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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 05 DECEMBER 2020

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn62k4s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcny)
Is Biden facing a new Middle East?

The assassination of the Iranian nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh appears to have made life more difficult for President-elect Biden - yet another event to weigh up as he considers what to do about Donald Trump’s legacy across the Middle East. Over the last four years the Republican president withdrew from the nuclear deal with Iran known as the JCPOA, shifted the US embassy to Jerusalem, withdrew almost all American troops from Syria and refused to support a bill that called for a ban on weapons sales to Saudi Arabia because of its role in the war in Yemen. Mr Trump’s 'maximum pressure' strategy did not prevent Iran from conducting nuclear enrichment and the country remains an influential player in Syria, Iraq and Lebanon. Meanwhile the Abraham Accords between Israel and the UAE, plus Israel and Bahrain have not just normalised diplomatic relations, but also opened new commercial and economic channels between old foes. In an article this year Joe Biden wrote that his administration would stand up to authoritarianism and will place democracy back at the core of US foreign policy. But is that realistic in a region that has adapted to the policies promoted by Donald Trump? To what extent does the thaw in relations between Israel and its Arab neighbours impact America's influence in the region? How much Obama-era policy can or should the Biden administration bring back? Join Ritula Shah and guests as they discuss whether Joe Biden is facing a new Middle East.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn62nwx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x193vmjvwzt)
Joe Biden wants agreement to help unemployed

US President-elect, Joe Biden, is calling for an urgent bipartisan agreement in Congress to help people who've lost their jobs because of the pandemic. The government of Denmark has pledged to give up its North Sea oil production by the year 2050 in order to meet its commitments under the Paris Agreement on Climate Change; we hear more from Steven Mufson at the Washington Post. Efforts in the US by the Trump administration to restrict the use of the H-1B professional visa were blocked this week by a court in California; the BBC's Mike Johnson reports. Warner Brothers has said all its films in 2021 will be streamed in the US as soon as they're released. So can the multiplex survive? We hear from Karen Krizanovich is a UK-based film critic and film industry expert. And we're joined throughout the programme by Will Murray, a reporter for Australia's Nine News. (Picture of Joe Biden by Alex Wong for Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn62sn1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbnk25)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccss4xf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhk6)
Thunder's glory and Jaffna's rise from the rubble

Sydney Thunder bowler Hannah Darlington on Big Bash glory, future Australia selection and barefoot circles.

Are England's coded messages from the dressing-room to the captain a vision of cricket's future or an underhand tactic that needs to be stamped out?

The northern city that bore the brunt of Sri Lanka's civil war sets out to discover its first international cricketer.

And reaction to Australia's comprehensive men's one-day series victory over India.

Photo: Sydney Thunder lift the WBBL Trophy (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn62xd5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj2)
China’s provocative political artist

China and Australia are in a diplomatic fight, after the Chinese foreign ministry spokesman posted a fake image of an Australian soldier killing an Afghan child. The artist was Wuheqilin, a self-styled "Wolf Warrior" and "cyber-nationalist" based in Beijing. BBC Chinese editor Howard Zhang tells us more about the controversial artist fighting China's corner.

In praise of Mborokhé
Seydina Alioune Djigo, who’s based at BBC Dakar, has put his journalistic neutrality on the line to nominate his favourite food for a Nobel prize. He tells us why he believes Mborokhé deserves international recognition.

Vietnam and stand-up comedy
Stand-up comedy is relatively new in Vietnam and, in a country where public performances are monitored by the state, doesn’t touch on sensitive topics. So the success of Leo Nguyen, a Vietnamese comedian based in the US, talking about politics and abuses of power, caught the attention of BBC Vietnamese journalist Thu Bui.

Let’s speak Quechua
Quechua is the most widely spoken indigenous language in South America, having spread across the region in the time of the Inca Empire. Lucia Blasco of BBC Mundo has been tracing its influence on Spanish, which absorbed many Quechua words after the arrival of the conquerors from Spain.

Remembering Ilyas Dayee
Ilyas Dayee was a journalist in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. He received many death threats for his work, and in November was killed by a car bomb outside his home. Former BBC Afghan journalist Auliya Atrafi grew up in the same village as Ilyas, and was taught English by his father. He shares his memories of Ilyas.


Image: Wuheqilin’s latest artwork
Credit: Wuheqilin


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmvy)
The V1 flying bomb

In 1944, Nazi Germany launched the V1s against the UK. The V1 was a pilotless, jet-propelled flying bomb - the first of its kind in the world and a precursor to the modern cruise missile. The V1 was also the first of Hitler's secret "revenge weapons" which he hoped would change the course of the Second World War. Some 10,000 V1s were fired at the UK. They killed more than 6,000 people and injured 20,000 more. Using archive recordings we hear from civilians who survived V1 attacks and from those tasked to stop the flying bombs.

Photo:A German V1 or 'Doodlebug' pilotless flying bomb in flight, circa 1944. (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn63149)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Reith Lectures (w3ct1cyl)
From moral to market sentiments

Dr Mark Carney, the former Governor of the Bank of Canada and the Bank of England, will chart how we have come to esteem financial value over human value and how we have gone from market economies to market societies. He argues that this has contributed to a trio of global crises: of credit, Covid and climate. And he outlines how we can turn this around.

In this first of four lectures, Mark Carney reflects that whenever he could step back from what felt like daily crisis management, the same deeper issues loomed. What is value? How does the way we assess value both shape our values and constrain our choices? How do the valuations of markets affect the values of our society? Carney argues that society has come to embody the Irish writer Oscar Wilde’s old aphorism: “Knowing the price of everything but the value of nothing.”

(Photo: Outgoing Bank of England governor Mark Carney makes a keynote address at the 2020 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26). Credit: Tolga Akmen/ Getty Images)


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn634wf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbnx9k)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccssj4t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj99)
Songhoy Blues: Mali’s Musical Optimists

An audience with Mali’s messengers of hope; Aliou Touré, the lead singer of rock revolutionaries Songhoy Blues, tells Tina about their new album and why they believe optimism is the only way to challenge the ongoing civil unrest in their country.

He’s been described as perhaps the greatest writer of Arabic fiction alive, but as well as a being a celebrated writer, poet and filmmaker, Hassan Blasim is also a refugee. Hassan discusses his latest novel God 99 - a work that tells the tale of 99 refugees and the man, also called Hassan, travelling through Europe to share their stories.

Belarusian playwright Andrei Kureichik talks to reporter Lucy Ash about the nation’s pro-democracy protest movement. Andrei reveals how his latest production, Insulted Belarus(sia) reflects the legacy of President Alexander Lukashenko, the man often called Europe’s Last Dictator.

Plus has a film, a play or a book ever changed the way you see the world? The activist and photographer Sunil Gupta shares the story of his discovery of the work of the Canadian writer, Alice Munro.

Presented by Tina Daheley


(Photo: Songhoy Blues. Credit: Kiss Diouara, Millennium Communication, Bamako)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn638mk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d5t0k1mx8)
Tigray: Eyewitness says Ethiopian government forces attacked the town of Humera

Dr Tewedros Tefera is a medical doctor and general surgeon at the main hospital in the Tigrayan town of Humera and he describes when it was attacked by Ethiopian government forces on November 8th. He has fled across the border to Sudan. Also: despite allegations of fraud and a boycott of the vote by the opposition, we’ll look ahead to Sunday’s parliamentary elections in Venezuela; and US job growth slowed sharply in November, will Congress approve a $900 billion relief bill?

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Lone Thiels, Danish crime novelist and journalist; and Andrea Sella a broadcaster and professor of chemistry at University College London.

(Picture: Ethiopians fleeing from the Tigray region arrive by boat to Sudan after crossing a river between the two countries. Credit: REUTERS/Baz Ratner)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn63dcp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d5t0k1rnd)
A doctor who fled Tigray says government forces attacked his town

A rare eyewitness account from events in Tigray describes a town being attacked by government forces. Dr Tewedros Tefera, a medical doctor, says some of those he treated were civilians. Also: the UK became the first country in the world to approve a Covid-19 vaccine for use, through an internationally recognised process, is this a “game-changer” for international efforts to end the pandemic? And Denmark’s first female Muslim member of parliament discusses her new book based on her own experiences of prejudice.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Lone Thiels, Danish crime novelist and journalist; and Andrea Sella a broadcaster and professor of chemistry at University College London.

(Photo: Ethiopian refugees from Tigray region wait in line to receive aid at the Um Rakuba refugee camp Credit: EPA/ALA KHEIR)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn63j3t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d5t0k1wdj)
Russia begins vaccinating people against Covid-19

Russia has begun using its own vaccine known as Sputnik V to vaccinate against Covid-19. Developers say it’s up to ninety-five percent effective and causes no major side effects. Also; as Brexit trade talks begin to wind down there is still no deal and time is running out, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson will have direct talks with EU president Ursula von der Leyen; and 25,000 jobs are at risk in the UK as two big British retailers face collapse, what does this mean for the future of the High Street?

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Lone Thiels, Danish crime novelist and journalist; and Andrea Sella a broadcaster and professor of chemistry at University College London.

(Photo: A nurse shows Russia"s "Sputnik-V" vaccine. Credit: REUTERS/Tatyana Makeyeva/File Photo)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsswd6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4x)
Good cops, bad cops

One of the major stories of the past year was the death of George Floyd in May, following his arrest outside a store in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The whole world saw the video of police officer Derek Chauvin kneeling on Floyd's neck, pinning him to the ground for more than 8 minutes. Chauvin has now been charged with murder - one of only a few American police officers to be charged with murdering a civilian.

George Floyd’s death was the result of a standard encounter between police officers and a member of the public, which unnecessarily spiralled out of control - a tragically familiar tale when it to comes to the police and minority communities.

What can America do to better tackle the problem of police brutality, and why does it seem so hard to bring bad cops to account?

Guests:

Leon Ford, a social justice campaigner from Pittsburgh who was paralysed after being shot by police during a traffic stop in 2012

Chief Art Acevedo, City of Houston Police Department

Redditt Hudson, former St Louis police officer, and co-founder of the National Coalition of Law Enforcement Officers for Justice Reform and Accountability

Editor: Hugh Levinson
Production team: Luke Radcliff, Maeve McGoran, Iyore Odighizuwa, Jonelle Awomoyi, Pamela Lorence


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn63mvy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19yy)
Coronavirus: Vaccine approved

The UK has become the first country to approve the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine and is due to start a mass immunisation programme next week. Meanwhile, Russia is due to begin a vaccination programme with its Sputnik V vaccine this weekend. And China is promising countries millions of vaccines. A pathway to an end to the pandemic and a return to normality could be in sight.

Host Nuala McGovern talks to Kerry. She has muscular dystrophy and has been shielding, or isolating, at home in England since March. We also hear from Dr Joseph Varon, Chief of Critical Care at the United Memorial Medical Center in Houston, Texas. He has been working without a break for 258 days. A photo of him cradling an elderly man on a Covid ward went viral this week. He explains the picture and shares his experiences of working non-stop due to the virus.

Joe Biden has this week called on Americans to wear masks for his first 100 days as US president. Nuala also talks to two campaigners in the US who are sceptical of face coverings and other coronavirus restrictions. We hear them in conversation with a doctor in Toronto, who treats Covid patients.

Picture: Kerry Thompson (Credit: Kerry Thompson)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccst04b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xwd)
Girl Taken

05/12/2020 GMT

Girl Taken is a two year investigation to find a little girl taken from her mother in Iran. In this 11 part series, recorded in real time, Sue Mitchell and Rob Lawrie slowly unravel the mystery of what happened to four year old Bru and set out to reunite mother and daughter after years of being apart.

The series starts when Sue Mitchell came into the story, as a reporter for the BBC covering the refugee crisis in Europe. The little girl had hit the media spotlight when her father, claiming to be a widow fleeing Afghanistan under threat of death from the Taliban, asked Rob Lawrie, a volunteer at the Calais camp, for help. He wanted Rob to smuggle Bru to the UK but this failed. Although the story was extensively covered no one knew Bru’s mother was alive and desperately searching for her.

Through the original BBC coverage the mother, Goli, makes contact with Sue and Rob, telling them her daughter was taken from the family home in Tehran without her knowledge or consent. She’d been to the police in Iran but was told they could not help. She then travelled thousands of miles at the hands of smugglers with Bru’s baby sister, Baran. Sickness forced her to stop in Denmark but authorities and refugee charities there could not find Bru. These recordings cover a series of dramatic turns in the search for the little girl.

The recordings also touch on the plight of other women whose children have been taken from them by abusive husbands. It is still a rare thing to happen, but this investigation exposes shortcomings in the asylum process. Since the recordings aired, officials have discovered other cases where men have come into the United Kingdom with a child to help their asylum claims. These claims have not been fully investigated in the past and there are few safeguards to protect those who have suffered as a result.

The series raises the plight of children living in the Calais Jungle and other overcrowded and unsanitary camps. Through Goli’s story we learn more about the control others had in shaping her life. She’d had an arranged marriage to a cruel and controlling man and lived in a society where she had few rights. When she decided to flee Iran and search for Bru, she encountered many dangers, from smugglers to perilous sea crossings in the dead of night with Bru’s baby sister, Baran, in her arms.

The series gives voice to one woman’s story and in doing so raises issues affecting many others. Goli left the only culture she had known to search the world for her little girl and in doing so changed her outlook completely. On reaching the West she immersed herself in the education she had always wanted. As she began making her own choices she starts to experience possibilities and freedoms she had never before imagined. Goli is hopeful that her story could help other women to challenge the injustice and cruelty she has overcome.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf5b)
The key events that propelled disability rights

Witness History has been looking at milestones in the history of disability rights around the world. Its editor Kirsty Reid explains how each case study was chosen to mark 25 years of the passing of the Disablity Discrimination Act in the UK.

Plus: the launch of the BBC’s 100 Women list 2020. We learn about its inspiring history.

Presenter Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn63rm2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c4rrvmkds)
“At some point you start sinking like a rock” – Alenka Artnik

Slovenia’s Alenka Artnik joins us after she set a new world record in freediving by descending 374 feet below the surface of the Red Sea. Just off the coast of Egypt, she secured a four-pound weight around her neck and fastened herself to a thin line before holding her breath and going for the record. Artnik tells us about the pressures on her body, how a traumatic past led her to try freediving and how seeing a vision of her dead brother on a previous dive helped her come to terms with his passing.

USA striker Jessica McDonald tells us about the challenges she has faced in balancing her sporting career with motherhood as FIFA prepare to bring in new maternity cover regulations. McDonald was the only mother in the USA’s World Cup winning squad in 2019. The North Carolina Courage player tells us she’s had coaches in the past who have used her son as a reason to criticise her when she’s had a bad game and that she knows plenty of players who have given up on football in order to start a family.

The coach of the PNG Hunters – Matthew Church – explains how the coronavirus pandemic means they’re relocating from Papua New Guinea to Australia for the 2021 season. The Rugby League side play in the Queensland League and usually travel between Port Moresby and Australia for matches.

Chris Nikic became the first person with Down's syndrome to finish an Ironman event - swimming 2.4 miles, cycling 112 miles and running a 26.2-mile marathon in Florida last month. In Ironman's 42-year history, no athlete with Down's syndrome - a genetic condition that can cause varying degrees of learning disability and slower physical development – had ever attempted an event, let alone finished one. Chris and his father Nick reflect on the achievement and Chris says he's targeting Ironman Hawaii next.

In Sporting Witness – we tell the story of Learie Constantine, who became the first West Indian cricketer to sign a professional contract in England. Whilst being a star, Learie helped improve race relations in Britain and later became the first black person to be awarded a peerage.

And the BBC’s Juliette Ferrington joins us from Turf Moor ahead of the early kick-off in the Premier League between Burnley and Everton.

Photo: Alenka Artnik freediving


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn63wc6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbpmsb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccst7ml)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cx3)
Belarus across the barricades - part one

Lucy Ash explores the world of the security forces that keep Lukashenko in power, peeling back the ubiquitous balaclavas to find the men and women beneath.

Minsk, early December. A wall of masked men in black body armour, beating their truncheons on steel shields. In front of them stand women bundled in winter coats and teenagers wrapped in red and white flags. They are singing a protest song once heard in the revolutionary shipyards of Gdansk a generation before - an anthem for democracy and change. For more than one hundred days these versions of Belarus have advanced and retreated - and now they seem locked in impasse.

Despite sanctions, despite disapproval so loud that even foreign diplomats are demonstrating - the government of Alexander Lukashenko stands firm. Despite violence and intimidation, arrest and the prohibition on all independent reporting, the demonstrators keep coming, day after day, night after night.

Producer: Monica Whitlock

(Photo: Belarusian law enforcement officers block opposition supporters during their rally to reject the presidential election results in Minsk, Belarus. Credit: Reuters)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn6403b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6tw)
Coconut water and confidence with Kranium, Masego and Alicai Harley

Kranium is a singer and songwriter who blends dancehall and reggae. Born in Montego Bay, Jamaica, and raised in Jamaica, Queens, New York, he’s worked with the likes of Ty Dolla $ign, Burna Boy, Mahalia and Ed Sheeran. He chats to Masego and Alicai Harley about working quickly in airports, what their best choruses are, how they use the sounds of what came before, and what it’s like working with the industry’s biggest names.

Answering those questions is Masego, a multi-instrumentalist, singer, and rapper based in LA. The video of him recording and live-looping his hit single Tadow with producer FKJ has been viewed over 240 million times. They're joined by an artist blowing up in London right now, Alicai Harley. She’s a singer, songwriter, and rapper known for her freestyles, whose sound fuses elements of dancehall, R&B, pop and UK grime.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn643vg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5pt9h1)
London: Brexit talks over trade deal

Boris Johnson and Ursula von der Leyen will hold direct talks later to try to secure a post-Brexit agreement between Britain and the EU.

A mass coronavirus immunisation campaign has begun in Moscow, using Russia's own Sputnik vaccine.

And China builds a quantum computer that can perform a calculation that would take a modern day supercomputer billions of years to complete.

(Photo credit: EPA/Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn647ll)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3ljrb8ts7x)
Live Sporting Action

Lee James presents live commentary on Manchester City against Fulham from the English Premier League. Plus highlights of Burnley v Everton and a look ahead to West Ham versus Manchester United and Chelsea against Leeds. Today in the Premier League will have reaction from the day’s top stories at 1630 GMT

On this Sportsworld Team this week as we build up to kick-off we’re joined by the former Arsenal and England international Rachel Yankey, the former West Bromwich Albion and Nigerian striker Peter Odemwingie and Spurs and Dutch goalkeeper Michel Vorm.

Also this week, the latest from the Rugby Championship, Formula One. Test cricket between New Zealand and West Indies and an interview with the new MOTO GP World Champion, Joan Mir.

Photo: Kevin De Bruyne of Manchester City looks on during the Premier League match between Manchester City and Burnley (Credit: Michael Regan/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn64ql3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbqh07)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsv2vh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Mayday (w3ct1cx8)
On 11 November 2019 James Le Mesurier was found dead in a street in Istanbul. He was the latest casualty in a very unusual war – one fought not on the battlefield, but online.

Le Mesurier was a mysterious figure with a taste for the finer things who served in the British Army in several of the world’s hotspots before focusing his energies on war-ravaged Syria from 2014. He co-founded the White Helmets, a Syrian civil defence force who filmed themselves pulling survivors and bodies from the rubble of bombed out buildings.

Soon, the White Helmets - and Le Mesurier - found themselves at the centre of a global race to control the narrative in the Syrian War. In this investigative series Mayday, presenter Chloe Hadjimatheou talks to the people who knew James, including his widow Emma, his ex-wife and former army colleagues, as well as those on the ground in Syria still working as White Helmets today in an effort to piece together James’ story and that of the White Helmets. She speaks to some of the White Helmet’s detractors and follows up accusations about the organisation to try and understand the truth surrounding them.

Chloe Hadjimatheou says: “Making this series has been an extraordinary experience, as listeners will discover. It started out being an investigation into the story of a man with an astonishing life and a mysterious death but it ended up taking me on a bizarre journey down rabbit holes of misinformation. Ultimately this is a story about how truth functions in modern warfare.”


SAT 18:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyc)
Vaccines: How safe and who gets it?

The UK has become the first country in the world to approve the use of a vaccine for Covid 19. But some people are worried that the decision was taken too quickly - can we really know it’s safe yet? Tim Harford tackles these safety concerns.

Plus, what is the best way to distribute the vaccine? How do you maximise the benefit of the first round of vaccines? Stuart McDonald, a fellow of the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries in the UK works out what groups would benefit most.


Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Charlotte McDonald


(A nurse vaccinates seniors against influenza to avoid cross-infection with coronavirus. Credit: Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn64vb7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Documentary (w3ct17xk)
Back down to Earth

Since November 2000 there have always been humans living in space on the International Space Station (ISS). But when was the last time we stopped to ask why we’re so eager to leave the Earth?
Although the ISS is a remarkable engineering achievement, human space exploration has proven dangerous and costly. There is no air, gravity or food, and water has to be recycled from sweat, stale breath and urine. As we return to the Moon and aim for Mars, some argue that space colonisation is also immoral, psychologically and socially damaging and unnecessarily expensive.

Beatriz De La Pava talks to astronauts, anthropologists, scientists, doctors and philosophers to investigate if it’s time to abandon the dream of human space travel and come back down to Earth. Featuring a near-mutiny in space, genetically modified astronauts, sentient robots and the challenges of haircuts on Mars, Beatriz questions whether we are cut-out for life beyond our beautiful home world.

(Photo: An astronaut hovers above the Earth. Credit: Nasa)


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn64z2c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3v)
Actor Viggo Mortensen

Viggo Mortensen tells us about his new movie Falling, in which he acts, directs and has also written

Hollywood star Amy Adams talks about her role in Ron Howard’s Hillbilly Elegy

Dolly Parton on losing a Dolly Parton lookalike contest and the woman who inspired her hit song Jolene

The reigning queen of performance art Marina Abramović talks about subverting the TV experience

We have music from Madagascar’s Modeste Hugues

And we hear from this year’s Booker Prize winner Douglas Stuart and former US President Barack Obama shares his thoughts on the power of books

Joining Nikki Bedi in the studio is film critic Guy Lodge and on the line from Essex is Abi Daré, who’ll also be telling us about her novel The Girl with the Louding Voice, about a young house girl in Lagos, Nigeria.


(Photo: Viggo Mortensen. Credit: Rich Polk via Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn652th)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5pv8g2)
President Trump campaigns for Georgia Senators

Donald Trump is back on the campaign trail. He's in Georgia to give his support to Republican Senators David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler, who are facing January runoffs. Also in the programme: Covid in South Dakota, Brexit deadline looms, and Argentina taxes the rich.

(Photo: Republican US Senators David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler at a Senate runoff election campaign rally in Canton, Georgia, 20 November 2020. Credit: EPA/TAMI CHAPPELL)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn656km)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qgtr1nkg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fm2ynqyj9)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsvkv0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1csk)
Jonestown: From socialism to slaughter - Part one

In 1978, over 900 US citizens died at Jonestown, a remote settlement in Guyana. The vast majority were members of a community run by the charismatic Rev Jim Jones, taking their own lives under armed guard on his orders. But how did a church known for racial integration and practical help for the poor come to such a destructive end? How could one man’s increasing paranoia have driven so many people, who had built a mission community from nothing in four years, into a seemingly pointless sacrifice?

In these programmes, Erin Martin – who herself grew up in a religious group that exercised strong control over its members – hears from survivors of what’s become known as the Jonestown Massacre, an event that captivated and horrified the US and international media.

Contributors include Stephan Jones, son of the Rev Jim Jones; Vera Washington, for whom Peoples Temple was “a wonderful, warm family” before it all went wrong; Jordan Vilchez, who at 16 already belonged to Jones’ inner circle; John Cobb, Leslie Wagner-Wilson, Tim Carter and Mike Cartmell, who each lost several family members in Jonestown; and Fielding M McGehee III, Temple archivist and Research Director at the Alternative Considerations of Jonestown website.

Between them, they reflect on the attraction of Peoples Temple, trace the road that ended with the destruction of the Jonestown community, and explain how they escaped with their lives. And they try to answer one crucial question: what could have led an idealistic group of community-minded people to such destruction?

Producer: Paul Arnold

(Photo:The local tourist office has placed signs to mark the site of Jonestown, Guyana. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn65b9r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spl)
Shell accused in court over fossil fuel phaseout

On this edition of Business Weekly, we analyse the court battle between Shell and the environmental groups who claim the oil giant remains too focused on fossil fuels. We look at a different approach to tackle deforestation and hear how an economic argument could help the Amazon rainforest. We also get an expert view on floundering UK clothing stores, doubly hit by the pandemic and our changing shopping habits. Could in-store cafes and leisure concessions be just the therapy the retail industry needs? We head to central London to hear the tales of a tailor - a master craftsman who is cutting his cloth to suit the future of high-end business wear. And we’ve a lesson in why ‘email etiquette’ needs to be applied to even the shortest message. Business Weekly is presented by Sasha Twining and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Shell petrol station in Hong Kong, Getty Images)



SUNDAY 06 DECEMBER 2020

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn65g1w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj99)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsvtb8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Mayday (w3ct1cx8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3cszf5b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn65kt0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3cszkxp)
Freak weather getting even freakier

This year’s Atlantic hurricane season has seen a new record for severe storms says Climatologist Michael Mann. He says warming oceans are one of the drivers.

And Australia has seen spring temperatures hit new highs. Climate scientist Sarah Perkins – Kirkpatrick says it’s all the more remarkable as weather patterns are currently in a cycle associated with cooler temperatures.

Where exactly did SARS- COV-2 emerge from? That’s one of the questions for a WHO fact-finding mission to China looking into the origins of the Virus. Peter Daszak has worked with Chinese scientists for many years, looking for bat viruses with the potential to jump to humans. He tells us how the mission hopes to map out the event which led to the initial spread of the virus.

And the Japanese Hayabusa2 space probe is due to return to earth. Masaki Fujimoto
Deputy director of the Japanese Space Agency JAXA, tell us what to expect when a cargo of material from a distant asteroid lands in the Australian desert.


From dumping raw sewage into rivers to littering the streets with our trash, humans don’t have a great track record when it comes to dealing with our waste. It’s something that CrowdScience listener and civil engineer Marc has noticed: he wonders if humans are particularly prone to messing up our surroundings, while other species are instinctively more hygienic and well-organised.

Aasre we, by nature, really less clean and tidy than other animals? Farming and technology have allowed us to live more densely and generate more rubbish - maybe our cleaning instincts just aren’t up to the vast quantities of waste we spew out? CrowdScience digs into the past to see if early human rubbish heaps can turn up any answers. We follow a sewer down to the River Thames to hear about The Great Stink of Victorian London; turn to ants for housekeeping inspiration; and find out how to raise hygiene standards by tapping into our feelings of disgust and our desire to follow rules.


(Image: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn65pk4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbrfz8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsw1tj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn65t98)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx5)
Yaa Gyasi: Homegoing

A novel of breathtaking sweep revealing the devastating impact of slavery through history.

This month World Book Club discusses the multi-prize-winning debut novel Homegoing with its acclaimed Ghanaian author Yaa Gyasi and her fans around the world.

The story of two half-sisters, separated by forces beyond their control: one sold into slavery, the other married to a white slave-trader, Homegoing traces the generations of family who follow, as their destinies lead them through two continents and three hundred years of history. A novel of remarkable sweep and power, with each character’s life indelibly drawn, Homegoing reveals the devastating legacy of slavery and the resilience of the human spirit.


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn65y1d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qj)
Is Hong Kong losing its freedoms?

Pascale Harter introduces analysis, reportage and personal reflections from correspondents around the world.

When Hong Kong was handed back to China in 1997, Beijing agreed to protect the independent judiciary and free speech there for 50 years. One country, two systems, the slogan said. However, earlier this year, China pushed through a harsh national security law which - in addition to curtailing Hong Kong’s democratic system, made it easy to punish anyone who criticised it, or the government. Danny Vincent reflects on what this means for the future of the territory as prominent democracy activists are sentenced to prison.

The Araucania region in the south of Chile has been making the headlines for all the wrong reasons recently. Arson attacks on timber lorries and prisoners on hunger strikes have become common occurrences. This is the homeland of one of Chile’s main indigenous peoples – the Mapuche – who make up 12% of the population. They say land has been stolen from them. And they want it back. An all too familiar story perhaps, but Jane Chambers travelled to the region to delve deeper.

George Floyd’s death not only triggered the Black Lives Matter movement but also a reconsidering of wrongs past, of how many countries’ made their money. In Australia, many people would like that question left in the past. But, as told by Will Higginbotham, the South Sea Islanders – a community of descendants from Pacific Islanders, many of whom were forcibly brought to Australia to work in cotton and sugar fields – are advocating that talking about it, can help drive change in the present.


The Belarus presidential election, which took place in August, is still widely disputed. Protests continue each weekend in the capital Minsk, despite violent crackdowns by the authorities. Demonstrators have been detained, grenades have been thrown, police have used water cannons to deter protestors and even threatened to use live rounds. But not all police officers have followed the orders; some have been so horrified by the violence that they have fled the country. Our correspondent Lucy Ash has been to Poland to meet one of them.

Presenter: Pascale Harter
Producer: Bethan Head
Editor: Jasper Corbett

(Image: Pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong Chi-fung, sentenced to jail, at the Lai Chi Kok Reception Centre in Hong Kong. Credit: EPA/Jerome Favre)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsw99s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xwd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj8)
The new normal

Love him or loathe him, we can all agree that Donald Trump is not a ‘normal’ President. Previous presidents would never behave like President Trump. Is the abnormal becoming normal? And how can we tackle people who say uncomfortable things?

Image: Donald Trump (Credit: David Cheskin/PA Wire)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn661sj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbrt6n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccswf1x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Mayday (w3ct1cx8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn665jn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d5t0k4jtc)
President Trump campaigns in Georgia for Senate runoff elections

President Trump has been speaking at a campaign rally in Georgia to garner support for two Republican Senators up for election in January. He also levelled criticism at Republican state officials and made further unsubstantiated claims of voter fraud in the elections. Also: the Afghan government and the Taliban have reached a framework agreement during negotiations in Qatar; and as most of Europe’s ski resorts remain closed, Switzerland’s are open for business.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Sanam Anderlini the Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security at the London School of Economics and the journalist and documentary-maker, Seyi Rhodes.

(Photo: U.S. President Donald Trump hosts a campaign event with U.S. Republican Senators David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler at Valdosta, Georgia. Credit: REUTERS/Dustin Chambers).


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn6698s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d5t0k4nkh)
Parts of California to enter new Covid-19 restrictions

Regions such as Southern California and San Joaquin Valley are expected to go under new restrictions. Cases have continued to rise in California, the state announced 25,000 new infections on Saturday.

Also in the programme: President Trump holds his first rally since the US Presidential Election, and a major case in the MeToo movement in China.

Joining Celia Hatton to discuss these and other issues are Sanam Anderlini the Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security at the London School of Economics and the journalist and documentary-maker, Seyi Rhodes.

(PHOTO: Surfers walk out of the Pacific Ocean at sunrise, in Santa Monica, California, U.S., December 4, 2020. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn66f0x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d5t0k4s9m)
Roll-out of Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine due to begin in UK in coming days

Britain’s National Health Service will begin what it calls the largest-ever vaccine roll-out in UK history on Tuesday. So what can we expect as the vaccine makes its way into the population? We’ll hear from Professor Anthony Harnden, the deputy chair of the UK’s Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation. Also: mass testing for coronavirus is underway in Austria to locate and isolate infected people before the Christmas holidays, and would you eat lab grown meat?

(Photo: Nurses at the Royal Free Hospital, London, simulate the administration of the Pfizer vaccine to support staff training ahead of the roll-out. Credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsws99)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6q)
Are humans naturally clean and tidy?

From dumping raw sewage into rivers to littering the streets with our trash, humans don’t have a great track record when it comes to dealing with our waste. It’s something that CrowdScience listener and civil engineer Marc has noticed: he wonders if humans are particularly prone to messing up our surroundings, while other species are instinctively more hygienic and well-organised.

Are we, by nature, really less clean and tidy than other animals? Farming and technology have allowed us to live more densely and generate more rubbish - maybe our cleaning instincts just aren’t up to the vast quantities of waste we spew out? CrowdScience digs into the past to see if early human rubbish heaps can turn up any answers. We follow a sewer down to the River Thames to hear about The Great Stink of Victorian London; turn to ants for housekeeping inspiration; and find out how to raise hygiene standards by tapping into our feelings of disgust and our desire to follow rules.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and produced by Cathy Edwards for the BBC World Service.

[Image: Man on beach with rubbish. Credit: Getty Images]


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn66js1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccswx1f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3cszf0t)
Rufus Wainwright: My music and my mother

Rufus Wainwright was once described by Elton John as 'the greatest songwriter on the planet'. He's the son of two North American folk music legends – Loudon Wainwright III and Kate McGarrigle but went on to forge his own prolific career. He's got 12 albums under his belt including the Grammy-nominated Rufus Does Judy at Carnegie Hall, where he sang Over the Rainbow with his mother Kate on stage, a song they’ve performed since his childhood. Rufus was especially close to his mum, early on in his songwriting career he looked to her for advice and approval, and her support helped him through a destructive crystal meth addiction. They sang together often, right up until she died from cancer in 2010. A longer version of this episode was first broadcast on 8th July 2020.

Rufus' latest album is called Unfollow the Rules.

Presenter: Emily Webb
Producer: Maryam Maruf

Picture: Rufus Wainwright with his mother Kate McGarrigle
Credit: Getty Images


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn66nj5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c17)
How to make it big in India's music industry

Bollywood dominates the music business in India. There is a lot of colour, drama, big sets and complex choreography. But a growing number of independent music artistes are now marking their own place, and providing a welcome alternative to the high-end, dress-to-impress film scores.

But can they make money and achieve success? And how can they challenge the bias in India that to be a successful musician, you need to have music titles in Hindi movies?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how to make it big in India’s music industry.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Ankur Tewari, musician; Ananya Birla, singer-songwriter; Vasundhara Mudgil, India head of communications, Spotify


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsx0sk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1csk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn66s89)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbsjpf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsx4jp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct1csg)
Finders Keepers

Finders Keepers: A photograph, a pipe and a skull

Actor and musician Kema Sikazwe is no historical expert. A young Zambian who now lives in northern England, he hasn’t even set foot inside a museum since he was ten years old. All that changes when Kema learns about the movement to return stolen objects back to where they came from. Should these priceless parts of history be returned? And if so, what’s at stake?

Kema measures the scale of the problem on a visit to Newcastle’s Great North Museum. Curator JC Niala shares her experience of seeing a photograph of her grandfather on display in a Kenyan exhibition, and Kema’s father tells him about an ongoing dispute between Britain and Zambia.

Theme music composed by Kema Sikazwe aka Kema Kay

Programme produced by Scattered Pictures


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn66x0f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Documentary (w3ct17xk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn670rk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5px6d4)
Brexit talks resume but obstacles remain

Representatives from the EU and UK resume post-Brexit trade negotiations today. They were paused on Friday with both sides citing what they called 'significant divergences'. So can a deal be done? We talk to Philip Rycroft, a former head of the UK’s Brexit department.

Also on the programme: after US government employees working in Cuba complained of a series of mysterious illnesses, the first official investigation says the cause was most likely directed radiowaves; and how a tiny amount of asteroid could help us understand how the solar system was formed.

(Photo: Britain's chief Brexit negotiator David Frost outside the Brussels-South railway station. Credit: Reuters/Johanna Geron)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn674hp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn6787t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjwf)
Alexandre Dumas: The man behind the Musketeers

The word 'swashbuckling' is often used to describe the novels of Alexandre Dumas the Elder, the creator of D’Artagnan and the Three Musketeers, the Count of Monte Cristo and the Man in the Iron Mask. But Dumas himself led a life as colourful as many of his gallery of rogues, villains and heroes. Having grown up in poverty, he found employment in the household of a future king of France. He was prolific on the page and pretty active away from it. At first with a series of highly successful plays and then with serialised novels, his production house churned out hundreds of thousands of pages of gripping narrative. He had pet projects like building a mansion and theatre, he had countless mistresses and he frequently found himself in legal disputes and on the run from debt collectors.

In the 150th anniversary year of Dumas’ death Rajan Datar explores the writer's life and work with Claudie Bernard, professor of French Literature, Thought and Culture at New York University; Daniel Desormeaux, professor of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Sylvain Ledda, professor of 19th Century Literature at Rouen University in France; and Anne O'Neil-Henry, associate professor of French and Francophone Studies at Georgetown University in Washington.

[Image: Alexandre Dumas the Elder. Credit: The Print Collector/Getty Images]


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn67czy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3ljrb8xxn8)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld Sunday will once again have former Wolves and Wales midfield Dave Edwards as a special guest. He will join Delyth Lloyd to preview the North London derby and then we will bring you full match commentary. Dave will be able to chat about his former teammate Gareth Bale and the impact he has on a team. Plus, we hope to speak to Carles Gil ahead of the MLS conference playoffs.

Photo: Arteta and Mourinho head to head (Credit: Richard Heathcote/Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn67r7b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbthng)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsy3hq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn67vzg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6tw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn67zql)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5py5c5)
Ugandan presidential candidate 'targeted by police'

Bobi Wine, the opposition candidate for the Ugandan presidency has told Newshour that he and his supporters were again attacked by the police, as he returned to campaign in Luuka where he was arrested last month. Also in the programme: Venezuela election, Brexit latest, US covid and holiday travel.

(Photo: Archive photo of Ugandan pop star and presidential candidate Bobi Wine, campaigning near Kampala, Uganda, November 30, 2020. Credit: REUTERS/Abubaker Lubowa)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn683gq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qgtr4kgk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fm2yntvfd)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsygr3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3cszf0t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn6876v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsylh7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xwd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]



MONDAY 07 DECEMBER 2020

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhd674)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19yy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn32khj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Discovery (w3ct1cx6)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The Zedonk Problem

Today I learnt that tigons and ligers are what you get when lions and tigers interbreed?!’ surprised listener Jamz G tells the doctors. ‘What determines whether species can interbreed?’

Geneticist Aoife McLysaght studies molecular evolution. She explains the modern definition of a species, built on ideas from Aristotle, Linnaeus and Darwin: a species is a group of organisms capable of interbreeding to produce fertile offspring. Hybrids – such as ligons and tigers – are usually infertile, because their common ancestors long ago diverged into the lions and tigers we know today. However, this definition isn’t absolute, and there are many ways a new species can be formed.

Hybrids also offer rich study subjects for scientists. Mathematical biologist Kit Yates discusses why he’s been reading research papers about hebras and zorses (horse x zebra) as their patterns offer insights into how cells spread and develop into organisms, building on a prediction made by codebreaking mathematician Alan Turing.

And it turns out that these hybrids are even more intriguing. As speciation and evolution expert Joana Meier explains, hybrids are not always infertile. Hybridisation can lead to successful new species arising, such as in Lake Victoria’s cichlid fish, who it seems have been having a wild evolutionary party for the last 15,000 years. And the picture gets even murkier when we discover that modern genetics reveals our human ancestors successfully mated with Neanderthals.

Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford
Producer: Jen Whyntie


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhd9z8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57z93hdpb0)
Brexit talks go down to the wire

Brexit talks go down to the wire, as the UK denies a claim by the EU that a deal is close; we hear from David Herszenhorn, the chief Brussels correspondent with Politico and Anna Jerzewska, the founder of Trade and Borders consultancy. A court in Ireland will decide if bankrupt Norwegian Air will be grounded permanently; we get analysis from Patrick Edmond, managing director of the aviation consultancy Altair. And 40 years after the death of John Lennon, Jude Southerland Kessler, author of the John Lennon Series, tells us why the ex-Beatle still influences the record industry. (Picture of Union Jack/EU flag via Getty Images).


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn32p7n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1csk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhdfqd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tmz64j)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn32szs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct0xb2)
How to hurricane-proof our world

The record-breaking Atlantic hurricane season has devastated parts of the Caribbean and Central America. We’ll hear what it has meant to one neighbourhood in Nicaragua. In a speech this week, the UN Secretary General said that “apocalyptic fires and floods, cyclones and hurricanes are increasingly the new normal.” What, if any, is the link between hurricanes and climate change, and should we be preparing for even stronger storms?

Presenters: Neal Razzell, Graihagh Jackson, Alfonso Flores Bermudes
Researcher: Zoe Gelber
Studio manager: Tom Brignell
Producer: Anna Meisel
Editor: Ravin Sampat


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhdkgj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5x)
Learie Constantine - West Indies cricket pioneer

In the 1920s, Learie Constantine became the first West Indian cricketer to sign a professional contract in England. He was a star of the domestic and international game thanks to his athletic all-round performances with bat and ball. Learie Constantine is also credited with helping improve race relations in Britain and later became the first black person to be awarded a peerage. Simon Watts introduces the memories of Learie Constantine as recorded in the BBC archives.

PHOTO: Learie Constantine in action (Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhdp6n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tmzfms)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn331h1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhdsys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf86129h)
Donald Trump's personal lawyer gets Covid

Rudy Giuliani becomes the latest confidant of Donald Trump to contract the virus but he's far from alone as cases in the US continue to rocket.

More extraordinary details of the assassination of Iran's top nuclear researcher as the country threatens more uranium enrichment.

And we hear from the Kid of the Year as chosen from American kids by TIME magazine.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhdxpx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf86161m)
Brexit deal negotiations resume

Talks between the UK and EU are set to resume in a final bid to agree a post-Brexit trade deal, will a failure to reach a deal on fishing quotas collapse the entire negotiations?

Russia rolls out its Covid vaccination program, but without international safety checks and recognition, so how safe is it?

Elections in Ghana, an African country famed for it's peaceful transitions of power, as voters cope with a struggling economy due to the pandemic.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhf1g1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf8619sr)
Brexit: mixed messages on progress

Talks between the United Kingdom and the European Union resume in a bid to reach a post Brexit trade deal.

Firefighters are struggling to control a bushfire at a world Heritage site in Australia - started by an illegal campfire in October.

In Russia where a mass vaccination campaign begins, with teachers and health workers the first in line.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhf565)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2w)
Owase Jeelani: Making life and death decisions

Stephen Sackur speaks to the paediatric neurosurgeon Owase Jeelani. Brain surgery carries with it an awesome burden of responsibility. And within neurosurgery there are particular challenges that take the physical and ethical pressure to an extreme. Imagine doing complex brain surgery on small children; then imagine trying to split conjoined twin babies joined at the head. Mr Jeelani's work has made headlines around the world. How does he deal with the stress of life and death decision-making?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn33jgk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7kc)
The end of the line for commuters?

How passenger fears and remote working are prompting a crisis in public transport. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Pat Foye, chairman of New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which is facing a multi-billion-dollar hole in its finances. Mohamed Mezghani, secretary general of the International Association of Public Transport, describes the challenge of getting commuters back onto trains and subways. Nicole Gelinas, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, explains why transport systems like New York's are so central to a city's economic success.

(Photo: Passengers on New York's subway system, Credit: Getty Images)


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmky)
The life and work of Chester Himes

The African-American crime writer Chester Himes first found widespread success in France. Although his early works had been published in the USA it was only after he moved to Europe and started writing crime fiction that he began to sell large numbers of books. Vincent Dowd has been speaking to writer Alex Wheatle, and Himes' biographer, Pim Higginson, about his life and works.

Photo: Chester Himes. (Copyright: Afro American Newspapers/Gado/Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhf8y9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xb2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn33n6p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 The Conversation (w3csynj2)
Yoga women

Why are so many women drawn to yoga? And, as it's become commodified in the West, has it lost its soul? Kim Chakanetsa discusses the billion-dollar yoga business with two women who used the power of yoga to transform their own lives.

Deepika Mehta turned to yoga after a climbing accident left her struggling to walk. She found hope in yoga teachings, and eventually used the practice to help overcome her injuries. Today she is one of the most successful and sought after Ashtanga yoga teachers in India. Based in Mumbai, Deepika has travelled all over the world to teach and further her own yoga studies.

Rima Rabbath grew up in Lebanon during the civil war, learning to live in the moment to escape the shelling. Eventually she would find a home in the practices and teachings of yoga. She had embarked on a successful corporate career when she attended her first yoga class in New York City. She has since become one of the leading teachers of Jivamukti yoga in Manhattan.

Produced by Jo Impey for the BBC World Service. This episode was first broadcast on April 22nd, 2019.

Image: (L) Deepika Mehta Credit: Radesh
Image: (R) Rima Rabbath Credit: Peter Stanglmayr


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhfdpf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj99)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn33ryt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Mayday (w3ct1cx8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhfjfk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn08vp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn33wpy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhfn5p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd43)
The sailor and the pirate king

Indian sailor Sudeep Choudhary was kidnapped at gunpoint by Nigerian pirates. He and his crew were taken to a swampy jungle prison in the Niger Delta where human skeletons hung in the trees. The hostages pinned their hopes on shaky ransom negotiations and the desperate efforts of their families back home. Sudeep tells Outlook's Kevin Ponniah his harrowing story and how his freedom was secured.

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Sudeep Choudhury
Picture design by Manuella Bonomi.
Image credits: Sanjeet Pattanaik, Getty Images and www.marinetraffic.com/DennisMortimer


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhfrxt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn0jby)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn34466)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 The Conversation (w3csynj2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhfwny)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg0429j)
"Catastrophic" situation in Belarus: UN

The UN Special Rapporteur on Belarus Anaïs Marin says human rights violations have gone "from bad to worse" as people protest against the August election result they say was rigged. President Alexander Lukashenko remains in power.

Also in the programme: the doctors’ union in Turkey has accused the government of a coronavirus cover-up; and will breakdancing get final approval as an official Olympic sport?

(Photo: Belarusian policemen block a subway entrance, as pensioners march during a rally against the government and Belarusian President Lukashenko in Minsk. Credit: EPA/STR)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhg0f2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn34cpg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlv6npr3vts)
UK-EU talks in final push for trade deal

Talks between the UK and EU have resumed, as the sides make a final bid for a trade deal. Barbara Moens is trade reporter at Politico, and explains the remaining sticking points as the December 31st end of the post-Brexit transition period rapidly approaches. Also in the programme, with the pandemic leading to a temporary pause on commuting to work for many, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa examines the challenging financial impact it has had on public transport systems around the world. Plus, musician Bob Dylan has sold his entire catalogue of more than 600 songs to Universal Music. Eamonn Forde is a writer on the business of music who discusses the significance of the deal.

(Picture: Britain's chief Brexit negotiator David Frost in Brussels. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhg456)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t532d0h71)
Coronavirus conversations: Sceptics

We continue to bring you conversations happening around the world about coronavirus and the effects it has had on people's lives. Today we talk to two people in the US who believe that Covid-19 exists, but think it's being somehow overblown and that the measures being taken to stop the spread are too restrictive.

Also, in India at least one person has died and hundreds have been hospitalised by an unidentified illness in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh. The patients had a wide range of symptoms from nausea to fits and falling unconscious. We bring you the latest on what we know about the illness.

And every day we invite a health expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer listener questions. Today we are joined by Dr Eleanor Murray, assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health.

(Photo: People gather for a rally against state and city mandates to stop indoor dining to control the spread of the coronavirus, in Staten Island, New York, USA. Credit: EPA/JUSTIN LANE)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhg7xb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t532d0lz5)
Coronavirus conversations: Sceptics

We continue to bring you conversations happening around the world about coronavirus and the effects it has had on people's lives. Today we talk to two people in the US who believe that coronavirus exists, but think it's being somehow overblown and that the measures being taken to stop the spread are too restrictive.

Also, Brexit negotiations continue between the UK and the EU. Disputes over fishing and business rules remain, with the UK government saying discussions in Brussels have reached "a critical moment". We bring you the latest.

And every day we speak to healthcare workers around the world who have been treating coronavirus patients. Today we go to South Africa, the worst affected country on the continent. We'll speak to Dr Luvuyo Tshona who works at Odi District hospital in Pretoria.

(Photo: People gather for a rally against state and city mandates to stop indoor dining to control the spread of the coronavirus, in Staten Island, New York, USA. Credit: EPA/JUSTIN LANE)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhgcng)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhghdl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn17tq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn34vnz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jx74csgvm)
2020/12/07 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhgm4q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xb2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn34zf3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1cx7)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The Space Burrito

Is there a point in space where the Sun could heat a burrito perfectly? asks Will. The doctors tackle this and a plethora of other conundrums from the Curious Cases inbox.

Featuring expert answers from astrophysicist Samaya Nissanke, cosmologist Andrew Pontzen, and cognitive neuroscientist Sophie Scott.

Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford
Producer: Jen Whyntie


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhgqwv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg04xjf)
Brexit: UK and EU seek to resolve stalemate

The European Commission president, Ursula von der Leyen, and the British prime minister, Boris Johnson, have said significant differences remain between them to review talks on a post-Brexit trade agreement, with a final deal yet to be met. The transition period is due to end in just over three weeks' time; and if no deal is ratified, the UK and EU will introduce import charges on each other's goods.

Also on the programme; We hear the latest on President of Egypt, Adel Fattah al-Sisi’s visit to France; and a look at the sale of Bob Dylan’s publishing rights for his entire back catalogue which has just taken place.

(Picture: Boris Johnson and European Commission President Ursula Von Der Leyen, Credit: Reuters )


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhgvmz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qv31c9mt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmg6z1lln)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn356xc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58sqv35l29)
European and British leaders will discuss Brexit Impasse

Brexit talks falter prompting the President of the European Commission, Ursula Von Der Leyen and the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, agree to meet this week.

We analyse what is at stake for the European Union and the UK as the end of month deadline approaches fast.

Next year's Paris Air show has been cancelled, but will the aviation industry revert to doing deal online.

And President Maduro wins political control in Venezuela, but he still has a long way to go before winning the approval of the international community.

(Picture: EU and UK flags. Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhgzd3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn35bnh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3csynj2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



TUESDAY 08 DECEMBER 2020

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhh347)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkpx)
The fall of Addis Ababa

In May 1991, the brutal Ethiopian dictator, Colonel Mengistu and his military regime were on the verge of collapse after years of civil war. The end came when a Tigrayan-led rebel movement advanced on the capital Addis Ababa and took power. We get a first-hand account from an American diplomat and hear how the events of 1991 contributed to the current crisis in Ethiopia. Plus, the controversy in France over banning headscarves and other religious symbols from schools, the Nazis' terrifying V1 bombing campaign in World War Two and the story of the Haitian slave leader, Toussaint Louverture.

Photo: EPRDF rebels in Addis Ababa, 28 May, 1991 (BBC)


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhh6wc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1946wv8fz8)
European and British leaders will meet to discuss Brexit impasse

Brexit talks stall prompting a meeting for later this week, between the President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen and the British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson. We will hear what is at stake for both sides with analysis from Carsten Brzeski, from ING in Frankfurt.

We will also consider the future of Venezuela, after President Maduro and his allies won political control, but the standoff with countries like the United States continues. Eileen Gavin, a Latin America analyst with the advisory group Maplecroft, gives us her analysis.

Throughout the programme we'll also get the views of our guests, Professor Peter Morici, from the University of Maryland, in Washington and financial professional Jessica Khine, who is in Malaysia.

(Picture: EU and UK flags. Getty Images.)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhhbmh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn231m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn35pww)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cx4)
Belarus across the barricades - part two

For 100 days and counting protesters are calling for an end to the 26-year long rule of Alexander Lukashenko in Belarus. Poet Valzhyna Mort records first-hand stories from her friends who are out protesting week after week; ordinary people making extraordinary choices. Obsessively, she reads the social media posts flooding her phone. In her hands, these tiny messages are poetry themselves, the oral history of our time captured on thousands of phones. The story is rich, layered, and homely. ‘Leave food out for cat.’ says one woman not sure whether masked security agents will snatch her from the street. A young father explains how he writes his address in his little son’s clothes in case he has to make it home alone one day. Yet in all this fear and rage comes a spirit of togetherness. Strangers have become friends. Apartment blocks have become neighbourhoods. Whole communities upload the choral part-songs they’ve been gathering to sing after dark each night. Whatever happens next in Belarus, this is a country transformed.

Producer: Monica Whitlock

(Photo: Pensioners protest in Minsk, Belarus. Credit: EPA)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhhgcm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd43)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmky)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhhl3r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn2bjw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn35yd4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct1cx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhhpvw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf863z6l)
Biden reportedly chooses first black Defense Secretary

Joe Biden is reported to have chosen a retired general, to be the first black US Defense Secretary.

The inquiry into the New Zealand mosque killings is released and says security services overlooked the dangers of far right violence.

And why has there been an upsurge in cattle rustling South Africa?


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhhtm0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf8642yq)
Covid-19: UK begins mass vaccination

Britain is about to start its mass vaccination campaign against the coronavirus - the first western country to do so.

The inquiry into the New Zealand mosque killings is released and says security services overlooked the dangers of far right violence.

And why, when many world famous musicians are trying to regain ownership of their back catalogues, is Bob Dylan selling his off?


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhhyc4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf8646pv)
Covid-19: UK starts vaccine roll-out

It's being described as V-day as people in Britain receive their first Covid-19 vaccines.

Despite Joe Biden winning the US election - why does Ohio state continues to support President Trump

UK prime minister, Boris Johnson, will travel to Europe this week in a last ditch effort to salvage the post-Brexit trade deal.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhj238)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv25)
Building with fungi

Companies are growing light and durable packaging from mycelium that is easy to compost. Another team in Europe is creating a fungal home, which will sense when it’s dark and switch the lights on. And researchers in the UK are developing strains of fungi that won’t just replace plastic, but eat it as well.

Produced and presented by Claire Bates

Picture: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn36fcn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8bd)
Is Boeing's 737 Max fit to fly?

It was grounded worldwide after two tragic accidents. Now, regulators in the US have given it permission to fly again – but will it really be safe? Theo Leggett speaks to Mark Pegram whose son Sam was killed aboard the flight which crashed after take-off from the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa in March last year. He also spoke to Ed Pierson, a former senior manager on the 737 production line at Boeing’s Renton factory, just outside Seattle, who gave testimony to the House of Representatives saying how months before the first accident, he had emailed his bosses, warning them how the pressure to produce new planes as fast as possible was undermining safety. In response to Mr Pierson’s testimony, Boeing insisted that the suggestion of a link between his concerns and the Max accidents was completely unfounded. It added that none of the authorities investigating the accidents had found that production conditions in the 737 factory had contributed in any way.The US regulator, the Federal Aviation Administration, has also come under fire.
Barry Valentine, a former assistant administrator at the FAA who now works as a consultant for the Wicks group, says lessons have been learnt. Also in the programme is attorney and former inspector general of the US department of transportation, Mary Schiavo. And Bjorn Fehrm, of aviation consultants Leeham, who insists the 737 Max will now be safe.


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmqg)
The pioneer of 'Mountain Filming'

In 1920 a German filmmaker called Arnold Fanck shot his first film - 'Marvels of the Snowshoe' - high in the mountains. He and his team dragged cameras on sledges to reach the highest peaks. They even attached cameras to their skis to make the early action films. Johannes Dell has been watching some of those films and talking to his grandson Matthias Fanck.

Photo: A still from one of Fanck's early Mountain Films. Copyright: Matthias Fanck.


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhj5vd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct1cx4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn36k3s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc8)
Guggenheim Bilbao: From Covid to Kandinsky

As Guggenheim Museum Bilbao prepares to open a major show of work by abstract artist, Wassily Kandinsky, In the Studio is behind-the-scenes and discovers how the museum continues to emerge and manage during the Coronavirus pandemic.

Basque journalist Olatz Arrieta speaks to the people at the heart of this cultural institution – from Director General, Juan Ignacio Vidarte and Eva Eguiren in the Visitor’s Centre, to those working closely on the Kandinsky and the exhibitions of the future.

But as Spain records more than one million coronavirus cases, and authorities in the Basque Country close the regions borders, will the Kandinsky show still open? Join Olatz to find out.

Presented by Olatz Arrieta

Produced by Neil McCarthy and Ella-mai Robey for the BBC World Service


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhj9lj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhjfbn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn35rs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn36sm1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 Discovery (w3ct1cx7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhjk2s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdkn)
The man behind Mindhunter: Face to face with serial killers

In the 1970s John E. Douglas was a relatively young FBI agent who would travel around the US teaching police officers the bureau's tactics. John knew he was inexperienced compared to the seasoned detectives he was instructing. But he had an idea to accelerate his learning: go into prisons and speak to notorious serial killers. He spoke to some of the most infamous criminals, including child killer Joseph McGowan. They weren't called 'serial killers' back then, John helped come up with the term. Through the interviews John was able to understand how the minds of these criminals worked and how it could be applied to solve open cases. But the gruelling work took its toll on John. Andrea Kennedy spoke to him about how it began to erode his mental health and very nearly cost him his life. His story inspired the Netflix series Mindhunter. This programme was first broadcast in June 2019.

(Photo: John E Douglas. Credit: Alexander James Towle/Fairfax Media/Getty Images)


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhjntx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn3f81)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn37139)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhjsl1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg06z6m)
UK begins Covid-19 vaccine programme

90-year-old Margaret Keenan has become the first person to be given an authorised, fully-tested Covid-19 vaccine in the UK.

Also in the programme: US President-elect Joe Biden will pick retired General Lloyd Austin as his Secretary of Defence according to US media; and an inquiry into the 2019 Christchurch massacre concluded it was “unpreventable”.

(Photo: Margaret Keenan, 90, is the first patient in the United Kingdom to receive the Pfizer/BioNtech covid-19 vaccine. Credit: PA)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhjxb5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn378lk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwvk4ylclg)
First person receives Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine

The UK has become the first country to give the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine to the public. Rebecca Brown is a fellow at the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford, and discusses how long it might take for life to return to something like normal. And Louis-James Davis of VST Enterprises, which has developed a digital health passport, makes the case for widespread use of such a technology. Also in the programme, as Boeing's 737 Max plane gets clearance from US authorities to carry passengers again after two deadly crashes, the BBC's Theo Leggett explores whether it will really be safe. Plus, the production of fertiliser is normally an energy-intensive industrial process. But the world's largest fertiliser producer, Yara of Norway, has said it plans to make its products without any fossil fuels, and we find out more from the company's chief executive, Svein Tore Holsether. And we get reaction to the move from Richard Young, policy director of the Sustainable Food Trust, which advocates chemical-free food production.

(Picture: Margaret Keenan receives her coronavirus vaccination. Picture credit: Reuters.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhk129)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t532d3d44)
Coronavirus: First Pfizer Covid-19 jabs

A British woman has become the first person in the world to be given a fully tested vaccine against Covid-19. We discuss the latest vaccine and other coronavirus stories with one of our regular experts, Dr Isaac Bogoch. We also go to Slovakia where a preliminary analysis has found that a recent mass testing in the country reduced coronavirus infections by 60% in one week.

The pandemic has led millions of young people to move back in with their parents, and we bring together families around the world to share their experiences.

Farmers in India continue to block roads and railways, protesting against agricultural reforms. We hear about their concerns.

(Photo: Dr Doreen Brown, 85, receives the first of two Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine jabs, in London. Credit: Victoria Jones/REUTERS)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhk4tf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t532d3hw8)
Coronavirus conversations: Moving back home

The pandemic has led millions of young people to move back in with their parents. So how are they coping? We'll hear from some of them.

As mass Covid vaccination programme is being rolled out across the United Kingdom, we look at the global situation with vaccines.

And we continue to hear from frontline health care workers around the world. Today we speak to Dr Dan Johnson, the division chief of critical care at the University of Nebraska Medical Center’s department of Anaesthesiology in Omaha, Nebraska, about the surge of Covid-19 cases in the US.

Farmers in India continue to block roads and railways, protesting against agricultural reforms. We’ll hear about their concerns.

(Photo: Betty Kao and Kathy Pao Credit: Kathy Pao)


.


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhk8kk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdkn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhkd9p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn44qt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn37rl2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jx74cwcrq)
2020/12/08 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhkj1t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct1cx4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn37wb6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz990)
Is the internet affordable where you live?

Malaysia, Rwanda and Columbia are amongst the countries where it is cheapest to get online, according to the Alliance for Affordable Internet (A4AI) 2020 Affordability Report. A4AI Director Sonia Jorge explains how despite broadband prices having fallen by half in five years, the cost to connect remains one of the biggest barriers to internet access - over one billion people live in countries where data is still not affordable.


India sharing economy during COVID
Just before the spring global lockdown our reporter Snezana Curcic travelled around India using only sharing economy platforms, for her transport, accommodation and eating out as she wanted to experience India first-hand. Her report somewhat changed from the original idea. Snezana catches up with the people she met to find out how they’ve adapted their use of the sharing economy during the pandemic.

Prayer app data danger
Over the last few weeks dedicated religious apps have had serious data breaches or have sold the data of their subscribers to other parties who have then sold them onto third parties like the US military. How concerned should users be – is this just another data privacy issue for app users or could it have more significant and dangerous implications for those concerned? Stephanie Hare joins us on the programme to unravel the many issues concerning these apps.


The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Bill Thompson.

(Image: Getty Images)

Studio Manager: Tim Heffer
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhkmsy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg07tfj)
Covid-19: Mass vaccination programme begins in the UK

Thousands of people have been inoculated against the coronavirus on the first day of a mass vaccination programme in Britain.

Also, the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid vaccine is safe and effective, giving good protection, researchers have confirmed in The Lancet journal.

And Joe Biden to nominate retired army general, Lloyd Austin, to be defense secretary. Austin, who would need a congressional waiver due to his recent military service, would be the Pentagon’s first Black leader.

(Photo: William Shakespeare receiving his first dose of the Covid-19 vaccine. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhkrk2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qv31g6jx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmg6z4hhr)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn383tg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58sqv38gzd)
First person receives Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine

The UK has become the first country to give the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine to the public. Rebecca Brown is a fellow at the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford, and discusses how long it might take for life to return to something like normal. And Louis-James Davis of VST Enterprises, which has developed a digital health passport, makes the case for widespread use of such a technology. Also in the programme, as Boeing's 737 Max plane gets clearance from US authorities to carry passengers again after two deadly crashes, the BBC's Theo Leggett explores whether it will really be safe. Plus, the production of fertiliser is normally an energy-intensive industrial process. But the world's largest fertiliser producer, Yara of Norway, has said it plans to make its products without any fossil fuels, and we find out more from the company's chief executive, Svein Tore Holsether. And we get reaction to the move from Richard Young, policy director of the Sustainable Food Trust, which advocates chemical-free food production.

(Picture: Margaret Keenan receives her coronavirus vaccination. Picture credit: Reuters.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhkw96)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv25)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn387kl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 09 DECEMBER 2020

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhl01b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhl3sg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1946wvcbwc)
Joe Biden outlines plans to contain coronavirus

The US-president elect, Joe Biden, has outlined his plans to contain the coronavirus health emergency. The number of cases has now passed 15 million in the US and over 290,000 Americans have died.

Also in the programme, what hope is there of turning agriculture green - we look at how the world's biggest fertiliser company is hoping to make the change.

And if you ever worried about the correct way to keep someone at a safe distance in a supermarket during a pandemic, the Scottish Government has a handy guide to help you find the right thing to say

Plus, we look at why China has banned over 100 apps from operating in the country - including Tripadvisor.

Alison Van Diggelen in California joins us throughout the programme.

PHOTO: Joe Biden/Reuters


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhl7jl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn4zyq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn38lsz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct1csh)
Finders Keepers

Finders Keepers: Icons and empire

Calls for the return of objects, looted from around the world are growing ever louder. Actor and musician Kema Sikazwe travels to London to see the Broken Hill Skull at the Natural History Museum. At the launch of the Return of the Icons campaign, V&A director Tristram Hunt explains how he is responding to Ethiopia’s formal restitution claim. Children’s author, Kandace Chimbiri describes how her writing fills gaping historical hole and French art historian Didier Rykner is convinced that President Macron’s approach, is fundamentally flawed. Should priceless parts of history be returned? And if so, what’s at stake?

Theme music composed by Kema Sikazwe aka Kema Kay

(Photo: Presenter, Kema Sikazwe in front of the Broken Hill Skull (which Zambia is trying to have repatriated from the UK) at the Natural History Museum. Credit: Will Sadler)


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhlc8q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdkn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmqg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhlh0v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn57fz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn38v97)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz990)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhllrz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf866w3p)
Covid vaccinations: aid agencies warn of unequal global roll-out

Aid agencies say they fear 90 per cent of people in poorer countries won't be immunised against the coronavirus next year, while rich nations will have more vaccine than they need.

The Ethiopian government has admitted to the shooting at United Nations staff in the northern region of Tigray.

A European Champions League football match has been suspended, after a match official was accused of racism.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhlqj3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf866zvt)
President-elect Joe Biden sets vaccination target

President-elect Joe Biden has set a goal of 100 million Covid vaccinations in his first 100 days in office, but what happens if you are country as large as Canada that is completely reliant on importing vaccines?

The EU adopts a far reaching human rights act that strengthens rights in members states, we get the view of Lithuania's outgoing Foreign Minister.

Mining firm Rio Tinto blew up two sacred Aboriginal rock shelters to get at iron ore, today the Australian government releases its report into how that was allowed to happen, but were minister partly to blame too?


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhlv87)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf8673ly)
US plan to vaccinate millions of its citizens

As President-elect Biden promises 100 million vaccinations in his first 100 day in office, major US philanthropist Melinda Gates gives her assessment of efforts so far to deal with the virus.

Why is the announcement of election results in Ghana being postponed by 24 hours?

And the Climate Change Committee here in the UK tells us the radical changes needed to reduce carbon emissions by almost 80 per cent.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhlz0c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7d)
Dr Anthony Fauci: Highly likely US Covid vaccinations just days away

Right now the conflicting currents in the course of the coronavirus pandemic are striking. On the one hand the UK Government is rolling out the first post-trial public vaccination programme. In the US the second surge of the virus is generating unprecedented levels of infection.. Stephen Sackur speaks to Dr Anthony Fauci the US Government's top expert and adviser on infectious diseases. Can the US quickly turn the tide on what looks like a public health disaster?

(Photo: Dr Anthony Fauci via videolink on Hardtalk)


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn39b8r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8np)
Big Pharma: Vaccine Heroes or Profiteers?

A UK grandmother became the world’s first recipient of the Pfizer Covid vaccine this week. What does this mean for the pharmaceutical industry? This could be seen as a moment of victory for the industry, which has received a lot of bad press in the last few years. But the prices set by the vaccine makers could also provoke accusations of profiteering. We’ll hear from former Pfizer executive John Lamattina, Thomas Cueni of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers, Tahir Amin of the Initiative for Medicines, Access & Knowledge, as well as Sudarshan Jain, Secretary General of the Indian Pharmaceutical Alliance.

(Image credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmsq)
Chief Albert Luthuli wins the Nobel Prize for Peace

When Chief Albert Luthuli won the Nobel Peace Prize he was living under a banning order in rural South Africa. He won the prize for advocating peaceful opposition to the Apartheid regime. His daughter Albertina spoke to Rob Walker for Witness History in 2010. Also listen to archive recordings of his acceptance speech.



(Picture: Albert Luthuli receives the Nobel Peace Prize in 1961. Credit: Keystone/Hulton Archive)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhm2rh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct1csh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn39g0w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cs8)
Don't log off: Grounded

Alan Dein searches for the stories that connect us in a changed world. Inspiring and moving stories of how the pandemic has changed people's lives on every continent. Today, airline pilot Peter in Australia talks about deciding to become a bus driver after the pandemic forced him to stop flying. And wedding planner Vithika in India discusses the dramatic impact of the pandemic on her industry. Plus, Chun Wing, a ballet dancer at the Paris Opera shares the frustrations of not being able to perform. Alan also speaks to Shira who lives in an orthodox community in Israel and he catches up with doctor Ahmed in Sudan who’s just made a major life decision.

Producers: Sarah Shebbeare and Laurence Grissell


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhm6hm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Reith Lectures (w3ct1cym)
Credit crisis to resilience

Dr Carney takes us back to the high drama of the global financial crash of 2008, which ended a period when bankers saw themselves as unassailable Masters of the Universe. More than a decade on, how much have the bankers changed their ways? How far has the financial sector changed? Carney says that we must remain vigilant and resist the “three lies of finance.” If we don’t, he warns, we will live with a system which is ill-prepared for the next crisis.

In his four BBC Reith Lectures Dr Mark Carney, the former Governor of the Bank of Canada and the Bank of England, charts how we have come to esteem financial value over human value and how we have gone from market economies to market societies. He argues that this has contributed to a trio of global crises: of credit, Covid and climate. And he outlines how we can turn this around.

(Photo: Outgoing Bank of England governor Mark Carney makes a keynote address at the 2020 United Nations Climate Change Conference. Credit: Tolga Akmen/ Getty Images)


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhmb7r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn62nw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn39pj4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Digital Planet (w3csz990)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhmfzw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdsf)
The secretaries who inspired the hit movie 9 to 5

Dolly Parton's 9 to 5 has long been an anthem for working women around the world. She wrote it on the set of a movie - the hit 80s comedy 9 to 5 starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin and of course Dolly Parton. It's a film about three secretaries who decide to take revenge on their misogynist boss. The film was inspired by the stories of real secretaries who became so exasperated by how they were being treated by their managers they decided to fight back. They formed an organisation called 9to5 and Karen Nussbaum was one of its founders.

Also on the programme we catch up with Jose Luis Alvarez, the Mexican conservationist saving thousands of baby turtles in the Mexican state of Guerrero.

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com


Picture: 9 to 5 film
Credit: Shutterstock


Clips used:
9 to 5 [Dolly Parton, RCA Nashville]
9 to 5 [IPC Films, Colin Higgins]
Barbarella [Dino de Laurentiis Cinematografica, Roger Vadim]
Private Secretary [Jack Chertok Television Productions]
Bad bosses contest [Phil Donahue Show, Multimedia Entertainment]
Coffee protest news clip [CBS]


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmsq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhmkr0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn6b54)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn39y0d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cs8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhmph4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg09w3q)
Brexit: Boris Johnson to meet Ursula von der Leyen for trade deal talks

The British prime minister, Boris Johnson has told parliament in London there's still a "good deal to be done" but has said the EU is insisting on terms "no prime minister could accept" in UK-EU trade talks.

Also in the programme: An alliance of international aid agencies and human rights groups says people living in poorer nations are set to miss out on coronavirus vaccines; and we mark the first anniversary of the volcanic eruption on White Island in which twenty-two people died.

(Photo: Britain"s Prime Minister Boris Johnson returns to his official residence at 10 Downing Street after Prime Minister's Questions in London. Credit: EPA).


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhmt78)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3b5hn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxnzwkckxv)
AirBnB prepares for initial public offering

Shares in the online home rental site AirBnB will start trading in New York on Thursday. Rebecca Crook is chief growth officer at the digital product agency SoMo, and tells us whether it's a sensible time to be launching such an IPO, given that the Covid-19 pandemic is still causing significant disruption to the global travel industry. And we get the perspective of AirBnB host Karen Fraser, who owns a converted double decker bus in Nairobi, Kenya. Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler examines whether pharmaceutical companies are likely to release their drug patents for medicines and vaccines related to coronavirus. Plus, the Halo Collective says one in five black women feel pressure to straighten their hair for work. UK consumer goods company Unilever has now signed the Halo Code, which is designed to protect employees with dreadlocks or afro hair, and we find out more from Mary Mante of the Halo Collective.

(Picture: An AirBnB logo. Picture credit: AFP.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhmxzd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t532d6917)
Coronavirus conversations: Biden taskforce

One of the first things Joe Biden announced, once it was clear he would be the next US president, was a twelve-person task force to respond to the Covid-19 pandemic. Two of the people on the taskforce spent some time with us to answer questions about how they intend to shape that response. Ms Loyce Pace and Dr Eric Goosby talk about a range of topics, including mask guidance, vaccine hesitancy and how long it will take the US to reach herd immunity.

We'll also get our regular coronavirus expert to answer your questions on the day's Covid-19 stories.

And we speak to a French football journalist who was in the stadium when players from Paris St Germain and Istanbul Basaksehir walked off the pitch over alleged racism from a match official. The match will resume later today with a new set of officials.

Picture: Ms Loyce Pace, executive director and president of the Global Health Council and part of the Biden administration's Covid-19 taskforce (Credit: BBC)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhn1qj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t532d6dsc)
Coronavirus conversations: Biden taskforce

One of the first things Joe Biden announced, once it was clear he would be the next US president, was a twelve-person task force to respond to the Covid-19 pandemic. Two of the people on the taskforce spent some time with us to answer questions about how they intend to shape that response. Ms Loyce Pace and Dr Eric Goosby talk about a range of topics, including mask guidance, vaccine hesitancy and how long it will take the US to reach herd immunity.

We'll also get our regular coronavirus expert to answer your questions on the day's Covid-19 stories.

And we speak to a French football journalist who was in the stadium when players from Paris St Germain and Istanbul Basaksehir walked off the pitch over alleged racism from a match official. The match will resume later today with a new set of officials.

Picture: Ms Loyce Pace, executive director and president of the Global Health Council and part of the Biden administration's Covid-19 taskforce (Credit: BBC)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhn5gn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdsf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmsq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhn96s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn71mx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3bnh5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jx74cz8nt)
2020/12/09 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhndyx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct1csh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3bs79)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszccx)
Gene therapy for sickle cell disease

Are genetic therapies for sickle cell disease beginning to come of age? Claudia Hammond talks to David Williams and Erica Esrick of Boston Children’s Hospital about their promising results with a gene therapy for the disease in a pilot trial involving six young patients. Their report appears in the latest edition of the New England Journal of Medicine alongside encouraging results of a CRISPR gene editing therapy for sickle cell disease. Both approaches target the same gene – the result of which is to make bone marrow cells to produce foetal haemoglobin to compensate for people’s faulty adult haemoglobin.

BBC Global health correspondent Naomi Grimley has a coronavirus global round up for us, and we report on the discovery of a pair of salivary glands new to medical science – the first new set of organs to be discovered for centuries. Dutch researchers detected them with a sophisticated form of body scanning, hiding where the back of the nasal cavity meets the top of the throat. It’s an anatomical revelation which may have implications for kinder radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

Claudia’s studio guest is Tabitha Mwangi, who is a lecturer in public health at Anglia Ruskin University and has also been a malaria researcher in Kenya. Tabitha talks about the great benefits of giving children four months of malaria prophylaxis tablets during the rainy season in West and Central sub-Sahelian Africa. A study involving millions of children and tens of thousands of health workers halved the number of children dying from malaria. Tabitha also tells Claudia about a simple strategy for improving the success rate in getting people onto TB treatment quickly, and whether schemes in low income countries to encourage mothers to grow their own vegetables to improve their children’s nutrition actually work.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

(Picture: Dr. Erica Esrick and Manny Johnson, the first patient to participate in the Boston Children’s Hospital sickle cell disease clinical trial. Credit: Boston’s Children’s Hospital.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhnjq1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg0bqbm)
Brexit: Boris Johnson in Brussels for critical trade deal talks

The British prime minister, Boris Johnson, and the European Commission president, Ursula Von der Leyen, are holding crucial talks to see whether a post-Brexit trade deal can be struck. Over dinner in Brussels, they're discussing the critical differences that have resulted in stalemate, three weeks before a deadline for agreement to be reached.

Also on the programme; more on the attempts to reduce COVID-19 inequalities in Washington DC; and we hear about the first black dancer at Germany’s top ballet company who says she’s faced persistent racism

(Picture: Boris Johnson and Ursula von der Leyen, Credit: Press Association )


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhnng5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qv31k3g0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmg6z7ddv)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3c0qk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58sqv3ccwh)
Major US lawsuits seek break up of Facebook

US federal regulators and more than 45 state prosecutors have sued Facebook, accusing the social media company of taking illegal actions to buy up rivals and stifle competition. The lawsuits are one of the most significant legal actions the US government has taken against the firm. Officials are asking the court to consider breaking up the company, which also owns Instagram and WhatsApp. We hear from Sally Hubbard, former anti-trust lawyer in New York City and the director of enforcement strategy at the Open Markets Institute.

Shares in the online home rental site AirBnB will start trading in New York on Thursday. Professor Howard Yu tells us why they are listing now. And we get the perspective of AirBnB host Karen Fraser, who owns a converted double decker bus in Nairobi, Kenya.

Also in the programme, the BBC's Ed Butler examines whether pharmaceutical companies are likely to release their drug patents for medicines and vaccines related to coronavirus.

PHOTO: Reuters


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhns69)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3c4gp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cs8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



THURSDAY 10 DECEMBER 2020

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhnwyf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 World Book Club (w3cszmx5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhp0pk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1946wvg7sg)
Should Facebook be broken up?

US federal regulators and more than 45 state prosecutors have sued Facebook, accusing the social media company of taking illegal actions to buy up rivals and stifle competition. The lawsuits are one of the most significant legal actions the US government has taken against the firm. Officials are asking the court to consider breaking up the company, which also owns Instagram and WhatsApp. We hear from Sally Hubbard, former anti-trust lawyer in New York City and the director of enforcement strategy at the Open Markets Institute.

Also on the programme, we assess why investors think the accomodation website AirBnb is worth an incredible $50 billion.

Plus, we examine whether pharmaceutical companies are likely to release their drug patents for medicines and vaccines related to coronavirus.

And we go to Amsterdam in the Netherlands, where the authorities have decided to limit the amount and type of Christmas lights that people are allowed to put on the outside of their homes.

Throughout the programme we are joined by guests Sushma Ramachandran in Delhi and Ralph Silva in Toronto.

PHOTO: Reuters


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhp4fp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn7wvt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3chq2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6m4)
Syria's soldiers of fortune

The bitter war between Armenia and Azerbaijan in the Caucasian region of Nagorno Karabakh may have come to an end, but the business of fighting may continue for at least some of its combatants. There’s growing evidence that hundreds of soldiers in this war were mercenaries recruited from mostly rebel-held regions in northern Syria - even though that's strongly denied by Azerbaijan. In this week’s Assignment Ed Butler hears testimony from a number of young Syrians, who say they fought in a war which in most cases they didn't realise they were signing up for. Some speak of shame at having to work this way – a symptom of the increasing economic desperation that's affecting the embattled regions of northern Syria where they live.

Produced and presented by Ed Butler.

(Image: Men in the same fatigues as SNA fighters photographed in Azerbaijan stand in front of a border sign written in Armenian, Russian and English. Credit: Telegram channel of Jarablus News)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhp85t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdsf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmsq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhpcxy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn84c2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3cr6b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszccx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhphp2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf869s0s)
Major US lawsuits seek break-up of Facebook

Could a legal challenge break up the Facebook empire, costing the tech giant its ownership of Whatsapp and Instagram?

Hong Kong introduces tough new measures to ward off what it describes as a "fourth wave" of coronavirus

And we have a BBC investigation into why Syrian mercenaries are turning up in Libya, Nagorno Karabakh... and even Venezuela.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhpmf6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf869wrx)
Will Facebook be forced to sell WhatsApp and Instagram?

The US government sues Facebook over concerns it has become a social media monopoly.

Britain and the European Union give themselves one final week to find a deal for Brexit.

We speak to Melinda Gates after her foundation gives $250 million to ensure the fair distribution of Covid vaccines.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhpr5b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf86b0j1)
Brexit talks: no breakthrough with 'large gaps' remaining

Talks between British and European Union negotiators will continue in Brussels today, in a last ditch attempt to agree a post Brexit trade deal

The US reaches another landmark in the covid pandemic, registering more than three thousands deaths in 24 hours.

And we hear from supermodel Naomi Campbell about why we need to give young designers more attention.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhpvxg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4h)
Has French secularism gone too far?

The French brand of secularism - laïcité - is central to the country’s national identity. It requires that public spaces – whether state classrooms, workplaces or ministries - be free of religion.

But the way the French government is applying the concept has come under fresh criticism. Many French Muslims claiming this cornerstone of French identity is now being used as a weapon against them. This week, Tanya Beckett asks has French secularism gone too far?


A boy holds a sign asking 'Liberty, fraternity?' at a gathering in Toulouse, France. Credit: Alain Pitton/Getty Images)


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3d75v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7y5)
Brexit: 'Large gaps' remain after trade talks

Boris Johnson's dinner with EU chief Ursula von der Leyen - aimed at breaking the Brexit trade deadlock - has ended without agreement. The BBC's Laura Kuenssberg said the evening had "plainly gone badly" and the chances of the UK leaving the post-Brexit transition period at the end of the year without a firm arrangement was a "big step closer". What would that mean for the UK, and the rest of the world? Joining the programme live will be BBC World Service political correspondent Rob Watson, and Dr Anna Jerzewska, Director of the trade consultancy Trade and Borders.


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmn6)
Neanderthal cave mystery

A teenage potholer discovered a cave system near the town of Bruniquel in France in 1990 which contained a mysterious circular structure. It turned out to be nearly 200,000 years old, and built by Neanderthals – transforming our understanding of Neanderthal culture and society. Lucy Burns speaks to Bruno Kowalczewski, who discovered the cave, and geologist Sophie Verheyden, who was part of the research project which discovered the structure’s incredible age.

Picture: taking measurements for the archaeo-magnetic survey in the Bruniquel Cave. Image: Etienne Fabre - SSAC via the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhpznl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6m4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3dbxz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqy)
Sourdough love stories

A spongy collection of flour, water, wild yeasts and bacteria may seem an unlikely object of affection, but some sourdough starters are truly cherished, and can even become part of the family.

Emily Thomas hears how one starter has been used to bake bread in the same family since the Canadian gold rush more than 120 years ago, and speaks to a man trying to preserve sourdough diversity and heritage by running the world's only library dedicated to starter cultures.

And a German baker, whose starter has survived Nazism and communism, reveals the commercial demands of maintaining it and why old ‘mothers’ (as sourdough starters are known) hold a powerful lesson for us all in nurturing living things.

Producers: Simon Tulett and Sarah Stolarz

(Picture: A woman holding bread. Credit: Getty Images/BBC)

Contributors:

Ione Christensen;
Karl de Smedt, Puratos;
Christoph Hatscher, Bäckerei & Konditorei Hatscher


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhq3dq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjwg)
Umm Kulthum: Egypt’s singing superstar

Umm Kulthum’s powerful voice and talent for communicating poetry was spotted early, when she accompanied her family to perform at weddings and special occasions. It wasn’t long before she was performing in the elite salons of early 20th-century Cairo, although her father dressed her as a boy to protect her from any unwelcome interactions with strangers.

In the Egyptian capital she quickly associated herself with the most talented musicians of the day, and from then on she never looked back. She explored the major Arabic song forms of the period, collaborating with composers and poets. She dabbled in film, negotiated record deals, and when public service broadcasting began in the 1930s, she secured herself a monthly slot on national radio. In awe of her talent and mesmerising presence, the Arab world practically came to a standstill whenever she was heard on the airwaves.

Joining Bridget Kendall to explore Umm Kulthum’s life are Virginia Danielson, author of The Voice of Egypt: Umm Kulthum, Arabic Song and Egyptian Society in the 20th Century; Salwa el-Shawan Castelo-Branco, professor of ethnomusicology at the New University of Lisbon and president of the International Council for Traditional Music; and Yara Salahiddeen, whose current research at the University of Oxford focuses on music-making in 19th and early 20th century urban Egyptian society.

[Image: Umm Kulthum performs on Nov 16 1967 at the Olympia concert hall, Paris. Credit: STRINGER, AFP via Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5y)
Stop the Springboks

In the winter of 1969 to 70, anti-apartheid campaigners disrupted 24 matches during a tour of the British Isles by South Africa’s Springboks rugby team. For the first time, the activists used direct-action tactics – running onto the pitch, throwing smoke bombs and even super-gluing the locks of the South Africans’ hotel rooms. The successful campaign forced the cancellation first of a planned tour by the South African cricket team later in 1970, and then of all future visits by South African teams until the end of apartheid. Simon Watts talks to Peter Hain, who organised the protests and later became a British cabinet minister.

PHOTO: An anti-apartheid demonstration outside a Springboks rugby match in central England in November 1969 (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhq74v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn8zkz)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3dlf7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 Health Check (w3cszccx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhqbwz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdbw)
Becoming 'brothers' with my guard in Guantanamo Bay

In 2002, Mauritanian engineer Mohamedou Salahi was detained by American intelligence services. They believed he was a senior figure in al-Qaeda and took him to Guantanamo Bay, the notorious US prison camp. Mohamedou was held there for 14 years without charge, during which time he says he was tortured. A glimmer of light came in the form of an unexpected and life-changing friendship he would make with Steve Wood, one of his American guards. A new Hollywood movie about Mohamedou's story will be released early next year called The Mauritanian. This story was first broadcast in August 2019.

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com


Image: (L-R) Mohamedou Salahi and Steve Wood
Credit: Mohamedou Salahi


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmn6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhqgn3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn9727)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3dtxh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhqld7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg0ds0t)
US regulators launch major lawsuit against Facebook

Facebook has accused American regulators of engaging in 'revisionist history' after they filed lawsuits on Wednesday that accuse the company of engaging in anti-trust practices.

Also in the programme: we'll hear from Syrian fighters recruited to fight in the Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict; and how bees use animal dung to protect their hives from killer hornets.

(Picture: Facebook logo displayed on a mobile phone REUTERS/Johanna Geron)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhqq4c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3f2dr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlw13fc2vzc)
EU sets out plans in case Brexit talks fail

The EU has set out plans for "no deal", including measures to avoid air travel disruption. The BBC's Kevin Connolly in Brussels brings us the details. Meanwhile at an EU leaders' summit, Poland and Hungary are poised to lift their veto over an EU coronavirus stimulus package, as Lili Bayer, a journalist with Politico in Brussels, explains. Also in the programme, there has been a sharp increase in the cost of global shipping, as the world's ports deal with unprecedented congestion. Lars Mikael Jensen is chief planner of services for the world's biggest container ship operator, Maersk Line of Denmark, and tells us what's behind the problems. One of Africa's biggest fashion events, Arise Fashion Week, is being streamed online, and we hear from supermodel Naomi Campbell, who is in Lagos, Nigeria, for the event. Plus, the BBC's Dougal Shaw meets some fathers who have decided to set up new businesses in lockdown.

(Picture: A plane lands at London's Heathrow Airport. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhqtwh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t532d95yb)
Afghan journalist Malala Maiwand shot dead

We talk about the violence against journalists in Afghanistan; the latest victim of a spate of assassinations across the country is Malala Maiwand. She was on her way to work today when gunmen opened a fire on her vehicle and shot her and her driver dead.

Many African countries have been praised for effectively fighting the spread of the virus but the number of new cases in the continent is gradually rising. In South Africa, there has been a spike in infections among those aged 15 to 19 years. We speak to those who attended a music festival that has been declared a Covid-19 “superspreader’ event.

And we explain the other developments with the pandemic with the help of our medical expert today – Dr Emma Hodcroft, from the University of Basel in Switzerland.

(Photo: People attend the funeral of Malala Maiwand, an Afghan journalist who was shot dead by unidentified gunmen while she was on her way to work in Jalalabad. Credit: EPA/Ghulamullah Habibi)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhqymm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t532d99pg)
Coronavirus conversations: Second wave in South Africa

South Africa has officially declared a second wave of Covid-19. The country's health minister pointed to "a large number of parties involving young people drinking alcohol", without taking precautions like social distancing and wearing masks. We hear from a couple of students who attended events to celebrate the end of their exams.

Also, we explain the lawsuits filed against Facebook over competition and what they could mean for the social media company.

And we continue to speak to frontline health workers about their work during the pandemic. Today we’ll hear from a Lebanese nurse in Beirut. He’s been treating Covid patients, contracted the disease himself and is also traumatised by the experience of helping the victims of the explosion in August.

(Photo: A volunteer receives an injection from a medical worker. Credit: Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhr2cr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdbw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmn6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhr63w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tn9yk0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3fkd8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jx74d25kx)
2020/12/10 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhr9w0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6m4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3fp4d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1f)
The unchecked spread of Covid-19 in Manaus

Pictures of coffins and mass graves seen by satellites showed that Manaus has been badly affected by Covid- 19. Now analysis of blood samples shows the extent to which the virus took hold in the Amazon city earlier this year. Investigators Ester Sabino and Lewis Buss from Brazil’s University of Sao Paulo discuss how and why the virus spread.

Humanity has been modifying the environment for millennia, but have we now reached a point where it’s all too much? An analysis by Emily Elhacham from Tel Aviv University shows the amount of stuff produced by humanity, from plastics to buildings now has a greater mass than all natural biomass on the planet.

And China has been to the moon. Space watcher Andrew Jones tells us how the robotic mission mimics the manned missions of the 1960s and 70s.





(Image: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhrfm4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg0fm7q)
US records more than 3,000 Covid deaths a day for first time

On September 11th 2001, 2,977 people died in the Al Qaeda attacks on the United States. On December 9th 2020 - yesterday - more than three thousand were registered as having died from Covid-19 just on that day.

Also in the programme: the Lebanese judge investigating the Beirut port blast has charged the outgoing Prime Minister Hassan Diab and three other former ministers with negligence; and Morocco becomes the fourth Arab country in a few months to normalise relations with Israel, in return for the United States recognising its claim to sovereignty over Western Sahara.

(Photo: A volunteer places American flags representing some of the lives lost in the United States in the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic on the National Mall in Washington, United States. Credit: Reuters/Joshua Roberts)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhrkc8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qv31n0c3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmg6zb99y)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3fxmn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58sqv3g8sl)
EU sets out plans in case Brexit talks fail

The EU has set out plans for "no deal", including measures to avoid air travel disruption. The BBC's Kevin Connolly in Brussels brings us the details. Meanwhile at an EU leaders' summit, Poland and Hungary are poised to lift their veto over an EU coronavirus stimulus package, as Lili Bayer, a journalist with Politico in Brussels, explains. Also in the programme, there has been a sharp increase in the cost of global shipping, as the world's ports deal with unprecedented congestion. Lars Mikael Jensen is chief planner of services for the world's biggest container ship operator, Maersk Line of Denmark, and tells us what's behind the problems. One of Africa's biggest fashion events, Arise Fashion Week, is being streamed online, and we hear from supermodel Naomi Campbell, who is in Lagos, Nigeria, for the event. Plus, the BBC's Dougal Shaw meets some fathers who have decided to set up new businesses in lockdown.

(Picture: A plane lands at London's Heathrow Airport. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhrp3d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4h)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3g1cs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



FRIDAY 11 DECEMBER 2020

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhrsvj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjwg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5y)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhrxln)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x1946wvk4pk)
Airbnb valued at over $100bn

Airbnb went public on Thursday with a record listing for 2020, despite the devastating year for the travel and hospitality industries.Their CEO tells us that they are looking after their sharing community

Plus - America moves a step closer to authorising its first vaccine - what will the challenges along the road be? And we talk about the lack of a firm plan to replace the current Covid aid for millions of Americans.

And supermodel Naomi Campell tells us why more attention should be given to African fashion designers.

Throughout the programme we are joined by guests James Mayger in Beijing and Kimberly Adams in Washington.

PHOTO: Getty Images


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhs1bs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tnbsrx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3gdm5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3cszth3)
Walking off in solidarity

Başakşehir's Nacer Chadli discusses the decision to abandon a Champions League match after an alleged racist incident. And we pay tribute to Italy's 1982 World Cup hero Paolo Rossi.

Picture: The score board and empty grandstand after the game was suspended in the first half as the players walked off amid allegations of racism by one of the match officials during the UEFA Champions League group H football match between Paris Saint-Germain and Istanbul Basaksehir FK at the Parc des Princes stadium in Paris. (FRANCK FIFE/AFP via Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhs52x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdbw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmn6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhs8v1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tnc185)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3gn3f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhsdl5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf86dnxw)
US vaccine approval draws one step closer

But with half of Americans saying they won't take the jab, we speak to someone who is having serious doubts

Morocco becomes the latest African country to normalise relations with Israel - in return the US recognises Morocco's claim to Western Sahara.

And we'll go to Hong Kong, where the democracy activist and media magnate Jimmy Lai has just been charged under the controversial new national security law.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhsjb9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf86dsp0)
US drug experts recommend Pfizer vaccine approval

We speak to a senator who's been fighting to encourage people to use vaccines.

Hong Kong media magnate Jimmy Lai is charged under the controversial new national security law.

We'll get an update on chances of a Brexit trade deal breakthrough - as Britain's prime minister suggests hope is fading


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhsn2f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wmf86dxf4)
Brexit deadline looms with no sign of agreement

We head to Brussels with Sunday apparently the real and final deadline for a trade deal.

A well-known Venetian historian tells us about his experience of the latest floods to wreak havoc in the Italian city.

And China conducts a secret trial of two Canadians on spying charges. We'll have a report about a new campaign to free them.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhsrtk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyc)
Nobel Peace Prize winner, the World Food Programme, warns of famines ahead

This year’s Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to the UN agency dedicated to feeding the hungry and fending off mass starvation, the World Food Programme. This week the award was handed to the body's Executive Director David Beasley in recognition of the agency’s worldwide effort to overcome the challenges of conflict and Covid-19. 2020 has been a terrible year for those experiencing extreme hunger; is there a real danger that 2021 will be even worse?

(Photo: David Beasley, director of the WFP appears via videolink on Hardtalk)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3h42y)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz79c)
Can post-Brexit Britain ban live animal exports?

Britain is looking to ban the export of live animals for slaughter and fattening after its existing trade arrangement with the European Union lapse at the end of this year. Natasha Smith of Compassion in World Farming, who have campaigned on this for decades, explains why they’re against the practice. Meanwhile UK minister Craig Mackinlay says leaving the EU’s trade rules after Brexit is key to getting the ban implemented. But will the ban run afoul of WTO free trade rules? Emily Rees of consultancy Trade Strategies breaks down the rules and whether the ban fits. But what do UK farmers think? Phil Stocker of the National Sheep Association says this ban overshoots, and puts farmers already in an unclear position because of Brexit, even more on the back foot. And Francesca Porta of the Brussels-based Eurogroup for Animals explains what changes might be coming in the EU itself on live animal transport.

Producer: Frey Lindsay.

(Image credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmvz)
The return of the beaver

In 2009, beavers were released into the wild in the Knapdale forest on the west coast of Scotland, some 400 years after they were wiped out in the UK. The Scottish Beaver Trial was the first official beaver re-introduction programme in the UK and was considered a landmark conservation project. The beaver is seen as a keystone species which can help shape and restore the environment. Alex Last spoke to Simon Jones, who was then the project manager of the Scottish Beaver Trial.

Photo: A beaver in Knapdale in 2011 © Steve Gardner (courtesy of the Scottish Wildlife Trust)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhswkp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpr)
Will Facebook be broken up?

US regulators launch lawsuits accusing the giant of buying rivals to stifle competition. Plus, does Uber’s sale of its autonomous driving division indicate a roadblock for driverless tech? And why a paper by leading AI ethics researcher Dr Timnit Gebru has caused a storm at her employer Google. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC cybersecurity reporter Joe Tidy. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, October 2019. Credit: REUTERS/ Erin Scott/ File Photo).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3h7v2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 World Football (w3cszth3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xht09t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnz)
Is Macron marginalising France's Muslims?

French President Emmanuel Macron has described Islam as 'a religion in crisis.' This week he presented draft legislation to cabinet ministers aimed at tackling radical elements and propping up ‘republican values’. Among the proposed measures are curbs on foreign funding for mosques and imams, new rules making it harder for children to be home-schooled, and fresh attempts to root out and prevent forced marriages. While the government has planned the policies for some time, it is publishing details just weeks after a pair of deadly terrorist attacks, including the beheading of a history teacher - Samuel Paty - who showed cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed to his students, and the killing of three churchgoers in Nice. But with the French presidential election less than 18-months away - and with the far-right politician Marine Le Pen thought to be one of Mr Macron’s greatest obstacles to re-election - many French Muslims have accused the government of unfairly targeting their community and using the national tradition of laïcité - or secularism - as an excuse to do so. France’s Muslim population has grown significantly since Algerian independence in 1962, as has the debate over ‘French values’. So are Muslims now being exploited for political gain, or are the new proposals a common-sense response to serious problems? Ritula Shah and guests discuss whether the French government is marginalising Muslims.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xht41y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tncwh2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3hhbb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1f)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xht7t2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj3)
A small election in North Macedonia

North Macedonia is holding local elections this weekend. The country has been independent for nearly three decades, but it is not unusual for the countries of the former Yugoslavia to be interested in what happens next door. But not generally in small mayoral elections. BBC Serbian reporter Aleksandar Miladinovic explains that he travelled more than 450 kilometres talk to Stip to find out more about one of the candidates, Simon Gajiga.

Nepali chef in MasterChef: The Professionals
It’s not only UK viewers who have been gripped by the current series of MasterChef: The Professionals. People in Nepal have also been following it closely as one of their own, Santosh Shah, is not only the first Nepali to appear on the show, he's made to the finals. BBC Nepali’s Rama Parajuli tells us more.

Kimchi clash
Kimchi is a salted and fermented cabbage and a staple of traditional Korean cuisine. It's taken very seriously in South Korea, which is why a claim by China about Kimchi has angered people there, as Julie Yoongyung Lee of BBC Korean explains.

Indian farmers’ protests
The Indian government's new farming reform law has sparked protests in the country, and 100,000 farmers have blocked the main entrances to the capital city of Delhi. Ishleen Kaur, originally from the Punjab region, spent her early summers milking cows and eating sugar cane in the fields there, and knows some of those taking part in the protests.

Brazil’s Hollywood style bank robberies
Shooting, kidnapping, rockets and banknotes flying through the air: not a Hollywood movie, but a robbery in the small city of Criciuma in southern Brazil. Digihub reporter and Brazilian, Fernando Duarte, explains how this modus operandi has caught on within Brazilian crime gangs.


Image: Simon Gajiga came to Stip 40 years ago from Nigeria, and now hopes to become mayor
Credit: BBC


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmvz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhtck6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tnd3zb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3hqtl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1csl)
Jonestown: From socialism to slaughter - Part two

In 1978, over 900 US citizens died at Jonestown, a remote settlement in Guyana. The vast majority were members of a community run by the charismatic Rev Jim Jones, taking their own lives with poison under armed guard on his orders. But how did a church known for racial integration and practical help for the poor come to such a destructive end? How could one man’s increasing paranoia have driven so many people, who had built a mission community from nothing in four years, into a seemingly pointless sacrifice?

In this second and final programme, Erin Martin – who herself grew up in a controlling religious group – hears from ex-members of Peoples Temple who explain how steadily increasing isolation made it so hard to leave the organisation. Vera Washington describes how she and seven others had to accelerate their escape plan when a leadership spy heard of it, and Jordan Vilchez relates how a faked assassination attempt on Jim Jones was used to reinforce their sense of threat from outside.

The move to the Guyanese jungle meant escape was almost impossible - Jim Jones’ son, Stephan, and a few others survived because they were on a visit to the capital, Georgetown. But could Jonestown have had a future? Tim Carter imagined paved streets and seeing his grandchildren there. And John Cobb still feels that if he hadn’t been in Georgetown with Stephan on November 8th, 1978, he could have prevented what was, before 9/11, the largest intentional loss of civilian lives in American history.

Producer: Paul Arnold

(Photo:Main entrance to Jonestown, with welcome sign over the road. The sign reads Welcome to Jonestown, on the top line; the next line reads Peoples Temple Agricultural Project, May 1978. Credit Jon Moore/The Jonestown Institute).


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhth9b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg0hnxx)
Hong Kong tycoon Jimmy Lai charged under national security law

Hong Kong pro-democracy media tycoon Jimmy Lai has been charged under the territory's new national security law. He is accused of conspiring with foreign forces to endanger national security. He is the most high-profile person charged under the new law and could face a lengthy jail sentence.

Also on the programme: the UK looks close to leaving the European Union without a trade deal; and Argentina gets closer to legalising abortion.

(Picture: Jimmy Lai was originally detained under the national security law in August. Credit: Getty)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhtm1g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3hz9v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltd6z4t50w)
EU leaders set 55% target for CO2 emissions cut

EU leaders have agreed on a more ambitious 55% goal for cutting greenhouse gases by 2030. We get reaction from Mark Breddy of the environmental organisation Greenpeace in Brussels. And we find out how challenging the target will be for Poland, which is home to around half of all coal workers in the EU, from Robert Tomaszewski, an energy analyst at Polityka Insight in Warsaw. Also in the programme, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa finds out why the UK's ambition to ban live animal exports after Brexit could be difficult to achieve. Plus, we find out why shares in Chinese toy maker Pop Mart rose by almost 80% on their debut in Hong Kong, from Shaun Rein, managing director of China Market Research Group.

(Picture: Belchatow coal-fired power plant in Poland. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhtqsl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t532dd2vf)
Coronavirus conversations: Kenyan doctors

We go to Kenya to hear how the country has been handling the pandemic so far. Two doctors in Nairobi talk about the conditions for health workers that are leading to calls for a strike. They include rising death rates, unpaid salaries and health insurance.

We look at the situation with Covid vaccines and other coronavirus stories with our regular expert, Dr Megan Murray from Harvard Medical School.

In the US, death row inmate Brandon Bernard has been executed and four more executions are being planned before the end of Donald Trump’s presidency. We explain the current policy with executions in the country.

(Photo: Kenyan doctors wearing protective face masks hold candles and portraits of their colleagues who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) during a vigil outside the Ministry of Health offices in Nairobi, Kenya December 9, 2020. Credit: Monicah Mwangi/Reuters)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhtvjq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t532dd6lk)
First execution of Trump's final days

Four more executions are being planned before the end of Donald Trump’s presidency. We explain the current policy with executions in the country.

Germany has recorded the highest daily number of coronavirus cases and deaths so far. We have spoken to a German doctor who explains how the country managed the first wave of cases so well and what’s behind the current spikes.

We go to Kenya to hear how the country has been handling the pandemic so far. Two doctors in Nairobi talk about the conditions for health workers that are leading to calls for a strike. They include rising death rates, unpaid salaries and health insurance.

(Photo: An undated handout photo made available by the defense team of Brandon Bernard shows federal inmate Brandon Bernard (R) with Pastor Aaron Chancy (L) as Bernard sits on death row awaiting his scheduled execution in Terre Haute, Indiana, USA, Issued 10 December 2020. Credit: EPA/DEFENSE TEAM OF BRANDON BERNARD)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhtz8v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmvz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhv30z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bk8tndvg3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3jg9c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jx74d52h0)
2020/12/11 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhv6s3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3jl1h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6r)
Will our spacecraft ever reach the stars?

The space between stars is usually measured in light years, but this makes it less easy to acknowledge the true scale of the distance. Even the closest star system to Earth, Proxima Centauri, is 4.2 light years or 40.13 trillion kilometres from Earth. If we are ever going to bridge the gap between the stars, we will have to have some very fast spaceships, with extremely reliable, long-lasting technology on board.

So does science allow for these spacecraft to exist? That’s what listener Allan wants to know, and to find out, Presenter Anand Jagatia speaks with Tracy Drain, a systems engineer at NASA JPL responsible for overseeing the development and missions of multiple unmanned interplanetary probes including some around Jupiter and Mars. She tells us the challenges involved with simply keeping our spacecraft working for the long-haul.

Even if we can overcome issues of wear and tear over time, powering a ship to other star systems will not be easy. Today’s chemical rockets are too inefficient for the job, so we speak with Rachel Moloney, a researcher in electric propulsion to ask if this relatively new technology could power ships through interstellar space.

Faster than light travel is the solution most often found in Science Fiction, but it goes against Einstein’s laws of relativity. Is there a way around it? Theoretical physicist Professor Miguel Alcubierre thinks there may be, and he describes the way a spaceship may be able to create a bubble of spacetime around itself to move faster than light without breaking these fixed laws. But there’s a catch...

Contributors:
Tracy Drain – Systems Engineer - NASA Jet Propulsion Lab, California, USA
Rachel Moloney – Researcher in Electrical Propulsion - Surrey Space Centre, UK
Professor Samuel Tisherman – Surgeon – University of Maryland school of Medicine, USA
Dr John Bradford – President & CTO of SpaceWorks, USA
Professor Miguel Alcubierre – Theoretical physicist known for the ‘Alcubierre Warp Drive’ – National University of Mexico


Presented by Anand Jagatia
Produced by Rory Galloway


[Image: Speceship. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhvbj7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2rg0jj4t)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhvg8c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qv31qx86)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fmg6zf671)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3jtjr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58sqv3k5pp)
EU leaders set 55% target for CO2 emissions cut

EU leaders have agreed on a more ambitious 55% goal for cutting greenhouse gases by 2030. We get reaction from Mark Breddy of the environmental organisation Greenpeace in Brussels. And we find out how challenging the target will be for Poland, which is home to around half of all coal workers in the EU, from Robert Tomaszewski, an energy analyst at Polityka Insight in Warsaw. Also in the programme, the BBC's Manuela Saragosa finds out why the UK's ambition to ban live animal exports after Brexit could be difficult to achieve. Plus, we find out why shares in Chinese toy maker Pop Mart rose by almost 80% on their debut in Hong Kong, from Shaun Rein, managing director of China Market Research Group.

(Picture: Belchatow coal-fired power plant in Poland. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p68xhvl0h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszbyc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0qn3jy8w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3cszth3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6m4)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6m4)

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BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5q0ccss4xf)

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BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5q0qn39b8r)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct19yy)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7kc)

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Business Weekly 23:06 SAT (w3ct0spl)

CrowdScience 08:32 SUN (w3cszv6q)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz990)

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Discovery 00:32 MON (w3ct1cx6)

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Discovery 11:32 TUE (w3ct1cx7)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9qj)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3csz9qj)

From Our Own Correspondent 23:06 SUN (w3csz9qj)

Girl Taken 09:32 SAT (w3ct0xwd)

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Girl Taken 23:32 SUN (w3ct0xwd)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc2w)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3cszc2w)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf5b)

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Stumped 02:32 SAT (w3cszhk6)

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The Big Idea 04:50 SUN (w3ct0xj8)

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The Climate Question 02:32 MON (w3ct0xb2)

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The Cultural Frontline 05:32 SAT (w3cszj99)

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The Forum 15:06 SUN (w3cszjwf)

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When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct1c4x)

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Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3cszmvy)

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WorklifeIndia 10:06 SUN (w3ct1c17)

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World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x57z93hdpb0)

World Business Report 15:32 MON (w172xlv6npr3vts)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3cszth3)

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