’ and that unequal global distribution will leave dangerous reservoirs of the virus around the world.

There are calls for the richer nations to send supplies elsewhere even before they’ve vaccinated all of the their adult populations. China and Russia are already coming to the aid of those countries in need, but is this a genuine attempt to help or a bid for greater global influence? And, in the rush for vaccines, has there been an unseemly ‘vaccine nationalism’ displayed by some industrialised nations?

Join Zeinab Badawi, her panel of experts and question askers from around the globe.
Panel:-
John Nkengasong Director of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention; expert virologist from Cameroon.
2nd Panellist TBC


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn498wz8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk48)
Singer and broadcaster Cerys Matthews

It’s a music special on this week’s Arts Hour as Nikki Bedi talks to singer, broadcaster, author and poetry-lover Cerys Matthews about her latest album ‘We Come From The Sun’, and to music journalist Beatriz de la Pava.

American band The Flaming Lips explain the unusual steps they’ve taken to keep playing live during the pandemic.

ABBA’s Björn Ulvaeus shares his thoughts on how streaming services should be fairer to artists.

We hear exactly what it takes to become a K-Pop star.

Finnish violinist Pekka Kuusisto on getting a whole orchestra to whistle while they play.

Radio DJ and Producer Seani B takes us through the basics of Dancehall.

Plus a brilliant collaboration between Cuban pianist Omar Sosa and Ethiopian musician Seleshe Damessae.


(Photo: Cerys Matthews. Credit: Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4990qd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nsz6bz)
Pope Francis denounces extremism on historic visit to Iraq

The second day of Pope Francis's visit to Iraq has taken him to Najaf for a meeting with a revered Shia Muslim spiritual leader, to the ancient city of Ur, and to St Joseph's Church in Baghdad where he officiated at Mass. We hear from Father Karam Shamasham, the priest at the Chaldean Catholic church in Telskuf in Nineveh province.

Also in the programme: We hear from the northern Yemeni city of Marib, the latest flashpoint between the Saudi-backed Yemeni government and attacking Houthi forces; and there has been a night of violent clashes between police and protesters in Paraguay, as people protest against the government's handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

(Photo: Pope Francis officiates the Holy mass at the Chaldean Cathedral of Saint Joseph in Baghdad, Iraq, on 6 March 2021. Credit: EPA/Vatican Media Handout)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4994gj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79w69v5lgc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frtfrvwf6)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwzhqx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct20d3)
The Right Thing: A life worth living?

Mike Wooldridge explores another story of faith and hard decisions. When American Beth Ball was pregnant with her first child, she found out that the baby had Down’s syndrome. Upon receiving the diagnosis, she says she was shocked at the heavy hints that she should terminate the pregnancy, and outdated information made available. For Beth and her husband Stephen, both Christians, the next months were a struggle, emotionally and spiritually. At one point, Beth prayed that if she was unable to cope with a baby with Down’s syndrome, God would take it away.

But then things were to change for the Ball family, and several times. Alongside Beth and Stephen, Mike hears from Dr Francis Hickey, an expert in Down’s syndrome, Michelle Sie Witten, President of the Global Down Syndrome Foundation, their Pastor Bill Cahoun, and the family of Jack Holm, a young man with Down’s syndrome who inspired them to re-imagine the future.

Producer: Paul Arnold

(Photo: DNA helix illustration. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49986n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sq0)
Reflecting on a year of the pandemic

Next week marks the first anniversary of the World Health Organisation officially labelling Covid-19 a pandemic. In the year since that announcement was made over two and a half million people have died from the disease. Global unemployment rose by 33 million, social gatherings have been largely forbidden and millions of children have had their education disrupted. On this episode of Business Weekly we’ll be looking at the cost of the coronavirus on our jobs, lives and wellbeing. We’ll hear from women forced out of the workforce, young people who had to grow up in lockdown and health workers who battled to save lives at the expense of their own mental wellbeing.

Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Marie Keyworth.

(Image: Young girl wearing mask looking through window, Getty Images)



SUNDAY 07 MARCH 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn499cys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9q)
Waad al-Kateab and fearless female storytellers

Ahead of International Women’s Day, Nawal al-Maghafi hears taboo-busting personal stories from fearless female creatives on this week’s Cultural Frontline.

After almost a decade of civil war in Syria, Nawal speaks to the Oscar-nominated filmmaker Waad al-Kateab and the journalist Wafa Ali Mustafa about collaborating to share the female experience of conflict. Waad tells Nawal about her award-winning film For Sama, made as a new mother during the siege of Aleppo. Their new film documents the disappearance of Wafa’s father, one of tens of thousands estimated by the UN to have disappeared during the conflict.

British activist Charlie Craggs has created a safe space to combat transphobia. Her unique beauty salon, Nail Transphobia, shares the stories of her trans-sisters over a shape and polish. In the BBC’s Beauty Fix podcast, Charlie reveals the rituals of self-care that are keeping her spirits up during lockdown, with model and author Naomi Shimada.

And it might be one of the last taboos in the fight for gender equality - women choosing not to have children. Israeli novelist Sarah Blau tells Nawal about combining a personal truth with a page-turning thriller, to challenge the stigma of child-free women in her religious community.

Plus, Patricia Cornwell, one of America’s best-selling crime writers, who puts female characters front and centre. She tells The Cultural Frontline about the pioneering female author who set her on course to be a writer.

Presenter: Nawal al-Maghafi

(Photo: Waad Al-Kateab. Credit: Courtesy of Channel 4 News/ITN Productions)


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwzr75)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3cszf5r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn499hpx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3cszky3)
Uncovering history with Little Foot's skull

One of our most complete ancient ancestor’s fossils has been transported to the UK from South Africa in order to be scanned at the Diamond Light Source. Roland Pease investigates what these scans could reveal about the human story.

Professor Corinne Le Quéré explains how she managed to look past the 7% reduction in human emissions caused by the pandemic in 2020 to reveal the impact of the Paris Climate agreements, and explains what more needs to be done. Roland speaks with anthropologist Dr. Rolf Quam, who has studied the inner ears of fossilised Neanderthal skulls to reveal they may have evolved the ability to hear the complex sounds of spoken language separately to our own species. Dr. Emma Hodcroft discusses the Brazilian P1 COVID 19 variant that is spreading around the world.

And, The sudden agony of stubbing a toe or burning a finger can make even the most polite among us swear our heads off. It’s like a reflex, a quick-release valve for the shock. But why do expletives give us such a sense of relief? Why does it sometimes feel so good to swear?

We set out to explore the science of swearing, prompted by a question from our listener Gadi. Psychological studies have shown bad language can relieve pain, or even make us stronger; we test out these theories for ourselves, and try to figure out why certain words are charged with such physical power.

We don’t just use strong words in shock or anger, either. They can help us to bond with others, to express joy, solidarity, or creativity. And although people curse all over the world, it’s not quite the same everywhere. We hear what people like to swear about in different countries, and whether swearing in a second language can ever be quite so satisfying.

(Image: Little Foot Skull. Copyright: Diamond Light Source Ltd)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn499mg1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c1n)
How to deal with online trolling

Abusive comments and insults have become far too common on the internet. Social media platforms in particular are a hotbed of trolls - people taking pleasure in sending sexist, malicious comments. Recent figures estimate that more than 40% of women Internet users in India fear being bullied or trolled online.

Should one engage with trolls by debating them, or ignore and block them, so their abusive views don’t gain any further visibility? When are the limits of free speech breached, and what can be done to control online trolling?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss solutions with three high-profile women who have themselves faced vicious online trolling.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Mandana Karimi, Bollywood actor; Karuna Nundy, advocate, Supreme Court of India; Sagarika Ghose, journalist and author


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwzzqf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pys)
Sainthood and Cup draws

Tim Harford explores the chances of becoming a saint, inspired by a throw away comment by the detective on the TV drama ‘Death in Paradise.’

Plus, a listener has a question about the recent Europa League Draw for the final knockout round. He spotted that none of the teams face a rival from their own country. What were the chances of that happening?


(Missionaries of the Charity of Kolkata honour Saint Mother Teresa. West Bengal, India. Credit: Satyajit Shaw/ Getty Images)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn499r65)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sq0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn499vy9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx8)
Tsitsi Dangarembga: Nervous Conditions

A modern classic in the African literary canon and voted in the Top Ten of Africa's 100 Best Books of the 20th Century, Nervous Conditions is the coming-of-age story of two Shona girls, Tambudzai and Nyasha, both trying to find their place in contemporary Zimbabwe.

Whilst Nyasha has been to England and questions the effect of that Westernisation on her family, Tambudzai is from a more traditional branch of the family and is awed by her cousin’s seeming sophistication.

Through its exploration of race, class, gender and the nature of friendship, the novel dramatizes the 'nervousness' of the 'postcolonial' condition that vexes us still.


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn499zpf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vx0byt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct20d3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49b3fk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7dbjhn8gq8)
Biden scores first legislative victory

President Joe Biden wins Senate approval for a 1.9 trillion-dollar relief package for millions of Americans affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

Also, Pope Francis marks his third day in Iraq with a Mass in the north of the country where ten thousand people are expected.

And in Brazil, the week ends with the number of coronavirus cases breaking records.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Christina Lamb, a British journalist and Chief Foreign Correspondent for the Sunday Times newspaper, and Edward Girardet a Swiss-American journalist, editor, and author based in Geneva.

(Picture: President Joe Biden delivers remarks on the Senate passage of the 1.9 trillion-dollar coronavirus relief bill. Credit: EPA)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49b75p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7dbjhn8lgd)
Why does Switzerland want to ban the burka?

Why Switzerland is voting to ban face coverings such as the niqab and burka, even though they are worn by very few women.

Also, President Joe Biden has welcomed the US Senate's vote to approve his 1.9 trillion-dollar coronavirus relief plan. Some observers are describing it as the first political victory of his administration. One US citizen tells us she needed help much sooner.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Christina Lamb, a British journalist and Chief Foreign Correspondent for the Sunday Times newspaper, and Edward Girardet a Swiss-American journalist, editor, and author based in Geneva.

(Picture: A poster reads "Stop Extremism!" ahead of a Swiss vote on banning face veils. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49bbxt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7dbjhn8q6j)
The Harry and Meghan interview

The eagerly-anticipated CBS interview of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

Also, police have carried out raids overnight in Myanmar's main city, Yangon, ahead of further demonstrations expected against the military coup.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Christina Lamb, a British journalist and Chief Foreign Correspondent for the Sunday Times newspaper, and Edward Girardet a Swiss-American journalist, editor, and author based in Geneva.

(Picture: The Duke and Duchess of Sussex. Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vx0q66)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 Outlook (w3cszf17)
Setting up a fake mafia to catch El Chapo

Infiltrating mobs, taking down contract killers and busting drug rings; this was the job of Special Agent Mike McGowan during his 30 year career in the FBI. He was already the expert in undercover operations at the bureau when he was handed the "superbowl" of cases - to bring down the Mexican drug lord El Chapo. In a sting that lasted four years, Mike and his team of agents convinced the notorious Sinaloa cartel that they too were an established crime organisation. He tells Outlook's Saskia Edwards about using dog psychology and a purple velour bathrobe to fool some of the world's most dangerous criminals. A longer version of this story was first broadcast on 16th February 2021.

His book is called Ghost: My Thirty Years as an FBI Undercover Agent

Presenter & Producer: Saskia Edwards
Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: SA Mike McGowan on the job
Credit: Courtesy of Mike McGowan


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49bgny)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vx0tyb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Africa Life Clinic (w3ct21g7)
Modern medicine versus the spirits

When it comes to mending broken bones or rectifying the eye problems caused by the disease Trachoma, what place does traditional medicine have? Many people would choose traditional medicine practitioners over conventional doctors and hospitals. However herbalism and spiritual belief are poor substitutes when surgery is needed. Can these two very different approaches be reconciled for the benefit of patients?
Priscila Ngethe, Khadidiatou Cisse, and Charles Mgbolu discuss the conflict and potential for collaboration between the opposing forces of traditional and orthodox medicine.
(Picture: Bone setting an arm. Credit: Life Clinic TV)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49blf2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbf)
Dating

Why do you do what you do? Exploring our loves, fears, habits and hopes, Dessa takes a deeply personal look at what lies behind our thoughts and behaviour. Can a better understanding of human nature help us be more generous with other people’s behaviour, and even our own?

In the first episode of the series, Dessa looks at dating. We spend a lot of time looking for love – but have we got that wrong? Is love really something you discover, or something you’d be better growing into?

Dessa finds answers in the supermarket cereal aisle and the brain scans carried out by a biological anthropologist - someone who puts your life in the context of everyone else’s. If you think you’re special, think again! But then, Dessa hears some words of wisdom from her mum on how best to navigate the wilderness of dating apps.

A co-production by BBC World Service and American Public Media.

(Image: Teenage Couple, Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vx0ypg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct20d3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49bq56)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fxglb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vx12fl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct2cb1)
Under the Canopy

Forests of folktale and imagination

Jessica unpicks the profound role that forests play in our imaginative life. We know of course that they feature heavily in the fairy tales and myths we use to navigate life as children, and as we hear from writers like Max Porter, Richard Powers and Melissa Harrison, they also offer ways of understanding the complexities of desire, politics and history in our adult lives. Poet Carl Phillips describes how forests mirror the wilderness within us, while Jinni Reddy tells of how she found beauty in the forest through facing down her fears.

Forest sounds appear courtesy of the 'Sounds of the Forest' project

Original musical composition: Erland Cooper

Spells written by Robert Macfarlane and these are read by Maxine Peake and the Bird sisters

Photo credit: Geoff Bird


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49btxb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4w)
Why did Alexei Navalny return to Russia?

After surviving an assassination attempt, the opposition leader returned to Russia - and was immediately arrested and jailed.

What does he have to gain by returning home, and can he still lead an effective campaign from prison?

Charmaine Cozier asks what does President Putin have to fear in Alexei Navalny's rising popularity, and could his anti-corruption campaign make a difference at the Russian parliamentary elections in September?


(Alexei Navalny at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport upon arrival from Berlin January 17, 2021. Credit: Kirill Kudryatsev /Getty Images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vx165q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Global Questions (w3ct1pxp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:32 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49byng)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nt1491)
Pope leads prayers in Mosul

Pope Francis is visiting parts of northern Iraq that were held by Islamic State (IS) militants on the third day of his historic trip to the country.

We'll hear from Bagan, Myanmar's cultural centre about the protests there today and the violent response from the police.

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, the British-Iranian woman jailed in Iran on spying charges, has had her ankle tag removed at the end of her five-year sentence.

And is streaming killing music? We'll hear from one half of the songwriting duo that made ABBA global superstars.


(Photo: There are churches from four of Iraq's Christian denominations in and around Mosul's Church Square. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49c2dl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49c64q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjwv)
Making waves: the history of swimming

Common to many cultures across the world, swimming appears on the surface to be a benign leisure activity. But in fact it has much to tell us about such things as the development of societies, our bodies and minds, and our relationship to our ancestors and the natural world.

For the Ancient Greeks and Romans, swimming was essential for instilling discipline, as a necessary skill for warriors, and to promote wellbeing. In West Africa where water had spiritual significance, communities there placed great importance on learning to swim from an early age. Their aquatic skills surprised the early colonialists, who then targeted divers to help them plunder shipwrecks when they were trafficked to the New World. Today however African American children are almost six times more likely to drown than their white counterparts as a consequence of historic racial segregation, according to research by the US Centers for Disease Control.

Rajan Datar is joined Professor Kevin Dawson from the University of California Merced, author of Undercurrents of Power: Aquatic Cultures in the African Diaspora; Mikael Rosén, swimmer, coach and author of Open Water: The History and Technique of Swimming; journalist Howard Means, author of Splash!: Ten Thousand Years of Swimming and writer Bonnie Tsui whose book Why we Swim was published in 2020.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service.

[Photo: Young boys swim together at an inter-racial camp circa 1948 in New York, New York. Credit: Irving Haberman/IH Images/Getty Images]


SUN 15:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh6b)
Zimbabwe's Paralympic pioneer

At the 2000 Paralympic Games in Sydney, Zimbabwean sprinter Elliot Mujaji won his country’s first ever Paralympic gold medal when he sprinted to victory in the 100 metres. Mujaji had been a promising runner as a teenager, but suffered severe burns and the amputation of his right arm while working in a part-time job as an electrician. Mujaji then faced a tough battle to get sponsorship in a country where there was virtually no support for Paralympic athletes. He talks to Ashley Byrne. The programme is a Made-In-Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Elliot Mujaji at the 2004 Paralympics (Getty Images)


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49c9wv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lpgtd1vk5)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary of the Manchester derby as leaders City host at the Etihad Stadium.

We'll have reaction to the day's early matches with West Brom taking on Newcastle United and champions Liverpool facing Fulham.

Elsewhere, we'll bring you the latest from day four of the final men's Test match between India and England in Ahmedabad.

Photo: Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola and his United counterpart Ole Gunnar Solskjaer (Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49cp47)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fyfkc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vx21dm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49cswc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6v9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49cxmh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nt2382)
Huge explosions rock Equatorial Guinea's main city

Officials in the West African country of Equatorial Guinea have appealed for international help after a munitions dump blew up in the economic capital Bata, killing at least fifteen people and injuring hundreds more. State television showed people looking for survivors in the rubble and lifting up debris from collapsed buildings.

Also in the programme: Pope Francis offers prayers for all those who lost their lives in the battle to liberate the Iraqi city of Mosul from Islamic State militants; and what Dutch researchers are hoping to learn from a music concert trial without social distancing.

(Image: An image from state television in Equatorial Guinea shows people searching through rubble following explosions at a military base in Bata. Credit TVGE/via REUTERS)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49d1cm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79w69v8hcg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frtfrysb9)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vx2dn0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct0pys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49d53r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vx2jd4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf17)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]



MONDAY 08 MARCH 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlj441)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g466hdf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Discovery (w3ct2ccd)
The Life Scientific: Cath Noakes

Professor Cath Noakes studies how air moves and the infection risk associated with different ventilation systems. Early in the pandemic, she was invited to join the government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, SAGE and asked to study the transmission routes for Covid-19. In July, together with many other scientists, she urged governments around the world and the World Health Organisation to recognise that Covid-19 could be transmitted in tiny particles in the air, even if the risk of getting infected in this way was much smaller than the risk from larger particles that travel less far. Her research highlights the importance of good ventilation as a way to stop the spread of infection in indoor environments. Being in a well ventilated space can reduce the risk of inhaling tiny airborne pathogens by 70%. Cath talks to Jim Al-Khalili about her journey from studying industrial processes to infection risk, her work on the airborne transmission of diseases and the challenge of designing buildings that are both well ventilated and energy efficient.

Producer: Anna Buckley

Photo credit: University of Leeds


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlj7w5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x5840lljm6x)
US on the brink of historic stimulus

President Biden has hailed a Senate vote to approve his Covid recovery plan as a giant step towards providing desperately needed help to the American people. The bill is worth nearly $2 trillion and will return to the House of Representatives for approval within days. The BBC's Peter Bowes give his analysis of why the bill is being viewed as historic and why it failed to get Republican support. Chinese exports have had a record breaking first two months of the year, the economist Michael Hughes explains the significance meanwhile as oil and other commodity prices continue to surge, Caroline Bain of Capital Economics urges caution. And on International Women's Day, The Economist's 'Glass Ceiling Index' finds that Scandinavia is where women have the best chances of equal treatment in work.
(Image: U.S. President Joe Biden tours Houston Food Bank in Houston, Texas, Credit: Reuters)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g466m4k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dljcm9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc39)
Evan McMullin: What next for anti-Trump Republicans?

Despite losing the presidency and both Houses of Congress, Donald Trump still seems to have a chokehold on the Republican party. So what will Republican anti-Trumpers do next: continue the fight from within the party, or get out and create a new one? Evan McMullin is one of the most prominent American Republicans determined to loosen President Trump's grip on the Party, and one of the key organisers and strategists behind the Stand Up Republic group of unhappy Republicans.


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g466qwp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4q)
Women making art from clay

Pottery is one of the oldest and most widespread decorative arts and has enjoyed rising popularity in recent years. At the same time, ceramics are increasingly significant as contemporary art. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two ceramicists about sprigging, drying, firing and smashing; commercial collaborations; and getting their pieces in museums.

Hitomi Hosono is a Japanese ceramicist whose delicate work sits in the British Museum and V&A. She's also collaborated with the world-famous Wedgewood pottery manufacturer to make jasperware vases. Her ceramics, with a chalk-like finish and gold embellishments, are rooted in both Japanese and European traditions. Inspired by the intricacy of plants, leaves and flowers her pots seem to sway in the breeze and grow.

Israeli ceramicist Zemer Peled took up pottery as part of therapy after a break-up in her 20s and now exhibits at galleries and museums around the world. Her work examines the beauty and brutality of the natural world. She makes large and small-scale sculptures and installations from thousands of porcelain shards – and has a growing collection of hammers!

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
Left: Hitomi Hosono (courtesy Adrian Sassoon)
Right: Zemer Peled (credit Zemer Peled Studio)


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dljhcf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 Deeply Human (w3ct2cbf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g466vmt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 03:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 on Sunday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dljm3k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbh)
What will happen to the fossil fuel workers?

The rise of renewables is good news for the climate, but for millions of families who rely on fossil fuels for a paycheque, it means big changes.

People have been talking about a “just transition” for decades. The term was first used in the 1990s, when US unions were demanding help for those who'd lost their jobs because of tightening environmental laws. Now it means looking at how we decarbonise our economies around the world, without leaving certain people behind. Neal and Graihagh hear from Craig, Colorado, as it plans for the shut down of its coal mines.

They also hear from the Middle East and North Africa, where countries have relied on oil and gas for their economies. The money from fossil fuels has kept an instable region together in the past, so what happens when that money runs out?

Reporter: Sam Brasch, Colorado State Radio
Experts: Laury Haytayan, Middle East and North Africa director at the Natural Resource Governance Institute; Professor Paul Stevens, Distinguished Fellow, Energy, Environment and Resources Programme at Chatham House.

Producer: Jordan Dunbar
Researchers: Olivia Noon and Dearbhail Starr
Editor: Emma Rippon


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g466zcy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv74)
Why does it feel so good to swear?

The sudden agony of stubbing a toe or burning a finger can make even the most polite among us swear our heads off. It’s like a reflex, a quick-release valve for the shock. But why do expletives give us such a sense of relief? Why does it sometimes feel so good to swear?

We set out to explore the science of swearing, prompted by a question from our listener Gadi. Psychological studies have shown bad language can relieve pain, or even make us stronger; we test out these theories for ourselves, and try to figure out why certain words are charged with such physical power.

We don’t just use strong words in shock or anger, either. They can help us to bond with others, to express joy, solidarity, or creativity. And although people curse all over the world, it’s not quite the same everywhere. We hear what people like to swear about in different countries, and whether swearing in a second language can ever be quite so satisfying.

Presented by Anand Jagatia
Produced by Cathy Edwards for the BBC World Service


(Photo: Woman swearing. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dljqvp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r9506d)
Meghan and Harry's Oprah interview is broadcast

The duke and duchess of Sussex put their side of the story of why they left Britain and royal duties - for a new life in California.

We get the latest from Myanmar to mark the fifth week of demonstrations against a coup - as the army takes over hospitals.

And we hear about the elephant vs avocado stand-off in Kenya.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dljvlt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r953yj)
British royal family criticised in Harry and Meghan interview

In the Oprah Winfrey interview, the couple say they felt they had little choice but to leave the royal family after Meghan was left feeling suicidal.

We hear about sailors from the pacific islands of Kiribati who've been left stranded by coronavirus on the other side of the world.

And why leading scientific experts are petitioning for the pardon of one of Australia’s worst female serial killers.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dljzby)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r957pn)
Oprah interview: Meghan 'didn't want to be alive anymore'

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle say they felt they had little choice but to leave the royal family after she was left feeling suicidal and they were offered no help.

Pope Francis has ended his historic visit to Iraq....we'll speak to a student who attended one of his masses.

And Switzerland has narrowly voted in favour of banning face coverings in public, including the burka or niqab worn by Muslim women.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlk332)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g467gcg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7ks)
Women, work and lockdowns

On International Women's Day, we ask what Covid-19 lockdowns have done to gender equality at work - and at home.

Mum Leslie Chiaramonte was forced to quit her nursing job amid the demands of juggling childcare and work. British politician Stella Creasy fears the pandemic will lead to a "tsunami" of unemployed mothers. But Holly Birkett, co-director of the Equal Parenting Project at the University of Birmingham, says it has helped to remove the stigma attached to flexible working.

Producer: Szu Ping Chan

(Photo: Stock photo of a mother multi-tasking with her young son; Credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmlc)
The women of Egypt's Arab Spring

In 2011 Egyptians took to the streets calling for the overthrow of President Hosni Mubarak, whose regime had been in power for nearly 30 years. Their uprising was part of a wave of pro-democracy protests in the Arab world aimed at ending autocratic rule. Women were at the forefront of protests in Cairo's Tahrir Square, many taking part in political demonstrations for the first time in their lives. Student activist Hend Nafea tells Farhana Haider she was campaigning not only for freedom, dignity and social justice, but also for her rights as a woman.

Photo: Hend Nafea protesting in Tahrir Square in January 2011. (Copyright Hend Nafea)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlk6v6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g467l3l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlkblb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g467pvq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlkgbg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09r46rl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:25 HM The Queen's Message To The Commonwealth (w3ct2d2c)
H.M. The Queen's Message To The Commonwealth

To mark Commonwealth Day, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II gives her annual message to the Commonwealth.


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g467tlv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv74)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlkl2l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd4j)
The sport I love damaged my brain

From the time he started playing rugby at the age of four, Alix Popham and everyone around him knew he was destined for big things. He didn't disappoint, representing his country, Wales, more than thirty times during a long and successful career at the top of the game. When injury forced him into retirement in 2011, he became an entrepreneur and fell in love with an old schoolfriend, Mel, with whom he had a baby girl. But their bright future dimmed when Alix found out last year - at the age of 40 - that he has early-onset dementia, a condition his doctors blame on brain trauma suffered throughout his career. He now struggles to remember many of his finest moments on the pitch. The devastating diagnosis has rocked his family - and the sport they love. Alix and Mel spoke to Jo Fidgen.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Alix Popham and Mel Bramwell-Popham
Credit: Alix Popham


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmlc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlkptq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09r4g7v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g468233)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlktkv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy3806f)
Jurors selected for George Floyd's murder trial

Jury selection for the trial of a former police officer accused of murdering George Floyd is getting underway in Minneapolis. We explore what the mood is like in the city.

Also on the programme: How the revelations from a high-profile interview between Oprah Winfrey and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, Harry and Meghan, are shaking the British royal family; and who is the first English feminist? We find out what Cambridge university thinks.

(Photo: Protesters raise their fists and chant after the "I Can't Breathe" Silent March for Justice in Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S. March 7, 2021. REUTERS/Nicholas Pfosi)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlky9z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g4689lc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvcd5v7sqp)
Deliveroo plans London listing

The food delivery firm Deliveroo plans a London listing expected to value it at $7bn. Anna MacDonald is a fund manager at Amati Global Investors in Edinburgh, and talks us through the significance of the company choosing London for its stock market flotation. And we consider the long-term future of the food delivery model, once coronavirus restrictions are lifted, with Peter Backman, who is a consultant in the restaurant sector. Also in the programme, it is International Women's Day, and this year the theme is 'Choose to Challenge'. The BBC's Nisha Patel has been talking with three women on three different continents, who are doing just that, challenging preconceptions and prejudice.

(Picture: A Deliveroo delivery rider. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dll223)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9tkh4f3y)
Meghan and Harry Interview

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have given a dramatic interview with Oprah Winfrey, on US television, accusing the British royal family of failing to protect them and alleging racism. The story is gaining huge attention around the world. We’ll unpick the main themes and talking points with commentators in the UK and in the US.

We hear from the US where the first trial in the death of George Floyd is set to begin with jury selection. We’ll explain what’s expected today and look at the debate on racial tensions in the US since the death of George Floyd.

And, this week marks one year since the pandemic was declared. We'll be hearing conversations throughout the week with people affected. Today we hear from supermarket workers - three people who have worked during the pandemic, a job they have done with great personal sacrifice.

And our regular medical expert, Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University School of Public Health will be giving her reflections on the year and answering listeners questions about the pandemic.

(Photo: Duke and Duchess of Sussex. Credit: EPA)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dll5t7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9tkh4jw2)
Coronavirus conversations: Supermarket workers

This week marks one year since the pandemic was declared and we will be bringing conversations throughout the week with people affected. Today we are starting by hearing from supermarket workers - three people who have worked during the pandemic, a job they have done with great personal sacrifice.

Proceedings begin today in connection with one of the most significant police trials in US history - over the killing of George Floyd last May in Minneapolis. A jury will be selected for the trial of Derek Chauvin - a white officer accused of second-degree murder. We hear from our reporter at the court.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex - Harry and Meghan - have given a dramatic interview with Oprah Winfrey, on US television, accusing the British royal family of failing to protect them and alleging racism. We'll hear from inter-racial couples about their life experiences.

And our regular medical expert, Professor Manfred Green, from the Department of Epidemiology, at the University of Haifa in Israel will talk us through the days coronavirus issues.

(Photo: Emma, a supermarket worker in the UK. Credit: Emma)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dll9kc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd4j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmlc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dllf9h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09r55qm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g468skw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k1ymgxdrj)
2021/03/08 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dllk1m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g468xb0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2ccf)
The Life Scientific: Jane Hurst

Mice, like humans, prefer to be treated with a little dignity, and that extends to how they are handled.

Pick a mouse up by its tail, as was the norm in laboratories for decades, and it gets anxious. Make a mouse anxious and it can skew the results of the research it’s being used for.

What mice like, and how they behave, is the focus of Professor Jane Hurst’s research. Much of that behaviour, she’s discovered, can be revealed by following what they do with their noses - where they take them and what’s contained in the scent marks they sniff.

Now William Prescott Professor of Animal Science at the University of Liverpool, Jane has unravelled a complex array of scent signals that underpin the way mice communicate, and how each selects a mate.

Within this heady mix of male scent, she’s identified one particular pheromone that is so alluring to females that she named it Darcin, after Mr Darcy in Pride and Prejudice.

Producer: Beth Eastwood


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dllnsr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy38vfb)
UN concerned over trapped Myanmar protesters

The United Nations Human Rights Office has stated its deep concern over the fate of a large group of protestors in Yangon - possibly in their hundreds - who've been confined and trapped by the security forces in one neighbourhood. Also on the programme: Brazil's former president - Lula - has had his convictions annulled. He'll be able to contest next year's elections; and how far has one TV interview shaken the foundations of an age-old institution? Harry and Meghan take aim at the Royal family and their courtiers.

(Photo: Police officers search for hiding demonstrators during a protest in Yangon, Myanmar. Credit: EPA/LYNN BO BO)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dllsjw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wkl4h7jq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fs5q25jhk)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g4694t8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172xm9stk51k14)
Deliveroo plans London listing

The food delivery firm Deliveroo plans a London listing expected to value it at $7bn. Anna MacDonald is a fund manager at Amati Global Investors in Edinburgh, and talks us through the significance of the company choosing London for its stock market flotation. And we consider the long-term future of the food delivery model, once coronavirus restrictions are lifted, with Peter Backman, who is a consultant in the restaurant sector. Also in the programme, it is International Women's Day, and this year the theme is 'Choose to Challenge'. The BBC's Nisha Patel has been talking with three women on three different continents, who are doing just that, challenging preconceptions and prejudice.

(Picture: A Deliveroo delivery rider. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dllx90)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc39)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g4698kd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



TUESDAY 09 MARCH 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlm114)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkqb)
The Iron Curtain

Churchill's Iron Curtain speech about the Cold War, the Sharpeville massacre in South Africa which radicalised many anti-apartheid movements and we hear from a man whose relatives were killed when police bombed the home of African-American radicals in the US. Plus how Nauru became a Pacific island limbo for asylum seekers and the first man to dive to the deepest point on the planet - the bottom of the Mariana Trench. We'll also hear from a BBC science correspondent about why we know more about space than the deepest depths of the ocean.

Photo: Winston Churchill at the podium delivering his "Iron Curtain" speech, at Westminster College in Fulton Missouri, 5th March 1946 (PA)


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlm4s8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x198ycydcw5)
Americans get to take off their masks

The Centre for Disease Control says that vaccinated Americans can now meet without masks but still urges caution about travel and meeting people away from the home. The BBC's Samira Hussain tells us this is cause for optimism that an end to lockdown restrictions is in sight.The food delivery firm Deliveroo plans a London listing expected to value it at $7bn. We consider the long-term future of the food delivery model once coronavirus restrictions are lifted with Peter Backman, a consultant in the restaurant sector. We learn about the introduction of Vietnam's first private defined contribution pension scheme and hear about the importance of the pep talk in getting us through the pandemic and we have an extended report about the challenges faced by three women around the world for International Women's Day. Our guests are Lien Hoang, from Nikkei Asia in Saigon, Vietnam and Professor Peter Morici from the University of Maryland in the US.


(Picture: A masked man in front of sign mandating mask wearing by CDC. Picture credit: European Photopress Agency)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlm8jd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2l)
The magic greenhouse

A greenhouse cooled and humidified by seawater and the wind is transforming arid land. In Somaliland, vegetables have been grown in a spot previously thought too hot and dry for farming.

It works by creating a cool oasis that shields the plant from the heat. The designers believe if more were built, they could make Somaliland completely self-sufficient in fresh produce.


Presenter Julie Ball
Written and Produced by Nick Holland and Julie Ball

Picture: Karl Fletcher, Seawater Greenhouse


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g469mss)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc5)
Chick Corea: Accomplishing the goal of art

Chick Corea, one of the legendary figures of jazz, died in February this year. He was a pianist, a 23-times Grammy award winner and he played with all the jazz greats. He was also recognised the world over as a composer, with hits like “Spain” and work ranging from bebop to fusion and symphonic works for classical players. As a tribute, In The Studio is repeating a programme made about Chick which was first broadcast in November 2020.

The programme begins in January 2020 when reporter Renata Sago started recording with Chick as he composed a new Trio Concerto for bass, drums and himself to premiere at the MUPA concert hall in Hungary’s capital Budapest in March. The pandemic meant that the premiere was later cancelled – but Covid-19 hadn’t slowed Chick down. He'd been taking on new projects and was looking forward to playing in front of a live audience again for the first time for months.

Renata caught up with him again to find out what new things he'd been writing, how he’d found a new audience in lockdown and how all kinds of musical styles helped him accomplish the goal of art.

Reporter: Renata Sago
Producer: Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service
Photograph of Chick Corea


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlmd8j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd4j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmlc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlmj0n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct2cpc)
The empty desk: Women, Covid and the US economy

A year ago American women out-numbered men in the workforce for the first time. Now, after a year of Covid pandemic that process has gone into reverse with more women than men leaving the workforce. Nada Tawfik hears how women are experiencing disproportionate job losses due to Covid recession and hears how working from home has changed work for many women.

(Photo: Women walk past the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) near Wall Street in New York. Credit: Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g469w91)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct2ccf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlmmrs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r97x3h)
'Trapped' Myanmar protesters allowed to leave

Hundreds of protestors were surrounded by the military in an apartment block before it ended the operation.

Is the PPE used to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 finding its way into the sea and even our food? We have a report from the Philippines.

And we'll also be talking about the trial of the former Minneapolis police officer accused of killing George Floyd, whose death last year sparked anti-racism demonstrations around the world.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlmrhx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r980vm)
Myanmar protesters protected by residents

A group of trapped protesters say they've managed to escape after army abandons its cordon.

We catch up on the progress of the trial of the former police officer accused of killing George Floyd.

And almost ten years on from the start of the war in Syria a new report says children displaced by the conflict can't see any future for themselves back in their homeland.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlmw81)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r984lr)
Myanmar protesters escape army roundup in Rangon

After a tense all night siege and house-to-house searches, the military lifts its cordon around a district in Rangon.

Demographic changes, economic development and now Brexit have raised the question of where Northern Ireland's future lies. So what does that mean for those who place the union with Britain at the heart of their identity?

And why Taiwan is asking its citizens to show patriotism by eating more pineapples.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dln005)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46bc8k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8cg)
The digital currency race

Central banks and many companies are rushing to develop their own digital currencies. Why are they doing it? What are the risks? And how might it upend our relationship with money?

Ed Butler speaks to Jay Joe, who runs a company providing some of the tech behind the Bahamas’ new digital currency, the Sand Dollar. Josh Lipsky of the Atlantic Council's GeoEconomics Center, explains what central banks in the Bahamas and elsewhere hope to gain from digitisation.

Samantha Hoffman, senior analyst at the Australian Strategic Policy Unit, explains how China might use its new digital version of the Yuan to snoop on people. And David Birch, author or The Currency Cold War, hopes digital currencies may soon allow our fridge and car to manage our finances for us.

Producers: Edwin Lane, Benjie Guy

(Picture: currency symbols. Credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmqw)
Cixi: China's most powerful woman

The Empress Dowager Cixi ruled China for 47 years until her death in 1908. But it wasn't until the 1970s that her story began to be properly documented. She'd been vilified as a murderous tyrant, but was that really true or was she a victim of a misogynistic version of history? Prof Sue Fawn Chung was the first academic to go back to study the original documents, and found many surprises. She tells Rebecca Kesby the story of "the much maligned Empress Dowager".

This programme is a rebroadcast

(Photo: Chinese Empress Dowager Cixi, portrait c1900. Credit: Ullstein bild/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dln3r9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2cpc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46bh0p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dln7hf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk48)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlnc7k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09r73np)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46bqhy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 Discovery (w3ct2ccf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlngzp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdl2)
I hated the word 'albino'

When Mala Bhargava was growing up, she found it hard to accept her appearance. Born with albinism, she had white hair and pale eyes and impaired vision. Her Indian mother was ashamed; she felt Mala's condition was a punishment. Mala hated being pointed at on the street and felt angry towards those who teased her. But the 1990s technology boom in India was to open up a whole new world for her. She began to write a successful column for a magazine and next to it was her picture. The face she had struggled to accept became recognisable across the country. She found fame, popularity and a new acceptance of how she looked.

Goran Bregovic is one of the biggest names in Balkan music. He's sold more than 15 million albums worldwide and leads an energetic 40-strong brass band playing a blend of Gypsy music, traditional Balkan rhythms and rock, inspired by his hometown Sarajevo. Jo Fidgen spoke to him in March 2017.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Mala Bhargava
Credit: Mala Bhargava


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmqw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlnlqt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09r7c4y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46bz06)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlnqgy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy3bx3j)
Myanmar protesters flee military assault

Security forces in Myanmar have tried a new tactic - trapping anti-coup activists in a neighbourhood in the largest city, Yangon. We hear how the protesters escaped after being cornered by the military assault overnight.

Also on the programme: Aboriginal people in the state of Victoria welcome Australia's first inquiry into the impact of colonisation; and why a rare chunk of meteorite discovered in southern England is getting scientists excited.

(Photo: Demonstrators react after being exposed to tear gas fired by the police during a protest in Yangon, Myanmar, 08 March 2021. EPA/LYNN BO BO)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlnv72)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46c6hg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlx08n1q9hc)
OECD: Prospects brighter for global economy

A leading international agency has upgraded its forecast for global growth for this year. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development said the world economy is likely to expand by 5.6% in 2021, and its chief economist Laurence Boone explains why the OECD believes prospects for growth are looking rosier. Also in the programme, the China National Offshore Oil Company, or CNOOC, has been de-listed from the New York Stock Exchange, and the BBC's Samira Hussain tells us what's behind the move. Plus, we take an in-depth look at Greenland, whose economy some believe is ripe for expansion. Allun Hubbard, a professor of glaciology at the Arctic University of Norway discusses prospects for agriculture in Greenland. The country depends heavily on funds from Denmark, but former Greenland prime minister Aleqa Hammond explores whether it could ever become independent. And Tracy Marchaud of the University of Southern Maine makes the case for a stronger tourism sector on the island.

(Picture: Construction workers. Picture credit: Reuters.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlnyz6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9tkh7b11)
Coronavirus conversations: Vaccine volunteers

As we look back at the year since the WHO declared the Covid-19 outbreak a pandemic, we speak to two people who volunteered to take part in trials which led to two of the vaccines now in widespread use. How does it feel to have played a part in developing the tool which could bring the pandemic to an end?

We’ll talk about the protesters in Myanmar who escaped after being trapped in four streets in Yangon overnight by security forces. More demonstrations against the military coup are taking place today.

As the world continues to digest the interview given by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex to Oprah Winfrey, we’ll hear from people who we originally met at the couple's wedding in 2018. How do they feel about what they saw in the interview?

Picture: Lydia took part in the Oxford / AstraZeneca trial (Credit: Jo Cross)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlp2qb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9tkh7fs5)
Violence against 'a third of women'

A new World Health Organisation report says a third of women experience physical or sexual violence at some point in their lives. It's the largest ever study of the problem and covers 2000 to 2018. We'll explain the report and focus on Mexico, where there were International Women's Day protests against femicide.

As we look back at the year since the WHO declared the Covid-19 outbreak a pandemic, we speak to two people who volunteered to take part in trials which led to two of the vaccines now in widespread use. How does it feel to have played a part in developing the tool which could bring the pandemic to an end?

More demonstrations against the military coup are taking place in Myanmar. We'll focus on where the military gets its funding and how international sanctions and private investors could put it under pressure. We'll speak to a BBC journalist who has been looking at the subject in-depth.

Picture: Women gesture during a protest against gender-based violence outside the National Palace on International Women's Day in Mexico City (REUTERS / Mahe Elipe)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlp6gg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdl2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmqw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlpb6l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09r82mq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46cpgz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k1ymh09nm)
2021/03/09 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlpfyq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2cpc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46ct73)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99f)
The cost of bias in AI fintech

We’ve been discussing bias in AI on the programme for more than a year now but what is the actual cost of it? KPMG is publishing a report, commissioned by the fintech company Finastra, which examines the size of global consumer lending markets and the potential impact of algorithmic bias in money lending decisions. Amber Sappington, Head of Data & Analytics at Finastra, discusses the potential problems and why there’s an urgency for the industry to acknowledge the problem and act on it.

Problematic Smartphone Use
‘Smartphone addiction’ has been in the news, following the publication of a new study by the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience Library at King’s in London. However, ‘Smartphone addiction’ is not a recognised medical condition. Gareth speaks with Dr Nicky Kalk, one of the authors of the study, about problematic smartphone use, and if it will be recognised as an illness.

Virtually Shakespeare
The Royal Shakespeare Company, the Philharmonia and Epic Games are amongst 15 organisations who are premiering a new live performance of “Dream” (which was inspired by A Midsummer Night’s Dream) using motion capture to tell the story of Puck. The aim is to create a shared live experience between a remote audience and a group of physical performers where the live audience can directly influence the world of the actors. Unlike a regular live stream, audiences will play an active role in world-building and the wider storytelling experience, as they would in any gaming environment. Reporter Hannah Fisher has more.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary by Ghislaine Boddington.

Studio Manager: John Boland
Producers: Emil Petrie and Ania Lichtarowicz

Image: Young woman uses digital tablet on virtual visual screen at night
Credit: dowell/Moment/Getty Images


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlpkpv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy3crbf)
Myanmar coup: Protesters insist 'we will not buckle'

Widespread protests have continued in Myanmar with peaceful but angry demonstrations against the military taking place in towns and cities across the country

Also in the programme: the World Health Organisation issues its most detailed report yet on violence against women. And Buckingham Palace responds to the damaging allegations levelled by Prince Harry and his wife Meghan.

(Photo:Around 200 people were thought to be trapped in the Sanchaung district. Credit: EPA)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlppfz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wkl4l4ft)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fs5q28fdn)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46d1qc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmdhsc4t4rh)
WHO: One in three women subjected to violence

A new report from the World Health Organization has found that a third of all women experience physical or sexual violence at some point in their lives. The report is the largest ever study of violence against women, and includes data from the years 2000 to 2018. In Mexico thousands marched in the capital Mexico City angry that the president Andrés Manuel López Obrador, know as AMLO, has failed to live up to his promises on women's rights.

A leading international agency has upgraded its forecast for global growth for this year. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development said the world economy is likely to expand by 5.6% in 2021, and its chief economist Laurence Boone explains why the OECD believes prospects for growth are looking rosier.

Plus, we take an in-depth look at Greenland, whose economy some believe is ripe for expansion. Allun Hubbard, a professor of glaciology at the Arctic University of Norway discusses prospects for agriculture in Greenland. The country depends heavily on funds from Denmark, but former Greenland prime minister Aleqa Hammond explores whether it could ever become independent. And Tracy Marchaud of the University of Southern Maine makes the case for a stronger tourism sector on the island.

(Picture: Mexico protests/REUTERS)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlpt63)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46d5gh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 10 MARCH 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlpxy7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk48)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlq1pc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x198ycyh8s8)
WHO: One in three women experience violence

The World Health Organization has found that a third of all women experience physical or sexual violence at some point in their lives. Its report is the largest ever study of violence against women. In Mexico thousands marched in the capital Mexico City on International Women's Day, bringing with them photos with the names of alleged rapists, murderers and harassers of women. Many are angry that the president Andrés Manuel López Obrador, known as AMLO, has failed to live up to his promises on women's rights.

A leading international agency has upgraded its forecast for global growth for this year. The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development said the world economy is likely to expand by 5.6% in 2021, and its chief economist Laurence Boone explains why the OECD believes prospects for growth are looking rosier.

Also in the programme, the economic impact of internet shutdowns in India. And we hear from the founder of Dr B, a US site which can match you with surplus Covid-19 vaccine doses.

Our guests today: Sushma Ramachandran, columnist with the Tribune in Delhi and The Economist's Sarah Birke in Mexico City.

(PHOTO: Women gathering in Mexico for International Women's Day/REUTERS)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlq5fh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7t)
Jewher Ilham: Fears for her Uighur family in China

A combination of personal testimony, leaked documents and satellite imagery points to a systematic policy of repression of the Muslim Uighur population of Xinjiang province in China. Jewher Ilham, a young Uighur woman, currently living in America, tells Stephen Sackur about her campaign to save her father who has been imprisoned for the past 7 years. The fate of the Uighurs has become a geopolitical issue - but is anything going to change?


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46djpw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x87)
Goal 8: Decent work

In 2015 the United Nations announced a radical plan to change the world.

Global leaders drew up a list of 17 "sustainable development goals" to create a blueprint for a better future. Governments agreed to support the goals which cover gender equality, health provision, a good education and much more. Now 17-year-olds from 17 different countries tell us what they think needs to change if the world is to meet those goals by 2030.

Seventeen-year-old Ruhani Akhtar doesn't want to work in a garment factory like her mother. But what other opportunities are open to young people in Bangladesh? The country has seen rapid economic growth during the last three decades and she wants to know what her options are. Ruhani talks to another young woman who went to Saudi Arabia as a domestic worker with disastrous results, to a government minister, and she visits a modern new textile factory where work is changing fast.

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producer: Nina Robinson

Project 17 was produced in partnership with The Open University


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlq95m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdl2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmqw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlqdxr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct2cb2)
Under the Canopy

Forests of science and knowledge

Writer Jessica J Lee, sets out to describe the myriad ways that forests operate in our lives and the life of the planet. She outlines the exciting developments that have taken place in our understanding of the ways forests work over recent decades, with science offering radical new ways of recognising these places as communities of mutually supportive trees rather than competitive spaces where individual trees fight one another for survival. She speaks with Peter Wohlleben who is one of the chief communicators of this ‘Wood Wide Web’ idea, and also expert on fungi Merlin Sheldrake about the crucial importance of mycorrhizzal networks in forest life. Jessica also hears from biologist Diana Beresford Kroeger and Haida leader Miles Richardson about how this new science is built on the back of much older, traditional knowledge held within indigenous communities.

Forest sounds appear courtesy of the 'Sounds of the Forest' project

Original musical composition: Erland Cooper

Spells written by Robert Macfarlane and these are read by Maxine Peake and the Bird sisters

Photo credit: Geoff Bird


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46ds64)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlqjnw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r9bt0l)
Meghan and Harry interview: Palace taking race issues 'very seriously'

Fallout from the interview with Queen Elizabeth's grandson, Harry, and his wife Meghan continues after the Royal Family issues a statement.
Ten years on from the Arab Spring, Syrians reflect on what many see as a lost decade.
And why are local officials in one state in Nigeria giving vigilante gangs pump action shotguns?


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlqnf0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r9bxrq)
Myanmar coup: military reportedly forces railway workers to end strike

Reports that security forces in Myanmar have raided a residential compound of striking railway workers and forced them back to work at gunpoint as the backlash against the military junta continues.
"Recollections may vary but we take issues surrounding race very seriously" - a statement from the Royal Family following the fallout from the Harry and Meghan interview.
And could shopkeepers in Sweden be an endangered species as high tech takes over?


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlqs54)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r9c1hv)
Ten years on: How Syria's war has affected its youth

Friends and family lost, homes abandoned, education cut short or non-existent - the International Red Cross tell us about the survey that shows what ten years of war and unrest have done to young Syrians

Covid-19: we look at Hungary as around the world some countries are preparing to ease out of the lockdown, while other are still seeing a peak in cases.

And should all intellectual property rights for Covid vaccines be waived to ensure maximum production around the globe?


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlqwx8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46f85n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8p3)
Lab grown meat: The new food frontier?

Are chicken nuggets grown from animal cells the ultimate innovation, or a flash in the pan?

As Singapore allows the sale of cultivated chicken nuggets, Elizabeth Hotson speaks to Josh Tetrick, whose company Eat Just brought the innovative snack to market. Colin Buchan, executive chef at the exclusive club 1880 in Singapore, tells us what it's like to cook the nuggets, while two vegan friends in London talk about the ethics. Plus, the BBC's Regan Morris tells us why bringing lab grown meat to market in the US may be a tricky task, and Kelly Laudon, an attorney with law firm Jones Day takes us through the legal implications.

(Picture: Lab-grown chicken nugget; Credit: Nicholas Yeo/Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmt4)
Jane: The underground abortion network

A group of feminists working under the name “Jane” carried out underground abortions in 1960s Chicago – when abortions were still illegal in most of the US.

Initially they gave abortion counselling and put women who wanted to terminate their pregnancies in touch with doctors who would perform the procedure. But when they discovered that one doctor they had been working with was not medically qualified, the women started to perform the abortions themselves.

Martha Scott was a member of the group – she received an abortion through the service, learned to perform abortions, and was one of the Janes arrested when they were busted by the police. She tells Lucy Burns about her experiences.

This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo courtesy of Martha Scott


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlr0nd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2cb2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46fcxs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlr4dj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlr84n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09rb0ks)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46fmf1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlrcws)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdsv)
The photoshoot that helped me grieve for my baby

Ashley Jones and her husband lost their daughter Skylar at just 21 months old to spinal muscular atrophy. Ashley poured her grief into the photos she had of her daughter. She had always been a keen photographer, and so she decided to use her skills help other grieving families. She’s started a non-profit called Love Not Lost which provides free photo sessions to families facing a terminal illness diagnosis.

Diana Britten found her calling by chance one day when she was offered a trial flying lesson and she fell in love with the stomach churning sport of aerobatics. She’s the first woman to claim the title of British Aerobatics Champion but it wasn’t always a smooth ride on her way to the top. She’s recently been awarded an MBE for services to aerobatics and charity.

Izzati and Atiqah Khairudin are Malaysia's first female hot air balloonists - they're also sisters and there was a bit of sibling rivalry as to which one of them would claim the title first, as they told Matthew Bannister. This interview was first broadcast in September 2016.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Ashley Jones and her daughter Skylar
Credit: Tessa Marie


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlrhmx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09rb821)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46fvx9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlrmd1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy3ft0m)
'I was told to shoot protesters - I refused'

Police officers from Myanmar have told the BBC they fled across the border into India after refusing to carry out the orders of the military which seized power in a coup last month. In some of the first such interviews, we hear from defectors who tell us they escaped, fearing they'd be forced to kill or harm civilians.

Also on the programme: Ten years on from the start of the civil war, the International Red Cross reveals the suffering of young Syrians; and why France is conducting its first military operations in space.

(Photo: Myanmar anti-riot police officers move forward to disperse demonstrators during a protest against the military coup in Pyinmana township, Naypyitaw, Myanmar, 04 March 2021. EPA/MAUNG LONLAN)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlrr45)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46g3dk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxtqcnhhtr)
Action sought on Indian Ocean tuna

The Indian Ocean Tuna Commission is meeting this week to try and protect the fish species. European vessels take home the biggest proportion of the stock, meaning local fishing communities often miss out, and tuna levels are depleting. Adam Ziyad is director general of the Maldives fisheries ministry, and vice-chair of the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission, and discusses the potential impact of over-fishing. And we get wider context from John Burton, from conservation organisation the International Pole and Line Foundation. Also in the programme, last year the commodities trader Mercuria paid $36m for 10,000 tonnes of copper blister, which is the impure form of the metal. But on delivery, it turned out to be painted paving slabs instead, and we find out more from Andy Hoffman, who has been covering the story for Bloomberg. Plus, as the full force of coronavirus lockdowns hit last year, we spoke to three professional musicians from different continents, to hear how they'd been impacted. We get an update from New York-based violinist Jennifer Koh, Guillem Bolto of Barcelona-based lockdown band Stay Homas, and singer Berita Khumalo, who was born and raised in Zimbabwe, but is now based in Johannesburg, South Africa.

(Picture: Workers offload tuna from a fishing boat. Picture credit: Reuters.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlrvw9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9tkhb6y4)
Coronavirus conversations: Developing Pfizer's vaccine

We're reflecting on a year since the Covid-19 outbreak was officially declared a pandemic by the WHO. One of the most important tools now being used to tackle the disease are the vaccines now in use around the world. Nicholas Kitchin is a Senior Director in Pfizer’s Vaccine Clinical Research and Development group and you'll hear him describe what it was like to be part of the development of the Pfizer / BioNTech jab.

We’ll also get your questions answered on the latest coronavirus news with our expert of the day, Dr Maria Sundaram, including whether aspirin might offer some kind of protection against the virus.

And we’ll talk about the latest demonstrations in Myanmar against the military coup, with the security forces targeting railway workers who were taking part in a general strike. We’ll also hear our reporter in India who has been to the border with Myanmar to speak to Burmese people who have left their country.

Picture: Pfizer's Nicholas Kitchin (Credit: Boston Globe Media.)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlrzmf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9tkhbbp8)
Brazil Covid hospitals 'close to collapse'

Experts say health systems across Brazil are under incredible strain, after it reported its highest daily number of deaths with Covid-19. They also say the highly contagious variant is a "threat to humanity". We speak to our reporter and regular expert epidemiologist in Brazil to explain what is happening and why things appear to be worsening in Brazil, even while they're improving in many other countries.

We're reflecting on a year since the Covid-19 outbreak was officially declared a pandemic by the WHO. One of the most important tools now being used to tackle the disease are the vaccines now in use around the world. Nicholas Kitchin is a Senior Director in Pfizer’s Vaccine Clinical Research and Development group and you'll hear him describe what it was like to be part of the development of the Pfizer / BioNTech jab.

And we’ll talk about the latest demonstrations in Myanmar against the military coup, with the security forces targeting railway workers who were taking part in a general strike. We’ll also hear our reporter in India who has been to the border with Myanmar to speak to Burmese people who have left their country.

Picture: Covid-19 patients are cared for in an area that was improvised to accommodate more patients at the public HRAN Hospital in Brasilia, Brazil (REUTERS / Ueslei Marcelino)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dls3ck)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdsv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dls73p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09rbzjt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46gld2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k1ymh36kq)
2021/03/10 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlsbvt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2cb2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46gq46)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcdb)
Do vaccines cure Long Covid?

A significant proportion of sufferers of Long Covid are reporting that their symptoms lessen or disappear completely after receiving a coronavirus vaccination. At the moment, the evidence is just anecdotal but doctors and researchers are intrigued. Claudia talks to New York infectious disease doctor Daniel Griffin who estimates that more than a third of his patients are getting some relief following vaccination and Prof Janet Lord, professor of immunology at Birmingham University, runs through the possible explanations.

Dangerous myths about blood transfusions. Dayo Yusuf reports from eastern Kenya on the myths about them in some pastoralist communities and meets the parents who rejected the option of a life-saving blood transfusion for their son who has chronic anaemia. They feared bad character traits of the donor would be passed onto him. Monica Lakhanpaul, professor of paediatrics, discusses other damaging health myths that she has studied in South Asia and how these false beliefs about the body and modern medical interventions can be most effectively tackled.

Claudia talks to neurologist Prof Peter Goadsby, one of the winners of this year’s Brain Prize – the Nobel equivalent for neuroscience. Four neurologists have won for their research on migraine – basic medical research that has culminated in a new generation of highly effective medications in the last couple of years.

As Claudia’s studio guest, Monica Lakhanpaul also offers thoughts about migraine as someone who suffers from them herself and who treats young people for migraine. She also talks about research she’s been doing in Rajasthan about the causes of stunted growth in young children – she’s discovered that the causes are much more complicated than inadequate nutrition.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Alexandra Feachem

(Picture: A woman receiving a vaccination at home. Photo credit: FG Trade/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlsgly)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy3gn7j)
Myanmar: Security forces attempt to break a strike against the coup

Myanmar's security forces have begun evicting railway workers from their homes in an attempt to break a general strike against the coup. There have been appeals to find those expelled food and shelter. Earlier images on social media showed the security forces forcing workers in Yangon back to work at gunpoint.

he number of patients in intensive care has reached a new high in the Czech Republic, as several Central European countries struggle with a new wave of the virus.

And two Syrian women reflect on how their lives have changed, ten years after the uprising against the Assad regime.

(Photo: Protesters have taken to the streets in their thousands since the coup - and have been met with increasing force. Credit: EPA)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlslc2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wkl4p1bx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fs5q2cb9r)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46gymg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmfb72rlc2w)
US House approves $1.9tn stimulus package

The US House of Representatives has approved President Biden's huge $1.9 trillion Covid-19 stimulus package aimed at kick-starting the economy scarred by the pandemic. Among the measures in the package is a one-off payment of $1400 for most Americans. Economist Rubeela Farooqi tells us what to expect.

Also, the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission is meeting this week to try and protect the fish species. European vessels take home the biggest proportion of the stock, meaning local fishing communities often miss out, and tuna levels are depleting. Adam Ziyad is director general of the Maldives fisheries ministry, and vice-chair of the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission, and discusses the potential impact of over-fishing. And we get wider context from John Burton, from conservation organisation the International Pole and Line Foundation.

Plus, as the full force of coronavirus lockdowns hit last year, we spoke to three professional musicians from different continents, to hear how they have been impacted. We get an update from New York-based violinist Jennifer Koh, Guillem Bolto of Barcelona-based lockdown band Stay Homas, and singer Berita Khumalo, who was born and raised in Zimbabwe, but is now based in Johannesburg, South Africa.

(Photo: US House of Representatives. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlsq36)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46h2cl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x87)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



THURSDAY 11 MARCH 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlstvb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlsylg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x198ycyl5pc)
Biden's $1.9tn stimulus package wins Congress approval

The House of Representatives approved the massive economic aid plan along partisan lines, with no Republicans voting in favour. This sixth Covid-19 relief bill is a major legislative win for Mr Biden. The final bill includes one-off direct payments worth $1,400 to be sent off to most Americans. It extends weekly jobless benefit payments of $300 until September. It also allocates $350bn to state and local governments, some $130bn to school reopening, $49bn for expanded Covid-19 testing and research, as well as $14bn for vaccine distribution.

Staying in the US, President Biden’s nomination of Marcia Fudge was confirmed as secretary of housing and urban development, making her the first Black woman to lead the agency in more than four decades. We look at how unfair property taxes stop Black Americans from gaining wealth.

Also in the programme, we ask why is the game Roblox, which has just listed on the US stock exchange, so popular with children under the age of 12.

Plus, a group of musicians tell us how they are feeling about the prospect of performing and touring again.

And - we hear from Delphine Viguier-Hovasse - global brand president at L'Oreal Paris, on the importance of having women in leadership positions for the success of the company.

(Photo: Joe Biden. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlt2bl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4x)
Is Antifa the threat it’s made out to be?

Vivid and sometimes wild claims about the antifascist group Antifa have been circulating in America. Some say that the group participates in widespread violence, while others have argued that it is a small but justified part of their fight against fascism.

Tanya Beckett takes a closer look at what is true and what is exaggeration.

Producer: Nathan Gower


(Members of Antifa protest at a far right Rally in Portland, Oregon USA. Credit: Diego Diaz/ Getty Images)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46hflz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrc)
Is it time to add vitamin D to food?

Vitamin D keeps our bones and muscles strong, and now there's some evidence it could help protect us from Covid-19. With many of us deficient in the 'sunshine vitamin' could food fortification be the best way to ensure we're getting enough?

Emily Thomas hears how enriched milk and margarines have helped to almost completely eliminate vitamin D deficiencies in Finland, and how plans to fortify flour could prevent devastating bone diseases like rickets in Mongolia.

As more countries are urged to act, we ask whose responsibility fortification should be - governments' or the food industry's? Plus, why is it so hard to get enough vitamin D from sunlight or our regular diets, and is it possible to get too much?

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Producers: Simon Tulett and Sarah Stolarz

Contributors:

Kevin Cashman, professor of food and health at University College Cork, Republic of Ireland;
Amaraa Bor, operations manager at the Christina Noble Children’s Foundation, Mongolia;
Christel Lamberg-Allardt, professor of food and nutrition at the University of Helsinki, Finland

(Picture: An optical illusion of a boy 'eating' the sun. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlt62q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdsv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmt4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlt9tv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3csz6mk)
The disinformation dragon

Prior to the Hong Kong pro-democracy movement and the Covid 19 pandemic, China’s presence on social media was largely to promote a positive image of its country – trying to ‘change the climate’ rather than seeking to sow confusion and division. But this is changing.

In this investigation for Assignment Paul Kenyon and Krassimira Twigg examine China’s new strategy of aggressively pushing disinformation on social media platforms through the use of ‘wolf warrior’ diplomats, internet bots, ‘the 50-cent army’ of loyal Chinese netizens and a longer term goal of inventing a new type of internet where authoritarian governments can control its users.

Editor: Lucy Proctor

(Image: Checking a smartphone, lit-up against a dark background. Credit:d3sign/Getty)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46hp37)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dltfkz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r9fpxp)
Covid-19: United Nations call for stateless people to be vaccinated

A year on from Covid-19 being declared a pandemic, vaccinations are being rolled out, but the UN calls on governments and financial institutions to make sure the world's 80 million refugees and displaced people are not forgotten.

We hear from one of Myanmar's police officers who fled the country after last month's coup.

And the story of one Hong Kong politician in exile - as Beijing prepares to announces tougher measures there.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dltkb3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r9ftnt)
Twelve months of Covid-19, officially

One year ago the World Health Organization declared Covid-19 a worldwide pandemic, we hear from Italy which was the first Western country to impose a total lockdown.

An important moment of diplomacy in the Middle East as Israel’s Prime Minister is in the United Arab Emirates to meet the top leadership there.

And why are rare species of fish washing up dead on the shores of South Africa?


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dltp27)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r9fydy)
The world marks a year of the Covid-19 pandemic

UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Filippo Grandi, tells us about the impact of the pandemic on some of the world's poorest people amid a widening inequality when it comes to receiving vaccines.

Japan as the country marks 10 years since the devastating earthquake and tsunami which also caused the nuclear disaster at Fukushima.

And the Chinese premier Jiang Zemin is expected to announce a further clampdown on freedoms in Hong Kong when he address the country's main political gathering, the Communist Party Congress.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dltstc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46j52r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7yl)
Josephine’s story: Covid hits Kenya

Josephine is a single mother of four in Kibera, the sprawling slum in Nairobi, Kenya. At the beginning of the pandemic she was working as a cook, but soon lost her job, and when the BBC's Ed Butler spoke to her a year ago her situation was dire.

In this episode, the first of a short series about Josephine and Kibera, we hear how she struggled to start a small business to help feed her family. Also in the programme, Kibera community organiser Kennedy Odede explains how those first few months of desperation impacted the slum's residents. And economist Edward Kusewa, explains how those early months of lockdowns in East Africa are still affecting lives.

Producer: Frey Lindsay.

(Image: A woman walks home through empty streets after the 7pm curfew in Kibera, Nairobi; Credit: Kabir Dhanji/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmnm)
The woman who asked Britain to return the Parthenon marbles

Melina Mercouri, famous actress turned politician, visited Britain in 1983 as Greek Minister of Culture and made the first official request for the return of the Parthenon marbles. The marbles were removed in 1801 by Lord Elgin, who was the British Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire at the time. Lord Elgin, who was based in Istanbul sent his agents to Athens to remove the marbles which he claimed were at risk of destruction. He later sold them to the British parliament who in turn entrusted them to the British Museum where they've been exhibited since 1832.

This programme was first broadcast in 2019

(Photo: The Greek Minister for Culture, Melina Mercouri, inspects the Parthenon Marbles in the British Museum in May 1983)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dltxkh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6mk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46j8tw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlv19m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjww)
BR Ambedkar: The Dalit hero of India

Educate, Agitate, Organise. This was the motto of the Indian scholar BR Ambedkar who led an extraordinary life of activism and achievement. It put him in conflict with many other political forces in his native country, such as the Indian National Congress and Mahatma Gandhi. In India itself, Ambedkar's legacy is widely respected but in other countries he is not so well known. And yet, Ambedkar was not only a leading intellectual of his day, brilliant orator, lawyer, successful politician and an unmatched champion of those suffering the harshest discrimination: he was also someone who rose from a Dalit background to being put in charge of writing the first constitution of independent India. The Dalits are the lowest of the low in the Indian social hierarchy, often considered as being below the lowest caste.

To tell Ambedkar's story Rajan Datar is joined by three distinguished Ambedkar scholars: Sunil Khilnani, professor of politics and history at Ashoka University and author of Incarnations: India in Fifty Lives; Valerian Rodrigues, emeritus professor of political studies at Jawaharlal Nehru University and first Ambedkar chair at Ambedkar University, both in New Delhi, and author of The Essential Writings of B.R. Ambedkar; and Ananya Vajpeyi, associate professor at the Centre for the Study of Developing Societies in New Delhi and author of Righteous Republic: The Political Foundations of Modern India.

[Photo: A statue of BR Ambedkar at Rashtriya Dalit Prerna Sthal in Noida, India. Credit: Sunil Ghosh/Hindustan Times via Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh6c)
The Palestinian women's football team

To mark International Women’s Day, Sporting Witness has the story of the founding of the Palestinian women’s football team, who played their first international match in 2005. Many of the players had to overcome hostility from male relatives, as well as the difficulties of day-to-day survival in the occupied West Bank. The Palestinian captain, Honey Thaljieh, talks to Charlotte North about how she found a sense of liberation through sport.

PHOTO: Honey Thaljieh, second right, on a visit to Australia in 2017 (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlv51r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09rdxgw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46jjb4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 Health Check (w3cszcdb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlv8sw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdc9)
The actress turning her back on Bollywood to follow her dad's dreams

Sonia Mann's life has been guided by the letter her father wrote to her on her birth. In September 1990, when she was just 16 days old, her father was killed in the Indian city of Amritsar, when he was on his way to meet her for the first time. Baldev Singh Mann was a left-wing activist and revolutionary, and in his letter he urged Sonia to continue his work. Sonia grew up to become an actress, but she tells Jo Fidgen that she carried his letter with her everywhere. In 2020, when thousands of India's farmers began protesting against the introduction of new agricultural laws, Sonia saw a chance to follow in her father's footsteps. She joined the protests on the edge of the city of Delhi and has turned her back on the world of movie-making to support them.

In 1967 New Yorker Chickie Donahue crossed oceans and hitched rides across a warzone to hand-deliver beers to his friends fighting in Vietnam. Not a soldier, Chickie relied on his charm and wit to get him to where he needed to go. But, as he told Mariana Des Forges, what began as a short morale-boosting mission soon became much more treacherous as Chickie found himself caught up in the deadly Lunar New Year attacks on what was then Saigon.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Sonia Mann taking a selfie at the farmer's protests in Delhi. Credit: Sakib Ali/Hindustan Times/Getty Images)


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmnm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlvdk0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09rf4z4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46jrtd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlvj94)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy3jpxq)
China passes measures to control Hong Kong elections

China's National People's Congress has approved plans that will allow a pro-Beijing panel to vet all candidates for the Hong Kong legislature. Beijing says the reforms will restore stability following years of protests, and ensure that only “patriots” rule Hong Kong. The British Foreign Secretary, Dominic Raab, said the move further undermined trust that Beijing would observe its legal obligations under the treaty that saw Britain return the territory to China.

Also in the programme: Myanmar's military rulers accuse the ousted civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi of corruption; and what lessons has the World Health Organization learned one year since it described the Covid-19 outbreak as a pandemic?

(Image: The closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. Credit: Epa/Roman Pilipey/Pool)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlvn18)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46k09n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlw5txg6sw8)
The pandemic a year on

A year on from the WHO declaring Covid 19 a pandemic, we examine the economic impact. Economists Marianna Mazzucato from University College London and Richard Portes from the London Business School discuss whether coronavirus has presented an opportunity for policymakers to build back in a way which might actually benefit people around the world. Also in the programme, the Australian government has launched a subsidy scheme offering half price air tickets to domestic holiday spots such as the Gold Coast. Margy Osmond is chief executive of Australia's Tourism and Transport Forum, and tells us what impact the move is likely to have on the country's faltering tourism sector. Plus, the BBC's Ijeoma Ndukwe reports on the difficulties that many of those held in the United States pre-trial have with paying bail, and asks whether a new reform agenda might help reverse social and racial inequality in the American justice system.

(Picture: Chairs piled outside closed restaurants in Lisbon. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlvrsd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9tkhf3v7)
Coronavirus conversations: Losing mom

To mark one year since the coronavirus pandemic was declared by the WHO, every day this week we are having conversations to highlight the challenges people have faced over the past year. We hear the story of one family in the US. Shaye and Paige are sisters in Oklahoma City and they tell us about losing their mother Judy to Covid-19, whilst their father Russell was in hospital with the illness. Russell also tells us about his recovery and how he found out his wife had passed away.

Also, we speak to our coronavirus expert of the day, Dr Helen Wimalarathna, about the latest news lines and research on the coronavirus. One of the countries we will be talking about is Brazil, where the daily number of Covid related deaths has exceeded 2,000 for the first time.

And we bring you the latest on the pro-democracy protests in Myanmar as the crackdown against protesters continues.

(Photo: (Left to right) Paige, Russell, Shaye, Judy. Credit: Patrick Rosch)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlvwjj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9tkhf7lc)
Coronavirus: One year of a pandemic

One year since the coronavirus pandemic was declared, we look at how different countries have handled the outbreaks and hear from our correspondents around the world.

We also hear the story of one family in the US. Shaye and Paige are sisters in Oklahoma City and they tell us about losing their mother Judy to Covid-19, whilst their father Russell was in hospital with the illness. Russell also tells us about his recovery and how he found out his wife had passed away.

And Dr Emma Hodcroft in Switzerland will be answering audience questions about the virus.

And as a police officer in the UK is being questioned on suspicion of kidnapping and murdering a woman who went missing in London last week, we hear about safety concerns and personal experiences women have been sharing on social media.

(Photo: Turkish anaesthesiology and reanimation doctor, Hanifi Keskec, is with a patient in the ICU at Prof Dr Ilhan Varank Training and Research Hospital, in Istanbul, Turkey, 08 March 2021 (Issued 11 March 2021) Credit: TOLGA BOZOGLU/EPA)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlw08n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdc9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmnm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlw40s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09rfwfx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46kh95)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k1ymh63gt)
2021/03/11 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlw7rx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6mk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46km19)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1v)
A shooting star parked on your driveway

Last week a fireball lit up the sky of western England. Locals and professionals scoured the countryside for any surviving precious fragments of meteorite, and thanks to them some bits of the earliest solar system are now in London’s Natural History Museum. And as an excited Sara Russell, Merit Researcher in Cosmic Mineralogy tells us, examples of carbonaceous chondrite – the soft, loamy type that fell in Winchcombe – such as this, are a rare and special chunk of luck.

10 years on from the Japanese Tsunami
Exactly a decade ago the disastrous huge wave caused by an earthquake at sea struck the coast of Japan, causing death and devastating consequences. The flood defences have been rebuilt to replace the ones swept away. But could new ways of spotting tsunamis beyond the horizon be, well, just over the horizon? Giovanni Occhipinti of the Paris Geophysics Institute tells Roland about his technique of looking at disruptions in the highest levels of the atmosphere - using the slight twinkle in a beam from a GPS or GNS satellite - to infer that a massive wave may be on its way.

Hacked EMA emails and mRNA vaccine stability
This week a piece in the British Medical Journal provides some insight into how the medical regulatory bodies scrutinised the novel RNA vaccines that were the science marvels of 2020. Investigative journalist Serena Tinari was one of the people who received anonymously a large, though selective, bundle of hacked emails and documents dating back to November copied from the servers of the European Medicines Agency. They make mention of concerns the Agency had over the levels of effective RNA contained in some batches of the industrially produced Pfizer Biontech Covid vaccine compared to the laboratory produced doses. The EMA did subsequently licence the vaccine - the problem having presumably been solved. However, as Serena describes, she was then surprised that the companies and agencies she and the BMJ approached would not tell her what the threshold was for adjudging acceptable levels, given as is well known, the fragility of mRNA and the need to store it carefully. They said it was commercially sensitive.

But as RNA researcher Prof Anna Blakney tells Science in Action, there are fascinating reasons why that might simply not be known, and also why precise accuracy likely doesn’t matter too much compared to the better-known clinical efficacy these vaccines continue to demonstrate.


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Alex Mansfield
Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant


Image: Meteorite of carbonaceous chondrite found in Gloucestershire, England, UK
Credit: Anonymous


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlwcj1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy3kk4m)
Covid-19: Brazil figures surge again

One year on from the World Health Organisation’s declaration that the new coronavirus was a global pandemic, we hear from Brazil where hospitals are reaching capacity as the country registers a record number of Covid-related deaths in a single day. We speak to David Almeida, the mayor of Manaus, the origin of a new and more infectious variant.

Also in the programme: China approves measures which allow Beijing to vet all candidates for the Hong Kong legislature; and Prince William says the British Royal family is “not a racist family”.

(Photo: Two women cry during the burial of one relative in Manaus in January 2021. Credits: Reuters).


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlwh85)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wkl4ry80)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fs5q2g76v)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46kvjk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmcpbmk9n4d)
The pandemic a year on

A year on from the WHO declaring Covid 19 a pandemic, we examine the economic impact. Economists Marianna Mazzucato from University College London and Richard Portes from the London Business School discuss whether coronavirus has presented an opportunity for policymakers to build back in a way which might actually benefit people around the world. Also in the programme, environmental activists from around the world will be attending a Global Forest Summit this weekend. Event organisers Thomas Friang, founding CEO of the Open Diplomacy Institute and Stéphane Hallaire, President of Reforest’Action tell us why a summit to address global deforestation is so urgent. The Australian government has launched a subsidy scheme offering half price air tickets to domestic holiday spots such as the Gold Coast. Margy Osmond is chief executive of Australia's Tourism and Transport Forum, and tells us what impact the move is likely to have on the country's faltering tourism sector. Plus, the BBC's Ijeoma Ndukwe reports on the difficulties that many of those held in the United States pre-trial have with paying bail, and asks whether a new reform agenda might help reverse social and racial inequality in the American justice system.

(Picture: Chairs piled outside closed restaurants in Lisbon. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlwm09)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46kz8p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



FRIDAY 12 MARCH 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlwqrf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjww)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlwvhk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x198ycyp2lg)
The pandemic a year on

A year on from the WHO declaring Covid 19 a pandemic, we examine the economic impact. Economists Marianna Mazzucato from University College London and Richard Portes from the London Business School discuss whether coronavirus has presented an opportunity for policymakers to build back in a way which might actually benefit people around the world. Also in the programme, environmental activists from around the world will be attending a Global Forest Summit this weekend. Event organisers Thomas Friang, founding CEO of the Open Diplomacy Institute and Stéphane Hallaire, President of Reforest Action tell us why a summit to address global deforestation is so urgent. The BBC's Ijeoma Ndukwe reports on the difficulties that many of those held in the United States pre-trial have with paying bail, and asks whether a new reform agenda might help reverse social and racial inequality in the American justice system.Plus, sound engineer Raoul Brand shares details of a soundscape audio documentary he's made which takes listeners on a journey through people's lives in their homes in different parts of the world.


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlwz7p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbys)
Dr Sasa: Does Myanmar have a democratic future?

Dr Sasa has a remarkable life story, which has taken him from a remote mountain village in western Myanmar to a place in the international media spotlight as a key spokesman for the political movement intent on reversing February’s military coup. He is from the Chin people - one of many minorities to have suffered long-term discrimination and persecution in Myanmar, or Burma as it was. He was the first child in his village to go to high school. He went on to train as a doctor and has devoted much of his life to improving medical and educational opportunities for the Chin people. For the past decade he’s been an activist in the National League for Democracy. He was with party leader and national figurehead Aung San Suu Kyi just hours before the generals mounted their coup on February 1. She was detained, along with many members of Myanmar’s Government and parliament. Dr Sasa managed to flee to a neighbouring, but undisclosed country. He’s since been appointed as UN representative of the Committee representing the ousted parliament, and is a leading voice in the pro-democracy movement. But with the military continuing to use lethal force against street protests what options do the opponents of the coup really have?


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46lbj2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3cszthj)
A Caf coronation, Löw leaving and the prize money pay gap

Former Confederation of African Football executive committee member, Musa Bility, gives us his take on Patrice Motsepe's unopposed election as Caf President after the South African's three rivals for the job withdrew from the race.

Former Germany, Chelsea and Leicester defender Robert Huth joins us to react to the news that international football's longest serving manager, Joachim Löw, will step down from his role with Die Mannschaft after this summer's European Championships.

Mani Djazmi, Pat Nevin and Heather O'Reilly discuss the findings of a BBC Sport investigation that revealed football still has one of the biggest prize money gender pay gaps.

And we hear about the superstition of 'Kirkicocho' that backfired on Sevilla goalkeeper, Yassine Bounou, in the Champions League this week.

Photo: Patrice Motsepe speaks onstage during Global Citizen Presents Global Goal Live event in New York.
Credit: Noam Galai/Getty Images for Global Citizen


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlx2zt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdc9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmnm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlx6qy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq5)
The $69m digital artwork

How the boom in 'non-fungible tokens' helped one artist become a multimillionaire. Mike Winkelmann - also known as Beeple - explains why his art has sold for $69m at auction despite being freely available to download. Also on the programme: A global security breach of Microsoft's email software hits thousands of businesses. We hear from the BBC's cybersecurity specialist Joe Tidy on why so-called 'zero-day' vulnerabilities are so scary. And Onyinye Ough from the organisation Step Up Nigeria tells us how virtual reality is being used to fight corruption in the West African country. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield.

(Picture credit: Christie's/ Getty Images)


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46ll0b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlxbh2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r9jlts)
US President addresses the nation about Coronavirus package

In a prime time television event, President Biden addressed America and defended his 1.9 trillion dollar stimulus package - we'll hear how his plans to overcome the pandemic have been received.

We speak to a doctor in Manaus in Brazil who describes the pressure health workers are under - in a country with the second highest death toll from the pandemic.

Also a warning from a former high level British intelligence officer that the UK needs to speed up its plans to protect itself from undue foreign influence.

And we'll hear why sea slugs chop their heads from their bodies - and grow them back again.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlxg76)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r9jqkx)
Biden eyes 4th July for 'Independence Day' from virus

Joe Biden has said the United States must be put on a war footing to help it defeat coronavirus - in his first prime time address as president.

In Libya a government of national unity has been formed – but will it put an end to the country’s long civil war?

And has a new TV documentary series effectively killed the career of New York filmmaker Woody Allen?


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlxkzb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2ws4r9jvb1)
Biden urges Americans to do their part in war on Covid

President Biden has his first big primetime TV moment and says Independence Day - 4th July - could "mark independence" from Covid-19 if people accept the vaccines.

The first ever talks between four of the world's biggest economies to try to contain China are being held.

And Goodwill Zwelithini, the king of the Zulu Nation, in South Africa, has died.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlxpqg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46m1zv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz79s)
Sexual assault in the music industry

As women begin to speak out against sexual violence and harassment, does the music industry face a #metoo reckoning?

Manuela Saragosa speaks to her colleague Tamanna Rahman about her investigation for BBC television into numerous claims of abuse, assault and rape, as many women finally break their silence. They discuss the cases of grime artist Solo 45, who was sentenced to prison for multiple counts of rape, and the superstar DJ Erick Morillo, who died last year shortly after being accused of drugging and raping a colleague.

But Tamanna says there are numerous other women she has spoken to who are still afraid to go public with their stories, in many cases because they fear destroying their careers. So what can be done, and what should the big record labels be doing in particular?

Producer: Laurence Knight

(Picture: Lone female street artist holds head in despair next to a guitar; Credit: JoseASReyes/Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmwd)
The first Indian to win Miss World

Reita Faria was the first Indian to win the Miss World beauty competition in 1966. She was studying medicine in Mumbai when a spur of the moment decision to take part in the contest turned her life upside down. Orna Merchant has been speaking to Reita Faria about her win, and whether she believes there is still a place for beauty contests in the 21st Century.

This programme is a rebroadcast


Photo: Reita Faria wearing the Miss World crown in November 1966. Credit: Staff/Mirrorpix/Getty Images


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlxtgl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46m5qz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 World Football (w3cszthj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlxy6q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpd)
How dangerous are deepfakes?

When a series of chillingly convincing Tom Cruise deepfakes went viral on TikTok this month, it brought home how fast synthetic media technology is evolving. Deepfakes are like photoshop for video – using a form of artificial intelligence called deep learning to create a realistic depiction of fake events. Are we entering an era where AI will let anyone make fake videos of anyone else? What will be the implications for individual dignity and privacy, and the shaping of public opinion and spreading disinformation? How might the technology bring new story-lines to filmmakers and joy to people who can now hear from their deceased relatives? What are the ethics of these developments and how do we regulate the technology as it continues to get better? Ritula Shah and a panel of experts discuss how deep fakes might change the world – for better and worse - and what we need to do now to get ready.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dly1yv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09rhtcz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46mf77)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dly5pz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjj)
Two to tango

Astor Piazzolla is known as the father of modern tango. The BBC's Valeria Perasso is from Argentina and was born and raised listening to his music. Irena Taranyuk of BBC Ukrainian is a big fan – and dancer - of tango. In the centenary year of Piazzolla’s birth, they discuss his “tango revolution” and its legacy around the world.

Loaves, oil and meat: Iran's lean Nowruz
Queues outside butchers, fights over cooking oil, and buying loaves by the half – all images seen on social media in Iran at a time of year when families would usually be stocking up for Nowruz, the celebration of Spring. Parham Ghobadi of BBC Persian reports on this very visible sign of the ongoing economic crisis in Iran.

The rise and fall of India's fugitive diamond merchant
How did one of the world’s leading fashion jewellers become India’s most wanted man? The story of diamond merchant Nirav Modi from fairytale rise to riches to fugitive accused of fraud, with the BBC’s South Asia Diaspora reporter Gaggan Sabherwal.

Russia’s ice-dancing ballerina
A Russian ballerina in full costume dancing on the frozen sea near St Petersburg caught the world’s attention. Ilmira Bagrautinova chose scenes from Swan Lake to highlight the threat to endangered swans of a proposed port nearby. She told BBC Russian’s Ekaterina Venediktova why that landscape means so much to her.

Image: Couple dancing tango
Credit: Hans Neleman / Getty


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmwd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dly9g3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09rj1w7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46mnqh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct2bh0)
Eighteen years in hell

In 1971, Aziz BineBine – a junior officer in the Moroccan army – was ordered to take part in a military exercise. Unbeknown to him, the attack on King Hassan’s summer palace near Casablanca was in fact a coup attempt.

The coup failed – and Aziz, who had never fired a shot, was accused of being part of the plot. He found himself publicly disowned by his father, a devout Islam scholar and close associate of the King. Sentenced to 10 years in jail, Aziz was soon transferred to the dungeon of a secret prison in the Atlas mountains - Tazmamart.

It was what Aziz describes as hell; his cell, furnished only with a concrete bench, was dark and dank, liable to flooding by blocked sewers, shared with scorpions and cockroaches, searing in summer and freezing in winter. Many of his fellow prisoners perished. Aziz was to remain at Tazmamart for 18 years.

But he found astonishing inner resources to survive this hell. Even before entering Tazmamart, he had made an act of complete, unconditional surrender to God, which enabled him to live one day at a time and forget everything else, even any desire to regain his freedom.

Aziz tells the story of his captivity and the faith that sustained him in conversation with John McCarthy, who himself experienced a long imprisonment as a British hostage in Lebanon in the 1980s. Both men were eventually released in 1991.

(Photo: The prison of Tazmamart, a former barracks in the eastern Middle Atlas mountains 60km from the city of Errachidia, Morocco. Credit:: Abdelhak Senna/AFP/Getty Images)


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlyf67)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy3mltt)
Mozambique: Thousands trapped by Islamist militants

The president of Mozambique has sacked the head of the army and the air force chief at a time of increased insecurity in the north-east, where an Islamist insurgency has driven more than half a million people from their homes in the past year. Aid agencies are calling the conflict in Cabo Delgado province an urgent and forgotten humanitarian crisis. A BBC team reports exclusively from the besieged town of Palma – the first international journalists to do so.

Also in the programme: The archbishop of Yangon calls on the security forces in Myanmar to stop the killing of protestors; and the king of the Zulu Nation in South Africa has died.

(Image: People queuing for food in Palma, Cabo Delgado province. Credit: BBC)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlyjyc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46mx6r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltjyg7y2xs)
$1.9tn US stimulus comes into force

With Joe Biden's $1.9tn stimulus package signed into law, we consider its economic impact. Actor Corey Mach talks us through his experience of the pandemic and what sort of difference the new law will make to him. And the BBC's Michelle Fleury explains what the American Rescue Plan is designed to achieve. Also in the programme, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson examines the business opportunities that have emerged for those seeking to make the most of people being stuck at home and bored during the lockdowns of the past year. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Stephanie Hare, explores how when faced with a workplace obstacle, a good pep talk can sometimes help us to move forwards.

(Picture: President Biden signs the American Rescue Plan. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlynph)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9tkhj0rb)
Coronavirus conversations: Intensive care doctors

It has been one year since the coronavirus outbreak was declared to be a pandemic. We’ve been hearing from frontline healthcare workers from around the world who have been struggling with either catching the virus themselves, losing colleagues or struggling mentally with the strain of their work. Today we'll hear a conversation between three doctors who work in intensive care units, treating some of the most serious coronavirus cases.

Also, King Goodwill Zwelithini of the Zulu nation in South Africa has died. The 72 year old king was the leader of South Africa's largest ethnic group and an influential traditional ruler. We'll hear from Zulu people how they will remember the king.

And we'll continue to answer all your questions about coronavirus with the help of Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University.

(Photo: Dr Maurizio Cecconi, head of intensive care at the Humanitas research hospital in Milan, Italy. Credit: Humanitas Research Hospital)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlysfm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9tkhj4hg)
US: What is Biden's coronavirus stimulus plan?

In the US, President Joe Biden has signed a $1.9 trillion economic relief bill into law. The Covid stimulus plan will aim to financially help struggling Americans. We'll speak to people who will be receiving money as part of the bill to hear how they will spend it.

It has been one year since the coronavirus outbreak was declared to be a pandemic. We’ve been hearing from frontline healthcare workers from around the world who have been struggling with either catching the virus themselves, losing colleagues or struggling mentally with the strain of their work. Today we'll hear a conversation between three doctors who work in intensive care units, treating some of the most serious coronavirus cases.

And we'll continue to answer all your questions about coronavirus with the help of Marc Mendelson, Professor of Infectious Diseases at the University of Cape Town.

(Photo: U.S. President Joe Biden delivers his first prime time address as president, marking the one-year anniversary of widespread shutdowns to combat the coronavirus pandemic from the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., March 11, 2021. Credit: Tom Brenner)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlyx5r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmwd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlz0xw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bq09rjsc0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46nd68)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k1ymh90cx)
2021/03/12 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlz4p0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46nhyd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv75)
How does my mind talk to my body?

This week CrowdScience investigates the information superhighway connecting mind with body. The Vagus nerve is part of our parasympathetic nervous system, delivering information from all our major organs to the brain stem, and stimulating it can help us switch off our fight or flight response and calm us down. But listener Mags wants to know what science says about its impact on our general wellbeing? Marnie Chesterton learns some deep breathing techniques and discovers how the length of our exhale is closely linked to our heart rate, all of which is important for developing something called vagal tone. Cold water immersion also said to stimulate the Vagus, so Marnie braves a freezing shower, only to discover she needs to get her face wet but keep the rest of her body dry, to avoid what scientists called autonomic conflict, which is when your stress response and calming response are both switched on by the same event. Activating both arms of the nervous system in this way can lead to serious heart problems in some people. New research into the gut-brain axis has shown that the Vagus nerve may be responsible for transporting the so-called happy hormone serotonin, which could have important implications for the treatment of depression. And innovations in electrical stimulation of this nerve means implanted devices may soon be used to treat inflammatory conditions like arthritis.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and produced by Marijke Peters for the BBC World Service


Contributors:

Dr Lucy Kaufmann, Adjunct Professor of Neurology, NYU

Mike Tipton, Professor of Human and Applied Physiology, University of Porstmouth

Mark Genovese, Emeritus Professor of Medicine, Stanford University

Dr Karen-Anne McVeigh Neufeld, Brain Body Institute, McMaster University


[Image credit: Getty Images)


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlz8f4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z7gy3ng1q)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlzd58)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79wkl4vv53)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fs5q2k43y)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46nrfn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmbvwwyq7m6)
$1.9tn US stimulus comes into force

With Joe Biden's $1.9tn stimulus package signed into law, we consider its economic impact. Actor Corey Mach talks us through his experience of the pandemic and what sort of difference the new law will make to him. And the BBC's Michelle Fleury explains what the American Rescue Plan is designed to achieve. Also in the programme, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson examines the business opportunities that have emerged for those seeking to make the most of people being stuck at home and bored during the lockdowns of the past year. Plus, our regular workplace commentator, Stephanie Hare, explores how when faced with a workplace obstacle, a good pep talk can sometimes help us to move forwards.

(Picture: President Biden signs the American Rescue Plan. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pc0dlzhxd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbys)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q5g46nw5s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3cszthj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Africa Life Clinic 09:32 SUN (w3ct21g7)

Assignment 19:06 SAT (w3csz6mj)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3csz6mk)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6mk)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6mk)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5q52vwx2tb)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5q52vwxg1q)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5q52vwxt93)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5q52vwxy17)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5q52vwy5jh)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5q52vwz0rd)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SAT (w172x5q52vwz4hj)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5q52vwzhqx)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172x5q52vwzr75)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5q52vwzzqf)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5q52vx0byt)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5q52vx0q66)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5q52vx0tyb)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5q52vx0ypg)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5q52vx12fl)

BBC News Summary 12:30 SUN (w172x5q52vx165q)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5q52vx21dm)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5q52vx2dn0)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5q52vx2jd4)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172x5q5g466hdf)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5q5g466m4k)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5q5g466qwp)

BBC News Summary 03:30 MON (w172x5q5g466vmt)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5q5g466zcy)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5q5g467gcg)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5q5g467tlv)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5q5g468233)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5q5g4689lc)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5q5g468skw)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5q5g4694t8)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5q5g4698kd)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5q5g469mss)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5q5g469w91)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5q5g46bc8k)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5q5g46bh0p)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5q5g46bqhy)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5q5g46bz06)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5q5g46c6hg)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5q5g46cpgz)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5q5g46ct73)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5q5g46d1qc)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5q5g46d5gh)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5q5g46djpw)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5q5g46ds64)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5q5g46f85n)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5q5g46fcxs)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5q5g46fmf1)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5q5g46fvx9)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5q5g46g3dk)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5q5g46gld2)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5q5g46gq46)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5q5g46gymg)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5q5g46h2cl)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5q5g46hflz)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5q5g46hp37)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5q5g46j52r)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5q5g46j8tw)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5q5g46jjb4)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5q5g46jrtd)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5q5g46k09n)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5q5g46kh95)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5q5g46km19)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5q5g46kvjk)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5q5g46kz8p)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5q5g46lbj2)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5q5g46ll0b)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5q5g46m1zv)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5q5g46m5qz)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5q5g46mf77)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5q5g46mnqh)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5q5g46mx6r)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5q5g46nd68)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5q5g46nhyd)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5q5g46nrfn)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5q5g46nw5s)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5pbn496h1p)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5pbn496lst)

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BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5pbn4972sb)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5pbn4976jg)

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BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5pbn497t83)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5pbn497y07)

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BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5pbn4985hh)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5pbn498nh0)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5pbn498s74)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172x5pbn498wz8)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5pbn4990qd)

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BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5pbn49986n)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5pbn499cys)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5pbn499hpx)

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BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5pbn49bq56)

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BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5pbn49c9wv)

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BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5pbn49d53r)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172x5pc0dlj441)

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BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172x5pc0dlm114)

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BBC News 00:00 WED (w172x5pc0dlpxy7)

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BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5pc0dlsq36)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172x5pc0dlstvb)

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BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172x5pc0dlxg76)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172x5pc0dlxkzb)

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BBC OS Conversations 05:06 SAT (w3ct19zc)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7ks)

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Business Weekly 23:06 SAT (w3ct0sq0)

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Comedians Vs. The News 11:32 SAT (w3ct21mj)

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Deeply Human 10:06 SUN (w3ct2cbf)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz99f)

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Discovery 00:32 MON (w3ct2ccd)

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From Our Own Correspondent 02:06 SAT (w3csz9qy)

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Global Questions 19:32 SAT (w3ct1pxp)

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HM The Queen's Message To The Commonwealth 11:25 MON (w3ct2d2c)

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I'm Not A Monster 09:32 SAT (w3ct1z6d)

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I'm Not A Monster 22:32 SUN (w3ct1z6d)

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Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6v9)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf5r)

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Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172x3lpgtcyq4t)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhkm)

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The Climate Question 04:06 MON (w3ct0xbh)

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The Conversation 02:32 MON (w3cszj4q)

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The Conversation 13:32 MON (w3cszj4q)

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The Cultural Frontline 00:06 SUN (w3cszj9q)

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The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3cszcpc)

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The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3cszky3)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172x7dbjhn5kt5)

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When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct21m1)

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Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3cszmwc)

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WorklifeIndia 02:06 SUN (w3ct1c1n)

World Book Club 04:06 SUN (w3cszmx8)

World Book Club 14:06 SUN (w3cszmx8)

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World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x5840lljm6x)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172xlvcd5v7sqp)

World Business Report 22:32 MON (w172xm9stk51k14)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3cszthj)

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