Radio-Lists Home Now on WS

RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 28 NOVEMBER 2020

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcw9djy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnx)
Covid vaccines: An opportunity for science?

The rapid development of coronavirus vaccines has heightened the hope for a world free of Covid-19. Governments have ordered millions of doses, health care systems are prioritising recipients, and businesses are drawing up post-pandemic plans. But despite these positive signs, many people still feel a sense of unease. One poll suggests nearly a quarter of the world’s population is unwilling to get a coronavirus jab. How much of the scepticism has to do with the record-breaking speed at which the vaccines have been developed? How much can be attributed to a wider ‘anti-vax’ movement that relies on emotion more than it does on facts? What can those promoting the vaccines do to alleviate the fears of those willing to be convinced, but who 'aren’t there yet'? And what opportunities do coronavirus vaccination programmes present when it comes to improving society’s trust in science? Join Ritual Shah and guests as they discuss what's behind the hesitancy of some to accept a Covid-19 vaccination, and what can be done about it.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcw9j92)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x193hc72rcz)
Black Friday expected to top online sales records

Black Friday started earlier this year as shoppers turned to online services during the pandemic. John Copeland, Vice President for Marketing and Customer Insights at Adobe, lays out the trends they saw this year. The Trump administration intends to scrap longstanding federal protection for US birds, Sarah Greenberger, Vice President of the National Audubon Society, explains why they are opposed to the move. Also in the programme, China will impose trade tariffs of up to 212% on Australian wine. We get industry reaction from Tony Battaglene, chief executive of Australian Grape and Wine. The BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports on how prepping, or survivalism, has gone mainstream.

Peter Ryan, Senior Business Correspondent at ABC in Sydney is our guest.

(Picture credit: Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcw9n16)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjk90wdgb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h009l)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhk5)
Buttler on captaincy and the bowler turned delivery driver

The weight is over for Australia and India as their heavyweight series gets underway in Sydney.

England's Jos Buttler talks Twenty20 World Cup, Ashes and his captaincy hopes.

And Paul Van Meekeren, the Dutch fast bowler delivering takeaway food during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Photo: Jos Buttler talks to Eoin Morgan (Getty Images)


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcw9rsb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj1)
The self-styled prophet of Siberia

In September FSB soldiers descended in helicopters on a remote Siberian village to arrest a religious leader, Vissarion. They arrived with guns, but were welcomed by his followers, who don't believe in conflict. BBC Russian journalist Nataliya Zotova travelled to deep into the forests of Krasnoyarsk Territory to meet followers of the Church of the Last Testament and find out more.

Thailand's "CIA" food hawkers
Thailand's pro-democracy protests have sprung up all over Bangkok, but in every location it seems the food hawkers were already set up and ready for business. BBC Thai's Chaiyot Yongcharoenchai set out to crack the mystery of the self-styled "CIA" food hawkers.

‘They messed with the wrong generation’
Peru has been in the headlines for having three presidents in a week. It’s a story of corruption allegations, impeachment and mass protests, with young people saying their generation has had enough of the broken system which their parents put up with. Ana Maria Roura has been making sense of events for BBC Mundo.

Lahore's toxic smog
It's the time of year when many Pakistani rice farmers set fire to their fields to burn stubble. The result is serious air pollution and a public health problem for the authorities. Umer Draz Nangiana of BBC Urdu has been finding out why so many farmers continue to burn their fields.

Image: Vissarion meets with his followers
Credit: Alexander Nemenov/AFP via Getty Images


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmvx)
The fight for disabled rights in the UK

The UK government passed the landmark Disability Discrimination Act in November 1995. The legislation made it illegal for employers or service providers to discriminate against disabled people. Campaigners brought London to a standstill in the run up to the passing of the Act. Baroness Jane Campbell was at the forefront of that fight for equality and remembers the time when disabled people seized control of their destiny.

Photo: A disabled woman on her mobility scooter is carried away by four policemen after obstructing the traffic outside the Houses of Parliament. Credit: PA Archive/PA Images


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcw9wjg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwb08l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjk90wrpq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h0cjz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj98)
Tsitsi Dangarembga: Writing Zimbabwe’s Women

This week as part of the BBC World Service’s 100 Women Season we're celebrating the female writers, artists and performers overcoming challenges and making their voices heard.

Shortlisted for the prestigious Booker prize, Tsitsi Dangarembga’s latest novel This Mournable Body reveals late 1990s Zimbabwe through the eyes of her female lead, Tambusai. Tsitsi talks to Tina about exploring the experience of Zimbabwean women through her characters and how she feels about being shortlisted at this point in her writing career.

Chilean female collective Las Tesis speak to our reporter Constanza Hola about their viral protest song The Rapist in Your Path and how it’s inspired women worldwide to speak out against sexual violence.

British Somali poet Hibaq Osman’s writing explores family history and identity with heartfelt honesty. She shares a poem from her first full collection, Where the Memory Was.

Plus: has a film, a book or a song ever changed the way you see the world? South African singer-songwriter Zahara on how she took courage from the film A Walk to Remember.

Presented by Tina Daheley.


(Photo: Tsitsi Dangarembga. Credit: DANIEL ROLAND/AFP via Getty Images)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwb40q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d5fr78h9f)
Iranian nuclear scientist killed

Iran has urged the United Nations to condemn the assassination of its top nuclear scientist, Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, and it's pointed the finger at Israel. We explore how the incoming Biden administration's relationship with its traditional ally will shape regional tensions.

Also on the programme: The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in the United States has passed thirteen million, with the pandemic still surging from coast to coast; And a new documentary explores Frank Zappa the man, his music, and politics.

(Photo: Blood stains from the shootout that killed the Iranian Scientist; Credit: WANA (West Asia News Agency) via REUTERS)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwb7rv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d5fr78m1k)
Iran blames Israel for scientist death

Iran has urged the United Nations to condemn the assassination of its top nuclear scientist, and it's pointed the finger at Israel. We hear from our chief international correspondent about reaction in the Middle East.

Also on the programme: With the violence in Ethiopia's Tigray province showing no signs of abating, the UN appeals for help with the thousands fleeing into Sudan; And what music do you associate with the emotions of a pandemic age? We'll hear from a composer who set his feelings to music.

To talk about these stories and more we are joined by Holly Dagres - she is an Iranian-American Non-Resident fellow at the Atlantic Council international affairs think-tank also the Curator of the current affairs newsletter, The Iranist And the neuroscientist Dr Daniel Glaser, who is an expert in the art of science communication and engagement.

(Photo : Prominent Iranian scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh; Credit: REUTERS)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwbchz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d5fr78qsp)
Israel blamed for scientist killing

The Iranian President Hasan Rouhani has blamed Israel for the assassination of a top nuclear scientist -- but says it won't slow down Iran's technical progress. Our chief international correspondent tells us how the news has gone down in the Middle East.

Also on the programme: Can the Inuit way of life survive climate change? We'll hear from one hunter on her fears for the future; And as the footballers union in England creates a task force to look into brain injuries among players, is it time for soccer to ban headers?

To talk about these stories and more we are joined by Holly Dagres - she is an Iranian-American Non-Resident fellow at the Atlantic Council international affairs think-tank And the neuro-scientist Dr Daniel Glaser, who is an expert in the art of science communication and engagement.

(Credit : Car attack that killed Prominent Iranian scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh; Photo : WANA (West Asia News Agency) via REUTERS)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h0qsc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4w)
How has Covid changed America?

Covid-19 has dramatically changed the way we live our lives, exposing fractures in our communities - but what's America's exit plan from the pandemic?

Carlos Watson and Philippa Thomas (standing in for Katty Kay) speak to journalist and author Fareed Zakaria about the dramatic and sudden shift in society this year. What are the lessons we need to learn to cope better in the future?

Carlos and Philippa also explore how President-elect Biden may tackle the pandemic, speaking to Dr Nicole Lurie, a public health expert who was an advisor to Joe Biden during his election campaign. Working under President Obama as assistant secretary for preparedness and response at the United States Department of Health, Dr Lurie planned for public health emergencies like the one we are living through right now. What does she think needs to be done to bring the pandemic under control?

Editor: Penny Murphy
Production team: Luke Radcliff, Maeve McGoran, Iyore Odighizuwa, Jonelle Awomoyi, Pamela Lorence


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwbh83)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19yx)
Coronavirus: Festive celebrations

The arrival of winter for many countries brings the threat of increased infections as people gather indoors to escape the cold. It’s also a time for celebrating religious festivals and holidays.

Host Nuala McGovern shares conversations with an American family in Indiana about Thanksgiving, and two young women in Gaza relate their experiences of curfew during the pandemic.

In Japan, officials have already warned of a possible third wave of infections. Three people living there discuss why they think cases are rising, the implications for Japanese New Year and whether the Olympics should still go ahead in 2021.

(Photo: Erin, Eden and Carliss Stennett in the US Credit: Erin Stennett)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h0vjh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xwc)
Girl Taken

28/11/2020 GMT

Girl Taken is a two year investigation to find a little girl taken from her mother in Iran. In this 11 part series, recorded in real time, Sue Mitchell and Rob Lawrie slowly unravel the mystery of what happened to four year old Bru and set out to reunite mother and daughter after years of being apart.

The series starts when Sue Mitchell came into the story, as a reporter for the BBC covering the refugee crisis in Europe. The little girl had hit the media spotlight when her father, claiming to be a widow fleeing Afghanistan under threat of death from the Taliban, asked Rob Lawrie, a volunteer at the Calais camp, for help. He wanted Rob to smuggle Bru to the UK but this failed. Although the story was extensively covered no one knew Bru’s mother was alive and desperately searching for her.

Through the original BBC coverage the mother, Goli, makes contact with Sue and Rob, telling them her daughter was taken from the family home in Tehran without her knowledge or consent. She’d been to the police in Iran but was told they could not help. She then travelled thousands of miles at the hands of smugglers with Bru’s baby sister, Baran. Sickness forced her to stop in Denmark but authorities and refugee charities there could not find Bru. These recordings cover a series of dramatic turns in the search for the little girl.

The recordings also touch on the plight of other women whose children have been taken from them by abusive husbands. It is still a rare thing to happen, but this investigation exposes shortcomings in the asylum process. Since the recordings aired, officials have discovered other cases where men have come into the United Kingdom with a child to help their asylum claims. These claims have not been fully investigated in the past and there are few safeguards to protect those who have suffered as a result.

The series raises the plight of children living in the Calais Jungle and other overcrowded and unsanitary camps. Through Goli’s story we learn more about the control others had in shaping her life. She’d had an arranged marriage to a cruel and controlling man and lived in a society where she had few rights. When she decided to flee Iran and search for Bru, she encountered many dangers, from smugglers to perilous sea crossings in the dead of night with Bru’s baby sister, Baran, in her arms.

The series gives voice to one woman’s story and in doing so raises issues affecting many others. Goli left the only culture she had known to search the world for her little girl and in doing so changed her outlook completely. On reaching the West she immersed herself in the education she had always wanted. As she began making her own choices she starts to experience possibilities and freedoms she had never before imagined. Goli is hopeful that her story could help other women to challenge the injustice and cruelty she has overcome.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf59)
Have news programmes got the tone right on reporting a vaccine?

How the BBC World Service manages listeners' expectations following the recently announced Covid vaccine. Have news programmes got the tone right for those listening in both the developing and developed world?
Plus we get your thoughts on the documentary Barack Obama talks to David Olusoga.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Producer: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwbm07)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c4dhjvdsy)
Memories of the magical Maradona

Arguably the greatest footballer of all time, Diego Maradona, passed away aged 60 this week after suffering a heart attack.

Maradona won the World Cup with Argentina in 1986 – scoring the 'goal of the century' and becoming renowned for his controversial ‘Hand of God’ goal, both of which came against England in the quarter-final of that tournament.

The footballing world has been brought to a standstill with tributes flooding in from across the globe. Argentina announced three days of national mourning and there were huge celebrations of Maradona's life in the capital Buenos Aires and in the Italian city of Naples, where Maradona became a hero for delivering Napoli's only two league titles.

Sportshour explores the legacy that Maradona leaves; bringing you reaction from around the globe to his death from the people he impacted the most.

Director of the acclaimed 2019 Diego Maradona documentary, Asif Kapadia, tells the story of Maradona’s sensational life. He discusses Maradona’s difficult upbringing in poverty, how the 1986 World Cup lifted him to superstardom and how he ended up in the hands of the Mafia in Naples.

Our search for Diego's legacy even takes us to the second tier of Scottish Football, and the Alloa Athletic winger Adam Brown. At the age of 13 and playing for Celtic, Brown had an unforgettable chance encounter with Diego Maradona that involved the Hand of God lifting him into the air.

We also hear from Jon Smith, Maradona's agent during his time at Napoli. Smith tells us there were two people; Diego and Maradona. And he reveals how he managed to help Maradona get special dispensation from the Naples police to skip red traffic lights.

Maradona’s legacy is undoubtedly cemented in football but what about other sports? He was often seen cheering on the Pumas, the Argentina men’s rugby union team. We go to Argentina and speak to rugby journalist Frankie Deges to see how the country has reacted to Maradona’s passing and to discuss the impact he had on the sport.

And Sporting Witness relives the infamous story of that World Cup quarter-final against England in 1986 in Mexico City, with former England striker Gary Lineker telling us what it was like to see the 'Hand of God' and the 'goal of the century' in the flesh.

Photo: Diego Maradona at the 1986 World Cup for Argentina (Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwbqrc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjk90xh5h)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h130r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cs1)
100 Women: The mushroom woman

This is the story of Chido Govera aka The Mushroom Woman. It is a story about her home, Zimbabwe. And it is also a story about mushrooms.

It never should have happened. Chido, an orphan, became the provider in her family aged seven. At 10 she was destined to marry a man 30 years older than her. But a chance encounter led her to discover the almost magical science of mushroom cultivation at a local university, and set her life on a very different course.

Cultivating mushrooms is unlike growing any other vegetable. Micro-organisms in organic matter provide fuel for air-bound silvery thread-like 'mycelium'. These anchor in damp soil and then quickly, tiny mushroom pins appear. Chido was enthralled by the way mushrooms emerge from next to nothing and colonise plant material. It reminded her of her Grandmother, who took Chido foraging for mushrooms in the forest as a child. From humble beginnings, mushrooms grow.

Chido realised she could grow these curious fungi in maize waste. She could feed herself and her family, and make a little money. What if she could teach other orphans to grow and sell edible mushrooms to provide an income? So that is what Chido did.

Today Chido runs a foundation training 1000s of other growers, mainly women and orphans, in Zimbabwe, and across Africa and the world. We hear their stories and discover the mysterious world of fungi.

Presenter: Chido Govera

(Photo: Chido Govera (Centre) Credit: The Future of Hope Foundation)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwbvhh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6tv)
Loving and hating the studio with Tune-Yards, Haim, Black Pumas and Chicano Batman

An unbelievable line up this week sees Tune-Yards' Merrill Garbus ask Danielle and Este from Haim, Black Pumas' Eric Burton and Bardo Martinez of Chicano Batman if they consider the audience when writing, the ways in which their creative process has adapted from when they started out, and how they use the music of the past in their work.

Eric Burton - a singer, songwriter, former busker, and one half of Black Pumas - was discovered whilst performing on the streets of Austin, Texas, by a friend of Grammy-winning artist and producer Adrian Quesada. Bardo Martinez is a Los Angeles-based vocalist, keyboardist, and bandleader of Chicano Batman. They have toured with the likes of Jack White, Alabama Shakes and Portugal The Man. And Haim are one of the biggest pop-rock bands of our time. Their latest album, Women in Music Part III, reflects on the strength of their bond, and personal struggles the three sisters have experienced during the writing process, which they have described as “collective therapy”.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwbz7m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z20xd14w6)
Iran blames Israel for death of nuclear scientist

Iran's president has blamed Israel for the killing of a top nuclear scientist on Friday, saying it would not slow down the country's nuclear programme. Hassan Rouhani also said Iran would retaliate over Mohsen Fakhrizadeh's killing at a time of its choosing.

Also in the programme: the Ethiopian military has reportedly begun shelling Mekelle - the besieged capital of Tigray province where the dissident regional leadership has refused to surrender; and China's ambitious mission to bring back the first rocks from the Moon in decades.

(Photo: Iranian hardline students burn US and Israeli flags during a protest over the killing of an Iranian nuclear scientist. Credit: EPA/Abedin Taherkenareh)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwc2zr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3ljd1z1mn2)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you full live commentary from the English Premier League as Manchester City host Burnley (1500 kick off GMT). We'll also have reaction from the day's earlier game between Brighton and Liverpool.

We look back on the life and career of one of football's greatest and iconic players of all time, Diego Maradona, after the Argentine sadly passed away this week, aged 60.

We'll also have reaction to the conclusion of rugby union's Autumn Nations Cup group stages as Wales play England, and in the Rugby Championship, we'll reflect on Argentina v New Zealand.

Image:Fans place offerings to late Diego Maradona in front of mural outside Argentinos Juniors' Stadium Diego Maradona on November 26, 2020 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. (Getty Images).


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwckz8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjk90ybdd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h1y7n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3cszvsr)
The truth behind a ‘woke’ Instagram network

It sounds like a dream proposition. A company with a big online following messages you out of the blue, asking you to represent them as a “brand ambassador”.

They promise you a boost in Instagram followers, and a discount on their products. And they even promise to donate large sums to charity.

But take away the rosy filter, and the reality does not look quite so good. New followers aren’t guaranteed. And the products for sale are so vastly overpriced that even with the discount, you’re losing out.

And perhaps most ethically dubious of all, we’ve found a network of accounts making false or dubious claims about charity contributions.

The accounts pledge large chunks of their profits to environmental projects, racial justice, LGBT rights organisations and other progressive causes that many are passionate about. The word “woke” comes to mind.

But we’ve discovered that these accounts often fail when it comes to delivering the profits – and the goods for sale.

Presenter: Reha Kansara
Reporter: Sean Allsop

Picture: Screenshot of a now-deleted account pledging charitable donations.
Picture credit: Instagram/BBC


SAT 18:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyb)
Tracking Covid 19

This year has shown us the importance of good robust data - as Covid-19 spread around the world it was vital to track where it was, how many people it was infecting and where it might go next. On More or Less we’ve spent months reporting on data inaccuracies and vacuums, but what makes for good or indeed bad data?

I’ve been speaking to Amy Maxmen, Senior reporter at the scientific journal ‘Nature’ about which countries are getting data collection right and which aren’t.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Charlotte McDonald


(Medical staff test visitors at a Covid-19 testing station in Seoul, South Korea. Credit: Jung Yeon-Je/Getty Images)


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwcpqd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 The Evidence (w3ct0xk4)
Coronavirus: The Evidence

Pandemic rules: follower or flouter?

Millions of us, across the world, are subject to curfews, stay-at-home orders and lockdowns but what makes us stick to the rules, bend them or ignore them altogether? Claudia Hammond and her expert panel of guests consider the psychology of following the rules.

Leading social psychologists share research which show that higher levels of trust in leadership translates to more pandemic guidance followed. A sense of “We” not “I”, a shared identity, makes a difference too, as well as identification with the whole of humankind, not just your immediate family.

But there is danger too, from a “narrative of blame”, where individuals are demonised if they break the rules. Such an approach, Claudia hears, is corrosive to the all-important sense of shared identity and alienates some groups, while making others complacent.

Also in the programme, what impact can rapid “have you got it” antigen tests which give results in minutes, rather than days, have on the virus?

Claudia hears from the Cameroon in Central, West Africa, one of the first countries in the world to try mass testing using these rapid diagnostic tests. And she talks to scientists at the forefront of evaluating and modelling how their use could affect transmission of the virus, and daily life for all of us, until a vaccine is available.

This month, Claudia’s panel of specialists answers BBC World Service listeners’ questions and includes Professor Michael Mina, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology Immunology and Infectious Diseases at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health in USA, Dr Margaret Harris, from the World Health Organisation in Geneva, Switzerland, Steve Reicher, Professor of Social Psychology at St Andrews University in Scotland, Professor Rolf Van Dick, social psychologist and Vice President of the Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany and Dr Jilian Sacks, senior scientific officer for Pandemic Preparedness for FIND, the Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics in Geneva.

The Evidence is produced in association with Wellcome Collection.
Producer: Fiona Hill
Studio engineer: Sarah Hockley
Editor: Deborah Cohen

Picture: COVID-19 Rapid Antigen detection test in New Delhi Metro stations, Credit: EPA/HARISH TYAGI


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwctgj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Conversation (w3ct1cw4)
The Conversation: BBC 100 Women

Celebrating the BBC 100 Women list 2020, Kim Chakanetsa and a panel of inspirational and influential women discuss whether some changes made because of Covid-19 restrictions could be seen as positive. They answer questions about bringing communities together, supporting lonely people and increasing flexibility for more inclusive employment.

Shani Dhanda is an award-winning disability specialist and social entrepreneur from the UK. She founded the Asian Woman Festival and Asian Disability Network. The pandemic has proved that flexible and home working is viable, and she wants to make sure our new online solutions are here to stay so that the world remains accessible to us all.

Karen Dolva has been seeking technological solutions to involuntary loneliness since 2015. A co-founder of No Isolation based in Norway, she’s helped develop a telepresence robot for children with long-term illness, and KOMP, a one-button screen for seniors. With reports from around the world of people feeling increasingly isolated because of Covid restrictions – should tech like this be used more widely?

Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr, became Mayor of Freetown, Sierra Leone in 2018 with an inclusive vision of the city's renewal and a three-year plan to "Transform Freetown" and tackle environmental degradation and facilitate the creation of jobs in the tourism sector. #FreetownTheTreeTown was launched this January and already over 450,000 seedlings have been planted to address flooding, soil erosion and water shortages faced by the city. She says we can turn frustration and dissatisfaction into positive change. What can we learn from such an approach post-Covid?

Aditi Mittal is India’s best known female stand-up comedian, who is finding new ways to perform safely and online. She also hosts the Women in Labour podcast, and hopes that the increased time at home for many male workers in India has shone a light on the amount of time required to run a household, something that has always been a big barrier to the female workforce.

Produced by Jane Thurlow and Caitlin Sneddon

Image from left: Aditi Mittal (credit Nanak Bhatia), Shani Dhanda (courtesy Shani Dhanda), Yvonne Aki-Sawyerr (credit TJ Bade) Karen Dolva (credit No Isolation)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwcy6n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z20xd23v7)
Ethiopia's Tigray crisis: Army 'takes regional capital of Mekelle'

The Ethiopian prime minister, Abiy Ahmed and the Army Chief of Staff, Birhanu Jula, have issued statements claiming that federal government troops are now in total control of Mekelle, the capital of Tigray province.

There have been appeals for calm and restraint following the killing of Iran's top nuclear scientist.

And the Roman Catholic Church has installed its first African American Cardinal. Wilton Gregory became the first black Archbishop of Washington only eighteen months ago.

(Photo: Thousands of people have been displaced by the conflict in Tigra. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwd1ys)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79q3kf8hym)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3flqpbysxg)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h2f75)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1ck2)
The Canadian Uighurs

Experts say China has detained as many as one million Uighurs and Muslims in "re-education" camps in Xinjiang province. Survivors have shared stories of countless alleged abuses including mass surveillance, forced labour and forced sterilization.

Uighur activist Rukiye Turdush said she feels helpless in Canada knowing Uighurs back home are being forced to learn Chinese, renounce their faith and abandon their culture.

"We said never again after World War Two, but it's happening again in the 21st century in China."

In this programme, reporter Idil Mussa meets Canadian Uighurs, like Turdush, to hear their stories. She learns that the Chinese state has tried to stop all contact with their families, how the Canadian Uighur community suffers from a collective guilt knowing their loved ones are suffering and how Toronto has become a hive of activism to raise awareness of their plight.

(Picture: Rukiye Turdush. Credit: Idil Mussa/BBC)


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwd5px)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0spk)
Will a Covid-19 vaccine rescue the global economy?

On this edition of Business Weekly, we look at the third covid vaccine and ask whether the jabs will be the shot in the arm the global economy needs. We hear the story of a 30-year old man evicted by his parents from the family home after he didn’t pay towards his upkeep. But we also ask what happens when parents rely on their children for money. Plus, we hear from the musicians who want more money when we stream their songs. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

(Image: Scientist holds vaccine equipment, Getty Images)



SUNDAY 29 NOVEMBER 2020

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwd9g1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj98)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h2nqf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Trending (w3cszvsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3cszf59)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwdf65)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3cszkxn)
Vaccines – the Covid confusion

While developing new treatments drug companies usually release little useful information on how the clinical trials are progressing. However with the world’s attention on potential vaccines against Covid -19, the usually dull data on the progression of each trial step is subject to huge scrutiny. It doesn’t help to clarify things says epidemiologist Nicole Basta when that data raises questions about the rigour of the trial itself. This seems to be what happened with the latest Astra Zeneca, and Oxford University trial – where the best results were reportedly due to a mistake.

The link between locust plagues and extreme weather was demonstrated once again when cyclone Gati hit Somalia – dumping 2 years worth of rain in just a few days. This creates a perfect environment for locusts to breed to plague proportions. And this will be the third time in as many years that cyclones will trigger such an effect says Keith Cressman from the UNFAO. However thanks to the previous recent locust plagues in East Africa the countries most in line for this returning locust storm are better prepared this time.

A study of tree rings from Greater Mongolia suggests the region is now drying out rapidly, the past 20 years have been drier than the past thousand says climate scientist Hans Liderholm. This points to potential desertification in coming years.

And the death of a scientific icon. The Arecibo observatory, featured in the films ‘Goldeneye’ and ‘Contact’, and responsible for the Nobel Prize winning detection of gravitational waves is facing demolition. Sitting in a crater in the jungles of Puerto Rico this 57 year old radio telescope dish has suffered severe storm damage and is in danger of collapse. Astronomer Anne Virkki, who works at the telescope and science writer Shannon Stirone explain its significance.

This year, dramatic wildfires wreaked havoc across the globe from Australia to Siberia. CrowdScience listener Melissa wants to know the extent to which climate change is a factor in blazes that appear to be increasing in both frequency and intensity.

Presenter Anand Jagatia hears how scientists use alternative worlds in computer models, to understand the role that global warming plays. After Siberia’s hottest ever year on record, he discovers the impact of increasing temperatures on boreal forests – and how they could help release huge stocks of carbon that has been stored in the soil. But is there anything we can do to prevent this happening? He visits the UK’s Peak District region, where conservationists are re-wilding a massive area with a special species of moss, which may offer a solution to an increase in infernos.


(Image: Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwdjy9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjk90z9cf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h2x6p)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwdnpf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct1csb)
100 Women: Women in power

As women such as Angela Merkel, Jacinda Ardern and Kamala Harris hold power and campaign to win it, writer and broadcaster Mary Ann Sieghart asks what it takes to be a powerful woman and what holds so many back.

Sexism, appearance and encouraging fathers are all up for discussion as Mary Ann talks to former Prime Ministers Jadranka Kosor and Julia Gillard, former Chair of the US Federal Reserve Janet Yellen, architect Yasmeen Lari, author Bernardine Evaristo and many others.

Tracing paths to power, Mary Ann uncovers the childhoods, families and educational influences that help women succeed. She digs into the latest research on the obstacles women still face and hears first-hand accounts of how powerful women navigate the hostility they often encounter. And finally, Mary Ann pulls together the hard-won advice of today’s female leaders for the next generation who want to make it to the top.


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwdsfk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qh)
Leaving Nagorno Karabakh

A Russian-backed ceasefire plan promises to protect the homes and sacred sites of Armenians who are now leaving territory taken by Azerbaijan in this year's conflict. But Peter Oborne found grief, loss and concern the dominant emotions as he followed the families who are leaving the area for the Armenian capital, Yerevan.

Pascale Harter introduces this account and more insight, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents and writers around the world.

High-level politics in Peru is often dramatic and conspiratorial, with legal intrigues, internal investigations and party purges playing out time after time. Meanwhile the public heartily distrusts most of its lawmakers. Dan Collyns uncovers the layers of outrage which fuelled an unprecedented wave of protest earlier this month, when the country had three appointed Presidents in a single week.

Khadim Rizvi, who died recently, was a wildly popular Sufi cleric from Pakistan, followed by tens of thousands of people and admired by many more. He also regularly called for the execution of alleged blasphemers, accused of insulting Islam and the Prophet Muhammad. Secunder Kermani ponders the contradictions and the appeal of Rizvi's fiery rhetoric - and how far his legacy may affect Pakistan's future.

And along the ancient shepherds' trails of the Greek island of Crete, Heidi Fuller Love learns of an ovine crime wave - as livestock rustling has gone industrial in scale and tactics. Sheep theft has a long and storied history here, going back at least as far as the Minoan civilisation, but with modern weapons and vehicles it's now a more serious business than ever.

(Image: A man prays in Dadivank Monastery, Nagorno-Karabakh. Credit: Hayk Baghdasaryan/Photolure via Reuters)


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h34py)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj7)
Do cities need rules?

Have you ever thought that your city is too regulated? Or that the city you live in doesn’t do enough to police people who break the rules? In this episode, David Edmonds has been speaking to Michele Gelfand, a psychologist whose research on rule makers and rule breakers could change the way we think about our cities. We’ll find out why you might be able to tell the time better in a city that's like Switzerland; why Japanese police officers reportedly egged people on to commit more crimes; and why living in a city like San Francisco could make you more creative.

Presented by David Edmonds.
Produced by Robbie Wojciechowski for the BBC World Service.

Image: A 'Don't Walk' sign (Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwdx5p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjk90znlt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h38g2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Trending (w3cszvsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwf0xt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d5fr7cd6j)
Ethiopia troops take control of Makelle

The Ethiopian government says that, after three weeks of fighting, its troops have driven the TPLF from the capital of the Tigray region. There's been no independent confirmation. And a Tigrayan leader has indicated that the fight will continue. We hear more about what happens to the Tigrayans next.

Also on the programme, we meet one resident of the Syrian capital, Damascus, who has made it her mission to help those who are most in need; And reaction from the streets of the Iranian capital Tehran, to the assassination of its lead nuclear scientist.

(Photo: Ethiopian PM meets AU negotiators; Credit: TWITTER/@PMETHIOPIA via REUTERS)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwf4ny)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d5fr7chyn)
Ethiopia : Army in control of Tigray

The Ethiopian government says its troops are in control of the capital of the Tigray region after a three- week campaign against the local leadership. We'll have the latest from the Ethiopian capital, Addis Adaba.

Also on the programme, will Iran retaliate following the assassination of its top nuclear scientist; And how commuters on the London Underground have been getting uplifting messages from two creative members of staff.

To discuss these stories and more we are joined on the programme by Alev Scott, a Turkish-British writer and journalist now based in Amsterdam; and Nick Kochan, a British financial and political journalist based in London.

(Photo : Tigrayan woman and child flee conflict; Credit: REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwf8f2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d5fr7cmps)
Twenty-three Afghan security personnel killed

At least twenty- three members of the Afghan security forces have been killed in a car bomb targeting an army base in the province of Ghazni. Officials believe more than a dozen others were injured in what appears to be one of the deadliest attacks on Afghan forces in months. We get the latest from our reporter on the ground.

Also on the programme, the Ethiopian government says its forces are beginning the search for the leaders of the Tigray region after asserting that federal troops had taken control of the main city, Mekelle; And a tribute to the man who played the villain Darth Vader in the Hollywood franchise of Star Wars.

To discuss these stories and more we are joined on the programme by Alev Scott, a Turkish-British writer and journalist now based in Amsterdam; and Nick Kochan, a British financial and political journalist based in London.

(Photo: Afghan Security forces on patrol; Credit: EPA/JALIL REZAYEE)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h3mpg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6p)
Can we prevent wildfires?

This year, dramatic wildfires wreaked havoc across the globe from Australia to Siberia. CrowdScience listener Melissa wants to know the extent to which climate change is a factor in blazes that appear to be increasing in both frequency and intensity.

Presenter Anand Jagatia hears how scientists use alternative worlds in computer models, to understand the role that global warming plays. After Siberia’s hottest ever year on record, he discovers the impact of increasing temperatures on boreal forests – and how they could help release huge stocks of carbon that has been stored in the soil. But is there anything we can do to prevent this happening? He visits the UK’s Peak District region, where conservationists are re-wilding a massive area with a special species of moss, which may offer a solution to an increase in infernos.

Presented by Anand Jagatia and Produced by Melanie Brown for the BBC World Service.

[Image: Forest Fire. Credit: Getty Images]


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwfd56)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h3rfl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3cszf0s)
The photo that exposed apartheid

It’s South Africa’s most iconic photograph – a dying 12-year-old school boy, Hector Pieterson, being carried away after he was shot by police during the 1976 Soweto Uprisings. The picture - taken by journalist Sam Nzima - exposed the horrors of apartheid to the world, and it also had a lasting impact on the lives of all those it captured. Reporter Gavin Fischer follows the incredible stories of the people affected by the photo – both in front of and behind the camera. This episode was first broadcast on 22 September, 2018.

Producer: Maryam Maruf

Image: Hector Pieterson Memorial in Soweto
Credit: Alamy


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwfhxb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c16)
India's vaccination drive against Covid-19

With more than 55 million cases and a million deaths worldwide, many hopes are pinned on a vaccine to end the coronavirus pandemic. There is now optimism that more than one vaccine will be available soon.

Not surprisingly, India is gearing up to roll out a massive vaccination drive to protect its billion plus people. It’s already an immunization powerhouse, making 60% of the world’s vaccines and is home to half a dozen manufacturers. The country plans to receive and utilize some 500 million doses of vaccines against the virus by July next year. But how daunting a challenge is it to vaccinate more than a billion people?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss India’s vaccination drive against Covid-19.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Dr Krishna Ella, chairman and MD, Bharat Biotech; Dr Lipika Nanda, vice president, multi-sectoral planning in public health, Public Health Foundation of India; Thomas Abraham, professor, public health communication expert


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h3w5q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1ck2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwfmng)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjk910d2l)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h3zxv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct1cgp)
Can Germany Save the World?

Can Germany Save the World?: Stepping up on the world stage

Because of its war history, Germany remains frightened of being assertive on its own. Yet it holds the key to enabling Europe to become the third global pole to China and America. This programme looks at Germany’s current place in the world: the facts, the psychology and the consequences. John Kampfner visits Duisburg in the gritty Ruhr area with its ambition to become “China City”. He goes to the former East, where businesses are desperate for closer ties with their former ally, Russia. He discusses the dilemmas Germany faces in its dealings with Russia: tensions over the poisoning of the opposition leader Alexei Navalny, and questions over the completion of the Nordstream 2 gas pipeline from Russia to Germany. He looks at the pressure Germany is under to increase defence spending, and asks whether the country is ready to be more assertive and to take its place on the world stage.

And then there is the question of what Germany represents. Today, one quarter of those living there have a non-German ethnic background. It used to be the crossroads between East and West. Now it’s a magnet for the global south. Germany looks and feels different. This final programme assesses whether, through its foreign policy and increasingly diverse population, Germany could become the standard bearer for liberal democracy in a more uncertain and often authoritarian world. How confident is the country as it looks ahead to a time without Angela Merkel at the helm?

Produced by Caroline Bayley


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwfrdl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 The Evidence (w3ct0xk4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwfw4q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z20xd41s9)
Ethiopia police hunt for Tigray leaders

The leader of the rebellion in Tigray region against Ethiopia's central government, Debretsion Gebremichael, has said his Tigray People's Liberation Front forces will fight on despite reports that federal troops have taken control of the Tigrayan capital.

Also in the programme: At least thirty members of the Afghan security forces have been killed in a car bomb attack on a military base in Ghazni, in the east of the country; and we remember Dave Prowse, the man behind the mask of Star Wars villain Darth Vader.

(Photo: Ethiopian refugees fleeing the fighting in Tigray region. Credit: Reuters/ Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwfzwv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct1csb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwg3mz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjwd)
Unlocking the mysteries of cuneiform tablets

Cuneiform is an ancient writing system distinguished by wedge-shaped marks made into clay. It developed over 5,000 years ago in Ancient Mesopotamia. At its height it was used to write languages across the ancient Middle East, from Iran to Syria to Anatolia in Turkey. But cuneiform writing fell out of use about 2,000 years ago in favour of alphabetic scripts. When scholars in the 19th century finally managed to redecipher it, they discovered fascinating insights into the culture and rituals of people living in the ancient Middle East, unlocking texts that have changed our understanding of history, including The Epic of Gilgamesh, the Code of Hammurabi and The Amarna Letters of Ancient Egypt. And cuneiform has even seen something of a revival in modern-day Iraqi visual culture.

Joining Rajan Datar to discuss cuneiform script are Professor Eleanor Robson of University College London, Dr Mark Weeden of SOAS, University of London and Ahmed Naji, author of 'Under The Palm Trees: Modern Iraqi Art with Mohamed Makiya and Jewad Selim'.

Image: Cuneiform writing of the ancient Sumerian or Assyrian civilisation in Iraq
Image credit: Getty Images


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwg7d3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3ljd1z4s1f)
Live Sporting Action

Sportsworld brings you full live commentary from the English Premier League as Chelsea take on Tottenham at Stamford Bridge (1500 kick off GMT). We'll also have reaction from the day's earlier game between Southampton and Manchester United.

We also look at the rest of the day's live sport including Formula One's Bahrain grand prix and Autumn Nations Cup rugby between Ireland and Georgia,

There's also One Day International cricket as England continue their tour of South Africa and Australia host India.

In boxing, we look back at the legends fight between Mike Tyson and Roy Jones Jr.

Image: Tottenham manager Jose Mourinho and Chelsea manager Frank Lampard 2019. (Getty Images).


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwglmh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjk911c1m)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h4yww)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4w)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwgqcm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6tv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwgv3r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z20xd50rb)
Ethiopia's Tigray crisis: Mekelle hospital struggling after attack

The International Red Cross says hospitals in the Tigray state capital in northern Ethiopia are running dangerously low on medical supplies to care for the wounded, following three weeks of fighting.

Also, the United Nations has condemned an attack by suspected Islamists in northeast Nigeria, in which a hundred and ten people may have been killed.

And we'll speak to one young woman who recently lost her father to coronavirus -- and her message to all those who don't take the disease seriously.


(Photo: Tens of thousands have fled from Tigray into Sudan because of the fighting, but there are concerns about the treatment of Tigrayans elsewhere in Ethiopia. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwgyvw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79q3kfcdvq)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172x3flqpc1ptk)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h5b48)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3cszf0s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p5kcwh2m0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q003h5fwd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]



MONDAY 30 NOVEMBER 2020

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5m1m9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19yx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccs9dwp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Discovery (w3ct1cx5)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The end of everything

Everyone knows about the Big Bang being the beginning of the universe and time - but when and how is it going to end? ask brothers Raffie and Xe from Rome. For this series, with lockdown learning in mind, Drs Rutherford and Fry are investigating scientific mysteries for students of all ages. The doctors sift science from philosophy to find out.

Cosmologist Jo Dunkley studies the origins and evolution of the universe. She explains how astrophysical ideas and techniques have evolved to tell us what we now know about our galaxy and far beyond, from the elegant parallax technique to standard candles. This particular distance measure, which uses stars of a known brightness to work out how far away other objects in the universe are, was discovered by American astronomer Henrietta Swan Leavitt in 1912, who worked at the Harvard University as one of several “computers” – women who processed and calculated data and made significant contributions to astronomy.

Curious Cases’ universal guru Andrew Pontzen puts this into context. Because the universe is so enormous, it turns out that these measurements are just the first steps on the cosmic distance ladder – a suite of tools that astrophysicists use to determine distances to celestial objects. Scientists know that objects are moving away from us because the wavelengths of light from them get stretched and appear redder in our telescopes – the so-called red shift effect. But having a handle on the distances to and between those objects allows cosmologists to monitor what’s happening to them over time. And it turns out that not only are they getting further apart, indicating that the universe is expanding, but that this process is accelerating.

So what might happen in the end? Expansion and then collapse – a big crunch? Expansion into the void – a big freeze, or a big rip? Or what if there is more than one universe – might a new one bubble up with totally different laws of physics that would cause our own to cease existing? It turns out that when dealing with predictions for something involving infinite space and time, the possibilities are largely limited by human imagination alone. Ideas are where science starts, but experiments are required to build evidence confirming or rejecting them as fact. The doctors discuss how gravitational wave detectors and quantum computers might one day provide this.

Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford
Producer: Jen Whyntie


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5m5cf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57yxv5mjq5)
Oil outlook brighter ahead of Opec meeting this week

Leaders of Opec will meet this week to extend existing production limits into early 2021. Dr Ellen Wald, consultant and senior fellow at the Atlantic Council in Jacksonville in Florida, tells us what we can expect from the meeting.
The Lebanese capital Beirut has long been established as a leading centre of medical tourism, attracting the best doctors to work there. But now medical professionals are beginning to leave. Dr Ghazi Zaatari, interim dean of medicine at the American University of Beirut, explains why.
And this Thursday, thousands of South Korean teenagers will sit the biggest exam of their lives - a ten hour test which will determine which university they will go to, and ultimately their career prospects. We speak to Nemo Kim, a journalist based in the capital, Seoul.

(Picture: An oil refinery. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccs9jmt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1ck2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5m93k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkb61jp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccs9ncy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct0xb1)
A degree away from carnage

Climate scientists have shifted the definition of what they believe is the "safe" limit of climate change. Researchers argued the global temperature rise must be kept below two degrees Celsius by the end of this century to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. But what are those worst impacts in reality? What does it mean to people, communities and the world we live in? In this episode, we go to the people who see the effect of the rising temperature in their daily life.

Produced by Eleanor Biggs & Jordan Dunbar
Edited by Ravin Sampat


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5mdvp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjwd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5w)
Maradona and the "Hand of God" goal

To mark the death of legendary Argentine striker, Diego Maradona, we revisit the 1986 World Cup and two goals which he famously scored against England in the quarter-final. The first is now known as the “Hand of God” and the second as the “Goal of the Century”. England forward Gary Lineker watched both goals go in and in 2012 he shared his memories with Fred Dove. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

PHOTO: The "Hand of God" goal (Allsport/Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5mjlt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkb690y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccs9ww6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5mnby)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zw7xpn)
China-Australia diplomatic spat intensifies

Australia demands an apology from China after Beijing tweets a photoshopped image depicting an Australian soldier holding a knife to the neck of an Afghan child.

Anywhere between 40 and 110 people are now believed to have been killed or kidnapped in Nigeria by militants.

Kavan - possibly the loneliest elephant in the world - finds a new home as a flight carries him from a zoo in Islamabad to his new home in Cambodia.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5ms32)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zw81fs)
Australia demands apology from China

Australia demands an apology after a Chinese official tweets a digitally-altered image depicting an Australian soldier murdering an Afghan child.

Iran accuses Israel of the assassination of its top nuclear scientist.

An electric ambulance that can take off like a helicopter and fly like a plane.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5mwv6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zw855x)
Fake picture: Australia-China relations continue to deteriorate

A rift between Australia and China has deepened after Beijing tweeted a faked image of an Australian soldier holding a knife to the neck of an Afghan child.

A state funeral is being held in Iran for the country's top nuclear scientist who was assassinated last week.

Officials in New Zealand have filed criminal charges linked to the deaths of 22 people, mainly tourists, in a volcanic eruption last year.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5n0lb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2v)
Anthony Gardner: How will Joe Biden handle foreign policy?

With Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the presidential election running out of road, attention is increasingly focused on President Elect Biden’s vision of America’s role in the world. Will he revert back to the policies and assumptions that defined the Obama years? Are there lessons to be learnt from Trump's disruption of foreign policy norms? HARDtalk’s Stephen Sackur speaks to Anthony Gardner, US ambassador to the EU under Barack Obama. What should the world expect from President Biden?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsbcvq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7kb)
Saving the Amazon rainforest with economics

Economics has a solution to halt rapid deforestation but can it be implemented? This year has seen some of the worst-ever fires destroy vast tracts of the Amazon rainforest as land there is cleared for farming. We hear how the field of economics may have come up with a solution to halt the Amazon’s rate of deforestation - and what’s needed to set that in motion. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Michael Greenstone, Professor of economics at the University of Chicago and to Professor Luciana Gatti, a researcher at Brazil's National Institute for Space Research which monitors greenhouse gas emissions in Amazon.


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmkx)
How Ethiopian rebels took power in 1991

In May 1991, the brutal Ethiopian dictator, Colonel Mengistu and his miltary regime were on the verge of collapse after years of civil war. The end came when a Tigrayan-led rebel movement advanced on the capital Addis Ababa and took power. They would rule for Ethiopia for decades. In 2014, we spoke to an American diplomat who witnessed the end of Ethiopia's civil war. Photo: EPRDF rebels in Addis Ababa, 28 May, 1991.

Photo: Rebels in Addis Ababa (BBC)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5n4bg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xb1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsbhlv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 The Conversation (w3ct1cw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5n82l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj98)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsbmbz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3cszvsr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0pyb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5nctq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkb747v)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsbr33)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6p)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5nhkv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd42)
Fighting plastic pollution in paradise

When Kristal Ambrose, who's from the Bahamas, had to hold down a sea turtle's flippers so that plastic could be removed from its intestines, she vowed never to drop plastic again. And her mission quickly grew. She started the Bahamas Plastic Movement to educate young people to try and tackle the problem. They took their fight to the government and managed to persuade them to bring in a ban on single-use plastics. Kristal has been awarded a Goldman Environmental Prize for her work.

Pioneering South African doctor Mashudu Tshifularo was once told by a teacher that he was "too stupid" to be a doctor, but he proved her wrong. Last year he performed the first ever middle ear transplant using bones created by a 3D printer to restore a patient's hearing. Outlook's Elna Schütz finds out about his remarkable life.

Picture: Kristal Ambrose at beach clean-up
Credit: Dorlan Curtis


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5nm9z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkb7cr3)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsbzlc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 The Conversation (w3ct1cw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5nr23)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5pbxpp)
Ethiopia: TPLF says it’s still fighting government troops

The leader of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front says his troops are still fighting against the military near the city of Mekelle. It has not been possible to independently verify either side’s statements. Also: four French police officers have been charged for beating a black man in Paris, and there’s been a war of words between China and South Korea over the production of Kimchi.

(Photo: Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed speaks during a question and answer session in parliament 30th November 2020 Credit: EPA/STR)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5nvt7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsc72m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlv69ffbq6y)
US pandemic financial assistance set to expire

Hardship may await millions of Americans if pandemic financial assistance is not replaced. Stephanie Freed is a freelance lighting designer who is out of work and whose additional government funds are scheduled to end in December, and discusses how she has had to rely on savings to make ends meet. Andrew Stettner is a senior fellow at policy organisation The Century Foundation in Washington DC, and explains that if nothing is done now, it could take a month after January's presidential inauguration to get new assistance in place under a Biden administration. And Maya McGuineas of the non-partisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget makes the case for a measure of compromise between Democrats and Republicans. Also in the programme, with fashion retail empire Arcadia potentially on the brink of collapse, we examine the implications for the 13,000 workers employed in its stores. Plus, as leading diamond producer De Beers outlines new social and environmental goals, including achieving gender parity by 2030, we find out more from company executive Mpumi Zikalala.

(Picture: A food bank in New York City. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5nzkc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t4qt27bm6)
Conflicting accounts of the fighting in Ethiopia

The government and rebel regional authority in Ethiopia's Tigray province are issuing conflicting accounts of the fighting there. We ask our correspondents what information they have been able to verify.

We also speak to our expert of the day on the coronavirus pandemic, Dr Eleanor Murray from Boston University. We discuss the news that the pharmaceutical company Moderna is filing for US and European emergency regulatory approval for its coronavirus vaccine, so it can be recommended for widespread use.

In France, four police officers have been charged with using unlawful force following the beating of a black music producer in Paris that was caught on CCTV. We hear from people of colour about their experiences with the police in the country.

(Photo: Ethiopian women who fled the ongoing fighting in Tigray region, gather in Hamdayet village near the Setit river on the Sudan-Ethiopia border in eastern Kassala state . Credit: Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah/File Photo/Reuters)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5p39h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t4qt27gcb)
Michel Zecler beating: Four French policemen charged

Four French police officers are under criminal investigation over the beating of a black music producer at his studio in Paris earlier this month. The video of the incident has caused widespread outrage. We hear from people of colour in France about their experiences with the police.

And we continue to catch up with health workers treating Covid-19 patients around the world. We speak to a medical student in Australia. She lives near the border between New South Wales and Victoria, a border which was reopened recently.

And in Iraq, children have started returning to school for the first time since late February, with social distancing measures in place and schools operating six days a week. We hear from one family about how they’ve been coping with the restrictions.

(Photo: Paris Public Prosecutor, French magistrate Remy Heitz holds a press conference concerning the four police officers who were detained, in Paris, France, 29 November 2020. Credit: CHRISTOPHE PETIT TESSON/EPA)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5p71m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5pbsr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkb836w)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccscq24)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jwvw20b7s)
2020/11/30 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5pgjw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0xb1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsctt8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3ct1cx6)
The Curious Cases of Rutherford and Fry

The Zedonk Problem

Today I learnt that tigons and ligers are what you get when lions and tigers interbreed?!’ surprised listener Jamz G tells the doctors. ‘What determines whether species can interbreed?’

Geneticist Aoife McLysaght studies molecular evolution. She explains the modern definition of a species, built on ideas from Aristotle, Linnaeus and Darwin: a species is a group of organisms capable of interbreeding to produce fertile offspring. Hybrids – such as ligons and tigers – are usually infertile, because their common ancestors long ago diverged into the lions and tigers we know today. However, this definition isn’t absolute, and there are many ways a new species can be formed.

Hybrids also offer rich study subjects for scientists. Mathematical biologist Kit Yates discusses why he’s been reading research papers about hebras and zorses (horse x zebra) as their patterns offer insights into how cells spread and develop into organisms, building on a prediction made by codebreaking mathematician Alan Turing.

And it turns out that these hybrids are even more intriguing. As speciation and evolution expert Joana Meier explains, hybrids are not always infertile. Hybridisation can lead to successful new species arising, such as in Lake Victoria’s cichlid fish, who it seems have been having a wild evolutionary party for the last 15,000 years. And the picture gets even murkier when we discover that modern genetics reveals our human ancestors successfully mated with Neanderthals.

Presenters: Hannah Fry & Adam Rutherford
Producer: Jen Whyntie


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5pl90)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5pcrxl)
Iran buries assassinated nuclear scientist

Iran's defence chief has said that the killing of the country's top nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh 'won't go unanswered'. Iran blames the attack on Israel, and there is evidence a driverless vehicle may have been involved. But will this latest assassination change how Iran relates to the world?

Also in the programme: we hear from Calabria in southern Italy, where the country's poorest region is suffering a second wave of COVID-19, exacerbated by the Mafia; and we bring together the second person ever to be cleared of HIV with the doctor who cured him.

(Picture: Members of Iranian forces carry the coffin of Iranian nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh during a funeral ceremony in Tehran, Iran; Credit: Reuters Wires)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5pq14)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qgtql50z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fm2yn8fzt)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsd29j)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58scksdfgg)
Topshop owner Arcadia goes into administration

Fashion retail empire Arcadia, which also owns Dorothy Perkins and Burton, has gone into administration, accountancy firm Deloitte has confirmed. We talk to Jonathan Eley, retail correspondent at the Financial Times, about what this means for the British High Street and about how its shops and employees will be affected.
Also in the programme, hardship may hit millions of Americans if pandemic financial assistance is not replaced. Stephanie Freed is a freelance lighting designer who is out of work and whose additional government funds are due to end in December, and discusses how she has had to rely on savings to make ends meet. Andrew Stettner is a senior fellow at policy organisation The Century Foundation in Washington DC, and explains that if nothing is done now, it could take a month after January's presidential inauguration to get new assistance in place under a Biden administration. And Maya McGuineas of the non-partisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget makes the case for a measure of compromise between Democrats and Republicans.
Plus, our regular workplace commentator Pilita Clark considers how email etiquette has become more significant during the coronavirus pandemic.

(Picture: A Topshop store. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5pts8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsd61n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3ct1cw4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]



TUESDAY 01 DECEMBER 2020

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5pyjd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkpw)
Disability History special

We look back at the fight for disability rights in the UK and India in the 1990s, plus the remarkable life of Helen Keller as told by her great niece, how a Rwandan Paralympic volleyball team made history, and the invention of the iconic disability vehicle, the Invacar. And we speak to Colin Barnes, Emeritus Professor of Disability Studies at Leeds University, about the historic struggle for disabled rights and recognition.

Photo: A disabled woman on her mobility scooter is carried away by four policemen after obstructing the traffic outside the Houses of Parliament. Credit: PA Archive/PA Images


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5q28j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x193vmjh9cf)
Dow Jones has best month since 1987

The Dow Jones ended November up 11.8%, its best monthly performance since January 1987. We talk to independent investment analyst Peter Jankovskis to hear what was behind the gain.

China is planning to raise the retirement age for its citizens after forty years of no change. It's a dilemma faced by many nations where populations are ageing and birth rates are falling, as we hear from Richard Jackson, president of the Global Ageing Institute in Virginia.

And we go to the US, where, in less than a month's time, around 10 million people will see their incomes cut as government financial aid - introduced to cope with the coronavirus pandemic - comes to an end. Concern is growing that millions will hit hard times unless politicians can agree to extend the scheme.

Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by political reporter Erin Delmore in New York and Yoko Ishikura, professor Emeritus at Hitotsubashi University in Tokyo, Japan.

(Picture: The New York Stock Exchange. Picture: Getty Images)


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5q60n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkb8yfs)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsdk91)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cx3)
Belarus across the barricades - part one

Lucy Ash explores the world of the security forces that keep Lukashenko in power, peeling back the ubiquitous balaclavas to find the men and women beneath.

Minsk, early December. A wall of masked men in black body armour, beating their truncheons on steel shields. In front of them stand women bundled in winter coats and teenagers wrapped in red and white flags. They are singing a protest song once heard in the revolutionary shipyards of Gdansk a generation before - an anthem for democracy and change. For more than one hundred days these versions of Belarus have advanced and retreated - and now they seem locked in impasse.

Despite sanctions, despite disapproval so loud that even foreign diplomats are demonstrating - the government of Alexander Lukashenko stands firm. Despite violence and intimidation, arrest and the prohibition on all independent reporting, the demonstrators keep coming, day after day, night after night.

Producer: Monica Whitlock

(Photo: Belarusian law enforcement officers block opposition supporters during their rally to reject the presidential election results in Minsk, Belarus. Credit: Reuters)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5q9rs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd42)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmkx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5qfhx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkb95y1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsdss9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3ct1cx6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5qk81)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zwbtlr)
Paris climate targets are reachable, say scientists

Scientists have expressed optimism that the targets of the Paris climate agreement are coming within reach.

As Covid-19 continues to surge in the US, Doctor Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and a member of the current administration’s pandemic task force talks to us about vaccination and the cultural challenges of selling science.

And what's going to happen to all that discarded PPE… we speak to an Indian inventor who's making bricks out of it, to build.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5qp05)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zwbybw)
Dr Fauci talks to us about Covid-19 in the US

Anthony Fauci - the man leading the fight against Covid-19 in America - talks to BBC Newsday about some of the political and cultural pressures driving the pandemic in the US.

Scientists say the targets set out in the Paris climate agreement are coming within reach though the challenges are still huge.

In southern Denmark a major tunnel is being built to improve links between Scandinavia and mainland Europe but not everyone thinks it's a good idea.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5qsr9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zwc230)
Dr Fauci outlines the "steep slope" of the US covid outbreak

Anthony Fauci - the man leading the fight against Covid 19 in America - says the "uninhibited infection" was impacted by cultural and political drivers in the US.

New scientific analysis, seen by the BBC, suggests the goals of the Paris climate agreement are coming "within reach".

And a drama from an unusual source - the Islamist group ISIS produces what it calls a film about its attack on Mosul.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5qxhf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv24)
Perovskites: The future of solar?

A new kind of solar cell - made by drying a special liquid on a surface - is being heralded as a revolution in solar power.

The minerals known as perovskites were discovered more than 150 years ago. More recently, their crystal structure has been copied using other materials and used to produce energy.

If it can be made to work, these crystals could be used to literally print out solar cells to put on skyscraper walls, furniture and electrical gadgets.

Produced and presented by Tom Colls

Image: Olga from Saule Technology


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsf8rt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8bc)
The EU's latest row

A showdown looms between Hungary and Poland and the rest of the EU over the bloc's latest budget, which includes a Covid economic recovery fund worth nearly $900bn. Hungary and Poland blocked approval of the budget earlier in the month over a clause that ties funding with adherence to the rule of law in the bloc, something both countries have been accused of undermining. With the fate of businesses and livelihoods hanging in the balance, the two sides will meet in mid-December at a summit to discuss how they can break the impasse. We hear from Brussels-based reporter Beatriz Ríos, Zoltán Kovács, a spokesman for Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban and German MEP Dennis Radtke.

(Picture credit: Getty Images)
.


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmqf)
Iraq's pioneering feminist

Dr Naziha Al-Dulaimi became the first woman to hold a ministerial office in the Arab world when she was appointed to head Iraq's Municipalities Ministry in 1959. As a minister, Dr Al-Dulaimi set about clearing some of Baghdad's slum areas, creating the first public housing projects. A leading feminist, she was also the driving force behind a secular Civil Affairs Law, that liberalised marriage and inheritance laws for Iraqi women. Mike Lanchin has been hearing about her from Mubejel Baban, a friend and former colleague of Dr Al-Dulaimi - and from her nephew, Dr Layth Al-Delaimy.

Photo:Dr Naziha Al-Dulaimi, 1950s (courtesy of the Al-Dulaimi family)


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5r17k)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct1cx3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsfdhy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc7)
Jordi Savall

Catalan conductor and violist Jordi Savall is the ringmaster of a unique, uproarious musical circus: a time-traveller who bridges centuries and cultures to make six hundred year-old music sound like it was composed yesterday.

He reveals to journalist Lluis Amiguet how he makes the music of the past sound utterly compelling – and relevant – to 21st century ears, as we move back and forth between his home studio in Barcelona and rehearsals for a musical celebration of the life of the 16th century French heroine Joan of Arc in Troyes, France.

What drives Jordi Savall to revive, remix and rejuvenate music from a long distant past? And what makes him seek out musical cultures across the globe – West Africa, South America, Asia and Ireland – and bring them together to help us understand the world in a new way?

Producer: Steven Rajam
An Overcoat Media production

Image: Jordi Savall (Credit: David Ignaszewski)


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5r4zp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3t)
Actor Gillian Anderson

Gillian Anderson explains how she got her teeth into the role of Margaret Thatcher in the latest season of The Crown.

British star Jason Isaacs talks about coping with the language barrier on the set of his latest film, the Chinese blockbuster Skyfire.

Star Wars actor John Boyega tells us about his growing activism and the changes he’d like to see in the movie industry.

Award-winning novelist Kamila Shamsie on the power of fairy tales and how she’s reimagined the story of The Ugly Duckling.

David Arquette reveals why he returned to wrestling after it killed off his Hollywood acting career.

And we have music from Armenian jazz pianist and composer Tigran Hamasyan.

Joining Nikki Bedi in the studio is film director, producer and writer Joseph A. Adesunloye. On the line from an island off the coast of Kenya is Maia Lekow, frontwoman of the Kenyan band Maia and the Big Sky, to discuss her directorial debut The Letter, which has just been selected as the Kenya's official selection for the 2021 Oscars.



(Image: Gillian Anderson. Credit: TOLGA AKMEN/AFP via Getty Images)


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5r8qt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbb14y)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsfn06)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 Discovery (w3ct1cx6)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5rdgy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdkm)
Speaking through music: Me and my non-verbal sister

Jane is Ian Brennan’s older sister. She has Down’s syndrome and is largely non-verbal but the two of them have communicated through music their whole lives. Ian has shared that knowledge with communities around the world, travelling the globe looking for music in unexpected places. He’s worked with Tuareg musicians in the Sahara desert, people who are homeless in California and prisoners in Malawi – often making records with people who have never even touched an instrument before. But he came home to the US earlier this year to make his most personal album yet – with his sister and her community. Their album is titled 'Who You Calling Slow?' by The Sheltered Workshop Singers.

Nims Purja was a member of the Gurkhas, the elite force of Nepalese soliders in the British Army. Their motto is 'better to die than be a coward' and in 2019 Nims set himself a fearless task - climbing all 14 of the world's 'death zone' mountains in record time. Part of his motivation was his mother, who was seriously ill.

Picture: Ian and Jane Brennan as children
Credit: Courtesy of Ian Brennan


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmqf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5rj72)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbb8n6)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsfwhg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5rmz6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5pftls)
United States faces grim stage of coronavirus pandemic

As cases of the virus break new records, President Trump's controversial pandemic advisor Scott Atlas resigns. We hear from the top US infectious diseases expert, Dr Anthony Fauci, who gives a sober assessment of the situation.

Also in the programme: the United Nations launches an appeal for an unprecedented amount of funding for humanitarian aid. The UN Emergency Relief Coordinator Mark Lowcock calls it the bleakest and darkest assessment of humanitarian needs ever presented. And a glimmer of hope in the battle against climate change, as a new study suggests global temperature rises can be held at 2 degrees centigrade - if countries fulfil their existing promises.

(Picture: Dr Anthony Fauci participates in a briefing with members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force at the White House in Washington, DC, 19 November 2020. Credit: EPA/Chris Kleponis)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5rrqb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv24)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsg3zq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwv5wmt6zm)
Shell in court

The oil giant Shell faces a trial over whether it hampered the phase-out of fossil fuels. Sara Shaw from Friends of the Earth outlines the case against the firm, and we get the perspective of Harry Brekelmans, projects and technology director at Shell. Also in the programme, the World Bank says the Lebanese authorities’ lack of policy action has caused the country’s continuing economic woes. We hear the background from Sami Halabi of Lebanon-based policy research firm Triangle. The BBC's Emma Simpson reports on the plight of self-employed and freelance workers in the UK who are unable to work because of the pandemic, but who have slipped through the social safety net provided by the government. Plus, with many more emails being sent as a result of so many people working from home, our regular workplace commentator Pilita Clarke considers some of the things to consider, and avoid, when drafting them.

(Picture: A Shell sign. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5rwgg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t4qt2b7j9)
Brazil bank heist

Armed men violently stormed the southern Brazilian city of Criciúma, mounting an assault on a bank. We hear from our reporter and a resident in the town.

We go to India where thousands of farmers have been marching upon the capital Delhi in protest at agriculture laws. The farmers argue the reforms that seek to loosen rules around sale, pricing and storage of farm products will destroy their livelihoods. They are setting up camps along major roads and some are planning to protest for months.

It’s the time when ski resorts around Europe would normally be gearing up for the start of the season but there’s uncertainty over when the mountains might open for sport this winter. We bring together ski instructors from Switzerland and France who face an anxious wait to find out about coronavirus restrictions.
We also put more questions about the coronavirus pandemic to one of our regular coronavirus experts, Dr Isacc Bogoch.

(Photo: Heist at Banco do Brasil in Criciuma. Credit: REUTERS/Guilherme Ferreira)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5s06l)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t4qt2bc8f)
Coronavirus conversations: Ski resorts

It’s the time when ski resorts around Europe would normally be gearing up for the start of the season but there’s uncertainty over when the mountains might open for skiing this winter. We bring together ski instructors from Switzerland and France who face an anxious wait to find out about coronavirus restrictions.

We also hear from a Mexican nurse who is treating Covid-19 patients and herself contracted the disease in April. She talks about the emotional toll of the pandemic on her and her colleagues, and remembers the many friends she’s lost to Covid.

And we look at the continued violence in Afghanistan. We connect with a student who was in class at the time of the attack on Kabul University earlier this month.

(Photo: Alex Chapman Credit: Alex Chapman)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5s3yq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdkm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmqf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5s7pv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbc03z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsglz7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jwvw2374w)
2020/12/01 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5scfz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct1cx3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsgqqc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98z)
Almost two-thirds of the world’s population now online

The Digital Intelligence Index (DII) has calculated that almost two-thirds of the world’s population is now online. The newly published report analyses 12 years of data to map 90 economies and over 95% of the world’s population to report on countries’ progress advancing their digital economies. Bhaskar Chakravorti, the dean of global business at Fletcher, The Graduate School of Global Affairs at Tufts University, led the research and is on the show.

VR/AR personal data safety and identification
Do you like playing video games in VR or perhaps take part in AR arts shows? Well if you do you may want to ask what is happening with your personal data – not your name or your age but the way you move. Research from Stanford University shows that it’s possible to identify someone from the way they walk in VR in just minutes. Professor Jeremy Bailenson has also looked at identifying medical conditions from our behaviour in VR – is it now possible to be anonymous in these environments and also to keep our very personal data safe?

Keeping an eye on your waste
The way we sort our recycling could be about to change, and all thanks to a sensor that mimics the relationship between the human eye and brain. Engineers at UK start-up RecyclEye have combined low-cost camera technology with a machine learning system to give waste sorting an intelligence boost. Digital Planet reporter Jack Monaghan finds out how this new technology might make rubbish a thing of the past, with sound engineering by Robert Moutrey.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Ghislaine Boddington.



(Image: Getty Images)

Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5sh63)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5pgntp)
President Trump's controversial COVID adviser stands down

One of President Trump's key COVID-19 advisers, the Stanford radiologist Dr Scott Atlas, has resigned from the White House Coronavirus Task Force a few days before the end of his four month term.

He was heavily criticised by public health experts inside and outside the administration, especially for his enthusiasm for herd immunity, his objections to lockdowns and his messaging on facemasks. Dr Atlas speaks to Newshour.

Also in the programme: Tibor Nagy, Assistant Secretary for African Affairs in the US State Department on the crisis in Tigray; and how scientists have used AI to crack the puzzle of how proteins fold themselves.

(Picture: President Trump and Dr Scott Atlas at a White House Coronavirus briefing on August 12 2020; Credit: Reuters Wires)


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5sly7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qgtqp1y2)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fm2yncbwx)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsgz6m)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58sckshbck)
Could a $908 billion coronavirus relief bill break the deadlock in Congress?

The proposal comes from a bipartisan group of senators for Covid-19 financial relief who hope to break the deadlock and allow Congress to come to an agreement about financial relief measures for US citizens. But there is doubt as to whether it will work, as we hear from Al Weaver, reporter at The Hill newspaper in Washington DC.
The oil giant Shell faces a trial over whether it hampered the phase-out of fossil fuels. Sara Shaw from Friends of the Earth outlines the case against the firm, and we get the perspective of Harry Brekelmans, projects and technology director at Shell.
Also in the programme, the World Bank says the Lebanese authorities’ lack of policy action has exacerbated the country’s continuing economic woes. We hear the background from Sami Halabi of Lebanon-based policy research firm Triangle.
And the BBC's Emma Simpson reports on the plight of self-employed and freelance workers in the UK who are unable to work because of the pandemic, but who have slipped through the social safety net provided by the government.

(Picture: Senators in Congress, Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5sqpc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv24)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsh2yr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 02 DECEMBER 2020

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5svfh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Tuesday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5sz5m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x193vmjl68j)
Could a $908 billion coronavirus relief bill break deadlock in Congress?

The proposal for Covid-19 financial relief comes from a bipartisan group of senators, who hope their pitch can bring agreement in Congress over further aid packages. But there is doubt as to whether it will work, as we hear from Al Weaver, reporter at The Hill newspaper in Washington DC.
Many business owners and self-employed people in the UK are missing out on government financial support during the coronavirus pandemic, because they pay themselves with dividends - meaning they are exempt from any benefit payments. The BBC's Emma Simpson has a special report.
Under new rules, pubs and bars in the UK are allowed to reopen, but only if they serve so-called 'substantial meals' - and that's causing some confusion. We try to figure it out, with the help of some Scotch eggs.
Jamie Robertson is joined throughout the programme by journalist Mehmal Sarfraz in Lahore in Pakistan, and by Tony Nash, CEO and founder of Complete Intelligence, who's in Houston, Texas.

(Picture: Senators in Congress, Picture credit: Getty Images)


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5t2xr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbcvbw)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccshg64)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct1csg)
Finders Keepers

Finders Keepers: A photograph, a pipe and a skull

Actor and musician Kema Sikazwe is no historical expert. A young Zambian who now lives in northern England, he hasn’t even set foot inside a museum since he was ten years old. All that changes when Kema learns about the movement to return stolen objects back to where they came from. Should these priceless parts of history be returned? And if so, what’s at stake?

Kema measures the scale of the problem on a visit to Newcastle’s Great North Museum. Curator JC Niala shares her experience of seeing a photograph of her grandfather on display in a Kenyan exhibition, and Kema’s father tells him about an ongoing dispute between Britain and Zambia.

Theme music composed by Kema Sikazwe aka Kema Kay

Programme produced by Scattered Pictures


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5t6nw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdkm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmqf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5tbf0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbd2v4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccshppd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5tg54)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zwfqhv)
More top Republicans publicly oppose President Trump's allegations

Donald Trump's top legal appointee has turned against the President and said there is no evidence of widespread voter fraud.

Could three of Hong Kong's top pro-democracy campaigners be in prison by the end of the day - they're on trial for breaking the law.

And Singapore is about to become the world's first country to sell ‘cultured meat’ - meat which has been grown in a lab.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5tkx8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zwfv7z)
Hong Kong pro-democracy activists await sentences

The leading faces of Hong Kong's pro-democracy movement are about to find out how long they will spend in prison with sentencing due to get under way shortly.

A Chinese spacecraft is collecting samples of rock on the moon – as Beijing bids to move ahead in the space race.

And in France there's concern after Muslim leaders are asked to sign up to a declaration of Republican values following a string of attacks by Islamist militants.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5tpnd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zwfz03)
Hong Kong: top democracy activists sentenced

In Hong Kong sentences in jail of up to 13 and a half months have been handed down to democracy activists Joshua Wong, Agnes Chow and Ivan Lam.

"Our planet is broken" and "humanity is in a suicidal war with nature" - that's what the UN Secretary General will tell the BBC in a special broadcast later today.

And we hear from Nigeria - thought to be the heart of one of the most common forms of cybercrime - Business Email Compromise - which costs economies an estimated $7bn dollars a year.


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5ttdj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7c)
Ishaq Dar: Pakistan's power struggle

Imran Khan won power in Pakistan two years ago with a promise to root out corruption and take on the country’s vested interests. So how's it going? Rising food prices and the Covid pandemic have left many Pakistanis feeling worse off, while the anti-corruption drive has become a political battleground. Stephen Sackur speaks to Ishaq Dar, who was Pakistan's finance minister. The country's anti-corruption body, the National Accountability Bureau, alleges he owned assets beyond his means of income, which he denies. He and former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif are trying to rally opposition to Imran Khan, but how much credibility do they have?


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsj5nx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8nn)
Are we giving suits the boot?

Is the era of the suited office worker at an end? Is the era of the suited office worker at an end?With so many people working from home because of the pandemic, there is far less demand for formal work attire. This is impacting those that make it all over the world, as we learn from Richard Anderson, a tailor on Savile Row - the street in London synonymous with suits - and Raja Fashions in Hong Kong, whose tailors usually travel the globe fitting their clients. We hear that while some office workers can't wait to dress up after the pandemic, others have embraced and even expanded their pyjama collection. Plus, Heather MacGregor, Executive Dean of Heriott-Watt Business School, tells us how her work wear has been impacted by working from home.

(Picture: a tailor adjusts a customer's suit in the fitting room at Henry Poole's in Savile Row, London, 1938. Credit Getty Images.)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmsp)
France's Muslim headscarf ban

A controversial law banning Islamic headscarves and other religious symbols from French state schools came into effect in 2004. The ban was designed to maintain France's tradition of strictly separating state and religion. It resulted in many Muslim girls being excluded from the classroom. Farhana Haider has been speaking to Ndella Paye a Muslim mother and activist who campaigned against the law.

Photo: 2004 February Demonstration in Paris against the French law forbidding manifestation of religious symbols in schools and workplace. Credit Owen Franken/Corbis via Getty Images


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5ty4n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct1csg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsj9f1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cs7)
Don't Log Off: Searching for hope

Alan Dein searches for the stories that connect us in a changed world. Inspiring and moving stories of how the pandemic has changed people's lives on every continent.

Today, Liana in Armenia celebrates her 30th birthday as her country finds itself at war with Azerbaijan - as well as Covid-19.
We also catch up with 25-year-old entrepreneur Fahad in Bangladesh, who Alan first spoke to in March when it looked like he might lose his hard-earned fortune.

Plus, Ugandan midwife Marion faces the toughest year of her career and Fish in China describes how lockdown is affecting her fellow students’ mental health.

Producers: Sarah Shebbeare and Laurence Grissell


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5v1ws)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Reith Lectures (w3ct1cyl)
From moral to market sentiments

Dr Mark Carney, the former Governor of the Bank of Canada and the Bank of England, will chart how we have come to esteem financial value over human value and how we have gone from market economies to market societies. He argues that this has contributed to a trio of global crises: of credit, Covid and climate. And he outlines how we can turn this around.

In this first of four lectures, Mark Carney reflects that whenever he could step back from what felt like daily crisis management, the same deeper issues loomed. What is value? How does the way we assess value both shape our values and constrain our choices? How do the valuations of markets affect the values of our society? Carney argues that society has come to embody the Irish writer Oscar Wilde’s old aphorism: “Knowing the price of everything but the value of nothing.”

(Photo: Outgoing Bank of England governor Mark Carney makes a keynote address at the 2020 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26). Credit: Tolga Akmen/ Getty Images)


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5v5mx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbdy21)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsjjx9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5v9d1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdsd)
I learned my mum's identity via SMS

In the last chaotic days of the Vietnam War, thousands of children were sent away to be adopted in safer countries. Four-year-old My Huong went to Australia and it would be many years before she returned to Vietnam and finally uncovered the extraordinary truth about her birth family. This interview was first broadcast in December 2018.

Image: My Huong and her mother Ho Thi Ich
Credit: My Huong Le


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmsp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5vf45)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbf5k9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsjsdk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cs7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5vjw9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5pjqhw)
Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine approved for use in the UK

The UK has become the first country in the world to approve a coronavirus vaccine and Britain's medicines regulator says the jab is safe to be rolled out. Also: leading pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong have been jailed for their involvement in mass protests last year, and Singapore grants regulatory approval to lab-grown meat.

(Photo: Dose of the COVID-19 vaccination from BioNTech and Pfizer. Credit: Reuters)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5vnmf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsk0wt)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxnmm7lfb0)
Pfizer vaccine judged safe for use in UK

The UK has become the first country in the world to approve the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. We discuss the implications with Penny Ward, visiting professor in pharmaceutical medicine at King's College London, who has advised companies on drug and device development. Also in the programme, the International Labour Organisation says the pandemic is likely to inflict massive downward pressure on wages, with women and low-paid workers disproportionately hit. Guy Ryder is director general of the ILO, and brings us the details. Plus, with many people working from home, the BBC's Ed Butler asks whether we've reached the end of the era of the suited businessman.

(Picture: Needles in front of Pfizer and BioNTech logos. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5vsck)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172xsx4c45sd19)
The state of the planet

Ahead of a crucial year in the battle to control climate change, presenter Lucy Hockings is joined by the UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres. He is warning that "our planet is broken". We'll hear a live discussion as he answers questions from activists around the world and talks solutions to the problems we face.

Picture: Fires in August 2020 in the world's largest wetland, the Pantanal in Brazil (REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5vx3p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t4qt2f85j)
UK approves Covid vaccine

British regulators have judged that the Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine against Covid-19 is safe to be used in the general population, which means a mass immunisation campaign can now begin. It's the first country to approve the vaccine. The UK government says the first 800,000 doses will be available next week. We'll answer your questions on the vaccine with our regular health expert and the BBC health team.

We'll also hear the UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres answer questions from young environmentalists around the world on climate change and the state of the planet. He's given a speech on the BBC in which he warns that "our planet is broken" and the world faces disaster without radical action. We'll play you some of the speech and some of a conversation he had with the naturalist, Sir David Attenborough.

Picture: A dose of the Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine (BioNTech SE 2020, all rights reserved/Handout via REUTERS)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5w0vt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdsd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmsp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5w4ly)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbfx12)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccskhwb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jwvw2641z)
2020/12/02 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5w8c2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct1csg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccskmmg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszccw)
Milestone in HIV prevention for women

In the week of World AIDS Day, Health Check looks at what's being described as a milestone in the prevention of HIV infection in women. It is a form of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) - an injection every 8 weeks of a drug called cabotegravir. A clinical trial has been comparing it to a daily PrEP pill which is already known to be effective at preventing HIV infection. The injection regimen was about 90% more effective at shielding women from the virus than the daily tablet. The trial involves more than 3,000 women in seven Southern and East African countries. Claudia talks to study co-leader Sinead Delany-Moretlwe of the University of Witwatersrand about why this form of PrEP seems to be so effective and whether it will be affordable for low and middle income countries.

Chhavi Sachdev reports on informal health workers known as ‘chhota doctors’ who are the backbone of primary health care for the hundreds of millions of rural people in India. They are not formally recognised as health care providers by the authorities and lack medical degrees, but they are the first port of call for many when people feel ill, particularly during India’s coronavirus lockdown.

At a time when so many people are stuck indoors working at home, World Health Organisation has published new recommendations on how much physical activity we should be doing for the sake of our health. We talk to Fiona Bull, head of the WHO’s physical activity unit.

James Gallagher is the Health Check guest this week talking about Covid-19 vaccines, vitamin D and a step towards a blood test to predict Alzheimer’s disease.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker


(Picture: Female doctor giving a young female patient an injection in her consultation room. Photo credit: Henk Badenhorst/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5wd36)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5pkkqs)
Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine rollout within days

The UK regulator has granted emergency approval for the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, the first vaccine to use mRNA. How has this breakthrough happened so fast? And how safe will it be?

Also in the programme: Nigeria’s "Business EMail Compromise" hackers; and a high profile sexual harassment case highlights #MeToo issues in China.

(Picture: A dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 is injected; Credit: Reuters Wires)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5whvb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qgtqryv5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fm2yng7t0)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccskw3q)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58scksl78n)
Pfizer vaccine judged safe for use in UK

The UK has become the first country in the world to approve the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. We discuss the implications with Penny Ward, visiting professor in pharmaceutical medicine at King's College London, who has advised companies on drug and device development. Also in the programme, the International Labour Organisation says the pandemic is likely to inflict massive downward pressure on wages, with women and low-paid workers disproportionately hit. Guy Ryder is director general of the ILO, and brings us the details. Plus, with many people working from home, the BBC's Ed Butler asks whether we've reached the end of the era of the suited businessman.

(Picture: Needles in front of Pfizer and BioNTech logos. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5wmlg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc7c)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccskzvv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cs7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



THURSDAY 03 DECEMBER 2020

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5wrbl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct1csb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5ww2q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x193vmjp35m)
Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine rollout within days

The UK has become the first country in the world to approve the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. We discuss the implications with Penny Ward, visiting professor in pharmaceutical medicine at King's College London, who has advised companies on drug and device development. Also in the programme, the International Labour Organisation says the pandemic is likely to inflict massive downward pressure on wages, with women and low-paid workers disproportionately hit. Guy Ryder is director general of the ILO, and brings us the details. Plus, with many people working from home, the BBC's Ed Butler asks whether we've reached the end of the era of the suited businessman. Fergus Nicoll is joined for comment throughout the programme by Rachel Cartland in Hong Kong and Dr John Halamka in Boston, USA.

(Picture: A dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 is injected; Credit: Reuters Wires)


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5wztv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbgr7z)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccslc37)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6m3)
Me and my trolls

Internet trolls are harassing and bullying people like never before. That’s according to research carried out in the UK which found abuse rising as the world spends more and more time online thanks to the Covid pandemic. But who are the people behind these often anonymous attacks? How do they get involved in persecuting people they don’t even know? And what can their victims do about it? British Journalist, Sali Hughes, has been a target herself. In this edition of Assignment, she sets out to discover how trolls justify their actions, and what motivates them. She speaks to other women who have suffered online abuse and hears about the devastating impact it can have. And, she goes face to face with one of her own former tormentors to make a sobering discovery: those provoking conflict in cyberspace include the most normal people in real life.

Producer: Paul Grant

(Photo: Anonymous internet-user in a mask. Credit: Peter Dazeley/Getty Images)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5x3kz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdsd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmsp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5x7b3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbgzr7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccslllh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszccw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5xc27)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zwjmdy)
On the frontline of climate change in the South Pacific

As the head of the United Nations issues a stark warning about the state of the planet, we'll hear from the president of a Pacific island state on the frontline of climate change because of rising sea levels; we speak to the American campaigner against the death penalty who has won the alternative Nobel prize; and Sean Connery's original gun from the first James Bond film is up for sale.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5xgtc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zwjr52)
Obituary: Valéry Giscard D'Estaing

Valéry Giscard d'Estaing, France's president from 1974 to 1981, has died at the age of 94; as the head of the United Nations issues a stark warning about the state of the planet, we'll hear from the president of a Pacific island state on the frontline of climate change because of rising sea levels; and we'll hear from the former gang member who's just written a song for his friend killed in a terror attack in London.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5xlkh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zwjvx6)
The mayor of Los Angeles has ordered the city into lockdown

The mayor of Los Angeles has ordered the city into lockdown, warning it's close to a devastating tipping point; the French government says it is to launch an operation against mosques it believes are encouraging religious extremism; and one of the world’s largest collections of rock art created an estimated 12,500 years ago has been discovered in the Amazonian rainforest.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5xq9m)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4g)
Why is Ethiopia’s Nobel Peace Prize winner bombing his own country?

In Ethiopia, a political battle has sparked a bloody conflict.

Federal Forces have engaged in combat with the Tigray People’s Liberation Front - or TPLF.

Hundreds have reportedly been killed and tens of thousands displaced.

Just last year, Abiy Ahmed, the Ethiopian Prime Minister, won a Nobel Prize for his part in brokering peace with neighbouring Eritrea.

So, Charmaine Cozier asks why Ethiopia’s Nobel Peace Prize winner is bombing his own country?


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsm2l0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7y4)
Is the Hyperloop coming of age?

In November Virgin Hyperloop trialled its first ever journey with passengers, in the desert of Nevada. The futuristic transport concept involves pods inside vacuum tubes carrying passengers at high speeds. So with this proof of concept, are certified Hyperloop transport systems on the horizon? On today’s programme, we’ll hear from Mars Geuze, Chief Commercial Officer of Hardt Hyperloop, who have raised $10m to develop the technology in Europe, as well as Bibop Gresta, founder of Hyperloop Italia, who hints that a big announcement may be imminent. And we’ll also hear from Roseline Walker, Senior Safety and Risk Researcher for the Transport Research Laboratory, who outlines for us some of the concerns and obstacles the new technology faces.

(Image Credit: Getty images.)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmn5)
The slaves who defeated Napoleon

The first successful slave uprising in modern times happened in present-day Haiti. Former slave, Toussaint Louverture, forced the French colony to abolish slavery in 1794. The rebellion sent shock waves across America and Europe and made its leader famous around the world. France eventually lost its colony completely when its great military leader, Napoleon, was defeated by the former slaves. They then created the world's first black republic, which they named 'Haiti' from the indigenous Taino language. Claire Bowes has been speaking to Sudhir Hazareesingh, who's written a biography of Toussaint Louverture.

Image: Toussaint Louverture - portrait after lithograph by Delpech. Courtesy of Culture Club/Getty Images


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5xv1r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6m3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsm6b4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqx)
The chef who took on hospital food

Almost ten years ago, chef Joshna Maharaj walked into a hospital kitchen and was horrified by what she saw. Since then she’s been leading a movement to change what patients eat.

But it’s not easy to make large cash-strapped public institutions up their food game, nor to win over cooks whose culinary skills have been reduced to opening packets.

Joshna tells Emily Thomas the story behind her new book Take Back the Tray - Revolutionising Food in Hospitals, Schools and Other Institutions.

(Picture: Joshna Maharaj. Credit: Joshna Maharaj/BBC)

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5xysw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjwf)
Alexandre Dumas: The man behind the Musketeers

The word 'swashbuckling' is often used to describe the novels of Alexandre Dumas the Elder, the creator of D’Artagnan and the Three Musketeers, the Count of Monte Cristo and the Man in the Iron Mask. But Dumas himself led a life as colourful as many of his gallery of rogues, villains and heroes. Having grown up in poverty, he found employment in the household of a future king of France. He was prolific on the page and pretty active away from it. At first with a series of highly successful plays and then with serialised novels, his production house churned out hundreds of thousands of pages of gripping narrative. He had pet projects like building a mansion and theatre, he had countless mistresses and he frequently found himself in legal disputes and on the run from debt collectors.

In the 150th anniversary year of Dumas’ death Rajan Datar explores the writer's life and work with Claudie Bernard, professor of French Literature, Thought and Culture at New York University; Daniel Desormeaux, professor of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore; Sylvain Ledda, professor of 19th Century Literature at Rouen University in France; and Anne O'Neil-Henry, associate professor of French and Francophone Studies at Georgetown University in Washington.

[Image: Alexandre Dumas the Elder. Credit: The Print Collector/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5x)
Learie Constantine - West Indies cricket pioneer

In the 1920s, Learie Constantine became the first West Indian cricketer to sign a professional contract in England. He was a star of the domestic and international game thanks to his athletic all-round performances with bat and ball. Learie Constantine is also credited with helping improve race relations in Britain and later became the first black person to be awarded a peerage. Simon Watts introduces the memories of Learie Constantine as recorded in the BBC archives.

PHOTO: Learie Constantine in action (Getty Images)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5y2k0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbhtz4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsmftd)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 Health Check (w3cszccw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5y694)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdbv)
My Falklands War: the woman with the white gloves

Sovereignty over the Falkland Islands - known in Argentina as the Islas Malvinas - is still the subject of a dispute between Britain and Argentina. Now that the last landmine has been cleared from the islands, Jo Fidgen hears what it was like to live through the ten-week Falklands War of 1982.

Trudi McPhee grew up on the Falkland Islands, she’s the sixth generation of her family to live there. As a child, she loved the place so much that she never wanted to go on holiday, so when Argentina invaded, Trudi’s reaction wasn’t fear, but anger. Although she'd been told directly by the Argentine military not to help British soldiers, when the local chief of police asked her and other farmers for help, she said yes. In an area with no roads, the volunteers' knowledge of the boggy ground conditions proved invaluable in moving supplies, troops and medics across the island. During the battle for Mount Longdon, Trudi wore white gloves to lead a convoy of vehicles, at night, over rough ground. Her determination to help in any way she could took her close to the frontline.

Claudio Ayuso and Ken Griffiths were both teenagers when they began their military training, Ken with the British Royal Navy and Claudio as a radio operator with the Argentine Navy. Neither expected that they would ever go to war, but in 1982, they both found themselves in the middle of the Falklands conflict. Years later both men realised that they needed some closure on that part of their lives. After reaching out to each other online, they formed a friendship more meaningful than they could ever have expected.

Picture: Road from Stanley with Mount William in the distance
Credit: Getty / Dennis Gooch

Any comments please email us on outlook@bbc.com


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmn5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5yb18)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbj2gd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsmp9n)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5yfsd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5pmmdz)
US hits record Covid cases and hospitalisations

An emergency order is in force in Los Angeles, as the US city fights a big surge in coronavirus infections. Hospitals have seen what's being described as a terrifying increase in the number of cases, and residents have been told to stay at home.

We hear from Jimmy Lai, media tycoon and pro-democracy supporter in Hong Kong.

And the French government says it is to launch an operation against mosques it believes are encouraging religious extremism.

(Photo: The number of people in hospital with coronavirus has more than doubled since early November. Credit: Getty Images)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5ykjj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsmxsx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlw0r519qcj)
Hong Kong pro-democracy tycoon Jimmy Lai detained

Hong Kong media tycoon and pro-democracy supporter Jimmy Lai has been charged with fraud. We hear from Mr Lai in his last interview before being detained, and get a sense of the mood for businesses in the city from Mike Bird of the Wall Street Journal.

Also in the programme, Ivana Davidovic reports on China's war against food waste. China's leader Xi Jinping has launched a campaign targeting food waste in the country. Jian Yi, who has been at the forefront of promoting a sustainable food system in China, and founded the Good Food Fund tells us President Xi's announcement came as a surprise. With some local authorities in China aiming to limit the amount of food diners order, Priscilla Young, co-founder of Brut Eatery, which has five outlets in Shanghai, is not sure of the benefits of a heavy-handed approach to curbing dining excess. James Palmer explains how Chinese complex relationship with food stems from centuries of famines. And we hear from Szechuan food and culture expert Fuchsia Dunlop how Chinese New Year feasts reveal why ordering too much is a sign of good luck for the future.

Plus, we find out how the fashion industry is adapting to coronavirus from Caroline Rush, chief executive of the British Fashion Council.

(Picture: Jimmy Lai in handcuffs. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5yp8n)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t4qt2j1bh)
Coronavirus: Russian Vaccine

We’ll look at the latest vaccine and other coronavirus stories with Dr Emma Hodcroft, molecular epidemiologist at the University of Basel in Switzerland. We’ll also talk about Russia’s Sputnik C vaccine. A list of side-effects has been published today and the government has ordered a large-scale vaccinations to begin next week.

Also, we've spoken to the doctor in Texas who became a viral story when a photo showed him in full PPE hugging and comforting a Covid-19 patient on Thanksgiving.

And we'll discuss the story behind the top twitter trend #GuernicaDePie in Argentina. It's the story about families who were evicted from the Guernica makeshift settlement outside Buenos Aires. They've blockaded a bridge in the city to protest. We hear from some of them.

(Photo A school teacher receives a jab while being injected with Sputnik V vaccine against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at a clinic in the town of Domodedovo near Moscow, Russia December 3, 2020.Credit: Maxim Shemetov/Reuters)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5yt0s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t4qt2j52m)
Coronavirus: 'Safer at home' order in Los Angeles

We hear from Los Angeles where residents have been told to remain at home, following an unprecedented surge in coronavirus cases. This comes as the United States hits record Covid cases and hospitalisations.

We also hear from the teacher in India who's won this year's Global Teacher Prize. He's been praised for improving the education of girls in his village, winning a million dollar prize fund. We talk about Russia’s Sputnik V vaccine as Russia's President Putin orders large-scale vaccinations to begin next week.

And we've spoken to the doctor in Texas who became a viral story when a photo showed him in full PPE hugging and comforting a Covid-19 patient on Thanksgiving.

(Photo: A worker deposits a novel coronavirus test in a barrel in Los Angeles Credit: Lucy Nicholson/Reuters)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5yxrx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdbv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmn5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5z1j1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbjsy5)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsndsf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jwvw290z2)
2020/12/03 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5z585)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6m3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsnjjk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1d)
Freak weather getting even freakier

This year’s Atlantic hurricane season has seen a new record for severe storms says Climatologist Michael Mann. He says warming oceans are one of the drivers.

And Australia has seen spring temperatures hit new highs. Climate scientist Sarah Perkins – Kirkpatrick says it’s all the more remarkable as weather patterns are currently in a cycle associated with cooler temperatures.

Where exactly did SARS- COV-2 emerge from? That’s one of the questions for a WHO fact-finding mission to China looking into the origins of the Virus. Peter Daszak has worked with Chinese scientists for many years, looking for bat viruses with the potential to jump to humans. He tells us how the mission hopes to map out the event which led to the initial spread of the virus.

And the Japanese Hayabusa2 space probe is due to return to earth. Masaki Fujimoto
Deputy director of the Japanese Space Agency JAXA, tell us what to expect when a cargo of material from a distant asteroid lands in the Australian desert.

(Image: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5z909)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5pngmw)
"Someone’s going to get killed": Georgia election official

An election official in the US state of Georgia, Gabriel Sterling, has said President Trump will bear responsibility for any violence that results from unsubstantiated election fraud claims he has stoked. He speaks to Newshour.

Also in the programme: The US tech firm IBM detects systematic hacking of the international vaccine supply chain; and locusts have been ravaging East Africa all year and now they're in Southern Africa.

(Photo: Gabriel Sterling, a voting system manager with the Georgia Secretary of State office, holds a press conference. Credit: EPA/Erik S Lesser)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5zdrf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qgtqvvr8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fm2ynk4q3)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsns0t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58scksp45r)
Hong Kong pro-democracy tycoon Jimmy Lai detained

Hong Kong media tycoon and pro-democracy supporter Jimmy Lai has been charged with fraud. We hear from Mr Lai in his last interview before being detained, and get a sense of the mood for businesses in the city from Mike Bird of the Wall Street Journal.

Also in the programme, Ivana Davidovic reports on China's war against food waste. China's leader Xi Jinping has launched a campaign targeting food waste in the country. Jian Yi, who has been at the forefront of promoting a sustainable food system in China, and founded the Good Food Fund tells us President Xi's announcement came as a surprise. With some local authorities in China aiming to limit the amount of food diners order, Priscilla Young, co-founder of Brut Eatery, which has five outlets in Shanghai, is not sure of the benefits of a heavy-handed approach to curbing dining excess. James Palmer explains how Chinese complex relationship with food stems from centuries of famines. And we hear from Szechuan food and culture expert Fuchsia Dunlop how Chinese New Year feasts reveal why ordering too much is a sign of good luck for the future.

Plus, we find out how the fashion industry is adapting to coronavirus from Caroline Rush, chief executive of the British Fashion Council.

(Picture: Jimmy Lai in handcuffs. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5zjhk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4g)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsnwry)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqx)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



FRIDAY 04 DECEMBER 2020

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5zn7p)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjwf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5zrzt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x193vmjs02q)
LA in lockdown

Los Angeles Mayor, Eric Garcetti, has issued an order for residents to stay at home, warning that the city is approaching a “devastating tipping point” in its fight against coronavirus. In India, farmers are protesting against new agricultural laws which they say will benefit only big private agribusiness. And staying in India, we hear why Ranjitsinh Disale, the winner of the Global Teacher Prize has donated half of his winnings to the other shortlisted candidates. Plus, the Chinese President, Xi Jinping, has launched a campaign targeting an unlikely enemy - food waste, via the Clean Plate Campaign, as we hear from the BBC's Ivana Davidovic. And joining us throughout the programme are Paddy Hirsch, contributing editor at National Public Radio in Los Angeles and the journalist and writer Madhavan Narayanan is in New Delhi. (Picture of a healthcare worker with a specimen bag in California. Picture by Mario Tama via Getty Images)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn5zwqy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbkn52)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsp80b)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3cszth2)
Tears in Lima and joy in the Artic

We reflect on differing fortunes for Norway's Bodo/Glimt and Peru's Alianza Lima. Plus, Icelandic goalkeeper Guðbjörg Gunnarsdóttir talks about the challenge of balancing motherhood with football.

Picture: A fan of Alianza Lima lights a flare during a match against Estudiantes de Mérida (Raul Sifuentes/Getty Images)


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn600h2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdbv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmn5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn60476)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbkwnb)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsphhl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn607zb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zwmjb1)
Biden to ask Americans to wear masks for 100 days

US President-elect Joe Biden has said he will ask Americans to wear masks for his first 100 days in office to curtail the spread of coronavirus; is the Philippine boxing hero boxing icon, Manny Pacquaio, being lined up to step into the shoes of current president, Rodrigo Duterte?; and a teacher from a village school in India, praised for improving the education of girls, has won this year's Global Teacher Prize.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn60cqg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zwmn25)
Coronavirus: Biden to ask all Americans to wear masks

President-elect Joe Biden says he'll ask Americans to wear facemasks for the first one-hundred days of his term to help curtail the surge in coronavirus infections; rising numbers of coronavirus cases in the Gaza Strip threaten to overwhelm the Palestinian territory's healthcare system, experts warn; and Bangladesh has started relocating hundreds of Rohingya refugees to a remote and flood-prone island in the Bay of Bengal.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn60hgl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wm1zwmrt9)
Biden says he will ask Americans to wear masks for his first 100 days in office

US President-elect Joe Biden has said he will ask Americans to wear masks for his first 100 days in office to curtail the spread of coronavirus; Warner Bros has escalated tensions between Hollywood's studios and US cinemas with a decision to make all releases available to stream as soon as they hit the big screen; and cycling is a big part of life in the Netherlands but even there electric bikes have become very popular for people of all ages.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn60m6q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3csy997)
William Kentridge: The unnaturalness of apartheid

Zeinab Badawi is in Johannesburg, interviewing William Kentridge. He is considered one of the world’s greatest living artists. He is versatile, hard-hitting and his talent spans many different genres. How has South Africa’s difficult, violent and racist past influenced his work?

(Photo: William Kentridge, Rome, 2015 Credit: Stefano Montesi/Corbis/Getty Images)


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccspzh3)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz79b)
The rise and rise of Instagram

Sarah Frier, author of No Filter: The Inside Story of Instagram, talks about the corporate drama behind the app. The photo sharing app Instagram has transformed business, culture and even our everyday lives. Manuela Saragosa finds out why Instagram sold out to Facebook, and how Kevin Systrom (one of the founders of Instagram) found his values soon collided with those of Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg.

(Picture credit: Getty Creative)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmvy)
The V1 Flying Bomb

In 1944, Nazi Germany launched the V1s against the UK. The V1 was a pilotless, jet-propelled flying bomb - the first of its kind in the world and a precursor to the modern cruise missile. The V1 was also the first of Hitler's secret "revenge weapons" which he hoped would change the course of the Second World War. Some 10,000 V1s were fired at the UK. They killed more than 6,000 people and injured 20,000 more. Using archive recordings we hear from civilians who survived V1 attacks and from those tasked to stop the flying bombs.

Photo:A German V1 or 'Doodlebug' pilotless flying bomb in flight, circa 1944. (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn60qyv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpq)
Life after Covid

Will a digital means of showing you’ve been immunised be the passport to living normal everyday life? Plus, what does China’s new law banning the export of goods deemed important for national security mean for Western tech giants? And we attend Web Summit - virtually - to consider whether the future of giant conferences is online. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: A health worker processes a sample for a Covid test in New Delhi, India. Credit: EPA/ RAJAT GUPTA).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsq377)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 World Football (w3cszth2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn60vpz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcny)
Is Biden facing a new Middle East?

The assassination of the Iranian nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh appears to have made life more difficult for President-elect Biden - yet another event to weigh up as he considers what to do about Donald Trump’s legacy across the Middle East. Over the last four years the Republican president withdrew from the nuclear deal with Iran known as the JCPOA, shifted the US embassy to Jerusalem, withdrew almost all American troops from Syria and refused to support a bill that called for a ban on weapons sales to Saudi Arabia because of its role in the war in Yemen. Mr Trump’s 'maximum pressure' strategy did not prevent Iran from conducting nuclear enrichment and the country remains an influential player in Syria, Iraq and Lebanon. Meanwhile the Abraham Accords between Israel and the UAE, plus Israel and Bahrain have not just normalised diplomatic relations, but also opened new commercial and economic channels between old foes. In an article this year Joe Biden wrote that his administration would stand up to authoritarianism and will place democracy back at the core of US foreign policy. But is that realistic in a region that has adapted to the policies promoted by Donald Trump? To what extent does the thaw in relations between Israel and its Arab neighbours impact America's influence in the region? How much Obama-era policy can or should the Biden administration bring back? Join Ritula Shah and guests as they discuss whether Joe Biden is facing a new Middle East.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn60zg3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkblqw7)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsqbqh)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn61367)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj2)
China’s provocative political artist

China and Australia are in a diplomatic fight, after the Chinese foreign ministry spokesman posted a fake image of an Australian soldier killing an Afghan child. The artist was Wuheqilin, a self-styled "Wolf Warrior" and "cyber-nationalist" based in Beijing. BBC Chinese editor Howard Zhang tells us more about the controversial artist fighting China's corner.

In praise of Mborokhé
Seydina Alioune Djigo, who’s based at BBC Dakar, has put his journalistic neutrality on the line to nominate his favourite food for a Nobel prize. He tells us why he believes Mborokhé deserves international recognition.

Vietnam and stand-up comedy
Stand-up comedy is relatively new in Vietnam and, in a country where public performances are monitored by the state, doesn’t touch on sensitive topics. So the success of Leo Nguyen, a Vietnamese comedian based in the US, talking about politics and abuses of power, caught the attention of BBC Vietnamese journalist Thu Bui.

Let’s speak Quechua
Quechua is the most widely spoken indigenous language in South America, having spread across the region in the time of the Inca Empire. Lucia Blasco of BBC Mundo has been tracing its influence on Spanish, which absorbed many Quechua words after the arrival of the conquerors from Spain.

Remembering Ilyas Dayee
Ilyas Dayee was a journalist in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. He received many death threats for his work, and in November was killed by a car bomb outside his home. Former BBC Afghan journalist Auliya Atrafi grew up in the same village as Ilyas, and was taught English by his father. He shares his memories of Ilyas.


Image: Wuheqilin’s latest artwork
Credit: Wuheqilin


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmvy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn616yc)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkblzch)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsql6r)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1csk)
Jonestown: From socialism to slaughter

In 1978, over 900 US citizens died at Jonestown, a remote settlement in Guyana. The vast majority were members of a community run by the charismatic Rev Jim Jones, taking their own lives under armed guard on his orders. But how did a church known for racial integration and practical help for the poor come to such a destructive end? How could one man’s increasing paranoia have driven so many people, who had built a mission community from nothing in four years, into a seemingly pointless sacrifice?

In these programmes, Erin Martin – who herself grew up in a religious group that exercised strong control over its members – hears from survivors of what’s become known as the Jonestown Massacre, an event that captivated and horrified the US and international media.

Contributors include Stephan Jones, son of the Rev Jim Jones; Vera Washington, for whom Peoples Temple was “a wonderful, warm family” before it all went wrong; Jordan Vilchez, who at 16 already belonged to Jones’ inner circle; John Cobb, Leslie Wagner-Wilson, Tim Carter and Mike Cartmell, who each lost several family members in Jonestown; and Fielding M McGehee III, Temple archivist and Research Director at the Alternative Considerations of Jonestown website.

Between them, they reflect on the attraction of Peoples Temple, trace the road that ended with the destruction of the Jonestown community, and explain how they escaped with their lives. And they try to answer one crucial question: what could have led an idealistic group of community-minded people to such destruction?

Producer: Paul Arnold

(Photo:The local tourist office has placed signs to mark the site of Jonestown, Guyana. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn61bph)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5pqjb2)
Coronavirus: Italy bans Christmas travel between regions

Italy is banning travel between its regions from 21 December to 6 January as part of strict coronavirus curbs over the Christmas holidays. We speak to an adviser to the Italian government and a global health expert about why it has proved so difficult for many European governments to bring Covid-19 under control.

Also, reports of negotiations between US prosecutors and the Huawei executive detained in Canada to allow her to return to China.

And musicians from all 197 countries come together for a new work -- we will talk to its composer and one of those taking part.

(Photo: A travel ban between different regions will be in place from 21 December to 6 January. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn61gfm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3csy997)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsqtq0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltcvpv10f1)
India farmer protests continue

Protests in India by farmers concerned by new laws show no sign of subsiding. We get the background from Ruchit Garg, founder of Harvesting, a company that works with farmers in Northern India. And we ask Renu Agal, online editor of news portal The Print, whether talks between farmers' representatives and the government this weekend might bring the standoff to an end. Also in the programme, efforts in the US by the Trump administration to restrict the use of the H-1B professional visa were blocked this week by a court in California. One Indian software engineer living in the US on an H-1B visa tells us how his family's life is disrupted by the threat of changes to the way they work. Jessica Vaughan of the Centre for Immigration Studies in Washington makes the case for reform to the visa system. And Sean Randolph, senior director of the Economic Institute at the Bay Area Council, argues that recipients of H1-B visas have significantly boosted the US economy. Plus, we consider the future of cinemas, as a row brews between the world's largest cinema chain, AMC, and film studio Warner Brothers, after Warner said its new films for 2021 will be available on streaming services in US homes as soon as they are released.

(Picture: Farmers stage a sit-in in Singhu. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn61l5r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t4qt2ly7l)
Biden: '100 days to mask'

US President-elect Joe Biden says he'll ask Americans to wear a face covering as soon as he takes office. "Just 100 days to mask," he told CNN, "not forever". He says it will drive down deaths from coronavirus which have once again hit record levels in the United States. We'll reflect the conversation in response amongst Americans.

We'll bring you the account of another medic who has been responding to the pandemic. Dr James Phillips was also at the eye of a political storm in Washington DC, after he tweeted that the drive taken by President Trump to meet supporters while being treated for Covid-19 at Walter Reed Medical Center was "insanity".

We'll hear how Afghans are remembering an extraordinary woman: Lieutenant General Suhaila Siddiq who has died at the age of 82. She was also a surgeon and the first and only woman to achieve her rank in the Afghan armed forces.

Picture: President-elect Joe Biden puts on a face covering (REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn61pxw)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t4qt2m1zq)
Coronavirus conversations: Ghana

As we continue to bring you stories of medics on the front line of the global pandemic, we meet Dr Kojo Hutton-Mensah who is treating Covid-19 patients in Kumasi. And we speak to Dr James Phillips, who was also at the eye of a political storm in Washington DC. He is the doctor who tweeted that the drive taken by President Trump to meet supporters while being treated for Covid-19 at Walter Reed Medical Center was "insanity".

Meanwhile, we'll hear the latest on the pandemic from BBC correspondents in countries we don't often get to, with stories from Poland and Turkey.

We'll also speak to a singer-songwriter in Quebec, whose one man band video went viral on social media, with his dog playing a starring role. Damien Robitaille's version of Technotronic's "Pump Up The Jam" - featuring Suki the Akita - has been giving millions of people a smile in difficult times.

Picture: Dr Kojo Hutton-Mensah (Komfo Akonye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn61tp0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmvy)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn61yf4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bjxkbmpv8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsr9pj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jwvw2cxw5)
2020/12/04 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn62258)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpq)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsrffn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6q)
Are humans naturally clean and tidy?

From dumping raw sewage into rivers to littering the streets with our trash, humans don’t have a great track record when it comes to dealing with our waste. It’s something that CrowdScience listener and civil engineer Marc has noticed: he wonders if humans are particularly prone to messing up our surroundings, while other species are instinctively more hygienic and well-organised.

Aasre we, by nature, really less clean and tidy than other animals? Farming and technology have allowed us to live more densely and generate more rubbish - maybe our cleaning instincts just aren’t up to the vast quantities of waste we spew out? CrowdScience digs into the past to see if early human rubbish heaps can turn up any answers. We follow a sewer down to the River Thames to hear about The Great Stink of Victorian London; turn to ants for housekeeping inspiration; and find out how to raise hygiene standards by tapping into our feelings of disgust and our desire to follow rules.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and produced by Cathy Edwards for the BBC World Service.

[Image: Man on beach with rubbish. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn625xd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z2d5prcjz)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn629nj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79qgtqyrnc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fm2ynn1m6)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsrnxx)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58sckss12v)
India farmer protests continue

Protests in India by farmers concerned by new laws show no sign of subsiding. We get the background from Ruchit Garg, founder of Harvesting, a company that works with farmers in Northern India. And we ask Renu Agal, online editor of news portal The Print, whether talks between farmers' representatives and the government this weekend might bring the standoff to an end. Also in the programme, efforts in the US by the Trump administration to restrict the use of the H-1B professional visa were blocked this week by a court in California. One Indian software engineer living in the US on an H-1B visa tells us how his family's life is disrupted by the threat of changes to the way they work. Jessica Vaughan of the Centre for Immigration Studies in Washington makes the case for reform to the visa system. And Sean Randolph, senior director of the Economic Institute at the Bay Area Council, argues that recipients of H1-B visas have significantly boosted the US economy. Plus, we consider the future of cinemas, as a row brews between the world's largest cinema chain, AMC, and film studio Warner Brothers, after Warner said its new films for 2021 will be available on streaming services in US homes as soon as they are released.

(Picture: Farmers stage a sit-in in Singhu. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p5xn62fdn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3csy997)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5q0ccsrsp1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3cszth2)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6m3)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6m3)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6m3)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5q003h009l)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5q003h0cjz)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5q003h0qsc)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5q003h0vjh)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5q003h130r)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5q003h1y7n)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5q003h2f75)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172x5q003h2nqf)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5q003h2x6p)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5q003h34py)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5q003h38g2)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SUN (w172x5q003h3mpg)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SUN (w172x5q003h3rfl)

BBC News Summary 10:30 SUN (w172x5q003h3w5q)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SUN (w172x5q003h3zxv)

BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5q003h4yww)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SUN (w172x5q003h5b48)

BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5q003h5fwd)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172x5q0ccs9dwp)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5q0ccs9jmt)

BBC News Summary 02:30 MON (w172x5q0ccs9ncy)

BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5q0ccs9ww6)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5q0ccsbcvq)

BBC News Summary 09:30 MON (w172x5q0ccsbhlv)

BBC News Summary 10:30 MON (w172x5q0ccsbmbz)

BBC News Summary 11:30 MON (w172x5q0ccsbr33)

BBC News Summary 13:30 MON (w172x5q0ccsbzlc)

BBC News Summary 15:30 MON (w172x5q0ccsc72m)

BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5q0ccscq24)

BBC News Summary 20:30 MON (w172x5q0ccsctt8)

BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5q0ccsd29j)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5q0ccsd61n)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5q0ccsdk91)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5q0ccsdss9)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5q0ccsf8rt)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5q0ccsfdhy)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5q0ccsfn06)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5q0ccsfwhg)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5q0ccsg3zq)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5q0ccsglz7)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5q0ccsgqqc)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5q0ccsgz6m)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5q0ccsh2yr)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5q0ccshg64)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5q0ccshppd)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5q0ccsj5nx)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5q0ccsj9f1)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5q0ccsjjx9)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5q0ccsjsdk)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5q0ccsk0wt)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5q0ccskhwb)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5q0ccskmmg)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5q0ccskw3q)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5q0ccskzvv)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5q0ccslc37)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5q0ccslllh)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5q0ccsm2l0)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5q0ccsm6b4)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5q0ccsmftd)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5q0ccsmp9n)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5q0ccsmxsx)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5q0ccsndsf)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5q0ccsnjjk)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5q0ccsns0t)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5q0ccsnwry)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5q0ccsp80b)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5q0ccsphhl)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5q0ccspzh3)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5q0ccsq377)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5q0ccsqbqh)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5q0ccsql6r)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5q0ccsqtq0)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5q0ccsr9pj)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5q0ccsrffn)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5q0ccsrnxx)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5q0ccsrsp1)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcw9djy)

BBC News 01:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcw9j92)

BBC News 02:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcw9n16)

BBC News 03:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcw9rsb)

BBC News 04:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcw9wjg)

BBC News 05:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwb08l)

BBC News 06:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwb40q)

BBC News 07:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwb7rv)

BBC News 08:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwbchz)

BBC News 09:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwbh83)

BBC News 10:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwbm07)

BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwbqrc)

BBC News 12:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwbvhh)

BBC News 13:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwbz7m)

BBC News 14:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwc2zr)

BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwckz8)

BBC News 19:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwcpqd)

BBC News 20:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwctgj)

BBC News 21:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwcy6n)

BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwd1ys)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5p5kcwd5px)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5p5kcwd9g1)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5p5kcwdf65)

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BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5p5kcwfmng)

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BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5p5kcwfw4q)

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BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5p5kcwh2m0)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172x5p5xn5m1m9)

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BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5p5xn5n0lb)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5p5xn5n4bg)

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BBC News 16:00 MON (w172x5p5xn5nzkc)

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BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172x5p5xn5pyjd)

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BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5p5xn5rmz6)

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BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5p5xn5rwgg)

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BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5p5xn5s3yq)

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BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5p5xn5sqpc)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172x5p5xn5svfh)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5p5xn5sz5m)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5p5xn5t2xr)

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BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5p5xn5whvb)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5p5xn5wmlg)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172x5p5xn5wrbl)

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BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172x5p5xn5zn7p)

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BBC News 06:00 FRI (w172x5p5xn60cqg)

BBC News 07:00 FRI (w172x5p5xn60hgl)

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BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct19yx)

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Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7kb)

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Business Weekly 23:06 SAT (w3ct0spk)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz98z)

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When Katty Met Carlos 08:32 SAT (w3ct1c4w)

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Witness History 03:50 SAT (w3cszmvx)

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WorklifeIndia 10:06 SUN (w3ct1c16)

World Business Report 01:06 MON (w172x57yxv5mjq5)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3cszth2)

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