Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 30 JANUARY 2021

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsq9r0h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcp6)
China's advance into Latin America

This month, in a highly unusual move, an American government agency bought nearly $3bn of debt from Ecuador that was owed to China. The aim – in the form of fresh loans – was to help Ecuador pay off 'predatory Chinese debt', strengthen its alliance with the United States and exclude Chinese companies from developing the country's telecoms network. Although the deal came at the end of the Trump presidency, it may encourage other South American countries to reach similar arrangements in the future. According to the UN, Chinese companies have invested $10bn a year in Latin America. Although the amount is far less than that of the United States, Chinese companies have made rapid inroads into the heart of Latin American economies, including in crucial sectors such as mining, power grids and telecommunications. There's speculation that many leaders find Chinese investment attractive because it's rarely tied to anti-corruption measures. Others say countries are walking into a Chinese-made 'debt trap' which will have negative economic consequences over the long run. So is China viewed by those across the region with suspicion, or as a welcome alternative to the United States - which has a controversial history operating outside its own borders? What's been the tangible impact of China's economic advances in Latin America, and will President Biden seek to cooperate with China in the region - or treat it as a strategic threat? Join Ritula Shah and guests as they discuss China's growing influence in Latin America.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsq9vrm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x196rs232vj)
The WHO warns against health nationalism

As the EU moves to protect its vaccine supplies, the World Health Organization tells the West to think about those who are less fortunate: people in poorer nations and health workers around the world.

Also in the programme, as many countries struggle to balance their books is it time for the rich to pay more tax we head to Argentina which now has a wealth tax but will it work ?

And - has the coronavirus made the world more or less corrupt ?

Plus - why does New Zealand want people to take better photographs when travelling there?

PHOTO: People getting a vaccine/Reuters


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsq9zhr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qs)
Brazil's steady stream of grief

The city of Manaus, in the Brazilian Amazon, was hard hit by its first wave of Covid infections last year - now it's reeling from a second wave far larger and more deadly than many had predicted. Katy Watson has been there to hear from the bereaved and witness the struggles of the living to keep their health system even close to functioning.

Pascale Harter introduces this and other dispatches from correspondents, journalists and writers around the world.

You might think that a woman who'd survived the Taliban's rule, gone on to be the first female film-director in Afghanistan, braved social disapproval by working as an actor and then signed up to the Afghan police force would be fearless. But Saba Sahar is afraid now - because recently, she only narrowly survived an assassination attempt. Gunmen fired on her, her two bodyguards and her young daughter as they drove through Kabul. The BBC's Yogita Limaye talks to a remarkable woman about her enduring worries - for herself, her family and her country - after a string of targeted killings.

India's Republic Day ceremonies are usually full of pomp and ritual - but this year the official events were dramatically upstaged by a 'tractor rally' called by angry farmers. The protesters have been demonstrating in Delhi for weeks against moves to reform India's agricultural sector. The tractor rally overspilled its agreed route and was aggressively dispersed by police. Raijini Vaidyanathan asked some of the farmers, and their supporters, about the root causes of their discontent.

Child labour is illegal in the Democratic Republic of Congo - but all the same, there are tens of thousands of children at work in the country's mines. Near Luhihi, in the east of the country, Olivia Acland recently talked to a couple of teenage boys hoping to strike it lucky... as they spend what should be their schooldays sifting through the spoil from a local gold mine.

(Image: A gravedigger works at the Parque Taruma cemetery during the coronavirus outbreak in Manaus, Brazil, Credit: Reuters/Bruno Kelly)


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb0bs4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhkg)
Burns on batting and babies

England opener Rory Burns joins us from quarantine in Chennai ahead of next week's first Test against England. He'll tells us how life has changed since becoming a dad, the competition for places in the English batting line upafter they won their fifth successive Test away from home, and whether India are currently the best Test team in the world. We ask whether travelling sportsmen and women should get Covid vaccines ahead of others.Plus we speak to Himanshu Vaid who has designed and re-constructed the biggest cricket stadium in the world.

Photo: Rory Burns of England during a nets session at the Bay Oval on November 20, 2019 in Mount Maunganui, New Zealand. (Photo by Gareth Copley/Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqb37w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjb)
Nigeria's 'Stingy Men Association'

BBC Pidgin has been reporting on the social media buzz around Nigeria’s Stingy Men Association, for men who want to avoid spending money on their wives and girlfriends. There’ve been jokes, spin-offs and celebrity members, but is it just a laugh, or is there a more serious side? Answers from Dan Ikpoyi of BBC Pidgin and Women’s Affairs journalist Azeezat Olaoluwa.

China’s controversial female comic
Yang Li has become a household name in China as a stand-up TV comedian. But a recent joke about men caused controversy, with critics accusing her of instigating hatred against men. Zhaoyin Feng of BBC Chinese tells us why some people in China find women making jokes at the expense of men a challenge.

Africa’s football pioneers
Today top African footballers playing for European clubs are household names. But their presence in Europe isn’t as recent as some might think. Ahmed Rouaba of BBC Arabic has uncovered fascinating stories of African stars from the early decades of the 20th century, many now forgotten.

Memories, identity and war
In January 1991, the Somali state collapsed into civil war after the fall of President Mohamed Siad Barre. For those living in what used to be British Somaliland, the violence began in 1988, when government forces bombed Hargeisa. Thousands fled to neighbouring Ethiopia, including Ismail Einashe, then a young boy, now a contributor to BBC Africa’s Letter from Africa. He reflects on his memories of that time, and Hartisheik refugee camp, to which he returned in 2019.

David Amanor has left the building!
All good things come to an end, and this is David’s last programme on The Fifth Floor. Friends from over the years bid a fond farewell, and remember some of his “best bits”. Expect Russian horses, songs and poetry, bees and the pungent stench of durian fruit.



Image: Celebrity members of Nigeria's "Stingy Men Association"
Credit: DON JAZZY/DEBO MR MACARONI


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmw6)
The anthem of the Arab Spring

In December 2010, anti-government protests broke out in Tunisia after a young fruit-seller called Mohammed Bouazizi set himself alight outside a government office in the south of the country. At one of the huge rallies in Tunis, a young singer called Emel Mathlouthi sang a song called "Kelmti Horra" or "My Word is Free". A video of her passionate performance immediately went viral and inspired protestors to take to the streets in other parts of the Middle East in what became known as the Arab Spring. Emel Mathlouthi talks to Witness History.

PHOTO: Emel Mathlouthi performing in 2012 (Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqb700)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcp6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqbbr4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z6)
Coronavirus: Vaccine hesitancy among ethnic minorities

Millions of people across the world are currently being vaccinated against Covid-19. Black, Asian and Latino groups have been the hardest hit by the first wave of the pandemic and yet people within these groups are more reluctant to take up the offer of the coronavirus vaccine.

Two doctors in the United States and the United Kingdom counteract the misinformation and share their experiences of patients’ vaccine mistrust with host Nuala McGovern, and a British Imam explains how he promotes the safety of the vaccine among the Muslim community.

The pandemic has affected many people in numerous ways and the wearing of masks is causing particular problems among people who stutter or stammer. People from India, the UK and US with speaking difficulties explain how masks are affecting their communication.

(Photo: Pharmacist Bhaveen Patel gives a dose of the Oxford / AstraZeneca covid vaccine to Joshua Labor at a coronavirus vaccination clinic held at Junction Pharmacy in Brixton, London. Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire)


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb0q0j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9k)
Olafur Eliasson: Public art made virtual

The Icelandic-Danish artist Olafur Eliasson is celebrated for his playful and tactile works, from shining suns to melting ice installations. Yet with so many galleries closed in lockdown, he’s turning his attention to augmented reality. It’s now possible to download the imagination of the environmental artist to a street near you, via an app. But is it as good as the real thing? Reporter Anna Bailey pressed download and spoke to Olafur to find out.

Public art has long been the preserve of men but feminist artists Nikki Luna from the Philippines and Bahia Shehab in Egypt challenge the patriarchy, by taking up space on the street and online. Nikki Luna’s audio-visual installations confront gender-based violence with the voices of marginalised women, while Bahia Shehab’s street art foregrounds the female form and addresses consent.

Mexican-American portrait artist Aliza Nisenbaum gives us a glimpse of the private moments behind public service. She talks to Nawal about why her latest project honours healthcare workers at the frontline of the battle against coronavirus.

Plus, we hear how a group of artists have been inspired to create a giant painting that highlights growing insecurity and political instability in Nigeria.

Presenter: Nawal Al-Maghafi

(Image: Olafur Eliasson, Caring Northern Light and Lucky Stone. Augmented reality. Courtesy of the artist and Acute Art.)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqbgh8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d8q528trz)
The war over COVID-19 vaccines

The vaccine wars heat up as the WHO criticises countries for squabbling; the EU says it is merely enforcing contracts.

Also, the French town bequeathed a large amount from the Jewish man they saved in 1943.

And Amsterdam's push to close one of its most famous attractions.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Loretta Napoleoni, Italian-born author and economist; and Robert Lawrence Kuhn, a corporate strategist, investment banker, and commentator on China based in the US.

(Picture: A syringe with the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqbl7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d8q528yj3)
Italian politics: The prime minister quits, but battles to remain

Why the prime minister of Italy is fighting to keep his job even though he resigned just four days ago.

Also, the vaccine wars heat up as the WHO criticises countries for squabbling, but the EU says it is merely enforcing contracts.

And the German member of the European Parliament who thinks the European Commission has presided over a disaster.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Loretta Napoleoni, Italian-born author and economist; and Robert Lawrence Kuhn, a corporate strategist, investment banker, and commentator on China based in the US.

(Picture: Caretaker Italian Prime Minister, Giuseppe Conte in Rome. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqbpzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d8q529287)
Vaccine nationalism

The World Health Organization strongly condemns the world's richer countries for squabbling over coronavirus vaccine supplies.

Also, enterprising New Yorkers have been seeking alternative pandemic-friendly recreational activities - bird-watching has become the city’s hottest new pastime.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Loretta Napoleoni, Italian-born author and economist; and Robert Lawrence Kuhn, a corporate strategist, investment banker, and commentator on China based in the US.

(Picture: European Commission Vice President Dombrovskis and Health Commissioner Kyriakides at a news conference in Brussels. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb127x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c55)
America’s loneliness epidemic

Even before Covid, four out of every 10 American adults admitted to feeling anxiety and depression, and up to 70% of young Americans said they were lonely. Now amid growing concerns of an emerging mental health crisis because of the coronavirus pandemic, Carlos Watson and Ritula Shah (standing in for Katty Kay) tackle the subject with the help of two leading health experts - Dr Altha Stewart, former head of the American Psychiatric Association and Dr Deepak Chopra, a prominent alternative medicine advocate. Together they explore how loneliness affects people of a different age, race and gender, and offer some solutions and advice as to how Americans can learn to cope, even after the pandemic has passed.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqbtqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 today]


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb1601)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cx0)
Two Minutes Past Nine

30/01/2021 GMT

On April 19th 1995 a 26-year-old named Timothy Mcveigh steered a yellow rental truck into downtown Oklahoma city. Inside was a two-ton homemade explosive.

The Oklahoma City Bombing killed 168 people and leaving 680 injured. Journalist Leah Sottile investigates the legacy of the attack in a series that gets into the heart of America’s far-right today.
Recorded over some of the most divisive and turbulent months in recent American political history, Two Minutes Past Nine explores and questions the changing face of far right extremism in all its chaos and conspiracism.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf5l)
The issues around good, impartial reporting

What are the issues around good, impartial reporting when facing an internet blackout and charges of vote rigging and intimidation? BBC correspondents in Uganda faced many challenges to ensure balanced reporting during the recent presidential elections in Uganda.
Plus we say goodbye to one of the best known voices on the BBC WS, Emilio San Pedro.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqbygs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c7nxcvr8h)
“Racism strips you entirely of your dignity'

“It strips you entirely of your dignity, of your feeling of any kind of self-worth” – Shaka Hislop on receiving racist abuse

Former Newcastle United and Trinidad and Tobago goalkeeper Shaka Hislop joins us in the week that Show Racism the Red Card launched in South Africa. The organisation is the UK’s largest anti-racism educational charity and it was formed twenty five years ago following a donation from Hislop. He recalls his own experiences of racism and discusses the abuse Manchester United’s Axel Tuanzebe and Anthony Martial suffered this week. Hislop is joined by Ged Grebby from Show Racism the Red Card and Busisuwe Nkosi from their new partners in South Africa – the Ahmed Kathrada Foundation. Together the three of them discuss their hopes for the new partnership and Nkosi gives us an insight into how racism still pervades a post-apartheid South Africa.

With the Winter X Games underway in Colorado, we hear from Olympic gold medallist Anna Gasser on her hopes for the Big Air competition. The Austrian snowboarder competes in the event on Saturday and tells us she may attempt a cab triple underflip, which has never been done in competition before.

Australian tennis player Li Tu joins us to talk about his hopes of replacing Andy Murray in next month’s Australian Open. Tu was a top junior player and represented his country in Davis Cup before falling out of love with the sport and taking a six year break. The 24-year-old returned to competition in August and is the in-form domestic player in Australia after winning a number of tournaments. He doesn’t have a world ranking, but that hasn’t stopped people in Australia calling for him to receive the wildcard that Murray has given up.

British Para Powerlifter Zoe Newson tells us about forming a support bubble with her parents so she can continue to train ahead of the Tokyo Paralympics. The two-time medallist also discusses her journey into the sport, how she balances competing and motherhood and how she’s trying to ignore all the noise around a possible cancellation of the games.

In Sporting Witness, we go back to 2004 when Mianne Bagger of Denmark became the first transgender woman to play in a professional golf tournament. Bagger reflects on playing in the Australian Women's Open in Sydney, in what was a landmark moment for trans sport and made headlines around the world.

And – the BBC’s Vicki Sparks joins us live from Goodison Park ahead of the early game in the Premier League between Everton and Newcastle.

Photo: Trinidad and Tobago's goalkeeper Shaka Hislop dives for the ball during a training session at " In der Ahe " stadium in Rotenburg, northern Germany, 18 June 2006. Trinidad & Tobago will face Paraguay on 20 of June for their last game in the first round of group B for the 2006 Fifa World Cup. AFP PHOTO / ARIS MESSINIS (Photo credit should read ARIS MESSINIS/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqc26x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bmtpvxtn1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb1fh9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 Global Questions (w3ct1pxn)
Global Questions

Social media: More powerful than government?

After social media suspended Donald Trump, some have questioned the power of the Silicon Valley giants: Alexei Navalny and Angela Merkel, among others, have wondered whether it was a step too far. The big five of Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Google and Twitter may have had humble origins but they're now among the biggest companies in the world, wielding enormous global influence. Has big tech gone too far, with this kind of censorship removing more content and threatening freedom of speech, or is it long overdue? And in the age of these new media monoliths, do we want them to be mere platforms or must they accept that they're publishers, responsible for content and democratically accountable?


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqc5z1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6v4)
The courage to be disliked with BŪJIN, Desire Marea, Lynn Daphne Rudolph and Jackie Queens

South African artists BŪJIN, Desire Marea, Lynn Daphne Rudolph and Jackie Queens discuss why the collective experience of creating is better, their biggest failures, and getting into trouble.

Cape Town-based artist BŪJIN makes music that blends East African techno with funk, bass and classical orchestrations. Her work incorporates performance, sound installation and research into the realms of sonic theatre.

She is joined by Desire Marea, a multi-disciplinary artist born in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. They’re one half of the music and performance duo FAKA, along with Fela Gucci, and at the start of 2020 they released their first solo album, Desire, on their label Izimakade Records.

Also joining them is one of South Africa’s leading classical violists, Lynn Daphne Rudolph. She switched to viola from the violin in 2014, and won the Mabel Quick prize for Best Instrumentalist in 2015. She studied performance at Nelson Mandela University and is a part of the Alternative Orchestra SA. Jackie Queens is a South African songwriter and vocalist born in Zimbabwe. She makes Afro-house and tech and set up her own record label, Bae Electronica, which provides a platform to new and emerging artists through projects such as GIRLS and Women of House.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqc9q5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z59b71hbr)
Europe's vaccine row intensifies

The European Union has reversed a decision to override a key part of the Brexit deal amid an ongoing row over vaccine supplies. So are the EU's increasingly robust actions a display of prudence or panic? We get a view from a member of the European Parliament's Public Health Committee.

Also in the programme: Why the US Air Force is clamping down on hair-based discrimination; and Amsterdam's plans to ban foreign tourists from sparking up in its famous cannabis cafes.

(Photo credit: A man receives a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a coronavirus disease vaccination center in Nantes, France, January 29, 2021. REUTERS/Stephane Mahe)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqcfg9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lmngt1z3m)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as Manchester City host Sheffield United. We'll also keep you up to date with the day's other matches as Crystal Palace take on Wolves and West Brom take on Fulham.

We'll have reaction to the day's early kick-off between Everton and Newcastle United.

Lee James is joined by former West Ham and Trinidad and Tobago goalkeeper Shaka Hislop, Minnesota United and Sierra Leone forward Kei Kamara and South Africa captain Janine van Wyk to discuss the Premier League's big talking points - including the appointment of Thomas Tuchel to replace Frank Lampard at Chelsea.

Elsewhere, we'll bring you the latest from the African Nations Championship as the quarter-finals get underway in Cameroon and the World Men's Handball Championship in Egypt.

In golf, we'll keep you up to date with the men's Farmer's Insurance Open and Dubai Desert Classic. And in cricket, we'll have reaction as the first men's Test between South Africa and Pakistan comes to a close.

Photo: Manchester City's Ilkay Gundogan (Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqcxft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bmtpvynvy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb28q6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxj)
On 11 November 2019 James Le Mesurier was found dead in a street in Istanbul. He was the latest casualty in a very unusual war – one fought not on the battlefield, but online.

Le Mesurier was a mysterious figure with a taste for the finer things who served in the British Army in several of the world’s hotspots before focusing his energies on war-ravaged Syria from 2014. He co-founded the White Helmets, a Syrian civil defence force who filmed themselves pulling survivors and bodies from the rubble of bombed out buildings.

Soon, the White Helmets - and Le Mesurier - found themselves at the centre of a global race to control the narrative in the Syrian War. In this investigative series Mayday, presenter Chloe Hadjimatheou talks to the people who knew James, including his widow Emma, his ex-wife and former army colleagues, as well as those on the ground in Syria still working as White Helmets today in an effort to piece together James’ story and that of the White Helmets. She speaks to some of the White Helmet’s detractors and follows up accusations about the organisation to try and understand the truth surrounding them.

Chloe Hadjimatheou says: “Making this series has been an extraordinary experience, as listeners will discover. It started out being an investigation into the story of a man with an astonishing life and a mysterious death but it ended up taking me on a bizarre journey down rabbit holes of misinformation. Ultimately this is a story about how truth functions in modern warfare.”


SAT 18:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh65)
Mianne Bagger - Golf's transgender pioneer

In 2004, Mianne Bagger of Denmark became the first transitioned woman to play in a professional golf tournament when she played in the Australian women's open in Sydney. It was a landmark moment for trans sport and made headlines around the world. Mianne Bagger talks to Robbie Wojciechowski.

PHOTO: Mianne Bagger in action in 2010 (Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqd15y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Evidence (w3ct205h)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

The Shapeshifting Virus

News that at least three new variants of SARS-CoV-2 have emerged in three separate continents have sent a chill throughout the scientific community. All viruses mutate but the speed and scale of the changes and the fact they occurred independently, is seen as a wake-up call.

Genetic sequencing in South Africa first raised the alarm about the version of the virus that was racing through populations in the Eastern and then Western Cape.

Scientists at the country’s KwaZulu-Natal Research and Innovation Sequencing Platform, KRISP, were struck by the sheer number of genetic mutations, many of which were on the all-important spike protein. This is where the virus binds to human cells and where neutralising antibodies, our immune system’s defences, also mount their defence. Any changes there, researchers knew, could be bad news.

Genetic sequencers in the UK also identified a new lineage which shares just some of the mutations in the South African variant. Named B.1.1.7 this version tore through populations in the South East of England and is now the dominant strain throughout the country and beyond. Latest estimates suggest is between 30 and 50% more infectious, although exactly how it is more transmissible is still being worked out.

In Brazil too, news earlier this month of another troubling variant, the P.1. tearing through populations in Manaus, the capital of Brazil’s Amazonas state, where so many were infected in the first wave of the pandemic. Like the version identified in South Africa, this variant also has mutation called E484K on the all-important spike protein. This could make the virus better at evading antibodies, with huge implications for re-infection rates and the new vaccines.

Claudia Hammond and her expert panel consider what the new shapeshifting virus means for the global goal of herd immunity and an end to the pandemic. And they answer your questions. Please do keep your virus queries coming in to the.evidence@bbc.co.uk and your question could be included in the next programme.

Claudia’s guests include Dr Richard Lessells, infectious diseases specialist from the University of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa and part of the team that identified the South African variant; Dr Muge Cevik, clinical lecturer in infectious diseases and medical virology at the University of St Andrews in Scotland and a member of the UK’s expert committee NERVTAG (New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group); Dr Shane Crotty, Professor for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research at la Jolla Institute for Immunology, University of California San Diego in the USA and Dr Margaret Harris from the World Health Organisation in Geneva.

Produced by: Fiona Hill, Samara Linton and Maria Simons
Editor: Deborah Cohen
Technical Support: Donald McDonald and Tim Heffer


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqd4y2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk43)
Author and poet Ben Okri

Scottish director Kevin MacDonald tells us about his latest films, Life In A Day 2020 and The Mauritanian

American novelist Raven Leilani explains the difficulties of getting the right title for her debut Luster

British actor Paul Bettany, star of WandaVision, on how things have shifted for him in the Marvel Cinematic Universe

We hear from poet Amanda Gorman, whose recital at Joe Biden’s inauguration wowed the world

Moroccan filmmaker Maryam Touzani looks at taboos and traditions in her movie Adam

Kenyan musician Muthoni Drummer Queen explains how the Covid 19 pandemic affected her relationship with music

And joining Nikki Bedi is essayist, critic, and broadcaster Bilal Qureshi and author and poet Ben Okri, who’ll also be talking about his latest collection of poetry A Fire in My Head.


(Photo: Ben Okri. Credit: David Levenson/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqd8p6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z59b72g9s)
Calls for UK PM to replace Northern Ireland Brexit deal

The First Minister of Northern Ireland, Arlene Foster, has urged British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to invoke part of the Brexit agreement to deal with problems in the movement of goods between GB and NI. Her comments came after a row in which the EU said it would halt vaccine supplies travelling into Northern Ireland from the Republic of Ireland. Also: Why Latinos in Los Angeles are disproportionally affected by Covid; and moves to end a very personal form of discrimination, especially for women of colour - we hear about hair.

(Photo: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Northern Ireland’s First Minister Arlene Foster at Hillsborough Castle during the Prime Minister’s visit to Belfast on 13/08/2020. Credit: Brian Lawless/PA Wire).


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqddfb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79tcz88vf5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fq035z4d0)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb2rpq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0w3g)
Redemption in recycling

In Philadelphia, husband and wife George and Mimi Limbach sit down in an old warehouse with 15 men who have recently been released from prison. Surrounding them are hundreds of old computers, which these former inmates will soon recycle as part of a rehabilitation programme underpinned by the couples Christian faith. They feel by offering these former offenders work they are keeping true to values such as forgiveness, love and second chances. “No one is here to judge. We are all on the same level,” George tells the young men.

In this programme, Colm Flynn travels to the computer recycling centre in a disadvantaged neighbourhood in Philadelphia to meet some of the former inmates who are building a better future "one computer tower at a time." We hear their raw stories, and hear why George and Mimi feel these people deserve a chance despite their past crimes.

Presenter: Colm Flynn


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqdj5g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spv)
Combating Covid: Closed borders and quarantine hotels

The UK has said it will impose strict restrictions on people travelling to the country in order to help stop the spread of Covid-19. Travellers from a list of countries deemed 'high risk’ will be put into hotels to quarantine. It is a scheme used in Australia, where cases have remained relatively low. We hear how the economy there was able to open up after the first wave of infections. The end of the Google Loon project means very little in practical terms to people in rural Africa who need internet access. It never managed to deliver on its promise to connect up more of the continent. So, what’s next? Will Elon Musk’s Starlink project be the answer?

Plus we get the latest on the farmers' protests in India after this week’s rally turned violent. And the director of the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo tells us how he had to protect the area from exploitative companies as well as armed militias. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Photo: Police at Frankfurt Airport. Credit: Getty Images)



SUNDAY 31 JANUARY 2021

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqdmxl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb305z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3cszf5l)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqdrnq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3cszkxy)
New Covid vaccine

Researchers at Imperial College have been working on a strategy that can make RNA vaccines stretch further. Anna Blakely explains how the new approach works and why RNA vaccines are adaptable to a changing disease.

In January 2019 a dam collapsed in Brazil, spilling 10 million cubic metres of red sludge down nearby rivers, claiming the lives of at least 259 people. An engineering report into the collapse looked at data from safety sensors around the site, and said they’d not revealed any weakening of the dam prior to the failure. But a new study using data from Earth observing satellites has found signs of subtle movement starting weeks earlier. Stephen Grebby of Nottingham University and Roland Pease discuss this finding.

An international collaboration led by Kew Gardens has just set out a list of ten golden rules for maintaining and restoring forests. The main author, Kate Hardwick talks about why the rules are necessary and why it isn’t as simple as planting any old trees.

There’s been a lot of debate about whether being bilingual is good for the brain. Does knowing more than one language take up precious capacity that could be used for better things? Or does it sharpen it, all the better to take on more challenges? Dean d’Souza of Anglia Ruskin University has been addressing this question by comparing the behaviour of infants brought up in monolingual and multilingual homes.


And, When planning to have a baby, women are expected to give up everything from smoking to alcohol, even soft cheese. But the other half of fertility comes from the sperm, usually provided by a man. So should men also give up their vices to improve the quality of their sperm, and their chances of conception?
That’s what Listener Stuart in Australia wants to know. He emailed CrowdScience after he and his wife had been trying to have a second child for two years. He gave up alcohol, and coffee, but wants to know if there is any hard science to back up the idea that this would improve his fertility.

To find out, presenter Anand Jagatia speaks with Professor Allan Pacey, a scientist who specialises in the study of male fertility and sperm. He discovers that male subfertility accounts for 50% the problems with getting pregnant. And we’re far from alone. Sperm is a remarkably diverse, but also fragile cell. Across the animal kingdom, different species have problems with male fertility, but have adapted novel ways to improve their chances of reaching the egg.

Men often struggle to speak about their fertility, and reporter Chhavi Sachdev tells Anand the impact this has on couples in India who struggle to conceive, or don’t want to. She speaks with fertility specialist Professor Nirmal Kumar Lohiya about how this reticence to speak about fertility is changing.

Viruses from Mumps to HIV have long been known to target the delicate sperm production cells in the testicles. Dr Krutika Kuppalli tells Anand why, and what we know about the possible impact of SARS CoV-2 on male fertility.

Professor Allan Pacey gives Anand and Stuart some advice for what to do while trying to conceive - don’t wear tight underwear - and get used to talking about your swimmers or even getting them checked out.


(Image: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqdwdv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c1h)
How to build a billion-dollar startup

India ranks fourth highest in the world when it comes to unicorns - privately-owned startups with valuations of over $1bn. But despite being a global startup hub, only a handful reach unicorn status and nearly 90% new ventures fail within the first five years of their inception.

So, what is the secret to building a billion-dollar business? What should your strategy be when picking an idea, trying to secure investment or putting a team together? And what about the long-term viability of businesses once they become unicorns?

Three Indian entrepreneurs tell us stories of their struggles and success, and share tips on how to build a billion-dollar startup.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Piyush Shah, co-founder, InMobi Group; Mehul Agrawal, co-founder and COO, CARS24; Neeti Mehta Shukla, co-founder, SVP, brand & culture, Automation Anywhere

(Photo: Young businessman standing in his factory. Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb37p7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cx0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 02:50 More or Less (w3ct0pym)
The rapid test row

A ferocious row has broken out among scientists about new coronavirus tests. Lateral flow tests provide results within minutes and some scientists believe they are offer accurate enough results at a speed that could allow us to resume business as usual. Others think they are so poor at detecting the virus that they could pose a huge danger.

In this week’s More or Less, Tim Harford looks at the evidence and what we know about these new tests.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Chloe Hadjimatheou

(Covid-19 rapid antigen tests. Credit: Chloe Hadjimatheou/BBC)


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqf04z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 23:06 on Saturday]


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqf3x3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct1gv6)
Compassion fatigue

Compassion fatigue has long been an issue for people in the medical and humanitarian professions. People often enter those worlds because of a desire to care, and to be compassionate towards others, but often compassion is tested to the limits. What does compassion fatigue mean for both those suffering from emotional burnout, and those on the receiving end?

We hear from doctors, humanitarians, and experts who explain why compassion is a finite resource. While compassion can motivate us, using it up can lead to disaster and disconnect.

We explore whether a diet of death and destruction turns people away from news, and if shock advertising works for charities, or if it just adds to a feeling of helplessness and inaction. We ask if social media has further eroded our sense of compassion to strangers, and if compassion is even necessary online, where the rules seem so different to those offline.

We also hear from climate activists who argue that we need to move away from shock campaigning and “flies in the eyes” advertising, and reinforce the individual’s responsibility to affect change at a local level. But, is this realistic, and does pulling at the heartstrings actually lead to the most impactful outcomes?

(Photo: Iranian nurse on Covid-19 frontline strives to keep work-life balance. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqf7n7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb3lxm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:50 More or Less (w3ct0pym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqfcdc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d8q52cqp2)
Russia braces for more protests

Protests are expected across Russia in support of the jailed opposition activist, Alexi Navalny. We hear from a one of his closest supporters and a former US ambassador to Moscow.

Also, the ongoing coronavirus vaccine war in Europe.

And US immigration policy under the Biden administration.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Latika Bourke, UK correspondent for the Sydney Morning Herald, a daily newspaper published in Australia; and Kevin Maguire, associate editor for the Daily Mirror, a national newspaper in the UK.

(Picture: Moscow. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqfh4h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d8q52cvf6)
Serbia tops Europe's vaccine roll-out

A success story: How Serbia got at the top of the COVID vaccination chart.

Also, protests are expected across Russia in support of the jailed opposition activist Alexi Navalny; we hear from his chief of staff.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Latika Bourke, UK correspondent for the Sydney Morning Herald, a daily newspaper published in Australia; and Kevin Maguire, associate editor for the Daily Mirror, a national newspaper in the UK.

(Picture: The Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine administered at the Batajnica Covid hospital in Belgrade, Serbia. Credit: EPA)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqflwm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d8q52cz5b)
Protests taking place across Russia

Protests are taking place across Russia today in support of the jailed opposition leader Alexi Navalny, we hear for his chief of staff.

And should Britain share some of its vaccine supplies with its crisis-hit European neighbours?

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Latika Bourke, UK correspondent for the Sydney Morning Herald, a daily newspaper published in Australia; and Kevin Maguire, associate editor for the Daily Mirror, a national newspaper in the UK.

(Picture: Law enforcement officers line up during a rally in for Alexei Navalny in Vladivostok, Russia. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb3z50)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6z)
Will giving up alcohol improve my sperm count?

When planning to have a baby, women are expected to give up everything from smoking to alcohol, even soft cheese. But the other half of fertility comes from the sperm, usually provided by a man. So should men also give up their vices to improve the quality of their sperm, and their chances of conception?
That’s what Listener Stuart in Australia wants to know. He emailed CrowdScience after he and his wife had been trying to have a second child for two years. He gave up alcohol, and coffee, but wants to know if there is any hard science to back up the idea that this would improve his fertility.

To find out, presenter Anand Jagatia speaks with Professor Allan Pacey, a scientist who specialises in the study of male fertility and sperm. He discovers that male subfertility accounts for 50% the problems with getting pregnant. And we’re far from alone. Sperm is a remarkably diverse, but also fragile cell. Across the animal kingdom, different species have problems with male fertility, but have adapted novel ways to improve their chances of reaching the egg.

Men often struggle to speak about their fertility, and reporter Chhavi Sachdev tells Anand the impact this has on couples in India who struggle to conceive, or don’t want to. She speaks with fertility specialist Professor Nirmal Kumar Lohiya about how this reticence to speak about fertility is changing.

Viruses from Mumps to HIV have long been known to target the delicate sperm production cells in the testicles. Dr Krutika Kuppalli tells Anand why, and what we know about the possible impact of SARS CoV-2 on male fertility.

Professor Allan Pacey gives Anand and Stuart some advice for what to do while trying to conceive - don’t wear tight underwear - and get used to talking about your swimmers or even getting them checked out.

Contributors:
Professor Allan Pacey - Andrologist at the University of Sheffield in the UK.
Dr Nicolla Hemmings, expert on bird sperm, Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellow at the University of Sheffield, UK.
Professor Nirmal Kumar Lohiya, Fertility specialist and co-developer of RISUG male contraceptive, University of Rajasthan, India
Dr Krutika Kuppalli, Assistant Professor at the Medical University of South Carolina, USA

Chhavi Sachdev, Reporter and presenter for CrowdScience

Presented by Anand Jagatia,
Produced by Rory Galloway

(Image: Sperm cells Credit: Getty images)


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqfqmr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb42x4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3cszf12)
Escaping lockdown in the Coral City

Colin Foord and Jared McKay are childhood best friends with a passion for aquatic life. As a kid Colin developed a strong love of sea life and would construct his own aquariums. Later, when Jay was suffering from depression, Colin would send him the equipment needed to build his own reef aquarium in his living room. Eventually they installed the Coral City Camera, a webcam streaming live from an urban coral reef in Miami which since lockdown has attracted thousands of dedicated daily viewers like Hollie Withers, searching for connection and a community.

Presenter: Clayton Conn.
Producers: Clayton Conn, Maryam Maruf and Mariana Des Forges

Picture: Marine life on the Coral City Camera
Credit: Coral City Camera


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqfvcw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb46n8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0w3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqfz40)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bmtpw0qk4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb4bdd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct1czq)
My Perfect City

My Perfect City: Communities in Barcelona

Barcelona has always put strong communities as a key aim of its urban planning. What has it got right, and should other cities follow suit?

In the 19th century, Barcelona instigated the City Market system. Every neighbourhood had its own food market, where locals met and mingled, but some fell into disrepair, and new areas didn’t have them. A renewed interest in the past 20 years has seen new ones built and old ones invested in.

In another major push, pilot schemes to reclaim public space by permanently pedestrianising streets have shown some success. These so-called “superblocks” have become car-less zones, with cafes, restaurants and children’s playgrounds reclaiming the streets which were once choked with traffic. Plans are afoot to broaden the initiative across the city’s more central districts.

Fi Glover and panellists Dr Ellie Cosgrave, director of the UCL Urban Laboratory, and Professor Greg Clark, urbanist and global city adviser, test the credentials of the Barcelona “village city” model. Should it be added to the perfect city portfolio?

The team also considers Addis Ababa’s attempts to build brand new liveable condominiums.


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqg2w4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Evidence (w3ct205h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqg6m8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z59b74d7v)
Thousands protest across Russia

Thousands of people turn out for fresh demonstrations in Russia, protesting against the arrest of the Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny. So, is Vladimir Putin in trouble? We ask a former Russian prime minister.

Also in the programme: WHO investigators visit the wet market in the Chinese city of Wuhan, where the first coronavirus cases were detected; and how a new design aims to keep the theatrical experience intimate in the age of social distancing.

(Picture credit: A participant holds a Russian flag during a rally in support of jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny in Moscow, Russia January 31, 2021. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqgbcd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct1gv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqgg3j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjwp)
Eleusinian Mysteries: Secret ceremonies promising happiness

In ancient Greece, thousands of people flocked each year to join the religious rites known as the Eleusinian Mysteries. Based on the cult of the goddess of fertility Demeter and her daughter Persephone, the Mysteries were for many a profoundly moving and life-changing experience. People from all over the Greek world and beyond travelled to Eleusis for at least 800 years and the ceremonies remained a highlight of the Athenian calendar throughout that time. But what really went on in the great hall of the sanctuary at Eleusis? Why did the organisers deem it necessary to issue a strict injunction against divulging what actually took place - and what happened to some of those who broke that rule?

These are some of the questions Bridget Kendall discusses with Christy Constantakopoulou, professor in ancient history and classics at Birkbeck College, London; Esther Eidinow, professor of ancient history at Bristol University; Dr. Philippe Michel Matthey who lectures about ancient religions at Geneva University; and Dr. Julietta Steinhauer, a lecturer in Hellenistic history at University College, London.

[Image: Detail from a vessel showing a scene of the Eleusis cult with Triptolemus in a winged chariot and Demeter, c.460 BC. Credit DeAgostini/Getty Images]


SUN 15:50 More or Less (w3ct0pym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqgkvn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lmngt53hz)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as West Ham welcome champions Liverpool to the London Stadium.

We'll also have reaction to the day's early matches as Chelsea host Burnley and Leicester City take on Leeds United.

Delyth Lloyd is joined by former Stoke and Republic of Ireland forward Jonathan Walters to discuss the weekend's big talking points.

Plus we'll reflect on the Copa Libertadores Final between Palmeiras and Santos and have the latest from the men's African Nations Championship with the quarter-finals taking place in Cameroon.

Elsewhere, in golf we'll bring you up to date with the men's Dubai Desert Classic and the Farmer's Insurance Open. We'll have the latest from the women's T20 between South Africa and Pakistan and the WTA warm-up events taking place for quarantined players ahead of next month's Australian Open.

Photo: West Ham manager David Moyes and Liverpool boss Jurgen Klopp (Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqgy31)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bmtpw1pj5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb59cf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c55)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqh1v5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6v4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqh5l9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z59b75c6w)
Thousands of Russians demand Navalny release

Tens of thousands of Russians have taken to the streets for the second week running in the biggest protests against President Vladimir Putin for a decade. Demonstrators in nearly 90 cities turned out in support of the jailed activist Alexei Navalny, denouncing the corruption he has exposed. Independent monitors said more than 5000 were detained.

Also in the programme: Portugal deals with a surge in coronavirus deaths and a giant iceberg threatens wildlife off South Georgia.

(Picture: Protestors rally in support of jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny in Moscow, Russia. Credit: REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqh9bf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79tcz8crb8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fq0362193)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb5nlt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cx0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 22:50 More or Less (w3ct0pym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p8tsqhf2k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 on Saturday]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q38jb5sby)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Outlook (w3cszf12)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



MONDAY 01 FEBRUARY 2021

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620md2v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msm9rc7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Global Questions (w3ct1pxn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:32 on Saturday]


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620mhtz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x582680mw5q)
India to unveil its latest budget

India is set to unveil its budget in a few hours, but which industries will get a boost from the government? We hear from Deepak Lalwani, the founder of Lalcap, a consultancy that advises on investment in India, plus we get the thoughts of Jayati Ghosh, an economist at the University of Massachusetts. Bakeries in Ireland are warning consumers the price of a loaf could soon rise by 10% because of the UK's exit from the European Union and new tariffs on imports of British flour. We get analysis from Paul Kelly, director of Food Drink Ireland. Brexit is also causing problems for fish exporters in Greenland, because of tariffs on seafood like prawns sold to UK customers. Henrik Leth, the chief executive of Polar Seafoods tells us that his company is losing out to rival seafood exporters in Norway and Canada. Economic commentator, Michael Hughes, explains how the UK is hoping to join the 11 country trade bloc known as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership. And David Foulkes, chief executive of the world's biggest boat manufacturer, Brunswick, tells us about the surging demand for boats over lockdown. (pic of Indian bank notes via Getty Images.)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msm9w3c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct0w3g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620mml3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc34)
Madawi Al-Rasheed: Can the Saudi Crown Prince's authority really be challenged?

President Biden has reportedly paused arms sales to Saudi Arabia as his administration reviews relations with its long-time strategic ally. But is there any prospect of external or internal pressure challenging the authority of Saudi Arabia’s de facto leader Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman? Stephen Sackur speaks to exiled opposition activist Madawi Al-Rasheed. What next for Saudi Arabia, reform, repression, or maybe both?


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msm9zvh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4k)
Selling Sunset: how I find homes for the rich and famous

The business of selling multi-million dollar homes: Kim Chakanetsa speaks to two women working in Dubai and LA's competitive real estate markets about what it takes to make it.

Amanza Smith is a real estate agent and interior designer. She's part of the team featured in the reality TV show Selling Sunset - a real estate agency for eye-popping high-end residential properties in Los Angeles. She says that while growing up poor 'sucks at the time', it's helped make her determined not to fail and has given her an ability to work really hard at everything she does.

Lebanese born Zeina Khoury lives in Dubai and is the CEO of High Mark Real Estate Brokers, a specialist luxury property sales and management company in the United Arab Emirates. The agency buys and sells exclusive properties, including opulent apartments in the Versace Palazzo Dubai, for clients based around the world.

Produced by Jane Thurlow

IMAGE DETAILS
Left: Zeina Khoury (courtesy Zeina Khoury)
Right: Amanza Smith (credit Michael Bezjian/Getty Images)


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620mrb7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjwp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh65)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620mw2c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbb)
Will Africa really leapfrog to renewables?

Africa has an electricity crisis. Hundreds of millions of people lack cheap, steady supply, crippling lives in countless ways. Every other continent has electrified off the back of fossil fuels but Africa, on the face of it, has the opportunity to do it differently. Researchers found that some 2,500 power plants are planned across the continent. But the majority are expected to run on fossil fuels threatening to lock Africa into dirty energy for decades. In this edition of The Climate Question, we ask: What would it take to bring clean power to every African?

For answers, we have one of Africa’s leading experts on power. Damilola Ogunbiyi ran the Lagos power authority before taking over efforts to electrify Nigeria’s rural communities. Today, she’s the CEO of Sustainable Energy for All and the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Sustainable Energy for All.

We are also joined by Tony Tiyou, the Cameroonian CEO of the firm Renewables in Africa.

And we hear from a community in Nigeria where people just want the lights on, now.


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmb7br)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620mzth)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdq8856)
Aung San Suu Kyi detained in Myanmar coup

The army arrests president in early morning raid, alleging a democratic election in November was fraudulent.

We speak to one of those behind the world's first space rocket to use bio-fuel.

And after months of silence the fugitive leader of the Tigray region claims genocide by Ethiopian and Eritrean troops.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620n3km)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdq8cxb)
Arrests in dawn coup in Myanmar

Aung San Suu Kyi and her colleagues are detained as the army takes power - claiming fraud in November's elections.

The EU says AstraZeneca will now supply an additional nine million Covid vaccine doses after days of criticism of the bloc's vaccination programme.

And the major publishing house that's putting great works by black authors back on the shelves.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620n79r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdq8hng)
Myanmar: Army declares one year state of emergency

We get reaction from Yangon after Aung Sun Suu Kyi and her cabinet are arrested.

Astra Zenica guarantees another 9 million doses of its covid vaccine to the EU - but it's still far short of what the EU expected to get.

And thousands more protesters are arrested in Russia as they take to the streets to demonstrate against the jailing of opposition politician Alexei Navalny.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620nc1w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmbqb8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7km)
Gamestop: Is it really a case of David vs Goliath?

What is Wall Street's role in the surge in Gamestop's share price? It’s been billed as a populist revolt against the financial behemoths of Wall Street: a global gang of small investors driving up the price of Gamestop shares, forcing losses on hedge funds. But is there more to this David versus Goliath story than at first meets the eye? Manuela Saragosa speaks to Alex Patton who trades in his spare time when he’s not at his day job in cybersecurity. She also speaks to former Wall Street professional Alexis Goldstein who now advocates for financial regulation and to Elizabeth Lopatto from the US technology website The Verge.
(Correction: in the programme it was said that shares had risen 70% this year when in fact they rose 70% on Friday 29 January 2021)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszml6)
The first Eurostar from England to France

The first Eurostar train left London's Waterloo station heading for the Gare du Nord in Paris in November 1994. It was the first commercial passenger train to travel through the Channel Tunnel which had only been finished a few months earlier. Robert Priston was one of the drivers on that three-hour journey and he has been telling Bethan Head about that day.

Photo: one of the first Eurostar trains. Credit: AFP/Getty Images.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620ngt0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmbv2d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620nlk4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmbytj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:50 on Sunday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620nq98)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z57gqd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmc2kn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620nv1d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd4c)
The gourmet chef who used to beg for food

Food has always been crucial in Sash Simpson’s life. Growing up alone on the streets of Chennai in India, it was the lack of food that he remembers. But after a chance encounter at a bus station his life was set on a different path which brought him a new family of over 30 adoptive siblings and the opportunity to prove himself in some of the finest kitchens in Toronto. He now has his own restaurant called Sash.

Can you drown in space? Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano came close during a routine space walk from the International Space Station. Everything was going well until he felt his spacesuit rapidly filling with water and he had to act fast to make it back to the airlock in time. This interview was first broadcast in December 2015.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Sash Simpson with his adoptive mother in India
Credit: Courtesy of Sash Simpson


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszml6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620nysj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z57q6n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmcb1x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620p2jn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljc857)
Myanmar military seizes power and detains Aung San Suu Kyi

The armed forces in Myanmar have staged a coup, detaining the elected leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, and other senior members of the governing party. The coup took place as parliament prepared to meet following elections last November in which representatives of the army performed badly.

There's been condemnation of the coup from governments around the world. We hear from our reporter in Myanmar's commercial capital, Yangon, a prominent Burmese writer in the city, and the man who was President Obama's ambassador to Myanmar about the influence of the US and China there.

(Image: A military checkpoint is seen on the way to the congress compound in Naypyitaw, Myanmar. Credit: REUTERS/Stringer)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620p68s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmckk5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlv9kv8c1ph)
Silver hits eight year peak

In the latest social media-driven surge, the price of silver has increased by up to 11%. Ross Norman, chief executive of information service Metals Daily puts the price rise into context. And the BBC's Manuela Saragosa speaks to some of the amateur stock traders aiming to beat billionaire investors at their own game, and those who say regulators should be taking a closer look at Wall Street. Also in the programme, as India's budget unveils plans to boost health spending significantly, we examine the implications with Dr Shikha Sharma, who is a general practitioner, and founder of tele-medical service NutriWell. Plus, with jigsaw puzzle sales soaring during coronavirus lockdowns, we hear about the impact on puzzle manufacturer JHG Puzzles from its director Julie Wilkins.

(Picture: Silver bullion coins. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620pb0x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t806x7p2r)
Myanmar's coup explained

The military has taken control from democratic leaders in Myanmar. We tell the story of the past 24 hours but also place it into context. What are the chapters in the country's recent history that led it to this moment? And we'll hear some of the Burmese people around the world closely following events back home.
(Picture: Police vehicles are seen lined up in Yangon, Myanmar February 1, 2021. Credit: The Road/via REUTERS)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620pfs1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t806x7stw)
Russia protests

We hear the conversations being had by protesters in Russia, who took to the street at the weekend demanding the release of the jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny. A monitoring group says more than 5,000 people were detained. We'll look at the broader picture with the help of BBC Russian. Also, we'll have the latest on the coup in Myanmar.
(Picture: A woman poses for a picture in front of law enforcement officers standing guard during a rally in support of jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Credit: REUTERS/Anton Vaganov)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620pkj5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszml6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620pp89)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z58fpf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmd1jp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k048x0nqb)
2021/02/01 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620pt0f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xbb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmd58t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3csz9fs)
The power of celibacy

You might think that sex is essential for life, but you'd be wrong!

Lucy Cooke travels to the Hawaiian island of Oahu to meet a community of mourning geckos - self-cloning sisters who have done away with males altogether.

An array of reptiles, amphibians and fish, along with a host of spineless wonders, from snails to spiders, can reproduce without sex. It's what biologists call parthenogenesis, from the Greek meaning “virgin birth”.

Many, like the mourning gecko, make great “weed” species. They're explosive opportunists capable of rapidly colonising new territory, as they don’t need to waste energy finding a mate. But without the mixing up of genes, that sex with a male provides, they are less able to adapt and change.

So sex pays if you don’t want to go extinct.

Yet there is one self-cloning sister that defies that theory - the Bdelloid Rotifer. Living for millions of years and comprising over 450 species, these microscopic water dwelling creatures have conquered the planet. They get around the drawbacks of no sex, by stealing genes, and escape disease by desiccating and then coming back to life.

Producer: Beth Eastwood

Picture: Female Komodo dragon at London Zoo, Credit: Matthew Fearn/PA


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620pxrk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljd3d4)
Military Coup in Myanmar: The World Reacts

The takeover was announced in a statement aired on a military-owned television station. It said the top army commander was in charge and a one-year state of emergency had been declared. The country's civilian leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, had been detained, along with other members of her National League for Democracy (NLD) party. As the day continued, more and more world leaders expressed outrage at the move by the Burmese military.

Also on the programme: A rare eyewitness account from the heart of Myanmar's militarised capital, Naypyidaw; the unequal burden in fighting covid in south Los Angeles - we hear from an intensive care nurse and a report from rebel-held Syria.

(Picture: Soldiers deploy on the road in Naypyidaw, Myanmar, 01 February 2021 Credit: EPA/MAUNG LONLAN)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620q1hp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79tr7klhhj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqcch8sgc)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmdds2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58wmzmdry0)
Silver hits eight year peak

In the latest social media-driven surge, the price of silver has increased by up to 11%. Ross Norman, chief executive of information service Metals Daily puts the price rise into context. Plus, will the Olympics in Japan go ahead? We speak to Simon Chadwick, Professor of Eurasian Sport at EM-Lyon business school. Also in the programme, as India's budget unveils plans to boost health spending significantly, we examine the implications with Dr Shikha Sharma, who is a general practitioner, and founder of tele-medical service NutriWell. Plus, with jigsaw puzzle sales soaring during coronavirus lockdowns, we hear about the impact on puzzle manufacturer JHG Puzzles from its director Julie Wilkins.

(Picture: Silver bullion coins. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620q57t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc34)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmdjj6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



TUESDAY 02 FEBRUARY 2021

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620q8zy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkq5)
The Arab Spring of 2011

In the early months of 2011 a wave of social unrest swept across the Arab world as people protested against repressive and authoritarian regimes, economic stagnation, unemployment and corruption. It began with reaction to the self-immolation of a young market trader in Tunisia, but soon became an outpouring of resentment after generations of fear. On The History Hour, Professor Khaled Fahmy of Cambridge University, helps us unravel the roots of the uprisings, describes what it was like to be there, and looks at why things haven't turned out as the protesters had wanted.

Photo: Libyan anti-Gaddafi protesters wave their old national flag as they stand atop an abandoned army tank in the eastern Libyan city of Benghazi on February 28, 2011.(Credit PATRICK BAZ/AFP via Getty Images)


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620qdr2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19741chmtz)
Will the Olympics go ahead?

Officially the games are going ahead in Japan, but on Monday the government said it would extend the state of emergency covering Tokyo and other regions struggling to contain coronavirus outbreaks by one month. So there is widespread doubt that the Games will go ahead and Simon Chadwick, Professor of Eurasian Sport at EM-Lyon business school gives us his view. Myanmar was a country that last year, in the midst of the pandemic was enjoying a 40% surge in foreign direct investment. Now the military has taken over the government and we look at what it means for the economy with William Greenlee, the managing director, looking after Myanmar & Singapore at international law firm DFDL. The price of silver has shot up in recent days - we find out why from Matt Philips, markets reporter for the New York Times. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific -Nicole Childers, Executive Producer at Marketplace Morning Report and Yoko Ishikura, Professor Emeritus at Hitotsubashi University and currently a member of the World Economic Forum’s Expert Network. (Picture description: A man sits by the coast at Odaiba Marine Park with the Olympic Rings installation in the background. Pic by Stanislav Kogiku via Getty Images).


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620qjh6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv11)
The breath of life

A clever invention is saving the lives of hundreds of children.

Pneumonia kills about 1.4 million children under five every year. Treatment with concentrated oxygen could save many of them, but the machines that make it need a reliable source of electricity. Some hospitals have frequent power cuts, though, which can be fatal.

So scientists in Australia and Uganda came up with an innovative way to produce oxygen by separating it from the rest of the air, using a vacuum created by running water.

Then they designed special bags that can store and deliver oxygen – even when the electricity cuts out. Their systems have provided oxygen for hundreds of sick children in Uganda.

People Fixing the World hears the story of these remarkable inventions.

Produced and presented by Ruth Evans

Picture credit: Peter Casamento


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmdwrl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcj)
Patrick Woodroffe: Lighting the stars

Patrick Woodroffe is one of the world’s foremost lighting designers. He has lit shows for stars ranging from Michael Jackson to Bob Dylan, from Lady Gaga to Elton John, as well as being creative director of the Rolling Stones live shows since 1982.

In 2013 he was made a Royal Designer for Industry (RDI) by the Royal Society of Arts, and he was awarded an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 2014, for services to the arts.

We join Patrick while he takes charge of the technical rehearsal period for the Last Domino? Tour, as show director for the sold-out arena tour that sees the remaining original Genesis band members reform for the first time since 2007.

Via a combination of Zoom calls, exclusive access to the fully Covid-19 compliant bubble of the London rehearsal team, actual performance recording, and personal contributions from Genesis founder members Mike Rutherford and Tony Banks, Grammy Award-winning record producer Steve Levine joins Patrick to examine his creative process.

As Steve and Patrick unravel the intimate relationship between sound and vision, they illuminate an artistic canvas that - in this case - is actually a leap of faith in the live events industry.

Not only does the country enter full lockdown during the rehearsal process, but Patrick has to work his lighting magic knowing there’s no guarantee the tour will take place on time… or at all.

Presenter: Steve Levine
Producer: Lewis Borg-Cardona

A Magnum Opus Broadcasting production for BBC World Service


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620qn7b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszml6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620qrzg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Documentary (w3ct205k)
The Coronavirus Front Line

Coronavirus Front Line: The search for a vaccine

Over the last few months the race has been on to create and test a vaccine for Covid -19. Over 200 are in development and some are now licensed and given to protect some of the most vulnerable in society and those caring for them. Winifred Robinson has been alongside medical teams at a UK hospital recording as events unfold.

She tracks vaccine development through the trial stages and examines what happens when it comes to eventual distribution. As priority lists are drawn up, there is mounting excitement amongst those waiting for the first deliveries – but not everyone is happy. Social media is awash with vaccine conspiracy theories and some of these are clearly taking hold.

She gains access to the heart of the medical teams, with recordings carried out by Dr John Wright, an expert on infectious diseases and how they spread. He has worked in Africa in epidemics of Ebola and HIV. Now he works at Bradford Royal Infirmary in the North of England. He has been co-ordinating the response to Covid and is helping to lead the vaccine trials and delivery there.

(Photo: Coronavirus vials. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmf47v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3csz9fs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620qwql)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdqc529)
Myanmar coup: military chief, Min Aung Hlaing, now in charge

In Myanmar, a day after the coup - domestically shock expressed, internationally sanctions threatened - but what's it like for the people?

A supporter of the former US president Donald Trump tells us how he should make his case against impeachment ahead of the deadline for his team to file his response on Tuesday.

And we report on difficulties for the courts in Nigeria trying to ensure equal inheritance rights for women.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620r0gq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdqc8tf)
Myanmar: no public protests a day after coup

The party that won last November's election in Myanmar - the National League for Democracy - has called for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi and other leading politicians detained by the military on Monday.

Russian Opposition Leader Alexei Navalgny is about to appear in court and could face up the three years in the jail.

Vietnam appoints its longest serving leader in decades, he's 76 and a communist naturally but he's not a strongman.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620r46v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdqcdkk)
Myanmar coup: Biden threatens to reimpose sanctions

Joe Biden said the detention of Aung San Suu Kyi and other civilian leaders was a direct assault on democracy and threatened to impose new sanctions on Myanmar if the military didn't reverse its actions.

Pharmaceutical giant Pfizer announce their financial results later, so will investor boost the company producing one of the Covid-19 vaccines?

And has "Havana syndrome" - a mysterious illness which affected American diplomats in Cuba - resurfaced in Russia?


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620r7yz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmfm7c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8c9)
How the military controls Myanmar's economy

Myanmar's military has announced it has taken control of the country, a decade after agreeing to hand power to a civilian government. Tin Htar Swe OBE, Myanmar analyst and former editor of the BBC Burmese Service, recounts the history leading up to this emergent coup, and where it might lead. Meanwhile, Vasuki Shastry, Associate Fellow at Chatham House's Asia-Pacific Programme, explains how the military have shaped Myanmar's economy and what effect international sanctions might have on their continued hold on it. And Rocco Macchiavello, lead academic with the International Growth Centre Myanmar, explains how, or if, Myanmar can continue its high economic growth seen over the last decade.

Producer: Frey Lindsay.

(Image credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmqq)
The Moscow State Circus

The biggest circus in Soviet Russia opened in Moscow in April 1971. Circus was considered the “people’s art form” in the USSR and was highly popular. The new Moscow State Circus building on Vernadsky Avenue could seat up to 3400 people and was filled with state of the art technology.

Alexander Egorenko was one of the backstage crew, and still works at the circus today. He tells Lucy Burns about his memories of the circus.


(Elephant Nicole celebrates her birthday at the Great Moscow State Circus, Jan 18 2021. Photo: Vyacheslav Prokofyev/Getty Images)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620rcq3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct205k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmfqzh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620rhg7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620rm6c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5bcmh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmfzgr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 Discovery (w3csz9fs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620rqyh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdkx)
That time I DJed from space

Four extraordinary stories that explore the thrills and chills of live music performances.

PJ Powers, the South African singer who became the first white pop star to perform live to a black audience in Soweto during the height of apartheid. (This interview was first broadcast in 2016)

Marjorie Eliot, the Harlem jazz pianist who for almost 30 years has been holding free concerts in her living room every Sunday – she does so to honour the memory of her son who died on a Sunday. (This interview was first broadcast in 2015)

Luca Parmitano, the Italian astronaut who became the first DJ in orbit, after playing a live set from the International Space Station to a cruise ship of clubbers in Ibiza.

The rapso band 3Canal on the origins of J'Ouvert Morning, the pre-dawn dance through the streets of Port of Spain that opens one of the biggest festivals in the Caribbean – the legendary Trinidad Carnival. (This interview was first broadcast in 2016)

Presented by Emily Webb

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Luca Parmitano
Credit: World Club Dome/ESA


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmqq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620rvpm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5bm3r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmg6z0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620rzfr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljg52b)
Calls for civil disobedience after Myanmar coup

As the army in Myanmar starts releasing detained politicians, an activist tells us the coup is "like a nightmare".

Also in the programme: A Moscow court decides whether to jail Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny; and was a former CIA officer a victim of "Havana Syndrome" in Moscow?

(Photo: People line up outside a bank branch in Yangon, Myanmar. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620s35w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmggg8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwyg9gtkg5)
Prosperity comes at 'devastating' cost to nature

A landmark review calls for transformational change in our economic approach to nature. We hear the perspective of Ben Groom, a professor of biodiversity economics at the University of Exeter, who was involved in the review. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on whether money was the driving force behind this week's coup in Myanmar. And we hear how foreigners with investments there are responding from Hans Vriens, managing partner at Vriens and Partners, a consultancy that handles around $4bn worth of projects in the country. Plus, BBC technology reporter Zoe Kleinman tells us whether as we are travelling less and staying home during the pandemic, we are giving more or less data away to big technology firms.

(Picture: Deforestation in the Amazon basin. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620s6y0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t806xbkzv)
New Covid-19 variants

The UK variant of coronavirus is undergoing genetic changes. Tests on some samples show a mutation already seen in the South Africa and Brazil variants.
Our BBC medical correspondent explains the changes and what can be done to help stop the spread. And our regular medical expert, Dr Isaac Bogoch, will answer listener questions about the new variants, and new trials combining two shots of different vaccines.

Also on the programme, we head to Turkey where police moved onto the campus of Istanbul's Boğaziçi university to quell a student protest after the appointment of a new rector. We hear from some of those young people.

(Photo: Coronavirus Credit: Getty)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620sbp4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t806xbpqz)
Alexei Navalny sentenced to 3.5 years in prison

Russia's leading opposition activist, Alexei Navalny, has denounced court proceedings against him as an attempt to intimidate millions of Russian citizens. Our BBC Russian reporter is outside the Moscow court where a decision was made to jail him for three-and-a-half years for embezzlement. He has already served a year under house arrest which will be deducted from the total.

We head to Turkey where dozens of people are detained by police after a student protest against the appointment of a new rector at Istanbul's Boğaziçi University. Our BBC correspondent reports the story, and, we hear from students on campus.

Also on the programme, news that the UK variant of coronavirus is undergoing genetic changes. Tests on some samples show a mutation already seen in the South Africa and Brazil variants. Our BBC medical correspondent explains the changes and what can be done to help stop the spread.

(Photo: Russian reinforced police units stand guard on the street in downtown of St. Petersburg. Credit: EPA/Anatoly Maltsev).


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620sgf8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmqq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620sl5d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5cblj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmgyfs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k048x3kmf)
2021/02/02 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620spxj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct205k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmh25x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz998)
Internet shutdowns in Myanmar and India

Internet services are returning to normal in Myanmar following a partial shutdown after the military took power over the weekend following their accusations of election fraud. In India though, the internet remains down in New Delhi and some surrounding regions as farmer’s protests continue. Mishi Choudhary, founder of the Software Freedom Law Centre in New Delhi, updates us on the situation.

Should Google pay for News content?
Following the threat by Google Australia that it could pull out of the country if new conditions are imposed forcing it to pay for News published in Australia, we speak with Angharad Yeo, tech reporter and the voice behind the “Queens of the Drone Age” podcast on what the row is about, the latest developments and how it might impact users in Australia.

Cybersecurity and Quantum Computing
This week in our series on the cybersecurity threats of the future: Quantum Computing. These new types of computers use the laws of quantum physics and are fundamentally different from our current computers. They are powerful machines – perhaps too powerful for the way we currently protect our data. What can we do about it? Florian Bohr has been finding out more.


(Image: A young woman reads her mobile phone in front of a poster proposing an access to Internet. Credit: Thierry Falise/LightRocket via Getty Images)



The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

Producers: Deborah Cohen and Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620stnn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljh097)
Putin critic Navalny jailed in Russia despite protests

A Moscow court has jailed Putin critic Alexei Navalny for more than two and a half years for violating the conditions of a suspended sentence. Thousands of supporters have rallied across Russia in support of Mr Navalny.

Also in the programme: the UN condemns the military coup in Myanmar as young protesters call for “civil disobedience”; and a mysterious illness which affected American diplomats in Cuba: the ‘Havana syndrome’.

(Photo: A still image taken from video footage shows Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny during the announcement of a court verdict in Moscow. Credit: Reuters).


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620syds)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79tr7kpddm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqcchcpcg)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmh9p5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58wmzmhnv3)
Prosperity comes at 'devastating' cost to nature

A landmark review calls for transformational change in our economic approach to nature. We hear the perspective of the UK's only Green MP, Caroline Lucas. And as Jeff Bezos announces that he's stepping down as Amazon CEO, Joe Saluzzi tells us whether the announcement had an impact on the financial markets. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler reports on whether money was the driving force behind this week's coup in Myanmar. And we hear how foreigners with investments there are responding from Hans Vriens, managing partner at Vriens and Partners, a consultancy that handles around $4bn worth of projects in the country. Plus, BBC technology reporter Zoe Kleinman tells us whether as we are travelling less and staying home during the pandemic, we are giving more or less data away to big technology firms.

(Picture: Deforestation in the Amazon basin. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620t24x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv11)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmhff9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 03 FEBRUARY 2021

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620t5x1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620t9n5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19741cljr2)
Jeff Bezos to step down as Amazon CEO

Amazon founder, Jeff Bezos, is to step down as Chief Executive of the e-commerce giant that he started in his garage nearly 30 years ago. He will become executive chairman, a move he said would give him "time and energy" to focus on his other ventures; our New York business correspondent Michelle Fleury brings us the latest. Plus, Caroline Lucas, the UK's only Green Party MP gives her take on the theory of Natural Capital, which explores the idea of putting a price on natural resources. BBC technology reporter Zoe Kleinman tells us whether as we are travelling less and staying home during the pandemic, we are giving more data away to big technology firms. And in 2014, Nigeria’s Supreme Court ruled that female children are equally entitled as their male siblings to inherit their father's estate but some families and communities backed by traditional rulers, say the ruling doesn’t change anything, and insist that women can’t inherit things like land or the family home; Olivia Ndubuisi reports from South East Nigeria. The Sundance Film Festival takes place every January near Salt Lake City in the US and is the largest independent film festival in the country but this year it's all been done virtually. As Tom Brook reports, the pandemic looms large in the films and the stories they tell. And we're joined throughout the programme by Simon Littlewood, founder and President of ACGrowth Delivered in Singapore, and in Vancouver, the multimedia journalist Hayley Woodin. (Picture of Jeff Bezos by Mandel Ngan via Getty Images).


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620tfd9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7n)
Dr Soumya Swaminathan: Is vaccine inequity undermining the fight against Covid?

The roll out of Covid-19 vaccines has boosted hopes the virus can be tamed. But it will have to be worldwide effort if it is to be effective, and right now the signs aren’t good. While tens of millions have already been vaccinated in the rich west, the world’s poor are facing a very long wait. The phrase ‘vaccine apartheid’ has already been coined. Stephen Sackur speaks to the Chief Scientist at the World Health Organisation Dr Soumya Swaminathan. Is vaccine inequity undermining the fight against Covid?


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmhsnp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x82)
Goal 3: Good health

The United Nations announced a radical plan to change the world in 2015.

Global leaders drew up a list of 17 "sustainable development goals" to create a blueprint for a better future. Governments agreed to support the goals which cover gender equality, access to clean water, a good education and much more. Now, 17-year-olds from 17 different countries tell us how they want the world to change.

Victoline lives in Kenya and she suffered from malaria a few years ago. She wants to know if a new vaccine could eradicate the disease in Africa and stop hundreds of thousands of children from dying every year. She talks to doctors, politicians and other teenagers about the science, the economics and the practicalities of fighting malaria.

Project 17 is a unique collaboration between the BBC World Service and the Open University.

Presenter: Sana Safi. Producer: Bob Howard.


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620tk4f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmqq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620tnwk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Compass (w3ct1gv8)
The New Arctic

The New Arctic

Allan Little investigates how the climate crisis is impacting different communities above the Arctic circle; from infrastructure damage to loss of life, eroding land and endangering thousand-year-old cultures and traditional knowledge. They are our eyes and ears on the speed with which our planet is changing. We look at Nenets reindeer herding on the Siberian tundra, infrastructure damage in Longyearbyen (the world’s most northern town on the Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard), a pioneering environmental program in Kotzebue, Alaska. For communities such as Pond Inlet (Mittimatalik) in Nunavut, Canada, climate change compounds existing challenges caused by colonialism and lack of economic development.


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmj14y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz998)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620tsmp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdqg1zd)
Russia detains thousands after the jailing of Alexei Navalny

Over 10,000 people have been taken into custody in Russia for supporting the opposition leader Alxey Navalny, who has been jailed for two-and-a-half years. We speak to someone who, like many others, tried to get to the courtroom, Nina Khrusheva is an academic, writer and also the great granddaughter of the former Soviet Premier, Nikita Khruschev.

The bushfires are back in Australia. We're live in Perth,battered by high winds and flames.

And we take a look at how different the Biden administration's Africa policy will be to that of Donald Trump’s, or even Barack Obama’s.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620txct)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdqg5qj)
Russia: thousands detained after jailing of Alexei Navalny

We go live to Moscow for the latest as the opposition leader Alexei Navalny begins his three year jail term today and some of the thousands who have been protesting against this are now in detention.

A BBC investigation has revealed women being raped and tortured in China's camps for Uighur Muslims. Our reporter has spoken to some of the victims.

And President Biden begins to dismantle another plank of the Trump Presidency - immigration on its border with Mexico - so how soon will childlren separated from their parents be reunited?


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620v13y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdqg9gn)
International calls for release of Alexei Navalny

The British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, has become the latest world leader to demand that Russia immediately release Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny and the hundreds, possibly thousands, of his detained supporters. We look at what effect this could have and we also speak to the great-granddaughter of Nikita Khrushchev.

We get an update on the military coup in Myanmar, where supporters of Aung San Suu Kyi have called for civil disobedience.

And the UN says more than 200,000 people have fled their homes in the Central African Republic since the conflict erupted last month. Rebel forces now control two-thirds of the country. We have an update.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620v4w2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmjj4g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8ny)
Will the Olympics be postponed (again)?

Uncertainty continues to mount over this summer's delayed Tokyo Olympic Games, as Japan’s Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga announces he is extending a coronavirus state of emergency in Tokyo and nine other areas through March. Last year's unprecedented postponement was arguably the biggest peacetime decision ever taken in sport. But that would be completely overshadowed by an actual cancellation. Seijiro Takeshita of the University of Shizuoka gives the view from the Japanese business community. Sports sponsorship expert Tim Crow explains how a potential delay would impact sponsorship revenue, while US economist Andrew Zimbalist takes on the larger overall costs to Japan. And we’ll also hear from Olympic medallist Kristian Thomas about what it means for players.

(Image credit: Getty.)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmsz)
The Burma uprising of 1988

On August 8th 1988 the Burmese military cracked down on anti-government demonstrators, killing hundreds possibly thousands of people. In the weeks of protest that followed, Aung San Suu Kyi rose to prominence as an opposition figure. The date 8.8.88 has come to symbolise the resistance movement in Myanmar at the time. Ma Thida was a medical student working at Rangoon General Hospital when the dead and injured began to arrive. In 2018 she spoke to Rebecca Kesby about treating gunshot wounds for the first time, and about her political activism and subsequent imprisonment.
This programme is a rebroadcast.

Photo: Demonstrators in Rangoon in 1988. Credit: Getty Images


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620v8m6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct1gv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmjmwl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620vdcb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct1gv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620vj3g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5f8jl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmjwcv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Digital Planet (w3csz998)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620vmvl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdsp)
Inside the hospitals of lockdown Wuhan

When Chinese-American film director Hao Wu was approached to make a film about the 76 days of lockdown in Wuhan, he was eager to do it. Based in New York and unable to get back into China as the coronavirus outbreak continued to spread, Hao worked with two co-directors on the ground in Wuhan who got unprecedented access to four hospitals across the city. The resulting film 76 Days tells the moving stories of patients struggling to survive and the kindness of the frontline medical staff trying to save them. The film, co-directed by Weixi Chen and a third anonymous filmmaker, is out now.

American mum Holly Jackson is on a mission, as she says, "to change lives, one wall at a time.” She's helping the country's poorest by placing small basic necessities such as shampoo, gloves and socks, in bags on walls in towns and cities around the US. Her non-profit organisation called Walls of Love has now helped over 100,000 people. Holly tells reporter Tara Gadomski how she was inspired to help people after being homeless herself.

Audric de Campeau is passionate about bees. Although he had a good job in marketing, he quit his job so that he could follow his passion and now has beehives on the roofs of some of the most famous buildings in Paris. (This interview was first broadcast in 2017)

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Nurse at a hospital in Wuhan holding a grandmother's hand
Credit: DogWoof


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmsz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620vrlq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5fj0v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmk3w3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620vwbv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljk1zf)
Aung San Suu Kyi charged after Myanmar military coup

Aung San Suu Kyi, the elected civilian leader and State Counsellor of Myanmar, has been charged by police following the military coup on Monday. And what does China make of the coup after it vetoed criticism of the army takeover at the UN Security Council?

Also in the programme: Matteo Renzi, the former Italian prime minister on why he backs the former central banker, Mario Draghi, to lead a new technocratic cabinet in Rome. And a Russian teenager tells us why he supports Alexei Navalny and his talk of a bright future for Russia.

(Photo: Myanmar's State Counselor Aung San Suu Kyi during a joint news conference with Czech Prime Minister Babis after their meeting in Prague, Czech Republic, 03 June 2019 (reissued 01 February 2021). Credit: EPA/Martin Divisek)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620w02z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmkccc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxrx12lrsk)
Draghi asked to form new Italian government

Former head of the EU's central bank Mario Draghi will try to form a government in Italy. Valentina Meliciani is professor of applied economics at Luiss University in Rome, and tells us whether the man credited with saving the Euro stands a chance of saving the Italian economy. Also in the programme, with many people locked down because of coronavirus, there are concerns of an increase in gambling addiction. Michael Guerin is an addiction therapist based in Ireland, and tells us he's seen a significant rise in enquiries from new problem gamblers and their families. Jade Vallis is a reformed gambler who tells us how her addiction impacted her family. As New York state gears up to legalise gambling, Elizabeth Toomey from the New York Council on Problem Gambling makes the case for increased funding for those who become addicted. And we get the gambling industry's perspective from Grainne Hurst, director of regulatory affairs and safer gambling at Entain, which is one of the world's biggest betting firms. Plus, we hear from top Indian designer, Sabyasachi Mukherjee, who feels that in spite of the pandemic, there will continue to be demand for elaborate wedding attire.

(Picture: Mario Draghi. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620w3v3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t806xfgwy)
Coronavirus: Oxford vaccine could cut spread

A study has shown that the Covid vaccine developed by Oxford University and AstraZeneca may reduce the spread of coronavirus to others. It is the first time that a vaccine has been shown to reduce transmission. We discuss that and the day’s other coronavirus stories with Dr Maria Sundaram from Toronto.

Portugal is seeing the highest infection rate in the world and the highest death rate in Europe right now. A German team of military medics is arriving in the country today to relieve pressures in intensive care. We speak to medics there about the challenges they are facing.

And after the military coup in Myanmar, police have filed several charges against the elected civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi. We speak to our reporters about today’s developments.

(Photo:Vials with AstraZeneca"s coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine are seen at the vaccination centre in the Newcastle Eagles Community Arena, in Newcastle upon Tyne, Britain, January 30, 2021. Credit: Lee Smith/File Photo/Reuters)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620w7l7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t806xfln2)
Coronavirus conversations: Portugal's Covid crisis

Germany has flown in medical staff, ventilators and hospital beds to help with the Covid-19 crisis unfolding in Portugal. A doctor and young nurse describe their realities and fears of treating Covid patients in intensive care units.

We speak to Dr Pedro Hallal, an epidemiologist in Brazil, about the new study showing that the Covid vaccine developed by Oxford University and AstraZeneca may reduce the spread of coronavirus to others. Dr Hallal will also help us answer some audience questions about the virus.

We also look at the reaction in Russia and around the world to the sentencing of Alexei Navalny. The opposition leader was jailed for 3,5 years for violating the conditions of a suspended sentence. Hundreds of his supporters have been arrested. We hear from foreign journalists in the country about what they have witnessed and reported.

(Photo: Funerary workers wearing protective suits carry the body of a man who died inside his house during the nigh in Lisbon Credit: MARIO CRUZ /EPA)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620wcbc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdsp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmsz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620wh2h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5g7hm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmkvbw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k048x6gjj)
2021/02/03 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620wltm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct1gv8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmkz30)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcd5)
Covid-19 vaccines prevent 100% of deaths

Claudia Hammond discusses the latest influx of excellent Covid-19 vaccine results with Sarah Boseley, health editor of The Guardian.

Dr Samara Linton reports on efforts by black doctors in the UK to overcome vaccine hesitancy in their communities.

The Biden administration is to rescind the USA’s Mexico City Policy which denies federal aid funding to organisations overseas that provide abortion counselling or services. The policy, also known as the Global Gag, prevented other family planning and HIV prevention services from receiving essential funding. Joy Phumaphi, former Botswanan health minister and now with the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health talks to Claudia about the impact of the policy on the health and wellbeing on women and children in sub-Saharan Africa, and about the prospects for these services after the Mexico City Policy’s imminent demise.

A team of eye specialists at University College London has found that levels of air pollution typical of big cities around the world increase the risk of one of the commonest causes of age-related sight loss – macular degeneration, a progressive deterioration of the retina. Professor Paul Foster tells Claudia how airborne pollutants from traffic and industry can damage the eye.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

(Picture: Dr. Nita Patel, Director of Antibody discovery and Vaccine development, lifts a vial with a potential coronavirus, COVID-19, vaccine at Novavax labs in Gaithersburg, Maryland in March 2020. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620wqkr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljkx6b)
Myanmar coup: Aung San Suu Kyi faces charges

The military leaders who seized power in a coup in Myanmar on Monday have filed criminal charges against Aung San Suu Kyi - the de facto leader who they deposed. A criminal conviction could result in her being barred from standing in future elections. Also on the programme: US Congress decides on the fate of a conspiracy theory supporting member over her social media activity; and we’ll hear from one of GameStop’s amateur investors following a whirlwind week for the company’s shares.

(Picture: Aung San Suu Kyi, Credit: Getty Images)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620wv9w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79tr7ks99q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqcchgl8k)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msml6l8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58wmzmlkr6)
Draghi asked to form new Italian government

Former head of the EU's central bank Mario Draghi will try to form a government in Italy. Valentina Meliciani is professor of applied economics at Luiss University in Rome, and tells us whether the man credited with saving the Euro stands a chance of saving the Italian economy. Also in the programme, with many people locked down because of coronavirus, there are concerns of an increase in gambling addiction. Michael Guerin is an addiction therapist based in Ireland, and tells us he's seen a significant rise in enquiries from new problem gamblers and their families. Jade Vallis is a reformed gambler who tells us how her addiction impacted her family. As New York state gears up to legalise gambling, Elizabeth Toomey from the New York Council on Problem Gambling makes the case for increased funding for those who become addicted. And we get the gambling industry's perspective from Grainne Hurst, director of regulatory affairs and safer gambling at Entain, which is one of the world's biggest betting firms. Plus, we take a look at the Golden Globe awards - three women have been nominated for best director, the first time more than one has been shortlisted in a single year.

(Picture: Mario Draghi. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620wz20)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7n)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmlbbd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 Project 17 (w3ct0x82)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



THURSDAY 04 FEBRUARY 2021

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620x2t4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct1gv6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 on Sunday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620x6k8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19741cpfn5)
Global vaccinations surpass new infections

The United States is now averaging more than 1.3 million COVID-19 vaccine shots per day, based on their seven-day average of daily doses administered. We speak to Dr. Maheshika Ratnayak, a family medicine doctor based in Texas. Also in the programme, former head of the EU's central bank Mario Draghi will try to form a government in Italy. Valentina Meliciani is professor of applied economics at Luiss University in Rome, and tells us whether the man credited with saving the Euro stands a chance of saving the Italian economy. Plus, with many people locked down because of coronavirus, there are concerns of an increase in gambling addiction. Michael Guerin is an addiction therapist based in Ireland, and tells us he's seen a significant rise in enquiries from new problem gamblers and their families. Jade Vallis is a reformed gambler who tells us how her addiction impacted her family. As New York state gears up to legalise gambling, Elizabeth Toomey from the New York Council on Problem Gambling makes the case for increased funding for those who become addicted. We also take a look at the Golden Globes awards - three women have been nominated for best director, the first time more than one has been shortlisted in a single year. And we're joined throughout the programme by Amanda Fischer, policy director for the Center for Equitable Growth in Washington DC, and Shuli Ren, a Bloomberg reporter based in Hong Kong.

(Picture: Vaccination centre. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620xb9d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4r)
Will QAnon survive?

With President Trump no longer in office and a clampdown by social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, what is the future for the QAnon conspiracy theory? It’s had a considerable following from the Republican rank and file who supported Donald Trump but was strongly associated with the attack on Capitol Hill. Now Republican party leaders have warned QAnon is dangerous. But will ordinary Americans turn their backs on it? With Tanya Beckett.

(A pro-Trump mob confronts U.S. Capitol police outside the Senate chamber in Washington DC. Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmlpks)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr6)
Nigella Lawson: My life in five dishes

The internationally-acclaimed food writer and TV cook Nigella Lawson, tells her life story through five memorable dishes. Often filmed devouring food with a showy relish, she tells Emily Thomas how her mother’s bulimia sparked a life-long determination to enjoy eating.

Nigella explains how a series of bereavements has led her to memorialise her loved ones through recipes, and why she’s become more protective of her privacy in recent years.

Nigella’s books and TV shows often give the impression of a gregarious host, cooking for a multitude of family and friends, but her latest book ‘Cook, Eat, Repeat’ and its accompanying TV series, partly written and produced during lockdown, show her on her own. We find out how she’s coped.

(Picture: Nigella Lawson. Credit: Matt Holyoak/ BBC).


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620xg1j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdsp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmsz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620xksn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 Assignment (w3csz6md)
Europe’s most dangerous capital

Bucharest, in Romania, is arguably Europe’s most dangerous capital city. It’s not the crime that’s the problem – it’s the buildings. Many of them don’t comply with basic laws and building regulations. Permits are regularly faked. And yet Bucharest is the most earthquake prone European capital. A serious quake would cause many of the buildings to collapse, with a potential loss of life into the thousands. Some years ago a red dot was put on a number of buildings in the city which were in danger of collapse. Nothing else has happened since. A microcosm of the problem is a type of building called ‘camine de nefamilisti’, or ‘homes for those without families’. These were built during the Ceaucescu era to temporarily house workers brought in from the countryside and people who were still single after university. The single room flats, the size of a prison cell, with a communal shower and toilet on each floor were never meant for families. But after the fall of Communism many of these ‘matchboxes’ ended up in private hands and conditions deteriorated, with whole families moved into spaces designed for a single person. Simona Rata grew up in one of these buildings. For Assignment, she returns to the ‘camine de nefamilisti’ and finds little has changed since her childhood.

Reporter: Simona Rata.
Producer: John Murphy
Editor: Bridget Harney


(Image: Abandoned building on Calea Mosilor, a busy street in the centre of Bucharest. Credit: Simona Rata/BBC)


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmly21)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcd5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620xpjs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdqjywh)
US Republicans resist pressure to oust lawmaker Marjorie Taylor Greene

The Democrats who control the US Congress have confirmed that there'll be a full vote today on whether to strip the controversial Republican representative, Marjorie Taylor Greene, of her role on two key Congressional committees, but the Republicans have said they will not support this move. We get the latest.

Canada has become the first country to designate the far right extremist group, the Proud Boys, a terrorist organisation. We speak to a counter-terrorism studies expert.

And for the first time in more than twenty years there have been no rhino deaths due to poaching in Kenya, as the Director General of Kenya's Wildlife Service explains.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620xt8x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdqk2mm)
US: controversial lawmaker gets support from Republicans

Rival Republican Party factions in the US House of Representatives have reached an uneasy truce by agreeing not to punish two Congresswomen - one of them an avid opponent of Donald Trump, and the other a strong supporter who's been accused of making incendiary untrue statements. We get the latest.

We go to Israel, the country with the fastest Covid vaccination rate in the world, and where today all over 16s will get the jab.

And how the Islamist threat in northern Mozambique is not just causing instability, but also affecting food supplies.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620xy11)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdqk6cr)
US Congress to vote on roles given to controversial Representative

The Democrats who control the Congress have confirmed that there'll be a full vote today on whether to strip Marjorie Taylor Greene, from Georgia, of her role in two committees. She has spread conspiracy theories and violent views. But the Republicans say they will not support the move. We get the latest.

Also we report from Portugal where a team of German doctors and nurses have arrived to help look after coronavirus patients as the country struggles to cope with a recent rise in cases.

And a former militia leader from Uganda may become the first defendant at the international criminal court to be found guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity - we look at the background to this trial.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620y1s5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmmf1k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7yf)
What's a song worth?

Music streaming services have changed the game. We hear about their impact on artists' income from Tom Gray of the 90s British band Gomez. Plus, Merck Mercuriadis, whose music investment company Hipgnosis is spending billions of dollars buying the copyright to some the biggest music hits of the past 50 years.

(Picture: dollar bills rain down on US pop star Miley Cyrus. Credit: Getty Images.)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmng)
Drugs in the Vietnam War

During the Vietnam war, US commanders grew increasingly concerned about the widespread use of drugs by US troops in Vietnam. Initially the focus was on marijuana. But in the early 1970s, reports began to emerge of the large scale use of heroin by US military personnel. The drug had became widely available in South Vietnam. Alex Last spoke to Dr Richard Ratner, then a psychiatrist in the US army in Vietnam, about his memories of treating soldiers suffering from heroin addiction.

Photo: Two soldiers in Vietnam exchange vials of heroin, July 1971 (Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620y5j9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6md)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmmjsp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620y98f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjwq)
Mermaids: Tales from the deep

We delve into the watery depths of sea creature folklore, with a round-the-world tour of different variations on the concept of mermaids – from the Sirens of Greek mythology to the Selkies or Seal Folk of Scottish legend, and water spirits known as Mami Water, which are venerated in parts of Africa and the Americas. Not forgetting the famous fairy tale, The Little Mermaid, which has captivated the imagination ever since its publication in 1837 and was popularised by Disney in the 1980s.

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss what these ancient stories can tell us are Cristina Bacchilega of the University of Hawaii, co-editor of The Penguin Book of Mermaids; British writer, Marcelle Mateki Akita, who has written a book for children called Fatama and Mami Wata's Secret; and Lynn Barbour, founder and Arts Director of the Orkney Folklore and Storytelling Centre in the Orkney Islands in Scotland.

Produced by Jo Impey for the BBC World Service.

[Image: Detail from Fisherman and Mermaids in the Blue Grotto on Capri by Hermann Corrodi (1844-1905). Credit: Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh66)
The NFL's Rooney Rule

In 2003, the NFL introduced a landmark diversity policy requiring American football teams to interview ethnic minority candidates for positions as head coaches or general managers. Known as the “Rooney Rule”, the policy was the result of organised pressure from black coaches and former players, led by former NFL champion, John Wooten. Initially seen as a success, the Rooney Rule has been influential not just in sport, but in the corporate world. John Wooten talks to Farhana Haider.

PHOTO: John Wooten in his playing days in the 1960s (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620yf0k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5j5fp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmms8y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 Health Check (w3cszcd5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620yjrp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdc4)
My life by Whitney Houston's side

Robyn Crawford and Whitney Houston met as teenagers on a summer's day in 1980 and become inseparable for two decades. Robyn was Whitney Houston's personal assistant, for a while her lover, and always her closest friend. They toured the world together as Whitney became an international superstar. But Robyn also remembers witnessing Whitney's struggle with a drug addiction that would ultimately end her life. After years of silence Robyn finally opened up about their relationship in 2019 with her memoir A Song for You.

Archive from this programme is courtesy of CBS, ABC, Sky and OWN.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: (L-R) Whitney Houston and Robyn Crawford in the 1980s
Credit: Robyn Crawford


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmng)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620ynht)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5jdxy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmn0s6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620ys7y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljmywj)
Myanmar’s generals cut off social media

Myanmar’s military government has cut off Facebook and other social media amid growing opposition to its seizure of power and the arrest of the country’s leader Aung San Suu Kyi. We hear how important Facebook is to people in Myanmar.

Also on the programme: After hundreds of players and staff are forced to isolate days before the start of the Australian Open tennis tournament – how likely is it the event will go ahead? And why British scientists are mixing and matching Covid vaccines in a new trial.

(Photo: People protest against the military coup outside Mandalay Medical University in Mandalay, Myanmar, 04 February 2021. EPA/KAUNG ZAW HEIN)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620yx02)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmn88g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlw40kwb1v2)
Shell posts $22bn loss

The oil industry is having to rethink its future as the world turns from fossil fuels. Shell's big losses were the result of having to write down, or reduce, the future value of its oil fields, and Stephen Schork, founder of the Schork Energy Intelligence Group assesses the future prospects for big oil companies. Also in the programme, French football is in turmoil after an emergency auction for the TV rights to matches in the top two leagues ended in failure. Kieran Maguire is lecturer in football finance at Liverpool University and explains why companies are playing hardball with clubs in France over screening rights. Plus, what’s a song worth? Music streaming services have changed the game, and we hear about their impact on artists' income from Tom Gray of the 90s British band Gomez. And Merck Mercuriadis tells us about his music investment company Hipgnosis, which is spending billions of dollars buying the copyright to some of the biggest music hits of the past 50 years.

(Picture: An oil well. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620z0r6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t806xjct1)
Uganda's LRA: Dominic Ongwen convicted of war crimes

The International Criminal Court in the Hague has found a former commander of the Uganda-based Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity. We will use our BBC colleagues’ expertise to explain LRA and the crimes of Dominic Ongwen, and bring reaction from the region.

We continue to answer audience questions about the pandemic and will also ask our experts about the trial launched in the UK to see if giving people different Covid vaccines for first and second doses works as well as giving them the same one twice.

And we look at what’s been happening in the northern region of Tigray in Ethiopia since the armed conflict in November between the regional government and forces supporting Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed. We reconnect with two Tigrayans in the US, who were desperately trying to reach their relatives during the conflict.

(Photo: Lord's Resistance Army ex-commander Dominic Ongwen sits in the courtroom of the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, Netherlands February 4, 2021 Credit: ICC-CPI/Handout via REUTERS)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620z4hb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t806xjhk5)
Ethiopia's Tigray crisis: What's happening now?

We look at what’s been happening in the northern region of Tigray in Ethiopia since the armed conflict in November between the regional government and forces supporting Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed. We reconnect with people who have not heard from their relatives in Tigray since the conflict began.

More European countries have decided not to recommend the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid vaccine for over 65s. One of them is Switzerland, and we’ll get our regular expert Dr Emma Hodcroft in Bern to explain the decision. We also discuss a trial launched in the UK to to see if giving people different Covid vaccines for their first and second doses works as well as the current approach of using the same type of vaccine twice.

The International Criminal Court in the Hague has found a former commander of the Uganda-based Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity. We bring reaction from the region.

(Photo: Ethiopians, who fled the ongoing fighting in Tigray region, prepare a meal within Hamdayet village on the Sudan-Ethiopia border, in the eastern Kassala state, Sudan December 16, 2020. Credit: Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/Reuters)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620z87g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdc4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmng)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620zczl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5k4dq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmnr7z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k048x9cfm)
2021/02/04 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620zhqq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6md)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmnw03)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1p)
Mixing Covid vaccines

A new trial is about to start in the UK, seeing if different vaccines can be mixed and matched in a two-dose schedule, and whether the timing matters. Governments want to know the answer as vaccines are in short supply. Oxford University’s Matthew Snape takes Roland Pease through the thinking.

Despite the numbers of vaccines being approved for use we still need treatments for Covid-19. A team at the University of North Carolina is upgrading the kind of manufactured antibodies that have been used to treat patients during the pandemic, monoclonal antibodies. Lisa Gralinski explains how they are designing souped-up antibodies that’ll neutralise not just SARS-CoV-2, but a whole range of coronaviruses.

Before global warming, the big ecological worry that exercised environmentalists was acid rain. We’d routinely see pictures of forests across the world dying because of the acid soaking they’d had poisoning the soil. In a way, this has been one of environmental activism’s success stories. The culprit was sulphur in coal and in forecourt fuels – which could be removed, with immediate effect on air quality. But biogeochemist Tobias Goldhammer of the Leibniz Institute in Berlin and colleagues have found that sulphur, from other sources, is still polluting water courses.

There’s been debate over when and where dogs became man’s best friend. Geoff Marsh reports on new research from archaeology and genetics that puts the time at around 20,000 years ago and the place as Siberia.



(Image: Getty Images)


Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Deborah Cohen


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620zmgv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljnt3f)
America is Back: the Biden foreign policy

President Biden makes his first major foreign policy speech promising to engage diplomatically with Russia, but to be tougher on Moscow than Donald Trump.

Also in the programme: Alexei Navalny's friend, author Boris Akunin; and a senior Lord's Resistance Army leader is found guilty of war crimes.

(Picture: Biden addresses State Department staff. Credit: EPA/JIM LO SCALZO)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620zr6z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79tr7kw66t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqcchkh5n)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmp3hc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58wmzmpgn9)
Shell posts $22bn loss

The oil industry is having to rethink its future as the world turns from fossil fuels. Shell's big losses were the result of having to write down, or reduce, the future value of its oil fields, and Stephen Schork, founder of the Schork Energy Intelligence Group assesses the future prospects for big oil companies. Also in the programme, French football is in turmoil after an emergency auction for the TV rights to matches in the top two leagues ended in failure. Keiran Maguire is lecturer in football finance at Liverpool University and explains why companies are playing hardball with clubs in France over screening rights. Plus, what’s a song worth? Music streaming services have changed the game, and we hear about their impact on artists' income from Tom Gray of the 90s British band Gomez. And Merck Mercuriadis tells us about his music investment company Hipgnosis, which is spending billions of dollars buying the copyright to some of the biggest music hits of the past 50 years.

(Picture: An oil well. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620zvz3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmp77h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]



FRIDAY 05 FEBRUARY 2021

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p9620zzq7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjwq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh66)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p962103gc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19741csbk8)
Joe Biden announces major foreign policy shifts

As President Biden unveils his foreign policy vision we look at what it will mean for the world's economy. Also in the programme, French football is in turmoil after an emergency auction for the TV rights to matches in the top two leagues ended in failure. Kieran Maguire is lecturer in football finance at Liverpool University and explains why companies are playing hardball with clubs in France over screening rights. Plus, what’s a song worth? Music streaming services have changed the game, and we hear about their impact on artists' income from Tom Gray of the 90s British band Gomez. And Merck Mercuriadis tells us about his music investment company Hipgnosis, which is spending billions of dollars buying the copyright to some of the biggest music hits of the past 50 years. We are joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific - Paddy Hirsch is the editor of NPRs daily business and economics podcast, the Indicator from Planet Money - he's in Los Angeles and Mehmal Safraz , Co-founder The Current PK, Journalist for Geo TV's Report Card as an analyst.


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p9621076h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbym)
Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya: Has Belarus’s revolution stalled?

Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya says she won last year’s presidential election in Belarus, and she is still intent on toppling Europe’s last de-facto dictator, Alexander Lukashenko. After months of protests and brutal repression, has Belarus’s revolution stalled?

(Photo: Belarus opposition leader Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmplgw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3cszthc)
Barca's Joan Laporta and USA coach Vlatko Andonovski

Barcelona's Presidential candidate Joan Laporta talks about the future of Lionel Messi, and how he intends to deal with a debt of nearly $1.5bn. And we'll also be joined by the coach of the USA's women's team Vlatko Andonovski.

Picture: USWNT head coach Vlatko Andonovski on the touchline during a game against Spain in March 2020 (Brad Smith/ISI Photos/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p96210bym)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdc4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmng)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p96210gpr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq0)
A tale of two ecommerce giants

Jeff Bezos's Amazon and Jack Ma's Alibaba report bumper profits, but both online shopping giants face challenges. Rory Cellan-Jones speaks to the BBC's Asia business correspondent Karishma Vaswani about Jack Ma's run-in with Chinese regulators, while BBC technology reporter Jane Wakefield assess the impact of Jeff Bezos's decision to step away from day-to-day running of Amazon. Plus we hear from Eliot Higgins, founder of online investigators Bellingcat, about how the internet has changed intelligence gathering. And Leo Kelion speaks to social networking pioneer Michael Birch about his plans to relaunch the social network platform Bebo.

(Photo: Jack Ma at a conference in Paris in 2019, Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmptz4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p96210lfw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdqmvsl)
Biden sets out new US foreign policy agenda

We look at his plans to try to find peace in Yemen - and discuss how America's relationship with Russia is likely to change.

As the military in Myanmar comes in for heavy criticism after seizing power, what's the situation for the country's already vulnerable Rohingya minority?

And in Turkey young people are taking to the streets to protest against the government - for a surprising reason.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p96210q60)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdqmzjq)
President Biden lays out his foreign policy plans

How will the new approach compare to President Trump's?

The business consultancy McKinsey is forced to pay more than half-a-billion dollars in compensation related to the Opioid epidemic in the United States.

And playing golf on the moon: American astronaut Alan Shepard's ball is found 50 years after he hit it for 'miles and miles and miles'.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p96210ty4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wqbdqn38v)
Biden lays out new US foreign policy

US President says his priorities include ending war in Yemen, and challenging Russia and China more.

A British MP tells us why she wants the UK government to act to protect Uighur women held in Chinese camps.

And one year on from the day that a massive store of fertiliser exploded in Beirut, we return to the Lebanese capital to see whether the city has recovered from the tragedy.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p96210yp8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmq9yn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz79m)
Moon landings and economic priorities

Manuela Saragosa speaks with economist Mariana Mazzucato, who argues that America’s Apollo programme, which landed people on the moon in the 1960s, has a lot to teach us about tackling some of the biggest economic challenges on earth today. Mazzucato is calling for a bolder, more visionary and interventionist state which would take on the UN's Sustainable Development Goals, among others. But would that work at a time of declining trust in government institutions and competence? And don't the UN's goals encompass societal challenges that are far more politically complex than Apollo's technological mission?

(Image credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmw7)
General Robert E Lee: US Civil War rebel

The US Civil War of 1861-65 left 700,000 troops dead. The Southern Confederate states rebelled against the Union of the North because the Confederates wanted to protect the right to own slaves. The hero of the rebel cause, General Robert E Lee, was charged with treason and had his citizenship revoked. So why did Congress reinstate his citizenship in 1975 more than one hundred years after his death? Claire Bowes has been speaking to former Democrat Congresswoman Elizabeth Holtzman who was one of just ten members of Congress to vote against the rehabilitation of General Lee and to John Reeves author of the book, The Lost Indictment of Robert E Lee. They describe how the proposal, put forward by a pro-segregationist Senator from Virginia, passed without even the mention of slavery.

Photo: General Robert E Lee courtesy of the Library of Congress


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p962112fd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmqfps)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 World Football (w3cszthc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p9621165j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcp7)
Cryptocurrencies: Fad or the future?

Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies have been back in the news this week after the endorsement of SpaceX and Tesla boss Elon Musk. His comments prompted the price of bitcoin to rise sharply. It’s thought that a perfect storm of inflationary coronavirus stimulus spending by governments, plus eroding trust in financial markets is pushing investors towards the volatile investments. Hundreds of so called ‘alt-coins’ have followed Bitcoin into the highly unregulated cryptocurrency marketplace and worthless coins are being marketed on social media with prices rocketing hundreds of percentage points in minutes. It all has institutional investors wondering whether to dip their toes in for fear of missing out - and regulators scratching their heads about what to do next. New US treasury secretary Janet Yellen says cryptocurrencies are of ‘particular concern’ and the Indian government is now seeking to prohibit private cryptocurrencies altogether. So what are they and how have they evolved since the early days of Bitcoin a decade ago? Ritula Shah and a panel of guests discuss cryptocurrencies and what should be done about them.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p962119xn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5m2bs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmqp61)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p96211fns)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjc)
Myanmar: Reporting the coup

It’s less than a week since a military coup in Myanmar, staged as a new session of parliament was set to open. BBC Burmese editor Soe Win Than tells us about events leading up to the coup, and reactions in Myanmar, where the transition to democracy has proved short-lived.

My Home Town: Changwon, South Korea
Julie Yoonnyung Lee of BBC Korean takes us to her hometown of Changwon in South Korea to ride bicycles and admire the cherry blossom.

Unwitching Assam
Birubala Rabha grew up in India's north-eastern state of Assam believing in witches and witchcraft. But after encounters with witch-doctors she lost her belief, and has become a campaigner, helping establish tough anti-witch hunting laws. Soutik Biswas of BBC Delhi tells her story.

Possibly Putin's palace
President Putin has categorically denied ownership of a splendid palace and estate revealed in a video made by Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny. Olga Ivshina of BBC Russian describes the stand-out details of the property, and the reaction of Russians to the story.

Lost Dreams
An Algerian teacher who sits exams alongside his students to support them, and a Syrian refugee in Austria who made Christmas cards for her neighbours to break down barriers. These are two stories from a BBC Arabic series called Lost Dreams, as we hear from Shereen Nanish at BBC Amman.


(Photo: Pro-coup marchers in Naypyitaw. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmw7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p96211kdx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5m9v1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmqxp9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1fq8)
Three months to save my son's life

Veer is four years old. He has a genetic disorder called Fanconi Anaemia affecting his bone marrow. In 2019, his parents were told they would need to find a lifesaving stem cell donor for him. Doctors estimated that Veer could expect to live for between two to five years before needing a transplant, depending on how quickly his bone marrow depletes. However, after one of Veer’s recent general check-ups, the Doctors said things were deteriorating faster than expected and Veer was only three to six months from needing the transplant. The challenge is to get people to register. Currently, only 2% of the UK’s population are stem cell donors. A donor could come from anywhere around the world but misconceptions about becoming a donor means registrants are low. In the end, all it involves is a procedure similar to giving blood.

Rajeev Gupta follows Veer’s parents as they dramatically ramp up efforts to save their son's life. In this emotional story, we get to know the charming little Veer and his family as they battle limitations placed by the coronavirus pandemic to try and find a match for him. Rajeev hears how Veer’s mum, Kirpa and dad, Nirav have increasingly turned to their Jain faith to help deal with the emotional traumas placed upon the family. Kirpa believes their faith inevitably guides them through this and will help Veer find his match. With exclusive access, this programme follows Veer and his family to what could be a joyous or equally heart wrenching conclusion.

Presenter/producer: Rajeev Gupta

(Photo: Veer. Credit: helpveernow.org)


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p96211p51)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljqvsm)
Yemen war: Joe Biden ends support for operations in foreign policy reset

The US is to end its support for offensive operations by its allies in Yemen, which has been devastated by a six-year war in which more than 110,000 people are believed to have died. "The war in Yemen must end," President Joe Biden said in his first major foreign policy speech.

Also in the programme: Alexei Navalny is back in court in Moscow and Israel's coronavirus vaccination programme has been effective in preventing serious illness.

(Photo: Millions in Yemen are in need of food, medicine or shelter after more than six years of war. Credit: Reuters)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p96211sx5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmr55k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlth43p1bwl)
Japanese brewery Kirin pulls out of Myanmar

As business weighs the cost of investing in Myanmar, Japan's Kirin brewery has pulled out. We get the perspective of Mark Farmaner, director of Burma Campaign UK, which promotes human rights in the country. And Vasuki Shastry, associate fellow of the Asia-Pacific programme at the research group Chatham House, tells us what wider impact the move is likely to have. Also in the programme, as Chinese video sharing app Kuaishou almost trebled in value on its first day trading on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange on Friday, the BBC's Katie Silver explains what's behind the popularity of the platform. Also in China, so-called 'super apps' are growing in popularity, whereby one app does the job of hundreds, and can help you organise almost every aspect of your life. The BBC's Karishma Vaswani brings us the details. Plus we look ahead to this weekend's Super Bowl in the US, which attracts a combined audience of over 100 million viewers and is one of the biggest moments in the advertising calendar. But we find out why this year, some big name brands have opted out of the spectacle.

(Picture: Cans of Kirin beer. Picture credit: EPA.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p96211xn9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t806xm8q4)
Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny back in court

Having been jailed for nearly three years this week for violating his parole conditions, Mr Navalny is now back in court facing defamation charges. He is accused of slandering a World War II veteran who appeared in a pro-Putin video. His lawyer says that the aim of his criminal persecution is to prevent him from standing in parliamentary and presidential elections. Our correspondent brings us the latest developments from Moscow.

And our China Media Analyst joins us to talk about Kuaishou, the Chinese short-form video app being compared to TikTok. Its shares surged more than 190% on the company's launch on the Hong Kong's stock exchange on Friday.

Also, we hear about the social media campaign by celebrities around the world in support of Indian farmers, who have been protesting for weeks in the capital Delhi against new farm laws being introduced.

(Photo:Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny in court in Moscow, 05 February 2021. Credit: EPA)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p962121df)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t806xmdg8)
OS conversations: Foreign journalists in Russia

In the week that Russia announced it was expelling three EU diplomats for taking part in protests backing opposition leader, Alexei Navalny, we bring together foreign correspondents in Moscow. They talk to each other about the realities and challenges of working as an international journalist in Russia.

And Alexei Navalny is now back in court facing defamation charges. He is accused of slandering a World War II veteran who appeared in a pro-Putin video. His lawyer says that the aim of his criminal persecution is to prevent him from standing in parliamentary and presidential elections. Our correspondent brings us the latest developments from Moscow.

Also we speak to a reporter in Romania where the Orthodox Church is facing pressure to change baptism rituals, after a baby died following a ceremony which involves immersing infants three times in holy water.

(Photo: Demonstrations in Moscow following arrest of Alexei Navalny, February 2, 2021. Credit: REUTERS/Evgenia Novozhenina)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p9621254k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjjc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmw7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p962128wp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bn5z5n19t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmrn52)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3k048xd8bq)
2021/02/05 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p96212dmt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhq0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msmrrx6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv70)
Can being happy help me fight infection?

Could being happier help us fight infectious disease?

As the world embarks on a mass vaccination programme to protect populations from Covid-19, Crowdscience asks whether our mood has any impact on our immune systems. In other words, could being happier help us fight infectious diseases? Marnie Chesterton explores how our mental wellbeing can impact our physical health and hears that stress and anxiety make it harder for our natural defence systems to kick in – a field known as psychoneuroimmunology. Professor Kavita Vedhara from the University of Nottingham explains flu jabs are less successful in patients with chronic stress.

So scientists are coming up with non-pharmacological ways to improve vaccine efficiency. We investigate the idea that watching a short feel-good video before receiving the inoculation could lead to increased production of antibodies to a virus. And talk to Professor Richard Davidson who says mindfulness reduces stress and makes vaccines more effective.


[Image: Happy couple wearing masks. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p96212jcy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z5nljrq0j)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p96212n42)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79tr7kz33x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fqcchnd2r)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msms0dg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58wmzmsckd)
Japanese brewery Kirin pulls out of Myanmar

As business weighs the cost of investing in Myanmar, Japan's Kirin brewery has pulled out. We get the perspective of Mark Farmaner, director of Burma Campaign UK, which promotes human rights in the country. And Vasuki Shastry, associate fellow of the Asia-Pacific programme at the research group Chatham House, tells us what wider impact the move is likely to have. Also in the programme, as Chinese video sharing app Kuaishou almost trebled in value on its first day trading on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange on Friday, the BBC's Katie Silver explains what's behind the popularity of the platform. Also in China, so-called 'super apps' are growing in popularity, whereby one app does the job of hundreds, and can help you organise almost every aspect of your life. The BBC's Karishma Vaswani brings us the details. Plus we look ahead to this weekend's Super Bowl in the US, which attracts a combined audience of over 100 million viewers and is one of the biggest moments in the advertising calendar. But we find out why this year, some big name brands have opted out of the spectacle.

(Picture: Cans of Kirin beer. Picture credit: EPA.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p96212rw6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbym)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q3msms44l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3cszthc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 04:06 THU (w3csz6md)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6md)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6md)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5q38jb0bs4)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5q38jb0q0j)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5q38jb127x)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5q38jb1601)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5q38jb1fh9)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5q38jb28q6)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5q38jb2rpq)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172x5q38jb305z)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5q38jb37p7)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5q38jb3lxm)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5q38jb3z50)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5q38jb42x4)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5q38jb59cf)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5q38jb5sby)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172x5q3msm9rc7)

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BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5q3msmb7br)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5q3msmbqb8)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5q3msmbv2d)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5q3msmdjj6)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5q3msmdwrl)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5q3msmf47v)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5q3msmfm7c)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5q3msmfqzh)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5q3msmfzgr)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5q3msmg6z0)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5q3msmgyfs)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5q3msmh9p5)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5q3msmhff9)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5q3msmhsnp)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5q3msmj14y)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5q3msmjj4g)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5q3msmjmwl)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5q3msmjwcv)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5q3msmk3w3)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5q3msmkccc)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5q3msmkvbw)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5q3msml6l8)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5q3msmlbbd)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5q3msmlpks)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5q3msmly21)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5q3msmmf1k)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5q3msmmjsp)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5q3msmms8y)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5q3msmn0s6)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5q3msmn88g)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5q3msmnr7z)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5q3msmnw03)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5q3msmp3hc)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5q3msmp77h)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5q3msmplgw)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5q3msmptz4)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5q3msmq9yn)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5q3msmqfps)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5q3msmqp61)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5q3msmqxp9)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5q3msmr55k)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5q3msmrn52)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5q3msmrrx6)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5q3msms0dg)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5q3msms44l)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5p8tsq9r0h)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5p8tsq9vrm)

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BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172x5p8tsqb700)

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BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5p8tsqc26x)

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BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5p8tsqd8p6)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5p8tsqddfb)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5p8tsqdj5g)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5p8tsqdmxl)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5p8tsqdrnq)

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BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5p8tsqg6m8)

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BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5p8tsqh5l9)

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BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5p8tsqhf2k)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172x5p9620md2v)

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BBC News 00:00 THU (w172x5p9620x2t4)

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BBC News 04:00 THU (w172x5p9620xksn)

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BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172x5p9620zzq7)

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BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5p96212rw6)

BBC OS Conversations 05:06 SAT (w3ct19z6)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct19z6)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 MON (w3ct19z6)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172x2t806x7p2r)

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BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172x2t806xjct1)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2t806xjhk5)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7km)

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Business Weekly 23:06 SAT (w3ct0spv)

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CrowdScience 08:32 SUN (w3cszv6z)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz998)

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Discovery 20:32 MON (w3csz9fs)

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Global Questions 11:32 SAT (w3ct1pxn)

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HARDtalk 02:06 MON (w3cszc34)

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Heart and Soul 22:32 SAT (w3ct0w3g)

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In the Studio 02:32 TUE (w3cszvcj)

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More or Less 02:50 SUN (w3ct0pym)

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Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6v4)

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Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2wqbdq8856)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf5l)

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People Fixing the World 02:06 TUE (w3cszv11)

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Science in Action 20:32 THU (w3cszh1p)

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Sports News 22:20 SAT (w172x3fq035z4d0)

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Sportsworld 14:06 SAT (w172x3lmngt1z3m)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhkg)

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The Arts Hour 20:06 SAT (w3cszk43)

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The Climate Question 04:06 MON (w3ct0xbb)

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The Compass 11:32 SUN (w3ct1czq)

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The Conversation 02:32 MON (w3cszj4k)

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The Conversation 13:32 MON (w3cszj4k)

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The Cultural Frontline 05:32 SAT (w3cszj9k)

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The Documentary 04:06 SUN (w3ct1gv6)

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The Evidence 19:06 SAT (w3ct205h)

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The Food Chain 02:32 THU (w3cszjr6)

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The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjwp)

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The Real Story 00:06 SAT (w3cszcp6)

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The Science Hour 01:06 SUN (w3cszkxy)

Two Minutes Past Nine 09:32 SAT (w3ct1cx0)

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Weekend 06:06 SAT (w172x7d8q528trz)

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When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct1c55)

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Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3cszmw6)

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WorklifeIndia 02:06 SUN (w3ct1c1h)

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World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x582680mw5q)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172xlv9kv8c1ph)

World Business Report 22:32 MON (w172x58wmzmdry0)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3cszthc)

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