Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 06 FEBRUARY 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p96212wmb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcp7)
Cryptocurrencies: Fad or the future?

Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies have been back in the news this week after the endorsement of SpaceX and Tesla boss Elon Musk. His comments prompted the price of bitcoin to rise sharply. It’s thought that a perfect storm of inflationary coronavirus stimulus spending by governments, plus eroding trust in financial markets is pushing investors towards the volatile investments. Hundreds of so called ‘alt-coins’ have followed Bitcoin into the highly unregulated cryptocurrency marketplace and worthless coins are being marketed on social media with prices rocketing hundreds of percentage points in minutes. It all has institutional investors wondering whether to dip their toes in for fear of missing out - and regulators scratching their heads about what to do next. New US treasury secretary Janet Yellen says cryptocurrencies are of ‘particular concern’ and the Indian government is now seeking to prohibit private cryptocurrencies altogether. So what are they and how have they evolved since the early days of Bitcoin a decade ago? Ritula Shah and a panel of guests discuss cryptocurrencies and what should be done about them.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p962130cg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19741cw7gc)
Japan's Kirin brewery ends Myanmar joint venture

The Japanese brewer has terminated the partnership following Monday's military coup. We get the perspective of Mark Farmaner, director of Burma Campaign UK, which promotes human rights in the country. And Vasuki Shastry, associate fellow of the Asia-Pacific programme at the research group Chatham House, tells us what wider impact the move is likely to have.
Rupert Murdoch will launch a news streaming service in the UK in the spring. We speak to James Warrington of the City AM newspaper about what the channel will offer.
The US House of Representatives has voted in favour of President Biden's coronavirus relief plan. We get the latest from the BBC's Michelle Fleury in New York.
Vishala Sri-Pathma is joined throughout the programme by Sarah Knight of ABC News in Perth, Australia.

(Picture: A Myanmar woman holds a placard against the military coup. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9621343l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qt)
Myanmar: The Lady and the Generals

Aung San Suu Kyi once seemed set to put Myanmar on a new path after years of military dictatorship. But her refusal to acknowledge the army’s persecution of Rohingya Muslims damaged her standing abroad. And although her party, the NLD, won a landslide victory in elections last year, it may prove to have been a pyrrhic one, says Jonathan Head, after this week’s military coup.

Pascale Harter introduces this and other dispatches from BBC correspondents and writers around the world.

In recent weeks, Lebanese cities have seen a new wave of public protest - but this time it wasn't about politics, but the harsh facts of survival. Six months after the huge blast in its capital city, Lebanon is still struggling to rebuild. Its people are finding whichever means they can to survive a devastating economic crisis, and meanwhile, authorities imposed one of the world's most stringent lockdowns to try and limit the spread of Covid-19. Leila Molana-Allen reports from Tripoli and Beirut.





In September 2017, a ferocious Category 5 hurricane swept through the eastern Caribbean. The islands of Dominica, St Croix and Puerto Rico were battered by winds of up to 280 kph - ripping the roofs from buildings, stripping every leaf from plants, and leaving many families homeless. On Dominica, Hurricane Maria left a trail of devastation and death; but this island and its people have shown both ingenuity and resilience in building back better. Mark Stratton recently visited, and found a place determined to stare down a new, global storm front: coronavirus.

South Africa has been battling to control a new variant of Covid, detected in the country last year. More than 45,000 people have died since the beginning of the pandemic. For those who are grieving, the usual customs surrounding mourning and funerals have been abruptly curtailed. Many people are now restricted to watching live-streamed funerals online, while closest family grieve alone, says Pumza Fihlani.


"No coup.” Credit: EPA/Narong Sangnak)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmshcz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhkh)
India v England: The clash of the Test titans

The Stumped team preview one of the biggest clashes not just in cricket but in world sport as India face England on home soil. We hear from former India player Suresh Raina on where he thinks the key battles will be. Plus as Joe Root is set to play in his 100th test we hear from the man himself and ask whether he could ever surpass Sachin Tendulkar's tally of runs?

Plus with the news coming this week that Australia have pulled out of their tour of South Africa later this month because of coronavirus concerns, we speak to former South Africa all-rounder Robin Peterson on how this will impact cricket in the country.

(Photo: Joe Root of England shakes hands with Virat Kohli of India prior to Day One of the Specsavers 1st Test match between England and India at Edgbaston on August 1, 2018 in Birmingham, England. Credit: Gareth Copley/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p962137vq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjc)
Myanmar: Reporting the coup

It’s less than a week since a military coup in Myanmar, staged as a new session of parliament was set to open. BBC Burmese editor Soe Win Than tells us about events leading up to the coup, and reactions in Myanmar, where the transition to democracy has proved short-lived.

My Home Town: Changwon, South Korea
Julie Yoonnyung Lee of BBC Korean takes us to her hometown of Changwon in South Korea to ride bicycles and admire the cherry blossom.

Unwitching Assam
Birubala Rabha grew up in India's north-eastern state of Assam believing in witches and witchcraft. But after encounters with witch-doctors she lost her belief, and has become a campaigner, helping establish tough anti-witch hunting laws. Soutik Biswas of BBC Delhi tells her story.

Possibly Putin's palace
President Putin has categorically denied ownership of a splendid palace and estate revealed in a video made by Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny. Olga Ivshina of BBC Russian describes the stand-out details of the property, and the reaction of Russians to the story.

Lost Dreams
An Algerian teacher who sits exams alongside his students to support them, and a Syrian refugee in Austria who made Christmas cards for her neighbours to break down barriers. These are two stories from a BBC Arabic series called Lost Dreams, as we hear from Shereen Nanish at BBC Amman.


(Photo: Pro-coup marchers in Naypyitaw. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmw7)
General Robert E Lee: US Civil War rebel

The US Civil War of 1861-65 left 700,000 troops dead. The Southern Confederate states rebelled against the Union of the North because the Confederates wanted to protect the right to own slaves. The hero of the rebel cause, General Robert E Lee, was charged with treason and had his citizenship revoked. So why did Congress reinstate his citizenship in 1975 more than one hundred years after his death? Claire Bowes has been speaking to former Democrat Congresswoman Elizabeth Holtzman who was one of just ten members of Congress to vote against the rehabilitation of General Lee and to John Reeves author of the book, The Lost Indictment of Robert E Lee. They describe how the proposal, put forward by a pro-segregationist Senator from Virginia, passed without even the mention of slavery.

Photo: General Robert E Lee courtesy of the Library of Congress


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p96213clv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcp7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p96213hbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z7)
Coronavirus: Guilty mums

Many parents are finding it hard to be a teacher and a parent at the same time during this pandemic. Two mums - Priya in India and Mpulte in South Africa - share their experiences.

Host Nuala McGovern also hears the urgent appeal being sent to medics to help in Portugal’s intensive care units, as the country undergoes a worrying spike in cases. “We need you,” is the message sent to one nurse, who is being drafted into ICU for the first time.

Plus, three women in Germany, Australia and the United States come together to explain why the pandemic has led them to sell naked images and videos of themselves online.

(Photo: Mputle Dikobe Credit: Mputle Dikobe)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmsvmc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxk)
On 11 November 2019 James Le Mesurier was found dead in a street in Istanbul. He was the latest casualty in a very unusual war – one fought not on the battlefield, but online.

Le Mesurier was a mysterious figure with a taste for the finer things who served in the British Army in several of the world’s hotspots before focusing his energies on war-ravaged Syria from 2014. He co-founded the White Helmets, a Syrian civil defence force who filmed themselves pulling survivors and bodies from the rubble of bombed out buildings.

Soon, the White Helmets - and Le Mesurier - found themselves at the centre of a global race to control the narrative in the Syrian War. In this investigative series Mayday, presenter Chloe Hadjimatheou talks to the people who knew James, including his widow Emma, his ex-wife and former army colleagues, as well as those on the ground in Syria still working as White Helmets today in an effort to piece together James’ story and that of the White Helmets. She speaks to some of the White Helmet’s detractors and follows up accusations about the organisation to try and understand the truth surrounding them.

Chloe Hadjimatheou says: “Making this series has been an extraordinary experience, as listeners will discover. It started out being an investigation into the story of a man with an astonishing life and a mysterious death but it ended up taking me on a bizarre journey down rabbit holes of misinformation. Ultimately this is a story about how truth functions in modern warfare.”


SAT 05:50 Ros Atkins on ... (w3ct24jd)
Trump impeachment: The Republicans' dilemma

As Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial approaches, Ros Atkins looks at the decisions that Republicans face over the former US president’s role in the storming of the Capitol and in the future of their party.

(Photo: President Donald Trump speaks on the first day of the Republican National Convention, in Charlotte, North Carolina. Credit: Jessica Koscielniak/Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p96213m33)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d92fd1zct)
Thousands protest in Myanmar

A large protest is underway in Myanmar’s main commercial city Yangon. Hundreds of workers have joined young activists and local residents, condemning the military coup. We hear the latest from the ground and from a foreign advisor to the detained Premier Aung Sung Suu Kyi.

Also on the programme, protesters are detained in Russia for supporting opposition leader, Alexei Navalny and we hear from the widow of Lokman Slim, a prominent Lebanese journalist and critic of Hezbollah, who was shot earlier this week.

To talk about these stories and others we are joined by Celia Szusterman who is the director of the Latin America Programme at the Institute for Statecraft in London and James Lynch, the founding director of FairSquare Research and Projects, which provides expert analysis on a range of human rights issues.

(Photo: Protestors gather in Yangon today; Credit: EPA/LYNN BO BO)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p96213qv7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d92fd233y)
International anger over Russian expulsions

European leaders condemn Russia's decision to expel three diplomats, in a growing row over the treatment of the opposition leader, Alexei Navalny.

Also on the programme: a plea to allow aid into Ethiopia's war-torn Tigray region, we hear from the head of the Norwegian Refugee Council, Jan Egeland and as LGBT+ history month is marked, we hear about the struggles some people still face in coming out about their sexuality.

To talk about these stories and many more we are joined by Celia Szusterman, who is the director of the Latin America Programme at the Institute for Statecraft in London and James Lynch, founding director of FairSquare Research and Projects, which provides expert analysis on a range of human rights issues.

(Photo: Russian police detain protestors in Moscow; Credit: EPA/ANATOLY MALTSEV)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p96213vlc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d92fd26w2)
Large rally in Yangon

Thousands of people have taken to the streets of Myanmar to protest against this week's military coup. We'll hear from the biggest city Yangon. We also hear from an Australian advisor to the country's deposed leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, just after he was detained in a hotel in the capital.

Also on the programme: we'll get the latest on the developments regarding vaccines against Coronavirus from a leading virologist; and hear about the Russian opposition leader, Alexei Navalny, who was back in court on Friday, this time accused of defaming a World War II veteran.

To talk about these stories and more we are joined in the studio by Celia Szusterman who is the director of the Latin America Programme at the Institute for Statecraft in London and James Lynch, the founding director of FairSquare Research and Projects, which provides expert analysis on a range of human rights issues.

(Photo: Protestors showing three fingers in defiance; Credit: EPA/NYEIN CHAN NAING)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmt6vr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c56)
Immigration in America

America was built on immigration, but is it still a good place for immigrants? Katty Kay and Carlos Watson discuss immigration, acceptance and assimilation with a top chef and a hip hop music manager.

Marcus Samuelsson was born in Ethiopia but brought up in Sweden by his Swedish adoptive parents, before moving to America in the 1990s. He now has a chain of restaurants across the US, including the famous Red Rooster in Harlem.

Sophia Chang was born in Canada to Korean immigrant parents. She moved to the US in her twenties and has been living in New York for more than three decades. She is known as “the first Asian woman in hip hop.” Amongst others, she has managed three members of Wu Tang Clan.

Both discuss their journeys and reasons for coming to America, their experiences of trying to fit into American society, and what they feel about America’s attitudes to immigrants. They also talk about America’s cultural mosaic, opportunities, what immigrants bring to the US, and racism.

This is a co-production between BBC World Service and Ozy Media.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p96213zbh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 today]


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmtblw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cx1)
Two Minutes Past Nine

06/02/2021 GMT

On April 19th 1995 a 26-year-old named Timothy Mcveigh steered a yellow rental truck into downtown Oklahoma city. Inside was a two-ton homemade explosive.

The Oklahoma City Bombing killed 168 people and leaving 680 injured. Journalist Leah Sottile investigates the legacy of the attack in a series that gets into the heart of America’s far-right today.
Recorded over some of the most divisive and turbulent months in recent American political history, Two Minutes Past Nine explores and questions the changing face of far right extremism in all its chaos and conspiracism.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf5m)
Reflections on money, work, family and business in India

It’s a show that reflects on money, work, family and business - we get listeners’ thoughts on Work Life India. Is it picking the right topics and only focussing on big cities? The shows’ host and producer respond..
Plus what’s happened to sports commentator Alan Green? And feedback for Voices from the Ghetto.
Presenter Rajan Datar
Producer Howard Shannon.


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9621432m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c815pmwwb)
Sportshour at the Super Bowl

This week’s Sportshour focuses on Super Bowl LV between the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the Kansas City Chiefs.

The BBC’s Blaire Toedte is on the ground in Florida for us as the Bucs aim to make history by becoming the first team to win a Super Bowl in their home stadium.

Seven and a half thousand vaccinated health care workers have been gifted tickets for the game as a thank you for their work during the covid pandemic. RJ Gardner is an ICU nurse with Aya Healthcare and tells us about running a covid ward in New Jersey at the start of the pandemic and the pressures involved with his current role in Atlanta. He discusses losing a patient he got close to, being away from his family and his shock at being told he’d be going to the Super Bowl.

Brad Johnson was Tampa Bay’s quarterback when they won their first and up to now only Super Bowl in in 2003. He tells us the Bucs were known as “the yuks” when he joined the team, such was their lowly reputation. Johnson also reflects on winning the Super Bowl and gives us his thoughts on Tom Brady and Patrick Mahomes.

The Mayor of Tampa, Jane Castor tells us how she’s been confident from the outset that the Bucs would win the Super Bowl, discusses rumours the city could be renamed in Tom Brady’s honour and tells us about a bet she has on the game with the Mayor of Kansas City.

John Biever will make history on Sunday as he becomes the only photographer to have worked at every Super Bowl. He recalls shooting his first, alongside his father, as a fifteen year old and how they worked together at the first thirty five Super Bowls before ill health and age forced his father to stop. He also talks about the importance of keeping his streak going and why he has a soft spot for the Kansas City Chiefs going into this game.

We hear from Bucs assistant defensive line coach, Lori Locust. She made history when she joined the team as she became the first woman position coach in the NFL and is part of a diverse coaching staff at the organisation. Jay Ajayi also gives us his thoughts on diversity in the NFL. Ajayi won the Super Bowl with the Philadelphia Eagles in 2018. He was born in London and has Nigerian heritage.

The NFL is the focus for Sporting Witness on this Super Bowl weekend as we bring you the story behind a landmark policy for diversity in sport. It's called the Rooney Rule and it was introduced by the NFL to require its teams to interview minority candidates for jobs as head coaches.

And – we’re joined live by fans of the Bucs and the Chiefs.

Photo: Tom Brad of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers (Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p962146tr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5pz7w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmtl34)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21md)
Tumi Morake and Joanne McNally

Comedians vs the News is back! Comedy couple Jess Salomon and Eman El-Husseini are ready to bring laughter to 2021.

This week, Jess and Eman are joined by the South African queen of comedy Tumi Morake and Irish stand-up sensation Joanne McNally. They’ll be finding out why a South African politician is in trouble for her killer outfit, and hearing all about the Irish Health Minister’s favourite emoji…

Join Comedians vs the News for the headlines as you’ve never heard them before.


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p96214bkw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6v5)
History in the making with Mickey Guyton and Jimmie Allen

Jimmie Allen, Mickey Guyton, Abby Anderson and Twinnie discuss issues around the country music industry, how they tell stories in their songs, and the importance of being yourself and speaking your mind.

Jimmie Allen is an artist from Southern Delaware, USA, who mixes country, rock, R&B, and pop. He released his debut album Mercury Lane in 2018, a tribute to the street he grew up on, which led him to be labelled “one of the hottest rising stars in country”. His latest EP, Bettie James, is a collaborative projective released last year.

On that EP is Mickey Guyton, and she’s also on the show today. She’s a singer-songwriter from Texas described as “the unapologetic voice country music needs right now”. Her debut single, Better Than You Left Me, broke the record for being added to more country radio stations in its first week of release than any other debut single. She also recently made history as the first Black female solo artist to earn a Grammy nomination in a country category.

Abby Anderson is also from Texas, where she learned to play the piano from the age of 5. She moved to Nashville at 17 before releasing her debut EP I’m Good in 2018. Since then, she’s collaborated with some of the biggest names in country, and is getting ready to release her debut album.

And finally, Twinnie is a singer-songwriter from Yorkshire, England, with strong ties to Nashville. Her career started in acting, and she performed in film, TV and theatre, before releasing her debut album Hollywood Gypsy in April 2020.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p96214gb0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljtmyl)
Myanmar: Thousands demonstrate against military coup

Thousands of people have taken to the streets of Myanmar's biggest city, Yangon, to protest against the military coup and demand the release of elected leader, Aung San Suu Kyi. Britain's ambassador in Myanmar says the protesters are taking a risk.

Also on the programme: A year on from his death from Covid-19, we remember the Chinese doctor who inspired an outpouring of anger and grief on the internet; and we talk to a British doctor caring for terminally ill patients in a time of pandemic.


Photo: Protesters hold placards and flash the three-finger salute, a symbol of resistance, during a protest against the military coup, in Yangon, Myanmar Credit: EPA/LYNN BO BO


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p96214l24)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3ln0r3v3qg)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as Newcastle United take on Southampton, who are looking to bounce back from their shock 9-0 defeat to Manchester United.

Lee James is joined by former West Ham and Trinidad and Tobago goalkeeper Shaka Hislop, Minnesota United and Sierra Leone forward Kei Kamara and former Everton and England defender Lindsay Johnson to discuss the Premier League's big talking points.

We'll have reaction to the day's early kick-off between Arsenal and Aston Villa.

Elsewhere, it's a busy weekend of men's Test cricket. We'll be in India to reflect on day two of their first Test against England in Chennai. We'll also keep you across the second men's Test match between Pakistan and South Africa in Rawalpindi and Bangladesh vs. West Indies in Chittagong.

After the build-up was dominated by a huge quarantine row, we'll preview the Australian Open as the first tennis grand slam of the year finally gets underway in Melbourne.

In rugby union, it's also the start of the men's Six Nations with Italy hosting France and England facing Scotland on the opening day.

And we'll look ahead to Super Bowl 55 as Tom Brady targets a record seventh success - this time with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers against the defending champions Kansas City Chiefs.

Photo: Jan Bednarek reacts to scoring an own goal in Southampton's 9-0 defeat at Manchester United (Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9621521n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5qtgs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmvfb1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c56)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p962155ss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3cszkq6)
The Burma protests of 1988

In August 1988, people took to the streets of Burma, or Myanmar, to protest against the country's military government. The bloody uprising would lead to the rise of Aung San Suu Kyi as the country's pro-democracy leader. Also, the epidemic of drug use among US troops in Vietnam in the 1970s, the first Eurostar train service and the launch of the spectacular Moscow State Circus in 1971

PHOTO: Protestors in Rangoon in 1988 (Getty Images)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p962159jx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk44)
Author Angie Thomas

The White Tiger director Ramin Bahrani and two of its stars Priyanka Chopra Jonas and Adarsh Gourav discuss their new movie.

New Zealand actress and comedian Rose Matafeo explains how comedy can get lost in translation.

Nadia Nakai, South Africa’s biggest female rapper, talks about her evolving career in music.

French actress Camille Cottin, star of the hit comedy show Call My Agent, tells us how close to reality it is.

Novelist Monique Roffey explains some Trinidadian vernacular from her 2020 Costa Award-winning novel The Mermaid of Black Conch.

And there’s music from Québécois band Le Vent du Nord from this year’s Celtic Connections Festival.

Nikki Bedi’s studio guests this week are British-Lebanese writer and film producer Nasri Attalah, and bestselling American author Angie Thomas joins us down the line from Jackson, Mississippi to discuss Concrete Rose, the prequel to her chart-topping novel The Hate U Give.


(Photo: Angie Thomas. Credit: Valerie Schmidt)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p96215f91)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljvlxm)
Myanmar coup: crowds protest against military

Myanmar's military rulers have shut down the country's internet as thousands of people joined the largest rally yet against Monday's coup. Civil society organisations urged internet providers and mobile networks to challenge the blackout order.

Also on the programme: President Brden’s Yemen policy switch; and the 50th anniversary of women’s right to vote in Switzerland.

(Photo: A protester wearing a face mask with the flag of the National League for Democracy (NLD) party during a protest against the military coup, in Yangon, Myanmar. Credit: EPA).


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p96215k15)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79tr7l2010)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqcchr8zv)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmvx9k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1fq8)
Three months to save my son's life

Veer is four years old. He has a genetic disorder called Fanconi Anaemia affecting his bone marrow. In 2019, his parents were told they would need to find a lifesaving stem cell donor for him. Doctors estimated that Veer could expect to live for between two to five years before needing a transplant, depending on how quickly his bone marrow depletes. However, after one of Veer’s recent general check-ups, the Doctors said things were deteriorating faster than expected and Veer was only three to six months from needing the transplant. The challenge is to get people to register. Currently, only 2% of the UK’s population are stem cell donors. A donor could come from anywhere around the world but misconceptions about becoming a donor means registrants are low. In the end, all it involves is a procedure similar to giving blood.

Rajeev Gupta follows Veer’s parents as they dramatically ramp up efforts to save their son's life. In this emotional story, we get to know the charming little Veer and his family as they battle limitations placed by the coronavirus pandemic to try and find a match for him. Rajeev hears how Veer’s mum, Kirpa and dad, Nirav have increasingly turned to their Jain faith to help deal with the emotional traumas placed upon the family. Kirpa believes their faith inevitably guides them through this and will help Veer find his match. With exclusive access, this programme follows Veer and his family to what could be a joyous or equally heart wrenching conclusion.

Presenter/producer: Rajeev Gupta

(Photo: Veer. Credit: helpveernow.org)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p96215ns9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spw)
Following the money in Myanmar

As protests continue against the military coup in Myanmar, Business Weekly hears how the army controls the country’s economy. Jeff Bezos has announced that he’s stepping down as Amazon chief executive so he can concentrate on other projects. We think about the good he could he do if he really put his mind - and his money - to it. And it’s a dog’s life - we hear how the trade in lockdown pets is booming. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: University teachers in Yangon protest against the military coup, STR/AFP via Getty Images)



SUNDAY 07 FEBRUARY 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p96215sjf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9l)
Bisa Butler: Crafting African American stories

This week, we meet the craft makers and textile artists telling new stories through traditional techniques.

Sewn in brightly coloured thread and African fabrics, artist Bisa Butler’s stunning quilt portraits often focus on unknown African Americans. Creating her quilts from vintage photos found in the American National Archives, she pieces together their stories using carefully chosen textiles. Bisa talks to Chi Chi about her creative process, storytelling through her quilts and the portrait she’d like to stitch next.

When master weaver Porfirio Gutierrez returned home to Mexico after years away, he found the traditional methods he’d grown up with were dying out and he was determined to do something about it. Porfirio Gutierrez tells our reporter Saskia Edwards how he has re-imagined Zapotec rug making to reflect both the ancient and modern world.

South African artist Kimathi Mafafo explains how she uses embroidery to represent traditional women in her series, Voiceless and to empower local women by teaching them her craft.

Plus: has a film, a book or an artwork ever changed the way you see the world? One of Britain’s leading tailors, Sir Paul Smith tells us about an influential painting as he celebrates 50 years in the fashion industry.


Presented by Chi Chi Izundu


(Photo: Bisa Butler. Credit: John Butler, courtesy of Claire Oliver Gallery)


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmw4st)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3cszf5m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p96215x8k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3cszkxz)
Mixing Covid vaccines

A new trial is about to start in the UK, seeing if different vaccines can be mixed and matched in a two-dose schedule, and whether the timing matters. Governments want to know the answer as vaccines are in short supply. Oxford University’s Matthew Snape takes Roland Pease through the thinking.

Despite the numbers of vaccines being approved for use we still need treatments for Covid-19. A team at the University of North Carolina is upgrading the kind of manufactured antibodies that have been used to treat patients during the pandemic, monoclonal antibodies. Lisa Gralinski explains how they are designing souped-up antibodies that’ll neutralise not just SARS-CoV-2, but a whole range of coronaviruses.

Before global warming, the big ecological worry that exercised environmentalists was acid rain. We’d routinely see pictures of forests across the world dying because of the acid soaking they’d had poisoning the soil. In a way, this has been one of environmental activism’s success stories. The culprit was sulphur in coal and in forecourt fuels – which could be removed, with immediate effect on air quality. But biogeochemist Tobias Goldhammer of the Leibniz Institute in Berlin and colleagues have found that sulphur, from other sources, is still polluting water courses.

There’s been debate over when and where dogs became man’s best friend. Geoff Marsh reports on new research from archaeology and genetics that puts the time at around 20,000 years ago and the place as Siberia.

Could being happier help us fight infectious disease?

As the world embarks on a mass vaccination programme to protect populations from Covid-19, Crowdscience asks whether our mood has any impact on our immune systems. In other words, could being happier help us fight infectious diseases? Marnie Chesterton explores how our mental wellbeing can impact our physical health and hears that stress and anxiety make it harder for our natural defence systems to kick in – a field known as psychoneuroimmunology. Professor Kavita Vedhara from the University of Nottingham explains flu jabs are less successful in patients with chronic stress.

So scientists are coming up with non-pharmacological ways to improve vaccine efficiency. We investigate the idea that watching a short feel-good video before receiving the inoculation could lead to increased production of antibodies to a virus. And talk to Professor Richard Davidson who says mindfulness reduces stress and makes vaccines more effective.


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9621610p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c1j)
How to tackle racism in sport

Warning: This programme contains racial slurs.

Whether it is impulsive or intended, structural or whispered, racism in sport has been growing over the decades. Racial bias and inequalities not only interfere with the game but also affect players’ morale and sometimes lead to lost opportunities.

How do top players deal with racism on and off the field and what needs to be done to stamp it out? How can sporting federations address this issue, and can audiences be made more aware of the impact racial slurs have on players?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we talk to three Olympians about ways to tackle racism in sport.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Anju Bobby George, former athlete, senior vice president, Athletics Federation of India; Jwala Gutta, Indian shuttler; Anita Asante, Aston Villa defender, former England international


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmwd92)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cx1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyn)
Glasgow vs Rwanda

Tim explores a shocking claim that life expectancy in some parts of Glasgow is less than it is in Rwanda. But is that fair on Glasgow and for that matter is it fair on Rwanda? And a listener asks whether loss of smell is a strong enough symptom of Covid that it might be used to help diagnose the virus, replacing rapid testing.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Chloe Hadjimatheou


(Left: Rwanda refugee - photo Reza. Right: Glasgow homeless man - photo Christopher Furlong / both Getty images)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p962164rt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p962168hy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx7)
Bill Bryson: Notes from a Small Island

This month World Book Club discusses Bill Bryson’s hugely acclaimed travelogue Notes from a Small Island with the author and his readers around the world.

After two decades as a resident of the United Kingdom, Bryson took what he thought might be a last affectionate trip around his adoptive country before returning to live in his native America. Notes from a Small Island is the irreverent and hilarious account of this meandering journey through his beloved island nation. From Dover to Downing Street, from Giggleswick to Loch Ness by way of Titsey and Nether Wallop, Bryson rejoices in Britain’s inimitable placenames and much else of more substance besides, his very own State of the Nation address, as it were.

A huge number-one bestseller when it was first published, Notes from a Small Island has become that nation's most loved book about Britain.


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p96216d82)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmwrjg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p96216j06)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d92fd4w8x)
Day 2 of Myanmar Protests

Thousands of people have taken to the streets of Myanmar for a second day in a row to protest against the military's seizure of power, we hear an analysis of the possible impact of those demonstrations.

Also on the programme: We'll be hearing about why there is vaccine hesitancy in the United States among health care workers; and a report on the boom in cross-country skiing, with ski stations shut across Europe.

For comment on these stories and many more we are joined on the programme by Shachi Kurl, President of Angus Reid Institute, which is a Canadian public opinion research organisation based in Vancouver and Jeremy Shapiro, research director of the European Council on Foreign Relations, a think tank based here in London, but who is currently in Washington.

(Photo: Protestors in Yangon; Credit: Reuters/Stringer)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p96216mrb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d92fd5011)
Myanmar Protests Continue

Tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets in Myanmar for a second day in a row to protest against the military's seizure of power. We take look at what happens next to the deposed leader, Aung San Suu Kyi

Also on the programme: A report from Melbourne, where the Australian Open Tennis Tournament is about to begun and the Bosnian director on what inspired her potentially award-winning film.

To talk about these stories and others we are joined by Shachi Kurl, President of Angus Reid Institute, a Canadian public opinion research organisation based in Vancouver and Jeremy Shapiro, research director of the European Council on Foreign Relations, a think tank based here in London, but who is currently in Washington.

(Photo: Yangon Protesters; Credit: Reuters/Stringer)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p96216rhg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d92fd53s5)
Tens of thousands in Myanmar Protests

Thousands of people are protesting for a second day in a row, in reaction to the military coup which took place nearly a week ago. We hear the latest about the events on the ground.

Also on the programme: Donald Trump's impeachment trial in the US Senate kicks off tomorrow - his supporters are upbeat; And Missions to Mars - scientists gear up for three new missions to the Red Planet's orbit.

To talk about these stories and many more we are joined by Shachi Kurl, President of Angus Reid Institute, a Canadian public opinion research organization based in Vancouver and Jeremy Shapiro, research director of the European Council on Foreign Relations, a think tank based here in London, but who is currently in Washington.

(Photo: Protesters demand the release of Aung San Suu Kyi; Credit: EPA/LYNN BO BO)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmx3rv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 Outlook (w3cszf13)
The tale of the little Countess's little cello

When Christine Walevska was given a rare, one-eighth-size Bernardel cello at the age of eight and a half, she fell in love with the instrument immediately and it set her on a path to becoming an internationally renowned concert cellist. The tiny cello, given to her by her father, had an intriguing label on the inside... it said "Pour la petite Comtesse Marie 1834". This label would prove crucial after the cello was stolen from Christine's father's shop in 1978. It led - 36 years later - to Christine receiving an email from the Breshears family in California. They had been searching for a rare child-size cello for their gifted six-year-old daughter Starla and had finally found one. Was it Christine's beloved Bernardel? This is the story of a rare cello, its theft and how it shaped the dreams of two highly talented young girls. A longer version of this programme was first broadcast on 31st December 2020.


Presenter: Saskia Edwards
Producer: June Christie

Picture: Cellist Christine Walevska aged eight and a half, with her rare Bernardel cello
Credit: Christine Walevska:


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p96216w7l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmx7hz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Africa Life Clinic (w3ct21g3)
Vaccinating Africa against Covid-19

So far five African counties have begun vaccination campaigns, with vaccines gifted to them by wealthier countries. For many of the continent’s 1.2 billion people Covid -19 vaccinations will come through the COVAX initiative, which is a programme designed to reach many of the poor and vulnerable across the world. Whilst this is a huge task, Africa does have the advantage of having developed effective methods of delivering vaccinations with campaigns to fight Polio and Ebola.

Along with the global pandemic, life threatening diseases such as cholera still thrive in inadequate sanitary conditions which is the situation for many people worldwide. However, there are some relatively simple and cheap solutions available, such as a scheme to build waterless latrines in Nigeria.

Reporters Rhoda Odhiambo and Charles Mgbolu join presenter Priscilla Ngethe to discuss these health issues.

(Picture: A man is being vaccinated by a healthcare worker. Credit: Getty Images).


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p96216zzq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c1j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmxc83)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1fq8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p962173qv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5sw4z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmxh07)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct1gv8)
The New Arctic

The New Arctic: Communities under threat

Allan Little investigates how the climate crisis is impacting different communities above the Arctic circle, from infrastructure damage to loss of life, eroding land and endangering thousand-year-old cultures and traditional knowledge. They are our eyes and ears on the speed with which our planet is changing. We look at Nenets reindeer herding on the Siberian tundra, infrastructure damage in Longyearbyen (the world’s most northern town on the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard), and a pioneering environmental program in Kotzebue, Alaska. For communities such as Pond Inlet (Mittimatalik) in Nunavut, Canada, climate change compounds existing challenges caused by colonialism and lack of economic development.


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p962177gz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4r)
Will QAnon survive?

With President Trump no longer in office and a clampdown by social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, what is the future for the QAnon conspiracy theory? It’s had a considerable following from the Republican rank and file who supported Donald Trump but was strongly associated with the attack on Capitol Hill. Now Republican party leaders have warned QAnon is dangerous. But will ordinary Americans turn their backs on it? With Tanya Beckett.

(A pro-Trump mob confronts U.S. Capitol police outside the Senate chamber in Washington DC. Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmxlrc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3csz6md)
Europe’s most dangerous capital

Bucharest, in Romania, is arguably Europe’s most dangerous capital city. It’s not the crime that’s the problem – it’s the buildings. Many of them don’t comply with basic laws and building regulations. Permits are regularly faked. And yet Bucharest is the most earthquake prone European capital. A serious quake would cause many of the buildings to collapse, with a potential loss of life into the thousands. Some years ago a red dot was put on a number of buildings in the city which were in danger of collapse. Nothing else has happened since. A microcosm of the problem is a type of building called ‘camine de nefamilisti’, or ‘homes for those without families’. These were built during the Ceaucescu era to temporarily house workers brought in from the countryside and people who were still single after university. The single room flats, the size of a prison cell, with a communal shower and toilet on each floor were never meant for families. But after the fall of Communism many of these ‘matchboxes’ ended up in private hands and conditions deteriorated, with whole families moved into spaces designed for a single person. Simona Rata grew up in one of these buildings. For Assignment, she returns to the ‘camine de nefamilisti’ and finds little has changed since her childhood.

Reporter and producer: Simona Rata
Assistant editor: John Murphy
Editor: Bridget Harney


(Image: Abandoned building on Calea Mosilor, a busy street in the centre of Bucharest. Credit: Simona Rata/BBC)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p96217c73)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljxjvp)
Myanmar coup: Largest protests since 2007

About 100,000 people have taken part in a rally in Myanmar's largest city, Yangon, to express their anger at last week's military coup. In a second day of protests, people called for the release of the elected leader, Aung San Suu Kyi. We get the latest from our correspondent on the ground.

Also, a collapsed glacier has caused flash flooding in northern India and many deaths.

And the makers of the AstraZeneca vaccine say it offers only limited protection against the South African coronavirus variant.

(Photo: Yangon protests. Credit: AFP)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p96217gz7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p96217lqc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjwq)
Mermaids: Tales from the deep

We delve into the watery depths of sea creature folklore, with a round-the-world tour of different variations on the concept of mermaids – from the Sirens of Greek mythology to the Selkies or Seal Folk of Scottish legend, and water spirits known as Mami Water, which are venerated in parts of Africa and the Americas. Not forgetting the famous fairy tale, The Little Mermaid, which has captivated the imagination ever since its publication in 1837 and was popularised by Disney in the 1980s.

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss what these ancient stories can tell us are Cristina Bacchilega of the University of Hawaii, co-editor of The Penguin Book of Mermaids; British writer, Marcelle Mateki Akita, who has written a book for children called Fatama and Mami Wata's Secret; and Lynn Barbour, founder and Arts Director of the Orkney Folklore and Storytelling Centre in the Orkney Islands in Scotland.

Produced by Jo Impey for the BBC World Service.

[Image: Detail from Fisherman and Mermaids in the Blue Grotto on Capri by Hermann Corrodi (1844-1905). Credit: Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images]


SUN 15:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p96217qgh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3ln0r3y83t)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as Liverpool host Manchester City. Liverpool's midweek loss to Brighton means City will go 10 points clear of the champions with victory at Anfield.

Delyth Lloyd is joined by former Stoke and Republic of Ireland striker Jonathan Walters to discuss the match and all the other big Premier League talking points. We'll also bring you reaction to the day's early games between Tottenham and West Brom and Wolves and Leicester.

Elsewhere, we'll have a round-up of the latest men's Test cricket as India face England, Pakistan take on South Africa and Bangladesh host West Indies.

We'll look ahead to the final of the men's football African Nations Championship.

Plus we'll preview Super Bowl 55 as Tampa Bay Buccaneers take on defending champions Kansas City Chiefs, with Tampa's Tom Brady targeting a record seventh Super Bowl success.

And we'll also discuss the opening matches of the Australian Open, as the first tennis grand slam of the year gets underway in Melbourne.

Photo: Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp with Manchester City counterpart Pep Guardiola (Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p962182pw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5tv40)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmyfz8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 Comedians Vs. The News (w3ct21md)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p962186g0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6v5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p96218b64)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljyhtq)
Protests sweep Myanmar

Tens of thousands of people rallied across Myanmar on Sunday to denounce last week’s coup and demand the release of Aung San Suu Kyi. These are the biggest protests since the 2007 Saffron Revolution that helped lead to democratic reforms.

Also in the programme: how the start of Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial could unfold this week; and do Hollywood movies influence how politicians behave?

(Photo: Demonstrators hold signs reading "Down with Military Dictatorship"" during a protest against the military coup in Naypyitaw, Myanmar. Credit: EPA).


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p96218fy8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79tr7l4wy3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqcchv5wy)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmyt6n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cx1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p96218kpd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmyxys)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf13)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 today]



MONDAY 08 FEBRUARY 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbdjpp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y2wz2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Discovery (w3csz9fs)
The power of celibacy

You might think that sex is essential for life, but you'd be wrong!

Lucy Cooke travels to the Hawaiian island of Oahu to meet a community of mourning geckos - self-cloning sisters who have done away with males altogether.

An array of reptiles, amphibians and fish, along with a host of spineless wonders, from snails to spiders, can reproduce without sex. It's what biologists call parthenogenesis, from the Greek meaning “virgin birth”.

Many, like the mourning gecko, make great “weed” species. They're explosive opportunists capable of rapidly colonising new territory, as they don’t need to waste energy finding a mate. But without the mixing up of genes, that sex with a male provides, they are less able to adapt and change.

So sex pays if you don’t want to go extinct.

Yet there is one self-cloning sister that defies that theory - the Bdelloid Rotifer. Living for millions of years and comprising over 450 species, these microscopic water dwelling creatures have conquered the planet. They get around the drawbacks of no sex, by stealing genes, and escape disease by desiccating and then coming back to life.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Picture: Female Komodo dragon at London Zoo, Credit: Matthew Fearn/PA


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbdnft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x582kjbf0sk)
Cuba opens the door to private businesses

Until now, only 127 professions in Cuba were allowed to have an element of private participation to them. The rest were controlled and administered by the government; that figure will be raised to more than 2,000 professions; we hear more from Will Grant, the BBC's Cuba Correspondent. Sales of classic cars have not crashed despite the pandemic, with people buying Morris Minors, Ford Capris and even Trabants and Ladas. We speak to John Mayhead, editor of Haggerty's Price Guide and Kiril Vitanov, a Bulgarian man living in Cambridge who drives a Russian Volga M21, the same kind of car owned by astronaut Yuri Gagarin. Spanish farmers have condemned the central government's move to declare the Iberian wolf a protected species and farmers are extremely angry, many claiming that romantic city-dweller notions of wolves in the moonlight are at odds with the reality farmers face of potential threats to livestock; we speak to the BBC's Madrid correspondent, Guy Hedgecoe. Plus, we hear from Mariana Mazzucato, a high-profile economist noted for her advocacy for more active state involvement in the economy. She's calling on governments to solve some of our most pressing problems by taking inspiration from the mission-driven methods of the Apollo project. (Picture of Cuban flag over Plaza de la Cathedral at sunset, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba, via Getty Images).


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y30q6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c56)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbds5y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc35)
Evan Medeiros: How should Biden approach China?

Stephen Sackur speaks to Evan Medeiros, who was President Obama’s top adviser on China policy. Under Donald Trump, US-China relations soured dramatically. A potentially dangerous era of competition and even confrontation beckons. What should President Biden's strategy be towards China?


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y34gb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4l)
Intimacy on screen

Whether it’s a stroke of a cheek or a sex scene, filming intimate content for movies and TV is a delicate business. When badly handled, it can even cause the actors harm. Kim Chakanetsa talks to an Indian movie director and to a pioneering intimacy coordinator about ensuring actors feel safe on set while filming simulated sex scenes. Also: has the #MeToo movement fuelled a demand for better boundaries, and how is the industry responding?

Ita O'Brien is a British movement director and intimacy coordinator for film, TV and theatre. She worked on the set of I May Destroy You, Normal People, Gentleman Jack and Sex Education. She has developed the 'Intimacy on Set' guidelines for those working with intimacy, scenes with sexual content and nudity.

Alankrita Shrivastava is an Indian screenwriter and director. Her 2017 movie, Lipstick Under My Burkha, was initially banned in India for containing 'contagious sexual scenes'. She explains the challenges of shooting sex scenes in Bollywood, where nudity isn't allowed, and how to put women's desire at the centre of the narrative.

Produced by Sarah Kendal and Alice Gioia for the BBC World Service.

IMAGE DETAILS
Left: Alankrita Shrivastava (credit Komal Gandhi)
Right: Ita O'Brien (credit Nic Dawkes)


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbdwy2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjwq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh66)
The NFL's Rooney Rule

In 2003, the NFL introduced a landmark diversity policy requiring American football teams to interview ethnic minority candidates for positions as head coaches or general managers. Known as the “Rooney Rule”, the policy was the result of organised pressure from black coaches and former players, led by former NFL champion, John Wooten. Initially seen as a success, the Rooney Rule has been influential not just in sport, but in the corporate world. John Wooten talks to Farhana Haider.

PHOTO: John Wooten in his playing days in the 1960s (Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbf0p6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbc)
Can the internet ever be green?

The big tech firms of the world have reported record profits during lockdown. These firms are some of the industrial titans of the digital age.

Their ability to manipulate vast quantities of data is revolutionising, well, everything. From streaming games and movies, to automating mining operations, controlling medical devices and even simple emails, the internet has brought incredible advances right across the globe.

But we now know that previous industrial revolutions placed a huge burden on the planet. Our climate question this week is: Will this one be any different?

Facebook has pledged to use only renewable energy by the end of 2020, not 2030, as we stated in the programme.

Guests:

Dr Rabih Bashroush - IT infrastructure expert, The Uptime Institute
Dr Stephanie Hare - Author and tech researcher
Mats Lewan - Tech reporter, Stockholm

Presented by Graihagh Jackson and Neal Razzell
Produced by Jordan Dunbar
Researched by Soila Apparicio
Edited by Emma Rippon


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y3cyl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv70)
Can being happy help me fight infection?

Could being happier help us fight infectious disease?

As the world embarks on a mass vaccination programme to protect populations from Covid-19, Crowdscience asks whether our mood has any impact on our immune systems. In other words, could being happier help us fight infectious diseases? Marnie Chesterton explores how our mental wellbeing can impact our physical health and hears that stress and anxiety make it harder for our natural defence systems to kick in – a field known as psychoneuroimmunology. Professor Kavita Vedhara from the University of Nottingham explains flu jabs are less successful in patients with chronic stress.

So scientists are coming up with non-pharmacological ways to improve vaccine efficiency. We investigate the idea that watching a short feel-good video before receiving the inoculation could lead to increased production of antibodies to a virus. And talk to Professor Richard Davidson who says mindfulness reduces stress and makes vaccines more effective.


[Image: Happy couple wearing masks. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbf4fb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp11ds1)
Covid-19 vaccine: South Africa pauses AstraZeneca roll-out

Oxford-AstraZeneca's vaccine offers "minimal protection" against mild disease from the South Africa variant, that's according to a recent study which has not yet been peer reviewed, and South Africa has halted its use for now. We get the view of an epidemiologist.

We go live to Haiti where the authorities claim they've foiled a coup.

And we speak to the UN Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, Alice Wairimu Nderitu, who says she had received reports of serious human rights violations by the parties to the conflict in Ethiopia’s northern Tigray region.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbf85g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp11jj5)
Protests continue in Myanmar

People are back in the streets on Monday in Myanmar protesting after the military seized power last week. We speak to the Executive Director of Burma Human Rights Network.

We get the latest after dozens of people are missing and feared dead after a piece of a Himalayan glacier fell into a river and triggered a huge flood in northern India.

And what next in Somalia after political leaders fail to break a deadlock over the country’s elections, as the government's mandate expires today.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbfcxl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp11n89)
Tens of thousands of people take to the streets in Myanmar

For the third day in a row tens of thousands of people are protesting in Myanmar against last week's military coup. The country's elected leader Aung San Suu Kyi remains in detention. We have an update.

South Africa has decided to halt its roll-out of the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine after a study showed disappointing results against the local variant of coronavirus. We get the view of an epidemiologist in South Africa.

And we look into what exactly dark web marketplaces are.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbfhnq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y3vy3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7kn)
Stormy seas for global shipping

We explore the twin crises affecting the shipping industry. First, thousands of seafarers are stranded far from home, unable to travel because of the coronavirus. Add to that congestion at ports across the globe and sky-high freight rates. The result? Unprecedented pressures on an industry that’s usually far from the public eye. We hear from stranded ship-workers and those trying to help them return home. And we speak to the importers and exporters struggling to stay afloat as shipping rates go up and up.

(Image credit: Getty Images.)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszml7)
DES Daughters

DES or Diethylstilbestrol was a form of synthetic estrogen developed in the 1930s, regularly prescribed to pregnant women to prevent miscarriage. But in the 1960s it was discovered that not only did it not prevent miscarriage, it also had dangerous side effects for the daughters of the women who had taken it while pregnant – including reproductive problems and rare gynaecological cancers. Millions of women were exposed all over the world. Lucy Burns speaks to mother and daughter Linda and Katie Greenebaum about their experiences of DES.

Photo: black and white image of smiling baby (H. Armstrong Roberts/ClassicStock/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbfmdv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y3zp7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbfr4z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 on Sunday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y43fc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbfvx3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7h0mb7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y475h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv70)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:32 today]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbfzn7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd4d)
The record-breaking runner who hated her legs

Mimi Anderson started running at the age of 36. She wanted more shapely legs and so hit the gym. Mimi had a history of eating disorders, but her newfound love of running forced a change in her relationship with food and her body image. She went on to become a record-breaking endurance athlete completing feats such as the Marathon des Sables and becoming the fastest woman to run the length of Great Britain. The training and competitions did lead to those thinner legs. But when she got them, she realised she didn't want or need them anymore. Her latest book is called Limitless.

Julius Achon’s talent for running took him from a poverty-stricken village in Uganda to the Olympics. But his life changed when he found a group of children sleeping under a bus while out running. Julius gave this interview to Jo Fidgen in 2018.

Photo: Mimi Anderson. Credit: Mikkel Beisner

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszml7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbg3dc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7h0vth)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y4gnr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbg74h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vv4ds2)
Protests swell in Myanmar

Massive crowds have marched in cities and towns across Myanmar in the largest show of force yet against last week's military coup. We hear how events unfolded on the streets of the country's largest city, Yangon.

Also in the programme: Why South Africa is halting its roll-out of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine; and how emergency workers in India are battling to rescue those trapped in the wreckage of a Himalayan glacier collapse.

(Image: Demonstrators gather during a protest against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar, 08 February 2021. EPA/LYNN BO BO)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbgbwm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y4q50)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlv9y3l469b)
Myanmar police use water cannon amid mass strike

Protests against Myanmar's military coup continue, as workers joined a nationwide strike. Nehginpao Kipgen is associate professor at the Jindal School of International Affairs in New Delhi, and discusses how recent developments are impacting countries that have trade relations with Myanmar. Also in the programme, the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar is at the southern tip of the Iberian peninsula, and the BBC's Joshua Thorpe has been finding out how Brexit is impacting businesses and workers there. Plus, with employment opportunities scarce in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, there is renewed interest in apprenticeships. We meet a man thought to be Britain's oldest apprentice at age 76, and we get wider context on the advantages and disadvantage of such schemes from Kathleen Henehan of the Resolution Foundation in the UK.

(Picture: Water cannon is sprayed on protesters in Myanmar. Picture credit: AFP.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbggmr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8ch70tpl)
Covid-19 variants and AstraZeneca

South Africa has put its rollout of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine on hold after a study showed "disappointing" results against its new Covid variant. Scientists say the variant accounts for 90% of new Covid cases in South Africa. A trial found that the vaccine wasn't effective in mild cases of the disease. But experts are hopeful that the vaccine will still be effective at preventing severe cases. We have the latest developments on the story from our reporter in South Africa.

Also on the programme, our regular coronavirus expert Dr Eleanor Murray, answering listener questions about the virus.

And we head to the Netherlands where there's been a decision to freeze international adoptions. This follows a report by a government commission that's revealed abuses in the adoption system. We talk to a local journalist there.

(Photo: Newspaper billboards in Johannesburg, South Africa, February 8, 2021. Credit Reuters/Sumaya Hisham)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbglcw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8ch70yfq)
Coronavirus conversations: Vaccinating teenagers

We head to Israel and a conversation between teenagers discussing how they feel about getting vaccinated against the coronavirus. The government has decided to vaccinate the country’s 16 to 18-year-olds, to enable them to sit exams. We talk to a couple of young people who are being vaccinated. And we discuss the issue with our medical expert Professor Manfred Green who is based in Israel.

Also on the prgramme, South Africa has put its rollout of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine on hold after a study showed "disappointing" results against its new Covid variant. Scientists say the variant accounts for 90% of new Covid cases in South Africa and a trial found that the vaccine wasn't effective in mild cases of the disease. We have the latest developments on the story from our reporter in South Africa.

And we head to the Netherlands where there's been a decision to freeze international adoptions. This follows a report by a government commission that's revealed abuses in the adoption system. We talk to a local journalist there.

(Photo: Vaccination in Israel. Credit: EPA/Abir Sultan)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbgq40)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszml7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbgtw4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7h1l98)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y564j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k0hk6stb5)
2021/02/08 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbgym8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y59wn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3csz9ft)
The power of one

We humans are a supremely social species, but the coronavirus pandemic has forced many of us into solitary confinement.

It feels like an unnatural, regressive move, that goes against our collective nature. So why do some species embrace the power of one? And how do they make a success of a solo existence?

Lucy Cooke meets some of the animal kingdom’s biggest loners - from the Komodo Dragon, to the Okapi and the Black Rhino - to explore the lure of solitude.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Picture: Okapi (Okapia johnstoni), forest giraffe or zebra giraffe, Credit: Jiri Hrebicek/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbh2cd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vv57zz)
Donald Trump’s lawyers reject impeachment case

On the eve of former President Trump’s second impeachment trial, his lawyers have called for the Senate to dismiss the incitement charge against him. Democrats leading the prosecution have called the evidence against him overwhelming. Also: Myanmar's military chief goes on TV to justify his total takeover as growing numbers of his compatriots join protests against the coup; and as international pressure grows for an end to the war in Yemen, we'll have a special report from inside the country.

(Photo: U.S. President Donald Trump at the end of his speech during a rally to contest the certification of the 2020 U.S. presidential election results by the U.S. Congress, in Washington, U.S, January 6, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Jim Bourg/File Photo)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbh63j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79v3hwcn3c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqqmt1y26)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y5kcx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58x07y5xjv)
Myanmar police use water cannon amid mass strike

Protests against Myanmar's military coup continue, as workers joined a nationwide strike. Nehginpao Kipgen is associate professor at the Jindal School of International Affairs in New Delhi, and discusses how recent developments are impacting countries that have trade relations with Myanmar. Also in the programme, the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar is at the southern tip of the Iberian peninsula, and the BBC's Joshua Thorpe has been finding out how Brexit is impacting businesses and workers there. Plus, with employment opportunities scarce in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, there is renewed interest in apprenticeships. We meet a man thought to be Britain's oldest apprentice at age 76, and we get wider context on the advantages and disadvantage of such schemes from Kathleen Henehan of the Resolution Foundation in the UK.

(Picture: Water cannon is sprayed on protesters in Myanmar. Picture credit: AFP.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbh9vn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc35)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y5p41)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



TUESDAY 09 FEBRUARY 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbhfls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkq6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbhkbx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x197h9p8sft)
Myanmar coup leader defends takeover amid mass protests

The leader of the coup in Myanmar has made his first TV address, seeking to justify the action amid mass protests. Huge protests were held on Monday for a third straight day, along with a nationwide strike, to oppose the coup. The military has begun to impose restrictions in some areas, including curfews and limits to gatherings. The BBC's Jamie Robertson discusses the situation with Editor Jyoti Malhotra of website The Print, in New Delhi and Peter Morici, economist at the University of Maryland. Meanwhile, the lure of the Bitcoin has now ensnared Elon Musk. The world's richest man says his company, Tesla, has bought $1.5 billion worth of the cryptocurrency. And, we explore the curious case of Gibraltar, caught between Spain, the UK, the EU and Brexit.

(Picture: Protests in Myanmar. Credit: EPA)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbhp31)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2g)
How to store power in soil and salt

Giant towers of building blocks rising into the sky and huge vats packed with volcanic rock or molten salt are being used as massive batteries.

They are the latest ideas for storing energy generated by the sun and the wind – so you can keep the lights on when it’s dark or the wind isn’t blowing.

We meet the entrepreneurs and scientists who are trying to harness the fundamental forces of physics to power the world.

Presenter: Tom Colls


Image: The Energy Vault tower (c/o Energy Vault)


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y61cf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 In the Studio (w3cszvck)
YouTube’s Life In A Day: The making of a documentary

Ten years ago, YouTube launched a global experiment to create the world’s largest user-generated feature film. The result was a documentary made from footage all shot on a single day, “by you”.

Exactly 10 years on, executive producer Ridley Scott (Alien, Gladiator) and Academy Award-winning director Kevin Macdonald (Whitney, Last King of Scotland) reunite for Life In A Day 2020.

Over the course of six months In the Studio follows the team – hearing from Kevin, the editors and Ridley - as they wrestle with 324,000 videos from 192 countries and create a new film.

We also catch up with award-winning composer Matthew Herbert, as he endeavours to score the film by using a myriad of sounds from the submitted footage.

Presenter/producer: Ella-mai Robey


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbhsv5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszml7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbhxl9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct205l)
The Coronavirus Front Line

Coronavirus Front Line: The search for a vaccine - part two

The medical teams at Bradford investigate the hesitancy over the Covid-19 vaccine. A team of young ambassadors is recruited to help build trust locally and medical teams follow up with those who appear reluctant for a variety of reasons. Abdul Majeed is one of those doubters, even though his uncle, Nawab Ali, has died from Covid and his father, Abdul Saboor, had been gravely ill in intensive care with Covid-19 for two months.

Abdul says he is worried by online media reports that the vaccine might be a way of micro-chipping people, and of altering their DNA. He is also suspicious about the long term side effects and mistrusts the official reassurances. He had similar doubts about Covid itself in the early months of the pandemic and did not believe it was real.

Dr Wright and the medical teams believe that around 70% of people will have to receive an effective vaccine, to stop the virus circulating in the population: the hope is that this can be achieved by late summer:

(Photo: Coronavirus vials. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y68vp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3csz9ft)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbj1bf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp149p4)
US: Donald Trump's second impeachment is set to start

Lawyers for Donald Trump have responded to his impeachment charges, saying supporters of the former US president stormed Congress of their own accord. We speak to a Democratic pollster.

We look at one way of tracking Covid-19 outbreaks by gathering internet search data and matching it to infection spikes.

And Somalia is in political limbo today after a deadline passed for new elections to select a new president. We speak to a senator who is calling for the president to step down.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbj52k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp14ff8)
Second impeachment of Donald Trump due to start

The former US president Donald Trump is charged with inciting insurrection but says he will not testify, though his detractors say the evidence is overwhelming. We speak to a lawyer.

Mass protests on the streets of Myanmar continue for the fourth day in a row as the military leader of the coup lays out his conditions for a re-run of the election. A Rohingya Muslim in Yangon describes his fear right now, following the deadly crackdown by the army in 2017.

And a mathematics professor has just made a breakthrough on the problem of tying knots - he explains this research field of mathematics.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbj8tp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp14k5d)
Myanmar: protests against the coup continue

Rohingya Muslims faced a deadly crackdown by Myanmar's army in 2017 where hundreds of thousands were forced to flee into neighbouring Bangladesh. A Rohingya Muslim in Yangon tells us what it is like now that the military have taken over.

The second impeachment trial of the former US president Donald Trump begins on Tuesday in the Senate. We get the view of a former lawyer for the Democrats during President Clinton's impeachment in the 1990s.

And we go to Bolivia where over thirty Andean condors in a rural community are believed to have been poisoned.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbjdkt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y6rv6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8cb)
Satellites to breach the digital divide

Bridging the global digital divide, using satellites in space, is the dream of the world's richest men like Elon Musk of SpaceX and Jeff Bezos of Amazon. They're joined in a new space race to carpet the earth in satellite constellations with national governments, private companies and the recently rescued OneWeb, under the new ownership of the British government and Bharti Enterprises.
Sunil Bharti Mittal, the executive Chair of OneWeb tells us why firing hundreds rockets skywards makes business sense, even in a crowded market. And he's promised to leave no-one behind. We also speak to Caleb Henry of Quilty Analytics who tells us about the players in the market and Victoria Samson of the Secure World Foundation warns of the dangers of a crowded Lower Earth Orbit.
Presented by Ed Butler and produced by Clare Williamson.
(Image: Lift off Vr, Credits: Roscosmos and Space Center Vostochny, TsENK)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmqr)
Francis Bacon in the archives

Francis Bacon painted distorted and disturbing images but his works are now widely considered one of the great achievements of post-war British art. Vincent Dowd has been trawling through the BBC archives listening to Bacon talking about his work, and gaining an insight into his Bohemian, hard-drinking ways.

Photo: Francis Bacon in London in 1970. Credit: Press Association


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbjj9y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct205l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y6wlb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 In the Studio (w3cszvck)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbjn22)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk44)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbjrt6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7h3j7b)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y742l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 Discovery (w3csz9ft)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbjwkb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdky)
The broken computer that unlocked my fortune

Freddie Figgers was abandoned as a baby by some rubbish bins. An elderly couple took him in and taught him right from wrong. He taught himself how to build a computer. When his beloved adoptive father got severe dementia, Freddie invented a special shoe with a GPS and two-way comms inside so he could always find him again. This was the beginning of his journey to becoming the youngest person in the US and the only African American to get a licence as a telecoms operator. Now worth millions of dollars, he has helped thousands of others through his Foundation and healthcare platform.

Arunachalam Muruganantham invented a machine that produces low-cost sanitary pads, giving employment and a better quality of life to millions of women. His story reached British yoga teacher Amy Peake, who decided to take his machine to a Syrian refugee camp. Since we spoke to Arunachalam in 2014 and Amy in 2015, many more of the life-changing machines have been installed around the world.

Image: Courtesy of Freddie Figgers

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmqr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbk09g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7h3rql)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y7ckv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 In the Studio (w3cszvck)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbk41l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vv79p5)
Trump on trial

The second impeachment trial of Donald Trump is set to begin in the US senate. We explore how the process will work and ask what impact it could have on the Republican party.

Also on the programme: We speak to a member of an international team of scientists investigating the origins of Covid-19 in China about what they have found; and the latest from the streets of Myanmar where protestors have been hit with rubber bullets in clashes with police.

(Image: U.S. President Donald Trump looks on at the end of his speech during a rally to contest the certification of the 2020 U.S. presidential election results by the U.S. Congress, in Washington, U.S, January 6, 2021. REUTERS/Jim Bourg/File Photo/File Photo)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbk7sq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y7m23)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwytkslq20)
EU may make big tech pay for news

The European Union may follow Australia in making Google and Facebook pay for news pages. We get the perspective of Maltese MEP Alex Saliba, who sits on a committee examining possible new legislation called the Digital Services Act. And we get reaction from France, which has already struck a deal for Google to pay publishers, from Pierre Petillault, director general of the Press Alliance, which represents hundreds of French daily and weekly titles. Also in the programme, back in 2017 a fire ripped through the Grenfell Tower high-rise residential tower block in London, killing 72 people. In the aftermath, hundreds of blocks across the UK with similar flammable cladding need to have those materials replaced. The BBC's Sarah Corker brings us the latest in an ongoing dispute over whether the government should foot the bill. Plus, the pandemic has seen a rise in contributions to television programmes by people from their own homes, often in front of a bookcase. Books by the Yard usually provides library backgrounds for films, pubs and restaurants, but as its chief executive Nick Bates explains, it has seen a rise in sales to those who want to use their bookcase to impress during meetings and TV appearances.

(Picture: The European Commission building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbkcjv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8ch73qlp)
Myanmar protests: police fire rubber bullets

Police in Myanmar have fired rubber bullets during a demonstration in the capital Nay Pyi Taw, as thousands defied a ban on protests. Water cannons and tear gas have also been used against protesters, who are standing against a coup that removed the elected government last week. We hear from our BBC Burmese reporter and people living in the country.

Also on the programme our regular coronavirus expert Dr Isaac Bogoch is answering listener questions about the virus, and talking through the latest stories on the pandemic.

And we hear from two young people who are clinically vulnerable and needed to shield immediately when the coronavirus pandemic started last March. We hear about their experience shielding for months on end and how they feel now that they have received the first dose of a Covid vaccine.

(Photo: Riot police stand guard during a protest against the military coup in Naypyitaw, Myanmar, 09 February 2021.Credit: EPA/Maung Lonlan)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbkh8z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8ch73vbt)
WHO says coronavirus lab leak 'extremely unlikely'

We'll explain what pandemic investigators from the World Health Organisation have found in Wuhan in China. They believe that any leak of the virus from a lab is "extremely unlikely". We'll bring you explanation and interviews from our correspondents in China. We'll also have our regular coronavirus expert, Dr Helen Wimalarathna to give her take and answer listener questions about the pandemic.

Also on the programme, we head to Myanmar, where the police have fired rubber bullets, water cannons and tear gas on protesters during demonstrations in the country. People are rallying against a coup that removed the elected government last week. We hear from our BBC Burmese reporter and people living through the turmoil.

(Photo: Experts from the World Health Organisation and China's National Health Commission at the WHO-China joint study news conference at a hotel in Wuhan. Credit: Aly Song/Reuters)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbkm13)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmqr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbkqs7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7h4h6c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y831m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k0hk6wq78)
2021/02/09 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbkvjc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct205l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y86sr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz999)
Wikipedia’s new universal code of conduct

Wikipedia introduces its first universal code of conduct in an attempt to combat aggressive behaviour towards marginalised and ethnic communities. Some editors believe this code will hinder the grassroots of the website. Dr. Jessica Wade of Imperial College London discusses her own experiences whilst attempting to promote awareness of women in science.

Open Banking launches in Brazil
Seven years into a recession, how will open banking in Brazil help to reboot the economy? This month changes in regulation will support open banking and encourage the growth of Fintech. We speak to Ricardo Taveira, CEO of Quanto, a platform that has received $15 million USD in funding to aid open banking and aims to connect digital and traditional banks by sharing user’s financial data.

Cybersecurity and digital identity
This week in our series on the cybersecurity threats of the future: digital identity. What does our digital identity consist of? How will our personal information be stored, protected and shared and why does it pose such a cybersecurity risk? Florian Bohr reports.

(Image: Getty Images)


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Angelica Mari.

Studio Manager: Giles Aspen
Producers: Harrison Lewis and Deborah Cohen


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbkz8h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vv84x2)
Donald Trump’s second impeachment process begins

The historic second impeachment against former President Trump has begun in the US Senate, with constitutional arguments about the process itself. We hear the latest from Washington and speak to one of Mr Trump’s former political directors. Also in the programme: an advisor to Colombia's President Ivan Duque tells us why Colombia has granted legal status to almost a million undocumented Venezuelan migrants; and the United Arab Emirates successfully puts a probe into orbit around Mars.

(Photo: U.S. President Donald Trump gestures as he speaks during a rally to contest the certification of the 2020 U.S. presidential election results by the U.S. Congress, in Washington, U.S, January 6, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Jim Bourg/File Photo)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbl30m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79v3hwgk0g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqqmt4tz9)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y8g90)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58x07y8tfy)
EU may make big tech pay for news

The European Union may follow Australia in making Google and Facebook pay for news pages. We get the perspective of Maltese MEP Alex Saliba, who sits on a committee examining possible new legislation called the Digital Services Act. And we get reaction from France, which has already struck a deal for Google to pay publishers, from Pierre Petillault, director general of the Press Alliance, which represents hundreds of French daily and weekly titles. Also in the programme, back in 2017 a fire ripped through the Grenfell Tower high-rise residential tower block in London, killing 72 people. In the aftermath, hundreds of blocks across the UK with similar flammable cladding need to have those materials replaced. The BBC's Sarah Corker brings us the latest in an ongoing dispute over whether the government should foot the bill. Plus, the pandemic has seen a rise in contributions to television programmes by people from their own homes, often in front of a bookcase. Books by the Yard usually provides library backgrounds for films, pubs and restaurants, but as its chief executive Nick Bates explains, it has seen a rise in sales to those who want to use their bookcase to impress during meetings and TV appearances.

(Picture: The European Commission building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbl6rr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv2g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y8l14)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3cszvck)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 10 FEBRUARY 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbblbhw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk44)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbblg80)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x197h9pcpbx)
Trump impeachment: Senate says trial is constitutional and can go ahead

Democrats prosecuting the case opened Tuesday's proceedings by showing a video montage of Mr Trump's 6 January speech and the deadly rioting by some of his supporters. The 56-44 split means six Republicans joined Democrats in voting to go ahead with the trial. Meanwhile, Twitter announces its quarterly numbers and surprises markets by saying it's considering new subscription services. And, we explore the knock-on financial impact of the Grenfell Tower disaster in Britain. Replacing dangerous building cladding materials is costing billions of dollars and driving some to bankruptcy. The BBC's Jamie Robertson is joined by Erin Delmore, political reporter in New York and Rebecca Jones, Bloomberg News Melbourne Bureau Chief.

(Picture credit: Reuters)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbll04)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7p)
Laurie Santos: Can we learn how to be happy?

Stephen Sackur speaks to American psychologist Professor Laurie Santos, whose work at Yale University on the science of happiness has won her an audience of millions thanks to her podcast and free online courses. With strict lockdowns in many countries around the world, isolation, economic insecurity, the absence of family and friends, Covid is putting enormous pressure on our mental health. Can we really learn how to be happy?


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y8y8j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x83)
Goal 4: Quality education

Seventeen-year-old Yolanda goes to a rural school in the Eastern Cape in South Africa. But the school has too few working toilets, not enough textbooks, and not enough teachers. Sometimes there are as many as 60 children in a class. She wants to know why so few children in South Africa can read and write properly.

She has spoken to other 17-year-olds, teachers, academics and a government official to try to find out what needs to be done to help South Africa meet the United Nations sustainable development goal on education by 2030.

Presenter: Sana Safi.
Producer: Ben Carter.

Made in partnership with the Open University.


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbblpr8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmqr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbblthd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct1gv9)
The New Arctic

The New Arctic: Resource extraction

Global warming is happening twice as fast in the Arctic. As the ice melts, it poses an existential threat to local communities and indigneous culture, whilst opening up possibilities of economic opportunities. What is the future of mining, of green energy, of tourism in a world that climate change is making accessible for the first time in millennia? And where does power lie? Who will control the rapidly changing icy far north as it thaws?

The US Geological Survey estimated the Arctic may be home to 30% of the planet's undiscovered natural gas reserves and 13% of its undiscovered oil. Russia for example, views its vast Arctic resources as a key driver of its future economy. On the other hand, the melting ice will cause trillions of dollars worth of climate change-related damage, globally, over the coming decades.

But for the communities who live above the Arctic Circle, it’s not a simple debate over preservation versus production - there is a need for jobs and sustainable local economic growth.

(Photo credit: Victpria Ferran.)


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y95rs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz999)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbly7j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp176l7)
Trump: Second day of impeachment trial

The trial against Donald Trump is currently taking place at the scene of the crime in front of a jury of the victims, with the accused playing golf hundreds of miles away. As it goes ahead, we hear from the nation's capital.

Defiant and on the run - we have an interview with one of the protest organisers in Myanmar, determined to carry on whatever the risks, with thousands - he says - ready to take his place.

If Brazil's been badly hit by the virus, its indigenous populations have been hit even worse. We hear about the tribes in the Amazon seeing their children dying from coronavirus.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbm1zn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp17bbc)
Storm on Capitol Hill leads to downfall of Trump

"It is constitutional....", so says the US Senate as it green-lights the continuation of the second impeachment trial of former US President Donald Trump - accused of "inciting insurrection" on Capitol Hill.

Calls for the EU's top diplomat to resign after Members of European Parliament say he was humiliated on a recent trip to Russia where they claim he failed to stand up to Moscow over the jailed Kremlin critic, Alexei Navalny.

A court orders Two Holocaust historians to apologise over accusing a former village mayor in Poland of collaborating with the Nazis. They say they were documenting history fairly.

And the United Arab Emirates celebrates its first successful mission to Mars - the 'Hope' satellite is now orbiting the Red planet studying its atmosphere in fine detail.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbm5qs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp17g2h)
Trump's second trial hears debate

Trump's second impeachment will go ahead as attempts by the Republicans to declare it unconstitutional failed. From today Democrats and Republicans, otherwise known as prosecution and defence, will make their arguments.

We have an interview with one of the protest organisers in Myanmar - they're defiant and under no illusion about the risks they are taking.

Plus, we speak to Rawiri Waititi, the co-leader of the Maori Party who was ejected from the country's parliament for not wearing a tie.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbm9gx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y9nr9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8nz)
The rise of amateur day traders

When shares in the apparently declining games company Gamestop soared almost 2000% in less than a month, the world’s attention was drawn to an army of amateur investors on new mobile trading platforms such as Robinhood. Investment author Ann Logue breaks down what makes these amateur traders different from regular day traders, and we’ll hear from one such amateur on the ups and downs of playing the market. Professional investor Bill Brewster speaks about what responsibilities the new investing apps have in making sure their users are informed both about the risks and how the apps actually work, and Barbara Roper of the Consumer Federation of America suggests where regulation can play a part. We’ll also hear from day trader and YouTuber HumbledTrader, who cautions people from getting into the game without doing their own research.

Producer: Marie Keyworth.

(Image credit: Getty Images.)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmt0)
The paper that helped the homeless

In 1989 celebrities in New York set up the 'Street News' paper to help the homeless. People living rough sold the paper at a profit instead of begging, initially it was very successful with around 250,000 copies sold per issue and the idea was copied around the world. Lee Stringer was living on the street when he began selling 'Street News', he discovered a talent for writing and went on to be a columnist and then editor of the paper. He told Witness History how living on the streets made him a better writer and how he became a successful author as a result of the chance he was given at 'Street News'.

(Photo: A street vendor holds a copy of 'Street News'. Credit CBS)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbmf71)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct1gv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401y9shf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbmjz5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbmnq9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7h6f4f)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yb0zp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Digital Planet (w3csz999)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbmsgf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdsq)
The voyage of The Fisherman's Friends

As the craze for sea shanties (started by Scottish postman Nathan Evans) continues to grow on social media worldwide, Outlook returns to Port Isaac, a tiny English village, where in 2019 Emily Webb met the sea shanty band The Fisherman’s Friends.

The group got together 25 years ago and started singing sea shanties, which are a type of maritime song. After a chance encounter with a BBC radio DJ, Johnnie Walker, they ended up landing a £1 million record contract. Much to the group’s surprise, their album rose up the charts and they went on to play the Royal Albert Hall and Glastonbury Festival. Things were going well until 2013, when an accident backstage at one of their gigs killed singer Trevor Grills and the band’s tour manager Paul McMullen. The band didn’t perform for a year and in fact had no intention of singing again. However, they returned to the stage and have had a feature film made about them, Fisherman’s Friends.

And: over the years, American Jim Haynes had hundreds of thousands of people round for dinner, most of them complete strangers. Jim Lived in Paris, and for more than 40 years, he had an open door policy every Sunday. He became known as the ‘godfather of social networking’ – and all manner of people dropped by to meet him. Jim died earlier this month aged 87. Jo Fidgen spoke to him in July 2015.

Image Credit: Chris Hewitt

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmt0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbmx6k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7h6nmp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yb8gy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbn0yp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vvb6l8)
Donald Trump's second impeachment trial kicks off

Democratic lawmakers start presenting their impeachment case against President Trump before the Senate today. Given how unlikely it is he will be convicted, is this a good use of Congress's time?

Also in the programme, as President Lukashenko convenes the People's Assembly in Belarus six months since the start of protests against his re-election, we hear from opposition politician Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, still in exile in Lithuania. And how Buddhist death metal (music) came to be a thing in Taiwan.

(Picture: Acting House Sergeant-at-Arms Timothy P. Blodgett and U.S. Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) lead House impeachment managers as they arrive for the Senate trial of impeachment against former President Donald Trump during a procession through the Rotunda inside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., February 9, 2021. Credit: Reuters / Al Drago)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbn4pt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ybhz6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxs89dcxdd)
The future of share trading

Share trading platforms are sometimes accused of encouraging amateurs to make risky bets. We meet some of the people engaging in share trading on apps like Robinhood, and hear from Bill Brewster, whose partner's cousin Alex Kearns took his own life when he thought he'd lost three quarters of a million dollars on the platform last summer. We also consider what more regulators can do with Barbara Roper, director of investor protection at the Consumer Federation of America. Also in the programme, the brewer Heineken has announced plans to cut around 8,000 jobs. Russ Mould from AJ Bell tells us what's behind the move. Plus, toymaker Mattel says global sales of Barbie dolls are up around 16%, helping the company to its best year of sales since 2017. Frederique Tutt is a global toy industry expert at research and analysis group NDP, and explains why Barbie is proving so popular.

(Picture: A Robinhood logo on a smartphone screen. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbn8fy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8ch76mhs)
OS Conversations: Young people shielding

We hear a conversation between two young people who have self-isolated since the first coronavirus lockdown. They were classified as vulnerable due to medical conditions and so have been shielding. They tell us how have they been coping.

People living in Myanmar and our colleagues at BBC Burmese tell the story as it continues to develop after a woman was shot in the head while protesting against Myanmar's military coup in the capital Nay Pyi Taw.

And, people in Turkey tell us how the country’s intention to land on the moon in 2023 makes them feel.

Photo: Luke Alexander Credit: Nikita Alexander


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbnd62)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8ch76r7x)
Myanmar protests

We hear from people living in Myanmar and our colleagues at BBC Burmese as the story in the country continues to develop.

Our Washington DC team will have all the latest on Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial.

And, we hear a conversation between two young people who have self-isolated since the first coronavirus lockdown. They were classified as vulnerable due to medical conditions and so have been shielding. They tell us how have they been coping.

Picture: Demonstrators hold placards during a protest against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar Credit: EPA/NYEIN CHAN NAING


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbnhy6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdsq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmt0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbnmpb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7h7d3g)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ybzyq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k0hk6zm4c)
2021/02/10 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbnrfg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct1gv9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yc3pv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcd6)
Covid vaccines: bad news, good news

The South African government has decided to pause its roll-out of the Astrazeneca-Oxford vaccine because of disappointing results of the vaccine’s effectiveness against the most common variant in the country in a trial of young people. And is there any good evidence from trials elsewhere that this vaccine reduces the chances of people spreading the coronavirus to others, as well as preventing severe illness and death? How do you test whether a vaccine prevents or reduces transmission of the coronavirus? Claudia’s regular guest epidemiologist Professor Matt Fox of Boston University discusses the issues.

Claudia talks to two ovarian cancer specialists, Dorothy Lombe in Zambia and Georgia Funtes Cintra in Brazil about the challenges and success stories in providing treatment and care for women with this kind of cancer. The Global Cancer Coalition Network has released a report documenting the worsening situation in cancer care in 104 countries because of the coronavirus pandemic. Dorothy and Georgia tells us how the disruption has affected their patients.

As Donald Trump’s impeachment trial gets underway, reporter Alison van Diggelen looks at social science research on political polarisation in US society, and an experiment run by Stanford University to heal divisions.

Does a frequent intake of spicy food influence a person’s risk of developing cancers of the gut? Studies to date have been inconclusive but now a massive study following 500,000 people comes out of China, finding that spicy food is protective. Spicy food appears to lower the risk of getting cancer of the oesophagus and, to a lesser extent, the stomach as well.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker


(Picture: A doctor walks in the Respiratory & Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto, South Africa in July 2020. Photo credit: Luca Sola/AFP/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbnw5l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vvc1t5)
WHO recommends Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine

The World Health Organisation has backed the Oxford vaccine for people aged over 65 and suggests it can prevent severe disease against the South African variant. Also: Donald Trump’s second impeachment trial continues; and we’ll hear from the president of the Ethiopian Red Cross Society who has just come back from Tigray.

(Photo: A vial of the AstraZeneca vaccine is seen at a COVID-19 vaccination centre in the Odeon Luxe Cinema in Maidstone, Britain. Credit: REUTERS/Andrew Couldridge/File Photo).


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbnzxq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79v3hwkfxk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqqmt7qwd)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ycc63)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58x07ycqc1)
The future of share trading

Share trading platforms are sometimes accused of encouraging amateurs to make risky bets. We meet some of the people engaging in share trading on apps like Robinhood, and hear from Bill Brewster, whose partner's cousin Alex Kearns took his own life when he thought he'd lost three quarters of a million dollars on the platform last summer. We also consider what more regulators can do with Barbara Roper, director of investor protection at the Consumer Federation of America. Also in the programme, a deal to sell TikTok's US business to Oracle and Walmart could be postponed or even scrapped; we get analysis from Susan Schmidt at Aviva Investors. Plus, toymaker Mattel says global sales of Barbie dolls are up around 16%, helping the company to its best year of sales since 2017. Frederique Tutt is a global toy industry expert at research and analysis group NPD, and explains why Barbie is proving so popular.

(Picture: A Robinhood logo on a smartphone screen. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbp3nv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ycgy7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x83)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



THURSDAY 11 FEBRUARY 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbp7dz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbpc53)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x197h9pgl80)
Donald Trump's second impeachment trial begins

Prosecutors at Donald Trump's impeachment trial for incitement have been setting out their case for why Senators should convict him. We have a special report on the world of the amateur trader, finding out what's important to them and if community led investing, on phone apps, is here to stay. Plus, toymaker Mattel says global sales of Barbie dolls are up around 16%, helping the company to its best year of sales since 2017; Frederique Tutt is a global toy industry expert at research and analysis group NPD, and explains why Barbie is proving so popular. And we're joined throughout the programme by Lien Hoang in Ho Chi Minh in Vietnam; she's a reporter at the Nikkei Asia. And from Toronto, we hear from Ralph Silva of the Silva Research Network. (Picture of Donald Trump as he departed the White House in Washington; taken by Mandel Ngan at Getty Images).


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbpgx7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4s)
How did Europe fall behind in the vaccine race?

On June the 12th of last year the 27 health ministers of the European union signed off on a plan to buy vaccines on behalf of all the EU’s member countries. The aim was to secure enough doses to immunise all of its 450 million citizens. But the delivery and vaccination programme has lagged far behind countries like the UK and US. Tanya Beckett finds out why.

(Waiting to be vaccinated at Santa Maria Hospital in Lisbon, Portugal. Photo: Patricia de Melo Moreiro /Getty Images)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ycv5m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr7)
Has coronavirus changed school meals for ever?

In March 2020, as countries struggled to contain the coronavirus pandemic, 90% of the world’s school children were sent home. With all eyes - and headlines - on the spread of Covid-19, it took a while for many to see that another crisis had been unleashed - hundreds of millions of children around the world were now going hungry because they relied on free school meals as their main source of nutrition. Not every parent had the money to buy more food - and few governments had adequate plans in place to help them.

Emily Thomas hears extraordinary stories from Kenya and the US of how schools and charities fought to reach children throughout school closures. Could the coronavirus have changed school meals for good - and if so, why did it take a pandemic for the world to wake up to their importance?

(Picture: boy with school lunch. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk.

Contributors:

Wawira Njiru: Founder and Executive Director, Food for Education

Carmen Burbano: Director of the World Food Programme’s School Feeding Division

Dr. Gabriella McLoughlin: Research Associate, Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbplnc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdsq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmt0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbpqdh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3csz6mf)
Unmasked: Stories from the PPE frontline

Personal protective equipment like masks and gloves are the last line of defence for healthcare workers on the frontline, preventing them from getting infected by the Covid patients they care for. But how protected are the factory workers who make these products? Phil Kemp investigates claims that exhausted migrant workers in Malaysia have worked up to 12 hours a day, 29 days a month to produce the gloves so desperately needed in hospitals around the world, with some exposed to outbreaks themselves at work.

Reporter: Phil Kemp
Producer: Anna Meisel


(Image: A worker inspects newly-made gloves. Credit: Reuters/Lim Huey Teng)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yd2nw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcd6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbpv4m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp1b3hb)
Democratic senators show evidence against Trump

We will tell you about the dramatic new footage that has been screened of last month's storming of Congress at the impeachment trial of Donald Trump. We ask what impact it could have on the case.

We bring you the latest on the growing protests in Myanmar against the military coup.

And we head to India where rescue efforts are continuing to try and free 30 people who are still trapped in a tunnel.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbpywr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp1b77g)
President Biden has imposed US sanctions against Myanmar military officials

More arrests have been made by the military in Myanmar - the UN Special Envoy to the country calls it an outrage and warns the military rulers won't get away with it. We have an interview with the UN special rapporteur on Myanmar Tom Andrews.

Donald Trump's impeachment trial has been shown new footage of violence he is accused of inciting.

We'll also hear a little tune from the world's oldest surviving musical instrument - from a conch which is 17,000-years old which was discovered in a cave in the Pyrenees.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbq2mw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp1bbzl)
World watches as Myanmar military makes more arrests

More arrests have been triggering some strong international reaction.

We're live in South Africa where President Cyril Ramaphosa will address the nation shortly against the backdrop of the coronavirus crisis which is weighing heavily on the country's ailing economy.

Ten years ago the Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak was forced to step down - our Middle East editor looks back at the protests in Tahrir Square.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbq6d0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ydknd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7yg)
Brexit and the City

Is one of the world's mighty financial centres under threat from the damage done by the UK's departure from the EU? Six weeks after the final Brexit divorce, Katie Martin of the Financial Times explains the short-term impact, and long-term implications. One winner is Amsterdam. Michael Kent, co-founder of Azimo, a digital payments firm, tells us why he's opened an office there. And if the City of London is losing its allure, why are bankers so optimistic? We hear from the boss of Barclays.

Photo: A man wearing a traditional bowler hat looks over at London's financial and business district known as the Square Mile (Credit: Getty).


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmnh)
A Ghanaian nurse's story

Nurses from outside the UK form a vital part of the country's National Health Service. Many come from African countries. Cecilia Anim - who left Ghana for England in 1972 - became the first black woman to be made president of the Royal College of Nursing. In 2017 she was awarded a CBE by the Queen. She has been speaking to Sharon Hemans for Witness History.

Photo: Cecilia Anim as a student nurse in Ghana in the 1960s. Credit: Cecilia Anim.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbqb44)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6mf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ydpdj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbqfw8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjwr)
Sister Juana, a great mind of Mexico

Sister Juana Ines de la Cruz is celebrated today as one of the finest poets in the history of Mexico. She was not just a creative and intellectual force but also a campaigner for women’s education and someone not afraid to challenge male hypocrisy. The colonial 17th-century society in which she lived was very patriarchal so, not surprisingly, her views brought her into conflict with the men in power.

Rajan Datar looks at key episodes in Sister Juana’s life and examines the passion and ingenuity in her poetry and plays with the help of Alicia Gaspar de Alba, Professor at University of California Los Angeles and a writer whose novels include Sor Juana’s Second Dream; Dr. Amy Fuller, Senior Lecturer at Nottingham Trent University, specialist in early modern Spain and Mexico and author of Between Two Worlds, a monograph on Sister Juana's plays; and Rosa Perelmuter, Professor of Romance Studies at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The reader is Pepa Duarte.

[Image: A painting of Sister Juana by the Mexican artist Miguel Cabrera (1695-1768). Credit: DeAgostini/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh67)
Nova Peris - Australia's first aboriginal Olympic champion

In 1996, Nova Peris became the first aboriginal Australian to win an Olympic gold medal when the “Hockeyroos” women’s hockey team took victory at the Atlanta games. Peris’s mother was one of Australia’s so-called Stolen Generation – the aboriginal children separated from their families by the state – and Peris experienced racial abuse herself during her sporting career. After triumphing in hockey, she switched to athletics and took another gold medal at the Commonwealth Games in the 200 metres sprint. Nova Peris talks to Robert Nicholson. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: Nova Peris at the 1996 Olympics (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbqkmd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7h9b1j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ydxws)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 Health Check (w3cszcd6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbqpcj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdc5)
Bassem Youssef: Egypt’s revolutionary comedian

Bassem Youssef was a heart surgeon in Cairo during the Arab Spring when he started poking fun at the politicians in power. His style of subversive comedy was groundbreaking, and Bassem soon became one of the best-known comedians in the Middle East. For a while he was described as 'Egypt's Jon Stewart'. Bassem's television show was wildly popular but his fan base didn't extend to the Egyptian authorities. His show was cancelled and soon he had to flee his home. He talks to Jo Fidgen about the personal price of satire in Egypt's revolution. This programme was first broadcast on 19th August, 2019. Since then Bassem has become the star of the web series Plant B which explores how diet can radically improve one's health. He's also written a children's book - The Magical Reality of Nadia - which is published this month.

Image: Bassem Youssef Credit: Kareem Mazhar

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmnh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbqt3n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7h9kjs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yf5d1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbqxvs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vvf3hc)
More detentions in Myanmar

The military leaders behind Myanmar's coup have arrested more officials linked to the ousted government. One of the protest movement's organisers tells us that their defiant and colourful response will continue.

Also in the programme: President Biden's chief medical advisor Anthony Fauci says he believes coronavirus can be beaten with a joint global effort; and rebel attacks on food convoys in the Central African Republic are leading to food shortages in the capital, Bangui.

Photo: Anti-coup protesters in Myanmar. Credit: EPA.


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbr1lx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yfdw9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlw4cv636fx)
Oil producing nations face an uncertain future

Think tank Carbon Tracker projects trillions of dollars of losses for major oil nations. Andrew Grant is Carbon Tracker's head of climate, energy and industry, and explains the basis of the predictions. And we hear how the countries involved plan to diversify away from oil, with energy analyst Cornelia Meyer of consultancy Meyer Resources. Also in the programme, as the second cricket test match in this series between India and England starts this weekend, the BBC's Rahul Tandon reports that more Indian players are now coming from smaller towns than bigger cities, and how that reflects a broader economic change taking place in the country. Plus, shares in dating app Bumble are trading on the New York Stock Exchange for the first time. Alex Wilhelm is senior editor at TechCrunch, and explains the attraction of such apps to investors. And with Valentine's Day approaching this weekend, our reporter Deborah Weitzmann meets some of those looking for, and finding, love.

(Picture: A Saudi oil facility. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbr5c1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8ch79jdw)
Myanmar coup: US announces sanctions

US President Joe Biden has announced sanctions on the leaders of Myanmar's military following a coup that overthrew Aung San Suu Kyi's democratically elected government. We hear the latest from BBC Burmese and get reaction to the sanctions from people in Myanmar.

Also, our regular health expert joins us to answer your coronavirus questions and talk through the main news lines of the day. Today it's the turn of Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Bern in Switzerland. If you have a question you want to ask, send it to our WhatsApp number +447730 751925.

And we hear how hospital porters and cleaners, who are at higher risk of contracting Covid-19 because of their work, have been impacted by the pandemic.

(Photo: Demonstrators shout slogans and hold up placards during a protest against the military coup, in Naypyitaw, Myanmar. Credit: EPA/Maung Lonlan)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbr935)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8ch79n50)
Trump impeachment trial: New video shown of Capitol riots

We go to Washington DC to hear the latest on Donald Trump's second impeachment trial. Senators have been shown dramatic video footage of rioters clashing with police and sometimes coming within metres of politicians. A two-thirds majority is required to convict Mr Trump, but the vast majority of Republicans have remained loyal to him.

Also, Dr Swapneil Parikh, an infectious diseases researcher in Mumbai, joins us to answer your questions about the pandemic and give us the latest on how India is dealing with the virus. If you have a question to ask, send to our WhatsApp number +447730 751925.

And we hear how hospital porters and cleaners, who are at higher risk of contracting Covid-19 because of their work, have been impacted by the pandemic.

(Photo: Snow falls at the U.S. Capitol on the third day of senate impeachment hearings against former U.S. president Donald Trump in Washington, U.S. Credit: REUTERS/Erin Scott)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbrdv9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmnh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbrjlf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7hb90k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yfwvt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k0hk72j1g)
2021/02/11 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbrnbk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6mf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yg0ly)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1q)
Perseverance approaches Mars

On 18th February the Perseverance rover should land on Mars. Katie Stack-Morgan of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab tells Roland Pease about the technological advances that mean that the spacecraft should be able to land in Jezero Crater. Imperial College geologist Sanjeev Gupta discusses what this crater can reveal about the history of life on the red planet.

After months of negotiations, and weeks of work on the ground, a team brought together by the World Health Organisation has just concluded its first attempts to find out the origins of SARS-Cov2 in Wuhan. Peter Daszak, who has worked closely with Chinese virologists in the past, briefed Roland Pease on what had been discovered.

The South African government has announced that it will not be rolling out the Astra Zeneca Covid vaccine as it appears it is not very effective against the dominant strain in the country. Helen Rees, of Witwatersrand University and a member of South Africa’s Health Products Regulatory Authority, explains that the ‘ban’ is an overstatement.

At least 35 people died in a flood disaster in the Himalayan state of Uttarakhand in India on February 6th. The details are still unclear, but the trigger seems to be associated with a glacier overhanging an upstream lake in the steep valley. Rupert Stuart-Smith of Oxford University, who has just published an analysis of a glacier melting disaster in waiting in the Andes, talks about the impacts of climate change on the stability of mountain glaciers.


(Image: An illustration of NASA’s Perseverance rover landing on Mars.
Credit NASA/JPL-Caltech)


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbrs2p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vvfyq8)
Trump’s impeachment managers focus on lack of remorse

Impeachment managers argued the insurrectionists who stormed the Capitol believed they were acting on Donald Trump’s orders. They warned that more political violence could occur if Trump is not held accountable.

Also in the programme: Israel begins vaccinating small numbers of Palestinians who enter the country to work; and we mark the UN International Day of Women and Girls in Science with two female scientists from India and the US.

(Photo: Former President Donald Trump during a rally to contest the certification of the 2020 U.S. presidential election in January 6, 2021.Credit: Reuters)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbrwtt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79v3hwnbtn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqqmtbmsh)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yg836)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172x593xbjtq86)
Oil producing nations face an uncertain future

Think tank Carbon Tracker projects trillions of dollars of losses for major oil nations. Andrew Grant is Carbon Tracker's head of climate, energy and industry, and explains the basis of the predictions. And we hear how the countries involved plan to diversify away from oil, with energy analyst Cornelia Meyer of consultancy Meyer Resources. And Microsoft's President, Brad Smith, has backed the Australian government in a row about whether online giants should have to pay for news that appears in searches, or is shared on their platforms; we get analysis from Rebecca Klar, a tech journalist from The Hill. Also in the programme, as the second cricket test match in this series between India and England starts this weekend, the BBC's Rahul Tandon reports that more Indian players are now coming from smaller towns than bigger cities, and how that reflects a broader economic change taking place in the country. And with Valentine's Day approaching this weekend, our reporter Deborah Weitzmann meets some of those looking for, and finding, love.

(Picture: A Saudi oil facility. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbs0ky)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ygcvb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



FRIDAY 12 FEBRUARY 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbs4b2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjwr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh67)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbs826)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x197h9pkh53)
Microsoft executive backs Australian government in tech war

The President of Microsoft, Brad Smith, says Australia's proposals that tech giants pay for news appearing on their services, strengthen democracy by supporting a free press. We hear more from Rebecca Klar, a tech journalist from The Hill. As the second cricket test match in this series between India and England starts this weekend, the BBC's Rahul Tandon reports that more Indian players are now coming from smaller towns than bigger cities, and how that reflects a broader economic change taking place in the country. It's an interesting time for dating services with the pandemic throwing the world of romance into disarray; our reporter Deborah Weitzmann has been to meet some people looking for love in the time of Covid. And we're joined throughout the programme by Michelle Jamrisko, Blomberg's senior Asia economy reporter who is based in Singapore and economist, Tony Nash from Complete Intelligence; he's based in Houston. (Picture of Microsoft logo on a mobile phone, via Getty Images).


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbsctb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyn)
Clément Beaune: Is Covid-19 exposing weaknesses in the EU?

Stephen Sackur speaks to France’s Europe Minister, Clément Beaune. The European Union faces a huge Covid challenge. The vaccine rollout has been slow, internal free movement is a concern, and tensions with Britain post-Brexit have risen. Is the virus exposing weaknesses in the EU?


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ygr2q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3cszthd)
Protests, death threats and a fake footballer

Myanmar goalkeeper Kyaw Zin Htet tells us about his decision to protest following the military coup. Norway's Tom Henning Øvrebø tells us why death threats are an occupational hazard for referees. And we hear from an imposter, who tried to fool some of the world's biggest clubs.

Picture: A player with the Myanmar Football Federation poses with an image of a red ribbon and makes the three finger salute at a protest against the military coup in Naypyidaw on February 7, 2021. (STR/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbshkg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmnh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbsm9l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq1)
Bitcoin’s energy cost

The buzz around the cryptocurrency grows after Elon Musk’s Tesla reveals it has bought $1.5bn worth of Bitcoin. But what’s its impact on global energy use? Plus how people in China have been using the Clubhouse audio social app to discuss usually banned topics. And new figures on the performance of the Covid-19 contact tracing app used in England and Wales. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC senior tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Representation of a Bitcoin plugged into a power outlet. Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401ygzkz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbsr1q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp1f0df)
Myanmar's amnesty for 23,000 prisoners

In Myanmar the army has announced an amnesty for more than 23,000 prisoners who were jailed by Aung San Suu Kyi's government.

We will head to the country with the third highest death toll from coronavirus, Mexico, and ask a doctor why so few people are being vaccinated.

Spectators are banned from Australia's Tennis Open in Melbourne as the state of Victoria enters a third lockdown.

And we will be looking back at the life of of one Jazz's greatest pianists, Chick Corea, who won 23 Grammys and has sadly passed away.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbsvsv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp1f44k)
Myanmar’s military to release thousands of prisoners

Myanmar's military announces an amnesty for more then 23,000 prisoners as it also prepares plans to restrict internet access permanently.

China bans the BBC World Service from Hong Kong after already banning BBC World TV from Mainland China.

Also, Poland prepares to re-open society - with everything from ski slopes to cinemas - but will this last or force the country into another lockdown later on?


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbszjz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wqpp1f7wp)
Burmese protesters urge for support as arrests continue

Myanmar’s military regime has ordered the release of more than 23,000 prisoners. This action by the military follows a week of fresh arrests targeting allies of ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi.

We'll look back at the latest from day three of Donald Trump's impeachment trial.

Also, we're in New York where restaurants are finally starting to open for customers again. Hundreds of restaurants have gone out of business in the past year whilst others are barely afloat. The move to partially open is not welcomed by everyone.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbt393)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yhgkh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz79n)
African Free trade: What’s in it for women?

After years of planning and delays, Africa’s new trade bloc, the African Continental Free Trade Area, opened in January with the promise of transforming the continent’s economies. Amandla Ooko-Ombaka of McKinsey and Company in Nairobi explains the enormous poverty-reducing potential the bloc represents. But some are calling for the agreement’s terms to more directly benefit women, by helping facilitate trade in their wares across borders. Caroline Gethi of the Organisation of Women in International Trade and Gloria Atuheirwe of Trademark East Africa say the agreement hasn't gone far enough to promote gender equality, and that it as yet doesn’t even recognise the role of women in informal trade which is the backbone of Africa’s economies.

(Image credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmw8)
How US 'smart bombs' hit an Iraqi air raid shelter in the first Gulf War

More than 400 civilians were killed when two US precision bombs hit the Amiriya air raid shelter in western Baghdad on the morning of 13 February 1991. The Americans claimed that the building had served as a command and control centre for Saddam Hussein's forces. It was the largest single case of civilian casualities that ocurred during Operation Desert Storm, the US-led campaign to force Iraq to withdraw from neighbouring Kuwait. Mike Lanchin has been hearing from one Iraqi woman whose four children were inside the air raid shelter the day it was bombed.

Photo: Inside the Amiriya air-raid shelter following the US bombing (Kaveh Kazemi/Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbt717)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yhl9m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 World Football (w3cszthd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbtbsc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcp8)
Is China erasing Uighur culture?

This week, lawyers in London concluded that the genocide of Uighur Muslims in Xinjiang province by the Chinese government is a ‘very credible’ allegation. The London based court also said that it is ‘plausible’ that the country’s president, Xi Jinping, is driving that policy. The allegation of genocide - levelled by Uighur activists, international human rights groups, as well as the US Secretary of State Antony Blinken - stems from an industrial scale crackdown in China’s Xinjiang province which has seen more than a million Uighurs and other ethnic minority Muslims imprisoned in a vast network of camps, where people say they have been subjected to rape and torture. The Chinese government has vehemently rejected the claims. It says measures are necessary to put an end to violent attacks in the region and it describes the facilities as re-education centres. So, what do we know about what is really going on in Xinjiang? Is there any merit to China’s argument about the need to defeat violent extremism in the region? Why is the Communist party intent on assimilating Uighurs into Han Chinese cultural traditions? How much is Xi Jinping’s vision for China behind it, and to what extent is Uighur culture - with its unique history and traditions - at risk of being destroyed in Beijing’s plan? Ritula Shah and a panel of expert guests discuss whether China is erasing Uighur culture.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbtgjh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7hd6ym)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yhtsw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbtl8m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjd)
Ethiopia's missing refugees

The Ethiopian government declared victory over the former ruling party of Tigray at the end of November, but information from the region is still sparse. One unanswered question is: what happened to thousands of Eritrean refugees living in camps there who went missing during the fighting? Bekit Teklemariam of BBC Tigrinya has been trying to find out.

Chinese New Year 2021
It’s officially Chinese New Year’s day today, usually a time when millions from outside and within China head home for the holidays. But this year China’s strict Covid-19 rules mean many won’t be making the journey, including BBC Chinese journalist Fan Wang. Fan is based in Hong Kong, and wrote an online story about some of the people who did decide to brave quarantine and isolation to spend the holidays with family.

Feasting without over-eating?
As China launches into two weeks of New Year’s self-indulgence, the internet is full of advice on how to feast without over-eating. This chimes with “Operation empty plate”, a national campaign against food waste launched last year and now being enshrined in a new law aimed at food outlets. BBC Chinese journalists Jeff Li, Yashan Zhao, Temtsel Hao and Suping share stories about China’s love of feasting, in history and in their own lives.

Colombia's cocaine hippos
Pablo Escobar has left a long legacy in Colombia, of which maybe the strangest part is the hippos. Once stars of his personal zoo, they were abandoned after his death and are now flourishing in their South American home, and presenting a serious environmental problem. Luis Fajardo of BBC Monitoring, who is from Colombia, tells us more.

Houbara bustard hunting in Balochistan
From November to February the houbara bustard overwinters in Pakistan's Balochistan province. Hot on their heels are the ruling families of the Gulf States. BBC Urdu's Saher Baloch visited the luxurious, sprawling hunting lodge of one of the families from the United Arab Emirates to meet the locals who look after the royal visitors.

Image: An Eritrean refugee child walks in front of a sign at Mai Aini Refugee camp, in Ethiopia
Credit: EDUARDO SOTERAS/AFP/Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbtq0r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7hdgfw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yj294)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0wkg)
Vipassana: 240 hours of silence

Vipassana, which means to see things as they really are, is one of India's most ancient techniques of meditation. It was taught by the Buddha more than 2,500 years ago as a universal remedy for universal ills. The practice died out in India, but survived in Burma, and is now a growing movement around the world.

To learn the technique students complete a 10-day silent retreat, which includes 10 hours of daily meditation. There is no eye contact, no communication, no exercise, no reading or writing, no technology. No distraction from the journey inwards. They must try to overcome the habit of reacting to sensation. By doing so, over 10 days students train themselves to stop reacting to the vicissitudes of life and experience the interconnectedness of all living things.

It is notoriously difficult, but what insights does it afford? What difficulties, both physical and emotional, are faced along the way? We hear the experiences of people who have made it through 240 hours of silence.

Vipassana was popularised by S.N. Goenka, who learnt the technique in Burma from his teacher, Sayagyi U Ba Khin, and in 1969 travelled to India to conduct the first Vipassana course in this tradition outside Burma. There are now around 200 Vipassana meditation centres around the world, attracting people from all walks of life. The course is free, and non-sectarian.

Producer: Eve Streeter
(Photo credit: Marc Sethi)


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbttrw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vvj0dg)
UN envoy calls for Myanmar sanctions

The United Nations' human rights envoy to Myanmar has called for sanctions against the leaders of last week's military coup. Speaking at an emergency meeting in Geneva, Tom Andrews said security forces had been using live ammunition against anti-coup protesters in breach of international law.

Also in the programme: Our correspondent reports on how the Russian authorities are trying to crush protests from Moscow to Vladivostok; and the lessons of Australia's hotel quarantine system for the rest of the world.

(Image: Myanmar honour guards during the parade to mark the 74th anniversary of Myanmar's Union Day. Credit: EPA/Nyunt Win)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbtyj0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yj9sd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlthhczthhf)
New German law to combat worker abuses

Germany's government is said to have agreed a new law to combat worker abuses overseas. We find out what’s behind the move from Miriam Saage-Maass, vice legal director at the European Centre for Constitutional and Human Rights. Also in the programme, the new African Continental Free Trade Area opened in January with the promise of transforming the region's economies. The BBC's Tamasin Ford reports on the poverty reducing potential the bloc represents, and asks whether the agreement goes far enough to promote gender equality. Since a public breakdown in 2007, the singer Britney Spears's financial affairs have been controlled by others under a system known as conservatorship. She is now pursuing legal proceedings to try and take back control, as Nick Reilly, senior reporter at music magazine NME explains. Plus, on Lunar New Year and with lockdowns in place in the UK, we meet Mark House, director of LuBan Kitchen in Liverpool, which has seen a surge in orders from people ordering the firm’s Chinese meal kits.

(Picture: The Reichstag building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbv284)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8ch7df9z)
Coronavirus: How has the world celebrated Lunar New Year?

Celebrations have been happening across the world for the Lunar New Year - also known as Chinese New Year. But how have festivities across East Asia and Asian communities across the world been affected by the coronavirus pandemic? We'll speak to people to hear how this year may be different to usual.

Also, in the East African nation of Tanzania the president and government have repeatedly downplayed the severity of coronavirus. There is little testing and no plans for a vaccination programme in Tanzania, which makes it nearly impossible to gauge the true extent of the virus. We'll speak to two people in Tanzania to hear their thoughts on the coronavirus situation in the country.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer your questions. Today our guest is Dr Megan Murray - Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University.

(Photo: A worshipper prays at the first day of Chinese Lunar New Year at Wong Tai Sin Temple, in Hong Kong, China February 12, 2021. Reuters/Tyrone Siu)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbv608)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t8ch7dk23)
Coronavirus conversations: Tanzania

In the East African nation of Tanzania the president and government have repeatedly downplayed the severity of coronavirus. There is little testing and no plans for a vaccination programme in Tanzania, which makes it nearly impossible to gauge the true extent of the virus. We'll speak to two people in Tanzania to hear their thoughts on the coronavirus situation in the country.

Also, celebrations have been happening across the world for the Lunar New Year - also known as Chinese New Year. But how have festivities across East Asia and Asian communities across the world been affected by the coronavirus pandemic? We'll hear how this year may be different to usual.

And every day we are joined by a health expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer your questions. Today our guest is Marc Mendelson - Professor of Infectious Diseases at the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

(Photo: A worker checks the temperature of travellers at the border post with Kenya in Namanga, northern Tanzania, on March 16, 2020. Credit: Filbert Rweyemamy/AFP)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbv9rd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmw8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbvfhj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bnk7hf5xn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yjsrx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k0hk75dyk)
2021/02/12 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbvk7n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yjxj1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv71)
Can I improve my sense of direction?

Do you find your bearings quickly or are you easily disorientated? Do your friends trust you with the directions in a new city?
Finding our way in the physical world – whether that’s around a building or a city - is an important everyday capability, one that has been integral to human survival. This week CrowdScience listeners want to know whether some people are ‘naturally’ better at navigating, so presenter Marnie Chesterton sets her compass and journeys into the human brain.
Accompanied by psychologists and neuroscientists Marnie learns how humans perceive their environment, recall routes and orientate themselves in unfamiliar spaces. We ask are some navigational strategies better than others?

Marnie also hears that the country you live in might be a good predictor of your navigation skills and how growing up in the countryside may give you an wayfaring advantage. But is our navigational ability down to biology or experience, and can we improve it?

With much of our modern map use being delegated to smartphones, Marnie explores what implications an over-reliance on GPS technology might have for our brain health.

Presenter: Marnie Chesterton
Producer: Melanie Brown

(Photo:Lost man with map. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbvnzs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z60vvjvmc)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbvsqx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79v3hwr7qr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqqmtfjpl)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yk509)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58x07ykj57)
New German law to combat worker abuses

Germany's government is said to have agreed a new law to combat worker abuses overseas. We find out what’s behind the move from Miriam Saage-Maass, vice legal director at the European Centre for Constitutional and Human Rights. Also in the programme, the new African Continental Free Trade Area opened in January with the promise of transforming the region's economies. The BBC's Tamasin Ford reports on the poverty reducing potential the bloc represents, and asks whether the agreement goes far enough to promote gender equality. Since a public breakdown in 2007, the singer Britney Spears's financial affairs have been controlled by others under a system known as conservatorship. She is now pursuing legal proceedings to try and take back control, as Nick Reilly, senior reporter at music magazine NME explains. Plus, on Lunar New Year and with lockdowns in place in the UK, we meet Mark House, director of LuBan Kitchen in Liverpool, which has seen a surge in orders from people ordering the firm’s Chinese meal kits.

(Picture: The Reichstag building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9kbbvxh1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q401yk8rf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3cszthd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Africa Life Clinic 09:32 SUN (w3ct21g3)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3csz6md)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3csz6mf)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6mf)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6mf)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5q3msmshcz)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5q3msmsvmc)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5q3msmt6vr)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5q3msmtblw)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5q3msmtl34)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5q3msmvfb1)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5q3msmvx9k)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172x5q3msmw4st)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5q3msmwd92)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5q3msmwrjg)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5q3msmx3rv)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5q3msmx7hz)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5q3msmxc83)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5q3msmxh07)

BBC News Summary 12:30 SUN (w172x5q3msmxlrc)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5q3msmyfz8)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5q3msmyt6n)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5q3msmyxys)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172x5q401y2wz2)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5q401y30q6)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5q401y34gb)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5q401y3cyl)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5q401y3vy3)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5q401y3zp7)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172x5q401y43fc)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5q401y475h)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5q401y4gnr)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5q401y4q50)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5q401y564j)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5q401y59wn)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5q401y5kcx)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5q401y5p41)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5q401y61cf)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5q401y68vp)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5q401y6rv6)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5q401y6wlb)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5q401y742l)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5q401y7ckv)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5q401y7m23)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5q401y831m)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5q401y86sr)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5q401y8g90)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5q401y8l14)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5q401y8y8j)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5q401y95rs)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5q401y9nr9)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5q401y9shf)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5q401yb0zp)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5q401yb8gy)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5q401ybhz6)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5q401ybzyq)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5q401yc3pv)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5q401ycc63)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5q401ycgy7)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5q401ycv5m)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5q401yd2nw)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5q401ydknd)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5q401ydpdj)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5q401ydxws)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5q401yf5d1)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5q401yfdw9)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5q401yfwvt)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5q401yg0ly)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5q401yg836)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5q401ygcvb)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5q401ygr2q)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5q401ygzkz)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5q401yhgkh)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5q401yhl9m)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5q401yhtsw)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5q401yj294)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5q401yj9sd)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5q401yjsrx)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5q401yjxj1)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5q401yk509)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5q401yk8rf)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5p96212wmb)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5p962130cg)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172x5p9621343l)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172x5p962137vq)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172x5p96213clv)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5p96213hbz)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5p96213m33)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172x5p96213qv7)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172x5p96213vlc)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172x5p96213zbh)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172x5p9621432m)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5p962146tr)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5p96214bkw)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5p96214gb0)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5p96214l24)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5p9621521n)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5p962155ss)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172x5p962159jx)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5p96215f91)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5p96215k15)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5p96215ns9)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5p96215sjf)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5p96215x8k)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172x5p9621610p)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172x5p962164rt)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172x5p962168hy)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172x5p96216d82)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172x5p96216j06)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172x5p96216mrb)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172x5p96216rhg)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172x5p96216w7l)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172x5p96216zzq)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5p962173qv)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172x5p962177gz)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5p96217c73)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172x5p96217gz7)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172x5p96217lqc)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5p96217qgh)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172x5p962182pw)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172x5p962186g0)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5p96218b64)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172x5p96218fy8)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5p96218kpd)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbdjpp)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbdnft)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbds5y)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbdwy2)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbf0p6)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbf4fb)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbf85g)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbfcxl)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbfhnq)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbfmdv)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbfr4z)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbfvx3)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbfzn7)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbg3dc)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbg74h)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbgbwm)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbggmr)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbglcw)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbgq40)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbgtw4)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbgym8)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbh2cd)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbh63j)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5p9kbbh9vn)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbhfls)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbhkbx)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbhp31)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbhsv5)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbhxl9)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbj1bf)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbj52k)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbj8tp)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbjdkt)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbjj9y)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbjn22)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbjrt6)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbjwkb)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbk09g)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbk41l)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbk7sq)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbkcjv)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbkh8z)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbkm13)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbkqs7)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbkvjc)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbkz8h)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbl30m)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5p9kbbl6rr)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172x5p9kbblbhw)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5p9kbblg80)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbll04)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172x5p9kbblpr8)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172x5p9kbblthd)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbly7j)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbm1zn)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbm5qs)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbm9gx)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbmf71)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbmjz5)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbmnq9)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbmsgf)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbmx6k)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbn0yp)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbn4pt)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbn8fy)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbnd62)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbnhy6)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbnmpb)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbnrfg)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbnw5l)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbnzxq)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5p9kbbp3nv)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbp7dz)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbpc53)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbpgx7)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbplnc)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbpqdh)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbpv4m)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbpywr)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbq2mw)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbq6d0)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbqb44)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbqfw8)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbqkmd)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbqpcj)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbqt3n)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbqxvs)

BBC News 15:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbr1lx)

BBC News 16:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbr5c1)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbr935)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbrdv9)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbrjlf)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbrnbk)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbrs2p)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbrwtt)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172x5p9kbbs0ky)

BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbs4b2)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbs826)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbsctb)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbshkg)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbsm9l)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbsr1q)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbsvsv)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbszjz)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbt393)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbt717)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbtbsc)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbtgjh)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbtl8m)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbtq0r)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbttrw)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbtyj0)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbv284)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbv608)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbv9rd)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbvfhj)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbvk7n)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbvnzs)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbvsqx)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5p9kbbvxh1)

BBC OS Conversations 05:06 SAT (w3ct19z7)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct19z7)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 MON (w3ct19z7)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172x2t8ch70tpl)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2t8ch70yfq)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172x2t8ch73qlp)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172x2t8ch73vbt)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172x2t8ch76mhs)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2t8ch76r7x)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172x2t8ch79jdw)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2t8ch79n50)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172x2t8ch7df9z)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172x2t8ch7dk23)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7kn)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz8cb)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8nz)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7yg)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz79n)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x19741cw7gc)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172x197h9p8sft)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172x197h9pcpbx)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x197h9pgl80)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x197h9pkh53)

Business Weekly 23:06 SAT (w3ct0spw)

Business Weekly 03:06 SUN (w3ct0spw)

Comedians Vs. The News 11:32 SAT (w3ct21md)

Comedians Vs. The News 19:32 SUN (w3ct21md)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv70)

CrowdScience 11:32 MON (w3cszv70)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv71)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz999)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf5m)

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People Fixing the World 02:06 TUE (w3cszv2g)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct1gv8)

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The Conversation 02:32 MON (w3cszj4l)

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The Cultural Frontline 00:06 SUN (w3cszj9l)

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The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjwq)

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The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3cszkxz)

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When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct1c56)

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WorklifeIndia 02:06 SUN (w3ct1c1j)

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World Book Club 04:06 SUN (w3cszmx7)

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World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x582kjbf0sk)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3cszthd)

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