Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 12 DECEMBER 2020

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhvprm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnz)
Is Macron marginalising France's Muslims?

French President Emmanuel Macron has described Islam as 'a religion in crisis.' This week he presented draft legislation to cabinet ministers aimed at tackling radical elements and propping up ‘republican values’. Among the proposed measures are curbs on foreign funding for mosques and imams, new rules making it harder for children to be home-schooled, and fresh attempts to root out and prevent forced marriages. While the government has planned the policies for some time, it is publishing details just weeks after a pair of deadly terrorist attacks, including the beheading of a history teacher - Samuel Paty - who showed cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed to his students, and the killing of three churchgoers in Nice. But with the French presidential election less than 18-months away - and with the far-right politician Marine Le Pen thought to be one of Mr Macron’s greatest obstacles to re-election - many French Muslims have accused the government of unfairly targeting their community and using the national tradition of laïcité - or secularism - as an excuse to do so. France’s Muslim population has grown significantly since Algerian independence in 1962, as has the debate over ‘French values’. So are Muslims now being exploited for political gain, or are the new proposals a common-sense response to serious problems? Ritula Shah and guests discuss whether the French government is marginalising Muslims.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhvthr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1946wvn1ln)
Trials to test combination of AstraZeneca and Sputnik vaccines

UK and Russian scientists are teaming up to trial a combination of the Oxford-AstraZeneca and Sputnik V vaccines to see if protection against Covid-19 can be improved. Mixing two similar vaccines could lead to a better immune response in people. And the WHO has announced its secured nearly a billion doses of the leading jabs for low and middle income countries.

Also in the programme, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa finds out why the UK's ambition to ban live animal exports after Brexit could be difficult to achieve and we hear from China where emotive chat bots are helping combat loneliness.

Sasha Twining is joined by Peter Ryan ABC's Senior Business Correspondent in Sydney for comment throughout the programme.

PHOTO: Getty Images


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhvy7w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tnfpp0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3k9j8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhk7)
Can India conquer Australia again?

Has Australia's batting crisis given India the advantage going into their eagerly-awaited Test series.

The remarkable story of the team of Filipino domestic helpers making big waves in the Hong Kong cricket leagues.

Plus, cricket supporters groups from around the world come together to fight for a bigger say in the future of the game.

Photo: Virat Kohli (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhw200)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj3)
A small election in North Macedonia

North Macedonia is holding local elections this weekend. The country has been independent for nearly three decades, but it is not unusual for the countries of the former Yugoslavia to be interested in what happens next door. But not generally in small mayoral elections. BBC Serbian reporter Aleksandar Miladinovic explains that he travelled more than 450 kilometres talk to Stip to find out more about one of the candidates, Simon Gajiga.

Nepali chef in MasterChef: The Professionals
It’s not only UK viewers who have been gripped by the current series of MasterChef: The Professionals. People in Nepal have also been following it closely as one of their own, Santosh Shah, is not only the first Nepali to appear on the show, he's made to the finals. BBC Nepali’s Rama Parajuli tells us more.

Kimchi clash
Kimchi is a salted and fermented cabbage and a staple of traditional Korean cuisine. It's taken very seriously in South Korea, which is why a claim by China about Kimchi has angered people there, as Julie Yoongyung Lee of BBC Korean explains.

Indian farmers’ protests
The Indian government's new farming reform law has sparked protests in the country, and 100,000 farmers have blocked the main entrances to the capital city of Delhi. Ishleen Kaur, originally from the Punjab region, spent her early summers milking cows and eating sugar cane in the fields there, and knows some of those taking part in the protests.

Brazil’s Hollywood style bank robberies
Shooting, kidnapping, rockets and banknotes flying through the air: not a Hollywood movie, but a robbery in the small city of Criciuma in southern Brazil. Digihub reporter and Brazilian, Fernando Duarte, explains how this modus operandi has caught on within Brazilian crime gangs.


Image: Simon Gajiga came to Stip 40 years ago from Nigeria, and now hopes to become mayor
Credit: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmvz)
The return of the beaver

In 2009, beavers were released into the wild in the Knapdale forest on the west coast of Scotland, some 400 years after they were wiped out in the UK. The Scottish Beaver Trial was the first official beaver re-introduction programme in the UK and was considered a landmark conservation project. The beaver is seen as a keystone species which can help shape and restore the environment. Alex Last spoke to Simon Jones, who was then the project manager of the Scottish Beaver Trial.

Photo: A beaver in Knapdale in 2011 © Steve Gardner (courtesy of the Scottish Wildlife Trust)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhw5r4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Reith Lectures (w3ct1cym)
Credit crisis to resilience

Dr Carney takes us back to the high drama of the global financial crash of 2008, which ended a period when bankers saw themselves as unassailable Masters of the Universe. More than a decade on, how much have the bankers changed their ways? How far has the financial sector changed? Carney says that we must remain vigilant and resist the “three lies of finance.” If we don’t, he warns, we will live with a system which is ill-prepared for the next crisis.

In his four BBC Reith Lectures Dr Mark Carney, the former Governor of the Bank of Canada and the Bank of England, charts how we have come to esteem financial value over human value and how we have gone from market economies to market societies. He argues that this has contributed to a trio of global crises: of credit, Covid and climate. And he outlines how we can turn this around.

(Photo: Outgoing Bank of England governor Mark Carney makes a keynote address at the 2020 United Nations Climate Change Conference. Credit: Tolga Akmen/ Getty Images)


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhw9h8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tng1xd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3knrn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9b)
Covid-19 and China’s changing club scene

How coronavirus is changing the landscape of China’s underground electronic music scene. DJ and broadcaster Frank McWeeny speaks to leading DJs and promoters about the collaboration and creativity that is transforming China’s electronic music scene after lockdown.

Inside the political battle between the pop star and the President that’s dividing Uganda. Journalist Patience Akumu on the political contest between seventy-six year old incumbent President Yoweri Museveni, and the man called the Ghetto President, the thirty-eight year old musician and performer Bobi Wine.

The Venezuelan pop sensation Liana Malva on her new musical project Gotas, that she hopes can help promote environmental awareness and protect her nation’s natural beauty.

Plus has a film, a book or a piece of music ever changed the way you see the world? Radiohead guitarist and film composer Jonny Greenwood shares his love for the Polish composer, Krzysztof Penderecki.


Presented by Tina Daheley

(Photo credit: Tao Yun)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhwf7d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d658vtsj3)
Pfizer vaccine approved in US

The US Food and Drug Administration has authorised the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine for emergency use. President Donald Trump said it would be made available for free to all Americans and that the first inoculations would take place within 24 hours.

Also in the programme: A Hong Kong democracy activist appears in court today and aid agencies say staff killed in conflict in Ethiopia's Tigray region.

(Picture: A vial of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine jab. Credit: Ben Birchall/Pool via REUTERS)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhwjzj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d658vtx87)
US approval for Pfizer vaccine

The US Food and Drug Administration has authorised the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine for emergency use. President Donald Trump said it would be made available for free to all Americans and that the first inoculations would take place within 24 hours.

Also in the programme: Pressure on Armenia's Prime Minister following the conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh and how Manhattan's Chinatown has been devastated by the coronavirus pandemic.

(Picture: Healthcare workers take part in a rehearsal for administering the Pfizer vaccine in the US. Credit: REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhwnqn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d658vv10c)
US authorises Pfizer vaccine

The US Food and Drug Administration has authorised the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine for emergency use. President Donald Trump said it would be made available for free to all Americans and that the first inoculations would take place within 24 hours.

Also in the programme: Brexit negotiations resume and are countries doing enough to prevent a climate change catastrophe?

(Photo: A vial of the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine. Credit: Liam McBurney/Reuters)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3l101)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4y)
Conspiracy theories in the time of Covid-19

Multiple conspiracy theories are circulating about Covid-19 - but how widely are they believed and what influence do they have?

From QAnon to the death of Jeffrey Epstein, conspiratorial thinking seems to be everywhere right now - is this the era when fringe ideas have gone mainstream?

Katty Kay and Carlos Watson speak to political scientist and conspiracy theory expert Prof Joseph Uscinski to explore why people believe in them, and what the potential consequences for wider society might be.

They hear directly from those who believe in them, as well as people who have been subjected to personal attacks from conspiracy theory extremists.


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhwsgs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19yz)
Coronavirus: Vaccines, frustrations and hope

Two doctors in Nairobi tell host Nuala McGovern why conditions for health workers in Nairobi are leading to calls for a strike. They include rising death rates, unpaid salaries and lack of a comprehensive medical insurance.

We’ll also hear from two members of US President-elect Joe Biden’s Covid task force about combatting vaccine hesitancy after the United States recorded the highest daily death toll in the world so far.

And as vaccines make people think about a possible return to normality, we hear from those who have had to move in with their parents during the pandemic.

(Photo: Kenyan doctors wearing protective face masks hold candles and portraits of their colleagues who died due to Covid-19 during a vigil outside the Ministry of Health offices in Nairobi, Kenya December 9, 2020. Credit: Monicah Mwangi/Reuters)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3l4r5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cws)
Two Minutes Past Nine

12/12/2020 GMT

On April 19th 1995 a 26-year-old named Timothy Mcveigh steered a yellow rental truck into downtown Oklahoma city. Inside was a two-ton homemade explosive.

The Oklahoma City Bombing killed 168 people and leaving 680 injured. Journalist Leah Sottile investigates the legacy of the attack in a series that gets into the heart of America’s far-right today.
Recorded over some of the most divisive and turbulent months in recent American political history, Two Minutes Past Nine explores and questions the changing face of far right extremism in all its chaos and conspiracism.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf5c)
Asking questions of the Climate Question series

What exactly is The Climate Question, the new BBC World Service podcast and weekly programme, asking? We quiz its presenters how they handle the politics of this topic - and how rigorous the show is in presenting contrasting schools of thought? Plus, what has happened to The Why Factor? We find out.

Presenter Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhwx6x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c5415dq0m)
Tiara Brown on quitting the police: 'Enough was enough'

“Enough was enough – I felt like I was on the wrong side” – Tiara Brown on leaving the police

Unbeaten professional boxer Tiara Brown joins us following her recent decision to resign from the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington D.C. The former “DC Officer of the Year” tells us she became increasingly disheartened by some of the behaviour she witnessed from fellow officers when working at the protests that followed the death of George Floyd and the shooting of Jacob Blake. Brown believes law enforcement can’t be changed from the inside and says she’s been targeted on social media following her resignation.

South Africa’s Devon Petersen tells us about his journey into darts and how he visualises winning the world championship during practise sessions ahead of next week’s PDC World Darts Championship. The crowd favourite also explains his walk on routine and laments the fact fans aren’t allowed to wear fancy dress this year. Petersen tells us in a normal year it’s not unusual to see “Santa having a pint with Smurfs”.

We speak to champion bodybuilder Rene Campbell about the reality of going against societal norms, when it comes to how some people think a woman should look. Campbell suffered with an eating disorder due to her wish to be slim before she got into bodybuilding. A photograph of her is currently featured in a six-month exhibition in west London called "Womanhood."

In Sporting Witness, we travel back to the winter of 1969-70, when anti-apartheid campaigners disrupted 24 matches during a tour of the British Isles by South Africa’s Springboks rugby team. The campaign forced the cancellation of a planned tour by the South African cricket team later in 1970, and then of all future visits by South African teams until the end of Apartheid. We hear from Peter Hain, who organised the protests and later became a British MP.

And – the BBC’s Alistair Bruce-Ball joins us from Molineux ahead of the day’s early game in the Premier League between Wolverhampton Wanderers and Aston Villa.

Photo: Tiara Brown poses after her victory against Vanessa Bradford at Generoso Pope Athletic Complex on October 24, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Edward Diller/Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhx0z1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tngsd5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3ld7f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cx4)
Belarus across the barricades - part two

For 100 days and counting protesters are calling for an end to the 26-year long rule of Alexander Lukashenko in Belarus. Poet Valzhyna Mort records first-hand stories from her friends who are out protesting week after week; ordinary people making extraordinary choices. Obsessively, she reads the social media posts flooding her phone. In her hands, these tiny messages are poetry themselves, the oral history of our time captured on thousands of phones. The story is rich, layered, and homely. ‘Leave food out for cat.’ says one woman not sure whether masked security agents will snatch her from the street. A young father explains how he writes his address in his little son’s clothes in case he has to make it home alone one day. Yet in all this fear and rage comes a spirit of togetherness. Strangers have become friends. Apartment blocks have become neighbourhoods. Whole communities upload the choral part-songs they’ve been gathering to sing after dark each night. Whatever happens next in Belarus, this is a country transformed.

Producer: Monica Whitlock

(Photo: Pensioners protest in Minsk, Belarus. Credit: EPA)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhx4q5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6tx)
The science behind the perfect hit with Becky Hill, MNEK, Ella Eyre and Frances

This week Music Life gets crazy about pop with host Becky Hill, who asks MNEK, Ella Eyre and Frances all about their signature styles, if there's a formula for writing the perfect hit, and when songs don’t turn out as expected.

Becky was a finalist on the first series of The Voice UK, and has since gone on to achieve global Pop stardom, working with the likes of Rudimental, MNEK, Little Simz, Jonas Blue, Jax Jones, Sigala and many more. An album is finally expected next year.

Former Music Life guest MNEK is a Grammy Award-winning singer, songwriter and record producer. He has written and produced for some of the biggest artists around the world, including Beyonce, Christina Aguilera, HER and Dua Lipa, and he’s amassed over 1 billion streams. Frances is a singer-songwriter and producer. She’s been releasing her own music since 2015, and has written and produced for the likes of Katy Perry, Dua Lipa and Meghan Trainor. And Ella Eyre is an award-winning British/Jamaican/Maltese singer-songwriter, who rose to fame back in 2013 when her collaboration with Rudimental topped the UK chart. Since releasing her debut album, Feline, back in 2015, she has toured with the likes of Olly Murs, Little Mix and the Script, and has worked with everyone from Ty Dolla $ign, Yxng Bane, and Kiana Ledé to Meghan Trainor and French Montana.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhx8g9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg0lg2w)
COVID-19: FDA approves Pfizer vaccine for emergency use in US

The US Food and Drug Administration has authorised the Pfizer BioNTech coronavirus vaccine for emergency use. President Trump said it would be made available for free to all Americans and that the first inoculations would take place within 24 hours

Also on the programme: Iran has hanged a prominent opposition journalist implicated in anti-government protests; and we hear reaction to the news that the UK’s Royal Navy is on standby in case of a no-deal Brexit.

(Picture: A hospital in Indiana rehearses its distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine, Credit: Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhxd6f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lk3lllxvr)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary as Newcastle United take on West Brom at St James' Park.

Lee James is joined by former Swansea and Tottenham goalkeeper Michel Vorm, ex-England and Arsenal forward Rachel Yankey and the former West Brom and Nigeria winger Peter Odemwingie to discuss all the big talking points.

We'll have reaction to the day's early kick-off between Wolves and Aston Villa and we'll look ahead to the first ever men's Manchester derby behind closed doors.

Elsewhere, two-time unified heavyweight world champion Anthony Joshua prepares to fight Bulgaria's Kubrat Pulev in front of 1,000 fans at Wembley Arena in London on Saturday. We'll have all the build-up to that fight and what it could mean for a bout between Joshua and Tyson Fury next year.

In golf, we'll have the latest from the Women's US Open and we'll have reaction to qualifying for the final race of the Formula One season in Abu Dhabi.

And we'll be in New Zealand ahead of day three of the second men's Test match against West Indies.

Photo: West Brom manager Slaven Bilic with Newcastle boss Steve Bruce (Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhxw5y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tnhmm2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3m7gb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Mayday (w3ct1cx9)
On 11 November 2019 James Le Mesurier was found dead in a street in Istanbul. He was the latest casualty in a very unusual war – one fought not on the battlefield, but online.

Le Mesurier was a mysterious figure with a taste for the finer things who served in the British Army in several of the world’s hotspots before focusing his energies on war-ravaged Syria from 2014. He co-founded the White Helmets, a Syrian civil defence force who filmed themselves pulling survivors and bodies from the rubble of bombed out buildings.

Soon, the White Helmets - and Le Mesurier - found themselves at the centre of a global race to control the narrative in the Syrian War. In this investigative series Mayday, presenter Chloe Hadjimatheou talks to the people who knew James, including his widow Emma, his ex-wife and former army colleagues, as well as those on the ground in Syria still working as White Helmets today in an effort to piece together James’ story and that of the White Helmets. She speaks to some of the White Helmet’s detractors and follows up accusations about the organisation to try and understand the truth surrounding them.

Chloe Hadjimatheou says: “Making this series has been an extraordinary experience, as listeners will discover. It started out being an investigation into the story of a man with an astonishing life and a mysterious death but it ended up taking me on a bizarre journey down rabbit holes of misinformation. Ultimately this is a story about how truth functions in modern warfare.”


SAT 18:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyd)
QAnon: Child runaways and trafficking numbers debunked

Tim Harford looks at false statistical claims online about missing and trafficked children in the US. These numbers have resurfaced online in part due to conspiracy theorists following QAnon. In the past few months they have inspired protests under the banner - ‘Save Our Children’. We wade through some of the false numbers with the help of Michael Hobbes, a reporter for Huff Post and the co-host of the podcast called You're Wrong About.


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhxzy2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 World Questions (w3cszt62)
Sudan

After a revolution and the fall of a long-term military dictator, Sudan is officially on the road to democracy and civilian rule. How do you rebuild a country? The US has promised to take Sudan off the state sponsors of terrorism blacklist, and within the country a peace process is bringing regional rebels into the fold. But is the movement to civilian rule fast enough? When will the conditions of women’s lives start to improve? At what point will becoming a mainstream nation again mean an improvement in the extreme economic hardships felt by so many in Sudan? The BBC’s James Copnall presents with a panel of leading figures from Sudan debating questions put to them from the public across the country.

The panel:
Omer Ismail: Foreign Minister
Walaa al-Boushi: Minister for Youth and Sport
Reem Abbas: Journalist and Blogger
Mohammed Nagi al-Assam: Nominee to Transition Partners Council

Producers: Charlie Taylor and Helen Towner
Studio Engineers: Ian Mitchell, Rob Symington and Donald McDonald

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Alaa Salah during a demonstration in Khartoum on April 8th 2019, Credit: Courtesy Lana H. Haroun)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhy3p6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3w)
Musician and comedian Tim Minchin

Tim Minchin, comedian, actor, writer and creator of Matilda the musical, joins Nikki Bedi on the line from Sydney, Australia to discuss his debut studio album Apart Together and his hit TV show Upright.

British star Felicity Jones reveals what George Clooney was like as a director and co-star on the set of his latest movie The Midnight Sky.

Italian filmmaker Luca Guadagnino explains his fondness for writing about outsiders, including in his latest work, the TV series We Are Who We Are.

Portuguese singer Mariza celebrates the centenary of Amália Rodrigues, the grande dame of fado, with her latest album.

The actor and writer Michaela Coel discusses her current state of post-writum depression with Louis Theroux, and talks about life after I May Destroy You.

Artist Tracey Emin on her love of Norwegian expressionist Edvard Munch, and what makes the most lasting kind of art.

Joining Nikki Bedi in the Arts Hour studio is broadcaster and journalist William Lee Adams.


(Photo: Tim Minchin. Credit: David Livingston/Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhy7fb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg0mf1x)
UN chief urges world leaders to declare 'climate emergency'

The UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called on every country to declare a 'climate emergency', with global leaders marking the fifth anniversary of the Paris climate accord. But critics felt most countries had failed to show the necessary level of ambition to curb global warning.

Also in the programme: Is Juan Guaido - the man recognized as Venezuela's legitimate leader by dozens of countries, including the United States - a "busted flush"? Last weekend President Nicolas Maduro and his Socialist party won back control of Venezuela's Congress in elections that were boycotted by Mr.Guaido and some other opposition parties; and as Harrison Ford is confirmed for a fifth film playing Indiana Jones, does the archaeologist he portrays bear any resemblance to reality?

(Photo: United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres speaks during a news conference at UN headquarters in New York City. Credit: Reuters/Eduardo Munoz)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhyc5g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qv31tt59)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmg6zj344)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3mqfv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1csl)
Jonestown: From socialism to slaughter - Part two

In 1978, over 900 US citizens died at Jonestown, a remote settlement in Guyana. The vast majority were members of a community run by the charismatic Rev Jim Jones, taking their own lives with poison under armed guard on his orders. But how did a church known for racial integration and practical help for the poor come to such a destructive end? How could one man’s increasing paranoia have driven so many people, who had built a mission community from nothing in four years, into a seemingly pointless sacrifice?

In this second and final programme, Erin Martin – who herself grew up in a controlling religious group – hears from ex-members of Peoples Temple who explain how steadily increasing isolation made it so hard to leave the organisation. Vera Washington describes how she and seven others had to accelerate their escape plan when a leadership spy heard of it, and Jordan Vilchez relates how a faked assassination attempt on Jim Jones was used to reinforce their sense of threat from outside.

The move to the Guyanese jungle meant escape was almost impossible - Jim Jones’ son, Stephan, and a few others survived because they were on a visit to the capital, Georgetown. But could Jonestown have had a future? Tim Carter imagined paved streets and seeing his grandchildren there. And John Cobb still feels that if he hadn’t been in Georgetown with Stephan on November 8th, 1978, he could have prevented what was, before 9/11, the largest intentional loss of civilian lives in American history.

Producer: Paul Arnold

(Photo:Main entrance to Jonestown, with welcome sign over the road. The sign reads Welcome to Jonestown, on the top line; the next line reads Peoples Temple Agricultural Project, May 1978. Credit Jon Moore/The Jonestown Institute).


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhygxl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spm)
What Covid-19 vaccines can do for Big Pharma

On this edition of Business Weekly, we ask whether Covid vaccines are the shot in the arm the pharmaceutical industry needs to rescue its reputation. Plus, as the world looks ahead to life after the pandemic, will our transportation systems be there to help us get around? There’s a financial crisis at New York’s mass transit system. What does that mean for the city it supports? Airbnb finally packs it bags and heads to the stock market. The holiday accommodation company’s shares boomed on their first day of trading this week. We speak to Airbnb’s chief executive, Brian Chesky. Also, in China, over 15m tonnes of food is wasted every year. The government has a new plan to tackle this, but how will it convince its citizens not to throw food away? And we’ll be talking about that nine figure deal reached by Bob Dylan to sell off his back catalogue. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Doctor wearing surgical gloves and preparing the coronavirus COVID-19 vaccine, Getty Images)



SUNDAY 13 DECEMBER 2020

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhylnq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3myy3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Mayday (w3ct1cx9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3cszf5c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhyqdv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3cszkxq)
The unchecked spread of Covid-19 in Manaus

Pictures of coffins and mass graves seen by satellites showed that Manaus has been badly affected by Covid- 19. Now analysis of blood samples shows the extent to which the virus took hold in the Amazon city earlier this year. Investigators Ester Sabino and Lewis Buss from Brazil’s University of Sao Paulo discuss how and why the virus spread.

Humanity has been modifying the environment for millennia, but have we now reached a point where it’s all too much? An analysis by Emily Elhacham from Tel Aviv University shows the amount of stuff produced by humanity, from plastics to buildings now has a greater mass than all natural biomass on the planet.

And China has been to the moon. Space watcher Andrew Jones tells us how the robotic mission mimics the manned missions of the 1960s and 70s.


The space between stars is usually measured in light years, but this makes it less easy to acknowledge the true scale of the distance. Even the closest star system to Earth, Proxima Centauri, is 4.2 light years or 40.13 trillion kilometres from Earth. If we are ever going to bridge the gap between the stars, we will have to have some very fast spaceships, with extremely reliable, long-lasting technology on board.

So does science allow for these spacecraft to exist? That’s what listener Allan wants to know, and to find out, Presenter Anand Jagatia speaks with Tracy Drain, a systems engineer at NASA JPL responsible for overseeing the development and missions of multiple unmanned interplanetary probes including some around Jupiter and Mars. She tells us the challenges involved with simply keeping our spacecraft working for the long-haul.

Even if we can overcome issues of wear and tear over time, powering a ship to other star systems will not be easy. Today’s chemical rockets are too inefficient for the job, so we speak with Rachel Moloney, a researcher in electric propulsion to ask if this relatively new technology could power ships through interstellar space.

Faster than light travel is the solution most often found in Science Fiction, but it goes against Einstein’s laws of relativity. Is there a way around it? Theoretical physicist Professor Miguel Alcubierre thinks there may be, and he describes the way a spaceship may be able to create a bubble of spacetime around itself to move faster than light without breaking these fixed laws. But there’s a catch...
(Image: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhyv4z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tnjll3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3n6fc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhyyx3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Big Idea (w3ct1csm)
Big ideas: The city

In this second of three omnibus editions of The Big Idea, David Edmonds looks at some of the latest research on cities. Drawing on the ideas of five leading thinkers, we ask whether violent or non-violent is more successful, why humans find cities appealing, the links between culture and whether people follow the rules, and how we might go about tackling rogue cops.


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhz2n7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qk)
Manners and the monarchy in Thailand

Thai society has traditionally been hierarchical - with everyone knowing their place and the monarch firmly at the top. But from imagery to pronouns, a new generation of protesters has abandoned established etiquette to call for royal privileges and prerogatives to be reined in. Jonathan Head examines why their language has been so outspoken - and why royalists have found their attitude so shocking.

Pascale Harter introduces this and other insights, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers around the world.

Although Ethiopia's central government insists that it has put down recent armed conflict in the country's northern Tigray region, news of what is really going on has been tightly controlled and few first-hand accounts have emerged of the costs of the fighting. Simon Marks, based in Addis Ababa, has been speaking to civilians who've escaped desperate conditions there - and listening to the official version of events.

When you think of Germany's great trading cities, the names of established giants like Hamburg, Munich or Dusseldorf might be the first to come to mind. Duisberg? Not so much. Its international profile has been much lower. But as Caroline Bayley explains, its logistical advantages have made it an irresistible prospect for Chinese investors . In fact, this lesser-known spot is home to Europe's largest inland port - and the westernmost end of China's 'Belt and Road' logistics project.

Every new US President takes office bearing a heavy weight of public expectation - and not just from American citizens. When it comes to the Middle East, the stakes of decisions taken in Washington DC are particularly high. As Joe Biden prepares to move into the White House, Jeremy Bowen remembers a previous moment of high early hopes during the Obama era - and considers how a new era of policy for the region might look.

(Image: An anti-government protester at a rally in Bangkok calling to lift section 112 of the Thai Criminal Code, which penalises defaming the monarch or the royal family. Credit: EPA/Diego Azubel)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3nfxm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj9)
The science of addiction

Some people are addicted to drugs, others to alcohol. Addicts often crave a substance, and yet when they inject or consume it, it doesn’t bring them any pleasure. David Edmonds finds out how humans can want something, but not like it.

Image: An addiction support group (Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhz6dc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tnjyth)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3nknr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Mayday (w3ct1cx9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhzb4h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d658vxpf6)
Hundreds feared missing in Nigeria school attack

Nigeria's President Muhammadu Buhari says the security forces have tracked down and exchanged fire with the gunmen who've abducted several hundred students from a secondary school in the north of the country. Reports say about half of the school’s eight-hundred students are still missing.

Also in the programme: A new bill intended to fight radicalism in France and violent clashes between supporters of US President Donald Trump and counter-demonstrators.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are the writer, broadcaster and comedian, Timandra Harkness and Peter Tatchell, international human rights campaigner and director of the Peter Tatchell Foundation

(Picture: The Government Science secondary school in Katsina State, Nigeria which was attacked by armed bandits. Credit: REUTERS/Abdullahi Inuwa)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhzfwm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d658vxt5b)
Brexit negotiations enter late stage

The British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen have warned they are unlikely to reach a post-Brexit trade deal by the end of Sunday.

Also in the programme: Why Brazil hasn’t yet approved a coronavirus vaccine and the Polish women who are going to the Czech Republic for an abortion.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are the writer, broadcaster and comedian, Timandra Harkness and Peter Tatchell, international human rights campaigner and director of the Peter Tatchell Foundation

(Picture: UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson (L) and European Commission President, Ursula von der Leyen (R). Credit: Aaron Chown/PA Wire)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhzkmr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d658vxxxg)
EU offer ‘unacceptable’ as Brexit trade talks continue

Talks between the UK and the European Union about a post-Brexit trade deal are continuing ahead of Sunday's deadline. Both sides previously warned they were unlikely to reach an agreement.

Also in the programme: There are efforts to locate hundreds of students abducted from a school in Nigeria and the 25th anniversary of the signing of a peace agreement which ended the conflict in Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are the writer, broadcaster and comedian, Timandra Harkness and Peter Tatchell, international human rights campaigner and director of the Peter Tatchell Foundation.

(Picture: UK Prime Minister, Boris Johnson (L) and European Commission President, Ursula von der Leyen (R). Credit: EPA/OLIVIER HOSLET / POOL)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3nxx4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 Global Questions (w3ct1d17)
Global Questions

A Covid-19 caccine: The end of the pandemic?

With the promise of a Covid-19 vaccine, Global Questions examines, if it could really be the silver bullet to end the pandemic.


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhzpcw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3p1n8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3cszf0v)
We found our baby on the subway

In 2000 Danny Stewart found a newborn baby boy, tucked in the corner of a New York subway station on his way home from work. The discovery hit the headlines, but when no one came forward to claim the baby the family court judge asked Danny if he would like to adopt him. Danny and his partner Peter Mercurio had never discussed raising a child together, but soon found themselves on an extraordinary journey. A longer version of this programme was broadcast on 7th October 2020.

Presenter: Anu Anand
Producer: Rebecca Vincent

Picture: (from left) Peter, Kevin and Danny
Credit: Photo courtesy of Peter Mercurio


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhzt40)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c18)
Why are India’s farmers angry?

Farmers in India are protesting amid a standoff with the government over new farm laws. Tens of thousands of farmers have laid siege to the capital Delhi, choking entry points, even as the coronavirus pandemic rages in the country. They are demanding that the government scrap the new laws, which they say, are against their interests.

The government has said that the reforms, which allow private players a greater role in the farming sector, will boost farmers’ incomes but the farmers are fear exploitation at the hands of big corporates, and are worried the government is planning to do away with the minimum assured price guarantee for their produce, which they say is a lifeline for them.

So, would the controversial reforms give much-needed relief to India’s ailing farming sector, or do they threaten farmers’ incomes and livelihoods by bringing in an unregulated free market?

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Hindol Sengupta, economic policy expert; Sudha Narayanan, agriculture economist; Shameek Chakravarty, founder and CEO, Farmizen

Photo: Indian farmers and supporters protest against new agricultural laws in New Delhi, India Credit: EPA


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3p5dd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1csl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhzxw4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tnkp98)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3p94j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct1csh)
Finders Keepers

Finders Keepers: Icons and empire

Calls for the return of objects, looted from around the world are growing ever louder. Actor and musician Kema Sikazwe travels to London to see the Broken Hill Skull at the Natural History Museum. At the launch of the Return of the Icons campaign, V&A director Tristram Hunt explains how he is responding to Ethiopia’s formal restitution claim. Children’s author, Kandace Chimbiri describes how her writing fills gaping historical hole and French art historian Didier Rykner is convinced that President Macron’s approach, is fundamentally flawed. Should priceless parts of history be returned? And if so, what’s at stake?

Theme music composed by Kema Sikazwe aka Kema Kay

(Photo: Presenter, Kema Sikazwe in front of the Broken Hill Skull (which Zambia is trying to have repatriated from the UK) at the Natural History Museum. Credit: Will Sadler)


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xj01m8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 World Questions (w3cszt62)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xj05cd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg0pbzz)
UK and EU to 'go extra mile' in post-Brexit talks

Britain and the European Union have agreed to continue talks on their post-Brexit trade relations, with both sides agreeing to go the extra mile to secure a deal.

Also in the programme: Hundreds of students are feared missing after gunmen raided a secondary school in north-western Nigeria; and Germany is tightening coronavirus restrictions to counter a surge in new infections, with schools and non-essential shops ordered to close.

(Photo credit: Getty Images)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xj093j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Big Idea (w3ct1csm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xj0dvn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjwg)
Umm Kulthum: Egypt’s singing superstar

Umm Kulthum’s powerful voice and talent for communicating poetry was spotted early, when she accompanied her family to perform at weddings and special occasions. It wasn’t long before she was performing in the elite salons of early 20th-century Cairo, although her father dressed her as a boy to protect her from any unwelcome interactions with strangers.

In the Egyptian capital she quickly associated herself with the most talented musicians of the day, and from then on she never looked back. She explored the major Arabic song forms of the period, collaborating with composers and poets. She dabbled in film, negotiated record deals, and when public service broadcasting began in the 1930s, she secured herself a monthly slot on national radio. In awe of her talent and mesmerising presence, the Arab world practically came to a standstill whenever she was heard on the airwaves.

Joining Bridget Kendall to explore Umm Kulthum’s life are Virginia Danielson, author of The Voice of Egypt: Umm Kulthum, Arabic Song and Egyptian Society in the 20th Century; Salwa el-Shawan Castelo-Branco, professor of ethnomusicology at the New University of Lisbon and president of the International Council for Traditional Music; and Yara Salahiddeen, whose current research at the University of Oxford focuses on music-making in 19th and early 20th century urban Egyptian society.

[Image: Umm Kulthum performs on Nov 16 1967 at the Olympia concert hall, Paris. Credit: STRINGER, AFP via Getty Images]


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xj0jls)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lk3llq283)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you live Premier League commentary of Fulham vs. Liverpool at Craven Cottage.

Delyth Lloyd is joined by former Wolves and Wales midfielder Dave Edwards to discuss all the key talking points ahead of the game and react to the day's early kick-offs with Southampton facing Sheffield United and Tottenham travelling to Crystal Palace.

Elsewhere, we'll have reaction to Anthony Joshua's heavyweight world title fight against Bulgaria's Kubrat Pulev and the finale of the Formula One season as the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix brings the curtains down on a very different championship.

In golf, we'll bring you the latest from the Women's US Open and we'll look ahead to day four of the second men's Test match between New Zealand and West Indies.

And we'll reflect on the MLS Conference Final between Columbus Crew and Seattle Sounders.

Photo: Liverpool forward Diogo Jota (Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xj0wv5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tnln89)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3q83k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xj10l9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6tx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xj14bf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg0q9z0)
UK and EU agree to extend Brexit trade talks

Teams from Britain and the EU are continuing efforts to break the deadlock over an agreement on future relations. The transition period ends in just over two weeks, and the two sides haven't agreed on rules for fair competition, the settling of disputes, and fishing rights.

Also in the programme: security forces in northern Nigeria attempt to free an unknown number of schoolchildren kidnapped by gunmen; and we hear from the man who broke one of the Zodiac serial killer's coded messages.

(Image: The president of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, and the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson. Credit: Epa/Olivier Hoslet and Gareth Fuller/PA Wire)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xj182k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qv31xq2d)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmg6zm017)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3qmby)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 The Documentary (w3ct1dz2)
Coping with grief

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, and the UK’s Chief Rabbi, Ephraim Mirvis, both experienced the loss of a child. They talk together about this experience and how to cope with grief.
Justin Welby and Ephraim Mirvis have become close friends. As well as being senior religious leaders in the UK, they have both experienced the death of a child. Johanna Welby was seven months old when she died in a car crash. Ephraim Mirvis’ daughter, Liora, was 30 when she died of cancer, leaving behind a husband and two children. They agreed to talk about their experiences at the end of a year when more than a million people have died around the world because of Covid-19. How should we respond to the loss of a loved one? And what can we do to support friends and family members who have experienced loss this year?

In this extended interview Justin Welby and Ephraim Mirvis discuss death, grief and recovery, and what we can learn from the coronavirus pandemic.

(Photo: The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby. Credit: Press Association)


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xj1ctp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3qr32)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Two Minutes Past Nine (w3ct1cws)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]



MONDAY 14 DECEMBER 2020

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t5btz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19yz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdvq3c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Discovery (w3ct1cx7)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The Space Burrito

Is there a point in space where the Sun could heat a burrito perfectly? asks Will. The doctors tackle this and a plethora of other conundrums from the Curious Cases inbox.

Featuring expert answers from astrophysicist Samaya Nissanke, cosmologist Andrew Pontzen, and cognitive neuroscientist Sophie Scott.

Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford
Producer: Jen Whyntie


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t5gl3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57znct5txv)
UK and EU agree to extend Brexit trade talks

The two sides had previously agreed Sunday as the deadline, but no deal has been reached. The UK prime minister Boris Johnson and European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen agreed to extend the deadline following a phone call on Sunday. We get the latest from Sam Fleming, FT bureau chief in Brussels.
Our regular market commentator Michael Hughes explains what's behind the recent rise in the oil price, which has now gone above $50 per barrel, and what the short term future for prices might be.
And sales of chess sets are up thanks to the hit series The Queen's Gambit on Netflix, which documents the life of former grandmaster Beth Harrison. And it's womnen who are behind the trend, as we hear from grandmaster Katerina Nemcova.

(Picture: UK prime minister Boris Johnson. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdvtvh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1csl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t5lb7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2yrbrc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdvylm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct0xb3)
The secret solution to climate change

If we educate and empower girls and young women, they are likely to have more control over their fertility. And with fewer people on the planet, it becomes the number one climate change solution. But it’s more complicated than it sounds, and not without controversy.

Experts: Christina Kwauk, a fellow in the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, and Paul Hawken, founder of Project Drawdown

Reporter: Ashley Lime
Producer: Jordan Dunbar
Researcher: Eleanor Biggs
Editor: Ravin Sampat
Sound mixer: Tom Brignell


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t5q2c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjwg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5y)
Stop the Springboks

In the winter of 1969 to 70, anti-apartheid campaigners disrupted 24 matches during a tour of the British Isles by South Africa’s Springboks rugby team. For the first time, the activists used direct-action tactics – running onto the pitch, throwing smoke bombs and even super-gluing the locks of the South Africans’ hotel rooms. The successful campaign forced the cancellation first of a planned tour by the South African cricket team later in 1970, and then of all future visits by South African teams until the end of apartheid. Simon Watts talks to Peter Hain, who organised the protests and later became a British cabinet minister.

PHOTO: An anti-apartheid demonstration outside a Springboks rugby match in central England in November 1969 (Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t5tth)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2yrl7m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdw62w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6r)
Will our spacecraft ever reach the stars?

The space between stars is usually measured in light years, but this makes it less easy to acknowledge the true scale of the distance. Even the closest star system to Earth, Proxima Centauri, is 4.2 light years or 40.13 trillion kilometres from Earth. If we are ever going to bridge the gap between the stars, we will have to have some very fast spaceships, with extremely reliable, long-lasting technology on board.

So does science allow for these spacecraft to exist? That’s what listener Allan wants to know, and to find out, Presenter Anand Jagatia speaks with Tracy Drain, a systems engineer at NASA JPL responsible for overseeing the development and missions of multiple unmanned interplanetary probes including some around Jupiter and Mars. She tells us the challenges involved with simply keeping our spacecraft working for the long-haul.

Even if we can overcome issues of wear and tear over time, powering a ship to other star systems will not be easy. Today’s chemical rockets are too inefficient for the job, so we speak with Rachel Moloney, a researcher in electric propulsion to ask if this relatively new technology could power ships through interstellar space.

Faster than light travel is the solution most often found in Science Fiction, but it goes against Einstein’s laws of relativity. Is there a way around it? Theoretical physicist Professor Miguel Alcubierre thinks there may be, and he describes the way a spaceship may be able to create a bubble of spacetime around itself to move faster than light without breaking these fixed laws. But there’s a catch...

Contributors:
Tracy Drain – Systems Engineer - NASA Jet Propulsion Lab, California, USA
Rachel Moloney – Researcher in Electrical Propulsion - Surrey Space Centre, UK
Professor Samuel Tisherman – Surgeon – University of Maryland school of Medicine, USA
Dr John Bradford – President & CTO of SpaceWorks, USA
Professor Miguel Alcubierre – Theoretical physicist known for the ‘Alcubierre Warp Drive’ – National University of Mexico


Presented by Anand Jagatia
Produced by Rory Galloway


[Image: Speceship. Credit: Getty Images]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t5ykm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjht6xb)
White House staff 'to receive early Pfizer vaccines'

The Coronavirus vaccine is set to be rolled out in parts of the United States this week.

The death of John Le Carre...one of the world's most famous writers described as an "undisputed giant of English literature"

And how the Nigerian security forces are trying to rescue children abducted from a school by gunmen.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t629r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjhtbng)
Covid-19: first vaccines to be rolled out in US

We talk to one of the suppliers involved in giving out the vaccine

One of the greatest thriller writers of the past fifty years has died - we'll talk about the books and the legacy of John Le Carre.

We'll get an update from Nigeria on the search for the school children kidnapped by gunmen last week.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t661w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjhtgdl)
US begins coronavirus vaccine rollout

Millions of doses of the Pfizer vaccine will be distributed in the coming months. We hear more about this massive logistical operation.

We look back on the life of one of the great masters of spy fiction, John Le Carre, who has died at the age of 89.

And we hear about some of the strangest and most unusual books in the world.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t69t0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2x)
Bernardine Evaristo: Is British culture changing?

Stephen Sackur speaks to Bernardine Evaristo, the Booker Prize-winning author of Girl, Woman, Other. In any society, the voices that are listened to, and the stories that are shared, say much about who is deemed to belong and who is excluded. On that basis, Britain is changing, but how deep does the cultural change go?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdwp2d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7kd)
Still no Brexit trade deal

Negotiators from the UK and EU are to begin a new push to reach agreement on post-Brexit trade after both sides agreed "to go the extra mile". A UK source said the "process still has some legs" but Boris Johnson has warned a no-deal is the "most likely" outcome. Sophie Pornschlegel, a senior policy analyst at the European Policy Centre, explains how much room there may be in Brussels' position, while the BBC's Rob Watson talks through what will be needed to get any deal over the line in the UK parliament before the 31st. And we'll hear from a UK coffee exporter, Dan Webber of Chimney Fire Coffee in Surrey, about what the prolonged uncertainty means for his business.

(Picture: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmkz)
White Christmas

American entertainer Bing Crosby made 'White Christmas' by Irving Berlin, one of the defining songs of World War Two. Rebecca Kesby has been speaking to his nephew Howard Crosby about the song and its importance to his uncle.

Photo: Bing Crosby in London in 1944 recording a performance for British and American troops. Credit: BBC.


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t6fk4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xb3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdwstj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4b)
Love at first knit

Knitting is sometimes dismissed as a gentle domestic activity, but this craft has a rich history of activism. It also helps keep your mind sharp and make you feel more relaxed. Kim Chakanetsa meets two knitting enthusiasts to unravel the social and cultural history of the craft.

Loretta Napoleoni is an Italo-American economist who usually writes about the financing of terrorism. She is also an avid knitter and in her latest book, The Power of Knitting, she looks at how knitting became a tool for women to fight discrimination and promote social change - from the spinning bees of the American Revolution to the knitting spies of WWI and WWII.

Hélène Magnússon is a knit designer based in Iceland. She grew up in France where she was a lawyer. In the 1990s she quit her high-flying career to move to Iceland, using knitting to explore the culture and history of Iceland and to make friends, until it eventually became her main profession. For her, the benefits of knitting go far beyond a finished scarf: when she was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, she realised that, throughout her life, she had been using the craft to cope with social situations she found stressful. You can find more about her work at icelandicknitter.com

Producer: Alice Gioia

Image:
L: Loretta Napoleoni - credit Roberto Vettorato
R: Hélène Magnússon – courtesy of Hélène Magnússon


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t6k98)
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MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj9b)
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MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdwxkn)
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MON 10:32 Mayday (w3ct1cx9)
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MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyd)
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MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t6p1d)
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MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2ysfgj)
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MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdx19s)
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MON 11:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6r)
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MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t6ssj)
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MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd44)
The Supervet: from bullies to bionic limbs

Growing up on a farm in Ireland as a lonely and unpopular child, Noel Fitzpatrick found solace in an invented superhero, ‘Vetman’, who rescued all the broken animals of the world. He’s now a pioneering veterinary surgeon who has become famous for fitting bionic limbs on injured pets. He tells Jo Fidgen how an operation on a tortoise almost cost him his life's passion.

Gilberto ‘Chito’ Shedden is a fisherman from Costa Rica. Years ago he befriended a wild crocodile called Pocho, and the unlikely relationship made international news. Outlook’s Clayton Conn went to meet him in 2019.

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com

Presenter: Jo Fidgen
Producer: Sophie Eastaugh

Picture: Noel Fitzpatrick operating on Oscar the Cat to give him two Bionic back feet in 2010
Credit: Wild Productions Ltd


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmkz)
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MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t6xjn)
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MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2ysnys)
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MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdx8t1)
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MON 13:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4b)
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MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t718s)
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MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z33q9x6xc)
US starts COVID-19 vaccine rollout

The United States is beginning the biggest vaccination programme in its history, with the COVID-19 Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine being delivered in every state. Dr. Moncef Slaoui, head scientist of the federal vaccine initiative Operation Warp Speed, told Newshour that he expected widespread immunity in the US by the middle of next year.

Also in the programme: the US Electoral College votes today to affirm President-elect Joe Biden’s victory; and lawyer Philippe Sands pays tribute to his friend the writer John le Carré.

(Image: Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. Credit: Reuters/Dado Ruvic)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t750x)
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MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2x)
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MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdxj99)
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MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlv70z1x0fm)
US coronavirus vaccine rollout begins

After the US approved Pfizer and BioNTech's coronavirus vaccine, its rollout has begun. Nick Timiraos is chief economics correspondent for the Wall Street Journal and tells us about the potential economic impact of a successful vaccination programme. And with indications that further coronavirus economic stimulus may be passed in the US soon, we examine the implications with Constance Hunter, chief economist for KPMG in the country. Also in the programme, the BBC's Karishma Vaswani looks at the effort to make Singapore a hub for distributing Covid-19 vaccines across the whole of Asia. US authorities have issued an emergency directive to stop using SolarWinds' Orion software, used by some of the world's biggest companies and US government departments, following a major cyberattack. Ken Munro is from the cyber security specialists Pen Test Partners, and brings us the details. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan's cockapoo Posy weighs in on why pet companies have performed particularly strongly this year.

(Picture: A container of the first shipment of Pfizer's vaccine in the US. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t78s1)
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MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5gbpsmtw)
US election: Electoral college vote

In the US, state electors will finally cast their Electoral College votes formalising Joe Biden’s win. We explain the process and hear whether Republicans now think this is the end of the road for President Trump who has been challenging the election results.

We look at the coronavirus outbreak in one of the worst affected countries, Brazil. We hear from a doctor treating Covid patients there and discuss how President Bolsonaro’s handling of the outbreak has complicated the preparedness in the country.

We also talk about the roll-out of vaccines in the US and other coronavirus stories with Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University.

We find out about the situation in Nigeria where gunmen are believed to be holding schoolchildren hostage in north-western Katsina state.

(Photo: U.S. President-elect Joe Biden announces more nominees and appointees for his administration during a news conference at his transition headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., December 11, 2020 Credit: Mike Segar/Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t7dj5)
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MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5gbpsrl0)
Post-Brexit trade talks continue

As talks continue over the future trade deals after Britain’s exit from the European Union, we return to people we spoke to during and after the 2016 Brexit referendum. We ask a British couple who were divided over the vote how they think the country’s divorce from the EU will affect them on a personal level?

In the US, state electors will finally cast their Electoral College votes formalising Joe Biden’s win. We explain the process and ask Republican voters whether they think this is the end of the road for President Trump who has been challenging the elections results.

We also look at the coronavirus outbreak in one of the worst affected countries, Brazil. We hear from a doctor treating Covid patients there and discuss how President Bolsonaro’s handling of the outbreak has complicated the preparedness in the country.

(Photo: Lorries arrive at the Port of Dover in Dover, Kent, Britain, 13 December 2020 Credit: VICKIE FLORES/EPA)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t7j89)
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MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd44)
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MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmkz)
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MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t7n0f)
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MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2ytdfk)
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MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdy08t)
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MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jxldpkmgg)
2020/12/14 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t7rrk)
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MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xb3)
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MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdy40y)
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MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1csc)
Steve Haake

Steve Haake has spent much of his career using technology to help elite sports people get better, faster and break records. He has turned his hand to the engineering behind most sports, from studying how golf balls land, to designing new tennis racquets and changing the materials in ice skates. He’s now Professor of Sports Engineering at Sheffield Hallam University and was the Founding Director of the Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre there.

Since the 2012 London Olympics, Steve has also been working to improve the health and wellbeing of all of us. As Chair of the Parkrun Research Board he’s heavily involved in this international phenomenon in which thousands of people have sprinted, jogged and stumbled around a 5-kilometre course on Saturday mornings, which he’s shown really does encourage people to be generally more active.

Jim al-Khalili talks to Steve Haake about how he got from a physics degree to being one of the leading sports engineers in the world, and how we can all improve our health by moving more.


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t7whp)
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MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z33q9y248)
US begins biggest vaccination programme in its history

An intensive care nurse in Long Island, New York is the first person in the United States to receive the Covid-19 jab. The US vaccination programme aims to reach 100 million people by April. Also: the US electoral college formally begins casting its votes; and a joint investigation co-led by the Bellingcat website has blamed Russian intelligence agents for the poisoning of opposition figure Alexei Navalny.

(Photo: Dr Michelle Chester prepares to administer a Pfizer coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, New York, U.S December 14, 2020. Credit: REUTERS/Brendan Mcdermid)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t807t)
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MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79r6cc4g7n)
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MON 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmth8tr6h)
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MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdycj6)
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MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58t33dyqp4)
US coronavirus vaccine rollout begins

After the US approved Pfizer and BioNTech's coronavirus vaccine, its rollout has begun. Nick Timiraos is chief economics correspondent for the Wall Street Journal and tells us about the potential economic impact of a successful vaccination programme. And with indications that further coronavirus economic stimulus may be passed in the US soon, we examine the implications with Constance Hunter, chief economist for KPMG in the country. Also in the programme, the BBC's Karishma Vaswani looks at the effort to make Singapore a hub for distributing Covid-19 vaccines across the whole of Asia. US authorities have issued an emergency directive to stop using SolarWinds' Orion software, used by some of the world's biggest companies and US government departments, following a major cyberattack. Ken Munro is from the cyber security specialists Pen Test Partners, and brings us the details. Plus, our regular workplace commentator Peter Morgan's cockapoo Posy weighs in on why pet companies have performed particularly strongly this year.

(Picture: A container of the first shipment of Pfizer's vaccine in the US. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t83zy)
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MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2x)
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MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdyh8b)
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MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3cszj4b)
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TUESDAY 15 DECEMBER 2020

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t87r2)
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TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkpy)
The first African to win the Nobel Peace Prize

When Chief Albert Luthuli won the Nobel Peace Prize he was living under a banning order in rural South Africa. He won the prize for advocating peaceful opposition to the Apartheid regime. We hear from his daughter Albertina and speak to a South African historian about his legacy. Plus the cave discovery in France that changed the way we think about Neanderthals, the best-selling African-American crime writer Chester Himes, celebrating 100 years since a cinematic first and the reintroduction of beavers that's helping restore Scotland's ecosystem.

(Picture: Albert Luthuli receives the Nobel Peace Prize in 1961. Credit: Keystone/Hulton Archive)


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t8ch6)
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TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x194l551ll3)
Electoral College Confirms Biden Win

Joe Biden has been formally certified as the next president of the United States, with results from electoral colleges in all but one US state giving him 302 votes. This takes him over the 270 threshold required to win the presidency. The electors in each state are appointed to reflect the popular vote, which was won by Mr Biden in November. We get reaction from Washington DC and examine the US democratic process.

Two major cyber-incidents on Monday. The first you may well have noticed, the second will have almost certainly passed you by but may be in the long term far more significant. Google applications including YouTube, Gmail and Docs suffered a massive service outage, with users unable to access many of the company's services. The second was a sweeping hacking campaign that may have attacked the US Department of Homeland Security, the Treasury and Commerce departments and thousands of businesses. We take a look at how working from home may be leaving businesses and government more vulnerable.

And we're in the Philippines where the country has been showing an interest in the very English game of cricket. Throughout the programme, Jamie Robertson is joined by analyst Tony Nash in the United States and social welfare expert Rachel Cartland in Hong Kong.


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t8h7b)
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TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2yv7ng)
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TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdyvhq)
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TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct1csp)
Disunion

On February 1st this year nearly every news bulletin began with the words 'the UK has officially left the European Union'. Boris Johnson could have been forgiven for congratulating himself for fulfilling his constitutional promise to 'get Brexit done'. But there was another story in the news that day too - health officials were trying to find anyone who’d had close contact with two Chinese tourists being treated in Newcastle for coronavirus.

No one at the time could have predicted then that a virus which began thousands of miles away in China would shake the foundations of Britain’s system of government; ten months on all the nations of the United Kingdom are living under different social regimes, internal borders divide the country as never before, and even parts of England have been in open revolt against Westminster.

In this programme Edward Stourton will explore how Covid19 is rewriting the rules Britain’s leaders live by and ask where it could take the UK.

(Image: Fractured Union Flag, Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t8lzg)
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TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd44)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmkz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t8qql)
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TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2yvh4q)
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TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdz2zz)
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TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct1csc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t8vgq)
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TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjhx3tf)
Biden win formalised

Joe Biden has said the "will of the people prevailed" after his presidential election victory was confirmed by the US electoral college; we go to northern Nigeria for the latest on the kidnapping of schoolboys - with hundreds still believed to be missing; and we'll be hearing what historic climate change on Venus tell us about the rising temperatures here on Earth.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t8z6v)
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TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjhx7kk)
Biden after win formalised: Time to turn the page

Joe Biden has said it is "time to turn the page" after his presidential election victory was confirmed by the US electoral college; we go to France where the latest lockdown may be ending but a curfew is now being imposed; and we'll hear from China about allegations of forced labour in the cotton industry -- one of the largest in the world.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t92yz)
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TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjhxc9p)
US electoral college vote officially confirms Biden’s victory

Joe Biden has won the state-by-state Electoral College vote that formally determines the US presidency, in effect ending Donald Trump's floundering campaign to overturn his loss in the November election; millions more people in England are set to move into the toughest Covid restrictions after government ministers warned that a new Covid strain of the virus may be linked to a rise in infections; and we hear from the Netherlands which is about to enter its toughest lockdown yet including over Christmas and the New Year.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t96q3)
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TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv26)
Making meat in a lab

Imagine if the meat we ate was all grown in shiny silver vats, with no animals harmed in the process.

That’s the vision of start-ups around the world, each trying to perfect lab-grown or cultured meat.

It’s a huge challenge in bioengineering to make it work at a cheap enough price. But there are big benefits for the planet if they can pull it off.

Presented by Amy Elizabeth
Produced by Amy Elizabeth and Tom Colls

Image: Lab-grown meat produced by Memphis Meat


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdzkzh)
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TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8bf)
Trusting the algorithm

Artificial intelligence is increasingly part of our daily lives - in health, in transport, entertainment and much more - but how many of us actually trust the algorithms that drive it? Rolls-Royce says it’s now developed a system, called the Aletheia framework, that gives IT engineers in any sector a way of testing whether their AI systems are making decisions that are safe and trustworthy. The aerospace company says it's making the framework available for free to all. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Caroline Gorski from Rolls-Royce who helped develop the Aletheia framework. She also speaks about AI's trust issues with Dame Wendy Hall, Professor of Computer Science at the University of Southampton in the UK and Chair of the Ada Lovelace Institute. Plus Pag Miles from the global recruitment company Alexander Mann Solutions, explains how the Aletheia framework might help his industry which is increasingly relying on AI to select and match candidates to jobs.


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmqh)
The birth of Bangladesh

In December 1970 Pakistan held its first democratic elections since gaining independence from British colonial rule in 1947. The elections led to war, the break up of Pakistan and the creation of a new country, Bangladesh. Farhana Haider has been speaking to the economist and leading figure in the Bengali independence movement, Rehman Sobhan, about the historic elections and their aftermath.

Photo East Pakistan 1971 The flag of Bangladesh is raised at the Awami League headquarters. Credit Getty Images


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t9bg7)
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TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct1csp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdzpqm)
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TUE 09:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc9)
René Redzepi on Noma's autumn menu

Every season of every year, chef René Redzepi reinvents Noma, the two Michelin-starred establishment in Copenhagen that is renowned as the most ground-breaking restaurant in the world. It spearheaded a revolution in Nordic cuisine, and its reputation has made Copenhagen a gastronomic capital. The restaurant has spawned the world-famous Nordic Food Lab food research institute, and hosts an annual international food symposium.

Dan Saladino has unprecedented access to the restaurant team. He follows them from their reopening in May as a neighbourhood burger bar, to the evening in October when diners experience their autumn ‘game and forest season’ menu for the first time. He explores Noma’s famous development kitchen, where Mette Søberg, head of research and development, and her team have previously pioneered dishes like the magnificent rotating celeriac shawarma and the delicate butterfly flatbread decorated in flower petals and pollen. He watches the physical transformation of the restaurant, as greenery is replaced by antlers, fungi and moss in the hands of acclaimed designer Christina Rudolph. And he eavesdrops on the restaurant kitchen and head sommelier Mads Kleppe on their first autumn service of 2020.

Presented by Dan Saladino and produced by Clare Salisbury for BBC Audio Bristol

Image: René Redzepi (Credit: Robin van Lonkhuijzen/AFP via Getty Images)


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t9g6c)
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TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t9kyh)
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TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2ywbcm)
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TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xdzy6w)
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TUE 11:32 Discovery (w3ct1csc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t9ppm)
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TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdkp)
Who do you think you are?

In 1994, 13-year-old Nicholas Barclay went missing in Texas. Several years later, he apparently resurfaced in Spain, and he was reunited with his family. But all was not as it seemed. Private investigator Charlie Parker knew he had an imposter on his hands. He spoke to Outlook's Jo Fidgen in 2018.

Rob Weston was abandoned in a cinema toilet in the UK in 1956. Decades later he was reunited with his brother Tommy Chalmers, thanks to the help of DNA detective Julia Bell. He spoke to Jo Fidgen in 2018.

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Newspaper article about Rob Weston
Credit: Photo courtesy of Rob Weston


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmqh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t9tfr)
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TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2ywkvw)
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TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf05q4)
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TUE 13:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5t9y5w)
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TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z33qb03tg)
China's 'tainted' cotton

China is forcing more than half a million Uighurs and other ethnic minorities to pick cotton in its western region of Xinjiang, according to a new investigation. Newshour examines how clothing companies can verify their supply chains.

Also in the programme: Kabul’s deputy governor killed by ‘sticky bomb’; and unconscious bias training to be scrapped in the UK.

(Image: Cotton in the field. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tb1y0)
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TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf0f6d)
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TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwvxf8cj69)
EU outlines digital services rules overhaul

The European Union has unveiled details of sweeping new rules for technology giants. Laura Kayali is a technology reporter for Politico in Brussels, has been examining the proposed new laws, and explains the implications for companies like Facebook and Google. And we get reaction to the move from Cecilia Bonefeld-Dahl, director general of Digital Europe, which represents the technology industry in the EU. Also in the programme, as vaccines for coronavirus get approved around the world, one of the key challenges with some of them is ensuring they are kept very cold during the shipping process. The BBC's Theo Leggett has been finding out where all the dry ice required is going to come from. Plus, there has been a surge in sales for sewing kits and machines, as people have spent more time at home during the pandemic. John Cole-Morgan runs a quilt shop in Tring, in southeast England, and discusses whether the trend is likely to continue when Covid-19 has been brought under control.

(Picture: The European Commission headquarters. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tb5p4)
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TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5gbpwjqz)
Nigeria school kidnappings: Hundreds of pupils still missing

More than 300 schoolboys are still missing after a mass kidnapping in the north-western Nigerian state of Katsina. The Islamist militant group Boko Haram has said it was behind the abductions. We'll hear from families of the missing boys and speak to our correspondent in Nigeria to find out the latest.

Also, we continue to bring you conversations about coronavirus from around the world. Today we go to South Korea, which was widely praised for its virus response earlier this year, with aggressive testing and contact tracing. We'll speak to three people in the country about how the virus has affected their lives.

And every day we invite a health expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer listener questions. Today we are joined by Dr Isaac Bogoch - an infectious diseases physician and scientist from the University of Toronto.

(Photo: A view shows an empty classroom at the Government Science school where gunmen abducted students, in Kankara. Credit: Reuters/ Afolabi Sotunde)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tb9f8)
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TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5gbpwnh3)
Coronavirus conversations: South Korea

We speak three people in South Korea about how the country is dealing with a third wave of the virus. The country was widely praised for its virus response earlier this year, with aggressive testing and contact tracing. We'll speak to three people in the country about how the virus has affected their lives.

Also, more than 300 schoolboys are still missing after a mass kidnapping in the north-western Nigerian state of Katsina. The Islamist militant group Boko Haram has said it was behind the abductions. We'll hear from families of the missing boys and speak to our correspondent in Nigeria to find out what’s happening.

And negotiations continue between the UK and the EU as they try to decide the terms on which Britain will exit the European Union. We'll explain what's going on.

(Photo: A medical worker swabs a citizen for a COVID-19 test at a makeshift clinic in Seoul, South Korea, 15 December 2020. European Pressphoto Agency/Jeon Heon-Kyun)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tbf5d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdkp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmqh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tbjxj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2yx9bn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf0x5x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jxldpnjck)
2020/12/15 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tbnnn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct1csp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf10y1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz991)
Dispelling COVID-19 vaccine myths online

Thousands of people in the UK have now received the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine and vaccinations have just started in Canada, yet despite promotion from the government, a recent survey shows many people are reluctant to have it. Part of this hesitation is due to misinformation and vaccine myths on social media. Anna-Sophie Harling Managing Director for Europe at NewsGuard– the trust tool web extension provider – talks about their special report on top COVID-19 vaccine myths online. Many of these myths have been circulating online for months so how can governments dispel these falsehoods and convince their populations to be vaccinated?



God of Mars PKGE:
Production has just started on the world’s first feature-length film to be shot with video game technology. “Gods of Mars” uses something called “the Unreal Engine”, which is normally used to make games like Fortnite and Gears of War. But this time it’s creating all the film’s special effects and virtual environments… from rocket ships to robots! It’s hoped that this kind of technology could save film-makers huge amounts of money. Chris Berrow has been taking a look for us.


Data Action
In her new book, “Data Action,” Associate Professor Sarah Williams from MIT issues a call for thinking ethically about data today. She’s on the programme to warn of the possibilities of using data for bias and segregation and how we need to learn to see the value behind the numbers.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.


(Image: Getty Images)

Studio Manager: John Boland
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tbsds)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z33qb0z1c)
Coronavirus: European nations tighten restrictions ahead of Christmas

A number of European countries have tightened coronavirus restrictions ahead of Christmas following a surge of infections in recent weeks. Meanwhile, Europe's medicines regulator is set to meet sooner than planned to consider approving a vaccine.

Also in the programme: Mitch McConnell the most powerful US Republican after the president has congratulated Joe Biden on his election victory. The BBC has seen information which suggests China is forcing hundreds of thousands of people from ethnic minorities including Uighurs to pick cotton in the Xinjiang region.

(Photo: Usually busy shopping streets were left empty after a Dutch lockdown began on Tuesday. Credit: Getty Images)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tbx4x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79r6cc7c4r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmth8xn3l)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf18f9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58t33f1ml7)
EU outlines digital services rules overhaul

The European Union has unveiled details of sweeping new rules for technology giants. Javier Espinoza the Financial Times correspondent in Brussels, has been examining the proposed new laws, and explains the implications for companies like Facebook and Google. And we get reaction to the move from Cecilia Bonefeld-Dahl, director general of Digital Europe, which represents the technology industry in the EU. Also in the programme, as vaccines for coronavirus get approved around the world, one of the key challenges with some of them is ensuring they are kept very cold during the shipping process. The BBC's Theo Leggett has been finding out where all the dry ice required is going to come from. Plus, there has been a surge in sales for sewing kits and machines, as people have spent more time at home during the pandemic. John Cole-Morgan runs a quilt shop in Tring, in southeast England, and discusses whether the trend is likely to continue when Covid-19 has been brought under control.

(Picture: The European Commission headquarters. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tc0x1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv26)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf1d5f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 16 DECEMBER 2020

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tc4n5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tc8d9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x194l554hh6)
Biden acknowledged as President-elect

The US Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell, has for the first time acknowledged that Joe Biden won the presidential election, describing him as the president-elect. Plus, the European Commission has proposed two tough new laws to put a check on the power of the world's big technology companies; we get the details from Javier Espinoza, the Financial Times' correspondent in Brussels. With several coronavirus vaccines given the green light, the challenge is not only how to distribute it but also how to keep it cold in the process.... and that's where a product you may have seen in the theatre or at a nightclub comes in; Theo Leggett reports. Some governments have been tempted to relax coronavirus restrictions over Christmas but with a rise in cases, the UK is under pressure to go the other way; we look at what Christmas could look like around the world. And we're joined throughout the programme by Mitchell Hartman from our sister programme Marketplace in the US and in Vietnam, Lien Hoang a reporter with Nikkei Asia. (Picture of Joe Biden by Drew Angerer via Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tcd4f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2yy4kk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf1rdt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct1csj)
Finders Keepers

Finders Keepers: A house that came home

What chance do communities have of getting looted artefacts back, and what lessons do the world's museums need to learn? Stijn Schoonderwoerd and Wayne Modest describe how the Netherlands are trying to decolonise their museums. Maori elders Sir Hirini Moko Mead and judge Layne Harvey led a successful campaign for the return of a sacred tribal meeting house, stolen over a hundred years before - what can others learn from their experience?


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tchwk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdkp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmqh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tcmmp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2yyd1t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf1zx2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz991)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tcrct)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjj00qj)
Top US Congress leaders say they hope to agree on Covid aid package

As US authorities get ready to approve a second vaccine we'll speak to a doctor on the frontline of the pandemic who was one of the first to get the jab; Germany has entered a hard lockdown closing schools and non-essential businesses in an attempt to stop a sharp rise in Covid-19 infections; and a Chinese space capsule bringing back the first moon rocks in more than four decades is on it's way back to Earth -- we'll hear about why this latest chapter in the space race is so significant.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tcw3y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjj04gn)
Germany under tougher restrictions amid Covid rise

Germany has entered a hard lockdown closing schools and non-essential businesses in an attempt to stop a sharp rise in Covid-19 infections; a verdict is likely later today in the trial of some of those involved in the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo; and we'll go to a small town in Italy which has built its fortune on recycling used clothes – and is now leading the way in sustainable fashion.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tczw2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjj086s)
Germany starts Christmas lockdown amid Covid surge

Germany has entered a hard lockdown closing schools and non-essential businesses in an attempt to stop a sharp rise in Covid-19 infections; hundreds of leaders from the world’s major faiths have called for gay conversion therapy to be banned; and a group of MP's in Britain have said that there should be a new approach by the government to relations with Iran.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5td3m6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7f)
Christopher Ruddy: Is the media amplifying division in America?

Stephen Sackur speaks to Christopher Ruddy, CEO of the conservative Newsmax media group and close personal friend of Donald Trump. His network has tried to outfox Fox News by being Trumpier than Trump. The President's unfounded claims of a stolen election might have been great for ratings, but what's it done to America’s body politic?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf2gwl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8nq)
Meeting in the virtual world

Could virtual offices provide an alternative to endless Zoom calls? Ed Bulter speaks to Jeremy Bailenson, director of Stanford University's Virtual Human Interaction Lab, about the phenomenon of 'Zoom fatigue', and why virtual reality could provide a solution. Phillip Wang, CEO of the startup Gather, shows us round his virtual office platform that combines video conferencing with old-school video game graphics. Ed tries out a meeting in virtual reality with Anand Agarawala, CEO of the VR platform Spatial. And Marc Bena from PwC explains why interest in virtual meetings is growing among businesses.

(Photo: A virtual meeting on VR platform Spatial, Credit: Spatial)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmsr)
British reality TV is born

The first British fly-on-the-wall documentary series aired on the BBC in 1974. It was called The Family and followed the lives of the Wilkins family in Reading. Marian Wilkins - now Archer - was the eldest daughter in The Family and has been speaking to Bethan Head about what it was like to be followed by cameras and have her wedding broadcast on television.

Photo: Screengrab from the first episode of The Family (1974).


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5td7cb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct1csj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf2lmq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cs9)
Don't log off: Opportunity

Today, Alan hears stories from people who’ve transformed their lives and are helping others to do the same against the backdrop of the pandemic.

He speaks to Alhaji in Sierra Leone who’s building a house for his parents from the money he’s earned working in the United States.
He hears from Tiffany in India who helps visually impaired people become more independent, after her own challenging childhood.
Alan also connects with Al in the United States who aims to inspire young people in a tough area of Chicago.

And he catches up with Ibrahim who, at the start of the pandemic, was homeless on the streets of Athens. Nine months on, Ibrahim’s life has changed beyond recognition.

Plus, Margaret in Uganda – who cares for youngsters orphaned by AIDS – shares her hopes for the new year.


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tdc3g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Reith Lectures (w3ct1cyn)
From Covid crisis to renaissance

Dr Mark Carney observes that the Covid pandemic has forced states to confront how we value health, wealth and opportunity. During the first few months of the crisis, most states chose to value human life more than the economic well-being of the nation-state. But if that seems to be changing how do we assess value in this sense? Carney elucidates surprising differences in the financial value put on a human life in different nations – and goes on to argue that this reductionist approach fails to take into deeper thinking about the worth of human existence.

(Photo: Outgoing Bank of England governor Mark Carney makes a keynote address at the 2020 United Nations Climate Change Conference. Credit: Tolga Akmen/Getty Images)


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tdgvl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2yz78q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf2v3z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Digital Planet (w3csz991)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tdllq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdsg)
The epic Arabic poem that was born in a stable

Iraqi poet Adnan Al-Sayegh was confined to a deserted stable for having banned books in his possession, while serving as a conscript in the Iraqi army during the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s. It was in these squalid conditions that he began writing a poem that would become one of the longest in Arabic history. It's called Uruk's Anthem and is over 500 pages long and took 12 years to write. The poem not only brought Adnan international recognition, but also put his life in danger, forcing him to flee his homeland in 1993. Now, for the first time, substantial extracts from Uruk's Anthem have been published jointly in English and Arabic - the book is called Let Me Tell You What I Saw and was co-written and translated by Jenny Lewis.

Mike Pelley from California has made it his mission to scuba dive in treacherous rivers to save precious objects that have been lost there. He’s so enthusiastic about his marine missions he’s given himself another name - Merman Mike. Although he doesn't get paid he says his reward is seeing the smiles on people's faces when they're reunited with a long-lost treasure from their past. He's been telling Outlook's Saskia Edwards all about it.

Tim Connaghan also brings smiles to people's faces. He's America's full-time national Santa Claus. Known as Santa Tim he's been a Santa Claus impersonator since 1970 and over the years has appeared in hundreds of TV commercials and magazine adverts. He also runs the International University of Santa Claus where you can get a PhD in something called 'Clausology' and learn how to answer those tricky questions from kids. He spoke to Outlook's Colm Flynn in 2017.

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com


Picture: Adnan Al-Sayegh holding the book Wait for me under the Statue of Liberty
Credit: Adnan Al-Sayegh


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tdqbv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2yzgrz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf32m7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cs9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tdv2z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z33qb30qk)
European countries impose pre-Christmas COVID lockdown

Several European countries are imposing strict pre-Christmas lockdowns to try and control the COVID-19 pandemic. We hear from Dresden, and talk to a German epidemiologist and the former health minister of the Czech Republic.


Also in the programme: the BBC's Mike Thomson reports from Darfur as international peacekeepers prepare to leave; and we speak to the medical anthropologist Paul Farmer, who has just won the Berggruen Prize for his work at the intersection of public health and human rights.

(Picture: Bonn, Germany; Credit: Reuters Wires)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tdyv3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf3b3h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxpc4w4qjp)
Australia WTO appeal over Chinese barley tariffs

Australia will appeal China's tariff on its barley at the World Trade Organisation. The BBC's Phil Mercer explains the background to the dispute, and we get context from Brett Hosking, chairman of the Australian trade body, Grain Growers. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler examines whether the idea of virtual offices could provide an alternative to endless zoom calls. Plus, as coronavirus vaccines are being rolled out around the world, we have a report from India exploring how that country of 1.3bn people is preparing to tackle the challenge of what could be the biggest immunisation programme in history.

(Picture: An Australian barley field being harvested. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tf2l7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5gbpzfn2)
Coronavirus conversations: Food banks

Billionaire MacKenzie Scott has donated $4.2bn to organisations helping people during the pandemic, including many which give out food to people who are struggling. We’ll speak to some of those groups about how they’ve seen demand grow through the year and some of the stories of the people they’re helping.

We’ll talk through the latest coronavirus stories with our expert of the day, Dr Maria Sundaram, and get your questions answered. Send your question in a WhatsApp audio message: +447730751925.

We’ll follow the progress of China’s Chang’e-5 space probe, due to land back on earth carrying material from the moon. They will be the first rocks to be brought from the moon since 1976. We’ll get a journalist from BBC Chinese to explain how the space programme fits in to China’s priorities.

Picture: A volunteer takes part in the Meadowlands Area YMCA and the Community Food Bank of New Jersey food drive ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday in East Rutherford, New Jersey (REUTERS/Brendan McDermid)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tf6bc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5gbpzkd6)
China probe brings rocks from moon

The Chang'e space probe is due to land with the first lunar samples brought to earth since 1976. We'll get our science correspondent to explain why it's a big deal in space exploration and what else China has planned beyond the earth's atmosphere.

Billionaire MacKenzie Scott has donated $4.2bn to organisations helping people during the pandemic, including many which give out food to people who are struggling. We’ll speak to some of those groups about how they’ve seen demand grow through the year and some of the stories of the people they’re helping.

And as we continue to cover the conversation around the future relationship between the UK and EU, we speak to two Italians who - last time we spoke - were studying in the UK. Our political correspondent Rob Watson will also help us understand some of the implications for the freedom to work and study between the UK and EU.

Picture: China's flag is seen unfurled from the Chang'e-5 spacecraft on the moon (CNSA/Handout via REUTERS)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tfb2h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdsg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tfftm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z067r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf3t30)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jxldprf8n)
2020/12/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tfkkr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct1csj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf3xv4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszccy)
In Iran, one in five infected by coronavirus

Iran was one of the first countries to be hit hard by the coronavirus. In the first population wide survey of infection rates in a Middle Eastern country, Iranian medical researchers now estimate that about one in five people on average were infected during its first wave in 18 cities in the country. But the rate varies enormously from city to city. In the city of Rasht, they estimate more than 70% of the population caught the virus. Claudia Hammond talks to Iranian infectious disease researcher Maryam Darvishian about the findings and what they mean for Iran’s attempts to control the virus today.

We look at the sleep hygiene plight of international students whose study and sleep cycles have been thrown into chaos because of Covid travel restrictions. We hear the experiences of a student in Singapore studying remotely at Columbia University in New York. Her classes are usually in the dead of night Singapore time. Harvard sleep researcher Jeanne Duffy advises on the best ways for students to plan their work/sleep patterns.

When surgical patients are under general anaesthetic, playing them soothing music and comforting messages may reduce the pain that they experience and the need for opioid pain relief in the 24 hours after their operations. This is the conclusion of a randomised study of about 400 patients undergoing surgery in five German hospitals. Claudia talks to anaesthesiologist Ernil Hansen of Regensberg University who explains how this might be working to make post-operative recovery more comfortable and less reliant on strong analgesic drugs.

Claudia’s studio guest this week is BBC Medicine and Science correspondent James Gallagher, talking about Covid-19 vaccines, how our genes influence the severity of Covid illness and how ear wax might improve blood sugar monitoring for diabetes.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

(Picture: People wearing protective masks walk through a street in Tehran in July 2020. Photo credit: Fatemeh Bahrami/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tfp9w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z33qb3vyg)
Fourteen people convicted in Charlie Hebdo trial

It was the biggest terrorist trial in French history, which found 14 people guilty of involvement in a series of deadly militant Islamist attacks on the Charlie Hebdo magazine and a Jewish supermarket in 2015.

Also in the programme: China has agreed to allow a World Health Organisation team into the country to investigate the origins of the coronavirus; and we’ll hear from classical performers celebrating Beethoven’s 250th birthday.

(Photo: Boumeddiene was Coulibaly's partner who fled to Syria days before the January 2015 attacks. Credit: French Police)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tft20)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79r6ccb81v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmth90k0p)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf45bd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58t33f4jhb)
WHO gets green light to visit Wuhan

China has given the World Health Organisation the green light to visit Wuhan to investigate the origins of coronavirus; Professor Sian Griffiths, an epidemiologist who helped lead Hong Kong's investigation into the Sars outbreak explains what the world can expect from the trip. Australia will appeal China's tariff on its barley at the World Trade Organisation; we hear from Brett Hosking, chairman of the Australian trade body, Grain Growers. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler examines whether the idea of virtual offices could provide an alternative to endless zoom calls. Plus, as coronavirus vaccines are being rolled out around the world, we have a report from India exploring how that country of 1.3bn people is preparing to tackle the challenge of what could be the biggest immunisation programme in history. (Picture of a job fair in Wuhan, Hubei province, China via Getty Images)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tfxt4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf492j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cs9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



THURSDAY 17 DECEMBER 2020

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tg1k8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Big Idea (w3ct1csm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tg59d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x194l557dd9)
WHO gets green light to visit Wuhan

China has given the World Health Organisation the green light to visit Wuhan to investigate the origins of coronavirus; Professor Sian Griffiths, an epidemiologist who helped lead Hong Kong's investigation into the Sars outbreak explains what the world can expect from the trip. Plus with only weeks left until Joe Biden begins his term as US President, will we see a huge difference in the US outlook on trade? We hear from US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer. As coronavirus vaccines are rolled out around the world, we have a report from India exploring how that country of 1.3bn people is preparing to tackle the challenge of what could be the biggest immunisation programme in history. A report into executive pay has shown that bosses of FTSE 100 companies in the UK earn on average a hundred times more than the lowest paid in their companies; we hear from Luke Hildyard, executive director of the High Pay Centre, which carried out the research. And for many actors, the pandemic and subsequent lockdowns has meant cancelled performances and tours, leaving them not just out of pocket but also unsure as to how to navigate their careers; we talk to actor Helen Percival who hopes to return to the stage next year. Plus, we're joined throughout the programme by Andy Uhler of Marketplace radio in the US and in Singapore, David Kuo co founder of the The Smart Investor. (Picture of a job fair in Wuhan, Hubei province, China via Getty Images)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tg91j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z11gn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf4n9x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6m5)
Darfur: A precarious peace

After 17 years of conflict costing 300,000 lives, a peace agreement offers new hope to Sudan’s troubled Darfur region. It comes as UNAMID, the United Nations and African Union peacekeeping force, prepares to finally pull out at the end of December. But with nearly two million displaced people still living in camps and some armed groups yet to sign the agreement, who will protect civilians if the peace fails? For Assignment, Mike Thomson gains rare access to Darfur to hear the stories of those still living with deep uncertainty.

Producer: Bob Howard
Editor: Bridget Harney

(Image: UN peacekeepers on patrol in Darfur, Sudan. Credit: Bob Howard/BBC)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tgdsn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdsg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tgjjs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z18yx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf4wt5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszccy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tgn8x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjj2xmm)
US trying to gauge full extent of cyber hack

The federal authorities in the United States say that a recently discovered cyber attack on government systems is significant and continuing.

The governor of Katsina State in Nigeria, where more than 300 school boys are still missing, tells us who he thinks kidnapped them.

And why the talking Kangaroo - a staple of kids TV - may be closer to the truth than we realised.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tgs11)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjj31cr)
US Homeland Security among cyber-hacked organisations

A cyber hacking attack on US government systems - it was discovered in the last few days - is "significant and continuing".

Kosovo's acting President speaks of her fears young people are leaving in droves saying corrupt leaders before her have failed the people.

And the top professional baseball league in the US has officially recognised the African American division which played between 1920 and 1948 during segregation.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tgws5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjj353w)
Cyber attack on US security agencies still a danger

The federal authorities in the United States say that a recently discovered cyber attack on government systems is significant and continuing.
Success for the battling mum in the UK who's been fighting for seven years to have air pollution recognised on her young daughter's death certificate.
And the actress who can't take to the stage at the moment so instead has become a virtual games master.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5th0j9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4j)
Has the time come for a European Super League?

The idea of a breakaway football league for Europe’s elite clubs has been discussed for decades.

It hasn’t happened yet, but could that be about to change?

Industry experts say officials from the continent’s biggest and most successful teams are meeting behind-closed-doors to discuss the proposition.

So we’re asking - has the time come for a European Super League?


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf5csp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7y6)
The monopoly case against Facebook

Why US regulators want to break up the social media giant. The US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and dozens of US states are arguing that Facebook is a monopoly that harms consumers. Ed Butler speaks to tech and anti-trust researcher Dina Srinivasan about why data privacy is at the centre of the arguments over Facebook's monopoly power. Former FTC chairman Bill Kovacic explains why breaking up the social media giant is still a distant possibility. And the BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones discusses the rising anti-tech sentiment among both US and European regulators.

(Photo: Facebook, Whatsapp and Instagram logos. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmn7)
The blockade of Gibraltar

In December 1982, Spain reopened its border with Gibraltar after a 13-year blockade of the disputed British territory. The border was closed by the dictator General Franco and led to the separation of families as well as a hardening of Gibraltarian attitudes towards Spain. It was only reopened when the new democratic government in Madrid wanted to join the European Union. Simon Watts talks to Tito Vallejo Smith, a retired defence worker and historian.

PHOTO: Gibraltarian and Spanish police officers side-by-side in the 1980s (Getty Images)


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5th48f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6m5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf5hjt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqz)
Lockdown food fails

Coronavirus shutdowns have seen many more people step into the kitchen to cook for themselves this year.

Whilst some have boasted about the joy, comfort and delectable dishes they’ve discovered, it was the food failures that really went viral.

Three amateur cooks tell Tamasin Ford about their epic kitchen catastrophes and the valuable lessons failure taught them about food, and themselves.

Producers: Simon Tulett and Sarah Stolarz

(Picture: A woman looking at burnt cakes in the oven. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)

Contributors:

Ngo Thi Viet Anh;
Heidi Allen;
Dan Nash


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5th80k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjwh)
The Kingdom of Aksum: Africa's trading empire

At its height, the Aksumite Empire extended across the northern Ethiopian and Eritrean highlands, and even included parts of Sudan, Somalia and modern-day Yemen. From the first century BC to the seventh or eighth centuries AD it was one of the most important trading hubs in north-east Africa. It was also one of the earliest states in the world to adopt Christianity. In fact the Persian prophet Mani named the Aksumite Empire as one of the “four great kingdoms on Earth” together with Persia, Rome and China. But despite its power and reputation, we’re only now beginning to understand more about the lives of the people who lived there.

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss the Aksumite Empire and its legacy are Helina Solomon Woldekiros, Assistant Professor of Archaeology at Washington University in St Louis, Missouri; Felege-Selam Solomon Yirga, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Tennessee; and Dr. Niall Finneran, Reader in Historical Archaeology and Heritage Studies at the University of Winchester in the UK. He is author of The Archaeology of Ethiopia.

Produced by Jo Impey for BBC World Service.

Image: 4th century stelae in Aksum, Ethiopia
Image credit: Arterra / Marica van der Meer / Universal Images Group via Getty Images


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5z)
Joey Dunlop - Northern Ireland's motorsport hero

In 2000, the Northern Irish motorbike racing champion, Joey Dunlop, was killed in a high-speed crash in Estonia. Dunlop was loved by fans across the sectarian divide for his fearless riding and modest personality. Tens of thousands of people attended the funeral for a champion who also gave up his free time to take aid to orphanages in Eastern Europe. Matt Murphy talks to Stephen Watson, a friend of Joey Dunlop and BBC Northern Ireland presenter.


PHOTO: Joey Dunlop at the Isle of Man TT in 1996 (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5thcrp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z245t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf5r12)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 Health Check (w3cszccy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5thhht)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdbx)
Discovering Stalin's million-dollar wine cellar

In 1998, Australian wine merchant John Baker was puzzled when he received a cryptic message and a list of wines he, on initial inspection, had never heard of. Once he cracked the code, he realised it was a cellar of around 40,000 bottles - including some of the most expensive wines ever produced. It was being offered for a million dollars, and had apparently been hidden away in the republic of Georgia by former head of the Soviet Union, Josef Stalin. Could he secure a deal?

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com

Picture: John Baker in the wine cellar
Credit: John Baker


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmn7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5thm7y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z2cp2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf5zjb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5thr02)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z33qb5xmn)
Cyber attack on US government systems 'ongoing'

The FBI and security agencies say a cyber attack on federal government systems is both "significant and ongoing". A joint statement says they are working to understand the full extent of the hacking campaign, which apparently began as long ago as March.

Also in the programme: Ten years after the Arab Spring began, what did it achieve? As international peacekeepers prepare to leave Sudan's war-torn Darfur region, we look at the chances of this latest peace deal holding.

(Picture: US Department of Homeland Security emblem. Credit: Reuters/ Hyungwon Kang/ File Photo)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5thvr6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf670l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlw1gpnw0l6)
European Parliament sets Brexit trade deal deadline

The European Parliament has set a Sunday deadline to ratify a Brexit trade deal this year. The BBC's Andrew Walker brings us the latest news on the ongoing negotiations. Also in the programme, we hear from the US trade representative, Robert Lighthizer, about the possibility of a UK-US trade deal before the end of the Trump administration. Zambia's president, Edgar Lungu, has said that the state must assume a significant stake in selected copper mines to benefit the country beyond taxes, though argued he is not calling for nationalisation. The Economist Intelligence Unit's Zambia analyst Neil Thompson brings us the details. We have a report from Abuja, Nigeria, on an initiative to use solar-powered fridges to help distribute coronavirus vaccines to even the most remote communities. Plus, a row has broken out between social networking giant Facebook and Apple, over a feature it is introducing to allow users of its products to ban apps from tracking their activities online. Kate O'Flaherty is a technology journalist who specialises in data security, and explains what led to the two tech giants falling out.

(Picture: A composite of the European and British flags. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5thzhb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5gbq2bk5)
Pandemic poverty in the US

We talk about the poverty in the US and hear more stories about people struggling to provide for their families during the pandemic. One father in Florida explains how he has lost it all and is about to be evicted.

And we explain the latest developments with the coronavirus with the help of our medical expert, Dr Emma Hodcroft, from the University of Basel in Switzerland.

We also go to Nigeria where a video has been released - apparently by the Islamist group Boko Haram - showing some of the 300 boys kidnapped last week in northwest Nigeria.

And we ask people in Tunisia what has changed in the country since the uprising ten years ago.

(Photo: People wait in a block-long line to pick up food at the Masbia of Flatbush food pantry in Brooklyn, New York, USA, 30 April 2020. Credit: JUSTIN LANE/PA)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tj37g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5gbq2g99)
Emmanuel Macron: French president tests positive for Covid

We go to France to hear how the nation is reacting to the news that their 42-year-old president has tested positive for Covid-19. Emmanuel Macron and many European leaders who have been in contact with him will now have to self-isolate for seven days.

We also continue our conversations about pandemic poverty in the United States and hear from one father who has lost it all and is about to be evicted.

And we go to Nigeria where a video has been released - apparently by the Islamist group Boko Haram - showing some of the 300 boys kidnapped last week in northwest Nigeria.

And as talks over the future relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union continue, we discuss the impact of Brexit on immigration which was one of the defining issues for many who supported Britain’s exit from the EU.

(Photo: French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris, France, December 16, 2020. Credit: Gonzalo Fuentes/Reuters)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tj6zl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdbx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmn7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tjbqq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z334v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf6q03)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jxldpvb5r)
2020/12/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tjggv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6m5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf6tr7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1g)
Covid -19 – Mutations are normal

This week the UK Health secretary raised concerns over a new variant of SARS- CoV-2 currently spreading across Europe. Viruses mutate all the time so it’s no surprise that a new form of the one causing Covid -19 would emerge. However, virologist Ravi Gupta who analysed the new strain says we need to be weary in case future strains mutate in ways that could overcome vaccines.

Immunologist Akiko Iwasaki is part of a team looking at the impact of Covid -19 on our immune system. Her research has uncovered autoantibodies linked to infection with the virus. These are responsible for a number of autoimmune diseases. The finding goes some way to explaining the symptoms seen by some people long after a Covid -19 infection.

And how clever are ravens? According to behavioural scientist Simone Pika at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in many ways they are up there with chimps or young children. She found they performed well in tests designed for primates.

Following the dinosaur destroying meteor strike where was the best place for life to develop a new? Geologists, David Kring and Tim Bralower, think they’ve found the answer hidden in plain sight.

(Image: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tjl6z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z33qb6rvk)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tjpz3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79r6ccf4yy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmth93fxs)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf727h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58t33f7fdf)
Google faces unfair practices lawsuit

Legal action has been started by 38 Attorneys general in the United States - alleging unfair and anti-competitive practice; we hear from Kirin Stacey, Washington Correspondent at the Financial Times. The European Parliament has set a Sunday deadline to ratify a Brexit trade deal this year. The BBC's Andrew Walker brings us the latest news on the ongoing negotiations. Also in the programme, we hear from the US trade representative, Robert Lighthizer, about the possibility of a UK-US trade deal before the end of the Trump administration. Zambia's president, Edgar Lungu, has said that the state must assume a significant stake in selected copper mines to benefit the country beyond taxes, though argued he is not calling for nationalisation. The Economist Intelligence Unit's Zambia analyst Neil Thompson brings us the details. We have a report from Abuja, Nigeria, on an initiative to use solar-powered fridges to help distribute coronavirus vaccines to even the most remote communities. (Picture of Google logo on a phone by Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty Images).


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tjtq7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf75zm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



FRIDAY 18 DECEMBER 2020

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tjygc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjwh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tk26h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x194l55b99d)
Google faces unfair practices lawsuit

Legal action has been started by 38 attorneys general in the United States - alleging unfair and anti-competitive practices by Google; we hear from Kiran Stacey, Washington Correspondent at the Financial Times. The US FDA endorses another Covid vaccine for authorisation, this one is made by Moderna, giving strength to the US vaccination effort. We hear from the makers of an at-home coronavirus test kit that doesn't involve a prescription. It's developed by an Australian company called Ellume and received US approval this week.
We have a report from Abuja, Nigeria, on an initiative to use solar-powered fridges to help distribute coronavirus vaccines to even the most remote communities.US President-elect Joe Biden has chosen congresswoman Deb Haaland to serve as the first Native American interior secretary; we hear from Aaron Payment, Tribal Chair of the Sioux Saint Marie Chipawa Indians who hopes her expected appointment will bring change.
And we're joined throughout the programme by Erin Delmore, a political commentator in Vermont and Jyoti Malhotra, editor of national and strategic affairs at The Print website in Delhi. (Picture of Google logo on a phone by Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty Images).


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tk5ym)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z3ycr)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf7k70)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3cszth4)
A new era for Beitar Jerusalem?

We look at the historic co-ownership of Beitar Jerusalem by an Arab and a Jew. Beitar have never had an Arab player but now they have an Arabic co-owner. Moshe Hogeg, who signed a partnership with Sheikh Hamad of Abu Dhabi, tells us that he had to consult the most important religious and political figures in Israel first.

Picture: Fans of Israeli Beitar Jerusalem football club show their support during the team's training in Jerusalem (EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tk9pr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdbx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmn7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tkffw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z45w0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf7sq8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tkk60)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjj5tjq)
Abducted schoolboys freed in Nigeria

A state governor in northern Nigeria says more than 300 schoolboys kidnapped by gunmen last week have now been released.

The departments which maintain the US nuclear weapons stockpile have become the latest government agencies to say that their networks have been hacked.

A panel of experts in the United States has voted in favour of granting emergency approval to Moderna's Covid vaccine paving the way for it to be shipped as soon as this weekend.

President Jair Bolsonaro has criticised a decision by Brazil's Supreme Court to make vaccination against coronavirus obligatory.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tkny4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjj5y8v)
Nigerian kidnapped boys returning to their families

Some 344 Nigerian schoolboys who were kidnapped a week ago, have now been released and are being reunited with their families.

A coalition of US Muslim groups is asking the world to stand up to China over its treatment of the country's Uighur Muslim minority.

And a special report from Venezuela where - despite the largest oil reserves in the world – the government is unable to provide the population with sufficient fuel.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tksp8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wmsjj620z)
Nigerian Schoolboys: authorities find unguarded students

Hundreds of the schoolboys kidnapped in northern Nigeria have now been released but confusion remains over the exact numbers of students abducted in the first place.

Covid-19: Lithuania is a small European country that's seen a sudden surge of the virus in the last month after controlling its spread remarkably well.

One of the most anticipated computer games of the decade has turned into a commercial disaster - as Sony pulls Cyberpunk 2077


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tkxfd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc22)
Adam Goodes: How racism drove him from Australian Rules football

Nowhere has the symbolic power of the Black Lives Matter movement been more evident than in the sports arena. All too often racism undermines the notion of a level playing field. HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to an athlete who made a stand. Adam Goodes was a star player in Aussie Rules football. One of the greatest ever players of Aboriginal descent, he quit the game after years of racist abuse. What lessons can Australia and the wider world learn from his experience?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf88ps)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz79d)
Cannabis in the USA: An illegal tax-paying business

America’s cannabis industry is worth tens of billions of dollar and it generates tax revenues and jobs. But it is barred from accessing most financial services. This is because, while legal in an increasing number US states, cannabis remains illegal at a federal level. We hear what it’s like running a cannabis business from Ken Churchill of the West Coast Cannabis Club in California. Emily Dufton, author of Grass Roots: The Rise and Fall and Rise of Marijuana in America, explains how the US went from "Just Say No" in the 1980s to yes now. And Robert Hoban, a lawyer who specialises in cannabis, explains why two currently empty Georgia Senate seats could determine whether the Biden administration can fulfil its pledge to decriminalise cannabis.

(Picture: purchasing legal marijuana at a dispensary. Credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmw0)
The GDR's Namibian children

On December 18th 1979 hundreds of Namibian children were taken to East Germany to escape the war in their home country. But after communism in Europe collapsed in 1989 the children were sent back to Africa and an uncertain future. Johannes Dell has been speaking to Selma Kamati who was just four years old when she found herself experiencing a snowy East German Christmas.

Photo: Selma Kamati (far right of picture) and some of the of the other Namibian children.


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tl15j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhps)
Hackers breach US government

Key government agencies are among thousands of organisations believed to have been hit using compromised network software from SolarWinds. Plus Facebook goes to war with Apple over its plans to restrict the targeting of iPhone users by advertisers. And the man whose school photograph became a viral meme without him knowing it. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf8dfx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 World Football (w3cszth4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tl4xn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcp0)
Big Tech under pressure

The European Union has this week proposed new rules that would police the practices of big technology companies, including US giants such as Google, Amazon, Apple, and Facebook. As well as delivering greater scrutiny, the laws, if passed, would even allow for the forced break-up of businesses deemed to be anti-competitive. The long awaited Digital Services Act and Digital Markets Act are seen as attempts to redefine the regulatory framework for a sector that will be key to the economy of the future. Meanwhile in the United States, the federal government and a large number of states have filed a case against Facebook alleging that the company is obstructing competition by buying up rivals. The interventions have been welcomed by those who’ve long argued for targeted measures aimed at the growing digital economy. But technology companies say they’re being penalised for their innovative business models. So have the titans of Silicon Valley become too big for the greater good, and - if so - should they be reformed or broken up? Ritula Shah and guests discuss the renewed focus on regulating global technology companies and what might come of it.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tl8ns)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z512x)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf8my5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tlddx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj4)
'Milk siblings' and Islam

Margarita Rodriguez of BBC Mundo recently published a story about Islamic milk kinship, or milk siblings. It refers to the relationship between children from different mothers who are breastfed by the same woman. It brings with it a special bond, but also prohibitions.

Living and working with Covid-19
The perks and pressures of working through a pandemic, with Beatriz de la Pava from BBC Minute’s Spanish team, BBC Russian’s Grigor Atanesian, Issariya Praithongyaem from BBC Thai, BBC Uzbek’s Ibrat Safo and BBC Marathi’s Mayuresh Konnur.

A Maharaja and a dancer
BBC Urdu has been running a series of stories about historical sites named after women, including a temple and a mosque inspired by Moran Mai, the court dancer who captured the heart of Maharaja Ranjit Singh, leader of the 19th century Sikh empire. Umer Draz Nangiana tells their story.


Image: Muslim mother with headscarf cradling baby
Credit: Getty/Narisara Nami


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmw0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tlj51)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z58l5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf8wff)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1cw9)
Black Jesus

The identity and colour of Jesus – and why it matters - has taken on a new significance in this year of protest and change. Seeing Jesus as a darker skinned Palestinian rather than blonde European is both historically accurate and theologically important, but it’s not a new idea.

James Cone, the influential US theologian released ‘A Black Theology of Liberation’ 50 years ago this year – and formally developed a radical new way of exploring the message of Christianity. While people often say it’s a ‘white man’s religion’, Cone emphasised Jesus’ identity as black, on the side of the oppressed, and Christianity as a religion of liberation.
Robert Beckford, one of the UK’s prominent black theologians, wants to explore the impact Black Theology has had, the implications for the church and whether seeing Jesus as black is having a revival due to the influence of black lives matter. In this programme Robert speaks to key theologians who studied under Cone; Professor Dwight Hopkins and the Very Reverend Kelly Brown Douglas about the social context and significance of Cone’s work. He hears from Rev Otis Moss III from a Chicago based church which lives out black theology, and Pastor Jonathan Jackson in the UK. Robert goes on to explore how young Christians are readdressing Jesus’ identity in the UK with Chine McDonald and has a discussion about embracing the Black Jesus with Clare Williams, Shermara Fletcher and Joel Brown. Plus he’ll hear from American artist and iconographer Mark Doox about the depiction of a black Christ in Christian art.

Producer: Miriam Williamson

(Picture: ‘The Holy Face' by Mark Doox)


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tlmx5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z33qb8tjr)
Nigerian boys released after kidnap ordeal

More than 300 schoolboys have been reunited with their families, a week after they were kidnapped from their school in north-west Nigeria. We hear from the spokesman for the governor of Katsina State.

Also in the programme: US Senator Dick Durbin on the cyber attacks on government agencies and private companies, and whether the incoming Biden administration should retaliate; and in a blow to President Bolsonaro, the Brazilian Supreme Court rules that citizens can be required to receive the vaccine - and if they don't, they may forfeit certain rights and freedoms.

(Photo: Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari receives a phone call from Katsina state Governor Aminu Bello Masari who is briefing him on the rescue mission of the abducted students of the Government Science Secondary School, in Daura, Nigeria. Credit: Nigeria Presidency/Handout via Reuters)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tlrn9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf93xp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltdl7gl9mq)
Cyberpunk 2077: Sony pulls game from Playstation store

Sony has pulled one of the year's most anticipated games, Cyberpunk 2077, as it has bugs. Mark Cieslak is a reporter with the BBC Click technology programme, and brings us the details. Also in the programme, we have the latest on the SolarWinds hack, which US investigators say is a 'grave risk' to the US government, amid speculation that thousands of businesses could also have been hit. Theresa Payton is a former chief information officer at the White House and is now the chief executive of cyber security consultancy Fortalice Solutions. As US vice-president Mike Pence receives his coronavirus vaccine in front of TV cameras, we have a report from New York on how long it might take for benefits from the country's vaccination programme to show in terms of new jobs and financial recovery. Plus, whilst cannabis becomes legal in more US states, it remains illegal at a federal level. The BBC's Manuela Saragosa examines what that means for the country's marijuana industry, and whether president-elect Joe Biden's administration is likely to be able to fulfil a pledge to decriminalise cannabis.

(Picture: A Cyberpunk 2077 display in a shop. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tlwdf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5gbq57g8)
Nigeria kidnapped schoolboys released

We'll be hearing the conversation in Nigeria following the release of the boys kidnapped from their school in Katsina state. The governor of Katsina state says all 344 pupils have been freed, but the circumstances are unclear. Questions also remain about exactly who took them as well as the security of schools, so we'll speak to relatives and BBC journalists covering the story.

A big debate in many countries as Christmas approaches is how to adapt the usual celebrations to the year of the coronavirus pandemic. Even if you're allowed to travel to meet your family, is it the responsible thing to do? We'll hear people who are grappling with that dilemma in South Africa and Tennessee.

Cyberpunk 2077 was a hugely anticipated title for gamers around the world when it was released just over a week ago, but now it's been pulled from Sony's PlayStation store after players complained it was riddled with bugs and glitches. We'll speak to someone who has been trying to play it and ask our tech reporter about the fallout for the industry.

Picture: Freed Nigerian schoolboys walk after they were rescued by security forces in Katsina, Nigeria (REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde; picture blurred by the BBC to protect the boys' identities)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tm04k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t5gbq5c6d)
Coronavirus conversations: The Christmas dilemma

A big debate in many countries as Christmas approaches is how to adapt the usual celebrations to the year of the coronavirus pandemic. Even if you're allowed to travel to meet your family, is it the responsible thing to do? We'll hear people who are grappling with that dilemma in South Africa and Tennessee.

We'll be hearing the conversation in Nigeria following the release of the boys kidnapped from their school in Katsina state. The governor of Katsina state says all 344 pupils have been freed, but the circumstances are unclear. Questions also remain about exactly who took them as well as the security of schools, so we'll speak to relatives and BBC journalists covering the story.

We're spending time this week explaining the talks between the UK and EU on what their relationship will be from the start of next year, following Britain's exit from the bloc - Brexit - back in January. The two sides have been struggling to agree and today we'll focus on the implications for the land border between the UK and the Republic of Ireland: historically troubled, politically fraught, economically important.

Picture: Christmas 2020 at the Taman Anggrek shopping mall in Jakarta, Indonesia (REUTERS / Ajeng Dinar Ulfiana)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tm3wp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmw0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tm7mt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bkn2z601y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf9lx6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jxldpy72v)
2020/12/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tmccy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhps)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf9qnb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6s)
Was I born Clumsy?

CrowdScience listener Simon has a problem. He’s always bumping into things, dropping tools and knocking stuff over. And he’s sick of it. He wants to know what is going on. Was he born like this? Or is it contagious? And most importantly, can he doing anything about it or is he going to be the proverbial ‘bull in a china shop’ for the rest of his life?

Host Anand Jagatia gets on the case, investigating the complex coordination needed for the simplest movements, like throwing a ball and catching it. With help from Dr Andrew Green, an exercise physiologist from Johannesburg University, he delves into our secret “sixth sense” – proprioception, which helps us locate our limbs without looking. Anand discovers that an easy task, like kicking a football, needs multiple parts of the brain to coordinate in order to work smoothly. Assistant Professor Jessica Bernard from Texas AMU studies the brain, particularly the cerebellum, a part that controls smooth movements. Dr Bernard explains how tiny glitches and larger lesions in different parts of the brain can make us clumsy in different ways. And how we use our thinking powers to stay balanced; a reason why, as your memory goes with old age, you’re more prone to falling over.

Our listener is not alone. Around the world, there is an under- diagnosed condition that affects millions of us. Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), also known as dyspraxia is a motor coordination condition that affects 5% of the global population. As Professor Amanda Kirby from the University of South Wales and CEO of Do-It solutions explains, if you can’t tie shoelaces, catch a ball and your handwriting is awful, there’s a chance that you have DCD. There’s a large genetic component, so you are likely to come from a clumsy family.

There’s no cure for DCD/Dyspraxia but all of us are capable of becoming better at a chosen task, and there’s a common pathway to mastery, whether that’s bike mechanics or open heart surgery. Professor Roger Kneebone is the author of Becoming Expert, and he talks to Simon about possible solutions to clumsiness, including accepting and living with it.

[Image: Man slipping on banana. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tmh42)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z33qb9nrn)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tmlw6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79r6ccj1w1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmth96btw)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xf9z4l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58t33fbb9j)
Cyberpunk 2077: Sony pulls game from Playstation store

Sony has pulled one of the year's most anticipated games, Cyberpunk 2077, as it has bugs. Mark Cieslak is a reporter with the BBC Click technology programme, and brings us the details. Also in the programme, we have the latest on the SolarWinds hack, which US investigators say is a 'grave risk' to the US government, amid speculation that thousands of businesses could also have been hit. Theresa Payton is a former chief information officer at the White House and is now the chief executive of cyber security consultancy Fortalice Solutions. As US vice-president Mike Pence receives his coronavirus vaccine in front of TV cameras, we have a report from New York on how long it might take for benefits from the country's vaccination programme to show in terms of new jobs and financial recovery. Plus, whilst cannabis becomes legal in more US states, it remains illegal at a federal level. The BBC's Manuela Saragosa examines what that means for the country's marijuana industry, and whether president-elect Joe Biden's administration is likely to be able to fulfil a pledge to decriminalise cannabis.

(Picture: A Cyberpunk 2077 display in a shop. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p6n5tmqmb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q12xfb2wq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3cszth4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6m5)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6m5)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6m5)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5q0qn3k9j8)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5q0qn3knrn)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5q0qn3l101)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5q0qn3l4r5)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5q0qn3ld7f)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5q0qn3m7gb)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5q0qn3mqfv)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172x5q0qn3myy3)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5q0qn3n6fc)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5q0qn3nfxm)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5q0qn3nknr)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5q0qn3nxx4)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5q0qn3p1n8)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5q0qn3p5dd)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5q0qn3p94j)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5q0qn3q83k)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5q0qn3qmby)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5q0qn3qr32)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172x5q12xdvq3c)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5q12xdvtvh)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5q12xdvylm)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5q12xdw62w)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5q12xdwp2d)

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BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5q12xdx19s)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5q12xdx8t1)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5q12xdxj99)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5q12xdy08t)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5q12xdy40y)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5q12xdycj6)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5q12xdyh8b)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5q12xdyvhq)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5q12xdz2zz)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5q12xdzkzh)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5q12xdzpqm)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5q12xdzy6w)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5q12xf05q4)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5q12xf0f6d)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5q12xf0x5x)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5q12xf10y1)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5q12xf18f9)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5q12xf1d5f)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5q12xf1rdt)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5q12xf1zx2)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5q12xf2gwl)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5q12xf2lmq)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5q12xf2v3z)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5q12xf32m7)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5q12xf3b3h)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5q12xf3t30)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5q12xf3xv4)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5q12xf45bd)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5q12xf492j)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5q12xf4n9x)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5q12xf4wt5)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5q12xf5csp)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5q12xf5hjt)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5q12xf5r12)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5q12xf5zjb)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5q12xf670l)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5q12xf6q03)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5q12xf6tr7)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5q12xf727h)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5q12xf75zm)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5q12xf7k70)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5q12xf7sq8)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5q12xf88ps)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5q12xf8dfx)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5q12xf8my5)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5q12xf8wff)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5q12xf93xp)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5q12xf9lx6)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5q12xf9qnb)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5q12xf9z4l)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5q12xfb2wq)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhvprm)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhvthr)

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BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhw200)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhw5r4)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhw9h8)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhwf7d)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhwjzj)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhwnqn)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhwsgs)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhwx6x)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhx0z1)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhx4q5)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhx8g9)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhxd6f)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhxw5y)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhxzy2)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhy3p6)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhy7fb)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhyc5g)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5p68xhygxl)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5p68xhylnq)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5p68xhyqdv)

BBC News 02:00 SUN (w172x5p68xhyv4z)

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BBC News 06:00 SUN (w172x5p68xhzb4h)

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BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5p68xhzxw4)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172x5p68xj01m8)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5p68xj05cd)

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BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5p68xj0jls)

BBC News 19:00 SUN (w172x5p68xj0wv5)

BBC News 20:00 SUN (w172x5p68xj10l9)

BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5p68xj14bf)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172x5p68xj182k)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5p68xj1ctp)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172x5p6n5t5btz)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172x5p6n5t5gl3)

BBC News 02:00 MON (w172x5p6n5t5lb7)

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BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5p6n5t69t0)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5p6n5t6fk4)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172x5p6n5t6k98)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5p6n5t6p1d)

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BBC News 15:00 MON (w172x5p6n5t750x)

BBC News 16:00 MON (w172x5p6n5t78s1)

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BBC News 18:00 MON (w172x5p6n5t7j89)

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BBC News 21:00 MON (w172x5p6n5t7whp)

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BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5p6n5t83zy)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172x5p6n5t87r2)

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BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5p6n5t9bg7)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5p6n5t9g6c)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5p6n5t9kyh)

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BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5p6n5t9tfr)

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BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5p6n5tb5p4)

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BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5p6n5tc0x1)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172x5p6n5tc4n5)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5p6n5tc8d9)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5p6n5tcd4f)

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BBC News 09:00 WED (w172x5p6n5td7cb)

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BBC News 20:00 WED (w172x5p6n5tfkkr)

BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5p6n5tfp9w)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5p6n5tft20)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5p6n5tfxt4)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172x5p6n5tg1k8)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5p6n5tg59d)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5p6n5tg91j)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5p6n5tgdsn)

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BBC News 09:00 THU (w172x5p6n5th48f)

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BBC News 12:00 THU (w172x5p6n5thhht)

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BBC News 21:00 THU (w172x5p6n5tjl6z)

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BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172x5p6n5tjygc)

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BBC News 19:00 FRI (w172x5p6n5tm7mt)

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BBC News 21:00 FRI (w172x5p6n5tmh42)

BBC News 22:00 FRI (w172x5p6n5tmlw6)

BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5p6n5tmqmb)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct19yz)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 MON (w3ct19yz)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172x2t5gbpsmtw)

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BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172x2t5gbq2bk5)

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BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172x2t5gbq57g8)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172x2t5gbq5c6d)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7kd)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz8bf)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8nq)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7y6)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz79d)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x1946wvn1ln)

Business Matters 01:06 TUE (w172x194l551ll3)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf5c)

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When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct1c4y)

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Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3cszmvz)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3cszth4)

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World Questions 19:06 SAT (w3cszt62)

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