Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 27 FEBRUARY 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzfbfv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpb)
Has Covid rolled back democratic rights?

Countries around the world are using the coronavirus pandemic to 'crush dissent and silence independent reporting' according to the UN chief Antonio Guterres. He says some nations are using restrictions meant to halt the spread of Covid-19 to weaken political opposition. Governments say a tighter grip over freedom of expression is essential to curb disinformation and confusion at a time when societies are under lockdown. Countries with authoritarian tendencies aren't the only ones under fire - the criticisms are being leveled at governments with well-established democracies too. So what are governments trying to get away with under the cover of Covid? How have the changes taken away democratic rights, and can the trends be reversed? Ritula Shah and a panel of guests discuss dissent in the time of Covid.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzfg5z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1986vb6p8w)
US house set to approve $1.9 trillion stimulus

The US House of Representatives prepares to pass President Biden's $1.9 trillion economic stimulus package to help provide support during the Covid-19 Pandemic, we speak to the Wall Street Jounal's Kristina Peterson about what new measures the bill includes. US Treasury Secretary holds talks on global digital tax reforms with her counterparts at the G20, we're joined by the FT's Washington Bureau Chief James Politi to discuss whether this will finally end the trans-Atlantic deadlock.

Also in the programme, three decades after the cult classic Eddie Murphy film Coming to America was released, a sequel will be screened on Amazon Prime from next week. We ask South African actor Nomzamo Mbatha, who stars in the new production, how the west's portrayal of Africa has changed since the 80s. Plus Pokemon hits 25, we find out just how the creature collecting game has kept everyone catching 'em all for so long

The BBC's Fergus Nicoll is joined by Radio New Zealand's Colin Peacock in Auckland.

(Picture: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi holds a press conference. Picture credit: EPA.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzfky3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qx)
Afghanistan hopes - and despairs

Under the terms of a deal made with the Taliban in Doha in 2020, the US agreed to start pulling its troops out of Afghanistan over the next two months. There were hopes that nearly four decades of war could be ended. But in recent months, the level of lethal violence in Afghanistan has risen - and civilians, judges, journalists, as well as police, Afghan and US soldiers, have all been targeted. The Taliban deny responsibility for the gun and bomb attacks which have been shaking Afghanistan's cities, particularly Kabul, almost every day. Many people - particularly the educated and the young - despair of making a better country, and are now desperate to leave, seeing no chance for peace. Yet when the BBC's Lyse Doucet recently interviewed the Afghan President Ashraf Ghani recently, she found him resolute - and still insistent that there's room for optimism.

Pascale Harter introduces this and other insights, impressions and analysis from writers around the world.

The mass protests in Myanmar against the recent military coup have used wit and solidarity, as well as public anger - from meme-heavy placards to elaborate costume - to call people together, despite the dangers of facing down the junta. On the streets of Yangon, Ben Dunnant has seen Burmese citizens of many different generations, professions and religions uniting to demand a return to democracy, the release of Aung San Suu Kyi and the end of full control by the armed forces.

And Stephen McConnell reveals what it was really like to be part of the press pack shadowing the World Health Organisation's team of scientists around the Chinese city of Wuhan. The experts were visiting to try and uncover the truth about the origins of the coronavirus pandemic. How much were they really allowed to discover - and how much evidence was their investigation allowed to see?



Image: An Afghan boy kisses the national flag. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency-EFE/Hedayatullah Amid)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll3y6h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhkl)
'Catches win matches but tashes win Ashes'

We discuss the pitch, umpiring decisions and England's fragile batting line up in the third test match between India and England.

Plus the first game of this summer's inaugural Hundred competition will be a women's match, so we look at how the profile of women's cricket is being raised.

And Cricket the Musical! We are joined by writer and star of the show Denis Carnahan.

Photo: Dennis Lillee of Australia poses for a photo during the Beach Cricket Tri-Nations match. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzfpp7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjg)
Somalia's election impasse

Somalia currently has a president in name only. President Mohamed Abdulahi Mohamed, who’s also known by his nickname Farmajo, should have ended his term of office on 8 February. But the parliamentary elections to begin the process of choosing a new president are yet to take place. It's a tense situation, and opposition protests last week in Mogadishu saw gunfire, with more protests planned. BBC Africa's Bella Sheegow in Mogadishu and BBC Monitoring's Ibrahim Aydid in Nairobi explain what's been happening.

Sri Lanka’s star of ‘Who Wants To Be a Millionaire’
A Muslim teenager in Sri Lanka has become a household name after her star performance in the local version of the tv show ‘Who Wants To Be a Millionaire’. Shukra Munawwar won the hearts of the audience, at a time of strong anti-Muslim rhetoric from some parts of society. Shirly Upul Kumara of BBC Sinhala went to meet her at her home in southern Sri Lanka.

Iranian kohl
BBC’s Nassim Hatam explores the history of kohl, or sormeh in Farsi, the black eye make-up that's been worn by Iranian women for millennia.

My Friend from a Care Home
Russia’s care homes house thousands of people behind high fences and closed doors. But the Covid-19 pandemic has provided a unique chance for a few residents to leave their institutions and start learning to live independently. In her BBC Russian documentary, Zlata Onufrieva follows Nina’s progress, as she adjusts to life outside with the help of her friend Arina.

Floods in southern Thailand
BBC Thai's Issariya Praithongyaem shares the story of the fruit farmers in Thailand’s Muslim south who lost thousands of dollars’ worth of crops due to floods caused by water released from a hydroelectric dam.


Image: Supporters of different opposition presidential candidates demonstrate in Mogadishu in February 2021
Credit: Photo by AFP via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmwb)
Banning landmines

In March 1999, the Ottawa Treaty banning anti-personnel landmines became part of international law. Over 80% of countries have signed the treaty, which was the culmination of a five-year campaign and which has saved hundreds of thousands of lives around the world. Louise Hidalgo has been talking to Jody Williams, who co-ordinated the campaign and was later awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for her work.

Picture: Jody Williams at the signing of the Ottawa Treaty, alongside dignitaries including then United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan. (Credit: Dave Chan/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzftfc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzfy5h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zb)
Coronavirus: Venezuela's hospitals

Venezuela’s hospitals are dealing with a pandemic at a time when the country is already in an economic crisis. Many hospitals don’t have running water and there are shortages of oxygen and other medical supplies to treat Covid patients. Two doctors in the capital Caracas share their stories with host Nuala McGovern.

In the United States, more than 500,000 lives have now been lost due to Covid-19. A reverend and deacon from a baptist church in New York, at one point the epicentre of the disease, reflect on how their community is coping almost a year after the pandemic was first declared.

Plus, three nightclub workers in Beirut, Warsaw and London discuss their fears for the industry’s survival despite the rollout of vaccines.

(Photo: A Venezuelan health worker prepares to vaccinate a colleague with Russia"s Sputnik V vaccine against the coronavirus disease at a hospital in Caracas, Venezuela February 22, 2021. Credit: Leonardo Fernandez Viloria/Reuters)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll49fw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxn)
On 11 November 2019 James Le Mesurier was found dead in a street in Istanbul. He was the latest casualty in a very unusual war – one fought not on the battlefield, but online.

Le Mesurier was a mysterious figure with a taste for the finer things who served in the British Army in several of the world’s hotspots before focusing his energies on war-ravaged Syria from 2014. He co-founded the White Helmets, a Syrian civil defence force who filmed themselves pulling survivors and bodies from the rubble of bombed out buildings.

Soon, the White Helmets - and Le Mesurier - found themselves at the centre of a global race to control the narrative in the Syrian War. In this investigative series Mayday, presenter Chloe Hadjimatheou talks to the people who knew James, including his widow Emma, his ex-wife and former army colleagues, as well as those on the ground in Syria still working as White Helmets today in an effort to piece together James’ story and that of the White Helmets. She speaks to some of the White Helmet’s detractors and follows up accusations about the organisation to try and understand the truth surrounding them.

Chloe Hadjimatheou says: “Making this series has been an extraordinary experience, as listeners will discover. It started out being an investigation into the story of a man with an astonishing life and a mysterious death but it ended up taking me on a bizarre journey down rabbit holes of misinformation. Ultimately this is a story about how truth functions in modern warfare.”


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct24jh)
Facebook's global power and influence

After a series of damaging scandals, many critics believe the social media giant has become too powerful and should be broken up. This week, Ros Atkins will consider Facebook's influence in Myanmar, its role in the storming of the Capitol building in Washington, and its decision to temporarily ban news in Australia.

(Photo: Facebook chairman Mark Zuckerberg testifies at a joint senate committee hearing in Washington DC. Credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzg1xm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7db57bdf6b)
US sanctions Saudis

The White House has imposed sanctions on Saudi Arabia, following revelations on the role of its Crown Prince in the murder of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi. We get reaction from the expert who led a UN investigation into Mr Khashoggi's death.

Also, 317 schoolgirls have been abducted from a boarding school in northern Nigeria, in the latest kidnapping of students in the country.

And after a high-speed car crash in California, will Tiger Woods ever play again?

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Julie Norman, a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at University College London, and John Nilsson-Wright, a specialist on the Korean peninsula, Japan and East Asia at Cambridge University and the Royal Institute of International Affairs.

(Photo: Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman of Saudi; Credit: EPA/ANDY RAIN)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzg5nr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7db57bdjyg)
Sanctions against Saudi nationals

The White House has imposed sanctions on Saudi Arabia, following revelations on the role of its Crown Prince in the murder of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi. We get reaction from the expert who led a UN investigation into Mr Khashoggi's death.

Also, why Greece wants the European Union to adopt vaccine passports.

And the Chinese court ruling that puts a price on domestic housework.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Julie Norman, a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at University College London, and John Nilsson-Wright, a specialist on the Korean peninsula, Japan and East Asia at Cambridge University and the Royal Institute of International Affairs. (Photo: Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman of Saudi; Credit: Bandar Algaloud/Courtesy of Saudi Royal Court/Handout via REUTERS )


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzg9dw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7db57bdnpl)
Biden imposes sanctions on Saudis

Joe Biden says the US will hold Saudi Arabia accountable for human rights abuses, following revelations on the role of its Crown Prince in the murder of dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi. We get reaction from the Saudis and ask what it means for Washington's relationship with a key ally.

Also, as leaders of the world's wealthiest nations prepare to descend on a southern English town for this year's G7 summit - what issues will be top of their agenda?

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Julie Norman, a Lecturer in Politics and International Relations at University College London, and John Nilsson-Wright, a specialist on the Korean peninsula, Japan and East Asia at Cambridge University and the Royal Institute of International Affairs.

(Photo: Saudi Arabia"s Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman; Credit: Bandar Algaloud/Courtesy of Saudi Royal Court/Handout via REUTERS/File Photo)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll4np8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m0)
Have Native Americans been let down?

At the height of the pandemic, Native Americans were dying of Covid at twice the rate of white Americans. Huge inequalities have been highlighted, not just in terms of health, but also housing, education and wealth. Twenty-three percent of Native Americans live below the poverty line, compared to 10 percent of white Americans, and Native Americans are 19 times more likely to live without running water in their home. But there’s some good news too. If confirmed, Deb Haaland will make history as the first Native American in a cabinet secretary role. She’ll be the Secretary of the Interior, which oversees the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Could this historic appointment change the fate of Native Americans today?

There’s a lot of history to undo. Jonodev Chaudhuri, ambassador for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, explains how his mother was forced to go to a boarding school where she was forbidden from speaking her native language, and her arm was broken by her teachers. The poor education she received didn’t set her up well in life. He says the federal government has broken promises made in treaties to safeguard the health, education and safety of his people in return for their land.

Amber Crotty, a tribal council delegate in the Navajo Nation in Arizona, tells how her tribe were left out of agreements over who had the right to the water that ran through their land, so today they can’t lawfully use it. One-third of her nation live without running water in their homes, and there are just 13 grocery stores on the 71,000 sq km reservation, meaning they have to drive for hours to buy food. She’s working hard to get her citizens vaccinated against Covid, and says the tide is now starting to turn. She hopes having a Native American head up the Department of the Interior, which oversees the Bureau of Indian Affairs, will help address many inequalities they face.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzgf50)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 today]


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll4sfd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6c)
I'm Not a Monster

2: Read Between the Lines

A man who says he’s a people smuggler offers to help the family, while a drive around a suburb in Indiana reveals their past. Sam’s father adds a new twist on who his daughter really is.

This episode includes descriptions of violence and some upsetting moments involving children.

CREDITS:
Reporter: Josh Baker
Written by: Josh Baker and Joe Kent
Producers: Joe Kent and Max Green
Production assistant: Lucie Sullivan
Mixed by Tom Brignell
Composer: Sam Slater
Series Editor: Emma Rippon

Commissioning Executive: Dylan Haskins
Commissioning Editor: Jason Phipps

ARCHIVE:
Fox News: ISIS uses purported American boy in latest propaganda video (August 2017)
CBS News: ISIS claims boy in propaganda video is American (August 2017)

“I’m Not a Monster” is a collaboration between BBC Panorama and FRONTLINE (PBS) and is a BBC Radio Current Affairs production for BBC Sounds.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf5q)
The pressures of reporting from Myanmar

With events in Myanmar hitting global headlines, we speak to the BBC’s correspondent in the country about the challenges - just how do you deliver accurate reporting from a closed country under military control? Plus we’re always eager to learn about your everyday lives and listening habits, there’s an-other in our regular series How I Hear.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzgjx4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c93zmzbpv)
How Inclusive is Football?

As part of LGBT+ History Month, Sportshour presenter Caroline Barker is joined by a panel of guests from the football community to discuss how inclusive, or not, the sport really is and what can and is being done to address those areas where it falls short.

We’ll also hear from Caitlin Rooskrantz, the first person of colour to be selected for South Africa’s Olympic gymnastics team. As part of Black History Month across the BBC World Service, Caitlin describes her route into the sport and why – on the day of what would have been her Olympic final last summer – she performed a routine that was streamed across the country.

As the Great Britain men’s basketball team celebrates a rare success – qualifying for the EuroBasket finals – Caroline speaks to Teddy Okereafor. Teddy reflects on equalling the team’s record for consecutive appearances, a mark which had stood for 45 years. He discusses the lows and the current highs of the team, as well as how a walk through a Newham park with his Mother set him on course for everything that’s happened since, and his Mum – Natasha Hart – on the pathway to an MBE.

Photo: A banner of former footballer Justin Fashanu is seen draped across the seats at Carrow Road, Norwich City's home ground. (Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzgnn8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s41f2d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll50xn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mh)
Dr Jason Leong and Eline Van der Velden

Brilliant comedians from around the world join Jess Salomon and Eman El- Husseini to take on the headlines.

This week Jess and Eman are joined by Malaysian star stand-up Dr Jason Leong and Dutch comedian Eline Van der Velden. They’ll be finding out why there’s never a dull day when it comes to Malaysian politics and asking if the Dutch are skating on thin ice.

Join Comedians vs The News for the funniest take on the global headlines you’ve heard this week.

The programme first broadcast on 26th February has been updated due to sensitive content.


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzgsdd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6v8)
A million ways to make a song with Eliza Shaddad and This Is the Kit

Eliza Shaddad is joined by Oddisee, Gaidaa and This Is the Kit's Kate Stables to discuss working from home, where they now record, and how factors such as politics and heritage feed into the creative system.

Eliza Shaddad is a singer songwriter whose debut album Future came out in 2018, which she described as her “sonic journal”.

Oddisee is a Sudanese-American rapper and producer based in Brooklyn, originally from Washington DC. His first release was a collaboration with DJ Jazzy Jeff in 2002, and since then he has released a series of acclaimed mixtapes, EPs and albums, as well as founding the rap trio Diamond District.

Gaidaa is a Sudanese Dutch artist who grew up between Sudan and Eindhoven in Holland. Her debut EP Overture came out last year, firmly establishing her as a rising star in the spheres of neo-soul and R&B.

And Kate Stables is the creative force behind the band This Is The Kit. Their songs are said to “untangle emotional knots and weave remarkable stories”, and the band’s latest album Off Off On came out on Rough Trade last October.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzgx4j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdh52s3)
UN investigator criticises Khashoggi report

Agnes Callamard, the woman who led the UN's investigation into the murder of the Saudi columnist Jamal Khashoggi, has criticised the US decision not to impose sanctions on the Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Newshour hears from Saudi analyst Ali Shehabi.

Also in the programme: Amnesty International has verified eyewitness accounts of a massacre in Aksum in Ethiopia's Tigray region last November; and Cornwall prepares for the G7.

(Picture: A demonstrator holds a poster with a picture of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi outside the Saudi Arabia consulate in Istanbul. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzh0wn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lp3k25kjz)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary, as West Bromwich Albion host Brighton and Hove Albion. Joining Lee James on the Sportsworld team will be former West Ham midfielder Nigel Reo-Coker, former Liverpool manager Vicky Jepson and former Wolves and Nigeria midfielder Seyi Olofinjana.

We’ll also be asking what next for Tiger Woods, after he was involved in a car accident? And as it’s LGBT+ month, we will be discussing whether sport has become more open to LGBTQ athletes.

Photo: Tariq Lamptey of Brighton and Hove Albion battles for possession with Grady Diangana of West Bromwich Albion. (Credit: Pool/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzhhw5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s42899)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll5w4k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzhmm9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Evidence (w3ct2cbb)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

Keeping out Covid-19

From flight bans, entry bans, compulsory quarantine and virus testing, most countries have introduced travel restrictions in an effort to control the spread of the virus. But for a virus that knows no borders, do cross border health measures actually work?

Claudia Hammond and her panel of global experts answer listeners’ questions and discuss the very latest science about the use of border controls in this pandemic.

The countries we can all learn from, researchers say, include Singapore, Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand and South Korea. Their border policies are said to be consistent and crucially, integrated with strong domestic public health measures.

So while we wait for vaccinations, it seems an international vaccination passport will be rolled out very soon, maybe as early as Spring. A digital passport – a golden ticket to travel – could give privileged access to those who have been inoculated. But what are the ethical and scientific concerns of such a move?

The panel with the answers include Kelley Lee, Professor of Public Health at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada who is leading an international project to assess cross border health measures, Pandemics and Borders, Dr Voo Teck Chuan, Assistant Professor at the University of Singapore Centre for Biomedical Ethics and a member of the WHO Working Group on Ethics and Covid-19, Dr Birger Forsberg, Associate Professor of International Health at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and senior physician and health planner at the regional health authority of Stockholm and Marc Lipsitch, Professor of Epidemiology at the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health and Director of the Centre for Communicable Disease Dynamics in the USA.

Produced by: Fiona Hill, Samara Linton and Maria Simons
Editor: Deborah Cohen
Technical Support: Sarah Hockley

Picture: Giving passport and certificate of covid-19 vaccination on border control, Credit: ArtistGNDphotography/Getty Images


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzhrcf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk47)
Actor Daniel Kaluuya

On this week’s Arts Hour, Nikki Bedi speaks to film critic Leila Latif and filmmaker Fernando Frias de la Parra about about his film I’m No Longer Here, Mexico’s entry for this year’s Oscars.

We’ll also hear from actor Daniel Kaluuya who reveals how an opera coach helped him prepare for his role as American activist Fred Hampton in Judas and The Black Messiah.

Actor and writer Ethan Hawke explains why he’s finally allowing his fiction to mirror his own life.

We’ll hear how Parv Kaur, the UK’s first female dhol player, broke into the male-dominated world of bhangra music.

Danish director Thomas Vinterberg speaks candidly about the tragedy which overshadowed his latest film Another Round.

British director Paul Greengrass on what it was like directing Tom Hanks in his movie News of The World.

And we hear a beautiful Guyanese lullaby from singer Sabihya.


(Photo: actor Daniel Kaluuya. Credit: Samir Hussein/WireImage)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzhw3k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdh61r4)
Spate of kidnappings prompts school closures in Nigeria

Police in Nigeria have launched a search and rescue operation for 317 girls kidnapped from a school in the state of Zamfara. The operation comes as 42 people kidnapped from a boarding school in a similar incident last week in Niger state were released. Also: it’s day three of the conference of American political conservatives, known as CPAC, where former secretary of state Mike Pompeo has been speaking; and we’ll hear about the life of one of the leading champions of America's movement of so-called 'beat poets’.

(Photo: A team of security experts tour the JSS Jangebe school, a day after over 300 schoolgirls were abducted. Credit: Reuters/Afolabi Sotunde).


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzhzvp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vv1jdfvj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frg5g2qtc)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll6c42)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct20d2)
The Right Thing: Saving the man who shot me

Mike Wooldridge tells the story of Rais Bhuiyan, who In his 20s, traded a job in the Bangladeshi Air Force for a life in the US. He was working at a petrol station. A man with baseball cap walked in and pointed a double-barrelled shotgun at him. Rais offered all the money in the till to him, but the attacker asked him where he was from. Rais was confused, and said ‘Excuse me?’, but as he spoke, he was shot. He said it felt like a million bees stinging his face. He fell to the floor and started reciting from the Koran, begging God not to take him that day.

White supremacist Mark Stroman’s attack left Bhuiyan partially blind, and two other men died during Stroman’s killing spree. In court Stroman said he had intended to target Muslims in revenge for the 9/11 attacks. Stroman was found guilty and received the death penalty, but Bhuiyan forgave his attacker and campaigned against the execution, saying that his faith told him that saving one life was like saving the whole of mankind.

As well as Rais, we hear from his friends, those who worked alongside him to save Mark Stroman, and the brother-in-law of one of the other victims, Waqar Hussein.

(Photo: Rais Bhuiyan. Credit: WFFA ABC Channel 8, Dallas)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzj3lt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spz)
How important are vaccine passports?

As the global Covid-19 vaccination drive slowly gathers pace - on Business Weekly we’ll be looking at whether vaccine passports will help us return to life as we once knew it. While the travel industry is keen to use them, scientists warn that not only will they not work properly but they could pose serious ethical dilemmas. We’ll also hear from the people scooping facemasks out of the ocean - who are warning that Covid-19 has caused a pandemic of plastic waste. In the effort to save the planet from climate change, US President Joe Biden has promised to reduce the US’s carbon emissions. We’ll hear from the American coal workers who are worried for their jobs. Also, the pandemic has thrown the global wedding industry into disarray. We’ll meet the couples who got married during the pandemic in really quite extraordinary circumstances. And we’ll look at the history of hairstyles in the workplace.

Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Szu Ping Chan.

Picture: A close-up of an ampoule and syringe needle (Credit: Getty).



SUNDAY 28 FEBRUARY 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzj7by)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9p)
Amitav Ghosh and new writing from India and Pakistan

Multi-award-winning Indian author Amitav Ghosh on using verse and folklore in his new book, Jungle Nama, to tell a cautionary tale about our relationship with the natural world.

Pakistani writers, Awais Khan from Lahore and Saba Karim Khan from Karachi, discuss the challenges in getting their English language stories in front of readers in their own country, and the influence of their foreign audience.

Amna Mufti in Lahore is an author and award-winning television script writer in Urdu. She tells us how that affects the way she writes stories and their content – and who can and cannot read them.

And Assamese author Aruni Kashyap on the vast audiences for Indian literature in the country’s indigenous languages and the centrality of farmers and farming when stories are not being written in English.


Presenter: Nawal Al-Maghafi
Producer: Paul Waters


(Photo: Indian writer Amitav Ghosh. Credit: Barbara Zanon/Getty Images)


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll6lmb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3cszf5q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzjc32)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3cszky2)
Waste not, want not

Although vaccines will go a long way to reducing the number of cases of Covid, there’s still a need for other approaches. One of these could be an engineered biomolecule, designed by virologists Anne Moscona and Matteo Porotto, that blocks SARS-CoV-2 precisely at the moment it tries to enter cells in the nose and upper airways. Roland Pease talks to Anne Moscona about this “molecular mask”.

We’re already beginning to see really encouraging analyses showing that Covid vaccines are performing as well in the real world as was promised by last year’s trials. Shane Crotty of the La Jolla Institute for Immunology discusses progress so far and the question of one dose or two with Roland.

Lives can be saved if there’s an early warning system for earthquakes and tsunamis. Seismologist Zhongwen Zhan at CalTech has been experimenting with a newly installed 10,000 km cable laid along the Pacific coasts of north and south America by Google, all the way from Los Angeles to Santiago. What he was looking for were subtle changes in a property of light that’s important to IT engineers, and can detect subsea earthquakes.

We are still sending too much waste to landfill sites. At the Commonwealth Science Conference this week Veena Sahajwalla of the University of New South Wales explained how she is creating small scale factories that can use discarded objects such as ceramics and textiles to make new products.

Listener Paula from Kenya is a computer scientist, she can’t help but notice the inequality in her workplace.

With only 1 in 10 countries having female heads of state, there is no doubt that men are in charge.

Paula wants to know if there is any scientific underpinning to this inequality? Perhaps it can be explained by our brains and bodies? Or does evolution weigh in?

Or maybe it is all down to society and the way we raise our boys and girls. The toys and ideals we give our children must surely have an impact.

And most importantly, if we want a world run by men and women equally, how can we get there? We hear how Iceland became the most gender equal country in the world.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton. Produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service


(Image: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzjgv6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c1m)
Ready for a zero waste lifestyle?

India generates over 270 million tonnes of waste every year - 80 percent of what South Asia produces - and nearly 77 percent of this waste ends up in open landfill sites, a clear sign that the country is running on a take-make-waste economy.

So, how can we do our bit to save the planet? How can we give the things we buy a new life rather than dumping them in landfill sites, or letting them wind up in the oceans?

While a lot of people want to go zero waste and plastic-free, the issue of convenience stands in the way. But those who do make changes say they love the challenge: planning ahead, shopping around, and finding creative ways to adopt a more sustainable lifestyle.

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we speak to three inspiring women championing zero waste in India, as they share their quick tips on making more responsible lifestyle choices.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Wilma Rodrigues, CEO, founder, Saahas Zero Waste; Nayana Premnath, zero waste influencer; Sahar Mansoor, CEO, founder, Bare Necessities


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll6v3l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyr)
Why are US Covid cases falling?

Cases of Covid 19 began to soar in the US in the autumn. By early January there were around 300,000 new cases a day. But since then the numbers have fallen steeply. What caused this dramatic drop? From herd immunity to the weather, Tim Harford explores some of the theories with Derek Thompson of The Atlantic magazine and Professor Jennifer Dowd, deputy director of the Lever Hume Centre for Demographic Science at the University of Oxford.


(People with face masks walk through The Mall in Central Park, New York City. Credit: Noam Galai /Getty Images)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzjllb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzjqbg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wjp)
Embankment baby

Tony May was only weeks old when he was abandoned as a baby on the Victoria Embankment in London in 1942. There was no clue to who he was or why he was left by the river Thames in the middle of World War Two. Raised by loving adopted parents who named him, Tony has never been able to discover the identity of his birth parents. Now in his 70s, Tony may finally be able to solve the mystery thanks to advances in DNA testing and painstaking detective work by genealogist Julia Bell. But this type of search is also not without its risks as there is no telling what secrets may be uncovered.

Will Tony be happy with the answers he finds? The popularity of home DNA testing has exploded in recent years as people around the world rush to find out more about their family history. Global test kit sales are predicted to hit 100 million by 2021, and as more people add to these huge online databases it is easier than ever to unearth information about the past. And we may not be prepared for the surprises and family secrets that await us.

Presenter: Claire Bates


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzjv2l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll76bz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzjytq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7db57bhb3f)
Deadly clashes in Myanmar

There have been fresh clashes on the streets of Myanmar. Reports are coming in of protestors being shot dead by police. We get the latest from Yangon.

Also on the programme, the search is on for hundreds of missing schoolgirls taken in the latest kidnapping in Nigeria; and in the US -- Republicans get ready for Donald Trump's first speech since leaving office.

To discuss these stories and others we are joined by Mary Dejevsky, a writer and broadcaster based in London and Ryan Heath, the global editor at Politico, the online news publication, from New York.

(Photo: Protestors hold placards during a protest against the military coup; Credit: EPA/LYNN BO BO)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzk2kv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7db57bhfvk)
Johnson & Johnson vaccine approved

The pharma company Johnson and Johnson says it's beginning immediate distribution of its single-dose coronavirus vaccine following its formal approval by US regulators; President Biden called it exciting news.

Also on the programme, a court verdict in Germany brings a degree of justice to victims of torture in Syria; and the wonders of the ancient Mesopotamian site of Ur - a stop in Pope Frances' upcoming historic visit to Iraq.

To discuss these stories and others we are joined by Mary Dejevsky, a writer and broadcaster based in London and Ryan Heath, the global editor at Politico, the online news publication, from New York.

(Photo: Vials of Johnson & Johnson"s Janssen coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine; Credit : Reuters/File Photo)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzk69z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7db57bhklp)
Police suppress Myanmar street protests

There have been further clashes in Myanmar, where at least two people protesting against this month's military coup are reported to have been been shot dead by security forces. We get the latest from Yangon.

Also on the programme, the plight of Iraqi Christians and what Pope Francis can do for them; and we hear about who might be missing from the awards list at the Golden Globe awards.

To discuss these stories and others we are joined by Mary Dejevsky, a writer and broadcaster based in London and Ryan Heath, the global editor at Politico, the online news publication, from New York.

(Photo:Riot police officers fire teargas canisters during a protest against the military coup in Yangon; Credit: REUTERS/Stringer)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll7klc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 Outlook (w3cszf16)
New York to Saigon: taking beers to my friends in a warzone

A crazy idea thrown around a neighbourhood pub soon became the adventure of a lifetime. In 1967 New-York-City-native Chickie Donahue crossed oceans and hitched rides across a warzone to hand-deliver beers to his friends fighting in Vietnam. Not a soldier, Chickie relied on his charm and wit to get him to where he needed to go. But what began as a short morale-boosting mission soon became much more trecherous as Chickie found himself caught up in the deadly Lunar New Year attacks on what was then Saigon.


Presenter and producer: Mariana Des Forges

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Chickie Donahue in Vietnam
Credit: Courtesy of Chickie Donahue


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzkb23)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll7pbh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Africa Life Clinic (w3ct21g6)
Africa’s blood shortage

We’re looking at why levels of blood donation in Africa are so low compared with other parts of the world. From Nigeria we hear about hospitals having to ask patients and family members to give blood to ensure there is enough for their relatives if they require treatment. From Somalia we look at how the continuing violence and unrest has brought into sharp focus the need for an organised system of blood donation – currently there is only one donor centre – for the whole country, run by volunteers. And in Kenya we meet people who refuse blood transfusions, believing they might take on the characteristics of the person donating the blood. Health workers and religious leaders are coming together to try to change these beliefs.
Presented by Priscilla Ngethe with contributions from Bella Sheegow, Charles Mgbolu and Dayo Yusuf.
(Picture: People donating blood in Kenya. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzkft7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c1m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll7t2m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct20d2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzkkkc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s449zh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll7xtr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct1gvc)
The New Arctic

The New Arctic: Power

Contrary to popular opinion, the Arctic is not a pristine, empty white desert. It is home to four million people distributed across eight distinct nation states: The USA, Canada, Kingdom of Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland and the Russian Federation.

Allan Little looks at how the region is fast becoming fraught with geopolitical tensions. Despite all sides stressing this is still an area of low tension, Russia is building up its military presence and capabilities, with Nato countries responding with large-scale Arctic training exercises. China’s interest in the region is also creating new security concerns. But at a local level, we discover a very different story - Norwegian and Russian border communities maintain long-standing friendships.

Many argue that a new cold war is unlikely and geopolitics are overshadowing more urgent security issues facing the region. Future disputes are predicted over resource management and lucrative new shipping routes but not all-out war. And how important is the Arctic Council as the primary forum for dialogue and inclusion of indigenous voices, who must play a key role in the future of the region.

(Photo: A family in the Tundra. Credit: Stine Barlindhaug)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzkp9h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Evidence (w3ct2cbb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzkt1m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdh7zp6)
Myanmar's bloodiest day of protests so far

In Myanmar it appears to be the bloodiest day since protests against the coup began, with reports of at least nine people killed by security forces in several cities.


Also in the programme: how good is the Johnson & Johnson vaccine and why do you only need one shot? And 47 pro-democracy activists and opposition figures in Hong Kong are charged with conspiracy to commit subversion.

(Image: A riot police officer fires a rubber bullet toward protesters in Yangon, February 28, 2021. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzkxsr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wjp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzl1jw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjwt)
Abraham Maslow’s psychology of human needs

Many students of psychology, business, nursing and other disciplines are taught about "Maslow's pyramid of human needs", a diagram that shows a progression from our basic needs, such as food and shelter, to higher, social needs and, eventually, to striving for often intangible life goals and fulfilment. The pyramid is an iconic image, yet Abraham Maslow, a leading humanistic psychologist of the 20th century, didn't actually create it. Moreover, his writings are much more sophisticated and perceptive than the diagram suggests. So where did this confusion come from and why didn't Maslow disown the pyramid? How should we understand Maslow's hierarchy of human needs? Why has it proved so useful in so many different disciplines? And in what way is it relevant to how we live today?

These are some of the questions that Bridget Kendall explores with Jessica Grogan from University of Texas at Austin, author of Encountering America, a history of humanistic psychology; David Baker, emeritus professor of psychology and former director of the Cummings Center for the History of Psychology at the University of Akron; and Scott Barry Kaufman, former director of the Imagination Institute at the University of Pennsylvania and author of Transcend which updates Maslow for the 21st century.


[Photo: Abraham Maslow, undated photograph. Credit: Bettmann/Getty Images]


SUN 15:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzl590)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lp3k28pyb)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld Sunday's live commentary game this week comes from Stamford Bridge, where two of the 'big six' face off as Chelsea host Manchester United. Joining Delyth Lloyd this week is the former United and Trinidad and Tobago striker Dwight Yorke, who won the treble at Old Trafford in 1999.

We'll also hear at length from the former Chelsea and Germany midfielder Michael Ballack, and reflect on Sunday's three early games, as well as discussing the action in the Women's Super League and across Europe.

Photo: Manchester United forward Marcus Rashford looks on with Chelsea's Timo Werner. (Credit: Chelsea FC via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzljjd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bp8s458yj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll8wss)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzln8j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6v8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzls0n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6rdh8yn7)
UN says at least 18 dead in Myanmar protests

The United Nations has condemned the use of lethal force against peaceful protesters in Myanmar. Protesters in several cities were met with live ammunition, rubber bullets, stun guns and water cannon. Also: we have more details on the penal colony in Russia where opposition leader Alexei Navalny has been sent to; and the annual Golden Globe awards for film and television will be handed out in Hollywood a few hours from now but there’s been some controversy regarding the 87 members who choose the winners.

( Photo: Protesters take cover as they clash with riot police officers during a protest against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar. Credit: REUTERS/Stringer)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzlwrs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vv1jhbrm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frg5g5mqg)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll9815)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 I'm Not A Monster (w3ct1z6c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pb8vzm0hx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4qll9cs9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf16)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]



MONDAY 01 MARCH 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48qzj6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19zb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwfbsl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Discovery (w3ct2cb0)
The Life Scientific: Giles Yeo

Professor Jim Al-Khalili talks to leading scientists about their life and work.


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48r38b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x583nb8rgm2)
Controversy for the Golden Globes

The Golden Globes has been in the news for all the wrong reasons, following exposés of The Hollywood Foreign Press Association, a group of 87 international journalists who vote on the awards; we hear from KJ Matthews, an entertainment reporter based in Los Angeles. The World Trade Organisation has a new boss in charge from Monday but press coverage of Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala has been criticised for being sexist and racist . We hear from Ugandan Economist Emmanuel Nshakira Rukundo who is currently at the University of Bonn in Germany. Plus we pick over the $1.9 trillion US stimulus package with the help of economist Michael Hughes. And the UN is appealing for $4bn for Yemen, warning that the country is on the verge of the worst famine the world has seen for decades; we hear from Elana DeLozier, a fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. (Picture of Golden Globe statues by Alberto E. Rodriguez for WireImage).


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwfgjq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21m0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48r70g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc38)
Harvey Goldsmith: Can live music survive Covid?

Stephen Sackur interviews one of the UK’s top live music promoters, Harvey Goldsmith. One of the many costs of the Covid pandemic means that, in much of the world, we can’t gather to enjoy the arts live; the creative world we used to know may be hard to revive. Has the cultural cost of Covid been ignored?


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwfl8v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4p)
Women digging for answers from the ancient past

Can our modern-day gender biases influence our understanding of the past? Kim Chakanetsa meets two archaeologists to talk about the risks of projecting our own assumptions onto the ancient world.

Dr Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson is a senior researcher in the department of Archaeology and Ancient History at Uppsala University in Sweden. She’s also one of the lead investigators on the Viking Phenomenon research project and she’s been studying a grave found in Sweden in the 19th century, which contained the remains of a high-ranking Viking warrior. For more than 100 years this person was assumed to be male. But when Charlotte and her team carried out a DNA test on the bones, they found out they belong to an individual who was biologically female. Her discovery shook the academic world.

Dr Sarah Murray is assistant professor at the University of Toronto and she specializes in the material culture and institutions of early Greece. She thinks we should re-consider the way we look at women’s participation in the social and economic structure of Ancient Greece. She recently published a paper dispelling the myth of the so-called Dipylon Master, a pottery artist who has been credited with creating very distinct funerary vases between 760 and 735 BC. Based on her studies, Sarah believes it’s more likely that a group of women were behind these artefacts.

Produced by Alice Gioia.

IMAGE DETAILS
Left: Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson (credit Linda Koffman)
Right: Sarah Murray (credit Kat Alexakis)


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48rbrl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjwt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh69)
The Gay Games

In 1982, the first ever Gay Games were held in San Francisco. Attracting a large crowd and featuring more than 1000 athletes from more than 100 countries, the event was organised by a group of LGBT activists, including former Olympians, to raise awareness about homophobia in sport. The Gay Games are now held every four years at venues around the world. Ashley Byrne speaks to organiser Sara Waddell Lewinstein and athlete Rick Tomin. This programme was first broadcast in 2010.

PHOTO: An athlete at the Gay Games (Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48rghq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbg)
Can we be ‘nudged’ to act on climate change?

Drastic change is needed to limit the increase in the global temperature caused by climate change. More than two-thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions come from how we live our lives. But the behaviours that drive these emissions tend to be deeply habitual and hard to shift - the way we heat our homes, what we eat and how we travel to work. And our behavioural good intentions all too often fail to translate into action. So our climate question this week is how we can be nudged, or even shoved, to change?

Guests:
Elisabeth Costa, senior director, Behavioural Insights Team
Erik Thulin, behavioural science lead at the Centre for Behaviour and the Environment at Rare
Professor Martine Visser, behavioural economist at the University of Cape Town
Mo Allie, BBC reporter in Cape Town

Presented by Graihagh Jackson and Neal Razzell
Produced by Alex Lewis
Researched by Zoe Gelber
Edited by Emma Rippon

And if you’ve got a climate question, then email the team: theclimatequestion@bbc.com


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwfts3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv73)
Why do men rule the world?

Listener Paula from Kenya is a computer scientist, she can’t help but notice the inequality in her workplace.

With only 1 in 10 countries having female heads of state, there is no doubt that men are in charge.

Paula wants to know if there is any scientific underpinning to this inequality? Perhaps it can be explained by our brains and bodies? Or does evolution weigh in?

Or maybe it is all down to society and the way we raise our boys and girls. The toys and ideals we give our children must surely have an impact.

And most importantly, if we want a world run by men and women equally, how can we get there? We hear how Iceland became the most gender equal country in the world.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton. Produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service

[Image: Men in board room. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48rl7v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgzcvlk)
Trump hints at 2024 Presidential bid

Donald Trump appears as the star speaker at a major conservative conference in Florida. We get a review of his comeback performance.

We speak to an organiser of the COVAX vaccine sharing scheme on the day of its first big rollout.

And an appeal for help with the world's worst humanitarian crisis...Yemen. The UN needs billions of dollars - how likely is it that they'll get it?


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48rpzz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgzczbp)
COVAX: vaccines rolled out in West Africa

One of the designers of the COVAX programme calls for richer countries to do more, as the first vaccines are rolled out in Ghana and Cote D'Ivoire.

18 people were killed during the latest pro-democracy demonstrations in Myanmar over the weekend. We'll go there for the latest.

And the incoming head of the CIA says he will make microwave attacks on US personnel around the globe his highest priority. We hear from a former agent who says the agency didn't believe him when he said he'd been targeted.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48rtr3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgzd32t)
Ghana and Cote D'Ivoire start Covid vaccination programmes

The doses were obtained from COVAX, the vaccine sharing scheme. We go live to Accra and hear from the health authorities there.

We'll look at how President Biden will handle future relations with Saudi Arabia, following the release of a declassified report which concluded that the de facto ruler of the kingdom, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, approved the killing of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

The former US President Donald Trump has spoken for the first time since he left the White House and says he won't be starting his own political party.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48ryh7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwg9rm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7kr)
Lockdown breakdowns

It’s almost a year since the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of COVID-19 a pandemic. Many embraced working from home to start off with. But has it lost its lustre? We look at the toll it’s taking on people’s mental health. We hear from Matthew Cooper, the co-founder of a start-up called Earn Up, a San Francisco-based financial technology platform that helps people automate their loan payments. He explains why the pandemic contributed to a breakdown at the end of 2020. We also speak to Margaret Heffernan, from the University of Bath, former CEO of five companies and author of several books including Uncharted, who tells us why checking in with staff must be done properly and personally, and hear from Mark Simmonds, the author of the memoir Breakdown and Repair: a fathers tale of stress and success; His own mental health issues led him to completely re-evaluate his career and working practices, and he offers some tips on coping with stress.
Remember if any of the issues in today’s edition affect you, experts agree that it’s important to talk to someone and get support. Do seek the help of a professional mental health body if not a doctor, or friends and family.


Picture: A stock picture shows a woman perched on the end of a bed with a laptop (Credit: Getty)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmlb)
The world's deepest dive 11km down

Don Walsh was the first to go to the very bottom of the deepest part of the ocean in 1960 in a specially designed submarine, the Bathyscaphe Trieste. The water pressure was 800 tonnes per square inch, and the successful mission to "Challenger Deep" in the Mariana Trench under the western Pacific, was a technological breakthrough in marine engineering. Don Walsh describes the dive to Rebecca Kesby, and explains why understanding the deep ocean is crucial in the fight to reduce climate change.

(Photo: The Bathyscaphe Trieste in 1960. Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48s27c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwgfhr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48s5zh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwgk7w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48s9qm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fc24r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwgp00)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv73)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48sfgr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd4h)
Taking over my parents' legendary jazz venue

In 1961, American couple Allan and Sandra Jaffe were on their honeymoon when they stumbled upon some of their favourite jazz musicians playing at a small art gallery in New Orleans. Within days the young couple had been offered the chance to run the place. Over the next 30 years they helped turn it into one of the city’s jazz institutions, Preservation Hall. Their son Ben Jaffe tells Outlook’s Emily Webb about following in the footsteps of his tuba-playing father - both in running the venue and as bandleader of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Ben Jaffe, Creative Director of Preservation Hall
Credit: Josh Goleman


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmlb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48sk6w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fc9n0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwgxh8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48snz0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nsgvll)
Myanmar: Aung San Suu Kyi appears in court on new charges

The deposed leader of Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi, has been charged with two more offences - inciting public unrest and violating communications laws - as she appeared before a court for a second time since last month's coup. We speak to her lawyer.

Also in the programme: Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy has been sentenced to three years in jail - two of them suspended - for corruption; and hundreds of pro-democracy protesters have gathered at a court in Hong Kong where 47 activists face charges of "conspiracy to commit subversion".

(Photo: protest against Myanmar's military coup. Credit: EPA)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48ssq4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwh4zj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvc0xjgn3v)
Texas power company files for bankruptcy

Texas's Brazos Electric Power Co-operative has filed for bankruptcy after winter storms. The firm says it's facing a $1.8bn bill as a result of last month's disruption, and Andy Uhler, energy reporter at Marketplace in Texas, explains the implications. Also in the programme, starting a week of special programming about mental health and the pandemic, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on what more businesses and governments could be doing to support their employees' mental wellbeing. Plus, a campaign is under way to promote the use of subtitles on television as a means of helping children to improve their literacy. We find out more from Oli Barrett, co-founder of Turn on the Subtitles.

(Picture: An electrical substation in Houston. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48sxg8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9g95c8j3)
Myanmar protests: Police open fire

In Myanmar, the security forces have again used tear gas and stun grenades against peaceful protesters in Yangon and other cities. But there was no repeat of the deadly violence witnessed on Sunday when eighteen demonstrators were killed. Ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi appeared in court via video link. Two new charges were announced against her. We hear from our BBC reporter who is watching developments.

Also on the programme we have our regular medical expert, Dr Eleanor Murray - assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health - answering listener questions about the coronavirus. And we hear from the Czech Republic which is experiencing a big surge in infections.

And we hear from people who have found some positive aspects to living through the pandemic, and others who have learnt new skills.

(Photo Protest against military coup in Yangon. Credit: EPA/NYEIN CHAN NAING


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48t16d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9g95cd87)
Coronavirus conversations: Learning new skills

On the show we've been bringing together people across the world with shared experiences of the pandemic. Today we are going to hear from two people who learnt something new during lockdown.

In Myanmar, the security forces have again used tear gas and stun grenades against peaceful protesters in Yangon and other cities. But there was no repeat of the deadly violence witnessed on Sunday when eighteen demonstrators were killed. We hear from a resident in Yangon and our BBC reporter who is monitoring what people are saying on social media.

And our regular medical expert, Professor Manfred Green from the University of Haifa in Israel, answers listener questions about coronavirus.


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48t4yj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd4h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmlb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48t8pn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fd13s)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwhmz1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k1lc5484p)
2021/03/01 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48tdfs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwhrq5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct2ccd)
The Life Scientific: Cath Noakes

Professor Cath Noakes studies how air moves and the infection risk associated with different ventilation systems. Early in the pandemic, she was invited to join the government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, SAGE and asked to study the transmission routes for Covid-19. In July, together with many other scientists, she urged governments around the world and the World Health Organisation to recognise that Covid-19 could be transmitted in tiny particles in the air, even if the risk of getting infected in this way was much smaller than the risk from larger particles that travel less far. Her research highlights the importance of good ventilation as a way to stop the spread of infection in indoor environments. Being in a well ventilated space can reduce the risk of inhaling tiny airborne pathogens by 70%. Cath talks to Jim Al-Khalili about her journey from studying industrial processes to infection risk, her work on the airborne transmission of diseases and the challenge of designing buildings that are both well ventilated and energy efficient.

Producer: Anna Buckley

Photo credit: University of Leeds


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48tj5x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nshpth)
US asks Saudi Arabia to adopt institutional reforms

The United States has urged Saudi Arabia to disband a rapid intervention force sanctioned over the murder of the journalist, Jamal Khashoggi. The State Department spokesman, Ned Price, said it wanted Saudi Arabia to adopt institutional reforms so anti- dissident activities and operations stopped completely.

Also, the former French president Nicolas Sarkozy is found guilty of corruption and given a prison sentence.

And how the war in Yemen has ripped apart schools, and how one nine year-old is trying to resist.

(Photo: Saudi crown prince. Credit: AFP)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48tmy1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79w69tq2xw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frtfrdcwq)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwj06f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172xm9sg8v8df9)
Texas power company files for bankruptcy

Texas's Brazos Electric Power Co-operative has filed for bankruptcy after winter storms. The firm says it's facing a $1.8bn bill as a result of last month's disruption, and Bloomberg's Jeremy Hill explains the implications. Also in the programme, starting a week of special programming about mental health and the pandemic, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on what more businesses and governments could be doing to support their employees' mental wellbeing. Plus, a campaign is under way to promote the use of subtitles on television as a means of helping children to improve their literacy. We find out more from Ollie Barrett, co-founder of Turn on the Subtitles.

(Picture: An electrical substation in Houston. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48trp5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc38)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwj3yk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



TUESDAY 02 MARCH 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48twf9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkq9)
The fall of Kwame Nkrumah

An eyewitness account of the overthrow of Ghana's famous independence leader. And we examine Nkrumah's legacy with Prof. Gareth Austin from Cambridge University. Plus the story of a heroic African WW2 airman, the scientists who alerted the world to the threat of acid rain, a Nobel Peace Prize winner on the 1990s campaign to ban landmines and an inside account of Ireland's financial crisis.

Photo: Kwame Nkrumah c 1955 (Getty Images)


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48v05f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x198l3mm78b)
Texas power cooperative files for bankruptcy protection

Texas's Brazos Electric Power Co-operative has filed for bankruptcy after winter storms. The firm says it's facing a $1.8bn bill as a result of last month's disruption, and Bloomberg's Jeremy Hill explains the implications. Also in the programme, starting a week of special programming about mental health and the pandemic, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on what more businesses and governments could be doing to support their employees' mental wellbeing. Plus, how would you react if your employer insisted you are vaccinated before you re-enter the workplace? A UK based plumbing company has advertised for new staff on a ‘no jab no job’ policy and employees will face very difference workplaces upon returning to workplaces, as Pilita Clarke explains. And we're joined by political reporter Erin Delmore who's in New York and Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus, Hitotsubashi University and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network, is in Tokyo.

(Picture: An electrical substation in Houston. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48v3xk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2k)
The secret to making your stuff last longer

The world generates more than two billion tonnes of rubbish every year. So we’re visiting companies in Sweden that want to make it easier to mend things when they break instead of replacing them – whether that’s clothes, bikes or washing machines.

We also hear about the country’s tax breaks designed to give people a financial incentive to repair more.

Produced and presented by Maddy Savage


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwjh5y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcn)
Emily Young: Stone carver and environmental artist

Artists and architects have for centuries been drawn to the stone in the hills of southern Tuscany. It's the home of Carrara marble and the quarry where Michelangelo found the stone for his work. Now it's home to Emily Young – acclaimed as Britain's greatest living stone carver.

Her sculptures are collected and displayed around the world, but as a passionate conservationist she also takes her work on to the front line of environmental activism; using sculptures to protect green spaces and take on gangs fishing illegally off the coast of Italy.

Over the course of 4 months In the Studio follows Emily Young as she turns a 3 and a half tonne block of stone into her latest work of art. And it becomes a race against time as the days shorten, the light closes in and the deadline looms for Britain to leave the European Union. This is an intimate portrait of an artist for whom the creative process is meditative and usually very private.

Presented and Produced by Phil Pegum
Executive Produced by Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48v7np)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd4h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmlb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48vcdt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 Assignment (w3csz6mj)
A year of Covid

In March 2020 the UK was gearing up to face the Covid-19 pandemic. Cases were increasing rapidly and by the end of month the country was in full lockdown with medics facing their toughest ever test. A group of doctors and nurses in intensive care units recorded audio diaries for the BBC which illustrated the true scale of the professional and personal challenge they faced. The UK was to become one of the worst hit countries for Covid-19 deaths in Europe. One year on – in the midst of a second wave - and a third lockdown - reporter Jane Deith revisits some of those doctors and nurses for Assignment to find out how they’re surviving the biggest challenge of their careers.

Producer: Rob Cave

(Photo: A nurse attends to a patient on a Covid-19 ward at Milton Keynes University Hospital, amid the spread of the coronavirus disease, 20 January, 2021. Credit: Toby Melville/Reuters)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwjqp6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct2ccd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48vh4y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgzgrhn)
The schoolchildren fighting a class action lawsuit against coal mining

The children, whose case has just reached the Federal court, say the mine will cause global warming and affect their futures.

Hundreds of Nigerian schoolgirls, kidnapped from a boarding school in the town of Jangebe on Friday, are reported to have been released.

And we hear about a remarkable school, in Yemen, doing its work in the middle of the world's worst humanitarian crisis.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48vlx2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgzgw7s)
Nigeria kidnappings: governor says all girls released

The 279 girls were taken from their school dormitory in Jangebe at 1am on Friday morning. It's not known if a ransom was paid.

The Czech Republic says it will accept doses of the Sputnik V Russian Covid vaccine, even though it has yet to receive final approval from the EU.

The Pope's visit to Iraq is due to get underway today - but there's concern that crowds could spread coronavirus further.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48vqn6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgzgzzx)
Nigeria: kidnapped schoolgirls released

We speak to the Zamfara state governor who negotiated their release and is with the girls.

Pope Francis insists he will travel to Iraq to meet with Muslim leaders and Christian communities - despite warnings of rising coronavirus infections.

And the trial of three LGBT activists in Poland - accused of offending religious feelings - concludes today.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48vvdb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwk6nq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8cf)
Growing up in lockdown

The Coronavirus pandemic has disrupted the lives of billions of people around the world, and with many countries still in lockdown the impact will continue to be felt for many years. Not least for teenagers, whose education, family and social lives have been profoundly disrupted. Today we meet such teenagers: Ayushmaan in New Delhi, Emma in Hamburg, Pelumi in Lagos and Gracie in Auckland talk to host Tamasin Ford and each other about the challenges of nearing adulthood in a world under lockdown, and how the extra pressures have impacted their mental health.

Remember if any of the issues in today’s edition affect you, do seek the help of a professional mental health body if not a doctor or friends and family.

Producer: Frey Lindsay.
(Image credit: Getty Creative.)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmqv)
Refugee Island

In 2001, boats carrying hundreds of, mainly Afghan, refugees arrived on the tiny Pacific island of Nauru. This marked the beginning of the “Pacific Solution” – a policy by the Australian government to establish offshore centres for processing asylum claims. The policy was intended to act as a deterrent, discouraging people from travelling to Australia. Many of the refugees lived in the cramped conditions of Nauru for years.

In this Witness History, Josephine Casserly speaks to Yahya, an Afghan refugee who left his home country as a school student when the Taliban gained control of his local area. Yahya was one of the first refugees to arrive at Nauru’s detention centre. Like many, he was hopeful that his stay in the makeshift camp would be a temporary measure, and he’d be quickly resettled in Australia. But that was not to be.


(Asylum seekers on their first day in the compound at Nauru after their long voyage, Sept 2001. Credit: Angela Whylie/Getty images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48vz4g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6mj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwkbdv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48w2wl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48w6mq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1ffz1v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwkkx3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 Discovery (w3ct2ccd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48wbcv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdl1)
My son found his birth mother using Google Earth

Sue Brierley adopted her son, Saroo, after he had been found wandering the streets of Kolkata as a five year old. He had got on a train that took him across India and away from his birth family, and couldn’t find his way back. Sue always believed that Saroo’s birth mother was alive, and would send comforting thoughts to her every night, sharing the boy's progress as he grew up in Tasmania. 25 years later Saroo used satellite maps online to retrace his steps to his first family’s home in India, and Sue finally met the birth mother she had thought about for so long. Saroo’s story was made into the Oscar-nominated film Lion, in which Sue’s character is played by Nicole Kidman.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Sue Brierley with Saroo, shortly after his adoption
Credit: Photo courtesy of Sue Brierley


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmqv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48wg3z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fg6k3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwktdc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48wkw3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nskrhp)
Nigerian schoolgirls released

Hundreds of schoolgirls abducted by gunmen in Nigeria's north-western Zamfara state have been released. The girls were abducted last Friday and taken to a forest, according to police.

Also in the programme: Singapore's Prime Minister calls for Myanmar's military junta to release Aung San Suu Kyi; and the environmental price of mining Bitcoin.

Photo: Abducted Nigerian schools following their release. Credit: Reuters


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48wpm7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwl1wm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwzxcqy4wj)
Global CO2 emissions rising after 2020 fall

The International Energy Agency says global CO2 levels are rising after a fall in 2020. Timothy Goodson is one of the report's lead authors and explains why we're seeing this trend, after reductions caused by the pandemic last year. Also in the programme, videoconferencing platform Zoom expects sales to rise by more than 40% this year, after a bumper 2020 as the firm benefited from coronavirus lockdowns. We consider whether video calls are here to stay with Karin Moser, professor of organisational behaviour at LSBU business school in London. The Women in Work index produced by PWC indicates that women's jobs have been disproportionately hit by events of the past year. Larice Stielow is one of the report's authors, and shares a concern that progress made in improving female representation across workplaces is in danger of being reversed. Plus, a Nike vice president has resigned after ties to her son's limited edition trainer resale business were revealed. We hear about the lucrative market from Tahsin Sabir, who is a collector.

(Picture: A power station chimney. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48wtcc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9g95g5f6)
Coronavirus: Your questions answered

Every day we are joined by a health expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer your questions. Today our guest is Dr Isaac Bogoch, an infectious diseases physician and scientist from the University of Toronto.

Also, more than two and half a million people worldwide have now died from Covid-19. The United States is at the top of that list with over 500,000 dead. Some in the US have been making a comparison with the loss of life from Covid-19 to those that died during the world wars. So how does the experience of a pandemic compare to being in a war? And how are those that have experiences conflict dealing with the pandemic? We'll speak to two veterans to find out.

And in Nigeria nearly 300 girls who were kidnapped from a school in last week have been released. It's still not known who the kidnappers are. We'll speak to our correspondent in Nigeria who's been following the story.

(Photo: A volunteer receives a dose of CureVac vaccine or a placebo during a study by the German biotech firm CureVac in Brussels, Belgium March 2, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Yves Herman)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48wy3h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9g95g95b)
Coronavirus conversations: US Veterans

More than two and half a million people worldwide have now died from Covid-19. The United States is at the top of that list with over 500,000 dead. Some in the US have been making a comparison with the loss of life from Covid-19 to those that died during wars. So how does the experience of a pandemic compare to being in a war? And how are those that have experiences conflict dealing with the pandemic? We'll speak to two veterans to find out.

Also, the head of the World Health Organization has said more than 200 million doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine are expected to be sent to 142 countries by the end of May. They will be delivered under the Covax scheme, which provides poorer countries with free vaccines. Today the latest Covax delivery is arriving in Nigeria. We'll speak to our Africa health reporter to find out more.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer your questions. Today our guest is Dr Isaac Bogoch, an infectious diseases physician and scientist from the University of Toronto.

(Photo: U.S. President Joe Biden attends a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Virginia, U.S., January 20, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Joshua Roberts/Pool)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48x1vm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmqv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48x5lr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fgy0w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwljw4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k1lc5751s)
2021/03/02 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48x9bw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6mj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwlnm8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99d)
Will algorithms always be biased?

Will there ever be equality in machine learning technology or will our cultural biases continue to be reflected in algorithms? Dr. Sandra Wachter from the Oxford Internet Institute argues in her latest research that data bias is unavoidable because of the current bias within western culture. How we now try and negate that bias in AI is critical if we are ever to ensure that this technology meets current legislation like EU non-discrimination law. She’s on the programme to discuss how we make real progress in AI equality.

This research has come from the Oxford Internet Institute, whose Incoming Director is also on the show – Professor Victoria Nash tells us of her plans in the new role.

EdTech in Malawi
A programme which allows seven year olds to have three lessons a week on ipads in Malawi is narrowing the learning gap between girls and boys. With an average class size of around 60 pupils with one teacher, young girls are often left behind and drop out of formal education, but with this individual approach many more are staying on in school. The programme is so successful it is now being rolled out to hundreds of schools, with the hope of going nationwide. Director for Education, Youth and Sports Lucia Chidalengwa of Education, Youth and Sports in Malawi’s Ntcheu district explains why this approach is so successful.

Online learning via your games console
With COVID cases rising in many countries and some regions even facing a third wave of the pandemic, many children around the world will continue to learn remotely – but what if there is no computer or laptop for them to use at home? How about converting a games console into an online school workstation? Reporter Chris Berrow shows you how to do it by powering up his games console and getting online to learn.



(Image: Getty images:)






The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producers: Emil Petrie and Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48xf30)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nsllql)
Protesters in Myanmar press junta for Suu Kyi's release

Some of Myanmar’s neighbours pressed its ruling junta on Tuesday to release ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi and cease using lethal force against opponents of their Feb. 1 coup.

Also on the programme: The US imposes sanctions on senior Russian officials over the poisoning of opposition leader Alexei Navalny; and three Afghan women journalist are shot dead in a wave of targeted killings.

(Photo: People make the three-finger salute on a street during a protest against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar, March 2, 2021. Credit: Reuters).


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48xjv4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79w69tsztz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frtfrh8st)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwlx3j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmdhf2v104n)
The US imposes sanctions on Russia

The US measures, which target Russia's top spy and six others, are being co-ordinated with similar moves by the European Union and we get details from Barbara Plett-Usher, the BBC's State Department Correspondent. Plus, we hear Reddit’s chief executive Steve Huffman talk about recent controversies involving the social media network. And The International Energy Agency says global CO2 levels are rising after a fall in 2020. Timothy Goodson is one of the report's lead authors and explains why we're seeing this trend, after reductions caused by the pandemic last year. Also in the programme, The Women in Work index produced by PWC indicates that women's jobs have been disproportionately hit by events of the past year. Larice Stielow is one of the report's authors, and shares a concern that progress made in improving female representation across workplaces is in danger of being reversed. Plus, a Nike vice president has resigned after ties to her son's limited edition trainer resale business were revealed. We hear about the lucrative market from Tahsin Sabir, who is a collector.

(Picture: Alexei Navalny by Mikhail Svetlov for Getty Images)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48xnl8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwm0vn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 03 MARCH 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48xsbd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk47)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48xx2j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x198l3mq45f)
The US imposes sanctions on Russia

The US measures, which target Russia's top spy and six others, are being co-ordinated with similar moves by the European Union and we get details from Barbara Plett-Usher, the BBC's State Department Correspondent. Plus, we hear Reddit’s chief executive Steve Huffman talk about recent controversies involving the social media network. And the International Energy Agency says global CO2 levels are rising after a fall in 2020. Timothy Goodson is one of the report's lead authors and explains why we're seeing this trend, after reductions caused by the pandemic last year. Plus, a Nike vice president has resigned after ties to her son's limited edition trainer resale business were revealed. We hear about the lucrative market from Tahsin Sabir, who is a collector. And joining us throughout the programme are Alexis Goldstein, an activist and financial reform advocate in Washington and Stefanie Yuen Thio, Joint Managing Partner at TSMP Law in Singapore.

(Picture: Alexei Navalny by Mikhail Svetlov for Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48y0tn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7s)
Valdis Dombrovskis: Is the EU ready to aggressively defend its interests?

Stephen Sackur speaks to the European Commission’s Executive Vice-President with responsibility for the economy and trade, Valdis Dombrovskis. Protectionism and nationalism are on the rise in global trade. With the US and China locked in strategic competition, is the EU ready to aggressively defend its interests?


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwmd31)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x86)
Goal 7: Affordable, clean energy

In 2015 the United Nations announced a radical plan to change the world.

Global leaders drew up a list of 17 "sustainable development goals" to create a blueprint for a better future. Governments agreed to support the goals which cover gender equality, health provision, a good education and much more. Now 17-year-olds from 17 different countries tell us what they think needs to change if the world is to meet those goals by 2030.

Nestor lives in the far north of Colombia and his village has been transformed since solar panels were brought in to provide electricity to the schools. Children now have access to computers, and light in their classrooms. He wants to find out just how much of Colombia's electricity can be created using renewable sources. He visits the country's biggest solar plant, and interviews Colombia's deputy energy minister to find out whether the government will meet the UN goal on clean energy by 2030.

Presenter: Sana Safi
Producer: Bob Howard

Project 17 was produced in partnership with The Open University


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48y4ks)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdl1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmqv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48y89x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct2cb1)
Under the Canopy

Forests of folktale and imagination

Jessica unpicks the profound role that forests play in our imaginative life. We know of course that they feature heavily in the fairy tales and myths we use to navigate life as children, and as we hear from writers like Max Porter, Richard Powers and Melissa Harrison, they also offer ways of understanding the complexities of desire, politics and history in our adult lives. Poet Carl Phillips describes how forests mirror the wilderness within us, while Jinni Reddy tells of how she found beauty in the forest through facing down her fears.

Forest sounds appear courtesy of the 'Sounds of the Forest' project

Original musical composition: Erland Cooper

Spells written by Robert Macfarlane and these are read by Maxine Peake and the Bird sisters

Photo credit: Geoff Bird


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwmml9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48yd21)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgzkndr)
Biden says US has enough vaccine to inoculate every adult by end of May

President Biden says the United States has secured enough coronavirus vaccine to inoculate every American adult by the end of May; China's policy of transferring hundreds of thousands of Uighurs and other ethnic minorities in Xinjiang to new jobs often far from home is leading to a thinning out of their populations, according to a high-level Chinese study seen by the BBC; and three women who worked for a TV station in the Afghan city of Jalalabad have been shot dead, in what seems to be the latest in a wave of targeted killings.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48yht5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgzks4w)
Biden promises enough vaccine for ‘every adult in America’ by the end of May

President Biden says the United States has secured enough coronavirus vaccine to inoculate every American adult by the end of May; why Pope Francis' visit to Iraq this week is raising concerns; and we'll speak to the head of Reddit about fake news and hate speech.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48ymk9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgzkwx0)
President Biden says there'll be enough vaccine for all adults by the end of May

President Biden says the United States has secured enough coronavirus vaccine to inoculate every American adult by the end of May; Germany's chancellor, Angela Merkel, meets regional leaders today to decide how and when lockdown restrictions can be lifted; and we'll be talking "earthquake swarms" - sounds a frightening concept, find out if they are as ominous as they sound.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48yr9f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwn3kt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8p2)
Guyana and the pandemic

How has mental health in the South American country been affected during lockdown? According to the World Health Organisation Guyana has for years had one of the highest suicide rates anywhere in the world. So how has the country fared during the pandemic? Ed Butler speaks to Supriya Singh-Bodden, founder of a non-profit organisation The Guyana Foundation, set up to foster development in the country, to Meena Upeachehan who works as a councillor for The Guyana Foundation, and to women in the country who have been suffering depression and domestic abuse. Plus he speaks to Dr Christine Moutier, Chief Medical Officer at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention who says early data shows that suicides have not gone up globally during the pandemic but may rise in the second or third waves.

(Picture: Traditional wooden house on stilts in rural Guyana. Picture credit: Arterra/Marica van der Meer/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmt3)
When US police dropped explosives on a Philadelphia home

On 13 May 1985 a police helicopter dropped explosives on a house in residential Philadelphia, in an attempt to end a stand-off with radical black activists from an organisaton called MOVE. Fire spread quickly through the surrounding buildings and 11 people died, including five children. All the victims belonged to MOVE. A total of sixty houses in the area were also burnt or badly damaged in the botched police operation. Mike Lanchin speaks to Mike Africa, who lost his great uncle and a cousin in the fire, and to the former Philadelphia reporter, Linn Washington.

Photo: Aerial view of smoke rising from smouldering rubble in Osage Avenue, West Philadelphia, May 1985 (Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48yw1k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct2cb1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwn79y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x86)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48yzsp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wjp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48z3jt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fjvyy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwngt6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48z78y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdst)
An Orthodox rapper in Jerusalem

Nissim Black grew up in the American city of Seattle, where he made his name rapping about drug dealing and drive-by shootings. These were all subjects that were familiar to him, and his music was doing well, but nevertheless Nissim became increasingly unhappy with the gangster image he portrayed. He started as a Christian looking for answers in the Bible, but a growing interest in the Old Testament led on to a conversion to Orthodox Judaism, and ultimately a move to Jerusalem. Nissim still raps, but now he does it in a Shtreimel hat.

Emmanuel 'Jagari' Chanda rose to fame in Zambia in the 1970s as the lead singer of the psychedelic rock band Witch. He toured much of Southern Africa, and his onstage antics made him one of the biggest figures of the Zamrock scene. Regional conflict and the AIDs pandemic put an end to the Zamrock scene and Jagari spent many years in the wilderness, but now he's back on stage once again. This was first broadcast in January 2018.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Image: Nissim Black
Credit: Tziporah Litman


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmt3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48zc12)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fk3g6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwnq9g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x86)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48zgs6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nsnnds)
Chinese study reveals Uighur 'assimilation' goal

A high-level Chinese report, meant for senior officials but accidentally posted online, has revealed policies in the western region of Xinjiang that are designed to assimilate Muslim Uighurs and other minorities. The paper contains detailed research on a massive relocation scheme that China says will help reduce poverty.

Also in the programme: we hear from a young woman in Mandalay who sheltered friends escaping Myanmar's security forces; and German media are reporting that the country’s main opposition party, the Alternative fuer Deutschland, has been designated as a suspected right wing extremist organisation by the domestic intelligence agency.

(Photo: A 19 year-old woman appeared in a 2017 state media report on labour transfer. Credit: a still taken from Chinese state media footage)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48zljb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwnysq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxtc3bqc6x)
UK to raise tax on some businesses

Amongst a range of spending measures the latest UK budget hikes tax on some businesses. The BBC's Sarah Corker gauges how the new measures have been received in the northwest of England, and Roger Bootle, chairman of Capital Economics looks at the UK's finance picture from a global perspective. Also in the programme, continuing a series this week examining how the pandemic has affected people's mental health, the BBC's Ed Butler explores why Guyana in South America has one of the highest suicide rates anywhere in the world.

(Picture: Rishi Sunak delivers the UK budget. Picture credit: PA.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48zq8g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9g95k2b9)
Myanmar protests: At least 10 people dead

In Myanmar - also known as Burma - at least 10 people have been killed in protests against the military seizure of power. Security forces used live rounds on large crowds in cities across the country. The military government has also arrested and charged six journalists with violating a public order law that could see them imprisoned for up to three years. We'll get the latest update and hear the voices of protestors across the country on their reaction to the crackdown on protestors and journalists.

Also, since the start of the coronavirus pandemic there's been a surge in the number of incidents of anti-Asian abuse. From being spat on and verbally harassed to incidents of physical assault, there have been thousands of reported cases in recent months. We'll bring together three people of Asian heritage to hear their experiences of anti-Asian racism and whether this has increased over the past year.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer your questions. Today our guest is Dr Maria Sundaram - infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto, Canada.

(Photo: Demonstrators flash the three-finger salute during a protest against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar, 03 March 2021. Credit: EPA/LYNN BO BO)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48zv0l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9g95k62f)
Coronavirus conversations: Anti-Asian racism

Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic there's been a surge in the number of incidents of anti-Asian abuse. From being spat on and verbally harassed to incidents of physical assault, there have been thousands of reported cases in recent months. We'll bring together three people of Asian heritage to hear their experiences of anti-Asian racism and whether this has increased over the past year.

Also, the US state of Texas will lift its mask requirement and allow businesses to reopen at full capacity next week, Governor Greg Abbott has announced. The announcement in Texas came as similar rules were lifted in other states, but the administration of President Joe Biden has made it clear coronavirus restrictions are still necessary. We'll hear about what's happening in Texas and across the US.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer your questions. Today our guest is Dr Pedro Hallal - an epidemiologist from the Federal University of Pelotas in Brazil.

(Photo: More than 200 people gathered on Washington Square Park in New York City to rally in support of the Asian community, against hate crime and white nationalism, 20/02/2021. Credit: Getty Images)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn48zyrq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdst)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmt3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4902hv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fktxz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwpfs7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k1lc5b1yw)
2021/03/03 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn49067z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct2cb1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwpkjc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcd9)
Pregnancy and Covid-19 vaccination

Health Check looks into issues around Covid-19 vaccination and pregnant women.

Harvard researcher Julia Wu has just done a global survey of attitudes of pregnant women about being vaccinated against Covid-19. Acceptance is highest in low and middle income countries such as India and Latin America. The greatest levels of reluctance were in the US and Russia.

Pfizer has started the first trial of a Covid-19 vaccine in pregnant women, which will ultimately involve 4000 women in ten countries in the Americas, Africa and Asia. Should we have waited this long for the first trial in this group of people, seeing that pregnant women are at greater risk of hospitalisation, death and premature birth if they become infected? Claudia discusses the unknowns and risk/benefit considerations around vaccinating pregnant women against the virus, with Johns Hopkins medical ethicist Ruth Faden and maternal immunisation researcher Acuzena Bardiji of the Institute for Global Health in Barcelona.

Matt Fox in Boston is our guest of the week, talking about the latest evidence for Covid vaccines being transmission blockers and whether vaccine hesitant people should be paid to be immunised.

From a freezing Canadian river bank, Sian Griffiths reports on the health pros and cons of surfing three metre high waves on the ice filled Ottawa River.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker


Image: Pregnant woman receiving a coronavirus vaccine in Tel Aviv, Israel
Credit: Photo by JACK GUEZ/AFP via Getty Images


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn490b03)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nsphmp)
ICC opens war crimes investigation in Palestinian territories

The ICC chief prosecutor Fatou Bensouda said the probe would cover events in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, East Jerusalem and Gaza Strip since June 2014. The ICC has the authority to prosecute those accused of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes on the territory of states party to the Rome Statute, its founding treaty. Israel has never ratified the Rome Statute, but the court ruled that it had jurisdiction because the United Nations secretary general accepted the Palestinians' accession to the treaty in 2015.

Also on the programme: Violence climbs to new levels in Myanmar, as demonstrators protest against the coup; and Germany's security agency designates the main opposition party as a suspected extremist organisation.

(Picture: Israeli soldiers shoot tear gas from the Israeli side of the Israel-Gaza border Credit: Reuters/Amir Cohen)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn490fr7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79w69twwr2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frtfrl5px)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwpt0m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmf9vtft6h1)
UK to raise tax on some businesses

Amongst a range of spending measures the latest UK budget hikes tax on some businesses. The BBC's Sarah Corker gauges how the new measures have been received in the northwest of England, and Roger Bootle, chairman of Capital Economics looks at the UK's finance picture from a global perspective. Also in the programme, continuing a series this week examining how the pandemic has affected people's mental health, the BBC's Ed Butler explores why Guyana in South America has one of the highest suicide rates anywhere in the world.

(Picture: Rishi Sunak delivers the UK budget. Picture credit: PA.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn490khc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwpxrr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x86)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



THURSDAY 04 MARCH 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn490p7h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct0wjp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn490szm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x198l3mt12j)
President Biden criticises states dropping mask mandate

President Biden has criticised the governor of Texas and others who have relaxed Covid-19 restrictions, saying that it was a big mistake to allow citizens to stop wearing masks. As a range of spending measures were revealed in the latest UK budget, Roger Bootle, chairman of Capital Economics looks at the UK's finance picture from a global perspective. Also in the programme, continuing a series this week examining how the pandemic has affected people's mental health, the BBC's Ed Butler explores why Guyana in South America has one of the highest suicide rates anywhere in the world. Plus, every year 800 ships are decommissioned when they become too old to work - but what happens to them? We hear from the BBC’s Kate West. It's food waste week in the UK, highlighting the sheer bulk of food that makes it into our homes but is never eaten and globally, it's estimated that around a third of all food produced, is lost or wasted; the BBC’s Nisha Patel, speaks about the issue with Nadiya Hussain, a cook and author. And we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific; Amanda Fischer, policy director for the Center for Equitable Growth in Washington DC and Jyoti Malhotra, editor of national & strategic affairs at The Print website. (Picture of President Biden by Samuel Corum for Getty Images).


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn490xqr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4w)
Why did Alexei Navalny return to Russia?

After surviving an assassination attempt, the opposition leader returned to Russia - and was immediately arrested and jailed.

What does he have to gain by returning home, and can he still lead an effective campaign from prison?

Charmaine Cozier asks what does President Putin have to fear in Alexei Navalny's rising popularity, and could his anti-corruption campaign make a difference at the Russian parliamentary elections in September?


(Alexei Navalny at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport upon arrival from Berlin January 17, 2021. Credit: Kirill Kudryatsev /Getty Images)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwq904)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrb)
How to feed a footballer

When a footballer is around, does food simply become fuel? Emily Thomas is joined by the wives of two former professional footballers and the ex-captain of the New Zealand National team. They reveal how the game affects meals for the players and the people around them. We hear about the highs and lows of fuelling a professional athlete - from managing diet through injury and retirement, to turning a blind eye to 2am curries, to keeping all the chocolate hidden away.

(Picture: Footballer shoots at goal. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk

Contributors:

Bex Smith
Prudencia Buxton
Shauna Muamba


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4911gw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdst)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmt3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn491570)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct2ccg)
Biden's world

President Biden claims “America is back”. He plans to put diplomacy first and restore long-standing American alliances.

His predecessor, President Trump, left behind a very different world from the one he greeted in 2016. Fresh crises confront the Biden Administration, including the Myanmar coup and political unrest in Russia. And climate change is now an urgent global problem.

Secretary of State Antony Blinken, National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan and White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki are tasked with repositioning America in that shifting world. They will assume a host of difficult problems – the rise of China, Putin’s Russia, Iranian nuclear capability and the conflict in Syria.

So who are they? And can they bring America back, to assume a leadership role in this complex new world?

BBC Washington reporter Suzanne Kianpour, who covered the Iran nuclear negotiations during the Obama Administration, reports.

Producer: Sophie Reid.


(Photo: US President Joe Biden speaks about administration plans to confront climate change at the White House ceremony in Washington. Credit: Carlos Barria/Reuters)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwqjhd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcd9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4918z4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgznk9v)
Study finds nearly all Covid-19 deaths happening in countries with high obesity rates

A new study has found that nearly all of the world's Covid-19 deaths are happening in countries with high rates of obesity; we go to Japan where there are growing concerns about whether it is feasible to hold the Olympics there during the pandemic; and we'll look at abortion in Latin America - for so long a taboo subject.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn491dq8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgznp1z)
US House of Representatives passes police reform bill named after George Floyd

The US House of Representatives has passed a police reform bill named after George Floyd, whose killing sparked an outcry against police racism and brutality; over half a billion doses of the Chinese coronavirus vaccine have gone to almost fifty countries but how good is it in comparison with other vaccines?; and the contents of an unopened letter that was mailed way back in 1697 - but never delivered - has been read by scientists who have created a way to virtually "unfold" sealed letters without actually breaking the seal.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn491jgd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgznst3)
US House of Representatives passes policing reform bill named after George Floyd

The US House of Representatives has passed a police reform bill named after George Floyd, whose killing sparked an outcry against police racism and brutality; Austria and Denmark are joining forces with Israel to produce second generation vaccines that will work against different mutations; and the contents of an unopened letter that was mailed way back in 1697 - but never delivered - has been read by scientists who have created a way to virtually "unfold" sealed letters without actually breaking the seal.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn491n6j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwr0gx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7yk)
Covid: Healthcare worker burnout

A year of crisis has taken a toll on those tasked with caring for the sick and elderly. It’s almost a year since the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of COVID-19 a pandemic. Manuela Saragosa revisits three frontline health care workers who she spoke to last year, about how they have coped. Dr Ma, a geriatrician in Hong Kong plus a care home worker in Spain and Dr. Laura Hawryluck, Associate Professor of Critical Care Medicine at the University of Toronto and an ICU doctor herself. Laura tells us of the strains and physical scars of the past year. And Elena Rusconi, Professor of Psychobiology and Physiological Psychology at the University of Trento, explains the results of a survey she and colleagues conducted on care workers in Northern Italy last year, which found that almost half had symptoms of moderate-to-severe anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Remember if any of the issues in today’s edition affect you, do seek the help of a professional mental health body if not a doctor or friends and family.

Producer: Frey Lindsay

(Picture: Dr. Laura Hawryluck in her ICU equipment. Picture credit: Laura Hawryluck)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmnl)
The Sharpeville massacre

In March 1960, the South African police opened fire on a crowd of demonstrators in the township of Sharpeville, killing 69 people and injuring nearly 200 more. The massacre outraged black South Africans, leading to a radicalisation of anti-apartheid organisations such as the ANC and a ruthless crackdown on dissent by the whites-only government. Simon Watts hears the memories of Nyakane Tsolo, who organised the demonstration in Sharpeville, and Ian Berry, a photographer whose pictures of the killings caused an international outcry.

PHOTO: The crowd fleeing from the police at Sharpeville in 1960 (Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn491ryn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct2ccg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwr471)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn491wps)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjwv)
Making waves: the history of swimming

Common to many cultures across the world, swimming appears on the surface to be a benign leisure activity. But in fact it has much to tell us about such things as the development of societies, our bodies and minds, and our relationship to our ancestors and the natural world.

For the Ancient Greeks and Romans, swimming was essential for instilling discipline, as a necessary skill for warriors, and to promote wellbeing. In West Africa where water had spiritual significance, communities there placed great importance on learning to swim from an early age. Their aquatic skills surprised the early colonialists, who then targeted divers to help them plunder shipwrecks when they were trafficked to the New World. Today however African American children are almost six times more likely to drown than their white counterparts as a consequence of historic racial segregation, according to research by the US Centers for Disease Control.

Rajan Datar is joined Professor Kevin Dawson from the University of California Merced, author of Undercurrents of Power: Aquatic Cultures in the African Diaspora; Mikael Rosén, swimmer, coach and author of Open Water: The History and Technique of Swimming; journalist Howard Means, author of Splash!: Ten Thousand Years of Swimming and writer Bonnie Tsui whose book Why we Swim was published in 2020.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service.

[Photo: Young boys swim together at an inter-racial camp circa 1948 in New York, New York. Credit: Irving Haberman/IH Images/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh6b)
Zimbabwe's Paralympic pioneer

At the 2000 Paralympic Games in Sydney, Zimbabwean sprinter Elliot Mujaji won his country’s first ever Paralympic gold medal when he sprinted to victory in the 100 metres. Mujaji had been a promising runner as a teenager, but suffered severe burns and the amputation of his right arm while working in a part-time job as an electrician. Mujaji then faced a tough battle to get sponsorship in a country where there was virtually no support for Paralympic athletes. He talks to Ashley Byrne. The programme is a Made-In-Manchester Production.

PHOTO: Elliot Mujaji at the 2004 Paralympics (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4920fx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fmrw1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwrcq9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 Health Check (w3cszcd9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn492461)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdc8)
The Cuban dad who became a lifeline for Chernobyl's children

In 1990, Manuel Barriuso was a professor of Russian literature in Havana when one morning he was ordered to the city's paediatric hospital. Unknown to him, a plane-load of seriously ill children – all victims of the devastating Chernobyl nuclear disaster – had arrived in Cuba for free treatment in a historic humanitarian program. And Manuel – who had no medical background – would be one of their translators. He had to abandon Tolstoy and Chekov and learn about oncology to translate life and death conversations between medics, sick children and their distressed parents. Manuel's sons Sebastián and Rodrigo have turned their father's story into the award-winning feature film, Un Traductor. They tell their remarkable story to Emily Webb.

YouTuber Jonna Jinton lives in the remote north of Sweden, along with her pet dog and cow. She has a unique passion: trying to revive a traditional Scandinavian herding call known as kulning. This interview was first broadcast in 2019.

Picture: Manuel Barriuso with his sons Sebastián and Rodrigo Barriuso, 1992.
Credit: Courtesy of Rodrigo & Sebastián Barriuso

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmnl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4927y5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fn0c9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwrm6k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn492cp9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nsrk9w)
Opponents of the coup in Myanmar continue to demonstrate

Opponents of the coup in Myanmar have defied the military and continued to demonstrate despite the increasing use of lethal force.

Also in the programme: how some European countries are giving up on EU procurement and looking to Russia and China for covid vaccines. And a new study reveals that almost all coronavirus deaths are in countries where half the population are obese.

(Photo: Protesters demand the release of detained leader Aung San Suu Kyi. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn492hff)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwrvpt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlw5gn4fn8f)
German airline Lufthansa posts record loss

The German airline Lufthansa has posted a record $8.1bn annual loss. Andreas Spaeth is a journalist who covers aviation in Germany, and tells us where the loss leaves the German government, which took a 20% stake in the airline as part of a bailout last year. Also in the programme, the Moscow Metro plans to implement facial recognition technology for people to pay fares by the end of this year. Ksenia Idrisova is cyber-security specialist at BBC Monitoring, and explains why many people are opposed to the move. Continuing our series looking at the impact of the pandemic on people's mental health, Nigerian artist Ken Nwadiogbu discusses his hyper-real art, and how it has become a form of therapy for the issues he faces. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Pilita Clarke explores the controversial issue of whether employers should be allowed to insist their workers are vaccinated against the coronavirus before returning to the workplace.

(Picture: Lufthansa planes. Picture credit: EPA.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn492m5k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9g95mz7d)
Myanmar: Funerals and more protests

Demonstrations against the military coup continue, despite the killing of dozens of people by security forces. Today was the funeral in Mandalay of 19-year-old Angel, also known as Kyal Sin, who has become a symbol of the crackdown on the protests. We'll hear from our correspondent, some of the protesters themselves, and talk about how the story is being covered by Burmese media.

We'll answer your questions on the coronavirus pandemic with our regular expert. Dr Emma Hodcroft will tell us what it means to "tweak" a Covid vaccine to make it more effective against new variants of the disease.

We'll also hear a conversation between three people who have lost relatives to Covid in the past year of the pandemic. From Bangladesh, Sweden and the United States, they share their experiences of coping with loss.

Picture: Angel, a 19-year-old protester, also known as Kyal Sin, lies on the ground before she was shot in the head as Myanmar's forces opened fire to disperse an anti-coup demonstration in Mandalay on March 3rd (REUTERS / Stringer)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn492qxp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9g95n2zj)
Coronavirus conversations: Pandemic grief

We'll hear a conversation between three people who have lost relatives to Covid in the past year of the pandemic. From Bangladesh, Sweden and the United States, they share their experiences of coping with loss.

We'll also get your questions answered on the latest coronavirus news with our regular expert, Dr Swapneil Parikh.

Demonstrations against the military coup continue in Myanmar, despite the killing of dozens of people by security forces. Today was the funeral in Mandalay of 19-year-old Angel, also known as Kyal Sin, who has become a symbol of the crackdown on the protests. We'll hear from our correspondent, some of the protesters themselves, and talk about how the story is being covered by Burmese media.

Picture: Reza Sedghi, father of Lili Sedghi, holding his birthday cake (Credit: Lili Sedghi)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn492vnt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdc8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmnl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn492zdy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fnqv2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwsbpb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k1lc5dyvz)
2021/03/04 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn493352)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct2ccg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwsgfg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1t)
Uncovering history with Little Foot's skull

One of our most complete ancient ancestor’s fossils has been transported to the UK from South Africa in order to be scanned at the Diamond Light Source. Roland Pease investigates what these scans could reveal about the human story.

Professor Corinne Le Quéré explains how she managed to look past the 7% reduction in human emissions caused by the pandemic in 2020 to reveal the impact of the Paris Climate agreements, and explains what more needs to be done. Roland speaks with anthropologist Dr. Rolf Quam, who has studied the inner ears of fossilised Neanderthal skulls to reveal they may have evolved the ability to hear the complex sounds of spoken language separately to our own species. Dr. Emma Hodcroft discusses the Brazilian P1 COVID 19 variant that is spreading around the world.


(Image: Little Foot Skull. Copyright: Diamond Light Source Ltd)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Rory Galloway


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4936x6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nssdjs)
Myanmar's protestors defy bloody crackdown

Protestors in Myanmar have again clashed with security forces as they returned to the streets to protest the military take-over. Myanmar's ambassador to the UN tells us the world must take action against the military.

Also on the programme: Why President Biden has condemned a decision to drop mask mandates in Texas and Mississippi as “Neanderthal thinking”; and what's driving a growing row between Buckingham Palace and the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, Harry and Meghan.

(Photo: People attend the funeral of Angel a 19-year-old protester also known as Kyal Sin who was shot in the head as Myanmar forces opened fire to disperse an anti-coup demonstration in Mandalay, Myanmar, March 4, 2021. REUTERS/Stringer)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn493bnb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79w69tzsn5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frtfrp2m0)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwspxq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmcnzc7jhjk)
Italy blocks AstraZeneca vaccine exports to Australia

The Italian government has blocked the export of an Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine shipment to Australia. The BBC's Theo Leggett explains what's behind the row, and International Chamber of Commerce's John Denton tells us just what the global cost vacinne nationalism might be. Also in the programme, the US has suspended tariffs on Scotch Whisky and other UK products put in place over a dispute about EU subsidies to Airbus, Michael Bilelli from the Wine and Spirts Wholesalers of America tells us how bad the tariffs hit whisky sales there. The Moscow Metro plans to implement facial recognition technology for people to pay fares by the end of this year. Ksenia Idrisova is cyber-security specialist at BBC Monitoring, and explains why many people are opposed to the move. Plus, continuing our series looking at the impact of the pandemic on people's mental health, Nigerian artist Ken Nwadiogbu discusses his hyper-real art, and how it has become a form of therapy for the issues he faces.

(Picture: A syringe being filled with a dose of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. Picture credit: EPA.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn493gdg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwstnv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjrb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



FRIDAY 05 MARCH 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn493l4l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjwv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh6b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn493pwq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x198l3mwxzm)
Italy blocks AstraZeneca vaccine exports to Australia

The Italian government has blocked the export of an Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine shipment to Australia. The BBC's Theo Leggett explains what's behind the row, and International Chamber of Commerce's John Denton tells us just what the global cost of vaccine nationalism might be. Also in the programme, the US has suspended tariffs on Scotch Whisky and other UK products put in place over a dispute about EU subsidies to Airbus, Michael Bilelli from the Wine and Spirts Wholesalers of America tells us how badly the tariffs hit whisky sales there. The Moscow Metro plans to implement facial recognition technology for people to pay fares by the end of this year. Ksenia Idrisova is a cyber-security specialist at BBC Monitoring, and explains why many people are opposed to the move. Continuing our series looking at the impact of the pandemic on people's mental health, Nigerian artist Ken Nwadiogbu discusses his hyper-real art, and how it has become a form of therapy for the issues he faces. Plus, Amazon has opened a bricks and mortar supermarket in the UK's capital city, we'll discuss why the online giant is moving into high street retail.

Joining the BBC's Sasha Twining is Bloomberg's Samson Ellis from Taipei in Taiwan and Rhonda Vonshay Sharpe, president of the Women's Institute for Science, Equity and Race in Virginia, USA.

(Picture: A syringe being filled with a dose of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. Picture credit: EPA)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn493tmv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyr)
Khin Zaw Win: Protests in Myanmar

Mass protests against military rule across Myanmar have been met with increasing force, and the death toll is rising. Stephen Sackur interviews Khin Zaw Win, a prominent political prisoner under the previous junta. What do the people of Myanmar want now - and what are they likely to get?


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwt5x7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3cszthh)
Chinese Super League uncertainty and Fifa Council

With the Chinese Super League champions, Jiangsu FC, ceasing operations just 108 days after winning the title we look at whether more clubs could follow before the 2021 season starts in April. Ghana International and Tianjin Tigers captain Frank Acheampong tells us he doesn't know yet whether the club will continue without their backers Teda, who have reportedly withdrawn their funding because of the Chinese football association’s new policy that removes mention of companies from club names.

Mani Djazmi, Heather O'Reilly and Pat Nevin discuss whether the packed fixture schedule is catching up with players in the Premier League and what impact that might have on the Uefa European Championships in the summer.

Fifa Council candidate Laura McAllister tells us why she wants to be one of world football's decision makers, and shares her thoughts on the joint bid from the UK and Republic of Ireland to host the 2030 World Cup.

And we reflect on the life of former Liverpool and Scotland winger Ian St John, who died this week at the age of 82.


Photo: Jiangsu Suning players and staff members celebrating after their team defeated Guangzhou Evergrande to win the Chinese Super League in November 2020.
Credit: STR/AFP via Getty Images.


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn493ycz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdc8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmnl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn494243)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq4)
The new “space race” for chips

A close look at how the latest silicon chips are made, what they’re used for, and why they represent “the new space race” at the heart of US-China rivalry. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC Online tech editor Leo Kelion. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Illustration with the flags of China and the USA behind a silicon chip, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwtfdh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4945w7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgzrg6y)
China set to overhaul Hong Kong electoral system

The draft decision - which China says will ensure "patriots" are in charge - is expected to be approved at the National People's Congress this week.

As the pope heads to Iraq, the Archbishop of Erbil tells us what the visit means for the country's much reduced Christian population - and what precautions are being taken because of the pandemic and insecurity.

And Brazil’s supreme federal court has ordered an investigation into the sale of protected areas of the Amazon rainforest on Facebook, following a BBC investigation.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4949mc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgzrkz2)
Historic papal visit: "The Iraqi people await us".

Pope Francis pays a visit to Iraq, his first international trip since the start of the pandemic. But there are concerns about rising Covid cases and insecurity.

The UN Security Council fails to reach an agreement on Ethiopia's Tigray region, despite reports of a worsening humanitarian situation, ongoing clashes and claims of war crimes being committed.

And Brazil's government launches an investigation into the controversial sale of parts of the rainforest on Facebook.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn494fch)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wrsgzrpq6)
China warns world not to interfere in Hong Kong

The National People's Congress - sometimes called China's rubber stamp parliament - will hear plans to overhaul Hong Kong's electoral system.

We'll get the latest on the protests in Myanmar and how the UN wants action against the military leaders who seized power last month.

And a massive moment for the Catholics of Iraq, as Pope Francis arrives for the first ever papal visit to the country.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn494k3m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwtxd0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz79r)
The joy of work

New York rat-catcher James Molluso has been dealing with vermin since he was a teenager. The pay isn't brilliant, the hours are long and the chemicals are toxic. So why does he love his job so much? We hear from John Bowe, who recounts surprising tales of happiness from his years interviewing crime scene cleaners, lawyers and taxidermists in the book Gig: Americans Talk About Their Jobs. And with Covid-19 blurring the lines between work and home life, Laurie Santos, professor of Psychology at Yale University, tells us what we can all do to break the daily grind.

Photo: Stock photo of a businessman holding a picture of a happy face (Credit: Getty).


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmwc)
Churchill's 'Iron Curtain' speech

In March 1946, the UK's former wartime leader, Winston Churchill, gave a historic speech which would come to symbolise the beginnings of the Cold War. Churchill had lost power following a crushing election defeat in Britain in 1945. Encouraged by the US President Harry Truman, Churchill agreed to give a speech on world affairs at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri. But why did the speech have such an impact. Alex Last hears from the historian Prof David Reynolds of Cambridge University, author of The Kremlin Letters: Stalin's wartime correspondence with Churchill and Roosevelt.

Photo: Winston Churchill at the podium delivering his "Iron Curtain" speech, at Westminster College in Fulton Missouri, 5th March 1946 (PA)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn494nvr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwv144)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 World Football (w3cszthh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn494slw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcpc)
Can Biden reset US Saudi Arabia relations?

It took President Joe Biden more than a month to schedule a phone call with King Salman of Saudi Arabia, a contrast to his predecessor Donald Trump, who chose the kingdom as his first foreign destination after the election. Even though Saudi Arabia is considered a key ally in a volatile region, Mr Biden took a tough stance on the kingdom during his campaign. He promised to end the sale of offensive weapons used in Saudi Arabia's war in Yemen, and accused its crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, of directly ordering the killing of the journalist Jamal Khashoggi. Mr Biden also pledged to restart nuclear talks with Iran, and further reduce America's dependence on fossil fuels, putting Washington at odds with the political and economic priorities of Riyadh. Now, as his administration looks for a reset of relations, what are the friction points in the decade old alliance between the two countries? Will a push for recalibration encourage Saudi Arabia to seek out new alliances at the expense of the United States? And can US policies succeed in the region by antagonising one of the leading countries in the Muslim world? Join Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn494xc0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fqns4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwv8md)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn495134)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjh)
Life in a Kurdish military camp

BBC Arabic's Namak Khoshnaw was given unfettered access to film in a military camp of Komala, the Revolutionary Party of Iranian Kurdistan, in Iraqi Kurdistan for his film Escape from Iran. Komala has become a magnet for young Iranian Kurds prepared to risk everything to leave their homeland and train as Peshmerga fighters. We find out about the challenges of filming it, the people fleeing Iran, and the memories it brought back for Namak, himself a former refugee.

Reciting the Koran
Nourin Mohamed Siddig was a Nigerian Koranic reciter who died recently. He found popularity on social media and sang in a unique African style, rather than the more usual Middle Eastern way. We hear from Ahmed Ambali of BBC Yoruba and Reem Fatthelbab of BBC Arabic, about the different ways of singing the Koran and why it’s important to keep them.

Selling the Amazon
A wealthy farmer, looking for investment opportunities in the Amazon. That was BBC Brazil’s Joao Fellet's assumed identity for almost a year, after he discovered “traders” illegally selling rainforest plots on Facebook Marketplace. From Sao Paulo to the Amazon, to Brazil's Supreme Court, Joao shares the “behind the scenes” of his epic report.

Russian prison colonies
Notorious Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny has been sentenced to 2 years imprisonment and it's rumoured he may spend them in penal colony ‘Number 2’. Oleg Boldyrev of BBC Russian explains the differences between prison and penal colonies, and what life in a penal colony might entail.


Image: Trainee graduating at Komala training camp, Iraqi Kurdistan
Credit: BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4954v8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1fqx8d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwvj3n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct20d3)
The Right Thing: A life worth living?

Mike Wooldridge explores another story of faith and hard decisions. When American Beth Ball was pregnant with her first child, she found out that the baby had Down’s syndrome. Upon receiving the diagnosis, she says she was shocked at the heavy hints that she should terminate the pregnancy, and outdated information made available. For Beth and her husband Stephen, both Christians, the next months were a struggle, emotionally and spiritually. At one point, Beth prayed that if she was unable to cope with a baby with Down’s syndrome, God would take it away.

But then things were to change for the Ball family, and several times. Alongside Beth and Stephen, Mike hears from Dr Francis Hickey, an expert in Down’s syndrome, Michelle Sie Witten, President of the Global Down Syndrome Foundation, their Pastor Bill Cahoun, and the family of Jack Holm, a young man with Down’s syndrome who inspired them to re-imagine the future.

Producer: Paul Arnold

(Photo: DNA helix illustration. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4958ld)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nsvg6z)
Pope Francis' historic Iraq visit gets underway

Pope Francis has arrived in Iraq for the first ever papal visit to the country. He hopes to use the trip to reassure Christians who were persecuted by the Islamic State group - and deepen ties with the Muslim world. But the visit comes amid a global pandemic and growing security concerns in Iraq. Despite these concerns making it his most risky visit yet, the 84-year-old insisted he was "duty bound".

Also on the programme: China reveals details of changes to Hong Kong's electoral system that will tighten Beijing's grip over the territory; and the women at the forefront of India's Farmers' protests.

(Picture: The Pope was greeted by Iraq's PM and dancers at the airport in Baghdad. Credit: Reuters.)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn495dbj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwvrlx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltjl5y4y9y)
China's NPC reduces economic growth target

China's National People's Congress has set a 6% economic growth target for the year ahead. Premier Li Keqiang also warned other countries not to interfere in the affairs of Hong Kong. We find out more from Dr Yu Jie, senior research fellow on China at the foreign affairs research institute Chatham House. Also in the programme, we gauge market reaction with Shanti Kelemen of Brown Shipley to news that the US economy added 380,000 jobs in February, well ahead of economists' expectations. Throughout the week we've been examining the impact of the pandemic on workers' mental health, but today the BBC's Szu Ping Chan reports on what makes for a happy and satisfying career. Plus, the US band Kings of Leon is releasing its latest album today, but it has also chosen to issue it as a tradeable digital token, which is being described as a bit like the digital currency Bitcoin. Alex Hern is technology editor of The Guardian, and dicusses whether this marks a genuine breakthrough in how artists can earn money, or just a triumph of marketing to get people talking about the new release.

(Picture: China's National People's Congress. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn495j2n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9g95qw4h)
Pope Francis in Iraq

We hear from people in Iraq after the first ever papal visit to the country. On his first international trip since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, Pope Francis has called for an end to violence and extremism in Iraq.

We'll continue to answer all your questions about coronavirus with the help of Dr Megan Murray from Harvard University.

And we'll also hear a conversation about bereavement with people who tragically lost a loved one to Covid-19 in Bangladesh, Sweden and USA.

Photo: Pope Francis speaks as he visits the Syro-Catholic Cathedral of "Our Lady of Salvation" in Baghdad Credit: Iraqiya TV/Reuters TV


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn495mts)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t9g95qzwm)
Myanmar: Your questions answered

We put your questions on the political situation in Myanmar to Soe Win Than, editor of BBC Burmese and Dr Jenny Hedström from the Swedish Defence University. If you have a question send it to us as a Whatsapp or Telegram voice message to +447730 751925 and we will try to get it answered.

We hear a conversation about bereavement with people in Bangladesh, Sweden and USA who all tragically lost a loved one to Covid-19.

And the BBC's Ros Atkins takes a more in-depth look at the relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia under the new US President Joe Biden.

Picture: People flash a three-finger salute as they attend the funeral of victims shot dead during the anti-coup protest in Yangon, Myanmar Credit: REUTERS/Stringer


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn495rkx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn495wb1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bpn1frmr5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vww7lf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k1lc5hvs2)
2021/03/05 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn496025)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwwcbk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv74)
Why does it feel so good to swear?

The sudden agony of stubbing a toe or burning a finger can make even the most polite among us swear our heads off. It’s like a reflex, a quick-release valve for the shock. But why do expletives give us such a sense of relief? Why does it sometimes feel so good to swear?

We set out to explore the science of swearing, prompted by a question from our listener Gadi. Psychological studies have shown bad language can relieve pain, or even make us stronger; we test out these theories for ourselves, and try to figure out why certain words are charged with such physical power.

We don’t just use strong words in shock or anger, either. They can help us to bond with others, to express joy, solidarity, or creativity. And although people curse all over the world, it’s not quite the same everywhere. We hear what people like to swear about in different countries, and whether swearing in a second language can ever be quite so satisfying.

Presented by Anand Jagatia
Produced by Cathy Edwards for the BBC World Service


(Photo: Woman swearing. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4963t9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z73nsw9fw)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn4967kf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79w69v2pk8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172x3frtfrrzj3)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwwltt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172xmbvjmmy30c)
China's NPC reduces economic growth target

China's National People's Congress has set a 6% economic growth target for the year ahead. Premier Li Keqiang also warned other countries not to interfere in the affairs of Hong Kong. We find out more from Dr Yu Jie, senior research fellow on China at the foreign affairs research institute Chatham House. Also in the programme, we gauge market reaction with Shanti Kelemen of Brown Shipley to news that the US economy added 380,000 jobs in February, well ahead of economists' expectations. Throughout the week we've been examining the impact of the pandemic on workers' mental health, but today the BBC's Szu Ping Chan reports on what makes for a happy and satisfying career. Plus, the US band Kings of Leon is releasing its latest album today, but it has also chosen to issue it as a tradeable digital token, which is being described as a bit like the digital currency Bitcoin. Alex Hern is technology editor of The Guardian, and dicusses whether this marks a genuine breakthrough in how artists can earn money, or just a triumph of marketing to get people talking about the new release.

(Picture: China's National People's Congress. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5pbn496c9k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q52vwwqky)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3cszthh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Africa Life Clinic 09:32 SUN (w3ct21g6)

Assignment 04:06 TUE (w3csz6mj)

Assignment 09:06 TUE (w3csz6mj)

Assignment 20:06 TUE (w3csz6mj)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5q4qll3y6h)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5q4qll49fw)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5q4qll4np8)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5q4qll4sfd)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5q4qll50xn)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5q4qll5w4k)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5q4qll6c42)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172x5q4qll6lmb)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5q4qll6v3l)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5q4qll76bz)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5q4qll7klc)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5q4qll7pbh)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5q4qll7t2m)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5q4qll7xtr)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5q4qll8wss)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5q4qll9815)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5q4qll9cs9)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172x5q52vwfbsl)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5q52vwfgjq)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5q52vwfl8v)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5q52vwfts3)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5q52vwg9rm)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5q52vwgfhr)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172x5q52vwgk7w)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5q52vwgp00)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5q52vwgxh8)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5q52vwh4zj)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5q52vwhmz1)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5q52vwhrq5)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5q52vwj06f)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5q52vwj3yk)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5q52vwjh5y)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5q52vwjqp6)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5q52vwk6nq)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5q52vwkbdv)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5q52vwkkx3)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5q52vwktdc)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5q52vwl1wm)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5q52vwljw4)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5q52vwlnm8)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5q52vwlx3j)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5q52vwm0vn)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5q52vwmd31)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5q52vwmml9)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5q52vwn3kt)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5q52vwn79y)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5q52vwngt6)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5q52vwnq9g)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5q52vwnysq)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5q52vwpfs7)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5q52vwpkjc)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5q52vwpt0m)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5q52vwpxrr)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5q52vwq904)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5q52vwqjhd)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5q52vwr0gx)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5q52vwr471)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5q52vwrcq9)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5q52vwrm6k)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5q52vwrvpt)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5q52vwsbpb)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5q52vwsgfg)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5q52vwspxq)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5q52vwstnv)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5q52vwt5x7)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5q52vwtfdh)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5q52vwtxd0)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5q52vwv144)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5q52vwv8md)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5q52vwvj3n)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5q52vwvrlx)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5q52vww7lf)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5q52vwwcbk)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5q52vwwltt)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5q52vwwqky)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzfbfv)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzfg5z)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzfky3)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzfpp7)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzftfc)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzfy5h)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzg1xm)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzg5nr)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzg9dw)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzgf50)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzgjx4)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzgnn8)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzgsdd)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzgx4j)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzh0wn)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzhhw5)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzhmm9)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzhrcf)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzhw3k)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzhzvp)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5pb8vzj3lt)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzj7by)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzjc32)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzjgv6)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzjllb)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzjqbg)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzjv2l)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzjytq)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzk2kv)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzk69z)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzkb23)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzkft7)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzkkkc)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzkp9h)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzkt1m)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzkxsr)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzl1jw)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzl590)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzljjd)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzln8j)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzls0n)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzlwrs)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5pb8vzm0hx)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172x5pbn48qzj6)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172x5pbn48r38b)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172x5pbn48r70g)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172x5pbn48rbrl)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172x5pbn48rghq)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172x5pbn48rl7v)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172x5pbn48rpzz)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172x5pbn48rtr3)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5pbn48ryh7)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5pbn48s27c)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172x5pbn48s5zh)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5pbn48s9qm)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172x5pbn48sfgr)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172x5pbn48sk6w)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172x5pbn48snz0)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172x5pbn48ssq4)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172x5pbn48sxg8)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172x5pbn48t16d)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172x5pbn48t4yj)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172x5pbn48t8pn)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172x5pbn48tdfs)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172x5pbn48tj5x)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172x5pbn48tmy1)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5pbn48trp5)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48twf9)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48v05f)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48v3xk)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48v7np)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48vcdt)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48vh4y)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48vlx2)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48vqn6)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48vvdb)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48vz4g)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48w2wl)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48w6mq)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48wbcv)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48wg3z)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48wkw3)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48wpm7)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48wtcc)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48wy3h)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48x1vm)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48x5lr)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48x9bw)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48xf30)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48xjv4)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5pbn48xnl8)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172x5pbn48xsbd)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5pbn48xx2j)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5pbn48y0tn)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172x5pbn48y4ks)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172x5pbn48y89x)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172x5pbn48yd21)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172x5pbn48yht5)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172x5pbn48ymk9)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172x5pbn48yr9f)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172x5pbn48yw1k)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172x5pbn48yzsp)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172x5pbn48z3jt)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172x5pbn48z78y)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172x5pbn48zc12)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172x5pbn48zgs6)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172x5pbn48zljb)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172x5pbn48zq8g)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172x5pbn48zv0l)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172x5pbn48zyrq)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172x5pbn4902hv)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172x5pbn49067z)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5pbn490b03)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5pbn490fr7)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5pbn490khc)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172x5pbn490p7h)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5pbn490szm)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5pbn490xqr)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5pbn4911gw)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172x5pbn491570)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172x5pbn4918z4)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172x5pbn491dq8)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172x5pbn491jgd)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172x5pbn491n6j)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172x5pbn491ryn)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172x5pbn491wps)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172x5pbn4920fx)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172x5pbn492461)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172x5pbn4927y5)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172x5pbn492cp9)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172x5pbn492hff)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172x5pbn492m5k)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172x5pbn492qxp)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172x5pbn492vnt)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172x5pbn492zdy)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172x5pbn493352)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172x5pbn4936x6)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172x5pbn493bnb)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172x5pbn493gdg)

BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172x5pbn493l4l)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172x5pbn493pwq)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172x5pbn493tmv)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172x5pbn493ycz)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172x5pbn494243)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172x5pbn4945w7)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172x5pbn4949mc)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172x5pbn494fch)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172x5pbn494k3m)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172x5pbn494nvr)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172x5pbn494slw)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172x5pbn494xc0)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172x5pbn495134)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172x5pbn4954v8)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172x5pbn4958ld)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172x5pbn495dbj)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172x5pbn495j2n)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172x5pbn495mts)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172x5pbn495rkx)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172x5pbn495wb1)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172x5pbn496025)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172x5pbn4963t9)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172x5pbn4967kf)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5pbn496c9k)

BBC OS Conversations 05:06 SAT (w3ct19zb)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct19zb)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 MON (w3ct19zb)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172x2t9g95c8j3)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2t9g95cd87)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172x2t9g95g5f6)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172x2t9g95g95b)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172x2t9g95k2b9)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2t9g95k62f)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172x2t9g95mz7d)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2t9g95n2zj)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172x2t9g95qw4h)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172x2t9g95qzwm)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7kr)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz8cf)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8p2)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7yk)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz79r)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x1986vb6p8w)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172x198l3mm78b)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172x198l3mq45f)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x198l3mt12j)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x198l3mwxzm)

Business Weekly 23:06 SAT (w3ct0spz)

Business Weekly 03:06 SUN (w3ct0spz)

Comedians Vs. The News 11:32 SAT (w3ct21mh)

Comedians Vs. The News 19:32 SUN (w3ct21mh)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv73)

CrowdScience 11:32 MON (w3cszv73)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv74)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz99d)

Digital Planet 04:32 WED (w3csz99d)

Digital Planet 11:32 WED (w3csz99d)

Discovery 00:32 MON (w3ct2cb0)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct2ccd)

Discovery 04:32 TUE (w3ct2ccd)

Discovery 11:32 TUE (w3ct2ccd)

From Our Own Correspondent 02:06 SAT (w3csz9qx)

From Our Own Correspondent 05:06 SUN (w3csz9qx)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3csz9qx)

From Our Own Correspondent 23:06 SUN (w3csz9qx)

HARDtalk 02:06 MON (w3cszc38)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc38)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3cszc38)

HARDtalk 23:06 MON (w3cszc38)

HARDtalk 02:06 WED (w3cszc7s)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3cszc7s)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3cszc7s)

HARDtalk 23:06 WED (w3cszc7s)

HARDtalk 02:06 FRI (w3cszbyr)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszbyr)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3cszbyr)

HARDtalk 23:06 FRI (w3cszbyr)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszcd9)

Health Check 04:32 THU (w3cszcd9)

Health Check 11:32 THU (w3cszcd9)

Heart and Soul 22:32 SAT (w3ct20d2)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct20d2)

Heart and Soul 13:32 FRI (w3ct20d3)

I'm Not A Monster 09:32 SAT (w3ct1z6c)

I'm Not A Monster 02:32 SUN (w3ct1z6c)

I'm Not A Monster 22:32 SUN (w3ct1z6c)

In the Studio 02:32 TUE (w3cszvcn)

In the Studio 09:32 TUE (w3cszvcn)

In the Studio 13:32 TUE (w3cszvcn)

In the Studio 23:32 TUE (w3cszvcn)

Mayday 05:32 SAT (w3ct1cxn)

Mayday 00:32 SUN (w3ct1cxn)

Mayday 10:32 MON (w3ct1cxn)

More or Less 02:50 SUN (w3ct0pyr)

More or Less 15:50 SUN (w3ct0pyr)

More or Less 22:50 SUN (w3ct0pyr)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pyr)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6v8)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6v8)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2wrsgzcvlk)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172x2wrsgzczbp)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172x2wrsgzd32t)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172x2wrsgzgrhn)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172x2wrsgzgw7s)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172x2wrsgzgzzx)

Newsday 05:06 WED (w172x2wrsgzkndr)

Newsday 06:06 WED (w172x2wrsgzks4w)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172x2wrsgzkwx0)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172x2wrsgznk9v)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172x2wrsgznp1z)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172x2wrsgznst3)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172x2wrsgzrg6y)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172x2wrsgzrkz2)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172x2wrsgzrpq6)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172x2z6rdh52s3)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172x2z6rdh61r4)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172x2z6rdh7zp6)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172x2z6rdh8yn7)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172x2z73nsgvll)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172x2z73nshpth)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172x2z73nskrhp)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172x2z73nsllql)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172x2z73nsnnds)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172x2z73nsphmp)

Newshour 14:06 THU (w172x2z73nsrk9w)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172x2z73nssdjs)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172x2z73nsvg6z)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172x2z73nsw9fw)

Outlook 08:32 SUN (w3cszf16)

Outlook 23:32 SUN (w3cszf16)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3cszd4h)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3cszd4h)

Outlook 03:06 TUE (w3cszd4h)

Outlook 12:06 TUE (w3cszdl1)

Outlook 18:06 TUE (w3cszdl1)

Outlook 03:06 WED (w3cszdl1)

Outlook 12:06 WED (w3cszdst)

Outlook 18:06 WED (w3cszdst)

Outlook 03:06 THU (w3cszdst)

Outlook 12:06 THU (w3cszdc8)

Outlook 18:06 THU (w3cszdc8)

Outlook 03:06 FRI (w3cszdc8)

Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf5q)

Over to You 00:50 SUN (w3cszf5q)

People Fixing the World 02:06 TUE (w3cszv2k)

People Fixing the World 08:06 TUE (w3cszv2k)

People Fixing the World 15:06 TUE (w3cszv2k)

People Fixing the World 23:06 TUE (w3cszv2k)

Project 17 02:32 WED (w3ct0x86)

Project 17 09:32 WED (w3ct0x86)

Project 17 13:32 WED (w3ct0x86)

Project 17 23:32 WED (w3ct0x86)

Ros Atkins on ... 05:50 SAT (w3ct24jh)

Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3cszh1t)

Science in Action 04:32 FRI (w3cszh1t)

Science in Action 11:32 FRI (w3cszh1t)

Sport Today 19:32 MON (w172x3k1lc5484p)

Sport Today 19:32 TUE (w172x3k1lc5751s)

Sport Today 19:32 WED (w172x3k1lc5b1yw)

Sport Today 19:32 THU (w172x3k1lc5dyvz)

Sport Today 19:32 FRI (w172x3k1lc5hvs2)

Sporting Witness 03:50 MON (w3cszh69)

Sporting Witness 10:50 THU (w3cszh6b)

Sporting Witness 00:50 FRI (w3cszh6b)

Sports News 22:20 SAT (w172x3frg5g2qtc)

Sports News 22:20 SUN (w172x3frg5g5mqg)

Sports News 22:20 MON (w172x3frtfrdcwq)

Sports News 22:20 TUE (w172x3frtfrh8st)

Sports News 22:20 WED (w172x3frtfrl5px)

Sports News 22:20 THU (w172x3frtfrp2m0)

Sports News 22:20 FRI (w172x3frtfrrzj3)

Sportshour 10:06 SAT (w172x3c93zmzbpv)

Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172x3lp3k25kjz)

Sportsworld 16:06 SUN (w172x3lp3k28pyb)

Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhkl)

Tech Tent 04:06 FRI (w3cszhq4)

Tech Tent 09:06 FRI (w3cszhq4)

Tech Tent 20:06 FRI (w3cszhq4)

The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk47)

The Arts Hour 10:06 TUE (w3cszk47)

The Arts Hour 00:06 WED (w3cszk47)

The Climate Question 04:06 MON (w3ct0xbg)

The Climate Question 09:06 MON (w3ct0xbg)

The Climate Question 20:06 MON (w3ct0xbg)

The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct1gvc)

The Compass 04:06 WED (w3ct2cb1)

The Compass 09:06 WED (w3ct2cb1)

The Compass 20:06 WED (w3ct2cb1)

The Conversation 02:32 MON (w3cszj4p)

The Conversation 09:32 MON (w3cszj4p)

The Conversation 13:32 MON (w3cszj4p)

The Conversation 23:32 MON (w3cszj4p)

The Cultural Frontline 00:06 SUN (w3cszj9p)

The Cultural Frontline 05:32 SUN (w3cszj9p)

The Cultural Frontline 10:06 MON (w3cszj9p)

The Documentary 04:06 SUN (w3ct0wjp)

The Documentary 14:06 SUN (w3ct0wjp)

The Documentary 10:06 WED (w3ct0wjp)

The Documentary 00:06 THU (w3ct0wjp)

The Documentary 04:06 THU (w3ct2ccg)

The Documentary 09:06 THU (w3ct2ccg)

The Documentary 20:06 THU (w3ct2ccg)

The Evidence 19:06 SAT (w3ct2cbb)

The Evidence 12:06 SUN (w3ct2cbb)

The Fifth Floor 03:06 SAT (w3cszjjg)

The Fifth Floor 12:06 FRI (w3cszjjh)

The Fifth Floor 18:06 FRI (w3cszjjh)

The Food Chain 02:32 THU (w3cszjrb)

The Food Chain 09:32 THU (w3cszjrb)

The Food Chain 13:32 THU (w3cszjrb)

The Food Chain 23:32 THU (w3cszjrb)

The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjwt)

The Forum 03:06 MON (w3cszjwt)

The Forum 10:06 THU (w3cszjwv)

The Forum 00:06 FRI (w3cszjwv)

The History Hour 00:06 TUE (w3cszkq9)

The Inquiry 02:06 THU (w3cszl4w)

The Inquiry 08:06 THU (w3cszl4w)

The Inquiry 15:06 THU (w3cszl4w)

The Inquiry 23:06 THU (w3cszl4w)

The Newsroom 11:06 SAT (w172x7bp8s41f2d)

The Newsroom 18:06 SAT (w172x7bp8s42899)

The Newsroom 22:06 SAT (w172x79vv1jdfvj)

The Newsroom 11:06 SUN (w172x7bp8s449zh)

The Newsroom 19:06 SUN (w172x7bp8s458yj)

The Newsroom 22:06 SUN (w172x79vv1jhbrm)

The Newsroom 11:06 MON (w172x7bpn1fc24r)

The Newsroom 13:06 MON (w172x7bpn1fc9n0)

The Newsroom 19:06 MON (w172x7bpn1fd13s)

The Newsroom 22:06 MON (w172x79w69tq2xw)

The Newsroom 11:06 TUE (w172x7bpn1ffz1v)

The Newsroom 13:06 TUE (w172x7bpn1fg6k3)

The Newsroom 19:06 TUE (w172x7bpn1fgy0w)

The Newsroom 22:06 TUE (w172x79w69tsztz)

The Newsroom 11:06 WED (w172x7bpn1fjvyy)

The Newsroom 13:06 WED (w172x7bpn1fk3g6)

The Newsroom 19:06 WED (w172x7bpn1fktxz)

The Newsroom 22:06 WED (w172x79w69twwr2)

The Newsroom 11:06 THU (w172x7bpn1fmrw1)

The Newsroom 13:06 THU (w172x7bpn1fn0c9)

The Newsroom 19:06 THU (w172x7bpn1fnqv2)

The Newsroom 22:06 THU (w172x79w69tzsn5)

The Newsroom 11:06 FRI (w172x7bpn1fqns4)

The Newsroom 13:06 FRI (w172x7bpn1fqx8d)

The Newsroom 19:06 FRI (w172x7bpn1frmr5)

The Newsroom 22:06 FRI (w172x79w69v2pk8)

The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3cszcpb)

The Real Story 04:06 SAT (w3cszcpb)

The Real Story 10:06 FRI (w3cszcpc)

The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3cszky2)

Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172x7db57bdf6b)

Weekend 07:06 SAT (w172x7db57bdjyg)

Weekend 08:06 SAT (w172x7db57bdnpl)

Weekend 06:06 SUN (w172x7db57bhb3f)

Weekend 07:06 SUN (w172x7db57bhfvk)

Weekend 08:06 SUN (w172x7db57bhklp)

When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct21m0)

When Katty Met Carlos 18:32 SAT (w3ct21m0)

When Katty Met Carlos 01:32 MON (w3ct21m0)

Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3cszmwb)

Witness History 08:50 MON (w3cszmlb)

Witness History 12:50 MON (w3cszmlb)

Witness History 18:50 MON (w3cszmlb)

Witness History 03:50 TUE (w3cszmlb)

Witness History 08:50 TUE (w3cszmqv)

Witness History 12:50 TUE (w3cszmqv)

Witness History 18:50 TUE (w3cszmqv)

Witness History 03:50 WED (w3cszmqv)

Witness History 08:50 WED (w3cszmt3)

Witness History 12:50 WED (w3cszmt3)

Witness History 18:50 WED (w3cszmt3)

Witness History 03:50 THU (w3cszmt3)

Witness History 08:50 THU (w3cszmnl)

Witness History 12:50 THU (w3cszmnl)

Witness History 18:50 THU (w3cszmnl)

Witness History 03:50 FRI (w3cszmnl)

Witness History 08:50 FRI (w3cszmwc)

Witness History 12:50 FRI (w3cszmwc)

Witness History 18:50 FRI (w3cszmwc)

WorklifeIndia 02:06 SUN (w3ct1c1m)

WorklifeIndia 10:06 SUN (w3ct1c1m)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x583nb8rgm2)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172xlvc0xjgn3v)

World Business Report 22:32 MON (w172xm9sg8v8df9)

World Business Report 15:32 TUE (w172xlwzxcqy4wj)

World Business Report 22:32 TUE (w172xmdhf2v104n)

World Business Report 15:32 WED (w172xlxtc3bqc6x)

World Business Report 22:32 WED (w172xmf9vtft6h1)

World Business Report 15:32 THU (w172xlw5gn4fn8f)

World Business Report 22:32 THU (w172xmcnzc7jhjk)

World Business Report 15:32 FRI (w172xltjl5y4y9y)

World Business Report 22:32 FRI (w172xmbvjmmy30c)

World Football 02:32 FRI (w3cszthh)

World Football 09:32 FRI (w3cszthh)

World Football 23:32 FRI (w3cszthh)