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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 19 DECEMBER 2020

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tmvcg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcp0)
Big Tech under pressure

The European Union has this week proposed new rules that would police the practices of big technology companies, including US giants such as Google, Amazon, Apple, and Facebook. As well as delivering greater scrutiny, the laws, if passed, would even allow for the forced break-up of businesses deemed to be anti-competitive. The long awaited Digital Services Act and Digital Markets Act are seen as attempts to redefine the regulatory framework for a sector that will be key to the economy of the future. Meanwhile in the United States, the federal government and a large number of states have filed a case against Facebook alleging that the company is obstructing competition by buying up rivals. The interventions have been welcomed by those who’ve long argued for targeted measures aimed at the growing digital economy. But technology companies say they’re being penalised for their innovative business models. So have the titans of Silicon Valley become too big for the greater good, and - if so - should they be reformed or broken up? Ritula Shah and guests discuss the renewed focus on regulating global technology companies and what might come of it.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tmz3l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x194l55f66h)
Sunburst hack on US government, 'worst ever'

Hackers are now known to have at least monitored data within the state, defence, homeland security, and treasury and commerce US government departments; we speak to Theresa Payton, a former chief information officer at the White House and chief executive of cyber security consultancy Fortalice Solutions. Sony has pulled one of the year's most anticipated games, Cyberpunk 2077, as it has bugs. As US vice-president Mike Pence receives his coronavirus vaccine in front of TV cameras, we have a report from New York on how long it might take for benefits from the country's vaccination programme to show in terms of new jobs and financial recovery. We're off to the Lake District in the north west of England full of dramatic fells and magnificent lakes and sheep... and where reporter Faarea Masud spoke to farmer James Rebanks about why he's calling for a return to more sustainable ways of farming. We hear from Kai Ryssdal at Marketplace in the US who's been talking about crowdfunding with the CEO of GoFundMe. Plus we hear how Andrew Slorance won $1,000,000 by re-inventing the wheelchair. We're joined throughout the programme by Sarah Knight, Manager at ABC radio in Perth Australia. (Picture of a computer keyboard via Getty Images).


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tn2vq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z6v8v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfbg43)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhk8)
Australia and India in thrilling Test battle

Alison Mitchell and Jim Maxwell are at the Adelaide Oval for reaction and debate as India and Australia go head-to-head in the opening Test, with Charu Sharma giving the Indian perspective.

Plus, England's all-time record run-scorer Sir Alastair Cook looks ahead to a massive year for England's Test team with tours of Sri Lanka, India and Australia.

Photo: Steve Smith (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tn6lv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj4)
'Milk siblings' and Islam

Margarita Rodriguez of BBC Mundo recently published a story about Islamic milk kinship, or milk siblings. It refers to the relationship between children from different mothers who are breastfed by the same woman. It brings with it a special bond, but also prohibitions.

Living and working with Covid-19
The perks and pressures of working through a pandemic, with Beatriz de la Pava from BBC Minute’s Spanish team, BBC Russian’s Grigor Atanesian, Issariya Praithongyaem from BBC Thai, BBC Uzbek’s Ibrat Safo and BBC Marathi’s Mayuresh Konnur.

A Maharaja and a dancer
BBC Urdu has been running a series of stories about historical sites named after women, including a temple and a mosque inspired by Moran Mai, the court dancer who captured the heart of Maharaja Ranjit Singh, leader of the 19th century Sikh empire. Umer Draz Nangiana tells their story.


Image: Muslim mother with headscarf cradling baby
Credit: Getty/Narisara Nami


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmw0)
The GDR's Namibian children

On December 18th 1979 hundreds of Namibian children were taken to East Germany to escape the war in their home country. But after communism in Europe collapsed in 1989 the children were sent back to Africa and an uncertain future. Johannes Dell has been speaking to Selma Kamati who was just four years old when she found herself experiencing a snowy East German Christmas.

Photo: Selma Kamati (far right of picture) and some of the of the other Namibian children.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tnbbz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Reith Lectures (w3ct1cyn)
From Covid crisis to renaissance

Dr Mark Carney observes that the Covid pandemic has forced states to confront how we value health, wealth and opportunity. During the first few months of the crisis, most states chose to value human life more than the economic well-being of the nation-state. But if that seems to be changing how do we assess value in this sense? Carney elucidates surprising differences in the financial value put on a human life in different nations – and goes on to argue that this reductionist approach fails to take into deeper thinking about the worth of human existence.

(Photo: Outgoing Bank of England governor Mark Carney makes a keynote address at the 2020 United Nations Climate Change Conference. Credit: Tolga Akmen/Getty Images)


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tng33)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z76j7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfbtch)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9c)
Board games: The politics of play

How do board games encourage players to explore ideas, politics and morals?

We meet Matt Leacock, designer of the game Pandemic, which has been used at medical schools to encourage co-operation, communication and strategy for trainees.

Reiner Knizia, designer of 700 board games, talks about how making a game out of tasks can change players' behaviour in daily life.

We explore the rise of a new generation of games where players collaborate, rather than oppose each other, in titles that deal with politics, hip-hop, ecology, employment, climate change and more. Quintin Smith from Shut Up & Sit Down discusses new trends in design, while Michelle Browne, designer of World of Work, tells us about the game that explores employment and social benefits.

Presented and produced by Zoë Comyns.

A New Normal production for the BBC World Service

Image: The board game Pandemic (Courtesy of Matt Leacock)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tnkv7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d6jk5ly3y)
Moderna's coronavirus vaccine approved in the US

The coronavirus vaccine developed by Moderna has become the second to be approved for emergency use in the U S, with millions of doses ready to be distributed.

Also, as the world's attention is fixed on the fight against coronarvirus, is another major killer, HIV, being forgotten?

Plus, how Sesame Street is getting involved in the welfare of Rohingya child refugees.

And, if you want to go skiing this Christmas in Europe - why it might have to be in Austria.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Lijia Zhang, a Chinese-born writer and social commentator, based in the UK; and Frank Langfitt, London correspondent for the US National Public Radio network.

(Picture: Vials with a coronavirus vaccine. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tnplc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d6jk5m1w2)
Italy set for lockdown over Christmas and New Year

Italy is imposing a nationwide lockdown over much of the Christmas and New Year period.

Also, the United States approves its second coronavirus vaccine for emergency use, with millions of doses ready to be distributed.

Plus, a look at China's global PR campaign to shape perceptions of its handling of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Lijia Zhang, a Chinese-born writer and social commentator, based in the UK; and Frank Langfitt, London correspondent for the US National Public Radio network.

(Picture: Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announcing lockdown rules over the Christmas and New Year period. Credit: EPA)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tntbh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d6jk5m5m6)
Has HIV been forgotten because of coronavirus?

As the world's attention is fixed on the fight against coronarvirus, is another major killer, HIV, being forgotten? We hear from a leading researcher in Uganda.

Also, the coronavirus vaccine developed by Moderna has become the second to be approved for emergency use in the U S -- with millions of doses ready to be distributed.

Joining Paul Henley to discuss these and other issues are Lijia Zhang, a Chinese-born writer and social commentator, based in the UK; and Frank Langfitt, London correspondent for the US National Public Radio network.

(Picture: Professor Pontiano Kaleebu, Director of the Uganda Virus Research Institute. Credit: Pontiano Kaleebu)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfc5lw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4z)
What next for the GOP?

In the week that the Electoral College confirmed Joe Biden as the next US President, Katty Kay and Carlos Watson take a look at the future of the Republican party. The Trump presidency might be over, but there is no sign that Republican leaders are ready to jettison Trumpism, especially after securing more than 72 million votes in November’s elections. Katty and Carlos are joined by Brian Lanza, who was part of President Trump’s 2016 transitional team, and by Michael Steele, the first African-American to hold the post of chairperson of the Republican National Committee, to discuss what role Donald Trump will play in the party’s path ahead; and, if not a Trump, then who else will seek to steer the GOP into the 2024 presidential run-off?


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tny2m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z0)
Coronavirus: Spikes and Santas

We are in the biggest holiday season for large parts of the world but many countries are experiencing a rise in Covid cases.

It’s worrying for those in South Korea's capital Seoul, where around half the country’s 52 million population live. So far there has not been a national lockdown, but this may be about to change as the authorities deal with a third spike in cases. Since around one in three South Koreans are Christians, Christmas will bring potential risks. Host Nuala McGovern hears from three people who live in South Korea about their experiences during the pandemic.

Also, ski instructors in Europe discuss the uncertainty of resort closures during the winter season.

And three Santas from Finland, the UK and the United States discuss how they are safely dispensing Christmas cheer during a pandemic.

Picture: Santa Larry speaking to the BBC from the North Pole / Dallas (BBC)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfc9c0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cwt)
Two Minutes Past Nine

19/12/2020 GMT

On April 19th 1995 a 26-year-old named Timothy Mcveigh steered a yellow rental truck into downtown Oklahoma city. Inside was a two-ton homemade explosive.

The Oklahoma City Bombing killed 168 people and leaving 680 injured. Journalist Leah Sottile investigates the legacy of the attack in a series that gets into the heart of America’s far-right today.
Recorded over some of the most divisive and turbulent months in recent American political history, Two Minutes Past Nine explores and questions the changing face of far right extremism in all its chaos and conspiracism.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf5d)
Moving personal stories of life in the pandemic

Presenter Alan Dein and producer Laurence Grissell explain how they found the inspirational personal stories in the documentary Don't Log Off. Plus, what programmes stood out for listeners in 2020?


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tp1tr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c5h9h5vmg)
“It’s much more than being a race car driver” – Nascar racer Bubba Wallace on finding his voice

Bubba Wallace joins us to reflect on a turbulent 2020 and to look ahead to racing for his new Michael Jordan owned team in 2021. Wallace led the successful calls for his sport to ban the confederate flag before a subsequent incident in Alabama prompted an FBI investigation. A member of his team found what looked like a noose hanging in his racing stall, with the authorities finding that no hate crime had been committed. As the only black driver at the top level of Nascar, Wallace tells us why it was important to speak out this year and how he feels about what happened in Alabama. He also tells us how excited he is to be working with Michael Jordan and that he’s been enjoying playing Call of Duty with Lewis Hamilton.

Mary Annette Pember of the Red Cliff Ojibwe tribe joins us to give her thoughts on the decision of Cleveland’s baseball team to drop the term “Indians” from their name. Pember – who is National Correspondent for Indian Country Today – dismisses the idea that teams using Native American terms and imagery are in some way honouring indigenous people. She also recalls having her home vandalised and receiving threatening phone calls when she spoke out against her local school’s Native American mascot.

Ahead of the WBA world super-middleweight champion Callum Smith facing Mexico’s Saul “Canelo” Alvarez in Texas we look at just what the Liverpudlian is up against. Canelo is widely regarded as the finest pound for pound boxer on the planet and is unbeaten in seven years. Former title holders Matthew Hatton, Rocky Fielding and Ryan Rhodes all tried and failed to beat the Mexican. They recall their encounters with him and tell us what Smith needs to do to win.

Professor Tony Belli joins us to talk about concussion in football. Belli is leading a study into concussion among Premier League players, which involves those who have suffered head injuries having samples of their saliva tested and compared to that of uninjured players. Research by Belli’s University of Birmingham has already found that saliva contains certain testable biomarkers if a concussion has occurred. He tells us about the test, his hopes for a wider roll-out and his belief that football's lawmakers approving trials for concussion substitutes from January is just the start of the process.

Alex Capstick has a special report on hopes for a green men’s football World Cup in Qatar in two years time. The sport’s world governing body FIFA and the tournament organisers are promising a net-zero sustainable event. But can the world’s biggest sporting event, let alone one in a desert nation rich on fossil fuels ever be sustainable?

In Sporting Witness – we mark 20 years since the Northern Irish motorbike racing champion – Joey Dunlop – was killed in a high-speed crash in Estonia. Dunlop was loved by fans across the sectarian divide.

NBA journalist Lindsay Dunn tells us what to look out for when the new season gets underway on Tuesday and Lizzi Doyle from the Anfield Wrap gives us her thoughts on Liverpool ahead of their game at Crystal Palace in the Premier League.


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tp5kw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z7y00)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfcjv8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct1csp)
Disunion

On February 1st this year nearly every news bulletin began with the words 'the UK has officially left the European Union'. Boris Johnson could have been forgiven for congratulating himself for fulfilling his constitutional promise to 'get Brexit done'. But there was another story in the news that day too - health officials were trying to find anyone who’d had close contact with two Chinese tourists being treated in Newcastle for coronavirus.

No one at the time could have predicted then that a virus which began thousands of miles away in China would shake the foundations of Britain’s system of government; ten months on all the nations of the United Kingdom are living under different social regimes, internal borders divide the country as never before, and even parts of England have been in open revolt against Westminster.

In this programme Edward Stourton will explore how Covid19 is rewriting the rules Britain’s leaders live by and ask where it could take the UK.

(Image: Fractured Union Flag, Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tp9b0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6ty)
Trapped in an idea with David Byrne and St Vincent

St. Vincent is an artist, songwriter and producer from Texas, now based in LA. After playing with the Polyphonic Spree and Sufjan Stevens, she formed her own band in 2006. She’s since released six albums including Love This Giant, a collaboration with David Byrne, and she completely shreds on the guitar. Vagabon is a Cameroonian-American multi-instrumentalist, singer, and producer described as an “indie rock game changer”. She started uploading tracks to Bandcamp in 2014 before releasing her debut album Infinite Worlds in 2017. And finally, David Byrne is one of the planet’s most engaging and prolific creators. He formed new wave band Talking Heads after dropping out of art school and they became one of the most influential bands of the twentieth century. Recently he has been working with Spike Lee on a film version of his Broadway show American Utopia, which has been described as ‘The Best Live Show of All Time’. Ahmed Gallab, also known as Sinkane is a Sudanese-American musician and singer based in New York, who blends Funk, Jazz, Dance, and Pop. His latest album ‘Dépaysé’ is about self-discovery as an immigrant in the USA.

Together they’ll discuss feeling the pressure to do something different, what American identity is and how it shows in their music, and whether they make things to make people think, or move their feet.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tpf24)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z33qbclpq)
Italy faces lockdown over Christmas period

Italians are facing tight lockdown rules over the Christmas and New Year holidays to help curb a third wave of coronavirus cases. Non-essential shops, restaurants and bars will be closed. Italians are only allowed to travel for work, health and emergency reasons.

Also in the programme: A new US senate report surrounding the Boeing 737 Max and how a surgeon who trains doctors in warzones is having to adapt to the coronavirus pandemic.

(Picture: Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte announces new restrictions. Credit: EPA/FILIPPO ATTILI)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tpjt8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lkgvxd2gl)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as Southampton take on Manchester City at St Mary's Stadium.

Lee James is joined by former Manchester City midfielder Michael Johnson, Tottenham goalkeeper Becky Spencer and Reading and Ghana full-back Andy Yiadom to discuss all the big talking points.

We'll have reaction to the early game between Crystal Palace and Liverpool and we'll keep you up to date with the Women's Super League and football across the rest of Europe.

Elsewhere, after the shortest offseason in history, we look ahead to the 2020/21 NBA season starting next week and discuss whether the LA Lakers can defend their title after ending a 10-year wait to win the Championship.

We'll have the latest from day three of the first men's Test match between Australia and India in Adelaide, we'll look ahead to the world super-middleweight title fight between Mexico's Saul Canelo Alvarez and Britain's Callum Smith, and we'll hear an interview with American world-record holding swimmer Caeleb Dressel.

Photo: Southampton manager Ralph Hassenhuttl & Manchester City boss Pep Guardiola (Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tq0ss)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z8s6x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfdd25)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxb)
On 11 November 2019 James Le Mesurier was found dead in a street in Istanbul. He was the latest casualty in a very unusual war – one fought not on the battlefield, but online.

Le Mesurier was a mysterious figure with a taste for the finer things who served in the British Army in several of the world’s hotspots before focusing his energies on war-ravaged Syria from 2014. He co-founded the White Helmets, a Syrian civil defence force who filmed themselves pulling survivors and bodies from the rubble of bombed out buildings.

Soon, the White Helmets - and Le Mesurier - found themselves at the centre of a global race to control the narrative in the Syrian War. In this investigative series Mayday, presenter Chloe Hadjimatheou talks to the people who knew James, including his widow Emma, his ex-wife and former army colleagues, as well as those on the ground in Syria still working as White Helmets today in an effort to piece together James’ story and that of the White Helmets. She speaks to some of the White Helmet’s detractors and follows up accusations about the organisation to try and understand the truth surrounding them.

Chloe Hadjimatheou says: “Making this series has been an extraordinary experience, as listeners will discover. It started out being an investigation into the story of a man with an astonishing life and a mysterious death but it ended up taking me on a bizarre journey down rabbit holes of misinformation. Ultimately this is a story about how truth functions in modern warfare.”


SAT 18:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyf)
The economics of a Covid Christmas

Tim Harford asks economist Joel Waldfogel how Covid 19 could affect spending at Christmas this year. They discuss the usual bump in sales and gift giving. The author of ‘Scroogenomics’ usually argues that presents are rarely as valued by the recipient compared to something they might buy for themselves. But what should people do this year?


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tq4jx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The History Hour (w3cszkpz)
The birth of Bangladesh

How Pakistan's first democratic elections in 1970 led to war, the break up of Pakistan and the creation of a new country, Bangladesh. Also Gibraltar under Spanish blockade plus refugees from Namibia’s war of independence, Britain’s first reality TV family and Bing Crosby’s White Christmas.

Photo East Pakistan 1971 The flag of Bangladesh is raised at the Awami League headquarters. Credit Getty Images


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tq891)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3x)
Granite Noir Crime Writing Festival

It’s a Crime Special in this week’s The Arts Hour, as Nikki Bedi talks to some of the big names taking part in Granite Noir, the crime writing festival that takes place annually in Aberdeen, Scotland.

We hear from Sara Paretsky, who revolutionised the US crime fiction scene when her Private Eye, V. I. Warshawski transformed the role of women from victims to investigators.

Dorothy Koomson is Britain’s biggest selling black female author of adult fiction. She tells us why she doesn’t write sequels, but chooses instead to create new characters each time she starts a new novel.

Helen Fitzgerald is known for her emotional thrillers. She grew up in small town Australia and has returned to her roots for her latest novel Ash Mountain.

Scottish writer and Granite Noir Ambassador Stuart MacBride explains why he chose the backdrop of Scottish Independence for his novel All That’s Dead, the importance of comedy in his works and why he’s needed a glossary of Scottish terms for both readers and editors of his books.

Sif Sigmarsdóttir is an Icelandic writer of young adult fiction. Her latest book, The Sharp Edge of a Snowflake, explores the dark side of social media, inspired by the Me Too movement and the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

And we speak to one of Granite Noir’s programmers Lee Randall and Jane Spiers, chief executive of Aberdeen Performing Arts.


(Photo: Granite Noir Crime Writing Festival venue Her Majesty's Theatre in Aberdeen, Scotland. Credit: Aberdeen Performing Arts)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tqd15)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z33qbdknr)
UK pandemic rules tightened over new strain of coronavirus

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson scraps the planned loosening of restrictions for Christmas as a new variant of the Covid-19 virus spreads rapidly in London and Southeast England. We hear about the new strain from a Cambridge University virologist. But will British people, disappointed by the sudden cancellation of their celebrations, obey the rules? A pollster and a psychologist give us their thoughts.

Also in the programme: the UN is on alert as political faultlines crack open in the Central African Republic; and a look at the Berlin restaurant offering free meals to the homeless.

(Picture: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson addresses news conference on new Covid-19 restrictions. Credit: Toby Melville/PA Wire)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tqhs9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79r6cclys4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmth997qz)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfdw1p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1cw9)
Black Jesus

The identity and colour of Jesus – and why it matters - has taken on a new significance in this year of protest and change. Seeing Jesus as a darker skinned Palestinian rather than blonde European is both historically accurate and theologically important, but it’s not a new idea.

James Cone, the influential US theologian released ‘A Black Theology of Liberation’ 50 years ago this year – and formally developed a radical new way of exploring the message of Christianity. While people often say it’s a ‘white man’s religion’, Cone emphasised Jesus’ identity as black, on the side of the oppressed, and Christianity as a religion of liberation.
Robert Beckford, one of the UK’s prominent black theologians, wants to explore the impact Black Theology has had, the implications for the church and whether seeing Jesus as black is having a revival due to the influence of black lives matter. In this programme Robert speaks to key theologians who studied under Cone; Professor Dwight Hopkins and the Very Reverend Kelly Brown Douglas about the social context and significance of Cone’s work. He hears from Rev Otis Moss III from a Chicago based church which lives out black theology, and Pastor Jonathan Jackson in the UK. Robert goes on to explore how young Christians are readdressing Jesus’ identity in the UK with Chine McDonald and has a discussion about embracing the Black Jesus with Clare Williams, Shermara Fletcher and Joel Brown. Plus he’ll hear from American artist and iconographer Mark Doox about the depiction of a black Christ in Christian art.

Producer: Miriam Williamson

(Picture: ‘The Holy Face' by Mark Doox)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tqmjf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spn)
Big trouble for Big Tech?

Regulatory bodies around the world are looking to tighten the rules that govern the digital world. Concerned by issues relating to both the web content and the business conduct of some of the big technology companies, legislators from the US to the EU are trying to re-write the digital laws. We look at what this could mean in practice for Silicon Valley. We also look at dry ice – how it works and the important role it will carry out in the distribution of the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine, as well as the possible implications that could have for the drinks industry. Plus while Zoom business meetings are all the rage now, how long before virtual reality take them to the next level? And we discuss the joy of traditional Christmas correspondence and find out why young people are starting to send greetings cards again. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft logos on a smartphone & laptop screen, Getty Images)



SUNDAY 20 DECEMBER 2020

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tqr8k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xff3jy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3cszf5d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tqw0p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3cszkxr)
Covid -19 – Mutations are normal

This week the UK Health secretary raised concerns over a new variant of SARS- CoV-2 currently spreading across Europe. Viruses mutate all the time so it’s no surprise that a new form of the one causing Covid -19 would emerge. However, virologist Ravi Gupta who analysed the new strain says we need to be weary in case future strains mutate in ways that could overcome vaccines.

Immunologist Akiko Iwasaki is part of a team looking at the impact of Covid -19 on our immune system. Her research has uncovered autoantibodies linked to infection with the virus. These are responsible for a number of autoimmune diseases. The finding goes some way to explaining the symptoms seen by some people long after a Covid -19 infection.

And how clever are ravens? According to behavioural scientist Simone Pika at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in many ways they are up there with chimps or young children. She found they performed well in tests designed for primates.

Following the dinosaur destroying meteor strike where was the best place for life to develop a new? Geologists, David Kring and Tim Bralower, think they’ve found the answer hidden in plain sight.

CrowdScience listener Simon has a problem. He’s always bumping into things, dropping tools and knocking stuff over. And he’s sick of it. He wants to know what is going on. Was he born like this? Or is it contagious? And most importantly, can he doing anything about it or is he going to be the proverbial ‘bull in a china shop’ for the rest of his life?

Host Anand Jagatia gets on the case, investigating the complex coordination needed for the simplest movements, like throwing a ball and catching it. With help from Dr Andrew Green, an exercise physiologist from Johannesburg University, he delves into our secret “sixth sense” – proprioception, which helps us locate our limbs without looking. Anand discovers that an easy task, like kicking a football, needs multiple parts of the brain to coordinate in order to work smoothly. Assistant Professor Jessica Bernard from Texas AMU studies the brain, particularly the cerebellum, a part that controls smooth movements. Dr Bernard explains how tiny glitches and larger lesions in different parts of the brain can make us clumsy in different ways. And how we use our thinking powers to stay balanced; a reason why, as your memory goes with old age, you’re more prone to falling over.

Our listener is not alone. Around the world, there is an under- diagnosed condition that affects millions of us. Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), also known as dyspraxia is a motor coordination condition that affects 5% of the global population. As Professor Amanda Kirby from the University of South Wales and CEO of Do-It solutions explains, if you can’t tie shoelaces, catch a ball and your handwriting is awful, there’s a chance that you have DCD. There’s a large genetic component, so you are likely to come from a clumsy family.

There’s no cure for DCD/Dyspraxia but all of us are capable of becoming better at a chosen task, and there’s a common pathway to mastery, whether that’s bike mechanics or open heart surgery. Professor Roger Kneebone is the author of Becoming Expert, and he talks to Simon about possible solutions to clumsiness, including accepting and living with it.

[IMAGE: Getty Images]


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tqzrt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z9r5y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xffc16)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tr3hy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct1cyz)
Dissecting Beethoven

It is 250 years since the birth of Beethoven. He is thought of as the revolutionary genius who tragically lost his hearing, but the autopsy carried out after his death reveals a far more complex story about Beethoven’s health.

BBC presenter Georgia Mann and neurosurgeon Henry Marsh explore the theories that alcoholism, congenital syphilis, an irregular heart beat and even ADHD may explain some of Beethoven’s suffering, and the music he wrote, music which resounds across the ages and the world.

(Photo: German composer Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827) composing the Missa Solemnis, February-April 1820. Oil painting by August Klober. Credit: Universal History Archive/Getty Images)


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tr782)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9ql)
Data, doctors - and doubt over Turkey's Covid statistics

Even the official statements of Covid infection cases in Turkey are alarming - but some of the country's doctors and opposition politicians argue that the true figures are higher still. Orla Guerin has been investigating the dispute over the numbers, and allegations from all sides that a health crisis has become highly politicised.

Pascale Harter introduces this and other stories, insights and analysis from BBC correspondents and writers around the world.

The new government which replaced Omar al-Bashir's regime in Sudan is a hybrid: half-civilian and half-military. What does that mean for the prospects for peace in some of the country's more restive corners - and in particular for its western region, Darfur, where a brutal conflict has lasted 17 years and caused hundreds of thousands of deaths? Mike Thomson wanted to see for himself. But at least some of the men now in power had other ideas...

The Galapagos Islands are a very special place - a laboratory for the process of evolution; home to unique flora and fauna amid gloriously impressive landscape. That's why so many people visit - or used to. As the Covid-19 pandemic closed down many of the islanders' usual supply lines, though, they've had to make adaptations of their own - including going back to a barter system for goods and a return to hunting feral introduced species. Jamie Lafferty has been looking into this rebalancing of their way of life.

And Yolande Knell visits another site with particular meaning - for women hoping for a child, or struggling wth motherhood. The so-called 'Milk Grotto' in the town of Bethlehem is believed by many to be a haven where the Virgin Mary herself once stopped to nurse the infant Jesus, during the holy family's flight from the massacre of the innocents ordered by King Herod. Today it's a shrine offering calm and comfort to families all over the world hoping for children of their own.


(A man mourns by coffins at the Kucukcekmece Municipality Morgue in Istanbul, Turkey. Credit: EPA/Sedat Suna)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xffljg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cwt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xjb)
Fighting pandemics

The 2020 pandemic has transformed our world, but it won’t be the last to do so. How should we prepare for the future? Along with one of the world’s leading epidemiologists, David Edmonds explores the science of pandemics – and why it is so uncertain.

Image: Stock image of a hotspot map (Credit: MR Cole/Getty Images)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5trc06)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2zb3fb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xffq8l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5trgrb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d6jk5pv11)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5trlhg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d6jk5pys5)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5trq7l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d6jk5q2j9)
A review of the week with the latest news.


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfg2hz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6s)
Was I born clumsy?

CrowdScience listener Simon has a problem. He’s always bumping into things, dropping tools and knocking stuff over. And he’s sick of it. He wants to know what is going on. Was he born like this? Or is it contagious? And most importantly, can he do anything about it, or is he going to be the proverbial ‘bull in a china shop’ for the rest of his life?

Host Anand Jagatia gets on the case, investigating the complex coordination needed for the simplest movements, like throwing a ball and catching it. With help from Dr Andrew Green, an exercise physiologist from Johannesburg University, he delves into our secret “sixth sense”, proprioception, which helps us locate our limbs without looking. Anand discovers that an easy task, like kicking a football, needs multiple parts of the brain to coordinate in order to work smoothly. Assistant Professor Jessica Bernard from Texas AMU studies the brain, particularly the cerebellum, a part that controls smooth movements. Dr Bernard explains how tiny glitches and larger lesions in different parts of the brain can make us clumsy in different ways. And how we use our thinking powers to stay balanced; a reason why, as your memory goes with old age, you’re more prone to falling over.

Our listener is not alone. Around the world, there is an under- diagnosed condition that affects millions of us. Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), also known as dyspraxia is a motor coordination condition that affects 5% of the global population. As Professor Amanda Kirby from the University of South Wales and CEO of Do-It solutions explains, if you can’t tie shoelaces, catch a ball and your handwriting is awful, there’s a chance that you have DCD. There’s a large genetic component, so you are likely to come from a clumsy family.

There’s no cure for DCD/Dyspraxia but all of us are capable of becoming better at a chosen task, and there’s a common pathway to mastery, whether that’s bike mechanics or open heart surgery. Professor Roger Kneebone is the author of Becoming Expert, and he talks to Simon about possible solutions to clumsiness, including accepting and living with it.

[Image: Man slipping on banana. Credit: Getty Images]


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5trtzq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9ql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfg683)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3cszf0w)
The Godfather of Hollywood sound

Walter Murch is a superstar sound designer, who's worked on some of Hollywood's biggest films like The Godfather trilogy and Apocalypse Now. His work has immersed audiences in everything from the clattering trains of New York to the rhythmic helicopter rotors of the Vietnam war. Walter's avant-garde production techniques have changed the way cinema sounds. His story is featured in the documentary, Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound. This episode was first broadcast on 1st January 2020.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Still from The Godfather
Credit: Getty Images/Paramount Pictures/Handout


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tryqv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c19)
Holidaying in a pandemic

Many people dream of a trip to Switzerland’s fairytale-like snowy peaks, or the pristine waters of Hawaii. But plans for these and other holidays in 2020 were brought to an abrupt halt by the coronavirus pandemic. With international and domestic travel replete with restrictions, there is no immediate relief in sight.

But the holiday season is nearly here, and as the world gets closer to a vaccine, the holidaying sentiment is also seeing an uptick.

But what is the new normal in planning a holiday? Are hotels and travel companies quick to adapt to travellers’ changed preferences? And how do safety and hygiene concerns affect people’s travel plans?

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Ankita Kumar, travel influencer; Ankita Sheth, co-founder, Vista Rooms; Vivek Shukla, general manager, corporate affairs, The Lalit


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfgb07)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1cw9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5ts2gz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2zbtx3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfgfrc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct1csj)
Finders Keepers

Finders Keepers: A house that came home

What chance do communities have of getting looted artefacts back, and what lessons do the world's museums need to learn? Stijn Schoonderwoerd and Wayne Modest describe how the Netherlands are trying to decolonise their museums. Maori elders Sir Hirini Moko Mead and judge Layne Harvey led a successful campaign for the return of a sacred tribal meeting house, stolen over a hundred years before - what can others learn from their experience?


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5ts673)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4j)
Has the time come for a European Super League?

The idea of a breakaway football league for Europe’s elite clubs has been discussed for decades.

It hasn’t happened yet, but could that be about to change?

Industry experts say officials from the continent’s biggest and most successful teams are meeting behind-closed-doors to discuss the proposition.

So we’re asking - has the time come for a European Super League?


SUN 12:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfgkhh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:32 Assignment (w3csz6m5)
Darfur: A precarious peace

After 17 years of conflict costing 300,000 lives, a peace agreement offers new hope to Sudan’s troubled Darfur region. It comes as UNAMID, the United Nations and African Union peacekeeping force, prepares to finally pull out at the end of December. But with nearly two million displaced people still living in camps and some armed groups yet to sign the agreement, who will protect civilians if the peace fails? For Assignment, Mike Thomson gains rare access to Darfur to hear the stories of those still living with deep uncertainty.

Producer: Bob Howard
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: UN peacekeepers on patrol in Darfur, Sudan. Credit: Bob Howard/BBC)


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5ts9z7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z33qbghlt)
Countries ban UK flights over new coronavirus variant

A new variant of coronavirus is thought be behind a rise in coronavirus cases in parts of the UK. The South-east of England has gone into a strict lockdown over the Christmas period, while other European countries have banned flights to and from the UK.

Also in the programme: Abducted schoolboys have been released in Nigeria and we hear from a profoundly deaf radio DJ.

(Picture: A street in Central London following the introduction of restrictions. Credit: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tsfqc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct1cyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tskgh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjwh)
The Kingdom of Aksum: Africa's trading empire

At its height, the Aksumite Empire extended across the northern Ethiopian and Eritrean highlands, and even included parts of Sudan, Somalia and modern-day Yemen. From the first century BC to the seventh or eighth centuries AD it was one of the most important trading hubs in north-east Africa. It was also one of the earliest states in the world to adopt Christianity. In fact the Persian prophet Mani named the Aksumite Empire as one of the “four great kingdoms on Earth” together with Persia, Rome and China. But despite its power and reputation, we’re only now beginning to understand more about the lives of the people who lived there.

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss the Aksumite Empire and its legacy are Helina Solomon Woldekiros, Assistant Professor of Archaeology at Washington University in St Louis, Missouri; Felege-Selam Solomon Yirga, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Tennessee; and Dr. Niall Finneran, Reader in Historical Archaeology and Heritage Studies at the University of Winchester in the UK. He is author of The Archaeology of Ethiopia.

Produced by Jo Impey for BBC World Service.

Image: 4th century stelae in Aksum, Ethiopia
Image credit: Arterra / Marica van der Meer / Universal Images Group via Getty Images


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xjb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tsp6m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lkgvxh6vy)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary of Manchester United vs. Leeds United at Old Trafford.

Delyth Lloyd is joined by former United and West Brom midfielder Jonathan Greening to discuss the big talking points ahead of the game.

We'll have reaction to the day's early games as Brighton take on Sheffield United and Tottenham face Leicester City.

Elsewhere, we'll bring you the latest from day four of the men's Test match between Australia and India in Adelaide, we'll have reaction to the world super-middleweight title fight between Mexico's Saul Canelo Alvarez and Britain's Callum Smith and the English Women's Super League.

Photo: Leeds manager Marcelo Bielsa (Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tt1g0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2zcsw4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfhdqd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tt564)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6ty)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tt8y8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z33qbhgkv)
Can the new variant of the Covid-19 virus be stopped?

We look at the growing number of European countries banning travel from the UK, and hear a medical expert's opinion on prospects for stopping the virus in its tracks.

Also in the programme, a doctor looks back on the Year of the Plague; and new archaeological evidence that suggests early humans may have hibernated to cope with winter cold and food shortages.

(Picture: France and other European nations ban travel from UK. Credit: EPA/ANDY RAIN)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5ttdpd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79r6ccpvp7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmth9d4n2)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfhrys)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3cszf0w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5ttjfj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9ql)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfhwpx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cwt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xjb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]



MONDAY 21 DECEMBER 2020

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g3yhft)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19z0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qmvq6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Discovery (w3ct1csc)
Steve Haake

Steve Haake has spent much of his career using technology to help elite sports people get better, faster and break records. He has turned his hand to the engineering behind most sports, from studying how golf balls land, to designing new tennis racquets and changing the materials in ice skates. He’s now Professor of Sports Engineering at Sheffield Hallam University and was the Founding Director of the Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre there.

Since the 2012 London Olympics, Steve has also been working to improve the health and wellbeing of all of us. As Chair of the Parkrun Research Board he’s heavily involved in this international phenomenon in which thousands of people have sprinted, jogged and stumbled around a 5-kilometre course on Saturday mornings, which he’s shown really does encourage people to be generally more active.

Jim al-Khalili talks to Steve Haake about how he got from a physics degree to being one of the leading sports engineers in the world, and how we can all improve our health by moving more.


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g3ym5y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x5800n3yzjp)
New covid strain shuts Christmas trade route

As a key Christmas trading route between France and the UK is shut down for 48 hours, France’s Bureau Chief for the Financial Times newspaper, Victor Mallet, tells us this could raise the price of fresh produce in the UK – especially with Brexit pending, and European countries banning travel to and from the UK, where London has just entered the most severe lockdown level in the country. An advisor to the UK government tells us the new strain of coronavirus will not impact the effectiveness of the new vaccine - Cambridge University epidemiologist Dr Hamid Patel also details the evolution of the new mutant covid strain. Plus: is the only way up for the stock markets? Economist Michael Hughes is sceptical.

(Image: The Coronavirus under a microscope. Photo By BSIP/UIG/Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qmzgb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1cw9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g3yqy2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8jhc6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qn36g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct0xb4)
Are Catholics ignoring the Pope on climate change?

In 2015, Pope Francis asked Catholics the world over to protect our planet. But five years on, with emissions and extinctions rising, what difference has it made? And have any other religions followed suit?

For answers, Neal and Graihagh are joined by two leading voices on the environment: Christiana Figueres, who helped the world reach the Paris Climate Agreement, and Cardinal Peter Turkson, the Pope’s leading climate advisor.

They’ll hear evidence from Poland, a Catholic country that runs on coal and where Church leaders are not always in step with the Vatican’s teaching on the environment. They’ll also assess the global impact of the Pope’s green push, and talk about the role of faith in fighting climate change.

Produced by Anna Meisel and Eleanor Biggs
Editor: Ravin Sampat.
Sound Design: Tom Brignall


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g3yvp6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjwh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5z)
Joey Dunlop - Northern Ireland's motorsport hero

In 2000, the Northern Irish motorbike racing champion, Joey Dunlop, was killed in a high-speed crash in Estonia. Dunlop was loved by fans across the sectarian divide for his fearless riding and modest personality. Tens of thousands of people attended the funeral for a champion who also gave up his free time to take aid to orphanages in Eastern Europe. Matt Murphy talks to Stephen Watson, a friend of Joey Dunlop and BBC Northern Ireland presenter.


PHOTO: Joey Dunlop at the Isle of Man TT in 1996 (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g3yzfb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8jqvg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qnbpq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g3z35g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4stlcj5)
US lawmakers agree on Covid aid package

About $900 billion of aid is finally approved - with many Covid-19 economic relief programmes set to expire at the end of the month.

We hear about the convent in South Africa where 8 nuns have died from Covid-19 - and 15 others are seriously ill with the disease.

And a mass farmers protest in India enters its fourth week. The farmers say they won't back down - even though a number have died because of the cold.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g3z6xl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4stlh89)
Covid-19 mutation: European countries shut borders with UK

Flights and ferries are cancelled and the Channel Tunnel is shut in response to a Covid-19 mutation spreading quickly in London and the south-east of England.

Europe's health chiefs are set to approve one of the Covid vaccines -- we'll be asking an expert in Germany for his hopes.

And Hungary has banned same-sex couples from adopting. We speak to one couple who managed to adopt a boy before the law came into force.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g3zbnq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4stlm0f)
European countries cut transport links to the UK

It follows concerns over a Covid-19 variant spreading quickly in London and the south-east of England.

Also a warning that if Britain fails to reach an agreement with the European Union on trade talks it could hit the economy three times harder than coronavirus.

And we speak to a black barrister mistaken for a defendant.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g3zgdv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2y)
Hermann Hauser: Is Europe failing to create tech champions?

The tech sector is fast becoming a battleground where the world’s greatest economic powers, the US and China, are competing for power and influence. Where is Europe in this race to shape the digital future? We speak to Hermann Hauser, a tech entrepreneur and venture capitalist who has profoundly shaped Europe and the UK’s technology sector. Is Europe failing to build its own tech champions?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qntp7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7kf)
Selling Christmas in 2020

How do brands strike the right tone in their Christmas adverts when many consumers have taken a financial hit? Elizabeth Hotson goes on an advertising odyssey and talks to Sarah Traverso, Group Director of Integrated Marketing and Content for Coca-Cola in the US, a company so central to Christmas advertising that some think Coca Cola invented Santa Claus. A myth quickly debunked by Ann Christine Diaz, the creativity editor at Advertising Age. What is the secret behind a successful Christmas campaign? A question for Simon Lloyd from DentsuMB, who was until recently the creative director of the advertising agency behind the John Lewis department store Christmas adverts. Global advertising spend is expected to contract by 10% ( $63bn) this year and with people spending so much time at home during the pandemic, the focus has gone to online advertising and social media, as James McDonald, Head of Data at the World Advertising Research Center, explains.

(Photo: socially-distanced Santa Claus in a mask in New York City, Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszml0)
The Great Dictator

In late 1940, The Great Dictator was first released in the USA. In his first role in talking movies, Charlie Chaplin satirised Adolf Hitler and his Nazi followers, before America had joined World War II. The film was a commercial success, but at the time, many people thought it should never have been made. Louise Hidalgo hears the memories of Hollywood set designer, Laurence Irving, and Chaplin's official biographer, David Robinson. The programme was first broadcast in 2010.

PHOTO: Charlie Chaplin in The Great Dictator (Bettmann/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g3zl4z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xb4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qnyfc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4c)
The joy of reindeer

What does a reindeer smell like? And how do they manage to survive in one of the harshest climates in the world, with temperatures that can drop to minus 30 degrees Celsius? Kim Chakanetsa talks all things reindeer with two women who follow these extraordinary animals for a living.

Anne Louise Næss Gaup is a reindeer herder from the indigenous Sámi community in Norway. She was brought up in a family of traditional herders and she spends most of her life on the road, looking after her migrating herd. She talks about her hard but rewarding work; why these animals are so important for her culture; and why it’s very inappropriate to ask her how many reindeer she owns.

Dr. Jackie Hrabok-Leppäjärvi has a joint Professorship at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Northwest Campus and at the Sámi Education Institute in Kaamanen, Finland. She teaches reindeer husbandry and applied arts. She started studying reindeer and caribous when she was 18 and she never looked back. She now develops science-based and sustainable reindeer husbandry programmes, helping indigenous communities to protect the animals they base their livelihood on.

Producer: Alice Gioia

Reindeer audio: Courtesy of Bengt Roger Kaaven, NRK SAPMI

Image:
L: Dr. Jackie Hrabok-Leppäjärvi
R: Anne Louise Næss Gaup


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g3zpx3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qp25h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Mayday (w3ct1cxb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g3ztn7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8kl2c)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qp5xm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g3zydc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd45)
My music bus healing a gang divide

Justin Finlayson is a former bus driver on a mission to save young lives. He comes from an area of London which suffers from a long term gang divide. When the violence got particularly bad back in 2017, he drew on his driving background and came up with an idea to try to heal the rivalries. Justin bought a double decker bus, built a recording studio inside, and created a musical sanctuary where young people from warring areas could make music. Justin’s project, which he called United Borders, soon captured the attention of the stars of UK hip hop and grime - Akala, Stormzy and Nines. But the project wasn't easy, and the first bus was burnt down by arsonists. Justin persevered and now he's operating in a new bus, surrounded by young people whose lives he's changed.

Jo Fidgen caught up with Justin to name him of the winners of BBC Inspirations 2020. For full details of the awards and Covid-19 related changes, please check the revised terms on our website: www.bbcworldservice.com/inspirations.

Producers: Harry Graham, Maryam Maruf, Troy Holmes
Editor: Munazza Khan

Picture: Justin Finlayson
Credit: Brunel Johnson


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszml0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4024h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8ktkm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qpfdw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g405wm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z3gzmpcj6)
Countries around the world stop travel from UK

Countries around the world have enforced travel bans on the UK after the emergence in the UK of a highly infectious variant of the coronavirus. The UK government is working "urgently" with its international partners to minimise disruption caused by travel bans imposed by other countries on people and goods from the UK. It comes after France shut its borders with the UK for 48 hours, meaning no lorries or ferries can sail from the port of Dover, and causing long queues.

Also on the programme: a drugs bust in Italy reveals the scale of illegal narcotics production in Syria; and a once in a lifetime celestial event as two planets, Jupiter and Saturn, align.

(Picture: Gatwick Airport on Sunday, as European nations began imposing travel bans. Credit: PA Media)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g409mr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qpnx4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlv7d7cp51g)
More than 30 countries ban UK arrivals over Covid

Many countries banned UK arrivals amid concern at the spread of a new Covid-19 variant. John Strickland is director of the independent aviation consultants JLS Consulting, and discusses the implications for the travel industry. France has also shut its border with the UK for 48 hours, meaning no lorries or ferries can travel from the port of Dover. Tavish Scott is chief executive of the Scottish Salmon Producers Association, and explains what that means for his members. And Ian Wright, chief executive of the Food and Drink Federation in the UK tells us whether British customers might start to see gaps on supermarket fresh produce shelves. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson asks whether the coronavirus pandemic means the era of the big budget Christmas television advert is over.

(Picture: Borders closed sign at Dover port. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g40fcw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5tm0ksfq)
New coronavirus variant: What do we know?

We'll explain what is known about a new coronavirus variant that is spreading rapidly in the UK. The variant was given as the reason for strict new lockdown rules for millions of people in the UK and for the subsequent decisions by dozens countries to suspend arrivals from Britain. We look at the impact of those travel restrictions and hear from people whose Christmas plans were ruined after the rules were tightened over the weekend. Also, Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University will help us answer your questions.

Last week, we spoke to Omar, an American father who lives in a motel in Florida with his family after losing his job as a result of the pandemic. He was facing eviction. Listeners have been contacting Omar, wanting to help. We speak to him about the response, as well as the announce of a new stimulus package in the United States. Does he think it will help?

And we explain “the great conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn”: the planets are set to cross paths today appearing to the naked eye as a “double planet”.

(Photo: Coronavirus Credit: Getty Images)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g40k40)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5tm0kx5v)
Coronavirus conversations: Covid-safe Santas

Three Santas from Finland, the UK and the United States discuss how they are safely dispensing Christmas cheer during this pandemic.

We'll also explain what is known about the new coronavirus variant that is spreading rapidly in the UK. The variant was given as the reason for strict new lockdown rules for millions of people in the UK and for the subsequent decisions by dozens countries to suspend arrivals from Britain. We look at the impact of those travel restrictions and hear from people whose Christmas plans were ruined after the rules were tightened over the weekend.

Over the Christmas period, we also connect with our correspondents around the world to hear how the pandemic has changed the places they cover. Today we go to Russia, one of the hardest-hit countries in the world.

Picture: Santa Larry speaking to BBC OS from the North Pole, AKA Dallas (BBC)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g40nw4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszml0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g40sm8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8lk1d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qq4wn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jxyp0bs29)
2020/12/21 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g40xcd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xb4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qq8ms)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1csd)
Alice Roberts

It’s amazing what we can learn from a pile of old bones. Having worked as a paediatric surgeon for several years (often doing the ward round on roller blades), Alice Roberts spent a decade teaching anatomy to medical students and studying human remains. A niche interest in the collar bone and how it has changed since we evolved from the common ancestor we share with other apes 6 million years ago, led her to some of the biggest questions in science. Who are we? And where do we come from? She is the presenter of several landmark TV series on human evolution and archaeology, such as The Incredible Human Journey and Digging for Britain. And in 2019 she became President of the British Science Association. In conversation with Jim Al Khalili, Alice shares her passion for the bones of our ancient ancestors and of the freshly dead, and describes her own incredible journey from a basement full of medieval bones to an eminent science communicator and public figure.

Producer: Anna Buckley


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4113j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z3gzmq6r3)
Covid: Flights shut down as EU discusses UK virus threat

EU officials are discussing a joint response to a new, more infectious Covid-19 variant in the UK, which has sparked travel bans by many countries. The new strain is said to be up to 70% more transmissible, but there is no evidence that it is more deadly.

Also in the programme: Young people are being infected by South Africa's coronavirus variant; and claims the Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny duped a Russian FSB agent into revealing details of the Novichok attack on him.

Photo: Numerous countries have introduced travel bans on the UK amid concerns over the new coronavirus variant. Credit: PA Media


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g414vn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79rkmnxlvh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fn5rllwtb)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qqj41)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58tgcqqw8z)
More than 40 countries ban UK arrivals over Covid

Many countries banned UK arrivals amid concern at the spread of a new Covid-19 variant. France has also shut its border with the UK for 48 hours, meaning no lorries or ferries can travel from the port of Dover. We get the latest from there with the BBC's Caroline Davies. Tavish Scott, chief executive of the Scottish Salmon Producers Association, explains what that means for his members. And Ian Wright, chief executive of the Food and Drink Federation in the UK tells us whether British customers might start to see gaps on supermarket fresh produce shelves. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson asks whether the coronavirus pandemic means the era of the big budget Christmas television advert is over.

(Picture: Borders closed sign at Dover port. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g418ls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qqmw5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



TUESDAY 22 DECEMBER 2020

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g41dbx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkpz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g41j31)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x194yfgtr5y)
More than 40 countries ban UK arrivals over Covid

The spread of a new variant of covid-19 in the UK has led more than 40 nations to ban flights from the UK. France, the nearest border with mainland Europe, has closed all access. We get the latest from the BBC's Caroline Davies at the port of Dover and hear about potential impact on food producers from Tavish Scott, chief executive of the Scottish Salmon Producers Association. The US Congress votes tonight on a $900 billion coronavirus stimulus package after a deal on its contents was reportedly reached on Sunday. We hear from people lining up outside a food bank in Arlington, Virginia and a volunteer dropping off groceries in one of Washington DC's poorest neighbourhoods. The BBC's Elizabeth Hotson asks whether the coronavirus pandemic means the era of the big budget Christmas television advert is over. Plus, we find out why Singapore's street food or "Hawker" culture has been given UNESCO World Heritage status.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show. Peter Morici, Professor Emeritus of International Business at the R.H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland, in Washington. And Stefanie Yuen Thio, Joint Managing Partner at TSMP Law, in Singapore.

Picture: Dover Port is closed as new travel restrictions to the continent remain in place on December 21, 2020 in Dover, England. Credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g41mv5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8md89)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qr03k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct1d0b)
Warrior elephant guardians

In a remote part of Northern Kenya, former Samburu warriors are elephant keepers, rescuing and raising baby elephants in what’s thought to be Africa’s first community owned and run elephant sanctuary.

At Reteti Elephant Sanctuary they rescue baby elephants that have been injured, orphaned or abandoned. They look after them, rehabilitate them and release them back to the wild. It is transforming the way local communities relate to elephants, in a way that benefits both humans and animals. The sanctuary has brought employment, revenue and a sense of pride. Reteti is on community owned land and it is managed by community members. The local people are now protecting the animals they live alongside.

Now the sanctuary is starting to employ women from the community as keepers too, who bring their own set of skills to the work.

The elephants are also proving an unexpected catalyst for peace, bringing tribes together from all over Northern Kenya, that normally fight over land and resources. Now they are finding ways to work together in peace, to protect the elephants.

(Photo: A baby elephant saying hello to one of the keepers. Credit: Michael Kaloki)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g41rl9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd45)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszml0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g41wbf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8mmrk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qr7lt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct1csd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4202k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4stp8f8)
UK variant of Covid-19 is not more deadly

We hear from a virologist as international health leaders play down concerns about the new variant spreading in London and the south-east of England.

Interpol seizes 40,000 sticks of dynamite in West Africa. But what was it intended to be used for?

And fifty thousand women die in childbirth in Nigeria each year. We hear about a village that has come up with a plan to save lives - and how the government wants to use it for the whole country.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g423tp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4stpd5d)
Covid-19: have politicians really listened to the scientists?

A new report says the British government's confused decision making and poor communication has made it harder for scientists to advise them.

The head of a scientific centre in Wuhan in China says she would welcome visits to investigate claims it was responsible for leaking the coronavirus.

And we listen in to part of an incredible phone call in which Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny apparently tricks a Russian agent into confessing to involvement in his poisoning.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g427kt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4stphxj)
New Covid strain 'could overwhelm UK'

A former chief scientific adviser to the British government says the new mutant strain of the coronavirus will quickly overwhelm the rest of the country.

The border between France and the UK remains shut - but food industry officials say there's no need to panic buy.

And we hear from the award winning author Charles Yu, who says racism against Asian Americans just doesn't make the headlines.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g42c9y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv27)
Saving mums and their unborn babies

Women in a village in Northern Nigeria have come up with an emergency transport scheme that is saving lives.

They decided to act when they saw mums-to-be and their unborn babies dying in childbirth because they couldn’t get to hospital in time.

Their solution also inspired the state government to help thousands of other women.

Produced and presented by Bara’atu Ibrahim


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qrqlb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8bg)
Has the time come for a 4-day working week?

Unilever in New Zealand is the latest firm to trial a 4-day week without cutting pay. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Paddy Gamble, the CEO of Perpetual Guardian which manages trusts, wills and estate planning. A couple of years ago they put their 240 staff on a four-day week but paid them for five. He says productivity has gone up since they introduced it. Charlotte Lockhart runs a global campaign for a 4-day week and she says its easy to do and its doesn't cost very much. But Marc Effron, president of The Talent Strategy Group, a global human resource management consultancy firm says a four day week doesn't actually improve productivity.

(Picture credit: Getty Creative)


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmqj)
The Sound of Music

The heart-warming musical, The Sound of Music, was released in 1965 and went on to become one of the most successful films of all time. It was based on the true story of the von Trapp family singers. But was their life really as it was portrayed in the movie? Maria von Trapp's youngest child, Johannes, talks to Louise Hidalgo. The programme was first broadcast in 2015.

(Photograph: The Trapp Family Singers, whose story inspired the film The Sound of Music, in Salzburg in 1937. Credit: BBC Photo Archives)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g42h22)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct1d0b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qrvbg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcb)
Rachel Barrie: Master whisky blender

Nick Low follows master whisky blender Dr Rachel Barrie on the final year of a three-year journey, as the launch date looms for her new range of whiskies from the Benriach Distillery in the north of Scotland. Her reputation is on the line as she comes up with 10 new whiskies for a range that includes some whiskies which have matured for up to 30 years.

With whisky containing three basic ingredients of water, malted barley and yeast, Rachel explains the process and skill that goes into making her whiskies world-beating, with expressions containing a myriad of flavours. With her own background being in chemistry, we join Rachel in her whisky lab, as she reveals how she puts scientific theories to work on the ancient art of whisky making and the blending of these natural ingredients. She describes the wooden casks and blends of whiskies she uses in the process like a painter’s palette, fine-tuning the flavours, as this precious liquid, stamped with her name, is bottled up and sent to whisky connoisseurs around the world.

Having personally tasted and “nosed” over 150,000 whiskies in her professional life, and become a judge at the World Whisky Competitions, Rachel is one of the most respected blenders in the business. She will give a lesson in whisky tasting with tips of what to look for and how to get all the spectrum of flavours from a sip of “the water of life”.

Image: Rachel Barrie (Credit: Nick Low)


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g42lt6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g42qkb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8ngzg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qs2tq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 Discovery (w3ct1csd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g42v9g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdkq)
Surviving civil war with a tracksuit and tennis racquet

Sam Jalloh learned to play tennis barefoot, with a racquet fashioned out of plywood. He'd grown up poor in Freetown and his motivation to play was at first driven by the allure of a fresh tracksuit. But when Sam took to the court his talent quickly got him noticed by local coaches. He was training around the clock, with a career at the national level beckoning. But while he honed his skills, a brutal civil war was tearing Sierra Leone apart. Even when Sam found himself in the crosshairs of the conflict, he never stopped playing. He’s now a successful tennis coach based in the UK and has a sports foundation that supports young athletes.

Emily Webb caught up with Sam to name him one of the winners of BBC Inspirations 2020. For full details of the awards and Covid-19 related changes, please check the revised terms on our website: www.bbcworldservice.com/inspirations.

Producers: Tom Harding-Assinder, Maryam Maruf, Troy Holmes
Editor: Munazza Khan

Picture Sam Jalloh
Credit: Courtesy of Sam Jalloh


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmqj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g42z1l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8nqgq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qsb9z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g432sq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z3gzms8f9)
France and UK in talks to end Channel disruption

More than 1,500 lorries are stuck in Kent waiting to leave the UK as politicians thrash out a plan to reopen France's border to trade and travel. The French government suspended their movement late on Sunday after the emergence in London and southern England of a highly infectious new variant of coronavirus. French officials say the suspension will remain in force until eleven o'clock tonight GMT.

Also on the programme: We examine claims that Covid-19 first leaked from a laboratory in the Chinese city of Wuhan; and a plea for help from a former US marine now in a Russian prison camp following charges of espionage.

(Picture: Freight lorries queue in Kent Credit: Andrew Matthews, PA Wire)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g436jv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qskt7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlww8pl4nt4)
US Congress passes Covid aid package

The US Congress has passed a long-awaited $900bn package of coronavirus pandemic aid. We get reaction from Carlos Gazitua, who runs the Sergio's chain of Cuban-American restaurants across Florida. And Diane Schanzenbach, director of the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University in Chicago, tells us whether the aid bill is likely to be effective. Also in the programme, in light of a case reaching the US Supreme Court which examines whether multinationals should be held accountable for the working conditions of people in other countries who help make their products, the BBC's Mike Johnson reports on the global chocolate industry, and the plight of some cocoa workers, both children and adults, who have been trafficked across borders. Plus, we find out how the pandemic has impacted ticket sales for the world's biggest lottery, El Gordo, which was drawn today in Spain.

(Picture: The United States Capitol building. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g43b8z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5tm0npbt)
EU-UK coronavirus travel restrictions continue

After dozens of countries imposed travel restrictions on people from the UK over the new coronavirus variant, talks are underway between the British and French governments about how to safely reopen the border. Hundreds of lorries are building up in the south-east of England, unable to cross to the continent via the Channel Tunnel. We speak to one of the lorry drivers currently stranded. And our business correspondent brings us the latest developments.

Our coronavirus expert of the day, Dr Isaac Bogoch, will answer more listener questions on the new variant itself and what we’re learning about whether it poses more of a risk. There are some questions about whether it could be more easily transmissible amongst children in particular.

And we’re revisiting some of the people we’ve spoken to through the year who have shared experiences during the coronavirus crisis. We’ll return to a couple of guests who told us about loneliness under lockdown, who have now struck up a friendship to help them through the pandemic.

(Photo: Lorries parked on the M20 near the port of Dover, December 22, 2020. Credit: Andrew Matthews/PA Wire)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g43g13)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5tm0nt2y)
How will China look back at 2020?

We’re asking BBC journalists to give us their take on an extraordinary year. Kerry Allen is our China analyst from BBC Monitoring and a regular voice on the programme. We’ll hear how China is looking back on 2020.

Also, after dozens of countries imposed travel restrictions on people from the UK over the new coronavirus variant, talks are underway between the British and French governments about how to safely reopen the border. Hundreds of lorries are building up in the south-east of England, unable to cross to the continent via the Channel Tunnel. Our Europe correspondent brings us the latest developments.

And, we’re revisiting some of the people we’ve spoken to through the year who have shared experiences during the coronavirus crisis. We’ll return to a couple of guests who told us about loneliness under lockdown, who have now struck up a friendship to help them through the pandemic.

(Photo: Coronavirus-Detection in Chinese Laboratory. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g43ks7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdkq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmqj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g43pjc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8pfyh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qt1sr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jxyp0fnzd)
2020/12/22 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g43t8h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct1d0b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qt5jw)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz992)
Solar grid brings power to Yemen

A solar farm, set and run by women in the Abs district of Yemen is providing cleaner and cheaper electricity to families. Arvind Kumar is Project Manager in the Yemen Country Office of the United Nations Development Programme. He is overseeing the programme and joins us on the show.

Tackling climate change with data
A global initiative to satellite observations, sensors across land and sea, commercial data sets and even citizen observations from our mobile phones is gathering momentum. Now the UNEP is highlighting environmental data as essential combatting climate change. David Jensen, Head of Policy and Innovation, Crisis Management Branch, UN Environment explains their plans.

Smelltech
In the world of virtual reality, companies normally focus on images and sound to create the most immersive experience. But there is a new kid on the block: olfactory VR. Companies now seek to capture one of our more neglected senses and recreate smell in a virtual environment. Digital Planet reporter Florian Bohr has been finding out more.

The programme is presenter by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

(Image: Getty Images)


Studio Manager: Matilda Macari
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g43y0m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z3gzmt3n6)
Agreement 'reached with France' over UK border

France has confirmed it will start letting traffic from Britain back in from midnight local time, provided drivers produce a negative coronavirus test certificate issued within the previous 72 hours. The measures come as a highly-transmissible coronavirus variant grips south-east England.

Also in the programme: the Israeli coalition government is on the verge of collapse and the country appears to be heading towards a fourth election in two years; and a member of the Russian Parliament tells us the poisoning of Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny isn’t a story for Russians.

(Photo: Chaos at ports caused by EU border closures. Credit: EPA)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g441rr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79rkmp0hrl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fn5rlpsqf)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qtf14)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58tgcqts62)
US sues Walmart for alleged role in opioid crisis

In a lawsuit filed on Tuesday, prosecutors said American retail giant Walmart filled hundreds of thousands of questionable prescriptions, "knowingly" violating vetting rules and fuelling the country's opioid crisis. We get the latest from Wall Street Journal Justice Department reporter Sadie Gurman. The US Congress has passed a long-awaited $900bn package of coronavirus pandemic aid. Diane Schanzenbach, director of the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University in Chicago, tells us whether the aid bill is likely to be effective. Also in the programme, in light of a case reaching the US Supreme Court which examines whether multinationals should be held accountable for the working conditions of people in other countries who help make their products, the BBC's Mike Johnson reports on the global chocolate industry, and the plight of some cocoa workers, both children and adults, who have been trafficked across borders. Plus, we find out how the pandemic has impacted ticket sales for the world's biggest lottery, El Gordo, which was drawn today in Spain.

(Picture: a sign for a pharmacy is posted at a Walmart store. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g445hw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv27)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qtjs8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3cszvcb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 23 DECEMBER 2020

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g44980)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g44f04)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x194yfgxn31)
Trump urges Congress to amend 'wasteful' coronavirus aid bill

President Donald Trump has rejected a $900 billion bipartisan Covid stimulus package, calling it "a disgrace". We get the latest from Politico's Daniel Lippman in Washington. In a lawsuit filed on Tuesday, prosecutors said American retail giant Walmart filled hundreds of thousands of questionable prescriptions, "knowingly" violating vetting rules and fueling the country's opioid crisis. We get the latest from Wall Street Journal Justice Department reporter Sadie Gurman. Exercise bike-maker Peloton has bought a US-based fitness equipment company after customers in the States complained of long waits for their bikes, caused by log jams at ports. Expert on global supply chains Willy Shih, Professor of Management Practice at Harvard Business School, explains the move. Also in the show, the BBC's Mike Johnson reports on the global chocolate industry, and the plight of some cocoa workers, both children and adults, who have been trafficked across borders in west Africa. US President Donald Trump has issued an order that all future federal buildings must be "beautiful" and preferably built in a classical Greek or Roman style. A reasonable instruction? We ask Robert Ivy, Chief Executive of the American Institute of Architects. Plus, we find out how the pandemic has impacted ticket sales for the world's biggest lottery, El Gordo, which was drawn in Spain on Tuesday.

(Picture: US President Donald Trump. Picture credit: Reuters.)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g44jr8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8q95d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qtx0n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct1czk)
My Perfect City

My Perfect City: Employment in Toronto

Fi Glover returns with panellists Dr Ellie Cosgrave, director of the UCL Urban Laboratory, and global city adviser Greg Clark to test the credentials of the most pioneering city initiatives around the world. Who is leading the way when it comes to solving humanity’s most pressing problems?

With unemployment rising around the world in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, the team assesses Toronto’s long-term strategy to boost employment.

Following the decline of the manufacturing sector in Canada, its largest city Toronto faced high unemployment levels. But over the last 30 years it has taken steps to increase its labour market, diversify its employment sector and attract large numbers of people into work.

Is it a model other cities should follow?

The team also consider Taipei’s employment record.


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g44nhd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdkq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmqj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g44s7j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8qjnn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qv4hx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz992)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g44wzn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4sts5bc)
Trump Rejects 'Wasteful' Coronavirus Stimulus Bill

Donald Trump has rejected a nine-hundred-billion-dollar coronavirus relief package which was agreed by the US Congress on Monday after months of delay. Mr Trump said the bill was a disgrace, wasting money on foreign countries and special interests, whilst failing to provide enough to American families.

France has begun reopening its borders to traffic from Britain after a forty-eight-hour closure which has left thousands of trucks stranded in south-east England. European Union citizens and residents, freight drivers and others will be allowed in, provided they have a negative coronavirus test.

Uganda has one of the largest parliaments in Africa. And it’s about to get even bigger. Since the last elections in 2016, dozens of new constituencies have been created and this means that - aside from electing their new president - Ugandans will be choosing more MPs when they vote on January 14th.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g450qs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4sts92h)
UK-France Services Return as Travel Ban Eased

France has begun reopening its borders to traffic from Britain after a forty-eight-hour closure which has left thousands of trucks stranded in south-east England. European Union citizens and residents, freight drivers and others will be allowed in, provided they have a negative coronavirus test.

Donald Trump has rejected a nine-hundred-billion-dollar coronavirus relief package which was agreed by the US Congress on Monday after months of delay. Mr Trump said the bill was a disgrace, wasting money on foreign countries and special interests, whilst failing to provide enough to American families.

American military vessels have arrived off the coast of Somalia to help with the withdrawal of around seven hundred US troops who were deployed in the fight against the militant group, Al Shabaab. Earlier this month, President Donald Trump ordered all American soldiers to leave Somalia.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g454gx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4stsdtm)
Live news, business and sport from around the world.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g45871)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxt)
Thomas Chatterton Williams: Race, identity and power

Not just in the United States, but across the world the Black Lives Matter movement has prompted debate about race, identity and power. It is a campaign predicated on ideas about what it means to be black and white; but what if those very terms are themselves part of the problem? Stephen Sackur speaks to Thomas Chatterton Williams, a mixed-race American writer and self-declared ex-black man, whose ideas present a challenge to so-called 'woke' culture. How much room is there right now for respectful, thoughtful debate?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qvmhf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8nr)
Cargo shipping in the pandemic

How the shipping industry has fared in 2020. Ed Butler speaks to Lars Jensen from SeaIntelligence Consulting about the ups and downs of the shipping industry during the pandemic, in a year that has seen a collapse in economic activity, but a boom in online shopping. And Bridget Rosewell, commissioner for the independent National Infrastructure Commission in the UK, explains why disruption to supply chains could cause businesses to rethink the way they ship goods around the world.

(Photo: A cargo ship is unloaded at the UK port of Felixstowe, Credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmss)
Satyajit Ray - India's master of film

Bengali film director Satyajit Ray has been described as one of the most influential directors in world cinema, with acclaimed US director Martin Scorsese among those crediting him as an inspiration. Early on in his career, Satyajit Ray released the classic Apu trilogy, which followed the life of a character called Apu from his childhood in rural Bengal to adulthood. Soumitra Chatterjee, the actor who played the title character in the final film, spoke to Farhana Haider. Soumitra Chatterjee died in November 2020.

(Photo: Satyajit Ray in 1989: Credit AFP/Getty Images)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g45cz5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct1czk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qvr7k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 The Documentary (w3ct1d0c)
The Digital Human: Messiah

Why do so many of us treat Silicon Valley billionaires like our new messiahs? For some, people like Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and engineer Elon Musk are the charismatic high priests for this new dark age. But how did we get to this point? And where will our adoration for technologies and those who create them lead us?

(Illustration of messiah. Credit: Seonaid Mackay)


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g45hq9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Reith Lectures (w3ct1cyp)
From climate crisis to real prosperity

In this final lecture, Dr Mark Carney turns his attention to climate change, arguing that the roots of our environmental emergency lie in a deeper crisis of values. He suggests how we can create an ecosystem in which society’s values broaden the market’s conceptions of value. In this way, individual creativity and market dynamism can be channelled to achieve broader social goals including inclusive growth and environmental sustainability.

(Photo: Outgoing Bank of England governor Mark Carney makes a keynote address at the 2020 United Nations Climate Change Conference. Credit: Tolga Akmen/Getty Images)


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g45mgf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8rcwk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qvzqt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Digital Planet (w3csz992)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g45r6k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdsh)
The sisterhood vs the man who gave them HIV

Diane Reeve is a Texan martial arts teacher who discovered that her boyfriend had knowingly infected her and many other women with HIV/Aids. She then tracked down a number of his former partners, rallied the women together to testify against him in a groundbreaking case. He was sentenced to 45 years in prison. Diane is now an advocate for safer online dating and an Aids awareness activist.

Jo Fidgen caught up with Diane to name her of the winners of BBC Inspirations 2020. For full details of the awards and Covid-19 related changes, please check the revised terms on our website: www.bbcworldservice.com/inspirations.

Producers: Tom Harding-Assinder, Maryam Maruf, Troy Holmes
Editor: Munazza Khan

Picture: Diane Reeve
Credit: Alyssa Vincent


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmss)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g45vyp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8rmct)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qw772)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 The Documentary (w3ct1d0c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g45zpt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z3gzmw5bd)
Soldiers join healthcare staff in southeast England to test thousands of stranded truck drivers

Soldiers have joined healthcare staff in Kent to carry out rapid tests on thousands of stranded lorry drivers. France ended its ban on UK arrivals on condition of a negative coronavirus test, but the backlog is expected to take days to clear. This long wait has led to clashes between some lorry drivers and police.

Also on the programme: President Trump has pardoned four guards from the private security firm Blackwater jailed for killing 14 civilians including two children in Baghdad - we hear from one Iraqi father; and the co-creator of the sleeper TV hit, the Queen's Gambit, on waiting 30 years to bring it to screen.

(Picture: A police officer speaks to lorry drivers at the entrance to the Port of Dover in Kent Credit: Andrew Matthews/PA Wire)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g463fy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qwgqb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxpqf5xw4j)
Trump denounces 'wasteful' coronavirus aid bill

US President Trump has urged Congress to boost individual coronavirus payments to $2,000. At the same time, he criticised what he described as "wasteful" items in a new aid package. Andrew Stettner is a senior fellow at policy organisation The Century Foundation in Washington DC, and discusses the implications if the bill is not signed into law soon. Also in the programme, we have the latest developments from the Anglo-French border, where thousands of lorries are queuing to make it into France, now drivers with a negative coronavirus test are being allowed to proceed into the country. As Formula 1 motor racing says it has been in discussions with Amazon over possibly streaming some of its races on the platform, Guardian F1 correspondent Giles Richards tells us it could help drive younger viewers to the sport. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson investigates how someone's accent can impact their job prospects.

(Picture: Donald Trump announces his opposition to the coronavirus aid bill. Picture credit: White House.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g46762)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5tm0rl7x)
Coronavirus conversations: Living with grief

Over the Christmas period, we are revisiting some of the people who have shared their experiences during the coronavirus crisis with the programme. Today we talk about grief and hear from people who have lost loved ones to Covid-19.

We also bring you the latest on the travel restrictions on people from the UK, that were imposed by dozens of countries over the new coronavirus variant. France has eased its ban but it could take days to clear a backlog of lorry drivers in the south-east England. The drivers need a negative Covid test result before they can cross to the continent. We speak to our correspondents and truckers about the situation.

And we talk through the latest coronavirus stories with Dr Maria Sundaram and get some audience questions answered.

(Photo: Remembrance candle. Credit: Getty Images / Jordi Clave / EyeEm)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g46by6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5tm0rq01)
South African Covid variant found in UK

The UK has detected two cases of another more transmissible variant of coronavirus. The two recently identified variants - one found first in the UK and the South African variant - share some similarities but have evolved separately. We'll speak to our health expert about what we know so far.

Also, we are revisiting some of the people we’ve spoken to through the year who have shared experiences during the coronavirus pandemic. Today we talk about grief and hear from people who have lost loved ones to Covid-19.

And we’re asking our BBC colleagues to give us their take on the extraordinary year of 2020. Today we speak to Divya Arya in India, a country which this year has seen more than ten million confirmed coronavirus cases and more than 146,000 Covid related deaths.

(Photo: Queues of stationary lorries on the M20 motorway in the UK after France closed the border over concerns about one of the new coronavirus variants. Credit: EPA/VICKIE FLORES)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g46gpb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdsh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmss)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g46lfg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8sbvl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qwypv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jxyp0jkwh)
2020/12/23 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g46q5l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct1czk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qx2fz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszccz)
Ambiguous loss: a different kind of grief

Have you lost a loved one who is still a part of your life in some way? Did it leave you feeling confused or frozen about how to continue with life? Claudia Hammond examines the distressing phenomenon known as ambiguous loss – the enormous challenge of dealing with a loss when you aren’t sure what has happened, leaving you searching for answers, unable to move on.

What has the pandemic done to our memories? Anecdotally many people report that they keep forgetting things which they are sure they would have remembered before. Psychologist Catherine Loveday of the University of Westminster examines the new emerging evidence.

Our brain is formed of two hemispheres and in most of us, the two halves are interconnected by millions of nerve fibres that form a large bridging structure called the corpus callosum. But some babies are born without a corpus callosum, linking the two sides. A quarter of these babies grow up with serious developmental difficulties and half have mild to moderate cognitive problems. But a quarter have no problems at all suggesting that somehow the brain is compensating for the low level of connectivity between the two hemispheres. New brain scanning research at the University of Geneva by Dr Vanessa Sifreddi has revealed how the brain does this.

Are you more open, less conscientious or more neurotic than you used to be? It used to be thought that personality was fixed in adulthood but it can and does change. Psychologist Eileen Graham has studied data from thousands of people and explains how and which traits are likely to increase or decrease.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

(Picture: Vintage orange velvet armchair in a stylish, minimal domestic room. Photo credit: Catherine Falls Commercial/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g46txq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z3gzmx0k9)
French warplanes over Central African Republic

The French President Emmanuel Macron has ordered French warplanes to begin immediate flights over the Central African Republic, to try to put a stop to further efforts to destabilise the country, ahead of Sunday's general election. The United Nations says the fourth largest town of Bambari was retaken from rebels who'd seized it on Tuesday. The government has accused the former president François Bozizé of joining up with armed groups in an attempt to stage a coup -- something he's denied.

Also in the programme: Thousands of migrants in Bosnia are having to live outdoors in freezing conditions, after an emergency camp was closed down and then set on fire; and why isn't President Trump signing the US coronavirus relief bill?

(Photo: Part of the capital Bangui, Central African Republic. Credit: Reuters file photo)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g46ynv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79rkmp3dnp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fn5rlspmj)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qx9y7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58tgcqxp35)
Trump denounces 'wasteful' coronavirus aid bill

US President Trump has urged Congress to boost individual coronavirus payments to $2,000. At the same time, he criticised what he described as "wasteful" items in a new aid package. Andrew Stettner is a senior fellow at policy organisation The Century Foundation in Washington DC, and discusses the implications if the bill is not signed into law soon. Also in the programme, we have the latest developments from the Anglo-French border, where thousands of lorries are queuing to make it into France, now drivers with a negative coronavirus test are being allowed to proceed into the country. As Formula 1 motor racing says it has been in discussions with Amazon over possibly streaming some of its races on the platform, Guardian F1 correspondent Giles Richards tells us it could help drive younger viewers to the sport. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson investigates how someone's accent can impact their job prospects.

(Picture: Donald Trump announces his opposition to the coronavirus aid bill. Picture credit: White House.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g472dz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbxt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qxfpc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Documentary (w3ct1d0c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



THURSDAY 24 DECEMBER 2020

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g47653)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct1cyz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g479x7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x194yfh0k04)
Brexit deal edges closer

As Brexit trade deal appears to be closer than ever we get the latest on the negotiations. The UK Kingdom has ordered anyone who's travelled to South Africa - or had close contact with anyone who has been in South Africa - to quarantine immediately as scientists have detected cases in the UK of a new strain of Covid-19 that originated from that country. UK online retailer Boohoo was this week accused of selling clothes made by workers in Pakistan who earn just 39 cents an hour. It highlighted a problem that is facing the industry as the global demand for cheap clothes continues to grow, as we hear from Noelle Hatley, Senior Lecturer in Fashion Business at the Manchester Fashion Institute. Plus, the BBC's Elizabeth Hotson investigates how someone's accent can impact their job prospects. And Pilita Clark discovers the unexpected benefit of office Christmas parties going online.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show. Mehmal Safraz, co-founder of The Current PK, in Lahore and Alexander Kauffman, environment reporter for the Huffington Post, in New York.

(Picture: The European Union Flag and the Union Jack are seen in front of the Berlaymont, the EU Commission headquarters. Credit: Getty Images.)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g47fnc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8t62h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qxsxr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6m6)
Shipwreck

In April 2015, more than 1000 refugees and migrants drowned when the old fishing boat they were travelling on sank in the Mediterranean. It was the area's worst shipwreck since World War Two.

But the people who died are not forgotten. Not by their families and friends, and not by a professor of forensic pathology at the University of Milan.

“There’s a body that needs to be identified, you identify it. This is the first commandment of forensic medicine,” says Dr Cristina Cattaneo.

Assignment tells the story of the raising of the fishing boat from the Mediterranean's seabed, and Dr Cattaneo's efforts to begin to identify the people who lost their lives on that moonless night on the edge of Europe.

Producer/presenter: Linda Pressly

(Image: Dr Cristina Cattaneo. Credit: Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g47kdh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdsh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmss)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g47p4m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8tfkr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qy1f0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszccz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g47swr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4stw27g)
Are we close to a UK-EU trade deal?

European Union and United Kingdom negotiators are reported to be closing in on a trade deal, raising hopes that a chaotic economic break between the two on New Year’s Day could be averted. Britain withdrew from the EU at the end of January this year. An economic transition period which largely maintained the status quo expires on December 31st.

The Central African Republic is set to vote in national elections on Sunday. However, the security situation has led to some opposition politicians to call for the election to be postponed. Hundreds of Rwandan troops and Russian mercenaries operating in the country separate to the UN forces there in defending government positions have complicated the picture further. So is there any prospect of a meaningful election happening?

Gunmen in Afghanistan killed the head of the country's biggest independent election monitoring group on Wednesday. Yousuf Rasheed had spoken out about voter intimidation and fraud. His killing is the latest in a series of assassinations, that have surged in recent weeks.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g47xmw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4stw5zl)
EU and UK closing in on a trade deal?

European Union and United Kingdowm negotiators are reported to be closing in on a trade deal, raising hopes that a chaotic economic break between the two on New Year’s Day could be averted. Britain withdrew from the EU at the end of January this year. An economic transition period which largely maintained the status quo expires on December 31st.

In Italy, a strict new lockdown comes into effect today that will last until January 6th. With more than 70,000 deaths associated with the virus, Italy is the worst affected country in Europe, in terms of coronavirus fatalities.

There have been reports of an massacre with in the western Benishangul-Gumuz region of Ethiopia. The Ethiopian Human Rights Commission say that more than 100 people may have been killed when unidentified armed assailants attacked a village on Wednesday.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g481d0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4stw9qq)
Are we close to a UK-EU trade deal?

European Union and United Kingdowm negotiators are reported to be closing in on a trade deal, raising hopes that a chaotic economic break between the two on New Year’s Day could be averted. Britain withdrew from the EU at the end of January this year. An economic transition period which largely maintained the status quo expires on December 31st.

The Central African Republic is set to vote in national elections on Sunday. However, the security situation has led to some opposition politicians to call for the election to be postponed. Hundreds of Rwandan troops and Russian mercenaries operating in the country separate to the UN forces there in defending government positions have complicated the picture further. So is there any prospect of a meaningful election happening?

Gunmen in Afghanistan killed the head of the country's biggest independent election monitoring group on Wednesday. Yousuf Rasheed had spoken out about voter intimidation and fraud. His killing is the latest in a series of assassinations, that have surged in recent weeks.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g48544)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4k)
Are we getting closer to a protein revolution in medicine?

One of biology's biggest mysteries has been solved using artificial intelligence. Predicting how a protein folds into a unique three-dimensional shape has puzzled scientists for half a century. Will a better understanding of protein shapes developed by the London-based AI lab, DeepMind, now play a key role in the development of new drugs? With Tanya Beckett


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qyjdj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7y7)
Brexit talks continue ahead of likely deal

Talks between the UK and the EU on a post-Brexit trade agreement continued during the night, but a deal is expected to be unveiled on Thursday. Negotiators in Brussels are said to be trying to finalise details on fishing quotas, which have proved an obstacle to an agreement during months of talks. On the programme we'll hear from Sally Jones, Brexit lead at Ernst and Young, Charles Grant at the Centre for European Reform, as well as the BBC's Political Correspondent Rob Watson.

(Picture credit: Reuters)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmn8)
Studio Ghibli - Japan's Oscar-winning animators

In August 1986 the first Studio Ghibli film hit the cinema screens. It would go on to bring Japanese animation to a world audience. Hirokatsu Kihara was a young animator who joined the studio to work on Castle in the Sky, its first feature length film. He spoke to Ashley Byrne of Made in Manchester about the early days of the great animation studio.

Photo: Oscar-winning animator Hayao Miyazaki, one of the founders of Studio Ghibli. Credit: Getty Images.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g488w8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6m6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qyn4n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr0)
What's food got to do with destiny?

What is it about garlic that wards off the evil eye? Why is rice sometimes thrown over the happy couple at a wedding?

The way we grow, eat and use certain foods is said to bring us luck - good or bad - but why do we imbue them with these mystical powers, and why do these beliefs persist?

Tamasin Ford explores some of the most common and also unusual food superstitions practiced around the world.

Producers: Simon Tulett and Sarah Stolarz

(Picture: Two hands pulling a wishbone. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)

Contributors:

Jayanti 'Jonty' Rajagopalan, owner of Detours India, Hyderabad;
Mae Azango, journalist with FrontPage Africa, Liberia;
Tasha Marks, food historian, London.


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g48dmd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjwj)
Mugham: the sound of Azerbaijan

Azerbaijan’s strategic location along the old Silk Road and its wealth of natural resources has made it a prime target for warring empires over centuries. The conquests and the invasions by Turkic and Persian peoples find echoes in the traditional art music of Azerbaijan known as mugham. The influence of the Russian and then Soviet empire also brought change for mugham, the effects of which are still debated today.

Mugham is characterised by a large degree of improvisation, but musicians learn for years from mugham masters to acquire the skills which allow them to extemporise within a strict framework. It’s no surprise to learn that in the 20th century, mugham fused with that other great improvisatory music – jazz. With the help of musical examples, Rajan Datar and guests will explore how mugham works and the instruments such as the tar and the kamancha that give this music its unique sound.

Joining Rajan will be ethnomusicologist and tar player Dr Polina Dessiatnitchenko who’s writing a book on mugham in post-Soviet Azerbaijan; Jeffrey Werbock, musician and chair of the Mugham Society of America; and music producer and artistic patron Nasib Piriyev, who set up BUTA Arts, an organisation designed to raise awareness of Azeri music and culture.

Produced by Fiona Clampin for BBC World Service.


Image: Alim Qasimov sings an improvised Mugham during the Opening Ceremony for the Baku 2015 European Games
Image credit: Francois Nel/Getty Images for BEGOC


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh60)
The yachting rescue that gripped the world

British sailor Pete Goss was taking part in the Vendee Globe single-handed round-the-world yacht race in 1996 when he received a distress call from another participant. French sailor Raphael Dinelli was 160 miles away in the Southern Ocean around Antarctica – but Pete Goss went back through hurricane force winds to rescue him.

Photo: Vendee Globe round-the-world race yacht "Aqua Quorum" carrying rescued French sailor Raphael Dinelli and British sailor Peter Goss off the southern coast of Tasmania 07 January. (Photo credit STR/AFP via Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g48jcj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8v8sn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qywmx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 Health Check (w3cszccz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g48n3n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdby)
After facing death row, the inmate who turned investigator

Sohail Yafat was in his 20s and working in an IT college in Lahore when he was wrongfully incarcerated for murder and facing death row. Behind bars he continued to fight for justice, while also quietly revolutionising his prison when he organised its first ever Christmas party. After a decade in jail, Sohail was released. He joined the legal charity Justice Project Pakistan as a private investigator. Through their work, the number of executions has dropped in Pakistan. Sohail is now working on building a reintegration centre to support recently released prisoners.

Emily Webb caught up with Sohail to name him one of the winners of BBC Inspirations 2020. For full details of the awards and Covid-19 related changes, please check the revised terms on our website: www.bbcworldservice.com/inspirations.

Producers: Maryam Maruf, Troy Holmes
Editor: Munazza Khan

With thanks to Ghazanfar Hyder for this voiceover performance in the interview with Sohail first broadcast on 16 December, 2018

Picture: Sohail Yafat
Credit: Ali Haider, JPP


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmn8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g48rvs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8vj8x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qz445)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g48wlx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z3gzmz27h)
Brexit deal: Details being finalised

The European Union and Britain are still trying to finalise the terms of a post-Brexit deal that will set out their relations for the next generation.

Also, President Trump pardons two close associates convicted as a result of the inquiry into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 election.

And rescuing a world-famous Christmas Eve tradition, the carols from King's College Cambridge.

(Photo credit: Getty Images)


THU 15:00 A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols (w3ct1cwb)
A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols

For millions listening on radio and online around the world, A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols, recorded from the Chapel of King's College, Cambridge, marks the beginning of Christmas. It is based around nine Bible readings which tell the story of the loving purposes of God. They are interspersed with carols old and new, sung by the world-famous chapel choir. In a normal year the choir would also lead the congregation in traditional Christmas hymns, but this year there was no congregation present. With Covid restrictions and the need for social distancing within the choir, a number of new arrangements have been made which capitalise on the rare opportunity to hear these ever popular hymns in versions for choir only.

As is so often the case, this year's service marks the musical contribution (through their arrangements and descants) of several former Directors of Music, including Sir David Willcocks, Sir Philip Ledger and Sir Stephen Cleobury, as well as the current Director, Daniel Hyde.

Photo: Chapel of King's College, Cambridge Credit: Getty Images


THU 16:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qzhck)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 16:32 BBC OS (w172x2t5tm0vjt9)
Brexit: UK and EU agree trade deal

The United Kingdom and European Union have agreed a post-Brexit trade deal after months of disagreements over fishing rights and future business rules. We get the latest from London and Brussels.

Also, our health expert answers your questions about the coronavirus pandemic. Today we are joined by Dr Helen Wimalarathna, a molecular epidemiologist at the University of Buckingham in the UK.

And we hear from hospital chaplains around the world as they continue to provide emotional support and guidance to staff, patients and families through the pandemic.

(Photo: European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen prepares to address a media conference on Brexit negotiations at EU headquarters in Brussels, Belgium. Credit: EPA/Francisco Seco)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g497v9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5tm0vlx4)
Brexit: UK and EU agree trade deal

The United Kingdom and European Union have agreed a post-Brexit trade deal after months of disagreements over fishing rights and future business rules. We get the latest from London and Brussels.

Also, our health expert answers your questions about the coronavirus pandemic. Today we are joined by Dr Helen Wimalarathna, a molecular epidemiologist at the University of Buckingham in the UK.

And we hear from hospital chaplains around the world as they continue to provide emotional support and guidance to staff, patients and families through the pandemic.

(Photo: European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen prepares to address a media conference on Brexit negotiations at EU headquarters in Brussels, Belgium. Credit: EPA/Francisco Seco)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g49clf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdby)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmn8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g49hbk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8w7rp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qzvly)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jxyp0mgsl)
2020/12/24 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g49m2p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6m6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5qzzc2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1h)
A year with Covid -19

It was the end of December 2019 when reports of a new flu like infection first came out of China. Within weeks millions of people were in lockdown as the virus took hold around the world.

In this programme we look back and revisit the scientists who were ready, those who had been studying bat coronaviruses and warning of their pandemic potential.

The scientific response was immediate. The coronavirus tests now used across the world were being developed within a few hours of news of the outbreak in China, and the vaccines we now have licenced for use began to be formulated just a few days later.


(Image: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g49qtt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z3gzmzxgd)
Post-Brexit trade deal agreed

After months of difficult negotiations, the EU and UK have come to an agreement on what their future relationship will look like. The deal contains new rules for how the UK and EU will live, work and trade together. Also in the programme: In the United States, there's political turmoil over the fate of a $900 billion coronavirus stimulus bill; and how do professional Santas find work during a pandemic?

(Photo: Prime Minister Boris Johnson during a media briefing in Downing Street, London, on the agreement of a post-Brexit trade deal. Credit: Paul Grover/Daily Telegraph/PA Wire).


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g49vky)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79rkmp69ks)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fn5rlwljm)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5r06vb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172x593xbd7lvg)
How will Covid change our cities?

This year has seen our cities coming under pressure as they struggled to withstand the impact of the coronavirus. City centres were deserted as shops shut and people stayed away. But in some city streets there was a new community spirit as people faced the pandemic together and supported neighbours they'd never met before. In this programme, Tamasin Ford investigates what the future could be for our cities, and asks how they need to change if they are to survive, and even flourish. We hear from architect Siri Zanelli; the mayor of Bristol in the south-west of England, Marvin Rees; transport planner Susan Claris; Singapore-based Lauren Sorkin, the head of the Resilient Cities network; Liu Qian of Greenpeace in Beijing, and Rosamund Kissi-Debrah who has been a campaigner for better air quality since the death of her daughter from asthma in 2013. And we have a report from Anna Holligan in Amsterdam on how its citizens feel about getting their city back. (Image: Mumbai skyline in lockdown March 2020. Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g49zb2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4k)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5r0blg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjr0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



FRIDAY 25 DECEMBER 2020

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4b326)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjwj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh60)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4b6tb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19f9l7yxyy)
Shaping the post-covid economic recovery

Covid-19 is set to prompt radical long term changes to how we live and work, so what lessons can be learnt when we eventually emerge from the pandemic? Could the changes in the way we work herald higher productivity and happier people in the future?

Martin Webber speaks to some of the people who managed to thrive during a very difficult year, including the milkman who saw a boom in deliveries and the dancer who found work in South Korea when the London stage went dark.

Plus, this year has seen our cities coming under pressure as they struggled to withstand the impact of the coronavirus. Housing, transport, air quality and sanitation all came under the spotlight and in some places were found wanting. City centres were deserted as shops shut and people stayed away. But in some city streets there was a new community spirit as people faced the pandemic together and supported the neighbours they'd never met before.
Tamasin Ford investigates what the future could be for our cities, and asks how they need to change if they are to survive, and even flourish.


(Image: A sign announces that a restaurant is "safely open" in Los Angeles, California. Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4bbkg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8x2zl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5r0ptv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3cszth5)
Nights out with Maradona and Ice Hockey with Cruyff

Thomas Rongen shares some fascinating stories and memories, from the glory days of the North American Soccer League in the early 1980s, to leading American Samoa to it's first ever international victory.

Picture: Thomas Rongen appeals to the fourth official during a match between the Carolina RailHawks and the Tampa Bay Rowdies in 2015 (Photo by Andy Mead/YCJ/Icon Sportswire/Corbis/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4bg9l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdby)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmn8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4bl1q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8xbgv)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5r0yb3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4bpsv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4styz4k)
What does a trade deal mean for the UK and EU?

EU ambassadors are to receive a Christmas Day briefing on the post-Brexit trade deal reached with the UK. So, what might it mean for the EU and UK?

What are the psychological effects for the Nigerian schoolboys detained and freed from Boko Haram?

And we meet an exciting new musical talent from Sierra Leone who has just released a fresh Christmas carol medley.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4btjz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4stz2wp)
EU diplomats to get Brexit trade deal briefing

EU ambassadors are to receive a Christmas Day briefing on the post-Brexit trade deal reached with the UK. So, what might it mean for the EU and UK?

What are the psychological effects for the Nigerian schoolboys detained and freed from Boko Haram?

And we meet an exciting new musical talent from Sierra Leone who has just released a fresh Christmas carol medley.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4by93)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wn4stz6mt)
Christmas Day briefing for EU diplomats on trade deal

EU ambassadors are to receive a Christmas Day briefing on the post-Brexit trade deal reached with the UK. So, what might it mean for the EU and UK?

What are the psychological effects for the Nigerian schoolboys detained and freed from Boko Haram?

And we meet an exciting new musical talent from Sierra Leone who has just released a fresh Christmas carol medley.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4c217)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc21)
Jane Goodall: A life with chimpanzees

HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to the world-famous conservation activist Jane Goodall. She has made a unique contribution to humankind’s understanding of our closest living animal relatives, the primates, and in particular the chimpanzee. Dr Goodall was in her twenties when she began her meticulous observation of chimp behaviour deep in Africa. Now she’s 86, and still campaigning to protect the natural world. Can the primates and so many other species be saved from mass extinction?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5r1f9m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz79f)
Will cities ever be the same?

This year has seen our cities coming under pressure as they struggled to withstand the impact of the coronavirus. City centres were deserted as shops shut and people stayed away. But in some city streets there was a new community spirit as people faced the pandemic together and supported neighbours they'd never met before. In this programme, Tamasin Ford investigates what the future could be for our cities, and asks how they need to change if they are to survive, and even flourish. We hear from architect Siri Zanelli; the mayor of Bristol in the south-west of England, Marvin Rees; transport planner Susan Claris; Singapore-based Lauren Sorkin, the head of the Resilient Cities network; Liu Qian of Greenpeace in Beijing, and Rosamund Kissi-Debrah who has been a campaigner for better air quality since the death of her daughter from asthma in 2013.

(Image: Mumbai skyline in lockdown March 2020. Getty Images.)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmw1)
It's a Wonderful Life

In December 1946, the classic Christmas film "It's a Wonderful Life" had its premiere in Hollywood. Starring Jimmy Stewart, the movie's message of hope and redemption is loved by millions. Simon Watts talks to former child star, Karolyn Grimes, who played six-year-old Zuzu Bailey. The programme was first broadcast in 2015.

PHOTO: Karolyn Grimes with Jimmy Stewart in "It's a Wonderful Life" (Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4c5sc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpt)
Tech Quiz of the Year 2020

Test your knowledge of the year’s biggest tech stories with Rory Cellan-Jones and the Tech Tent team. With BBC tech reporters Chris Fox, Zoe Kleinman, David Molloy, and Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

Image: Stock photo of a man sitting outdoors in front of a festive background, listening to earphones. Credit: Getty Images.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5r1k1r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 World Football (w3cszth5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4c9jh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 Trending (w3ct1d1z)
Votes, viruses, victims: 2020 in disinformation

From the global pandemic to the US election, the extraordinary events of 2020 have both fuelled, and been shaped by, the online spread of falsehoods, propaganda and bizarre conspiracy theories.

Trending’s Mike Wendling and Marianna Spring, the BBC’s specialist disinformation reporter, look back at some of the most viral rumours, how they debunked them, and discover what happened next.

Producers: Jonathan Griffin and Sam Judah

Picture caption: Photo illustration of a phone showing “fake news”

Picture credit: BBC


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4cf8m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8y5pr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5r1sk0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4ck0r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj5)
Memorable journeys of 2020

Three journalists share stories of travels undertaken in the year of the pandemic. BBC Delhi's Neha Sharma went to Indian-administered Kashmir, a year after it was stripped of autonomy; Victoria Uwonkunda of BBC Africa covered the US election, finding voters from the African diaspora; and Olga Ivshina of BBC Russian went to Azerbaijan to meet families affected by the Nagorno Karabakh conflict.

Mosul after Islamic State
Iraqis recently celebrated Victory Day, which marks the day in December 2017 when the last remnants of so-called Islamic State were finally driven from the country. The toughest part of that campaign was the battle to retake Mosul, captured by IS in 2014. Two BBC journalists who reported on the fighting - Nafiseh Kohnavard of BBC Persian, and BBC Arabic's Basheer Al-Zaidi - share memories, and tell us what Mosul is like now.

In praise of borsch
Roman Lebed of BBC Ukrainian gives us his ode to borsch, the beetroot soup eaten all over Ukraine and Russia. But who made it first? Roman tells us about the battle over its origins, and shares memories of his great-grandmother's recipe, as well as revealing his own secret ingredient.


Image: Olga Ivshina in Azerbaijan
Credit: BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmw1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4cnrw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8yf60)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5r2118)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1d0y)
To Santa from Shanghai

In the far north of Finland, 6km south of the Artic Circle, the town of Rovaniemi is the “official home" of Santa Claus - the location where any letter addressed to Santa (over 500,000 every year) will arrive.

St Nicholas may have roots in 3rd Century Turkey - but this one-time logging town is now the centre of a vast Santa industry. In 2019, more than half a million people came to Rovaniemi’s Santa Village – including 60,000 from China. Dignitaries such as Chinese President Xi Jinping have also made a pilgrimage to the home of the world’s most identifiable, pan-cultural, pan-faith icon.

This year, though, things are different. Santa’s village lies eerily quiet due to Covid-19. All focus – and hope – lies on his official Post Office, and the letters that continue to stream through the door from children – and adults – across the world. Producer Steven Rajam tells the story of the global Santa tourism boom, the myths, fantasies and traditions that Santa represents across different cultures.

Contributors include writer on Christmas and biographer of Santa Claus, Gerry Bowler; historian Martin Johnes; expert on China and religion, Fenggang Yang; travel agency chief Chao Tang; and supervisor at Santa’s official post office, Katja Tervonen, who details how the hundreds of letters received every year give a unique insight into the thoughts and emotions of children around the world.

(Photo: Driver POV of sleigh ride in thick snow and bright sunshine in Rovaniemi. Credit: Lars Ley)


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4csj0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z3gzn1z4l)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4cx84)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 Her Majesty the Queen's Christmas Message (w3ct1gv7)
Her Majesty The Queens Christmas Message

Coverage of Her Majesty the Queen's traditional Christmas message to the Commonwealth.


FRI 15:11 HARDtalk (w3cszc21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5r28jj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltdyhscg7k)
Review of the year - 2020

Covid-19 is set to prompt radical long term changes to how we live and work, so what lessons can be learnt when we eventually emerge from the pandemic? Could the changes in the way we work herald higher productivity and happier people in the future?

We hear the stories of the people who managed to thrive during a very difficult year, including the milkman who saw a boom in deliveries and the dancer who found work in South Korea when the London stage went dark.

Martin Webber is joined by Professor Devi Sridhar who holds the Chair of Global Public Health at the University of Edinburgh; economist Roger Bootle, of Capital Economics; Robert Reich, former Labour Secretary under President Clinton; Tomas Philipson, who was Chair of the Council of Economic Advisors under Mr Trump; and actor Thomas Inge who is currently starring in the musical Cats in South Korea.

(Image: courier delivers a package of Amazon in Rome. Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4d108)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5tm0yd23)
2020/12/25 16:06 GMT

BBC OS gives a vibrant account of the day’s events with explanation and reaction from those involved.


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4d4rd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5tm0yht7)
2020/12/25 17:06 GMT

BBC OS gives a vibrant account of the day’s events with explanation and reaction from those involved.


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4d8hj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmw1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4dd7n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bl0c8z4ns)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5r2rj1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jxyp0qcpp)
2020/12/25 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4dhzs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpt)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5r2w85)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6t)
Do animals exercise?

At Christmas, is there a better gift than knowledge? CrowdScience has cooked up its own version of 'secret Santa', with members of the team setting one another the challenge of answering surprising questions from all over the world.

Are humans the only animals to exercise? Can you get colder than absolute zero? Why are sounds louder at night? When it comes to food dropped on the floor, is there such thing as the "three second rule"? And, does honey really have healing properties?

Producers and presenters from the CrowdScience team speak to all manner of experts, from zoologists through to material scientists, to find the answers.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service.


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4dmqx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z3gzn2tch)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4drh1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79rkmp96gw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fn5rlzhfq)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5r33rf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172xltdyhsd9gg)
Review of the year - 2020

Covid-19 is set to prompt radical long term changes to how we live and work, so what lessons can be learnt when we eventually emerge from the pandemic? Could the changes in the way we work herald higher productivity and happier people in the future?

We hear the stories of the people who managed to thrive during a very difficult year, including the milkman who saw a boom in deliveries and the dancer who found work in South Korea when the London stage went dark.

Martin Webber is joined by Professor Devi Sridhar who holds the Chair of Global Public Health at the University of Edinburgh; economist Roger Bootle, of Capital Economics; Robert Reich, former Labour Secretary under President Clinton; Tomas Philipson, who was Chair of the Council of Economic Advisors under Mr Trump; and actor Thomas Inge who is currently starring in the musical Cats in South Korea.

(Image: courier delivers a package of Amazon in Rome. Credit: Getty Images).


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p70g4dw75)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc21)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q1g5r37hk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3cszth5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols 15:00 THU (w3ct1cwb)

Assignment 12:32 SUN (w3csz6m5)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6m6)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6m6)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6m6)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5q12xfbg43)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5q12xfbtch)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5q12xfc5lw)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5q12xfc9c0)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5q12xfcjv8)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5q12xfdd25)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5q12xfdw1p)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172x5q12xff3jy)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5q12xffc16)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5q12xffljg)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5q12xffq8l)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5q12xfg2hz)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5q12xfg683)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5q12xfgb07)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5q12xfgfrc)

BBC News Summary 12:30 SUN (w172x5q12xfgkhh)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5q12xfhdqd)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5q12xfhrys)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5q12xfhwpx)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qmvq6)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qmzgb)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qn36g)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qnbpq)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qntp7)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qnyfc)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qp25h)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qp5xm)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qpfdw)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qpnx4)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qq4wn)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qq8ms)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qqj41)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5q1g5qqmw5)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5q1g5qr03k)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5q1g5qr7lt)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5q1g5qrqlb)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5q1g5qrvbg)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5q1g5qs2tq)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5q1g5qsb9z)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5q1g5qskt7)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5q1g5qt1sr)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5q1g5qt5jw)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5q1g5qtf14)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5q1g5qtjs8)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5q1g5qtx0n)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5q1g5qv4hx)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5q1g5qvmhf)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5q1g5qvr7k)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5q1g5qvzqt)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5q1g5qw772)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5q1g5qwgqb)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5q1g5qwypv)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5q1g5qx2fz)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5q1g5qx9y7)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5q1g5qxfpc)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5q1g5qxsxr)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5q1g5qy1f0)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5q1g5qyjdj)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5q1g5qyn4n)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5q1g5qywmx)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5q1g5qz445)

BBC News Summary 16:30 THU (w172x5q1g5qzhck)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5q1g5qzvly)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5q1g5qzzc2)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5q1g5r06vb)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5q1g5r0blg)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5q1g5r0ptv)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5q1g5r0yb3)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5q1g5r1f9m)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5q1g5r1k1r)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5q1g5r1sk0)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5q1g5r2118)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5q1g5r28jj)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5q1g5r2rj1)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5q1g5r2w85)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5q1g5r33rf)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5q1g5r37hk)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tmvcg)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tmz3l)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tn2vq)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tn6lv)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tnbbz)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tng33)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tnkv7)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tnplc)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tntbh)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tny2m)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tp1tr)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tp5kw)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tp9b0)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tpf24)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tpjt8)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tq0ss)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tq4jx)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tq891)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tqd15)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tqhs9)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5p6n5tqmjf)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5tqr8k)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5tqw0p)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5tqzrt)

BBC News 03:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5tr3hy)

BBC News 04:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5tr782)

BBC News 05:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5trc06)

BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5trgrb)

BBC News 07:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5trlhg)

BBC News 08:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5trq7l)

BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5trtzq)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5tryqv)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5ts2gz)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5ts673)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5ts9z7)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5tsfqc)

BBC News 15:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5tskgh)

BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5tsp6m)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5tt1g0)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5tt564)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5tt8y8)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5ttdpd)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5p6n5ttjfj)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172x5p70g3yhft)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172x5p70g3ym5y)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172x5p70g3yqy2)

BBC News 03:00 MON (w172x5p70g3yvp6)

BBC News 04:00 MON (w172x5p70g3yzfb)

BBC News 05:00 MON (w172x5p70g3z35g)

BBC News 06:00 MON (w172x5p70g3z6xl)

BBC News 07:00 MON (w172x5p70g3zbnq)

BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5p70g3zgdv)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5p70g3zl4z)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172x5p70g3zpx3)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5p70g3ztn7)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172x5p70g3zydc)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172x5p70g4024h)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172x5p70g405wm)

BBC News 15:00 MON (w172x5p70g409mr)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172x5p70g40fcw)

BBC News 17:00 MON (w172x5p70g40k40)

BBC News 18:00 MON (w172x5p70g40nw4)

BBC News 19:00 MON (w172x5p70g40sm8)

BBC News 20:00 MON (w172x5p70g40xcd)

BBC News 21:00 MON (w172x5p70g4113j)

BBC News 22:00 MON (w172x5p70g414vn)

BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5p70g418ls)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172x5p70g41dbx)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172x5p70g41j31)

BBC News 02:00 TUE (w172x5p70g41mv5)

BBC News 03:00 TUE (w172x5p70g41rl9)

BBC News 04:00 TUE (w172x5p70g41wbf)

BBC News 05:00 TUE (w172x5p70g4202k)

BBC News 06:00 TUE (w172x5p70g423tp)

BBC News 07:00 TUE (w172x5p70g427kt)

BBC News 08:00 TUE (w172x5p70g42c9y)

BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5p70g42h22)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5p70g42lt6)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5p70g42qkb)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172x5p70g42v9g)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5p70g42z1l)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5p70g432sq)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172x5p70g436jv)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5p70g43b8z)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172x5p70g43g13)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5p70g43ks7)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172x5p70g43pjc)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172x5p70g43t8h)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172x5p70g43y0m)

BBC News 22:00 TUE (w172x5p70g441rr)

BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5p70g445hw)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172x5p70g44980)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5p70g44f04)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5p70g44jr8)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172x5p70g44nhd)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172x5p70g44s7j)

BBC News 05:00 WED (w172x5p70g44wzn)

BBC News 06:00 WED (w172x5p70g450qs)

BBC News 07:00 WED (w172x5p70g454gx)

BBC News 08:00 WED (w172x5p70g45871)

BBC News 09:00 WED (w172x5p70g45cz5)

BBC News 10:00 WED (w172x5p70g45hq9)

BBC News 11:00 WED (w172x5p70g45mgf)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172x5p70g45r6k)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172x5p70g45vyp)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172x5p70g45zpt)

BBC News 15:00 WED (w172x5p70g463fy)

BBC News 16:00 WED (w172x5p70g46762)

BBC News 17:00 WED (w172x5p70g46by6)

BBC News 18:00 WED (w172x5p70g46gpb)

BBC News 19:00 WED (w172x5p70g46lfg)

BBC News 20:00 WED (w172x5p70g46q5l)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5p70g46txq)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5p70g46ynv)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5p70g472dz)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172x5p70g47653)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5p70g479x7)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5p70g47fnc)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5p70g47kdh)

BBC News 04:00 THU (w172x5p70g47p4m)

BBC News 05:00 THU (w172x5p70g47swr)

BBC News 06:00 THU (w172x5p70g47xmw)

BBC News 07:00 THU (w172x5p70g481d0)

BBC News 08:00 THU (w172x5p70g48544)

BBC News 09:00 THU (w172x5p70g488w8)

BBC News 10:00 THU (w172x5p70g48dmd)

BBC News 11:00 THU (w172x5p70g48jcj)

BBC News 12:00 THU (w172x5p70g48n3n)

BBC News 13:00 THU (w172x5p70g48rvs)

BBC News 14:00 THU (w172x5p70g48wlx)

BBC News 17:00 THU (w172x5p70g497v9)

BBC News 18:00 THU (w172x5p70g49clf)

BBC News 19:00 THU (w172x5p70g49hbk)

BBC News 20:00 THU (w172x5p70g49m2p)

BBC News 21:00 THU (w172x5p70g49qtt)

BBC News 22:00 THU (w172x5p70g49vky)

BBC News 23:00 THU (w172x5p70g49zb2)

BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4b326)

BBC News 01:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4b6tb)

BBC News 02:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4bbkg)

BBC News 03:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4bg9l)

BBC News 04:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4bl1q)

BBC News 05:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4bpsv)

BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4btjz)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4by93)

BBC News 08:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4c217)

BBC News 09:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4c5sc)

BBC News 10:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4c9jh)

BBC News 11:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4cf8m)

BBC News 12:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4ck0r)

BBC News 13:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4cnrw)

BBC News 14:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4csj0)

BBC News 15:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4cx84)

BBC News 16:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4d108)

BBC News 17:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4d4rd)

BBC News 18:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4d8hj)

BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4dd7n)

BBC News 20:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4dhzs)

BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4dmqx)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4drh1)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5p70g4dw75)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct19z0)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 MON (w3ct19z0)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172x2t5tm0ksfq)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2t5tm0kx5v)

BBC OS 16:06 TUE (w172x2t5tm0npbt)

BBC OS 17:06 TUE (w172x2t5tm0nt2y)

BBC OS 16:06 WED (w172x2t5tm0rl7x)

BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2t5tm0rq01)

BBC OS 16:32 THU (w172x2t5tm0vjt9)

BBC OS 17:06 THU (w172x2t5tm0vlx4)

BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172x2t5tm0yd23)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172x2t5tm0yht7)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7kf)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz8bg)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8nr)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7y7)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz79f)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x194l55f66h)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172x194yfgtr5y)

Business Matters 01:06 WED (w172x194yfgxn31)

Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x194yfh0k04)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x19f9l7yxyy)

Business Weekly 23:06 SAT (w3ct0spn)

CrowdScience 08:32 SUN (w3cszv6s)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv6s)

CrowdScience 11:32 MON (w3cszv6s)

CrowdScience 20:32 FRI (w3cszv6t)

Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz992)

Digital Planet 04:32 WED (w3csz992)

Digital Planet 11:32 WED (w3csz992)

Discovery 00:32 MON (w3ct1csc)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3ct1csd)

Discovery 04:32 TUE (w3ct1csd)

Discovery 11:32 TUE (w3ct1csd)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9ql)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3csz9ql)

From Our Own Correspondent 23:06 SUN (w3csz9ql)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc2y)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3cszc2y)

HARDtalk 23:06 MON (w3cszc2y)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3cszbxt)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3cszbxt)

HARDtalk 23:06 WED (w3cszbxt)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszc21)

HARDtalk 15:11 FRI (w3cszc21)

HARDtalk 23:06 FRI (w3cszc21)

Health Check 20:32 WED (w3cszccz)

Health Check 04:32 THU (w3cszccz)

Health Check 11:32 THU (w3cszccz)

Heart and Soul 22:32 SAT (w3ct1cw9)

Heart and Soul 10:32 SUN (w3ct1cw9)

Heart and Soul 01:32 MON (w3ct1cw9)

Heart and Soul 13:32 FRI (w3ct1d0y)

Her Majesty the Queen's Christmas Message 15:06 FRI (w3ct1gv7)

In the Studio 09:32 TUE (w3cszvcb)

In the Studio 13:32 TUE (w3cszvcb)

In the Studio 23:32 TUE (w3cszvcb)

Mayday 18:32 SAT (w3ct1cxb)

Mayday 00:32 SUN (w3ct1cxb)

Mayday 05:32 SUN (w3ct1cxb)

Mayday 10:32 MON (w3ct1cxb)

More or Less 18:50 SAT (w3ct0pyf)

More or Less 05:50 SUN (w3ct0pyf)

More or Less 10:50 MON (w3ct0pyf)

Music Life 12:06 SAT (w3csz6ty)

Music Life 20:06 SUN (w3csz6ty)

Newsday 05:06 MON (w172x2wn4stlcj5)

Newsday 06:06 MON (w172x2wn4stlh89)

Newsday 07:06 MON (w172x2wn4stlm0f)

Newsday 05:06 TUE (w172x2wn4stp8f8)

Newsday 06:06 TUE (w172x2wn4stpd5d)

Newsday 07:06 TUE (w172x2wn4stphxj)

Newsday 05:06 WED (w172x2wn4sts5bc)

Newsday 06:06 WED (w172x2wn4sts92h)

Newsday 07:06 WED (w172x2wn4stsdtm)

Newsday 05:06 THU (w172x2wn4stw27g)

Newsday 06:06 THU (w172x2wn4stw5zl)

Newsday 07:06 THU (w172x2wn4stw9qq)

Newsday 05:06 FRI (w172x2wn4styz4k)

Newsday 06:06 FRI (w172x2wn4stz2wp)

Newsday 07:06 FRI (w172x2wn4stz6mt)

Newshour 13:06 SAT (w172x2z33qbclpq)

Newshour 21:06 SAT (w172x2z33qbdknr)

Newshour 13:06 SUN (w172x2z33qbghlt)

Newshour 21:06 SUN (w172x2z33qbhgkv)

Newshour 14:06 MON (w172x2z3gzmpcj6)

Newshour 21:06 MON (w172x2z3gzmq6r3)

Newshour 14:06 TUE (w172x2z3gzms8f9)

Newshour 21:06 TUE (w172x2z3gzmt3n6)

Newshour 14:06 WED (w172x2z3gzmw5bd)

Newshour 21:06 WED (w172x2z3gzmx0k9)

Newshour 14:06 THU (w172x2z3gzmz27h)

Newshour 21:06 THU (w172x2z3gzmzxgd)

Newshour 14:06 FRI (w172x2z3gzn1z4l)

Newshour 21:06 FRI (w172x2z3gzn2tch)

Outlook 09:32 SUN (w3cszf0w)

Outlook 22:32 SUN (w3cszf0w)

Outlook 12:06 MON (w3cszd45)

Outlook 18:06 MON (w3cszd45)

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