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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 13 FEBRUARY 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbw175)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcp8)
Is China erasing Uighur culture?

This week, lawyers in London concluded that the genocide of Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang province by the Chinese government is a ‘very credible’ allegation. The London based court also said that it is ‘plausible’ that the country’s president, Xi Jinping, is driving that policy. The allegation of genocide - levelled by Uighur activists, international human rights groups, as well as the US Secretary of State Antony Blinken - stems from an industrial scale crackdown in China’s Xinjiang province which has seen more than a million Uighurs and other ethnic minority Muslims imprisoned in a vast network of camps, where people say they have been subjected to rape and torture. The Chinese government has vehemently rejected the claims. It says measures are necessary to put an end to violent attacks in the region and it describes the facilities as re-education centres. So, what do we know about what is really going on in Xinjiang? Is there any merit to China’s argument about the need to defeat violent extremism in the region? Why is the Communist party intent on assimilating Uighurs into Han Chinese cultural traditions? How much is Xi Jinping’s vision for China behind it, and to what extent is Uighur culture - with its unique history and traditions - at risk of being destroyed in Beijing’s plan? Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss whether China is erasing Uighur culture.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbw4z9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x197h9pnd26)
Framing Britney Spears

Since a public breakdown in 2007, the singer Britney Spears's financial affairs have been controlled by others under a system known as conservatorship. She is now pursuing legal proceedings to try and take back control; we hear from Liz Day, senior editor of a new documentary series about the singer, 'Framing Britney Spears.' As the latest stage in the impeachment trial of former president Donald Trump comes to an end, we get the latest from the BBC's Lebo Diseko. Germany's government is said to have agreed a new law to combat worker abuses overseas. We find out what’s behind the move from Miriam Saage-Maass, vice legal director at the European Centre for Constitutional and Human Rights. Also in the programme, the new African Continental Free Trade Area opened in January with the promise of transforming the region's economies. The BBC's Tamasin Ford reports on the poverty reducing potential the bloc represents, and asks whether the agreement goes far enough to promote gender equality. Kai Ryssdale from APM's Marketplace tells us about the $1.9 trillion economic relief plan the new President Biden wants to pass. Plus, as the Lunar New Year holiday starts in the shadow of the pandemic, the BBC’s Victoria Craig explains how people are finding ways to celebrate. And we're joined throughout the programme by Sharon Brettkelly, presenter of The Detail podcast on Radio New Zealand.

(Picture: Britney Spears. Picture credit: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic.)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbw8qf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qv)
Egypt - Ten Years On

In 2011, Kevin Connolly was a witness to the seething demonstrations on Tahrir Square, unprecedented unrest on the streets - and longtime President Hosni Mubarak's fall from power. It was a time of high hopes and ideals - but a decade later, Egypt's military is still firmly in charge of the country and real change seems a long way off. Did journalists mis-read the situation back then - and how might it evolve now?

Pascale Harter introduces insight, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers from around the world.

The Roma minority in Bulgaria - as in other countries in Europe - is all too often marginalised, stereotyped and sidelined. Amid the lockdowns and dangers of the Covid era, prejudice against Roma people has grown even more virulent - while the conditions many of them live in have worsened even further. Jean Mackenzie reports from Sliven in Bulgaria on a settlement struggling to survive the pandemic.

It's Oscars season and countries around the world are submitting their entries for the Academy Award 'Best International Feature Film'. But Pakistan's contender, a comedy of faith and manners called 'Zindagi Tamasha', or 'The World is a Circus', has turned into a spectacle in its own right - even though it's not even been screened in public in Pakistan itself. Secunder Kermani explores the country's culture wars, and talks to the film's director.

The pangolin - a small, shy, scaly mammal which lives on ants and grubs - might not be as famous or as charismatic as other threatened creatures like elephants, pandas or tigers. But it's still the world's most-trafficked animal, and endangered across Africa and Asia. In India, though, one conservationist dreamed up a special strategy to protect it - and enlisted a village priest to help. Geetanjali Krishna reports on an ingenious plan to save the species.

(Image: Poster of President Hosni Mubarak being torn down during a protest in Egypt in 2011. Credit: EPA/Ahmed Youssef)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ykmzt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhkj)
Mayers on his dazzling debut

We reflect on one of England's finest test wins as they beat India in the first test in Chennai.

Plus we hear from the man who delivered one of the most amazing test debuts of all time. West Indies' Kyle Mayers tells us about scoring his match winning double century and how a hurricane in the Caribbean helped to forge his career.

Photo: Kyle Mayers celebrates after scoring a century (100 runs) during the fifth day of the first cricket Test match between Bangladesh and West Indies at the Zohur Ahmed Chowdhury Stadium in Chittagong on February 7, 2021. (Photo by MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbwdgk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjd)
Ethiopia's missing refugees

The Ethiopian government declared victory over the former ruling party of Tigray at the end of November, but information from the region is still sparse. One unanswered question is: what happened to thousands of Eritrean refugees living in camps there who went missing during the fighting? Bekit Teklemariam of BBC Tigrinya has been trying to find out.

Chinese New Year 2021
It’s officially Chinese New Year’s day today, usually a time when millions from outside and within China head home for the holidays. But this year China’s strict Covid-19 rules mean many won’t be making the journey, including BBC Chinese journalist Fan Wang. Fan is based in Hong Kong, and wrote an online story about some of the people who did decide to brave quarantine and isolation to spend the holidays with family.

Feasting without over-eating?
As China launches into two weeks of New Year’s self-indulgence, the internet is full of advice on how to feast without over-eating. This chimes with “Operation empty plate”, a national campaign against food waste launched last year and now being enshrined in a new law aimed at food outlets. BBC Chinese journalists Jeff Li, Yashan Zhao, Temtsel Hao and Suping share stories about China’s love of feasting, in history and in their own lives.

Colombia's cocaine hippos
Pablo Escobar has left a long legacy in Colombia, of which maybe the strangest part is the hippos. Once stars of his personal zoo, they were abandoned after his death and are now flourishing in their South American home, and presenting a serious environmental problem. Luis Fajardo of BBC Monitoring, who is from Colombia, tells us more.

Houbara bustard hunting in Balochistan
From November to February the houbara bustard overwinters in Pakistan's Balochistan province. Hot on their heels are the ruling families of the Gulf States. BBC Urdu's Saher Baloch visited the luxurious, sprawling hunting lodge of one of the families from the United Arab Emirates to meet the locals who look after the royal visitors.

Image: An Eritrean refugee child walks in front of a sign at Mai Aini Refugee camp, in Ethiopia
Credit: EDUARDO SOTERAS/AFP/Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmw8)
How US 'smart bombs' hit an Iraqi air raid shelter in the first Gulf War

More than 400 civilians were killed when two US precision bombs hit the Amiriya air raid shelter in western Baghdad on the morning of 13 February 1991. The Americans claimed that the building had served as a command and control centre for Saddam Hussein's forces. It was the largest single case of civilian casualities that ocurred during Operation Desert Storm, the US-led campaign to force Iraq to withdraw from neighbouring Kuwait. Mike Lanchin has been hearing from one Iraqi woman whose four children were inside the air raid shelter the day it was bombed.

Photo: Inside the Amiriya air-raid shelter following the US bombing (Kaveh Kazemi/Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbwj6p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcp8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbwmyt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z8)
Coronavirus: The vaccinated

Around the world, millions of people are receiving their first dose of vaccines against Covid-19. Healthcare workers are often prioritised and today we introduce two hospital workers; a porter here in the UK and a cleaner in the US. They share their feelings about what it’s like doing a job that comes with a high risk of catching Covid-19. Host Nuala McGovern hears their stories. They share the pride they take in doing their work, despite feeling they don’t always get the appreciation they deserve.

We also hear from two young adults in the UK. They have just received their first vaccine because they are clinically vulnerable. They tell us how relieved they are, after having to stay mostly indoors, since the start of the pandemic. Meanwhile, Israel extended its vaccinations to 16-18 year olds to enable them to return to school. We hear from two teenagers about the growing prospect of going back to some form of normality.

(Photo:Candice Martinez)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yl076)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxl)
On 11 November 2019 James Le Mesurier was found dead in a street in Istanbul. He was the latest casualty in a very unusual war – one fought not on the battlefield, but online.

Le Mesurier was a mysterious figure with a taste for the finer things who served in the British Army in several of the world’s hotspots before focusing his energies on war-ravaged Syria from 2014. He co-founded the White Helmets, a Syrian civil defence force who filmed themselves pulling survivors and bodies from the rubble of bombed out buildings.

Soon, the White Helmets - and Le Mesurier - found themselves at the centre of a global race to control the narrative in the Syrian War. In this investigative series Mayday, presenter Chloe Hadjimatheou talks to the people who knew James, including his widow Emma, his ex-wife and former army colleagues, as well as those on the ground in Syria still working as White Helmets today in an effort to piece together James’ story and that of the White Helmets. She speaks to some of the White Helmet’s detractors and follows up accusations about the organisation to try and understand the truth surrounding them.

Chloe Hadjimatheou says: “Making this series has been an extraordinary experience, as listeners will discover. It started out being an investigation into the story of a man with an astonishing life and a mysterious death but it ended up taking me on a bizarre journey down rabbit holes of misinformation. Ultimately this is a story about how truth functions in modern warfare.”


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct24jf)
The slow search for the origin of Covid-19

As scientists from the World Health Organisation release the findings of their latest visit to Wuhan, Ros Atkins looks at the reasons why so much remains unknown about the start of the pandemic, and the central role China is playing in shaping the investigations.


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbwrpy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d9fppv3zn)
Both sides rest their cases against Trump

Both the defence and the prosecution have now rested their cases in Donald Trump's second impeachment trial, a process some observers say lacked punch.

Also, we hear from the biggest city in Myanmar, where it's day 8 of the protests against a military takeover.

Plus, why South Asians in the UK are apparently prone to listening to fake news about COVID?

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Anne Karpf, a British sociologist, writer, and Professor of Life Writing and Culture at the London Metropolitan University; and Mike Berners-Lee, a writer and consultant on the environment and a professor at Lancaster University here in the UK.

(Picture: US Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell leaves the Senate chamber at the end of the Senate impeachment trial. Credit: REX/Shutterstock)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbwwg2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d9fppv7qs)
The cases for and against Trump's impeachment rest

Both the defence and the prosecution have now rested their cases in Donald Trump's second impeachment trial. The White House says the footage of rioting at the US Congress on January the sixth shown during the proceedings was a terrible warning to the American people.

Also, could "vaccine passports" be a means to allow a quick and safe return to normality for international travel?

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Anne Karpf, a British sociologist, writer, and Professor of Life Writing and Culture at the London Metropolitan University; and Mike Berners-Lee, a writer and consultant on the environment and a professor at Lancaster University here in the UK.

(Picture: The US Capitol Building in Washington, DC. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbx066)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d9fppvcgx)
Protests continue in Myanmar

We hear from the biggest city in Myanmar, where it's day 8 of the protests against a military takeover.

Also, both the defence and the prosecution have now rested their cases in Donald Trump's second impeachment trial, a process some observers say lacked punch.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Anne Karpf, a British sociologist, writer, and Professor of Life Writing and Culture at the London Metropolitan University; and Mike Berners-Lee, a writer and consultant on the environment and a professor at Lancaster University here in the UK.

(Picture: Protesters in front of the statue of General Aung San in Yangon. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ylcgl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21ly)
The wonderful world of Gen Z

How are Generation Z shaping your world? They are the generation born from 1996 to the present day. As the oldest members are turning 24, they’re already shaking things up in the workplace and at the ballot box. Social justice is the most important issue for them and their demands that companies take a stand on political issues is causing a debate in the workplace.

Deja Foxx was the youngest staffer working on Vice President Kamala Harris’ election campaign, working on social media strategy. She is the founder of Gen Z Girl Gang, which promotes inclusivity and diversity. At 17, she founded a sex education organisation helping teens at risk of homelessness and those formerly in prison with access to birth control.

Maya Penn started her own sustainable fashion brand Maya’s Ideas at only 8 years old. She is also the author of ‘You Got This’, a handbook for other would be teenage CEOs and is an award winning environmental activist and artist.

As the most diverse generation America has seen, it’s no wonder that inclusivity is important to them. Deja and Maya discuss how they feel empowered to build a more just and vibrant world…with a little help from their smartphones.

This is a co-production between BBC World Service and Ozy Media.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbx3yb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 today]


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ylh6q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cx2)
Two Minutes Past Nine

13/02/2021 GMT

On April 19th 1995 a 26-year-old named Timothy Mcveigh steered a yellow rental truck into downtown Oklahoma city. Inside was a two-ton homemade explosive.

The Oklahoma City Bombing killed 168 people and leaving 680 injured. Journalist Leah Sottile investigates the legacy of the attack in a series that gets into the heart of America’s far-right today.
Recorded over some of the most divisive and turbulent months in recent American political history, Two Minutes Past Nine explores and questions the changing face of far right extremism in all its chaos and conspiracism.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf5n)
Seventeen teenagers and 17 UN sustainable development goals

The series Project 17 sees seventeen 17-year-olds tell the BBC World Service if their lives have been improved by the UN sustainable development goals. We hear what listeners think of this youth-focussed programme. Plus, how the BBC has teamed up with news media across the world to run the Trusted News Initiative.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbx7pg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c8dg0f1h5)
Finding out I was pregnant is something I will 'never forget'

“We’ve had huge football moments but nothing will ever compare to seeing those two solid lines on a pregnancy test” - Katrina Gorry on impending motherhood.

Australia midfielder Katrina Gorry tells us why she chose to have a baby in 2021 and miss playing in a second Olympic Games. The 28 year old is due to give birth in August after undergoing successful IVF treatment and says when the Tokyo Games were moved from 2020 she did have second thoughts about her plan. Gorry is now targeting playing at the 2023 World Cup on home soil.

With Melbourne in a five day lockdown following a coronavirus outbreak in Victoria state, we have the latest news from the Australian Open Tennis. The event had been accepting fans this week but Saturday’s action will be the first day of the tournament played behind closed doors.

This time next year the Winter Olympics will be underway in Beijing. The BBC’s Alex Capstick looks ahead to an event that has had concerns raised about human rights and air pollution, with the World Uighur Congress going as far as describing the event as the “Genocide Games”.

Joel Hamer and Jacob Few join us to discuss playing for the Cardiff Lions. The team calls itself Wales' first gay and inclusive rugby union side. Joel says after coming out, playing for any of his previous clubs was a non-starter and he reveals how being part of the Lions has helped him during the covid-19 pandemic and the subsequent lockdown. Jacob tells us about the inclusive ethos of the club and how his family still ask him why a straight man would want to play for an inclusive team.

The BBC’s Henry Moeran brings us the latest on day one of the second test between India and England. The hosts are looking to bounce back following a 227 runs defeat in the first test.

In Sporting Witness we tell the story of Nova Peris. In 1996 she became the first Aboriginal Australian to win an Olympic Gold medal, when the “Hockeyroos” women’s hockey team took victory at the Atlanta Games.

Andrew Kelly pays tribute to Tony Collins after the first black manager in the English Football League passed away at the age of 94 this week. Kelly was on Rochdale’s books as a young player, when Collins was manager and he’s now a director of the club. He says Collins “broke through a barrier that had been around eternally”.

And – the BBC’s football correspondent – John Murray – joins us live from the King Power stadium ahead of Leicester City’s game against Liverpool in the Premier League.

Photo: Katrina Gorry #19 of the Australian National Team during a game between Jamaica and Australia at Stade des Alpes on June 18, 2019 in Grenoble, France. (Photo by Andrew Katsampes/ISI Photos/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbxcfl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7hh3vq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ylqpz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mf)
Patton Oswalt and Antonio Badia

Brilliant comedians from around the world join Jess Salomon and Eman El- Husseini to take on the headlines.

This week Jess and Eman are joined by Hollywood star Patton Oswalt and Mexican super stand-up Antonio Badia. They’ll be catching up on the latest news from Donald Trump’s lawyers and asking why one Mexican political candidate wants to be a mysterious man in a mask…

Join Comedians vs The News for the headlines as you’ve never heard them before.


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbxh5q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6v6)
Comparison is the thief of joy with Liz Lubega and TINYMAN

Liz Lubega, R-Kay, Intalekt and TINYMAN discuss the importance of community, the love of language and culture, and whether self-doubt has got in the way of creating.

R-Kay is a Ugandan producer and multi-instrumentalist from Brixton, South London. His sound blends hip-hop and jazz influences with his classical training, having studied cello from an early age before taking up piano. Last year, he composed the score for the documentary Damilola: The Boy Next Door, and released his debut album Ivory.

Intelekt is a South London-based producer, artist, DJ, and mentor. As well as being a solo artist, he makes up half of soulful, jazz-influenced rap duo Billy Dukes. He self-released his debut EP It Is What It Is in 2015, which featured collaborations with Ella Frank and former guests on this show Jacob Banks and Kojey Radical.

TINYMAN is an artist, writer and founder of groundbreaking collective Orphgang, which counts R-Kay and Intalekt as members. His boundary-pushing music means he’s been able to work with the likes of Ray BLK, Jaz Karis, and Che Lingo to name just a few.

And the host this week is Liz Lubega. Born in East London and raised in Uganda for most of her teenage years, she’s worked and toured with the likes of Childish Gambino, Nicole Scherzinger, Tom Odell, and Stormzy.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbxlxv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vvlskf)
Experts say pandemic will end when all countries get vaccinated

Infectious disease experts wrote in the Lancet medical journal that in order to end the pandemic it’s essential that all countries get vaccinated. Also: US Senators look set to vote on Donald Trump’s impeachment trial; and the bodies of more than one hundred French and Russian soldiers who died during Napoleon Bonaparte's retreat from Moscow in 1812 are being laid to rest in Russia.

(Photo: A man in West Virginia in the US receives a COVID-19 vaccine. Credit: REUTERS/Stephen Zenner)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbxqnz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lnd0fm8b9)
Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbby6nh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7hhz2m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ymkxw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21ly)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbybdm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 World Questions (w3cszt64)
The politics of Covid-19

What works - and at what cost - in the fight against Covid? Jonny Dymond brings together top flight decision-makers with the public feeling the brunt of those decisions around the world. How some countries get ahead with vaccines, what the world has learned about preventing the next pandemic and whether vaccine passports are an assault on human rights - a few of the political questions on which a global panel from Singapore, USA, Kenya, South Korea and the United Kingdom, compare notes.

On the panel:
Nadhim Zahawi, MP: UK Minister for Covid-19 Vaccine Deployment
Sabina Chege, MP: Chair of Parliamentary Committee on Health, Kenya
Prof Kenneth Mac: Director of Medical Services, Singapore
Jennifer Nuzzo: Director of The Outbreak Observatory, Johns Hopkins University, USA
Jie-Ae Sohn: Former CNN Bureau Chief in Seoul and Advisor to the World Bank

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

Producers: Charlie Taylor and Helen Towner
Assistant Producer: Steven Williams
Studio Engineers: Chris Weightman, Ian Mitchell and Giles Aspen

(Photo: Lucy Powderly receives a Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine from sergeant Julia Benson of the Illinois Army National Guard, Credit: Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbyg4r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk45)
Actor Sam Neill

New Zealand actor Sam Neill on playing an Australian sheep farmer in his latest film Rams.

The acclaimed Welsh screenwriter Russell T Davies tells us about his hit TV series It’s a Sin and why he regularly killed off UK Prime Ministers in Doctor Who.

K Ming Chang explains her fascination for Taiwanese folklore and myths and why she used them in her debut novel Bestiary.

We’ll hear actor and writer Justin Theroux in conversation with his cousin Louis Theroux.

The legendary French American actress Leslie Caron reveals what it was like to star in the big Hollywood musicals.

And there’s folk music from Russia.

Joining Nikki Bedi are critic Guy Lodge and filmmaker Maite Alberdi, who’ll also be talking about her latest film The Mole Agent.


(Photo: Sam Neill. Credit: David Zorrakino/Europa Press via Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbykww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vvmrjg)
Trump aquitted by US senate

Former US president Donald Trump has been acquitted by the US Senate in his second impeachment trial in twelve months. Republicans shielded him from accountability for the deadly assault by his supporters on the US Capitol. The Senate vote of 57 to 43 fell short of the two-thirds majority needed to convict Mr Trump on a charge of incitement of insurrection after a five-day trial.

Also on the programme we take a look at the anti government protests taking place on the campuses of some of Turkey's elite universities. And this Valentine's Day, why not say it with folk music, rather than flowers? We hear from the musicians raising money for colleagues who have lost their livelihoods in the pandemic.

(Picture: Washington DC, January 6th. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbypn0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79v3hwv4mv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqqmtjflp)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yn1xd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0wkg)
Vipassana: 240 hours of silence

Vipassana, which means to see things as they really are, is one of India's most ancient techniques of meditation. It was taught by the Buddha more than 2,500 years ago as a universal remedy for universal ills. The practice died out in India, but survived in Burma, and is now a growing movement around the world.

To learn the technique students complete a 10-day silent retreat, which includes 10 hours of daily meditation. There is no eye contact, no communication, no exercise, no reading or writing, no technology. No distraction from the journey inwards. They must try to overcome the habit of reacting to sensation. By doing so, over 10 days students train themselves to stop reacting to the vicissitudes of life and experience the interconnectedness of all living things.

It is notoriously difficult, but what insights does it afford? What difficulties, both physical and emotional, are faced along the way? We hear the experiences of people who have made it through 240 hours of silence.

Vipassana was popularised by S.N. Goenka, who learnt the technique in Burma from his teacher, Sayagyi U Ba Khin, and in 1969 travelled to India to conduct the first Vipassana course in this tradition outside Burma. There are now around 200 Vipassana meditation centres around the world, attracting people from all walks of life. The course is free, and non-sectarian.

Producer: Eve Streeter
(Photo credit: Marc Sethi)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbytd4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spx)
Amateur trading: Reward and risk

On this episode of Business Weekly, we examine the world of amateur traders. One in five Americans now play the stockmarket, but there are warnings that inexperienced traders could be caught out. Also, we take a look at the new space race. Commercial enterprises are vying to see who can get the most satellites into orbit in order to provide internet connectivity to some of the world’s poorest and most rural regions. In the week when Bumble made its market debut, we hear how dating apps are faring during the pandemic. And we chat to the man who provides books for home offices so his clients can seem well-read on video conferencing calls. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

((Photo Illustration by Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images)



SUNDAY 14 FEBRUARY 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbyy48)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9m)
Hao Wu: Wuhan under lockdown on film

This week, we go behind the camera with some of the world’s leading documentary filmmakers.

As the World Health Organisation begin their visit to Wuhan to determine the origins of Covid-19, perhaps some clues can be gleaned from Hao Wu’s documentary 76 days. Alongside his co-directors Weixi Chen and Anonymous, he documented the early days of the pandemic by following the staff and patients of four Wuhan hospitals from January to April 2020. He speaks to Chi Chi about the making of his film.

From marches in the streets to meetings in city halls, Suvi West‘s new documentary Eatnameamet - Our Silent Struggle, follows the Sámi people's fight for their culture and land. Shannon Kring’s documentary, End of the Line: The Women of Standing Rock, tells the story of the indigenous women who risk their lives to stop the Dakota Access oil pipeline construction in the United States. Suvi and Shannon discuss the challenges, and the urgency of telling the stories of indigenous communities through film.

When you think of a secret agent, your mind might not jump to an 85-year-old man. However, in the Chilean documentary The Mole Agent, director Maite Alberdi follows the story of 85-year-old Sergio who has been hired by a private detective to infiltrate a retirement home. Maite spent four months filming inside the retirement home and shares the lessons she learnt while making the documentary.

Presented by Chi Chi Izundu


(Photo Credit: Hao Wu from the film 76 Days)


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yn9dn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3cszf5n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbz1wd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3cszky0)
Perseverance approaches Mars

On 18th February the Perseverance rover should land on Mars. Katie Stack-Morgan of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab tells Roland Pease about the technological advances that mean that the spacecraft should be able to land in Jezero Crater. Imperial College geologist Sanjeev Gupta discusses what this crater can reveal about the history of life on the red planet.

After months of negotiations, and weeks of work on the ground, a team brought together by the World Health Organisation has just concluded its first attempts to find out the origins of SARS-Cov2 in Wuhan. Peter Daszak, who has worked closely with Chinese virologists in the past, briefed Roland Pease on what had been discovered.

The South African government has announced that it will not be rolling out the Astra Zeneca Covid vaccine as it appears it is not very effective against the dominant strain in the country. Helen Rees, of Witwatersrand University and a member of South Africa’s Health Products Regulatory Authority, explains that the ‘ban’ is an overstatement.

At least 35 people died in a flood disaster in the Himalayan state of Uttarakhand in India on February 6th. The details are still unclear, but the trigger seems to be associated with a glacier overhanging an upstream lake in the steep valley. Rupert Stuart-Smith of Oxford University, who has just published an analysis of a glacier melting disaster in waiting in the Andes, talks about the impacts of climate change on the stability of mountain glaciers.

And Do you find your bearings quickly or are you easily disorientated? Do your friends trust you with the directions in a new city?
Finding our way in the physical world – whether that’s around a building or a city - is an important everyday capability, one that has been integral to human survival. This week CrowdScience listeners want to know whether some people are ‘naturally’ better at navigating, so presenter Marnie Chesterton sets her compass and journeys into the human brain.
Accompanied by psychologists and neuroscientists Marnie learns how humans perceive their environment, recall routes and orientate themselves in unfamiliar spaces. We ask are some navigational strategies better than others?

Marnie also hears that the country you live in might be a good predictor of your navigation skills and how growing up in the countryside may give you an wayfaring advantage. But is our navigational ability down to biology or experience, and can we improve it?

With much of our modern map use being delegated to smartphones, Marnie explores what implications an over-reliance on GPS technology might have for our brain health.


(Image: An illustration of NASA’s Perseverance rover landing on Mars.
Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech)


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Deborah Cohen


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbz5mj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c1k)
'Love jihad': Is love bound by religion?

Interfaith relationships in India have always faced the heat. Love remains difficult and at times dangerous across large sections of Indian society, which runs on patriarchy, caste, and religion.

New anti-conversion laws implemented by some states now make interfaith marriages even more difficult. Their apparent target is the so-called 'love jihad', a term used by radical Hindu groups to accuse Muslim men of converting Hindu women by marriage.

We speak with two interfaith couples, one married for over 20 years and the other for nearly two years, to hear their stories – and struggles – of love, faith and religious identity. They tell us what keeps them going, as we ask if love is bound by religion.

Presenter: Devina Gupta
Contributors: Ranu Kulsreshtha and Asif Iqbal, co-founders, Dhanak of Humanity; Krutika Lele and Tamir Khan, musicians and interfaith couple

Image: A group of housewives and working professionals heading various voluntary organisations demonstrate demanding an anti-conversion law along the lines of Uttar Pradesh government's Prohibition of Unlawful Religious Conversion Ordinance, at Central Park, on December 10, 2020 in Jaipur, India. (Photo by Himanshu Vyas/Hindustan Times via Getty Images)


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ynjwx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cx2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyp)
How much Covid in the world?

If we brought all the virus particles of the Sars-CoV-2 virus from every human currently infected, how much would there be? This was a question posed by one of our listeners. We lined up two experts to try to work this out. YouTube maths nerd Matt Parker and Kit Yates, senior lecturer in mathematical biology at the University of Bath, UK give us their best estimates. One believes the particles would fit into a small can of coke, the other a spoonful.


(Coronavirus cells. Credit RomoloTavani /Getty Creative)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbz9cn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbzf3s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct20d6)
World Wide Waves: The sounds of community radio

We may think we live in a digital age, but only half the world is currently online. Across the globe, small radio stations bind remote communities, play a dazzling array of music, educate, entertain and empower people to make change. Cameroon’s Radio Taboo, in a remote rainforest village 100 miles off the grid, relies on solar power; its journalists and engineers are all local men and women. Radio Civic Sfantu Gheorghe in the Danube Delta preserves the history of the community. Tamil Nadu’s Kadal Osai (“the sound of the ocean”) broadcasts to local fishermen about weather, fishing techniques—and climate change. In Bolivia, Radio Pio Doce is one of the last remaining stations founded in the 1950s to organise mostly indigenous tin miners against successive dictatorships. And KTNN, the Voice of the Navajo Nation, helps lift its listeners’ spirits in a time of loss and grief.

Produced by David Goren
Presented by Maria Margaronis.

(Image: Cameroon's Radio Taboo, Credit: Oumarou Mebouack)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbzjvx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ynx49)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbznm1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d9fppy0wr)
Trump acquitted

Former US President, Donald Trump, is found not guilty of inciting insurrection.

Also, Canada's attempts to tackle racism and extremism.

Plus, integration in Germany creates a new pool of CDU voters for the party of the Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Michaela Kuefner, Chief Political Editor of Deutsche Welle, Germany’s international news provider; and Dave Clark, news editor for the French news agency, AFP.

(Picture: Former US President Donald Trump. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbzsc5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d9fppy4mw)
Trump Not Guilty

The US Senate has voted to acquit Donald Trump of inciting the attack on the Capitol Building last month. But even so, members of his own party denounced him at the conclusion of his second impeachment trial. We hear about the future of the Republican party.

Also on the programme: Voters in Kosovo go to the polls; And as one of Hungary's opposition broadcasters goes off air, there's growing concern over media freedom in Eastern Europe.

To talk about these stories and more we are joined by Michaela Kuefner, Chief Political Editor of Deutsche Welle, Germany’s international News provider; And from Brussels by Dave Clark, news editor for the French news agency, AFP.

(Photo: The American flag flies at half staff at the U.S. Capitol Building on the fifth day of the impeachment trial; Credit: REUTERS/Al Drago TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbzx39)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d9fppy8d0)
Protests in Myanmar continue

Thousands of Burmese returned to the streets to protests against the military coup.

Also, as the US Senate acquits Donald Trump of charges of inciting an insurrection, where does the process leave the Republican party?

Plus, how to find love, we hear from an expert.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Michaela Kuefner, Chief Political Editor of Deutsche Welle, Germany’s international news provider; and Dave Clark, news editor for the French news agency, AFP.

(Picture: Demonstrators against the military coup in Myanmar outside the Chinese embassy in Yangon. Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yp8cp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 Outlook (w3cszf14)
The making of the 'Wish Man'

Frank Shankwitz was the co-founder of the Make-A-Wish Foundation, an organisation that since 1980 has granted hundreds of thousands of wishes for children with life-threatening medical conditions. Frank’s inspiration came from his own difficult childhood, a near-death experience and an encounter with a 7-year-old boy named Chris Greicius. Frank passed away recently; he spoke to Outlook's Andrea Kennedy about his extraordinary life in October 2019.

Presenter: Andrea Kennedy
Producer: Tom Harding Assinder

Picture: Frank Shankwitz and Chris Greicius
Credit: Frank Shankwitz

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbc00vf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ypd3t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Africa Life Clinic (w3ct21g4)
Superbugs and superfoods

Infections caused by germs which have become resistant to the medicines used to treat them pose a great threat to people’s health, as curable diseases become untreatable. Unregulated medicine dispensation and improper cleaning and sanitation at hospitals can all contribute to the spread of resistant germs. Overuse of antibiotics in animal rearing can also contribute, although this is less prevalent in Africa. Professor Joachim Osur and Dr John Kiiru explain.

Many claims have been made about the potential health benefits of coconut oil. The oil is used widely in cooking and for hair, skin and healthcare. Dayo Yusuf travelled to Mombasa, Kenya, to investigate how coconut oil is produced and explore the nutritional facts and fiction.

Priscilla Ngethe discusses these issues with BBC Africa Health Editor Anne Mawathe and reporter Dayo Yusuf.

(Picture: Antibiotics. Credit: Getty Images).


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbc04lk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c1k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yphvy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0wkg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbc08bp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7hl0rt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ypmm2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct1gv9)
The New Arctic

The New Arctic: Resource extraction

Global warming is happening twice as fast in the Arctic. As the ice melts, it poses an existential threat to local communities and indigneous culture, whilst opening up possibilities of economic opportunities. What is the future of mining, of green energy, of tourism in a world that climate change is making accessible for the first time in millennia? And where does power lie? Who will control the rapidly changing icy far north as it thaws?

The US Geological Survey estimated the Arctic may be home to 30% of the planet's undiscovered natural gas reserves and 13% of its undiscovered oil. Russia for example, views its vast Arctic resources as a key driver of its future economy. On the other hand, the melting ice will cause trillions of dollars worth of climate change-related damage, globally, over the coming decades.

But for the communities who live above the Arctic Circle, it’s not a simple debate over preservation versus production - there is a need for jobs and sustainable local economic growth.

(Photo credit: Victpria Ferran.)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbc0d2t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 World Questions (w3cszt64)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbc0hty)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vvppgj)
WHO defends the credibility of its mission to China

Dominic Dwyer, one of the scientists investigating the origins of the pandemic tells us there was cooperation from the Chinese but they could have provided more information.

Also in the programme: more protests in Myanmar and Guinea says it's facing a new Ebola epidemic, five years after a disastrous outbreak in West Africa was brought to an end.

(Photo: Market in Wuhan. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbc0ml2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct20d6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbc0rb6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjwr)
Sister Juana, a great mind of Mexico

Sister Juana Ines de la Cruz is celebrated today as one of the finest poets in the history of Mexico. She was not just a creative and intellectual force but also a campaigner for women’s education and someone not afraid to challenge male hypocrisy. The colonial 17th-century society in which she lived was very patriarchal so, not surprisingly, her views brought her into conflict with the men in power.

Rajan Datar looks at key episodes in Sister Juana’s life and examines the passion and ingenuity in her poetry and plays with the help of Alicia Gaspar de Alba, Professor at University of California Los Angeles and a writer whose novels include Sor Juana’s Second Dream; Dr. Amy Fuller, Senior Lecturer at Nottingham Trent University, specialist in early modern Spain and Mexico and author of Between Two Worlds, a monograph on Sister Juana's plays; and Rosa Perelmuter, Professor of Romance Studies at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The reader is Pepa Duarte.

[Image: A painting of Sister Juana by the Mexican artist Miguel Cabrera (1695-1768). Credit: DeAgostini/Getty Images]


SUN 15:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbc0w2b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lnd0fqdqn)
Live sport from around the world with news, interviews and analysis.


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbc179q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7hlzqv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yqll3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21mf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbc1c1v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6v6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbc1gsz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vvqnfk)
Fighting intensifies in northern Yemen

Houthi rebels and government forces have clashed near the city of Ma'rib, the last government controlled stronghold in the north of the country.

Also on the programme as armoured vehicles are seen in the streets of cities across Myanmar, the internet has been switched off amid growing fears of a new crackdown on protesters. And in Russia, hundred of women have taken to the streets, armed with flowers, to show solidarity with the jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

(Picture: Houthi Rebels in Sanaa, Yemen's capitol. Credit: Getty)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbc1lk3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79v3hwy1jy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqqmtmbhs)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yqyth)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cx2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbc1q97)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yr2km)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf14)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]



MONDAY 15 FEBRUARY 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln5p9j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7w1kx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Discovery (w3csz9ft)
The power of one

We humans are a supremely social species, but the coronavirus pandemic has forced many of us into solitary confinement.

It feels like an unnatural, regressive move, that goes against our collective nature. So why do some species embrace the power of one? And how do they make a success of a solo existence?

Lucy Cooke meets some of the animal kingdom’s biggest loners - from the Komodo Dragon, to the Okapi and the Black Rhino - to explore the lure of solitude.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Picture: Okapi (Okapia johnstoni), forest giraffe or zebra giraffe, Credit: Jiri Hrebicek/Getty Images


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln5t1n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x582xsn65dd)
When will Biden name the head of the FDA?

Why is there no rush from the White House to install a new head of America's Food and Drug Administration despite pressures to roll out Covid vaccines?

Also in the programme, Hollywood movie producers are losing big bonuses because new releases go straight to streaming services.

Plus, a looming banking crisis in Poland over loans denominated in Swiss Francs.

And Kenya's trade minister says the country wants to boost its textile industry.

PHOTO: Reuters


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7w5b1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct21ly)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln5xss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc36)
Kirill Dmitriev: Russia's Sputnik V a vaccine for humankind?

Right now the world is seeing two sides of Vladimir Putin’s Russia. The one he wants you to see is the scientifically advanced nation offering the world an effective Covid vaccine known as Sputnik V. The one he’d rather you ignore is the repressive authoritarian state that ruthlessly eliminates those who threaten the status quo. Stephen Sackur speaks to Kirill Dmitriev a Putin ally, the boss of one of Russia’s sovereign wealth funds and a key backer of the Russian vaccine.


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7w925)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4m)
Women writing true crime

Women are big fans of true crime stories… from books, to films, podcasts and TV programmes. Kim Chakanetsa talks to two women who've made their name reporting on true crime.

Connie Walker is a Canadian journalist whose award-winning true crime podcast series, Missing and Murdered, examines violence and discrimination against women and girls from Indigenous communities. She is Cree and uses the mystery, and twists and turns of true crime to help educate people about Indigenous history.

While Tanya Farber was covering the trial of a man who murdered his family she realised that this kind of crime got a lot of attention, as did trials involving women killers. She wrote Blood on Her Hands: South Africa’s Most Notorious Female Killers.

They talk about what sparks this fascination when by far the majority of victims and perpetrators of crime are men.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
Left: Tanya Farber (courtesy Tanya Farber)
Right: Connie Walker (courtesy Connie Walker)


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln61jx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjwr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh67)
Nova Peris - Australia's first aboriginal Olympic champion

In 1996, Nova Peris became the first aboriginal Australian to win an Olympic gold medal when the “Hockeyroos” women’s hockey team took victory at the Atlanta games. Peris’s mother was one of Australia’s so-called Stolen Generation – the aboriginal children separated from their families by the state – and Peris experienced racial abuse herself during her sporting career. After triumphing in hockey, she switched to athletics and took another gold medal at the Commonwealth Games in the 200 metres sprint. Nova Peris talks to Robert Nicholson. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Nova Peris at the 1996 Olympics (Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln6591)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbd)
Does big money really believe green is good?

When a man sitting on nearly $9 trillion dollars of funds speaks, CEOs, investors and politicians listen.

In late January, Larry Fink, boss of the world’s largest hedge fund, BlackRock, announced in his annual letter that "climate risk is investment risk. But we also believe the climate transition presents a historic investment opportunity.”

He's not alone in championing big money's green awakening, but the titans of finance remain invested in the fossil fuel industry to the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars. So does the rhetoric marry with reality?

Guests:
Caroline Le Meaux - Head of ESG Research, Engagement, and Voting policy at Amundi
Jeanne Martin - Senior Manager at Share Action
Vishala Sri-Pathma - BBC business reporter


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7wjkf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv71)
Can I improve my sense of direction?

Do you find your bearings quickly or are you easily disorientated? Do your friends trust you with the directions in a new city?
Finding our way in the physical world – whether that’s around a building or a city - is an important everyday capability, one that has been integral to human survival. This week CrowdScience listeners want to know whether some people are ‘naturally’ better at navigating, so presenter Marnie Chesterton sets her compass and journeys into the human brain.
Accompanied by psychologists and neuroscientists Marnie learns how humans perceive their environment, recall routes and orientate themselves in unfamiliar spaces. We ask are some navigational strategies better than others?

Marnie also hears that the country you live in might be a good predictor of your navigation skills and how growing up in the countryside may give you an wayfaring advantage. But is our navigational ability down to biology or experience, and can we improve it?

With much of our modern map use being delegated to smartphones, Marnie explores what implications an over-reliance on GPS technology might have for our brain health.

Presenter: Marnie Chesterton
Producer: Melanie Brown

(Photo:Lost man with map. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln6915)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1ybtkcw)
Myanmar troops on the streets as internet cut off

There are growing fears that the army is about to start a major crackdown in Myanmar.

Guinea declares a fresh Ebola epidemic - so what do the authorities there need to do to bring it under control?

And why is the Czech Republic lifting some coronavirus restrictions when it still has some of the worst infection rates in Europe?


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln6ds9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1ybtp40)
Myanmar: Aung San Suu Kyi's detention extended

The army deploys extra armoured vehicles on the street, amid fears of a crackdown in Myanmar.

We'll be talking about Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Nigeria’s former Finance Minister, who's expected to be named as the World Trade Organisation's first female and first African leader.

And the UK gets a new coronavirus quarantine system. From today those arriving from more than thirty countries will be confined to a hotel for 10 days.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln6jjf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1ybtsw4)
Myanmar protests continue amid fears of crackdown

More troops are deployed and the detention of Aung San Suu Kyi is extended by another two days.

From today, the United Kingdom will force travellers from 30 countries to isolate in quarantine hotels at their own expense.

And 200 years after his death, why a digital version of the romantic poet John Keats has been created.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln6n8k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7x0jy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7kp)
Bill Gates versus climate change

Eliminating carbon emissions in the next 30 years would be "the most amazing thing humanity has ever done".

In an exclusive interview, Bill Gates tells Justin Rowlatt why he has set his sights on tackling global warming, and how the challenge compares to efforts to contain the coronavirus pandemic - which he is also taking a leading role in, with the funding of vaccine rollouts. The Microsoft founder and world's most influential philanthropist is particularly focused on the parts of the economy that are the toughest to decarbonise - things like cement, steel and aviation.

His thinking is strongly influenced by the energy historian Vaclav Smil. Gates says he has read every one of the Czech-Canadian professor's 40-odd books on the subject. But in a rare interview, Professor Smil tells Justin that he has a decidedly more pessimistic view of how quick and painless the energy transition can be.

(Picture: Justin Rowlatt interviewing Bill Gates at the Natural History Museum)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszml8)
Britain's forgotten slave owners: Part one

It wasn't until recently that researchers working in the national archive in London discovered the extent to which ordinary people in Britain had been involved in the slave trade in the 18th and early 19th century. Louise Hidalgo has been talking to Dr Nick Draper, who uncovered volumes of records detailing the thousands of people who claimed compensation when slavery was abolished in Britain in 1834. He and colleagues at University College London set up the Legacies of British Slave-ownership database, documenting this forgotten part of Britain's history.

(Photo: Taken from Josiah Wedgwood's medallion, 'Am I Not a Man and a Brother?''. The inscription became one of the most famous catchphrases of British and American abolitionists. Credit: MPI/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln6s0p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7x492)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln6wrt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7x816)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln70hy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxhssry2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7xcsb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv71)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln7482)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd4f)
The scavenger who found a brass symphony

Ronald Kabuye grew up in the Katwe slums of Kampala, Uganda, scavenging for food and trying to sell scrap metal for cash. One day in the street he saw a performance by the M-Lisada marching band, a group made up of children from a local orphanage. Ronald was enthralled. He joined the band, took up the trombone, and learned to read music. Performing gave him an escape and ultimately the opportunity to travel the world and play with some of the world's most influential musicians.

Ronald is now a music teacher for the charity Brass for Africa. One of his pupils is Sumayya Nabakooza, who has overcome tough opposition to become one of very few female tuba players in Africa. They both share their story with Outlook's Anu Anand.

Picture: Ronald Kabuye
Credit: Brass For Africa


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszml8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln7806)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxhst0fb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7xm8l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln7crb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d44xkcx)
Myanmar coup: Protesters threatened with jail sentences

Myanmar's military has warned anti-coup protesters across the country that they could face up to 20 years in prison if they obstruct the armed forces.

Long sentences and fines will also apply to those found to incite "hatred or contempt" towards the coup leaders, the military said. The warnings come following reports of soldiers firing rubber bullets and wounding demonstrators.

Also on the programme: the latest from India and the months long protests by hundreds of thousands of the country's farmers; and we’ll hear from Bill Gates who has turned his sights on the climate crisis.

(Picture: Myanmar Protesters Credit: Reuters)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln7hhg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7xvrv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlvb9cwxbx5)
Google strikes Australian news pay deal

This week, the Australian parliament will debate whether to force digital giants like Google and Facebook to pay newspapers and television stations for linking to their news and features. In anticipation of this, the owner of the Seven television network has announced an agreement with Google worth a reported $23 million a year. We hear from Shona Ghosh, senior technology editor for the website, Business Insider. Plus, Bill Gates describes the implications of meeting the global target to reduce net carbon emissions to zero by the year 2050. And Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, the former Nigerian finance minister and World Bank managing director has been confirmed as the World Trade Organisation's new director-general. She'll be the first woman, and the first African, to head the WTO; we get analysis from Mayeni Jones, the BBC's Nigeria correspondent in Lagos. And our regular workplace commentator, Stephanie Hare talks about how to approach bereavement in the workplace. (Picture of Google logo on phone by Nicolas Economou for Getty Images).


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln7m7l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8qrjsz9f)
First woman, first African: Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala becomes WTO boss

The former Nigerian finance minister, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, has become the first woman and the first African to be appointed as director general of the World Trade Organization. We go to Nigeria to hear what is expected from her leadership.

We also hear again from protesters in Myanmar demanding the restoration of democracy after a military coup.

Also, Dr Eleanor Murray - assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health - will answer audience questions about the pandemic and look at the latest lines on the story.

We learn how sniffer dogs are being used to detect Covid-19 infections and speak to a dog trainer who works with “Covid dogs” at Helsinki airport.

(Photo: Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala poses outside a Nigerian diplomatic residence in Chambesy, near Geneva, Switzerland, September 29, 2020. Credit; Emma Farge/File Photo/Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln7qzq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8qrjt31k)
Coronavirus: Sniffer dogs used to detect Covid-19

We speak to a dog trainer in Finland about how sniffer dogs are being used to detect Covid-19 infections at Helsinki airport.

And Professor Manfred Green, a medical doctor and professor of epidemiology in the school of public health at the University of Haifa in Israel will be joining us to discuss today’s news on the coronavirus.

The former Nigerian finance minister, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, has become the first woman and the first African to be appointed as director general of the World Trade Organization. We go to Nigeria to hear what is expected from her leadership.

We also go to Texas in the US to hear how people are coping with one of the coldest winters for decades.

(Photo: A sniffer dog trained to detect the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in highly frequented places works, at the International Airport of Santiago, Chile, December 21, 2020. Credit: Ivan Alvarado/Reuters)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln7vqv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszml8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln7zgz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxhstqx3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7ybrc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k0vtjkyy0)
2021/02/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln8373)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7yghh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3csz9fv)
The power of night

Lucy Cooke meets some of the animal kingdom’s nocturnal inhabitants to understand why it pays to stir once the sun goes down.

She examines some of the extraordinary nocturnal adaptations from the largest group of mammals, the bats, to the mysterious long fingered lemur, the Aye Aye, to hear why the dark has proved evolutionarily advantageous. In an increasingly crowded planet, could future survival for many diurnal animals depend on a nightlife?

Producer Adrian Washbourne

Picture: Honey Badger, Credit: Cindernatalie/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln86z7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d44ydlt)
Rubber bullets fired against protesters in Myanmar

Soldiers in Myanmar have used rubber bullets against protesters in the city of Mandalay, as the military junta tries to quell resistance to its rule. The coup leader, General Min Aung Hlaing, has said he will handle mass protests "softly," though he did not clarify what that means in practice. We hear from a student protester in Mandalay.

Also in the programme: The former Nigerian finance minister, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, becomes the first woman and first African to head the World Trade Organisation; and scientists who drilled a hole through the Antarctic ice sheet have found unexpected new life forms living on the sea bed.

(Image: A soldier is seen on top of an armoured vehicle in Naypyitaw, Myanmar. Credit: Reuters/Stringer)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln8bqc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vgs64sq6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fr2x3v2p1)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7ypzr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58xcj7z24p)
Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala named first female, African boss of WTO

In her own words "history was made" today when Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala became the first woman and the first African director general of the World Trade Organization. She tells us how she plans to reform the WTO and the importance of climate change.

Also in the programme, the global economic cost of the Coronavirus pandemic will run into trillions of dollars. Could the world set up a better early warning system for future pandemics? Dr Micheal Mina, an epidemiologist based at the Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health is trying to do just that with the project he calls Global Immunological Observatory.

Plus, this week, the Australian parliament will debate whether to force digital giants like Google and Facebook to pay newspapers and television stations for linking to their news and features. In anticipation of this, the owner of the Seven television network has announced an agreement with Google worth a reported $23 million a year. We hear from Shona Ghosh, senior technology editor for the website, Business Insider.

And, Bill Gates describes the implications of meeting the global target to reduce net carbon emissions to zero by the year 2050.

PHOTO: Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln8ggh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc36)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7ytqw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



TUESDAY 16 FEBRUARY 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln8l6m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkq7)
US 'smart bombs' hit an Iraqi air raid shelter

More than 400 civilians were killed when two US precision bombs hit the Amiriya air raid shelter in western Baghdad on the morning of 13 February 1991. The Americans claimed that the building had served as a command and control centre for Saddam Hussein's forces. It was the largest single case of civilian casualities that ocurred during Operation Desert Storm. Also in this week's programme, a drug scandal from the 1970s which blighted the lives of generations, rare archive of the celebrated British artist, Francis Bacon, the 1980s New York Street News newspaper set up to help the homeless and we hear from a nurse from West Africa who devoted her life to the British health service.

Photo: Inside the Amiriya air-raid shelter following the US bombing (Kaveh Kazemi/Getty Images)


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln8pyr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x197vl01y1n)
Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala named first female, African boss of WTO

In her own words "history was made" today when Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala became the first woman and the first African director general of the World Trade Organization. She tells us how she plans to reform the WTO and the importance of climate change.

Also in the programme, the global economic cost of the Coronavirus pandemic will run into trillions of dollars. Could the world set up a better early warning system for future pandemics? Dr Micheal Mina, an epidemiologist based at the Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health is trying to do just that with the project he calls Global Immunological Observatory.

Plus, Bill Gates describes the implications of meeting the global target to reduce net carbon emissions to zero by the year 2050.

And our regular workplace commentator, Stephanie Hare talks about how to approach bereavement in the workplace.

PHOTO: Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala/Getty Images


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln8tpw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2h)
Beating superbugs

A small team of Indian scientists think they’ve found a new way to kill superbugs. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are killing hundreds of thousands of people every year, and that number is going up fast. But one Bangalore-based biotech company thinks they might be on the verge of a breakthrough.

Produced and presented by Jo Mathys

Picture: Science Photo Library


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7z5z8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcl)
Rex, King of Mardi Gras

As the Mardi Gras season draws near, In the Studio goes behind the scenes with the Krewe of Rex, New Orleans’s oldest parading organisation, to see how the masters of carnival create their mobile sculptures.

New Orleans reporter, Betsy Shepherd follows Rex’s creative team for a year - the length of time it takes to make the ornate floats that are the fixture of Mardi Gras street parades. But 2020 turned out to be anything but typical. She speaks with creative director Henri Schindler and his team of artisans about the history and craft surrounding this most ephemeral of art forms as well as the challenges and delights of building a fantasy world amidst a pandemic.

What will the 2021 Mardi Gras season bring? Join Betsy for a parade of sounds from Mardi Gras’s most ardent practitioners as they work to keep the spirit of carnival alive.

Presented by Betsy Shepherd

Produced by Betsy Shepherd and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service

Image courtesy of the Rex Organization


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln8yg0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd4f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszml8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln9264)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct20d5)
Inside the brain of Jeff Bezos

David Baker reveals the thinking and the values that made Jeff Bezos the richest man on the planet, and Amazon the most wildly successful company, even in a year when the global economy faces catastrophe. Speaking to senior colleagues within his businesses, longstanding business partners and analysts, David Baker learns the secrets to Amazon's success. As the billionaire creates a huge philanthropic foundation, the programme examines the impact of Jeff Bezos' ideas on the fight against global climate change and the exploration of the solar system, as well as his impact on the media.

(Photo: Amazon president, chairman and CEO Bezos speaks at the Business Insider"s Ignition Future of Digital conference, New York City. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7zfgj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3csz9fv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln95y8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1ybxg8z)
Myanmar: latest internet shutdown

We speak to a protester who's determined to continue despite threats of punishment by military.

We'll go to Hong Kong and hear from a veteran pro-democracy activist going on trial today - alongside media tycoon Jimmy Lai

And how locals in New Orleans are celebrating the famous Mardi Gras - despite the pandemic.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln99pd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1ybxl13)
Myanmar protests: public workers try to shut down services

Healthcare workers on strike in protest at the coup say they're being hidden and protected by residents of Yangon

We go to Bangladesh for an update on the trial of those alleged to be involved in the killing of the prominent US/Bangladeshi writer and blogger, Avijit Roy.

Bill Gates has been talking about the challenge of tackling the coronavirus, but he says the real task is combatting climate change.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln9ffj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1ybxps7)
A doctor's view of the Myanmar protests

We speak to a doctor who's refusing to work until Aung San Suu Kyi is reinstated: "we are planning to 100% shut down... hospitals, transport, electricity and education".

Cuba is working on a homegrown coronavirus vaccine which it hopes will bring both health and commercial benefits to the island.

And we go to Hong Kong and hear from a veteran pro-democracy activist on trial under the new national security law.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln9k5n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb7zxg1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8cc)
Teaching children about money

Though children will usually learn how to add, subtract or multiply in school, very often they are not taught the skills they need to manage their money in older life. We’ll hear from children around the world about their understanding of, and relationship with, money. Then, Lily Lapenna MBE, of MyBnk, describes her decades long campaign to improve financial education in UK schools, and how a gap still remains between boys and girls in financial literacy. Eddie Behringer, CEO of the fintech firm Copper, explains how their bank accounts for teenagers can help build skills from early on. And Dhruti Shah, author of the illustrated business dictionary Bear Markets and Beyond, recounts how she wishes she’d realised sooner just how much finance and business would factor in her life, and how a basic business vocabulary can help you understand your world better.

(Image credit: Getty Images)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmqs)
Britain's forgotten slave owners: Part two

How one man used research by historians at University College London into Britain's forgotten slave-owners to track down the descendants of the family who'd owned his ancestors two centuries earlier. Dr James Dawkins tells Louise Hidalgo how his quest led him to the famous evolutionary biologist, Professor Richard Dawkins, author of the Selfish Gene, with whom he shares a name and a past.

Picture: slaves unloaded from slave ship at their destination; from Amelia Opie The Black Man's Lament: or How to Make Sugar, London, 1826 (Credit: Universal History Archive/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln9nxs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct20d5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb80165)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln9snx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xln9xf1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxhswnv5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb808pf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 Discovery (w3csz9fv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnb155)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdkz)
Setting up a fake mafia to catch El Chapo

Infiltrating mobs, taking down contract killers and busting drug rings; this was the job of Special Agent Mike McGowan during his 30 year career in the FBI. He was already the expert in undercover operations at the bureau when he was handed the "superbowl" of cases - to bring down the Mexican drug lord El Chapo. In a sting that lasted four years, Michael and his team of agents convinced the notorious Sinaloa cartel that they too were an established crime organisation. He tells Outlook's Saskia Edwards about using dog psychology and a purple velour bathrobe to fool some of the world's most dangerous criminals.

His book is called Ghost: My Thirty Years as an FBI Undercover Agent

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: SA Michael McGowan on the job
Credit: Courtesy of Michael McGowan


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmqs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnb4x9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxhswxbf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb80j5p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnb8nf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d450g90)
Myanmar coup: Army says there's been no coup

Myanmar's military has promised that it will eventually hold new elections and relinquish power. Detained opposition leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, who was earlier charged with possessing illegal walkie-talkies, is now also alleged to have violated the country's Natural Disaster Law, although it is not clear what the new charge relates to.

Also in the programme: Princess Latifa, Dubai’s ruler daughter, reveals ‘hostage’ ordeal; and a new report says there have been 349 confirmed chemical attacks carried out in Syria since 2012.

(Photo: Myanmar’s military spokesman General Zaw Min Tun attends a news conference in Naypyitaw, Myanmar on February 16, 2021. Credit: Reuters).


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnbddk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb80rny)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwz5v3cvnv)
BHP's profits surge

An increase in demand for iron ore has led to a sharp rise in BHP's profits, making the company the most valuable on the London stock market; BHP now expects China to churn out one billion tonnes of steel in 2021. So where is all that steel going? We hear from BHP's CEO Mike Henry and get additional analysis from Shaun Rein, a Shanghai-based business consultant. Plus, the era of Black Lives Matter has seen the toppling of statues in cities in Britain and the United States and calls for the return of cultural property stolen during colonial times are getting louder. At the same time, leaders of new cultural institutions in Africa are re-imagining the whole concept of what a 21st century museum should look like, as the BBC's Ivana Davidovic finds out in an extended report. And while many of the world's biggest football clubs have global scouting operations looking for the next Ronaldo or Messi, the pandemic is forced a rethink in how they do that, partly with the help of artificial intelligence. Premier League club, Burnley, for example, is asking young people to trial for the club's academy using a mobile phone app to film themselves performing specific drills. The app, called AiScout, makes money by charging clubs a fee and we hear from Richard Felton-Thomas, the app's director of sports science. (Picture of BHP Iron Ore plant, Port Hedland, Western Australia via Getty Images).


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnbj4p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8qrjww6j)
Dubai's Princess Latifa

We explain the BBC's exclusive story about the daughter of the ruler of Dubai. Princess Latifa has sent secret video messages to friends accusing her father of holding her hostage. Dubai and the UAE have previously said she is safe in the care of family. We speak to the reporter who has been working on the story.

Myanmar's detained opposition leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, has been handed a second criminal charge. People in the country continue to get in touch with the programme. You'll hear their messages about the anti-coup protests along with all the latest analysis from BBC Burmese.

And, Dr Isaac Bogoch - an infectious diseases physician and scientist from the University of Toronto - will answer all the latest questions on the coronavirus pandemic and vaccine rollouts across the world.

(Photo: A still of Princess Latifa, daughter of the ruler of Dubai, taken from video footage shared with the BBC)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnbmwt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8qrjwzyn)
Coronavirus conversations: 'Vaccine passports'

One route back to some kind of normal being discussed in several countries hit by the Covid pandemic is the idea of a so-called “vaccine passport” – a document that demonstrates you have had a coronavirus jab, in order to allow you to travel. We’ll talk through the pros and cons with people involved in the policy and technology in Denmark, Sweden and Estonia.

We’ll also answer your questions and talk through the pandemic news of the day with our coronavirus expert, Dr Helen Wimalarathna.

And, we’ll hear how Mardi Gras is different this year in New Orleans, with Covid measures in place.

(Photo: A Palestinian health worker holds a vial of Moderna COVID-19 Credit: REUTERS/Mussa Qawasma/File Photo)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnbrmy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdkz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmqs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnbwd2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxhsxmt6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb817ng)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k0vtjnvv3)
2021/02/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnc046)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct20d5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb81cdl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99b)
Comparing the landscape of Mars to Earth

‘With every new view from the surface of Mars comes a reminder of just how fortunate we are to live on Earth.’ Acclaimed science writer and filmmaker Dr Chris Riley uses images from the landing sites on Mars to compare relative locations on Earth. Hear how you might be able to help.

Old Tech
Our Digital Planet social media community is a-buzz with stories of old technology, and the role you have had in technological history. Several listeners share their experiences with expert opinion from the curator of Technology and Engineering at the Science Museum Dr Rachel Boon.

Wearable Thermoelectric Batteries
Thermoelectric technologies are able to generate electricity by manipulating heat differences, but they are usually bulky and fragile. Dr Jianliang Xiao, and his team based in Colorado, discuss advancements in material composition that have led to the creation of a self-healing and recyclable battery with the potential to power wearable devices.

(Image: NASA)


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producers: Harrison Lewis and Hannah Fisher
Editor: Deborah Cohen


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnc3wb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d4519hx)
Yemen: US urges Houthis to halt advance on Marib

The United States has urged the Houthi rebels in Yemen to halt their advance on the government-held city of Marib, in the north of the country. The US State Department called on the rebels to return to negotiations. The UN says an assault on the city could have unimaginable humanitarian consequences, with hundreds-of-thousands of civilians potentially being forced to flee.

Also in the programme: The BBC has obtained videos filmed in secret by the daughter of the ruler of Dubai, in which she says she is being held captive by her family; and can a cartoon dog help overcome vaccine hesitancy in Japan?

(Image: Houthi fighters in Sanaa, Yemen. Credit: Epa/Yahya Arhab)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnc7mg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vgs67pm9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fr2x3xzl4)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb81lwv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58xcj81z1s)
BHP's profits surge

An increase in demand for iron ore has led to a sharp rise in BHP's profits, making the company the most valuable on the London stock market; BHP now expects China to churn out one billion tonnes of steel in 2021. So where is all that steel going? We hear from BHP's CEO Mike Henry and get additional analysis from Shaun Rein, a Shanghai-based business consultant. Plus, the era of Black Lives Matter has seen the toppling of statues in cities in Britain and the United States and calls for the return of cultural property stolen during colonial times are getting louder. At the same time, leaders of new cultural institutions in Africa are re-imagining the whole concept of what a 21st century museum should look like, as the BBC's Ivana Davidovic finds out in an extended report. And while many of the world's biggest football clubs have global scouting operations looking for the next Ronaldo or Messi, the pandemic is forced a rethink in how they do that, partly with the help of artificial intelligence. Premier League club, Burnley, for example, is asking young people to trial for the club's academy using a mobile phone app to film themselves performing specific drills. We get analysis from Reece Clifford, a sports analytics specialist. (Picture of BHP Iron Ore plant, Port Hedland, Western Australia via Getty Images).


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlncccl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb81qmz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 17 FEBRUARY 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnch3q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnclvv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x197vl04tyr)
Snow storm wreaks havoc in Texas

Around 150 million Americans have been advised to take precautions as an unprecedented winter storm continues to cause havoc across twenty five US states. In one of the worst affected states, Texas, more than four million people are without power as a surge in demand caused the power grid to fail. We hear how ageing infrastructure, unregulated grid and climate change have all contributed to the situation.

Also - we go to Japan, where the government is trying to convince somewhat reluctant population to get vaccinated against Covid-19.

And the BBC's Ivana Davidovic looks at the museum world. The era of Black Lives Matter has seen the toppling of statues in cities in Britain and the United States. Calls for the return of cultural property stolen during colonial times are getting louder. Many looted artefacts are housed by major national museums in Europe and North America. Leaders of new cultural institutions in Africa meanwhile are re-imagining the whole concept of what a 21st century museum should look like.

Plus - how can artificial intelligence help football teams scout stars of the future?

(Photo of snow in Austin, Texas. Photo by Montinique Monroe via Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlncqlz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7q)
Yogendra Yadav: Are farmers' protests a defining moment for India?

Thousands of Indian farmers are keeping up their long-running protest against farm law reform. Stephen Sackur interviews Yogendra Yadav, leader of the Swaraj Party and prominent backer of the farmers’ cause. India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, has faced down a host of opponents in the past. Is his government versus the farmers a defining moment for India?


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb822wc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x84)
Goal 5: Gender equality

Seventeen-year-old Sahar Beg from New Delhi, is looking at gender inequality in India. She and her friends know they are treated differently just because they were born girls. They talk about families where the brother’s birthday is celebrated every year, when none of the sister’s birthdays are marked at all. Then there is the question of violence against women and girls. Sahar has watched the reports about a gang rape in Hathras, Uttar Pradesh and talks to the local political leader who is defending the accused men. She also talks to the Chair of the National Commission for Women, Rekha Sharma about what needs to change and whether the pandemic has actually taken women’s rights away. In lockdowns which have seen spikes in domestic abuse around the world, Sahar hears the inspiring story of a survivor which gives her hope. Project 17 is produced in partnership with The Open University.
Presenter: Sana Safi
Producers: Nina Robinson and Rajesh Joshi


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlncvc3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdkz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmqs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlncz37)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct1gvb)
The New Arctic

The New Arctic: Tourism

Allan Little looks at the growing tourism industry above the Arctic circle which is raising complex social, economic and environmental consequences for remote communities.

On the one hand, there are sustainable, indigenous-operated businesses that benefit from increasing numbers of visitors in search of authentic reindeer experiences and the Northern Lights, but other regions are experiencing the problem of mass tourism. On the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard, we see how the Covid-19 pandemic has exposed the fragility of a seasonal tourism-based economy, as operators now fight for survival.

Paradoxically, tourists are often drawn north to witness the Arctic before it melts, while their carbon footprint is only adding to the problem. We meet several tourism businesses providing greener, more sustainable alternatives, including the world’s first hybrid-electric whale watching vessel.

Producer: Victoria Ferran

(Photo credit:: Victoria Ferran)


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb82bcm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnd2vc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1yc0c62)
Myanmar: Aung San Suu Kyi handed second criminal charge

Myanmar's detained opposition leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, has been handed a second criminal charge but it's not clear what the new charge relates to. Myanmar's military has repeated its promise to hold fresh elections and relinquish power as protests continue. We speak to someone who has been protesting for the past fifteen days.

The BBC has obtained secretly recorded footage of Princess Latifa of Dubai who says she is being held in solitary confinement.

And Donald Trump has launched a scathing attack on the Senate Republican leader, Mitch McConnell, as the battle over the future of the party intensifies.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnd6lh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1yc0gy6)
Protests continue in Myanmar calling for democracy to return

In Myanmar the detained civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi is facing fresh charges as demonstrations against her arrest and the military coup continue. We speak to the Chief of the Myanmar Team with the United Nations of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

We go live to the Netherlands to hear about a growing legal row about the coronavirus curfew.

And we report from Afghanistan where there have been moves towards a peace deal with the Taliban, but for those on the frontline, violence is still a constant problem.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlndbbm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1yc0lpb)
Thousands are protesting in Yangon, Myanmar

The military in Myanmar have laid new criminal charges against detained opposition leader, Aung San Suu Kyi. Thousands are now protesting in the commercial capital, Yangon. We look at what could happen next.

NATO defence ministers are meeting to decide on the future of the alliance's ten thousand troops in Afghanistan. As it stands, they're due to pull out in May. We get the latest from our Chief International Correspondent Lyse Doucet who is in Kabul.

And we're live in South Africa where former president Jacob Zuma is in trouble for not appearing in court, he's refusing to be questioned in a corruption case.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlndg2r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb82tc4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8p0)
The great semiconductor shortage

Why Taiwan isn't making enough computer chips. Ed Butler speaks to Jan-Peter Kleinhans, head of technology and geopolitics at SNV, a German think tank, about the central role of Taiwan in the complex global supply chain of semiconductors. The BBC's Theo Leggett explains why the car industry has been particularly hit by the shortage of chips. And Shelley Rigger, professor of East Asian politics at Davidson University in the US, discusses the growing significance of Taiwan in the technology war between China and the US.

(Photo: A man walks past a company logo at the headquarters of the world's largest semiconductor maker TSMC in Taiwan, Credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmt1)
The Immortal Cells of Henrietta Lacks

The story of an African American woman who played a largely unsung role in countless medical breakthroughs over more than half a century. Henrietta Lacks had cells taken from her body in 1951 when she was suffering from cancer. Those cells were found to be unique in a most particular way. They continued to reproduce endlessly in the laboratory. Culture from those cells have since been used in thousands of scientific experiments. But as Farhana Haider reports, Henrietta herself was never asked if her cells could be used in medical research.

(Photo: Henrietta Lacks. Copyright: Lacks Family)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlndktw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct1gvb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb82y38)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x84)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlndpl0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct20d6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlndtb4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxhszkr8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb835lj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Digital Planet (w3csz99b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlndy28)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdsr)
The 'illegal' backflip that shocked the Olympics

At the 1998 Winter Olympics in Japan, French figure skater Surya Bonaly performed an ‘illegal’ move - a backflip - that cemented her name in sporting history. This interview was first broadcast in 2019.

Last week the singer Mary Wilson died at the age of 76. She was born to a poor family in Mississippi, the daughter of an itinerant worker and a mother who couldn't read or write, but she grew up to be a legend of Motown, co-founder of one of the most successful groups of all time: The Supremes. In an interview from the Outlook archives, Mary describes her childhood, why she hated some of their early hits and what really happened with Diana Ross.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Image: Surya Bonaly at the 1995 World Championships
Credit: Getty Images


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmt1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnf1td)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxhszt7j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb83f2s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x84)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnf5kj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d453c63)
Myanmar coup: Crowds of protesters converge in Yangon

Hundreds of thousands of people gathered across Myanmar as a campaign of civil disobedience continued. In the largest city, Yangon, drivers blocked roads with their cars, telling security forces that they'd broken down. The army have been imposing an internet blackout overnight this week.

Also in the programme: as NATO defence ministers start a two day meeting to discuss the future of the mission in Afghanistan, we report from there; and a judge in India has ruled that "a woman cannot be punished for raising her voice against sexual abuse" in a defamation case against a journalist.

(Photo: Demonstrators block railway tracks during a protest against the military coup in Mandalay, Myanmar, on 17 February 2021.Credit: EPA).


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnf99n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb83nl1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxsmkq5207)
The Great Green Wall

International efforts are accelerating to save huge swathes of the Sahel - a belt of land running across Africa just below the Sahara - from becoming desert themselves. Millions of euros were pledged at a virtual summit last month, focused on creating what environmental activists have called a Great Green Wall. But why has a project that began 13 years ago been so slow to deliver? The BBC's Fergus Nicoll reports. Italy's Prime Minister, Mario Draghi has been unveiling how his new government will tackle the coronavirus pandemic that's caused one of the worst economic crises in the Eurozone. Plus, Ford Europe says that by 2030, their new fleet with be all-electric; we hear from the CEO of Ford Europe, Stuart Rowley. And we hear the secrets behind success of the Canadian e-commerce company, Shopify in an interview with Ivan Mazour, the founding CEO of Ometria, which handles marketing for a lot of Shopify retailers. (Picture of a worker in Kaffrine Senegal by Xaume Olleros for Trees for the Future).


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnff1s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8qrjzs3m)
Coronavirus conversations: Vaccinations at Zaatari refugee camp

We look at Covid vaccine distribution around the world and speak to two people - a father and his daughter - at the Zaatari refugee camp where a vaccination centre has opened this week. We also discuss today's other coronavirus stories with our medical expert, Dr Maria Sundaram

We hear about the reaction to the story we covered yesterday about Princess Latifa. The UN says it will raise her detention with the UAE after she accused her father of holding her hostage in Dubai.

We also get the latest from Nigeria where gunmen have raided a boarding school, abducting an unknown number of students, staff and their families.

(Photo: Khedywi Al-Nablsi and Tasneem Khedywi Al-Nablsi Credit: Tasneem Khedywi Al-Nablsi/AP)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnfjsx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8qrjzwvr)
Coronavirus: Gaza receives its first vaccine shipment

Today the Gaza Strip has received their first 1000 vaccines to protect frontline health workers and the most vulnerable. The vaccines were donated to Gaza by the Palestinian Authority, which controls the other Palestinian territory of the West Bank. But at the moment it's not known how Gaza will vaccinate the rest of it's population. We speak to someone in Gaza who's been looking at the available options.

And continuing to look at Covid vaccine distribution around the world, we speak to two people - a father and his daughter - at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan. This week it became the first refugee camp to open a vaccination centre.

Also, every day we are joined by a health expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer your questions. Today our guest is Dr Pedro Hallal - an epidemiologist from the Federal University of Pelotas in the south of Brazil.

(Photo: Palestinian workers unload the first shipment of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccines, in the southern Gaza Strip February February 17, 2021. Credit: Reuters/Ibraheem Abu Mustafa)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnfnk1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmt1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnfs95)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxht0jq9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb844kk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k0vtjrrr6)
2021/02/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnfx19)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct1gvb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8489p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcd7)
Covid surge in Mozambique

Claudia talks to Dr Lucia Chambal at the Central Hospital of Maputo in Mozambique. She is helping to coordinate the response of the country’s largest hospital to an ongoing surge in new Covid patients. In the last three weeks, they’ve had to create more than new 150 beds to accommodate these patients, including erecting large tents to act as Covid wards in the hospital grounds. Dr Chambal talks about the pressures, saying they’ve admitted many more patients since January than during the entire period between last March and December.

A study at New York hospital has revealed the substantial benefits of giving mobilising physiotherapy to hospitalised Covid-19 patients. In the first months of the pandemic at the Montefiore Medical Center when patient numbers dramatically increased, some patients received physiotherapy while others didn’t because of a lack of PPE for therapists. Looking back at the fate of both groups of patients, the hospital has now found that the survival rate of those getting the therapy was twice that of those who didn’t. What makes that result particularly interesting is the people who were given physical therapy were on average older and more likely to have risky health conditions. Yet their chances of survival were higher because of the therapy.

Is coconut oil an amazing superfood or an overhyped food fad? Africa Life Clinic’s Dayo Yusif reports from coconut heaven on Kenya’s Indian Ocean coast.

BBC Health and Science correspondent James Gallagher is Claudia’s studio guest, talking about evidence from Israel that the vaccination programme there is reducing the spread of the coronavirus in the population: whether the drug Budesonide in asthma inhalers prevents Covid illness development: and whether there is such a thing as a superfood.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker


(Picture: A woman walks with her daughter in Maputo, Mozambique in February 2021. Photo credit: Alfredo Zuniga/AFP/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlng0sf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d4546f0)
Myanmar: ASSK lawyer says "spark will become a prairie fire"

Aung San Suu Kyi’s lawyer, Khin Maung Zaw, has spoken to Newshour about the civil disobedience movement sweeping Myanmar.

Also in the programme: the provocative American radio personality Rush Limbaugh has died at the age of 70; and a report from Afghanistan, as NATO defence ministers meet to discuss the future of the alliance’s 10,000 troops there.

(Picture: Demonstrators hold placards calling for the release of detained State Counselor Aung San Suu Kyi during a protest against the military coup in Yangon Credit: EPA/LYNN BO BO)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlng4jk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vgs6bljd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fr2x40wh7)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb84hsy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58xcj84vyw)
Google to pay News Corp for stories

Google has agreed to pay Rupert Murdoch's News Corp for content from news sites across its media empire. Meanwhile, Facebook has announced it is banning the publishing and sharing of news on its platform in Australia. This follows moves by the Australian Government to make digital giants pay for journalism. We hear from Peter Lewis, Director of the Centre of Responsible Technology and is based in Sydney.International efforts are accelerating to save huge swathes of the Sahel - a belt of land running across Africa just below the Sahara - from becoming desert themselves. Millions of euros were pledged at a virtual summit last month, focused on creating what environmental activists have called a Great Green Wall. But why has a project that began 13 years ago been so slow to deliver? The BBC's Fergus Nicoll reports.Plus, Ford Europe says that by 2030, their new fleet with be all-electric; we hear from the CEO of Ford Europe, Stuart Rowley.

(Picture: Rupert Murdoch, Credit: Getty Images.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlng88p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb84mk2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x84)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



THURSDAY 18 FEBRUARY 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlngd0t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct20d6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnghry)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x197vl07qvv)
Google to pay News Corp for stories

Google has agreed to pay Rupert Murdoch's News Corp for content from news sites across its media empire. Meanwhile, Facebook has announced it is banning the publishing and sharing of news on its platform in Australia. This follows moves by the Australian Government to make digital giants pay for journalism. We get the thoughts of Peter Lewis, Director of the Centre of Responsible Technology and is based in Sydney. We discuss one of the highest-profile court cases to come out of the Me-Too Movement in India - M J Akbar, a former minister has lost his his defamation case against journalist Priya Ramani, who had accused him of being a sexual predator. Also on in the show - a Great Green Wall across the arid lands of northern Africa - can the project save fragile communities in 11 countries - or is it just a mirage? And Ford Europe pledge to go all-electric by 2030. We hear from their CEO, Stuart Rowley.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show. Les Williams, an Associate Professor at The School of Engineering at The University of Virginia, in Arlington, VA. And Sushma Ramachandran, an independent business journalist and columnist for The Tribune newspaper, in Delhi.

(Picture: Rupert Murdoch. Credit: Getty Images.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlngmj2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4t)
Can we solve our space junk problem?

The world is entering a new space race but every new satellite launched into Earth’s orbit runs the risk of colliding with one of the millions of pieces of space junk left behind by previous missions. So how can we solve our space junk problem? Featuring former NASA astrophysicist, Don Kessler; Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, Moriba Jah; space systems engineer, Richard Duke; and Victoria Samson of the Secure World Foundation


Presenter: Charmaine Cozier
Producer: Viv Jones


(A spent S-IVb rocket floats in Earth orbit. View from Skylab Space Station 1973. NASA photo via Getty Images)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb84zsg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqy)
Sourdough love stories

A spongy collection of flour, water, wild yeasts and bacteria may seem an unlikely object of affection, but some sourdough starters are truly cherished, and can even become part of the family.

Emily Thomas hears how one starter has been used to bake bread in the same family since the Canadian gold rush more than 120 years ago, and speaks to a man trying to preserve sourdough diversity and heritage by running the world's only library dedicated to starter cultures.

And a German baker, whose starter has survived Nazism and communism, reveals the commercial demands of maintaining it and why old ‘mothers’ (as sourdough starters are known) hold a powerful lesson for us all in nurturing living things.

Producers: Simon Tulett and Sarah Stolarz

(Picture: A woman holding bread. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)

Contributors:

Ione Christensen;
Karl de Smedt, Puratos;
Christoph Hatscher, Bäckerei & Konditorei Hatscher


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlngr86)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmt1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlngw0b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3csz6mg)
Drug-free in Norway

Warning: Some listeners might find these stories disturbing.

Can Norwegians with psychosis benefit from radical, drug-free treatment? In a challenge to the foundations of western psychiatry, a handful of Norway’s mental health facilities are offering medication-free treatment to people with serious psychiatric conditions. But five years after the scheme began it is still being questioned by the health establishment. For Assignment, Lucy Proctor hears the testimony of Norwegian psychiatric patients, and the doctors who have aligned themselves on either side of the debate. Why is this happening in Norway? And how much power should people with debilitating psychosis have over their own lives?

Presenter: Lucy Proctor
Producer: Linda Pressly

(Image: Artwork depicting a young woman, with her head in her hands. Credit: Malin Rossi)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8578q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcd7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlngzrg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1yc3835)
Facebook blocks news content in Australia

If you're in Australia you'll find that Facebook pages of all local and global news sites are unavailable. Facebook has done this in response to a proposed law which would make tech giants pay for news content on their platforms. We have the latest.

A mayor in Texas describes the situation in the state where a huge winter storm sweeping has left millions without power.

And we hear from one of the few actresses who is a Bollywood and a Hollywood star, Priyanka Chopra.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnh3hl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1yc3cv9)
Facebook users in Australia are blocked from sharing or viewing news

There's been a dramatic escalation in the row between Facebook and Australia.The social media giant has blocked Australian users from sharing or viewing news. It's all down to a proposed social media law, as we will hear live from Sydney.

Freezing temperatures, no power and people burning wooden fences to keep warm. We'll head to the usually hot Texas to find out what's going on and how people are coping

And we find out about an experiment to vaccinate all adults in one small Brazilian town to see if it stops Covid-19 in its tracks.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnh77q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1yc3hlf)
Facebook blocks news content from being shared or viewed in Australia

The row between big tech and journalism in Australia means Facebook has now blocked its users there from viewing or sharing news. We look at how it's come to this.

Haiti is in political turmoil over the president's term of office. He says he still has until next year, his opponents say he should have left already. So who's right? We ask the country's foreign minister.


And South Africa starts its Covid vaccination programme after a temporary suspension and a switch of vaccines.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnhbzv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb85q87)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7yh)
The Paystack effect

How the biggest start-up acquisition out of Nigeria is resonating across Africa. Last year Nigeria saw its biggest ever start-up acquisition - a multi million dollar deal for digital payments company Paystack. The result was a massive shift in the minds of entrepreneurs and investors in Africa’s Fintech scene. The company which processes more than half of all online payments in Nigeria, was started by two graduates in their 20s five years ago. It ended in a $200 hundred million dollar deal with Stripe, the US-based payments software company. Tamasin Ford speaks to Chilufya Mutale, the co-founder and CEO of PremierCredit in Lusaka, an online micro-lending platform operating in Zambia and Zimbabwe. Plus Chijioke Dozie, the co-founder of Carbon, a PanAfrican digital bank operating in Nigeria, Kenya and Ghana who says the Paystack acquisition is not only inspiring for existing entrepreneurs, it will encourage more people to join the Fintech scene. And to Katlego Maphai, the co-founder and CEO of Yoco in Cape Town, a digital payments company for small businesses in South Africa. Plus Maya Horgan Famodu, the founder and Managing Director at Ingressive Capital, a Venture Capitalist Fund based in Lagos in Nigeria which targets early stage start-ups across Sub-Saharan Africa and were an early investor in Paystack. And to Amandine Lobelle, the head of business operations at Paystack.
(Picture credit: Getty Creative)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmnj)
Free breakfasts with the Black Panthers

The Black Panther Party hit the headlines in the late 1960s with their call for a revolution in the USA. But they also ran a number of "survival programmes" to help their local communities - the biggest of which was a project providing free breakfasts for schoolchildren.

Reverend Earl Neil was one of the organisers of the first Free Breakfast for Children programme at St Augustine's Church in Oakland, California. He spoke to Lucy Burns.

(IMAGE: Shutterstock)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnhgqz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6mg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb85v0c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnhlh3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjws)
The Kalevala: the Finnish epic that inspired a nation

When the Kalevala was published in 1835, Finland had a distinct cultural and linguistic identity but it had always been part of either the Swedish or the Russian empire. Neither did Finland have much of a literary tradition, but as the 19th-century progressed the Kalevala took on a symbolic role as the representation of a Finnish identity that fed into the movement for Finnish independence. Rooted in the folk culture of the Karelia region, a travelling doctor shaped the song texts into a story in a way which is still being debated today.

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss how the Kalevala underscored the search for Finnish national identity are Dr Niina Hämäläinen, executive director of the Kalevala Society in Helsinki; Professor Tom DuBois from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the author of Finnish Folk Poetry and the Kalevala; and the award-winning British musician, playwright and storyteller, Nick Hennessey.


Produced by Fiona Clampin for the BBC World Service.


[Image: The Defense of the Sampo, 1896. Artist: Akseli Gallen-Kallela. Credit: Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh68)
The first woman to play in the NHL

French Canadian Manon Rhéaume became the first, and only, woman to play in the National Hockey League. In 1992 she was signed by the Tampa Bay Lightning as a goaltender after a successful performance in training camp. Manon tells Rebecca Kesby how she started playing ice hockey at the age of 5 with her brothers, and why she loves playing in goal with pucks flying at her at well over 100km an hour. Manon Rhéaume played in the men professional league for 5 years and represented Canada in the Women's game.

(Photo: Manon Rhéaume for the Tampa Bay Lightning in 1992. Credit: Manon Rhéaume's private collection)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnhq77)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxht2gnc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb862hm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 Health Check (w3cszcd7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnhtzc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdc6)
Swimming with polar bears – a photographer’s 'crazy' dream

The list of underwater predators that Amos Nachoum has photographed is long - it includes the Nile crocodile, the great white shark, orcas, anacondas and many other creatures that most of us would hope never to encounter. But for Amos that list was incomplete, his dream, his white whale, was to swim with a polar bear and photograph it. His first attempt went badly wrong, but it did not deter him and in 2015 he made his second attempt. He shares his account of that adventure with Outlook's Saskia Edwards.

The documentary about Amos’ expedition to swim with the polar bear is Picture of His Life by Dani Menkin and Yonatan Nir.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Swimming polar bears
Credit: Amos Nachoum


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmnj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnhyqh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxht2q4m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb869zw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnj2gm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d456836)
Facebook unfriends Australia

Australian prime minister Scott Morrison has said his government will not be intimidated after Facebook blocked news feeds to users. We ask what led Facebook to make the decision and what its global impact could be.

Also in the programme: What the future holds for Nato's 10,000 troops in Afghanistan; and Nasa's mission to land a spacecraft on Mars approaches its moment of truth.

(Image: A 3D printed Facebook logo is seen in front of displayed Australia"s flag in this illustration photo taken February 18, 2021. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnj66r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb86kh4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlw4r3hwc1r)
The Australian government versus Facebook

Facebook pages of all local and global news sites are now unavailable and people outside the country are also unable to read or access any Australian news publications on the platform. Facebook is responding to a proposed law which would make tech giants pay for news content on their platforms; we hear from Bruce Ellen, President of Country Press Australia, which represents news outlets across the country and we're also joined by Daniel Gervais who teaches at the Vanderbilt Law School in Tennessee. There's a big piracy problem along a huge stretch of coast from Senegal right down to Angola. And these days the pirates aren't after cargo, they're after the sailors. As Marie Keyworth reports, the shipping industry wants immediate action to protect its staff. Plus, things are changing in the world of fairy tails; we hear from Trish Cooke who's starting a new publishing venture, involving a modern retelling of the Rapunzel, Pinocchio and Jack and the Beanstalk stories. (Photo of ABC News reports on Facebook's news ban on Australian and International content. Photo by Brendon Thorne for Getty Images).


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnj9yw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8qrk2p0q)
Facebook blocks news in Australia

Facebook has responded to a proposed Australian law to make platforms pay for the news content they host by blocking news for its Australian users. We'll get our reporter to explain the political background to the row and we'll hear how Australians are responding.

We’ll spend time looking at the future of nightlife in several countries around the world after the coronavirus pandemic. We’re talking to people who run venues in Poland, Kenya, Lebanon and the UK about what it’s been like to close their clubs or operate under restrictions.

And we’ll speak to a BBC reporter who has been investigating an online video platform called Omegle. The live video chat site has increased in popularity recently, but has no age verification process in place. The investigation found children exposing themselves in front of strangers. The founder says the site has increased moderation efforts.

Picture: Facebook logo and the Australian newspapers (AAP Image/Lukas Coch/via REUTERS)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnjfq0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8qrk2srv)
Coronavirus conversations: Clubbing after Covid

We’ll spend time looking at the future of nightlife in several countries around the world after the coronavirus pandemic. We’re talking to people who run venues in Poland, Kenya, Lebanon and the UK about what it’s been like to close their clubs or operate under restrictions.

We’ll explain the row between Facebook and Australia that has led to Facebook blocking news content for Australian users. It’s all over a proposed law that would make tech companies pay for news content on their platforms. We’ll talk to our tech teams about the international implications.

And we’ll hear people who are struggling in the severe winter storm hitting Texas and get our reporter to explain why it’s become a story about politics, too.

Picture: Bartender makes cocktails in a mask (Getty Creative / MaximFesenko)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnjkg4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdc6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmnj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnjp68)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxht3fmd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb871gn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k0vtjvnn9)
2021/02/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnjsyd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6mg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8756s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1r)
Weird weather

A paper in the BMJ shows that deaths from Covid 9 are being massively overlooked in Zambia. The new data come from post-mortem tests at the University Hospital mortuary in Lusaka, showing that at least 1 in 6 deaths there are due to the coronavirus; many of the victims had also been suffering from tuberculosis. Chris Gill of Boston University’s Department of Global Health, and Lawrence Mwananyanda, chief scientific officer of Right to Care, Zambia, discuss their findings with Roland Pease.

New variants of concern continue to be reported, such as the one labelled B 1 1 7 in the UK, or B 1 351 identified in South Africa. Geneticist Emma Hodcroft, of the University of Bern, talks about seven variants that have been found in the US. Although all these variants are evolving from different starting points, certain individual mutations keep recurring – which suggests they have specific advantages for the virus.
Her co-author Jeremy Kamil, of Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, explains how he can watch the viruses replicating inside cells.

Much of the United States, as far south as Texas, and Eurasia, has been gripped by an extraordinary blast of Arctic weather. Roland hears from climatalogist Jennifer Francis, of the Woodwell Climate Research Center, about the Arctic’s role in this weird weather.

Life, in the form of sponges, has been discovered hundreds of metres under the thick ice surrounding Antarctica, where it’s dark, subzero and barren. The British Antarctic Survey’s Huw Griffiths reveals how it was spotted unexpectedly in pictures colleagues took with a sub-glacial camera.






(Image: A man walks to his friend's home in a neighborhood without electricity as snow covers the BlackHawk neighborhood in Pflugerville, Texas, U.S. Credit: Reuters)


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Deborah Cohen


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnjxpj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d4573b3)
Nasa’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars

After a seven-month journey of around 470 million kilometres, Nasa’s Perseverance rover has landed on Mars. The ambitious mission hopes to find some fossil evidence of micro-organisms.

Also in the programme: we’ll hear from Afghanistan after NATO decided there needed to be a reduction in violence before more foreign troops could be withdrawn; and as power cuts and water shortages continue in Texas, which is in the middle of a winter storm, officials warn it could take weeks before supplies are fully restored. What went wrong?

(Photo: an artist impression issued by NASA of the Mars 2020 spacecraft carrying the Perseverance rover as it approaches Mars. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/PA Wire).


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnk1fn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vgs6fhfh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fr2x43sdb)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb87dq1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58xcj87rvz)
GameStop US Congressional hearing takes place

Key players in the GameStop affair have appeared in front of a US Congressional Committee. The price of the video game store's shares rose from less than $20 at the beginning of January to more than $350 in a matter of weeks. Politico's Nancy Scola tells us what we've learnt. In the past few hours a NASA spacecraft that left Earth seven months ago has successfully landed on the surface of Mars. We hear what's hoped to be discovered from Luther Beegle, one of the scientists involved in the mission. Plus, Facebook pages of all local and global news sites are now unavailable and people outside the country are also unable to read or access any Australian news publications on the platform. Facebook is responding to a proposed law which would make tech giants pay for news content on their platforms; we hear from Bruce Ellen, President of Country Press Australia, which represents news outlets across the country. There's a big piracy problem along a huge stretch of the coast of west Africa - from Senegal right down to Angola, as Marie Keyworth reports. Plus, things are changing in the world of fairy tales; we hear from Trish Cooke who's starting a new publishing venture, involving a modern retelling of the Rapunzel, Pinocchio and Jack and the Beanstalk stories.

(Picture: Keith Gill, an investor known as 'Roaring Kitty', gives evidence at the US Congressional Hearing into GameStop. Credit: CSPAN.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnk55s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb87jg5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



FRIDAY 19 FEBRUARY 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnk8xx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh68)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnkdp1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x197vl0bmry)
GameStop US Congressional hearing takes place

Key players in the GameStop affair have appeared in front of a US Congressional Committee. The price of the video game store's shares rose from less than $20 at the beginning of January to more than $350 in a matter of weeks. Politico's Nancy Scola tells us what we've learnt. Plus, Facebook pages of all local and global news sites are now unavailable and people outside the country are also unable to read or access any Australian news publications on the platform. Facebook is responding to a proposed law which would make tech giants pay for news content on their platforms; we hear from Bruce Ellen, President of Country Press Australia, which represents news outlets across the country. And, there's a big piracy problem along a huge stretch of coast from Senegal right down to Angola. And these days the pirates aren't after cargo, they're after the sailors. As Marie Keyworth reports, the shipping industry wants immediate action to protect its staff. Plus, things are changing in the world of fairy tails; we hear from Trish Cooke who's starting a new publishing venture, involving a modern retelling of the Rapunzel, Pinocchio and Jack and the Beanstalk stories.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show. Nicole Chilers, Executive Producer of American Public Media's Marketplace Morning Report, in Los Angeles. And Rachel Cartland, a writer based in Hong Kong.

(Picture: Keith Gill, an investor known as 'Roaring Kitty', gives evidence at the US Congressional Hearing into GameStop. Credit: CSPAN.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnkjf5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyp)
Douglas Stuart: Stories of tender souls in tough places

Stephen Sackur speaks to the Booker prize-winning author Douglas Stuart. His novel, Shuggie Bain, centres on a boy growing up amid poverty, addiction and intolerance in Glasgow. There are deep parallels with his own life. How does he extract so much love from hardship?


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb87wpk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3cszthf)
Ibrahim Ba, Colo Colo and the Milan derby

Ibrahim Ba looks ahead to the Milan derby. Plus, Brondy's Theresa Eslund discusses her career and looks ahead to facing Lyon in the UEFA Champions League.

Picture: The mural of Romelo Lukaku and Zlatan Ibrahimovic of AC Milan outside the Giuseppe Meazza stadium (Claudio Villa/Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnkn59)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdc6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmnj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnkrxf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq2)
Facebook blocks Australia’s news

The social giant takes down news content ahead of a new law that would force it to pay media publishers. Plus, are digital vaccine certificates or passports essential for a return to normal life or a bad idea that could entrench inequality? And yet more evidence that the global auto industry is racing to electric vehicles. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter David Molloy. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8845t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnkwnk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1yc6508)
Covid-19: how can vaccines be distributed more fairly?

We talk to a US doctor who says he's personally received more doses than 130 countries.

We find out about the new American spacecraft that has touched down on Mars and what it will be doing there.

And how social media influencers stand accused of glamourising dangerous migration routes across the Mediterranean.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnl0dp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1yc68rd)
"I've personally received more vaccine doses than 130 countries"

A US doctor appeals to rich nations to share access to Covid vaccines more equitably - and not to engage in vaccine nationalism.

Senator Ted Cruz of Texas faces a backlash after he left his freezing state - where hundreds of thousands are still without power - for the Mexican resort of Cancun.

And “standing for farmers is not sedition”: we get the latest on the case of a young Indian climate activist in police custody for her online work in support of protesting farmers.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnl44t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wr1yc6dhj)
G7 considers Covid vaccine nationalism

The global distribution of vaccines will be top of the agenda during a remote meeting of G7 leaders today.

Nasa's latest Mars rover has touched down safely on the Red planet to start its two year mission to search for signs of life.

And we hear about some painstaking work by archivists to reconstruct wartime letters recovered from a ship sunk by a U-boat off the coast of Ireland.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnl7wy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb88m5b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz79p)
Why hair matters

To some it may sound absurd to consider hairstyles a workplace issue, but for millions of men and women with African and Afro-Caribbean hair, it is just that. For decades, some hairstyles have been discouraged at work. But things are finally starting to change. This month, the US Airforce is changing its hair code to be more inclusive. We explore the historic racism behind hair-based discrimination and hear from the women who have united to change attitudes and laws. We speak to businesswomen, historians and those in the arts – from the UK, the US and East Africa – to find out what hair has to do with it all anyway.
Presenter: Vivienne Nunis
Producer: Sarah Treanor

(Image credit: Getty)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmw9)
Mary Wilson

The Motown group The Supremes had a string of number one hits in 1964. They would become the most popular girl group of the 1960s. One of the three original singers, Mary Wilson, spoke to Vincent Dowd about growing up in Detroit, commercial success, and civil rights.

Photo: The Supremes, (left to right) Florence Ballard, Mary Wilson, Diana Ross, on a visit to London in 1964. Credit: PA Wire.


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnlcn2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb88qxg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 World Football (w3cszthf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnlhd6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcp9)
Who should pay for the news?

Google this week signed multi-million dollar deals with a number of major news providers in Australia, agreeing to pay for the journalism it features on its new ‘News Showcase’ pages. It comes as Australia’s parliament debates a proposed new law that would force tech giants to negotiate with news outlets big and small. Facebook, which like Google opposes the draft law, responded by blocking access to news content on the platform nationwide. But critics argue the proposed laws don’t go far enough and that the traditional business model of funding journalism through advertising revenue is broken. The pandemic has meant reduced income for many small newsrooms, despite an apparent rise in appetite for local information surrounding Covid-19. If access to reliable news is crucial to the smooth running of democracy, who should step in to pay for the journalism voters need? When it comes to paying the bills, what is the future of news? Join Paul Henley and a panel of expert guests.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnlm4b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxht5ckg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb88zdq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnlqwg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjf)
Six years on: the murder of Avijit Roy

It’s six years since the secular blogger Avijit Roy was murdered outside the Dhaka book fair, where he'd been a speaker. This week, five men were sentenced to be hanged for their part in the killing. BBC Bangla journalist Akbar Hossain has been covering the story since 2015 and reflects on the story.

The "Switzerland of Africa"
Photos posted on social media this week show alpine vistas and snow covered houses in Morocco. It's not a surprise to BBC Africa's Nora Fakim, who visited the French-built ski resort of Ifrane several years ago. She shares her memories of the Switzerland of Africa.

Where gender can be a matter of life or death
‘Leila’ is a 64-year-old teacher, dancer and actor, and the only openly intersex person in Afghanistan. Living in such a conservative society, she has faced many verbal and physical attacks. She told her story to Mahjooba Nowrouzi of BBC Afghan.

First African to head the WTO
Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala takes over as Director General of the World Trade Organisation this week. She's the first woman and first African to hold the role, and she's making Nigerians everywhere proud, including BBC Africa's Peter Okwoche.

Colombia's love affair with cycling
Cycling is the national sport of Colombia, but it went into decline during decades of armed conflict. Now Colombians are rediscovering their love of cycling and, at the same time, their own country. The BBC’s Daniel Pardo is one of them.


Image: Respects are paid to Avijit Roy in Dhaka, 2015
Credit: MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP via Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmw9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnlvml)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxht5m1q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb896wz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct17xj)
The living water

Elizabeth Alker loves to feel the cold water as she slides into it from the river bank or steps nervously from the lake side. She is a Christian, used to the euphoric feeling that worship also brings her, and swimming in the open gives her a similar, immersive sensation - as soon as she leaves the water she immediately craves it again.

She sets outs to find out why so many people have that same craving, discovering tranquility and spirituality in the icy water. From there she moves on to consider the spiritual nature of water itself.

Right across the world’s faiths water represents life, fertility, healing and purity. It has been used in rituals for thousands of years, rivers are sacred, baptisms with water symbolises the introduction of children to their faith

Elizabeth explores why water is so important in the lives of believers, wild swimmers and the millions around the world whose spiritual thirst is quenched by its power.

She goes swimming with Helen Pidd of The Guardian newspaper who first introduced her to swimming outdoors, and Scottish singer Julie Fowlis who explains how the stories and myths surrounding water make their way into Gaelic music.

Professor Bron Taylor, author of ‘Dark Green Religion’ discusses the place of water in organised religion - as well as his own connection with the ocean having speak years as a coast guard.

Izumi Hasegawa describes the place of water in Shinto, and Ruth Fitzmaurice, author of ‘I Found My Tribe’, describes how swimming in the ocean helped her profoundly through the illness and death of her beloved husband Simon.

Why is water so important in the lives of believers, wild swimmers and the millions around the world whose spiritual thirst is quenched by its power.

Producer: Geoff Bird
Presenter: Elizabeth Alker

(Photo: Two people watch someone swimming in the water. Credit: Richard Lautens/Toronto Star/Getty Images)


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnlzcq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d459509)
Billions to boost global vaccine supply

Leaders of the G7 group of rich countries are meeting virtually with a vow to invest billions of dollars to boost supplies of coronavirus vaccines to poorer nations. We ask if it will be enough to meet the challenges faced in the developing world.

Also on the programme: Why people are taking to the streets in Spain to demand the release of a jailed rapper; and as the US rejoins the Paris Climate Accords - what difference will it make?

(Image: A South African health worker receives the Johnson and Johnson Covid-19 vaccine during the roll out of the first batch of vaccines at Khayelitsha hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, 17 February 2021. EPA/NIC BOTHMA)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnm33v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb89gd7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlthvn9ln38)
Africa's vaccine gap

The G7 group of the world's leading economies held a virtual meeting today to discuss the distribution of vaccines to Africa. We hear from Dr Mohga Kamal-Yanni, a global health expert with the People’s Vaccine Alliance. Vaccines aren't the only challenge in confronting coronavirus in Africa; many of the region's countries still don't have the ventilators needed to keep the most seriously ill patients alive. But now a Nigerian man has come up with a ventilator that's powered by water and is cheap to make; we talk to the ventilator's inventor, Yusuf Bilesanmi. Plus, the UK Supreme Court has ruled that the ride-hailing app Uber must classify its drivers as workers and not as self-employed; Susannah Streeter of Hargreaves Lansdown goes over the implications. And as President Biden takes the US back into the Paris Climate Agreement process, the BBC's Mike Johnson looks at the future of the US energy sector. (Picture of vaccine via Getty Images).


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnm6vz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8qrk5kxt)
Coronavirus: Dominican Republic

Around the world people are calling for rich countries to help the developing world get more Covid vaccines. We'll look at the situation in the country worst-hit by the pandemic in the Caribbean, the Dominican Republic. We also hear views from around the world about global vaccine distribution.

We also discuss vaccine diplomacy and other coronavirus stories with Dr Megan Murray from Harvard Medical School.

And we explain what’s behind the latest violence in Somalia where international flights at the capital’s airport have been suspended following heavy gunfire.


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnmbm3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8qrk5pny)
Coronavirus: Vaccine diplomacy

Today we’ve heard a plea for rich countries with a surplus of Covid vaccines to fund the 130 countries which don’t have any. We spend some time looking at global vaccine distribution and hear views from around the world. We also speak to a doctor in the Dominican Republic, the country worst-hit by the pandemic in the Caribbean.

Also, we are looking in depth the impact the pandemic has had on students, especially on the most vulnerable and marginalised.

And we get questions answered on vaccine diplomacy and other coronavirus stories from our regular expert, Dr Marc Mendelson in Cape Town, South Africa.

(Photo: Women hold placards to demand fair distribution of vaccines to developing countries during a protest in Lahore, Pakistan, 29 January Credit: RAHAT DAR/EPA


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnmgc7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmw9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnml3c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnxht6bjh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb89ycr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k0vtjykkd)
2021/02/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnmpvh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8b23w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv72)
Can We Build Houses from Living Trees?

It’s the stuff of fairy tales – a beautiful cottage, with windows, chimney and floorboards … and supported by a living growing tree. CrowdScience listener Jack wants to know why living houses aren’t a common sight when they could contribute to leafier cities with cleaner air. The UK has an impressive collection of treehouses, but they remain in the realm of novelty, for good reasons. Architects are used to materials like concrete and steel changing over time, but a house built around a living tree needs another level of flexibility in its design. That doesn’t mean it’s impossible and CrowdScience hears about a project in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, where architect Ahadu Abaineh made a three-storey, supported by 4 living Eucalyptus trees as a natural foundation.

Host Marnie Chesterton meets some of the global treehouse building fraternity, including builder of over 200 structures, Takashi Kobayashi, who adapts his houses to the Japanese weather. In Oregon, USA, Michael Garnier has built an entire village of treehouses for his “Treesort”. He’s developed better ways of building , including the Tree Attachment Bolt, which holds the weight of the house while minimising damage to the tree.

Professor Mitchell Joachim from Terreform One explains the wild potential of living architecture, a movement which looks at organic ways of building. He’s currently building a prototype living house, by shaping willow saplings onto a scaffold that will become a home, built of live trees.

Photo Credit: Ahadu Abaineh


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnmtlm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z6d45b076)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnmybr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79vgs6jdbl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fr2x46p9f)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8b9m4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58xcj8bns2)
First broadcast 19/02/2021 22:32 GMT

The latest business and finance news from around the world, on the BBC.


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9xlnn22w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q4cb8bfc8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3cszthf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Africa Life Clinic 09:32 SUN (w3ct21g4)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3csz6mg)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6mg)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6mg)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5q401ykmzt)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5q401yl076)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5q401ylcgl)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5q401ylh6q)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5q401ylqpz)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5q401ymkxw)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5q401yn1xd)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172x5q401yn9dn)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5q401ynjwx)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5q401ynx49)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5q401yp8cp)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5q401ypd3t)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5q401yphvy)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5q401ypmm2)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5q401yqll3)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5q401yqyth)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5q401yr2km)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7w1kx)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7w5b1)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7w925)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7wjkf)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7x0jy)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7x492)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7x816)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7xcsb)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7xm8l)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7xvrv)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7ybrc)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7yghh)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7ypzr)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5q4cb7ytqw)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5q4cb7z5z8)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5q4cb7zfgj)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5q4cb7zxg1)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5q4cb80165)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5q4cb808pf)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5q4cb80j5p)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5q4cb80rny)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5q4cb817ng)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5q4cb81cdl)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5q4cb81lwv)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5q4cb81qmz)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5q4cb822wc)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5q4cb82bcm)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5q4cb82tc4)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5q4cb82y38)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5q4cb835lj)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5q4cb83f2s)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5q4cb83nl1)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5q4cb844kk)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5q4cb8489p)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5q4cb84hsy)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5q4cb84mk2)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5q4cb84zsg)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5q4cb8578q)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5q4cb85q87)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5q4cb85v0c)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5q4cb862hm)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5q4cb869zw)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5q4cb86kh4)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5q4cb871gn)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5q4cb8756s)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5q4cb87dq1)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5q4cb87jg5)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5q4cb87wpk)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5q4cb8845t)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5q4cb88m5b)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5q4cb88qxg)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5q4cb88zdq)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5q4cb896wz)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5q4cb89gd7)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5q4cb89ycr)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5q4cb8b23w)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5q4cb8b9m4)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5q4cb8bfc8)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbw175)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbw4z9)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbw8qf)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbwdgk)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbwj6p)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbwmyt)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbwrpy)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbwwg2)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbx066)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbx3yb)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbx7pg)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbxcfl)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbxh5q)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbxlxv)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbxqnz)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbby6nh)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbybdm)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbyg4r)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbykww)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbypn0)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5p9kbbytd4)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbbyy48)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbbz1wd)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbbz5mj)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbbz9cn)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbbzf3s)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbbzjvx)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbbznm1)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbbzsc5)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbbzx39)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbc00vf)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbc04lk)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbc08bp)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbc0d2t)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbc0hty)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbc0ml2)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbc0rb6)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbc0w2b)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbc179q)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbc1c1v)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbc1gsz)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbc1lk3)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5p9kbc1q97)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172x5p9xln5p9j)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172x5p9xln5t1n)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172x5p9xln5xss)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172x5p9xln61jx)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172x5p9xln6591)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172x5p9xln6915)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172x5p9xln6ds9)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172x5p9xln6jjf)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5p9xln6n8k)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5p9xln6s0p)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172x5p9xln6wrt)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5p9xln70hy)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172x5p9xln7482)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172x5p9xln7806)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172x5p9xln7crb)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172x5p9xln7hhg)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172x5p9xln7m7l)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172x5p9xln7qzq)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172x5p9xln7vqv)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172x5p9xln7zgz)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172x5p9xln8373)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172x5p9xln86z7)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172x5p9xln8bqc)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5p9xln8ggh)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172x5p9xln8l6m)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172x5p9xln8pyr)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172x5p9xln8tpw)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172x5p9xln8yg0)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172x5p9xln9264)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172x5p9xln95y8)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172x5p9xln99pd)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172x5p9xln9ffj)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172x5p9xln9k5n)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5p9xln9nxs)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5p9xln9snx)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5p9xln9xf1)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172x5p9xlnb155)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5p9xlnb4x9)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5p9xlnb8nf)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172x5p9xlnbddk)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5p9xlnbj4p)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172x5p9xlnbmwt)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5p9xlnbrmy)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172x5p9xlnbwd2)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172x5p9xlnc046)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172x5p9xlnc3wb)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172x5p9xlnc7mg)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5p9xlncccl)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172x5p9xlnch3q)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5p9xlnclvv)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5p9xlncqlz)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172x5p9xlncvc3)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172x5p9xlncz37)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172x5p9xlnd2vc)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172x5p9xlnd6lh)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172x5p9xlndbbm)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172x5p9xlndg2r)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172x5p9xlndktw)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172x5p9xlndpl0)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172x5p9xlndtb4)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172x5p9xlndy28)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172x5p9xlnf1td)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172x5p9xlnf5kj)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172x5p9xlnf99n)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172x5p9xlnff1s)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172x5p9xlnfjsx)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172x5p9xlnfnk1)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172x5p9xlnfs95)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172x5p9xlnfx19)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5p9xlng0sf)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5p9xlng4jk)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5p9xlng88p)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172x5p9xlngd0t)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnghry)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5p9xlngmj2)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5p9xlngr86)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172x5p9xlngw0b)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172x5p9xlngzrg)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnh3hl)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnh77q)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnhbzv)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnhgqz)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnhlh3)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnhq77)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnhtzc)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnhyqh)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnj2gm)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnj66r)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnj9yw)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnjfq0)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnjkg4)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnjp68)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnjsyd)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnjxpj)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnk1fn)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172x5p9xlnk55s)

BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnk8xx)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnkdp1)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnkjf5)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnkn59)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnkrxf)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnkwnk)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnl0dp)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnl44t)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnl7wy)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnlcn2)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnlhd6)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnlm4b)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnlqwg)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnlvml)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnlzcq)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnm33v)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnm6vz)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnmbm3)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnmgc7)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnml3c)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnmpvh)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnmtlm)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnmybr)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5p9xlnn22w)

BBC OS Conversations 05:06 SAT (w3ct19z8)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct19z8)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 MON (w3ct19z8)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172x2t8qrjsz9f)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2t8qrjt31k)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172x2t8qrjww6j)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172x2t8qrjwzyn)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172x2t8qrjzs3m)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2t8qrjzwvr)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172x2t8qrk2p0q)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2t8qrk2srv)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172x2t8qrk5kxt)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172x2t8qrk5pny)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7kp)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz8cc)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8p0)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7yh)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz79p)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x197h9pnd26)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172x197vl01y1n)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172x197vl04tyr)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x197vl07qvv)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x197vl0bmry)

Business Weekly 23:06 SAT (w3ct0spx)

Business Weekly 03:06 SUN (w3ct0spx)

Comedians Vs. The News 11:32 SAT (w3ct21mf)

Comedians Vs. The News 19:32 SUN (w3ct21mf)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv71)

CrowdScience 11:32 MON (w3cszv71)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv72)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz99b)

Digital Planet 04:32 WED (w3csz99b)

Digital Planet 11:32 WED (w3csz99b)

Discovery 00:32 MON (w3csz9ft)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3csz9fv)

Discovery 04:32 TUE (w3csz9fv)

Discovery 11:32 TUE (w3csz9fv)

From Our Own Correspondent 02:06 SAT (w3csz9qv)

From Our Own Correspondent 05:06 SUN (w3csz9qv)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3csz9qv)

From Our Own Correspondent 23:06 SUN (w3csz9qv)

HARDtalk 02:06 MON (w3cszc36)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc36)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3cszc36)

HARDtalk 23:06 MON (w3cszc36)

HARDtalk 02:06 WED (w3cszc7q)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3cszc7q)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3cszc7q)

HARDtalk 23:06 WED (w3cszc7q)

HARDtalk 02:06 FRI (w3cszbyp)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszbyp)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3cszbyp)

HARDtalk 23:06 FRI (w3cszbyp)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszcd7)

Health Check 04:32 THU (w3cszcd7)

Health Check 11:32 THU (w3cszcd7)

Heart and Soul 22:32 SAT (w3ct0wkg)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct0wkg)

Heart and Soul 13:32 FRI (w3ct17xj)

In the Studio 02:32 TUE (w3cszvcl)

In the Studio 09:32 TUE (w3cszvcl)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf5n)

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People Fixing the World 02:06 TUE (w3cszv2h)

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Project 17 02:32 WED (w3ct0x84)

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Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172x3lnd0fm8b9)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhkj)

Tech Tent 04:06 FRI (w3cszhq2)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk45)

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The Climate Question 04:06 MON (w3ct0xbd)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct1gv9)

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The Conversation 02:32 MON (w3cszj4m)

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The Conversation 13:32 MON (w3cszj4m)

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The Cultural Frontline 00:06 SUN (w3cszj9m)

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The Documentary 04:06 SUN (w3ct20d6)

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The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjwr)

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The History Hour 00:06 TUE (w3cszkq7)

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When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct21ly)

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WorklifeIndia 02:06 SUN (w3ct1c1k)

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World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x582xsn65dd)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3cszthf)

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World Questions 19:06 SAT (w3cszt64)

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