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RADIO-LISTS: BBC WORLD SERVICE
Unofficial Weekly Listings for BBC World Service (UK DAB version) — supported by bbc.co.uk/programmes/



SATURDAY 14 NOVEMBER 2020

SAT 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7r3b8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 00:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnv)
Climate change: Can Biden make a difference?

President-elect Joe Biden has said that one of the first acts of his presidency will be to return the United States to the Paris climate change agreement. His administration is proposing to make US electricity production carbon-free by 2035 and to have the country achieve 'net zero' emissions by the middle of the century. In 2015 the United States played a leading role in bringing together 195 countries that pledged to work together to keep the global temperature rise below two degrees Celsius. But less than six months after taking office Donald Trump said he’d withdraw from the agreement, claiming it was putting American jobs and the economy at risk. By the end of the Trump presidency the US had left - and had also rolled back dozens of environmental protections and implemented plans to expand drilling for oil and gas into public lands. So what has four years of President Trump done to global efforts to tackle climate change? How will America's return to the top table under a Democratic leader change the picture? Will President-elect Biden have the support he needs from Congress and the American people to meet his ambitious targets? And what now for US leadership in persuading other countries to commit fully to fighting climate change? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of expert guests.


SAT 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7r72d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 01:06 Business Matters (w172x192rtljg59)
Asian trade deal set to be signed this weekend

Fifteen countries have been negotiating the deal for nearly a decade. They include the ten countries that make up the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) plus China, Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand. Parag Khanna, author of The Future is Asian, tells us about the significance of the agreement.
The BBC's Michelle Fleury brings us the latest from New York where further coronavirus restrictions are due to come into force. She also gives us reaction after President Trump's press conference earlier.
Plus, to mark World Kindness Day we hear from Kelly Allison, the founder of Corporate Kindness, about how she chose people over profit in her own business and now helps other companies to do the same.
Sasha Twining is joined throughout the programme by Sinead Mangan, journalist for ABC News in Australia in Perth.

(Picture: Vietnam's Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc at the virtual Asean conference. Picture: Getty Images)


SAT 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7rbtj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bhtrdb37n)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvfq2x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 02:32 Stumped (w3cszhk3)
Inside the Mumbai machine

We hear from Mumbai Indians batting coach Robin Singh after the franchise won a fifth Indian Premier League title in eight seasons.

Plus, has Covid-19 spoilt the Afghanistan story, or can natural talent and determination help them keep climbing cricket's ladder?

And the parallels between the US election race and Test cricket.

Photo: Mumbai Indians logo


SAT 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7rgkn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 03:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjhz)
Young, French and Muslim

Islam is under scrutiny in France, especially since the killing of teacher Samuel Paty after he showed his class cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad. Many Muslim-majority countries have called for a boycott of French products, but what do Muslims living in France think? The BBC's Fethi Benaissa has been talking to the Arabic-speaking community.

How do you say 'lockdown'?
As Collins dictionary declares 'lockdown' to be its word of the year, we take a virtual stroll round the Fifth Floor to see how it's said in Russian, Sinhala, Korean and Spanish, thanks to Yulia James, Saroj Pathirana, Julie Yoonnyung Lee and Lucia Blasco.

BBC Mundo's dance star
BBC TV's famous Strictly Come Dancing show was thrown open to insiders recently. They called it Strictly BBC - Dancing with our Staff. One of the 3 finalists was Inma Gil from BBC Mundo, dancing in her living room with her 9-year-old daughter Nora.

Kenya's camel-back clinic
Last year BBC Africa TV reported on the big challenge of getting medicines and healthcare to Kenya's Maasai, Samburu and Turkana people, who are often on the move with their livestock. Christine Njeri discovered how camels have been enlisted to help with transport.

Saris in lockdown
Chinki Sinha, who's a contributor to BBC Hindi in Delhi, returned to the family home in Bihar for lockdown. As time went by, friends and followers on social media started to notice an eye-catching series of fashion shoots, with Chinki, her aunt and her mother, dressed in a succession of beautiful saris.

Image: Young French Muslims
Credit: BBC


SAT 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmvv)
The 'good enough' mother

Psychoanalyst and paediatrician Donald Winnicott helped shape childcare in Britain through a series of BBC radio broadcasts in the 1940s and 50s. He suggested mothers did best when they followed their instincts, got to know their babies and ignored prescribed rules. He became most famous for developing the idea of what he called ‘the good-enough mother’. He also introduced the term 'transitional object' to describe the favourite teddy that babies cling to, He suggested it represented an important phase of development, helping babies develop a sense of self, separate from their mothers. Claire Bowes has been speaking to retired psychoanalyst Jennifer Johns, who knew Donald Winnicott.

PHOTO: A mother with her baby in the 1960s. Credit: BBC.


SAT 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7rl9s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 04:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 00:06 today]


SAT 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7rq1x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bhtrdbgh1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvg2b9)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 05:32 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj96)
Capturing #endsars on camera

A hashtag that went viral, photographs that caught the world’s attention. Rachel Seidu, a photo journalist from Lagos, tells us how she took to the streets to capture the #EndSars protests against police brutality in Nigeria.

In Johannesburg, one woman is using her camera to change perceptions of a nation still plagued by racial injustice, inequality and high crime rates. Angel Khumalo tells reporter Mpho Lakaje about the photo club she runs to show another side of her community.

We hear from two photographers documenting the impact of Covid-19 on mental health. New Zealand based photographer Tatsiana Chypsanava and Spanish photo journalist Manu Brabo are studying the effect of lockdown on their communities as part of The Wellcome Trust’s Covid-19 Anxiety Project.

Plus: has a film, a book or a song ever changed the way you see the world? Photographer Misan Harriman, who shot the cover of British Vogue’s September activism issue, tells us how a scene from the film Crash has influenced his work.

Presented by Tina Daheley


(Image Credit: Rachel Seidu)


SAT 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7rtt1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d4q6lq62r)
US President Nearly Concedes

The US president, Donald Trump, has given his first public acknowledgement that he may not be in the White House after January. We get the latest from our correspondent.
Also on the programme the raging civil war in Northern Ethiopia; And we'll hear from Azerbaijan, victorious in its six week war with Armenia over Nagorno-Karabakh.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Jef McAllister former journalist and lawyer; and Dr Yu Jie research fellow on China at London's Chatham House.

(Photo: US President Trump at the White House; Credit:REUTERS/Carlos Barria)


SAT 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7ryk5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d4q6lq9tw)
President Trump says time will tell

The US president Donald Trump, has given his first public acknowledgement that he may not be in the White House after January. We hear from our correspondent and from Deborah Pryce, a former Republican member of Congress from Ohio, who thinks its time for Mr Trump to leave the White House.


Also on the programme - public health costs in Spain of stopping outdoor exercise during lockdown; And the human cost of war for civilians caught in Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict -- we hear from one family in Azerbaijan.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Jef McAllister former journalist and lawyer; and Dr Yu Jie research fellow on China at London's Chatham House.

(Photo: US President Donald Trump; Credit: EPA/Chris Kleponis / POOL)


SAT 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7s299)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d4q6lqfl0)
Afghanistan "Deadliest" Country For Civilians

Violence in Afghanistan has worsened in recent months including targeted killings of journalists, politicians and rights activists. We hear from the Director General of the International Committee of the Red Cross - Robert Mardini who says that Afghanistan remains the most dangerous place in the world for civilians.

Also on the programme - President Trump has spoken publicly for the first time since the election was called for his rival Joe Biden; And the extraordinary life of a Eddie Jaku - a Holocaust survivor and why he is the Happiest man on Earth.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Jef McAllister former journalist and lawyer; and Dr Yu Jie research fellow on China at London's Chatham House.

(Photo: Car bombed in Helmand, Afghanistan; Credit:EPA/WATAN YAR)


SAT 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvgfkp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 08:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4t)
Bridging divided America

America’s turbulent 2020 election has highlighted how divided the United States is. President-elect Joe Biden has promised to bring the country together, and this may become one of the biggest challenges of his presidency. Katty Kay and Carlos Watson discuss what politicians, leaders and communities can do to bridge divides in this polarised nation. They’re joined by veteran civil rights leader Reverend Al Sharpton and former Governor of Ohio John Kasich.

Editor: Penny Murphy
Produced by Viv Jones, John Murphy, Maeve McGoran, Iyore Odighizuwa, Jonelle Awomoyi and Suzanne Kianpour
Mixed by Andy Garratt


SAT 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7s61f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19yv)
US election: A test of democracy

Joe Biden is the projected winner of the race to be the next president of the United States. Donald Trump, however, refuses to concede the election and many of his supporters continue to believe that he’ll remain in power after the inauguration in January.

Host Ben James shares conversations among Trump supporters in Georgia, Florida and Washington DC, who believe President Trump’s unsubstantiated claims of voting fraud. One of them changed from a Democrat because she felt Trump treated immigrants better.

Plus women from both political sides come together to consider the impact of Kamala Harris as America’s first female Vice-President elect.

(Photo: Trump supporter Bobbie. Credit: Bobbie Donnelly)


SAT 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvgk9t)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 09:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw9)
Girl Taken

14/11/2020 GMT

Girl Taken is a two year investigation to find a little girl taken from her mother in Iran. In this 11 part series, recorded in real time, Sue Mitchell and Rob Lawrie slowly unravel the mystery of what happened to four year old Bru and set out to reunite mother and daughter after years of being apart.

The series starts when Sue Mitchell came into the story, as a reporter for the BBC covering the refugee crisis in Europe. The little girl had hit the media spotlight when her father, claiming to be a widow fleeing Afghanistan under threat of death from the Taliban, asked Rob Lawrie, a volunteer at the Calais camp, for help. He wanted Rob to smuggle Bru to the UK but this failed. Although the story was extensively covered no one knew Bru’s mother was alive and desperately searching for her.

Through the original BBC coverage the mother, Goli, makes contact with Sue and Rob, telling them her daughter was taken from the family home in Tehran without her knowledge or consent. She’d been to the police in Iran but was told they could not help. She then travelled thousands of miles at the hands of smugglers with Bru’s baby sister, Baran. Sickness forced her to stop in Denmark but authorities and refugee charities there could not find Bru. These recordings cover a series of dramatic turns in the search for the little girl.

The recordings also touch on the plight of other women whose children have been taken from them by abusive husbands. It is still a rare thing to happen, but this investigation exposes shortcomings in the asylum process. Since the recordings aired, officials have discovered other cases where men have come into the United Kingdom with a child to help their asylum claims. These claims have not been fully investigated in the past and there are few safeguards to protect those who have suffered as a result.

The series raises the plight of children living in the Calais Jungle and other overcrowded and unsanitary camps. Through Goli’s story we learn more about the control others had in shaping her life. She’d had an arranged marriage to a cruel and controlling man and lived in a society where she had few rights. When she decided to flee Iran and search for Bru, she encountered many dangers, from smugglers to perilous sea crossings in the dead of night with Bru’s baby sister, Baran, in her arms.

The series gives voice to one woman’s story and in doing so raises issues affecting many others. Goli left the only culture she had known to search the world for her little girl and in doing so changed her outlook completely. On reaching the West she immersed herself in the education she had always wanted. As she began making her own choices she starts to experience possibilities and freedoms she had never before imagined. Goli is hopeful that her story could help other women to challenge the injustice and cruelty she has overcome.


SAT 09:50 Over to You (w3cszf57)
Listeners react to the US presidential election campaign

Your feedback on the BBC World Service’s coverage of the US elections. Was reporting across the campaign distinctive and illuminating? Did the corporation get the political balance right? We speak with the BBC’s Nuala McGovern to get her personal perspective.

Presenter: Rajan Datar
Produced: Howard Shannon


SAT 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7s9sk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 10:06 Sportshour (w172x3c3nyx93l8)
'The business of boxing is systematically built against females' – Heather Hardy

Former boxing world champion Heather Hardy – gives us an insight into the realities of making a living from boxing ahead of a huge night at Wembley Arena, which sees two women’s world title fights on the same bill.

Hardy believes the sport still has much to do in terms of the gender pay gap and that the time has come for women to stop thanking men for opportunities to showcase their skills. Hardy says women need to co-headline big shows and admits her own career may be over. She lost her world title in her last fight and says she’ll never fight again for “a pay check that doesn’t make sense”.

However, despite her own struggles in the sport, Hardy does believe boxing is a viable career choice for young girls and women that are coming through now.

We also hear from promoter Eddie Hearn, who addresses Hardy’s concerns about pay and promotion for female fighters and the BBC’s boxing correspondent, Mike Costello, gives us his views on the pay gap and looks ahead to the night's action.

Gia Peebles and Lesleigh Mausi from the Ebony Anglers join us to talk about friendship, fishing and what it’s like being part of an all-Black, all-female competitive angling team. The team was set up earlier this year and they’ve already won a major tournament. Peebles and Mausi talk us through their big haul and explain how they’re hoping to inspire young girls and boys to take up the sport.

We hear how long-covid has affected former world number three tennis player Grigor Dimitrov. He’s been speaking to the BBC’s Laura Scott after he contracted coronavirus back in June.

Sporting Witness charts the remarkable career of the Argentina blind football captain Silvio Velo - who's still finding the net in his late forties and is credited with raising the profile of his sport in South America.

And the BBC’s golf correspondent, Iain Carter, joins us with all the latest news ahead of the third round of the The Masters at Augusta National.

(Photo: Heather Hardy celebrates after winning her featherweight bout against Paola Torres in 2018. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7sfjp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bhtrdc5yt)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvgst2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 11:32 The Documentary (w3ct0z3f)
India's missing children

In India, a child goes missing every eight minutes. BBC South Asia Correspondent Rajini Vaidyanathan meets the family of one of those children and follows their attempts to trace their daughter. It’s a journey that takes us into the murky world of human trafficking, where children are bought and sold as commodities – forced to work long hours in factories, brothels or as domestic servants. And far from slowing the trade, the Coronavirus has fuelled demand for child labour and led to an increase in child trafficking as ‘middle-men’ target communities worst-hit by the pandemic.

(Photo: A girl puts her hand print on an installation during an awareness campaign program initiated by Delhi Police for those children who were missing and kidnapped. Credit: Biplov Bhuyan/Hindustan Times/Getty Images)


SAT 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7sk8t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 12:06 Music Life (w3csz6ts)
The importance of improvising with Bebel Gilberto and Martha Wainwright

Bebel Gilberto welcomes Martha Wainwright, Sam Amidon and Martin Hayes to talk about the influence of their musical families, their most memorable live shows, why improvising is so essential, and walking the creative tightrope between doing something new and following traditions.

Brazilian singer and songwriter Bebel Gilberto is the daughter of Bossa Nova star Joao Gilberto and singer Miucha. Martha Wainwright is a Canadian-American singer and songwriter born in New York City to musicians Kate McGarrigle and Loudon Wainwright III, and her brother is Rufus Wainwright. She released her debut record in 2005, and has since released a further six albums. Sam Amidon is a folk artist from Vermont, USA, who plays guitar, fiddle, and banjo. He followed in the footsteps of his folk musician parents, who would play Irish and Appalachian folk music for him. And Martin Hayes, a traditional Irish fiddle player, and founder of the Irish-American group The Gloaming. He grew up in County Clare, where his father PJ Hayes was a respected fiddle player. He won six All-Ireland Fiddle competitions before moving to Chicago, and has played for President Obama at the White House.


SAT 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7sp0y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z19crgvnj)
Ethiopia: Conflict worsens as airports attacked

The Ethiopian government says two regional airports were targeted; it blamed the Tigrayan forces that it's been fighting.

Also on the programme: Azerbaijan won the war with Armenia over Nagorno Karabakh, but has been left to count the human cost of the conflict; demonstrators continue to demand government reform in Thailand and we ask scientists whether lightning can be tamed?

(Picture: Troops loyal to the government ride in trucks to face the Tigray People's Liberation Front forces, Credit: Reuters)


SAT 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7sss2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 14:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lhnjbhbfd)
Live Sporting Action

We bring you build up and live commentary of the Women's Super League where Aston Villa women play Birmingham City women.

Masters Golf - moved from its traditional spot in April because of the coronavirus pandemic, Augusta National will host the final major of this calendar year in unprecedented circumstances. The field is the same as it would have been when the tournament was cancelled in March, but the picture is very different. Lee James and the BBC golf correspondent Iain Carter look ahead to Saturday’s third round.

Plus we bring you Benchwarmers - Sportsworld looks at mental and physical challengers of being consistently left out or not being able to win a race. From those who have spent the whole year in a bio bubble not playing that much, to the reserve goalkeeper, the 12th man in cricket and athletics pacemaker with no chance of winning. Guests include former Tottenham goalkeeper Michel Vorm, England and Somerset cricketer Jack Leach and former Great Britain athlete and 800 metres runner Jenny Meadows. Plus what do you want from a pacemaker – Kenya’s Sally Kipyego tells us and how do you manage a benched player, former South Africa and Netherlands coach Vera Pauw has her say with Lee James.

Photo: Demi Stokes of Manchester City runs with the ball during the Women's Super League match between Aston Villa and Manchester City at Villa Park on September 05, 2020 in Birmingham, England. (Photo by Harriet Lander/Getty Images)


SAT 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7t8rl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bhtrdd15q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 18:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvhn0z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 18:32 Trending (w3cszvsp)
Doxxed and hacked In Hong Kong

The fight over democracy in Hong Kong continues. In the week that pro-democracy lawmakers resigned en masse in protest at the sacking of four of their colleagues, we take a look at the secretive struggles happening online.

Trade union leader Carol Ng was shocked to find her phone number and photo on a mysterious website – HK Leaks – which lists names and personal details of some 1,800 activists.

Who is behind the site? It appears to be hosted in Russia, but many believe it’s a smear campaign driven by the Chinese authorities.

Also featured on the site is Nathan Law, one of Hong Kong’s youngest-ever lawmakers. He fled to the UK in the wake of a new security law.

We meet him in London, where he tells us about “government backed” attempts to hack his online accounts, and also about his unique relationship with California’s social media giants.

Big tech appears to be standing shoulder to shoulder with the activists, and protecting them from government intrusion online – but that doesn’t mean the companies want to say much about it.

Facebook, Google and others have previously tried to court the Chinese government, in hopes of gaining access to an enormous new market. So this time around, are the firms acting out of nobility – or are there more strategic forces at play?

Presenter: Sam Judah

(Photo: Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Nathan Law. Credit: Getty Images)


SAT 18:50 More or Less (w3ct0py8)
Vaccine numbers

A vaccine which has shown in a clinical trial to be 90% effective against Covid-19 has been widely welcomed. But what does it mean and how was it worked out? Although experts and politicians urge caution, how excited can we be about the results of this trial of the vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNTech? Tim Harford explores what we know about this new vaccine candidate with Jennifer Rogers, vice president of the Royal Statistical Society in the UK, and she also works for Phastar, a consultancy which specialises in analysing clinical trials.

Presenter: Tim Harford
Producer: Charlotte McDonald


SAT 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7tdhq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 19:06 World Questions (w3cszt61)
The Environment

World Questions focuses on a single global issue – the environment.

The BBC’s Justin Rowlatt chairs a remote debate with leading scientists, academics, businesspeople and activists from around the world – to try to come up with some answers to one of the most pressing issues of our times.

The questions come from members of the public from across the world – from a stall holder in Haiti, to an engineer in Hong Kong and a group of schoolgirls in Spain. Are we too selfish to save the planet? What lessons can we learn from the Coronavirus pandemic? Why is it proving so difficult to stop climate change and the destruction of the natural world?

The panel:
Professor Sir Robert Watson: Leading climatologist and former chair of IPCC
Ska Keller: German Green MEP and co-president of the Greens/EFA group in the European Parliament
Sir Partha Dasgupta: Professor of Economics at Cambridge University, author of an independent global review on the Economics of Biodiversity
Elizabeth Wathuti: Kenyan environmental campaigner and activist
Michael Liebreich: Chairman and CEO of Liebreich Associates, consultant on clean energy, climate finance and sustainable development

Producers: Helen Towner and Charlie Taylor
Studio Engineers: Tim Heffer, Chris Weightman and Ian Mitchell

BBC World Questions is a series of international events created in partnership with the British Council.

(Photo: Turtle holding plastic bag, Credit: Sarayut Thaneerat/EyeEm / Getty Images


SAT 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7tj7v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 20:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3r)
Actor Matthew McConaughey

Oscar-winning star Matthew McConaughey talks about one of his favourite roles and predicts the future of going to the movies.

Actor Kristin Scott Thomas tells us about playing Mrs Danvers in the new adaptation of Rebecca, and how some early advice she was given almost made her quit her acting dream.

Country superstar Keith Urban reveals the role his wife Nicole Kidman plays in his music.

We hear how boiled eggs helped Octavia Spencer give a natural performance in her latest movie The Witches.

And ballerina and artistic director of the English National Ballet Tamara Rojo tells us about the moment she knew she wanted to be a dancer.

Joining Nikki Bedi in the studio is film critic Rich Cline, and on the line from Tel Aviv to talk about her latest TV show Tehran and her album Zan, is actor and singer Liraz.


(Photo: Matthew McConaughey. Credit: Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic via Getty Images)


SAT 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7tmzz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z19crhtmk)
Conflict in northern Ethiopia spreads

Residents of the Eritrean capital, Asmara, have reported loud explosions in the city. The cause is unclear but it comes hours after a senior official in the Tigray region of neighbouring Ethiopia threatened missile strikes on Eritrea. We'll hear from Tigray and from neighbouring Sudan, where thousands of people are seeking refuge from the fighting.

Also in the programme: how the controversial impeachment of Peru's president has led to mass protests; and why has the US state of North Dakota been so badly hit by the coronavirus?

(Picture: An Ethiopian woman who fled the ongoing fighting in Tigray region is seen in Hamdait village on the Sudan-Ethiopia border in eastern Kassala state, Sudan. Credit: REUTERS/El Tayeb Siddig)


SAT 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7trr3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79pd0sq6qy)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SAT 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fl04qdhps)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SAT 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvj40h)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SAT 22:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1cw3)
Catholic women and the US elections

As the campaign in the 2020 US Election went on it became clearer that America’s Catholics were crucial to the result.
Here are two candidates, the Democrat Joe Biden, a practising Catholic, who represents a social justice interpretation of the faith, and the Republican, Donald Trump, with who now describes himself as ‘a non-denominational Christian’ but who appeals to the socially conservative Catholic pro-life agenda. It is a fascinating dynamic. The rival campaigns targeted Catholics with fervent appeals to vote based on faith, especially on the issue of abortion.

After a tense week, Joe Biden was called, and declared the next president of the United States, only the second Catholic to hold the presidency. As he steps up to lead, he faces the challenge of a divided America and it may take a lot more than just words to heal, and an awful lot of faith to fix the wounds inflicted by both sides.

Angela Davis, in Minnesota, brings together four Catholic women across the US, to discuss issues that affected their vote, such as right to abortion and racism. Did they vote on faith or policy?

In a divided America, what does the Catholic faith tell us about how democrats and republicans can now come together and heal?

Presented by: Angela Davis
Produced by: Louise Clarke-Rowbotham

Photo: A pile of I voted stickers, November 2020 / Credit: Aimee Dilger/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images.


SAT 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7twh7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SAT 23:06 Business Weekly (w3ct0sph)
Getting a Covid-19 vaccine to where it's most needed

Excitement and hope this week as the pharmaceutical giant Pfizer said it believed that its Covid-19 vaccine is 90% effective. On this edition of Business Weekly we’ll look at the logistical challenges of rolling it out. How will it be transported? Who will get access to it - and how much will it cost? Also at a high level climate change conference in London our correspondent chats to chief executives who say capitalism can help the planet - but will they put their money where their mouth is? Plus, what, if anything do parents owe their children? We have the intriguing story of the man who sued his parents because they couldn’t afford him. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Vishala Sri-Pathma.

(Image: Patient receiving an injection, Getty Images)



SUNDAY 15 NOVEMBER 2020

SUN 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7v07c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj96)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvjchr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 00:32 Trending (w3cszvsp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 00:50 Over to You (w3cszf57)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:50 on Saturday]


SUN 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7v3zh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 01:06 The Science Hour (w3cszkxl)
Covid-19 defeats US Marines

The WHO is working with China to try and pinpoint the source of SARS- COV-2. Sian Griffiths, Emeritus Professor of Public Health at the Chinese University of Hong Kong says there are lessons we can learn from the investigation she led into the original SARS outbreak back in 2003. That inquiry revealed how SARS had spread from bats to humans via civet cats.

A Covid-19 vaccine claims to be 90% effective. It uses genetic material, messenger RNA. Daniel Anderson of Harvard MIT Health Science tells us about the huge potential of mRNA to provide treatments for many medical conditions.

However, rolling out such a vaccine globally faces a huge range of economic and practical obstacles as ethicist Nicole Hassoun of Binghamton University explains.

And a unique experiment shows despite a vast range of precautions including being isolated US Marines have contracted Covid -19. Stuart Sealfon, Professor of Neurology at Mount Sinai Hospitals says this study shows we need testing to be integrated more thoroughly into everyday life and that many of the precautions we currently use may not be enough to prevent transmission.

We all feel pain on a regular basis; when we stub a toe, break a bone or even experience heartbreak. Bebeto from Cameroon wants to know how to cope with a pain in his wrist that just won’t go away. Does a positive mindset help? Or perhaps meditation? Marnie Chesterton speaks to psychologists and neuroscientists to find the answers.

We hear from two people with very different experiences of pain. Lucy has fibromyalgia and experiences pain all over her body every day. While Stephen has a rare genetic condition which means he doesn’t feel physical pain at all. But they both argue that pain shouldn’t always be unwanted. Perhaps we need to embrace and accept our pain in order to beat it.


(Image: Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7v7qm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bhtrdf04r)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvjm00)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 02:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7vcgr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 03:06 The Documentary (w3ct1cq3)
Blood lands

At dusk on a warm evening in 2016, two men arrive, unexpectedly, at a remote South African farmhouse. The frenzy that follows will come to haunt a community, destroying families, turning neighbours into "traitors", prompting street protests and threats of violence, and dividing the small farming and tourist town of Parys along racial lines. Blood Lands is a murder investigation, a political drama, a courtroom thriller, and a profound exploration of the enduring tensions threatening the “rainbow nation".

Over the course of three years, correspondent Andrew Harding has followed every twist of the police’s hunt for the killers, the betrayals that opened the door to an explosive trial, and the fortunes of all those involved – from the dead men’s families to the handful of men controversially selected for prosecution.

Presenter – Andrew Harding
Producer – Becky Lipscombe
Sound mix – Neil Churchill; Nigel Appleton; Tom Brignall
Editor – Bridget Harney


SUN 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7vh6w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qf)
Afghanistan's murdered hopes

The recent attack on Kabul University didn't only end the lives of dozens of students. It also symbolised the death of many other Afghans' hopes - not just for their own lives, but for their country. Lyse Doucet has been talking to university staff and students who survived the assault about its impact and its aftermath.

Pascale Harter introduces this and other stories of the lives behind the headlines, from BBC correspondents and journalists around the world.

Why was an unremarkable, middle-aged electrician gunned down outside his home in a quiet Dutch town? Jiyar Gol presents the inside story of a remarkable investigation which took him on a mystery tour of several European countries, hunting the truth about what really happened. Even he didn't suspect, two and a half years ago, that the story would be so complex - or that it would reveal a web of intrigue stretching from the Netherlands to Iran and beyond.

Olga Ivshina reports from the Azeri side of the recent fighting over the enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh, and reveals how war reporting has changed in 2020. Now, journalists trying to get to the frontline don't only contend with pushy government minders, gunfire and air strikes - they have to weigh up the risks of Covid 19 as well.

And Tim Whewell explores the conflicted relationship between Napoleon Bonaparte, his beloved Josephine, and her home island of Martinique. While still officially a part of metropolitan France, the island is starting to question its colonial history - including the centuries when its sugar plantations, worked by enslaved people, sent huge profits back to Europe. How deep does that legacy still run today?


SUN 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvjvh8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 04:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 04:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj5)
The importance of fairness

Ernst Fehr is well named: he’s an economist who writes about fairness. In fact, until his pioneering work, economists had been dismissive about whether fairness was a subject worthy of study. Now some have tipped Fehr to win a Nobel Prize. David Edmonds speaks to him about why it pays to be fair, and why people are less selfish than you think.

Presented by David Edmonds
Produced by Robbie Wojciechowski for the BBC World Service

Image: Statue of the scales of justice (Credit: Getty Images)


SUN 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7vlz0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bhtrdfcd4)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 05:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvjz7d)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 05:32 Trending (w3cszvsp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


SUN 05:50 More or Less (w3ct0py8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


SUN 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7vqq4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 06:06 Weekend (w172x7d4q6lt2zv)
Thousands take to the streets for Trump

As thousands took the streets in Washington DC in support of President Trump, how united are the Democrats as Joe Biden plans his transition?

Also, one of the most audacious art heists ever mounted, thirty years ago in Boston, a Dublin underworld figure tells the BBC he knows the identity of the perpetrator, and that the paintings are across the Atlantic in Ireland.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Chitra Nagarajan, a writer and human rights activist specialising in Nigeria - now based in Berlin; and Andrew Mueller, Australian author and broadcaster on Monocle 24 Radio based in London.

(Picture: Trump supporters gather in Washington DC For The "Million Maga March". Credit: Photo by Amy Harris/REX/Shutterstoc)


SUN 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7vvg8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 07:06 Weekend (w172x7d4q6lt6qz)
Tensions escalate in Ethiopia

There's been a major escalation of the conflict in Ethiopia, with rockets fired into neighbouring Eritrea by the rebel Tigrayan authorities. We'll hear the latest reports about the fighting and about the numbers of civilians fleeing.

Also, thousands of people have marched through the streets of Washington in support of President Trump's unfounded claims of fraud in the US election. We'll discuss the psychology behind Mr Trump's refusal to concede.

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Chitra Nagarajan, a writer and human rights activist specialising in Nigeria - now based in Berlin; and Andrew Mueller, Australian author and broadcaster on Monocle 24 Radio based in London.

(Picture: Ethiopians who fled the fighting in Tigray region, sit with their belongings in Hamdait village on the Sudan-Ethiopia border. Credit: Reuters)


SUN 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7vz6d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:06 Weekend (w172x7d4q6ltbh3)
Thousands descend on Washington for Trump

There's been a major escalation of the conflict in Ethiopia, with rockets fired into neighbouring Eritrea by the rebel Tigrayan authorities. We'll hear the latest reports about the fighting and about the numbers of civilians fleeing.

Also, as thousands have protested in Washington DC in support of President Trump, how united are the Democrats as Joe Biden plans his transition?

Joining Julian Worricker to discuss these and other issues are Chitra Nagarajan, a writer and human rights activist specialising in Nigeria - now based in Berlin; and Andrew Mueller, Australian author and broadcaster on Monocle 24 Radio based in London.

(Picture: Thousands take part in a pro-Trump MAGA rally march on Pennsylvania Avenue. Credit: REX/Shutterstock)


SUN 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvkbgs)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 08:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6m)
How can I beat pain?

We all feel pain on a regular basis; when we stub a toe, break a bone or even experience heartbreak. Bebeto from Cameroon wants to know how to cope with a pain in his wrist that just won’t go away. Does a positive mindset help? Or perhaps meditation? Marnie Chesterton speaks to psychologists and neuroscientists to find the answers.

We hear from two people with very different experiences of pain. Lucy has fibromyalgia and experiences pain all over her body every day. While Stephen has a rare genetic condition which means he doesn’t feel physical pain at all. But they both argue that pain shouldn’t always be unwanted. Perhaps we need to embrace and accept our pain in order to beat it.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton. Produced by Caroline Steel for the BBC World Service

[Image: Man in pain. Credit: Getty Images]


SUN 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7w2yj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvkg6x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 09:32 Outlook (w3cszf0q)
In bed with an assassin

Jason P. Howe was a British conflict photographer covering the war in Colombia, when he met a young woman at a bus stop. Her name was Marilyn, and they started a relationship that would last several years.

Over time, it became clear to Jason that Marilyn had another life. She'd disappear at night on her motorcycle. People were scared of her, bars would empty when she entered them. Eventually, she would reveal a violent secret that was shocking even in the context of a warzone. Marilyn was an assassin for Colombian paramilitary forces.

Jason spoke to Outlook's Andrea Kennedy back in 2019.

Image: Jason Howe and Marilyn
Credit: Jason P. Howe


SUN 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7w6pn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:06 WorklifeIndia (w3ct1c14)
How is India celebrating digital Diwali?

Diwali, the festival of lights, is an important time for retailers in India to do brisk business. As the pandemic year drags on, the country has been grappling with Covid-19 cases while enduring one of the longest and strictest lockdowns, so brands are now placing their bets on Diwali.

The five-day festival is considered an auspicious time to make purchases to appease the Hindu goddess of prosperity and wealth, Lakshmi. But is that convincing shoppers to return to the stores amid a health scare?

And how has digital added the new spark to Diwali shopping? Recent studies estimate online sales to grow more than 34% to $6.5bn in India this Diwali. Is the auspicious season-to-spend witnessing a virtual avatar?

In this edition of WorklifeIndia, we discuss how digital is the new shining light for India’s Diwali this year.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Pratap TP, co-founder, Qwikcilver gifting solutions; Ayushi Gudwani, founder and CEO, Fablestreet; Uma Talreja, chief marketing and chief customer officer, Shoppers Stop


SUN 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvkkz1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 10:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1cw3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


SUN 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7wbfs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bhtrdg2vx)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvkpq5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 11:32 The Compass (w3ct1cgm)
Can Germany Save the World?

Can Germany Save the World?: Mutti and her crisis management

A year ago, many Germans were dismissing Angela Merkel as beyond her sell-by date. Her motto, "langsam aber sicher" (slow but sure), was seen as outdated. Covid has transformed that. It is not that she has particularly changed, it is just that the world has come to respect traits that had previously been derided. Germany has now dealt with three crises with extraordinary agility – from unification 30 years ago, to the influx of a million refugees in 2015 and now the pandemic.

John Kampfner looks at these crises and how Germany and Merkel have responded to them. Through the experiences of people across the country, he finds that there is much that can be learned from the way Germany faces its challenges. Is Angela Merkel’s true strength as Germany’s Chancellor her ability to handle a crisis?


SUN 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7wg5x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 12:06 World Questions (w3cszt61)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:06 on Saturday]


SUN 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7wky1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 13:06 Newshour (w172x2z19crkrkm)
Nagorno-Karabakh: Territory handover delayed

The first handover of a district from Armenia to Azerbaijan has been postponed by 10 days. An adviser to the Azerbaijani President said that they had agreed to an Armenian request and that control of Kalbajar would now be transferred on 25th November.

Also on the programme: A look at the world's biggest-ever free trade group that’s just been formed between 15 Asian countries; and we learn more about the relationship between Tigray and Eritrea, and why fighting has broken out between the two.

(Picture: A man reacts as he stands near a house set on fire by departing Ethnic Armenians in the village of Cherektar, in the region of Nagorno-Karabakh Credit: Reuters)


SUN 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7wpp5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 14:06 The Documentary (w3ct1cq3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 today]


SUN 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7wtf9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 15:06 The Forum (w3cszjwb)
The woman whose cells changed medical history

The story of a young mother who unwittingly left behind a vast medical legacy. Henrietta Lacks died of cancer in Baltimore in 1951 and though she never gave consent to her tissue being used for research, doctors at the time found that her unusually virulent tumour had extraordinary properties. As her cells multiplied in labs around the world, they helped make possible all sorts of medical breakthroughs, from the polio vaccine to cancer drugs and IVF treatment. But it took the Lacks family decades to discover what was going on, and the story raises questions for all of us – about medical ethics, institutional racism, and our right to privacy.

Joining Bridget Kendall to discuss this remarkable story are: Henrietta Lacks' grandson David Lacks Jnr who's on the board of the HeLa Genome Access Working Group; the award-winning science writer, Rebecca Skloot, whose book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks brought the story to the world's attention a decade ago; and Sir John Burn, Professor of Clinical Genetics at Newcastle University.

Produced by Jo Impey for BBC World Service

Image: Henrietta Lacks
Image credit: Lacks Family


SUN 15:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]


SUN 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7wy5f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 16:06 Sportsworld (w172x3lhnjblgtr)
Live Sporting Action

Delyth Lloyd will be speaking to 20 time grand slam champion Rafa Nadal ahead of the ATP Tour finals in London. The Spaniard will be discussing his French Open win, the unusual year and his aspirations for the 2021 calendar.

Mental wellbeing - Kelly Catlin, concussion and cycling. In March 2019 USA Olympic cyclist Kelly Catlin committed suicide. The death of the Olympic silver medallist from Rio 2016, and a three-time World champion, shocked the cycling community around the world. 18 months on Delyth Lloyd has spoken to her parents Mark Catlin and Carolyn Emory to discuss Kelly the person, the cyclist and her struggles with depression and the impact a serious concussion may have played a few months before her death. We’ll also hear from other elite cyclists who have been encouraged to speak out about their own struggles with concussion and depression following Kelly’s death. Plus for all the money spent on elite performance and gold medals being defined by the narrowest of margins, what lessons have been learned and what support is available for the mental wellbeing of Olympians.

Golf Blackout It’s the final weekend of golf’s Masters golf at Augusta. This year marks 45 years ago since Lee Elder became the first black golfer to play in the Masters. We hear from players, coaches and caddies about their own experiences on and off tour, the challenges some of the current players have faced and what strides golf needs to take to become more accessible. Interviews include - Joseph Bramlett - one of only four black players on the PGA Tour, first black golfer to graduate from the tour's qualifying school since Adrian Stills in 1985 and Vernel Bennett - president and co-founder of the United Black Golfers Association

Photo: Spain's Rafael Nadal eyes the ball as he returns it to Spain's Pablo Carreno Busta during their men's singles quarter-final tennis match on day 5 at the ATP World Tour Masters 1000 - Paris Masters (Paris Bercy) - indoor tennis tournament at The AccorHotels Arena in Paris on November 6, 2020. (Photo by FRANCK FIFE / AFP) (Photo by FRANCK FIFE/AFP via Getty Images)


SUN 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7x9dt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bhtrdh1ty)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvlnp6)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 19:32 When Katty Met Carlos (w3ct1c4t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Saturday]


SUN 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7xf4y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 20:06 Music Life (w3csz6ts)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Saturday]


SUN 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7xjx2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z19crlqjn)
Obama: "we are very divided right now"

The former US President, Barack Obama, has warned that a lack of commonly held facts - fuelled by conspiracy theories - is causing the United States to become ever more divided and resentful.

Also in the programme: Peru's interim president, Manuel Merino, has stepped down after less than a week in office; and the French bookshop owner defying lockdown orders to close.


(Photo: Former US President Barack Obama speaks during a Voter Mobilization Drive-In Rally in Atlanta, Georgia, the day before the US Presidential election. Credit: EPA/ERIK S. LESSER)


SUN 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7xnn6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79pd0st3n1)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


SUN 22:20 Sports News (w172x3fl04qhdlw)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


SUN 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvm0xl)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 22:32 Outlook (w3cszf0q)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


SUN 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p4tv7xsdb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:06 From Our Own Correspondent (w3csz9qf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:06 today]


SUN 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pz8kvm4nq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


SUN 23:32 Girl Taken (w3ct0xw9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 on Saturday]


SUN 23:50 The Big Idea (w3ct0xj5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 04:50 today]



MONDAY 16 NOVEMBER 2020

MON 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k1rdm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 00:06 BBC OS Conversations (w3ct19yv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 on Saturday]


MON 00:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4r3p0)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 00:32 Discovery (w3csz9fd)
Birds: singing for survival

As large areas of the world have locked down this year, many of us have become more aware of the birdsong around us. The relative silence has allowed us to listen in. But scientists have known for several years that the birds themselves have been responding to human noise too, by pitching their songs and other calls higher, to be heard over the rumble of our urban life.

There are several ways in which birds can adapt how they communicate in the face of environmental pressures, but what are the limits to these adaptations? And what can this tell us about how to maximise conservation efforts in the future? Rory Crawford talks to ornithologists and animal behaviourists studying bird species around the world. He finds out how the advance of technology is helping researchers explore birds’ preferences and behaviours in the wild, and hears how one particular bird changed its song, and the new version rapidly spread across North America – “the most viral tweet of all time”, as it’s been called!

Picture: A Robin [Erithacus rubecula], Credit: Gary Chalker/Getty Images


MON 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k1w4r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 01:06 World Business Report (w172x57y69k27hh)
Covid vaccine: Challenges of distributing it around the world

After highs of a vaccine success story - the difficult questions remain about how the big pharmaceutical firms go about getting it to people around the world.

We head to Ethiopia - once held up as the poster child of of coming economic success on the African continent - now seemingly spiralling towards civil war and a possible conflict with neighbouring Eritrea.

And we'll tell you all about the world's biggest free trade agreement - and what it might mean more generally for global trade.

PHOTO: Getty Images


MON 01:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4r7f4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 01:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1cw3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 22:32 on Saturday]


MON 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k1zww)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pmrb0)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4rc58)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 02:32 The Climate Question (w3ct0x9z)
America v China

Will a Joe Biden presidency be better for the environment than President Trump’s policies? Is China really set to take the lead on tackling climate change? And can the world's two biggest emitters of greenhouse gases work together for the good of the planet?

We're joined by former governor of California Jerry Brown, now with the California-China Climate Institute at Berkeley, and Daily Telegraph journalist Sophia Yan.

Presenters: Neal Razzell, Graihagh Jackson, Vincent Ni
Researcher: Eleanor Biggs
Producer: Anna Meisel
Editor: Ravin Sampat


MON 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k23n0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 03:06 The Forum (w3cszjwb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:06 on Sunday]


MON 03:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5t)
The 'Blind Maradona'

The Argentine blind footballer Silvio Velo is considered one of the greatest players of all time in his sport. Captain of Argentina since 1991, Velo has won two world championships, earning himself the nicknames “The Blind Maradona” and later “The Blind Messi”. He is still scoring goals in his late forties and is credited with boosting the profile of blind sport in South America. Silvio Velo talks to Dan Hardoon. The programme is a Whistledown Production.

(Photo: Silvio Velo in action. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k27d4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pmzt8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4rlnj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 04:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k2c48)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg7pmgz)
Obama: one election won't stop 'truth decay'

Coronavirus cases pass the 11m mark in the USA while Donald Trump still refuses to start handing over power in what former President Obama says remains a hugely divided country.

Peru loses its second president in a week - we try to find out who's in charge of one of the countries worst affected by the virus globally.

And in Ethiopia there are reports of hundreds of deaths from fighting in the northern Tigray region.


MON 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k2gwd)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg7pr73)
Olympics chief says Tokyo games will have spectators

The International Olympic chief says he's confident the Tokyo Games will take place next year in front of spectators, with those attending vaccinated against the coronavirus.

The number of Coronavirus cases has passed the 11million mark in the USA, amid warnings that Donald Trump's refusal to start handing over power may worsen the crisis.

Plus the small European state of Moldova votes to look Europe's way rather than Russia's.


MON 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k2lmj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg7pvz7)
Tokyo Games will have fans, Olympic chief says

The International Olympic chief says he's confident the Tokyo Games will take place next year in front of spectators, with those attending vaccinated against the coronavirus.

A BBC report from Kenya reveals a growing trade in stolen children - babies who are snatched from their mothers and sold for profit.

And the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been told to self isolate - with Brexit just around the corner and his valued adviser ready to leave government.


MON 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k2qcn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2s)
Arancha Gonzalez: How much influence does the EU have?

In the midst of of a pandemic which has inflicted severe damage on the European economy, it is tempting to see the US election victory of Joe Biden as a boost for the EU. After all, Donald Trump seemed to view Europe more as an economic rival than strategic partner. Stephen Sackur speaks to Spain's foreign minister Arancha Gonzalez. What kind of power and influence can the EU wield on the world stage when it is grappling with a covid-recession, Brexit and deep internal division?


MON 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4s2n1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7k8)
The Pink Frontline

A lack of legal protection in many parts of the world leaves many transgender employees vulnerable. Few countries offer legal protection against discrimination of transgender people. This week is transgender awareness week - what role do companies play in the rights of transgender people?
Manuela Saragosa speaks to Caroline Paige, joint chief executive of a UK pressure group called Fighting with Pride. In 1999 she became the first transgender officer to transition openly while serving in the UK Armed Forces, some 19 years after she’d first joined the Royal Air Force as a pilot. South African author of The Pink Line, Mark Gevisser describes the fight to get laws to protect transgender people from discrimination as a new culture war along a human rights frontier. He says one of the most significant markers is which countries allow people to legally change their gender on official documents. Manuela also speaks to Lily Zheng who is a diversity consultant to businesses and organisations and is herself transgender and to Thai university lecturer Kath Khangpiboon, living and working as a woman in Thailand although official documents only recognise her as male.









Pic of Kath Khangpiboon, via Kath Khangpiboon


MON 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmkv)
Captured by Somali pirates

In 2008, Captain Colin Darch and his crew were taking a tug boat from Russia to Singapore when they were attacked by Somali pirates in the Gulf of Aden. They were held hostage for 47 days. In the late 2000s, Somali piracy was starting to become a major threat in the Indian Ocean. Over the next few years there were hundreds of attacks a year until naval forces from around the world deployed to the Gulf of Aden to protect shipping. Alex Last has been talking to Captain Colin Darch about his ordeal.

Photo: An armed Somali pirate keeping vigil on the coast in northeastern Somalia, while the captured Greek cargo ship, MV Filitsa is anchored offshore (MOHAMED DAHIR/AFP via Getty Images)


MON 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k2v3s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 09:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0x9z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4s6d5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 09:32 The Conversation (w3cszj46)
Why are you calling me ‘inspirational’?

How do women with disabilities deal with well-intentioned but patronising interactions? Kim Chakanetsa looks at the way disabled women are portrayed on mainstream and social media, and how they are often described as being 'inspirational' solely, or in part, because of their disability.

Leanora Volpe is a London-based athlete and a member of Great Britain's Paraclimbing Team. Five years ago she was diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome or EDS. She explains how she learned to navigate the world as a woman with a disability, and how it’s opened the door to competitive climbing. As a top athlete, she knows people look up to her as a role model, but she is uncomfortable with being called 'an inspiration' just because of her disability.

Amy Zayed is a music journalist and broadcaster based in Cologne. She was born blind in a family of Egyptian migrants who had just relocated to the German countryside, so she grew up knowing she was perceived as ‘different’. She talks about building a career with - and not 'despite' - her disability, and why people’s discomfort with difference can be harmful.

Producer: Alice Gioia

Image:
L: Leanora Volpe – credit Michelle Tofi
R: Amy Zayed – credit Sonja Niemeier

Audio:
Stella Young – credit TEDxSydney 2014, Sydney Opera House, Australia
Paraclimbing World Championships 2019 – credit International Federation of Sport Climbing (IFSC)


MON 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k2yvx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 10:06 The Cultural Frontline (w3cszj96)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4sb49)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 10:32 Trending (w3cszvsp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:32 on Saturday]


MON 10:50 More or Less (w3ct0py8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:50 on Saturday]


MON 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k32m1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pnv15)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4sfwf)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 11:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6m)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:32 on Sunday]


MON 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k36c5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 12:06 Outlook (w3cszd40)
A scandal at the Oscars: Marlon Brando and me

When Hollywood legend, Marlon Brando won a Best Actor Oscar for his role in The Godfather in 1973, he chose not to accept it. Instead he asked a young Native American woman called Sacheen Littlefeather to go on stage, in front of a televised audience of 85 million people and reject it on his behalf. It was the first time someone had made a political point at the Oscars and would have a profound effect on Sacheen's life and future. Now in her 70s and living with stage four breast cancer, Sacheen tells Jo Fidgen about her controversial speech.
 
Sacheen Littlefeather is the subject of a documentary called Sacheen: Breaking the Silence.
 
When Jung Hoon's parents moved back to North Korea in the 1960s, it was to a life they had not been sold. They were of Korean descent, but the family had been living in Japan from the time that Korea was under Japanese rule. They were not having the greatest time - and in the 1960s, North Korea had this propaganda campaign to encourage ethnic Koreans to come back. The campaign described the country as a kind of utopia - but when they got there and saw the reality, it was too late to change their minds. Jung Hoon spoke to Outlook's Je Seung Lee about his family's experience and life in North Korea. 
 
(Photo: Sacheen Littlefeather refuses Marlon Brando's Academy Award)
Credit: Getty Images


MON 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmkv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k3b39)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pp2jf)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4spcp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 13:32 The Conversation (w3cszj46)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


MON 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k3fvf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z1nn1smh0)
Moderna's vaccine "94.5% effective"

The US biotech company Moderna has announced the first results from its SARS CoV-2 vaccine trial. The trial involved 30,000 people in the US, half of whom were given two doses of the vaccine, four weeks apart, the rest had dummy injections. Of the first 95 people to develop COVID-19 symptoms, only 5 had received the vaccine. The Moderna vaccine is easier to store than that announced by Pfizer and BioNtech last week as it does not need to be kept so cold.


Also in the programme: a year long BBC investigation in Kenya has uncovered evidence of a lucrative trade in stolen children; and why the war in Ethiopia's Tigray province could destabilise the region.

(Picture: Vials and medical syringe are see in front of Moderna logo. Credit: Reuters wires)


MON 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k3klk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4sxvy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlv5kwssf08)
Moderna Covid vaccine shows nearly 95% protection

Early data shows a new vaccine from Moderna could be 95% effective against Covid-19. Michael Kinch is a vaccine specialist and associate vice-chancellor at Washington University in St Louis, and explains the implications of this latest development in the fight against coronavirus. Also in the programme, the BBC's Vishala Sri-Pathma explores how Sri Lanka has been hit by the pandemic, as it continues to be a political and economic battleground for the US, China and India. Plus, as a SpaceX capsule carrying four astronauts continues its journey towards the International Space Station, following a successful launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Centre in Florida, University of Oxford astrophysicist Dr Becky Smethurst discusses the wider significance of this first commercial flight for the new transport system.

(Picture: Hands holding a syringe and a vial. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k3pbp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t408fp1dj)
Coronavirus: Moderna vaccine shows nearly 95% protection

A new vaccine, developed by US company Moderna, has been shown to be nearly 95% effective against Covid-19. It comes just a week after similar results from Pfizer. Dr Eleanor Murray, assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health, tells us her thoughts on the development and answers some of the key questions about the vaccine.

Also, a year-long investigation by BBC Africa Eye has uncovered evidence of illegal underground rings in Kenya that snatch babies from their mothers and sell them for a profit. The BBC's Ferdinand Omondi gives us more details about the investigation.

And we hear from an 18-year-old woman in Chicago in the US who began "eat with me" videos on TikTok, encouraging those with eating disorders to have their meals virtually alongside her.

(Photo: Vials and a medical syringe are seen in front of a displayed Moderna logo. Credit: REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo)


MON 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k3t2t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t408fp54n)
Coronavirus: Being a paramedic in New York

New York has introduced new coronavirus restrictions, with Mayor Bill de Blasio warning it was the city's "last chance" to stop a second surge. The US has now passed 11 million cases of the virus. We hear from a paramedic in New York City to find out how medics are coping with the increase in cases.

Also, two participants in the Moderna vaccine trial give us their reaction to news that the vaccine has been shown to be nearly 95% effective against Covid-19. It comes just a week after similar results from Pfizer.

And we hear from an 18-year-old woman in Chicago in the US who began "eat with me" videos on TikTok, encouraging those with eating disorders to have their meals virtually alongside her.

(Photo: Anthony Almojera, lieutenant paramedic and vice president of the Fire Department of New York's Emergency Medical Services officers' union. Credit: Anthony Almojera)


MON 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k3xty)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 18:06 Outlook (w3cszd40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


MON 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmkv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


MON 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k41l2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60ppt06)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4tdvg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jw4bfg113)
2020/11/16 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


MON 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k45b6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 20:06 The Climate Question (w3ct0x9z)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


MON 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4tjll)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 20:32 Discovery (w3csz9ff)
Broad spectrum

Autism is a lifelong condition, often seen as particularly ‘male’. Yet a growing number of women, and those assigned female at birth, are being diagnosed as autistic in their 30s, 40s, 50s, and beyond. Writer and performer Helen Keen is one of them, and she’s found this diagnosis has helped her make sense of many aspects of her life, from growing up with selective mutism, to struggling to fit in as a young adult. In this programme Helen asks why she, like a growing number of others, had to wait till she was well into adulthood before finding her place on the autistic spectrum. She discovers that for many years psychologists believed that autism was rarely seen in women and non-binary people. Now it is accepted that people often display autistic traits in different way - for example, they may learn to ‘camouflage’ and behave in a neurotypical way - but at what cost? Helen talks to others like her who have had late diagnoses, and finds out if knowing they are on the autistic spectrum has given them insight into how they can navigate the pressures on them from contemporary society. She also explores how we can value and celebrate neurodiversity.

Helen also talks to psychologists Professor Francesca Happé, of the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience in London, and Dr Steven Stagg of Anglia Ruskin University about their research into autism.

Picture: Geometric camouflage pattern, Credit: Yuri Parmenov/Getty Images


MON 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k492b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z1nn1tgpx)
Second Covid-19 vaccine breakthrough nearly 95% effective

A new vaccine that protects against Covid-19 is nearly 95% effective, early data shows. US company Moderna has developed an "RNA vaccine" which it means part of the coronavirus's genetic code is injected into the body.

Also in the programme a BBC investigation uncovers a baby-stealing network in Kenya and Peru has a new president, the third one in a week. (Photo of person being vaccinated. Credit: Getty Images)

(Photo of person being vaccinated. Credit: Getty Images)


MON 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k4dtg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79pr930vt9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


MON 22:20 Sports News (w172x3flcf0q4s4)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


MON 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4ts2v)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58rn14v47s)
Moderna Covid vaccine shows nearly 95% protection

Early data shows a new vaccine from Moderna could be 95% effective against Covid-19. Michael Kinch is a vaccine specialist and associate vice-chancellor at Washington University in St Louis, and explains the implications of this latest development in the fight against coronavirus. Also in the programme, the BBC's Vishala Sri-Pathma explores how Sri Lanka has been hit by the pandemic, as it continues to be a political and economic battleground for the US, China and India. Plus, as a SpaceX capsule carrying four astronauts continues its journey towards the International Space Station, following a successful launch from NASA's Kennedy Space Centre in Florida, University of Oxford astrophysicist Dr Becky Smethurst discusses the wider significance of this first commercial flight for the new transport system.

(Picture: Hands holding a syringe and a vial. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


MON 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k4jkl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


MON 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc2s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


MON 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4twtz)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


MON 23:32 The Conversation (w3cszj46)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



TUESDAY 17 NOVEMBER 2020

TUE 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k4n9q)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 00:06 The History Hour (w3cszkpt)
The Guerrilla Girls

In 1985 a group of anonymous female artists in New York began dressing up with gorilla masks on their heads and putting up fly-posters around the city's museums and galleries. We hear from two of the original Guerrilla Girls, who launched a campaign to demand greater representation for women and minorities in the art world. Also on the programme, the rarely heard voices of Africans who were forced to take sides in WW1; how Pluto lost its status as a planet, the invention of a revolutionary sign language, Makaton, in the 1970s, and changing 20th century theories of child rearing.

PHOTO: Some of the Guerrilla Girls in 1990 (Getty Images)


TUE 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k4s1v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19342wy04r)
Moderna Covid vaccine shows 95% protection

Early data shows a new vaccine from Moderna could be 95% effective against Covid-19. Michael Kinch is a vaccine specialist and associate vice-chancellor at Washington University in St Louis, and explains the implications of this latest development in the fight against coronavirus.

Also, we're in Europe where a 1.8 trillion euro package is being threatened by two countries who claim the EU is compromising their sovereignty.

And - we are asking if Sri Lanka is too dependent on Chinese money?

Plus - why have Hollywood stars Ryan Reynolds and Rob McElhenney decided to buy Wrexham football club? The Welsh club is in English football's fifth tier following their relegation from the Football League in 2008.

We are joined by Jyoti Malhotra in India and Hayley Woodin in Canada

PHOTO: Moderna/Reuters


TUE 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k4wsz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pqn73)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4v82c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 02:32 The Documentary (w3ct1ck0)
Obesity crisis in Thai temples

Very early every morning, Thai Buddhist monks leave their monasteries to seek alms. They have been doing this since the time of the Buddha who stated that monks cannot cook for themselves. They can only eat food that has been given to them.

By giving alms, people are making merit for themselves and their ancestors and so, whilst the food takes care of the monks’ physical health, the monks can concentrate on the spiritual wellbeing of the nation by offering blessings in return for food and spending many hours each day in prayer and meditation.

Obesity is a growing problem in Thailand. As the country becomes more affluent, its citizens are working more and cooking less which means that they are buying more convenience foods containing high levels of fat and sugar.

In the Thai population at large, one in three men is obese but the numbers are worse in Thai temples where one in two Buddhist monks is obese. They eat the same food as the Thai population and they only eat in the mornings so what is the problem?

Sucheera Maguire has been to Bangkok to talk to those who give and receive alms and she takes a look at some of the ingenious solutions that Thai nutritionists have come up with to combat the obesity crisis in Thai temples.

(Photo: Thai monk giving blessings to a street food trader. Credit: Helen Lee)


TUE 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k50k3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 03:06 Outlook (w3cszd40)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Monday]


TUE 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmkv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Monday]


TUE 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k5497)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pqwqc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4vhkm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 04:32 Discovery (w3csz9ff)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k581c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg7sjd2)
Covid: delays in transition could cost US lives

A second vaccine performs well in tests, but in the US - one of the worst affected countries - President-elect Joe Biden says the delays in presidential transition could cost lives.

Honduras is hit by another monster hurricane, before it's even recovered from the last one.

And why moose are licking cars in Canada.


TUE 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k5csh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg7sn46)
A second Coronavirus vaccine performs well in tests

The US president-elect, Joe Biden, has said more people could die from Covid-19 if President Trump prevents co-ordination with the incoming administration.

Concerns about a rise in cyber attacks on healthcare organisations working on vaccines, Microsoft says it's so far detected seven attacks on prominent companies.

And one of the Sisters Sledge talks about her disco remix in response to Covid-19.


TUE 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k5hjm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg7srwb)
Covid: President-elect says he would not hesitate to be vaccinated

As a second Coronavirus vaccine is announced US President-elect Joe Biden says he's concerned delays in the presidential transition could cost lives, but maintains most vulnerable must be given first.

Several Indian garment factories being investigated for bad working conditions.

Football: Arsenal captain Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and his Gabon team-mates spent the night sleeping on an airport floor ahead of their African Cup of Nations qualifier against Gambia.


TUE 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k5m8r)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv22)
From prison to star employee

Why former criminals are being chosen for jobs at hundreds of companies in a small US city.

One boss even tells us that some violent and sex offenders have become her best employees.

Produced and presented by Jo Mathys

Photo: Getty Images


TUE 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4vzk4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8b9)
Varoufakis: My alternative to capitalism

With Covid rampaging and many economies on life-support, some say we need to look beyond capitalism. A blue-sky thinker, the outspoken former Greek finance minister, Yanis Varoufakis, gives his thoughts on a radical alternative to standard market economics, including making all employees shareholders in corporations. And Miatta Fahnbulleh, chief executive of the New Economics Foundation, imagines how this might ever be seriously attempted in practice.


TUE 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmqc)
The world's first woman premier

Sirimavo Bandaranaike was elected the modern world's first female head of government in 1960 when she became Prime Minister of Sri Lanka or Ceylon as it was known then. She entered politics after the assassination of her husband Solomon Bandrainaike in 1959. Farhana Haider has been speaking to her daughter Sunethra Bandaranaike about her mother's remarkable political achievement.

Photo Sirimavo Bandaranaike the Prime Minister of Ceylon (later Sri Lanka), 1960. Credit Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images


TUE 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k5r0w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:06 The Documentary (w3ct1ck0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4w398)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 09:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc5)
Chick Corea: Accomplishing the goal of art

Chick Corea is one of the legendary figures of jazz. He’s a pianist, a 23-times Grammy award winner and he’s played with all the jazz greats, like Miles Davis. He’s also recognised the world over as a composer, with hits like “Spain” and work ranging from bebop to fusion, works for children and symphonic works for classical players.

In January this year, reporter Renata Sago began recording with Chick as he composed a new Trio Concerto for bass, drums and himself on piano. It was to have its first performance at the MUPA concert hall in Hungary’s capital Budapest in March. In his studio in Florida USA, Renata talks to him about how he writes and where his many sources of inspiration come from. And she hears from Chick that although he’s composed the music he’ll be performing, sometimes it’s not easy to play and he has to do a lot of practising.

The pandemic meant that the premiere was later cancelled – but Covid-19 hasn’t slowed Chick down. In fact during the past few months he’s been taking on new projects and is looking forward to playing in front of a live audience again for the first time for months.

Renata catches up with him again to find out what he’s working on now, how he’s found a new audience in lockdown and how he turns to all kinds of musical styles to help him accomplish the goal of art.

Presented by Renata Sago
Produced by Emma Kingsley for BBC World Service

Photograph of Chick Corea


TUE 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k5vs0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 10:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


TUE 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k5zj4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60prqy8)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4wbsj)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 11:32 Discovery (w3csz9ff)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Monday]


TUE 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k6388)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdkk)
The accidental sleuth who solved a murder

When a millionaire farmer went missing in Sweden, an inexperienced volunteer called Therese Tang was drafted in to help search for him. She had her suspicions about a member of the man's family - and found an unorthodox way to get to the truth.  This story was first broadcast on Outlook in January 2019.

Sara Faith Alterman was eight when she accidently discovered that her prudish dad was secretly a globally successful writer of adult books. Growing up, it was never discussed, but when he was dying of Alzheimer's in his late 60s, he asked Sara to help him write again before it was too late. She shares her story with Outlook's Mariana Des Forges.

Sara Faith Alterman's memoir is called Lets Never Talk about this Again.

A book has also been written about Therese Tang's experience - it's called The Dark Heart by Joakim Palmkvist.

The presenter is Jo Fidgen.

Picture: Therese Tang
Credit: Suvad Mrkonic


TUE 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k670d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60przfj)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4wl8s)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 13:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


TUE 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k6brj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z1nn1wjd3)
Abiy Ahmed's Tigray ultimatum runs out

A 3-day ultimatum issued by Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed to the ruling TPLF in Tigray province has expired. Is there any chance the TPLF will surrender - and if not, is civil war now unstoppable? Are neighbouring countries already involved? And can the international community help pull Ethiopia back from the brink and avoid a much more serious humanitarian crisis?

Also in the programme: a BBC investigation uncovers evidence of workers being exploited in Indian factories supplying British supermarkets; and a project to bring four centuries of historic smells back to life.

(PIcture: Ethiopians at the Setit River on the Sudan-Ethiopia border in Hamdait village in eastern Kassala state. Credit: Reuters Wires)


TUE 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k6ghn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4wts1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlwtgc07xry)
Hungary and Poland block EU budget

The EU's Covid-19 financial rescue package has been blocked by Hungary and Poland. Zoltan Kovacks is official spokesman for the Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orban, and tells us why the country has taken this step. And Terry Reintke, German MEP for the Green Party discusses whether funds for a rescue package will ever be disbursed. Also in the programme, following a devastating fire in the Grenfell Tower in London, which took 72 lives, the BBC's Sarah Corker reports on the financial and emotional impact that replacement of the type of exterior cladding used at Grenfell, and implicated in the fire, has had on people living in similar tower blocks all over the UK. Plus, with many people stuck at home during the pandemic, there has been a sharp rise in sales of DIY products this year. Kaitlin Madden edits Real Homes magazine in the US, and talks us through the sort of projects that people are undertaking.

(Picture: European flags. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k6l7s)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t408fry9m)
Ethiopia conflict developing into a 'full-scale humanitarian crisis'

The conflict in Ethiopia's northern Tigray region is developing into a "full-scale humanitarian crisis", the UN has said. At least 27,000 people have so far fled to neighbouring Sudan, and the UN says its teams there are overwhelmed. We bring you the latest on what's happening in Ethiopia.

Also, since the start of this pandemic we have been bringing you conversations with people around the world to hear how their lives have been affected by coronavirus. Today we go to Latin America and speak to three women to hear how their countries across the region have been affected by rising rates of domestic violence and less access to help.

And every day we invite a medical expert to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer audience questions. Today, we will be joined by Dr Isaac Bogoch - an infectious diseases physician and scientist from the University of Toronto.

(Photo: An Ethiopian who fled the ongoing fighting in Tigray region, prepares a meal in Hamdait village on the Sudan-Ethiopia border in eastern Kassala state, Sudan, November 14, 2020. Credit: Reuters/El Tayeb Siddig)


TUE 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k6pzx)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t408fs21r)
Coronavirus conversations: Women in Latin America

Since the start of this pandemic we have been bringing you conversations with people around the world to hear how their lives have been affected by coronavirus. Today we go to Latin America which has been one of the epicentres of the pandemic. We speak to three women to hear how their countries across the region have been affected by rising rates of domestic violence and less access to help.

Also, the conflict in Ethiopia's northern Tigray region is developing into a "full-scale humanitarian crisis", the UN has said. At least 27,000 people have so far fled to neighbouring Sudan, and the UN says its teams there are overwhelmed. We hear from relatives of people in the region who can't get in contact with their loved ones.

And, we are returning to frontline health workers around the world to hear how they have been coping throughout the pandemic. Today we go to France, which is in lockdown and experiencing a second wave of coronavirus, and speak to a emergency doctor in Paris.

(Photo: Arlete Mendes from Sao Paulo, Brazil. Credit: Arlete Mendes)


TUE 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k6tr1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdkk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


TUE 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


TUE 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k6yh5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pspx9)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4x9rk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jw4bfjxy6)
2020/11/17 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


TUE 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k7279)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:06 The Documentary (w3ct1ck0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


TUE 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4xfhp)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 20:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98x)
Video games can be good for you

Playing video games is positively linked with wellbeing according research from the Oxford Internet Institute. The new study is the first of its kind as, instead of asking players how much they play, it uses industry data on actual play time for popular video games EA's Plants vs Zombies: Battle for Neighborville and Nintendo's Animal Crossing: New Horizons. The study suggests that experiences of competence and connecting with others through playing the games may contribute to people’s wellbeing – however if you already are in a bad mood, playing video games is not going to improve your mood! Professor Andrew Przybylski, Director of Research at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, explains the findings.

Underwater navigation 'solved'
GPS does not work underwater and powering location devices so they can emit sound with batteries is not practical in wet environments. This means that locating animals and robots underwater is not easy. Now though a team at MIT may have found a solution that uses sound for navigation and by reflecting signals from the underwater environment doesn't need batteries. Possible applications include marine conservation, climate data gathering and mapping the ocean itself.

Brazilians on lower incomes are embracing digital services
A new study by the Brazilian Network Information Center shows that Brazilians on lower incomes are turning to digital services - especially fintech - during the COVID19 pandemic. The unbanked population has fallen by about 70% in the country as more and more people use apps and computers to move money.

The programme is presented by Gareth Mitchell with expert commentary from Angelica Mari.

(Main Image: Still from Animal Crossing game Copyright: Nintendo)

Studio Manager: Donald MacDonald
Producer: Ania Lichtarowicz


TUE 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k75zf)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z1nn1xcm0)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


TUE 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k79qk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79pr933rqd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


TUE 22:20 Sports News (w172x3flcf0t1p7)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


TUE 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4xnzy)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58rn14y14w)
Facebook and Twitter grilled over US election actions

Democrats questioned whether steps taken to flag that President Trump's claims of election fraud were "disputed" had gone far enough. Republican members of the Judiciary Committee asked whether the tech firms should be taking such action at all.

Also in the programme, following a devastating fire in the Grenfell Tower in London, which took 72 lives, the BBC's Sarah Corker reports on the financial and emotional impact that replacement of the type of exterior cladding used at Grenfell, and implicated in the fire, has had on people living in similar tower blocks all over the UK.

Plus, with many people stuck at home during the pandemic, there has been a sharp rise in sales of DIY products this year. Kaitlin Madden edits Real Homes magazine in the US, and talks us through the sort of projects that people are undertaking.

And - with the fourth season of the Crown underway, we look at the importance of royal fashion.

PHOTO: Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey/EPA

(Picture: European flags. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


TUE 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k7fgp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:06 People Fixing the World (w3cszv22)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


TUE 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4xsr2)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


TUE 23:32 In the Studio (w3cszvc5)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



WEDNESDAY 18 NOVEMBER 2020

WED 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k7k6t)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 00:06 The Arts Hour (w3cszk3r)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:06 on Saturday]


WED 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k7nyy)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19342x0x1v)
Republicans alarmed by withdrawal from Afghanistan plans for US forces

The Pentagon has confirmed that President Trump would further slash the number of US troops in Afghanistan and Iraq. Those in Afghanistan will be almost halved, to two thousand five hundred - Iraq will have the same number after a smaller reduction.

Also in the programme - Facebook and Twitter bosses were grilled in the Senate over US election actions.

Plus - prisoners in El Paso, Texas, were spotted moving bodies of deceased Covid-19 patients for which they were paid $2 an hour. Hundred of thousands of prisoners who work get paid no more than a few cents an hour. Many get nothing. And most are working for private companies, including prisons themselves, which are profiting hugely from their work. We take a deeper look at the legal, social and ethical framework around prison labour in the US with Genevieve Le Baron, professor of Politics at the University of Sheffield and the Co-Chair of Yale University’s Modern Slavery Working Group.

And - with the fourth season of the Crown underway, we look at the importance of royal fashion.

Throughout the programme we are joined by guests David Kuo in Singapore and Erin Delmore in the US.

PHOTO: US troops in Iraq/Reuters


WED 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k7sq2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60ptk46)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4y4zg)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 02:32 The Compass (w3ct1cgn)
Can Germany Save the World?

Can Germany Save the World?: Building a post-Covid society

As governments around the world rethink their economies and societies after Covid, addressing the environment, towns and cities and the way we live, is it possible that Germany is closer to finding the answers?

In this programme, John Kampfner looks at where they’re getting it right, and where they are going wrong. The contradictions are many. Why is a country with one of the most powerful and longest-established green parties struggling to meet its climate emissions targets? Given their strength in engineering and science, why have they fallen behind on some of the basics of tech? And in spite of the emphasis on social responsibility, why have there been so many high-profile corporate scandals?

There’s another curiosity. It’s sometimes called 'entschleunigung' - work-life balance. But it’s more than that. Germans have generally shunned what they see as the sharp-elbowed culture of the Anglo-Saxon world. Where else would the disused Tempelhof airport in the centre of Berlin be kept for the enjoyment of local roller-bladers, cyclists and walkers rather than be developed into real estate? And what other capital city is toying with the possibility of giant property companies being forced to hand back private apartments to the state? Could this more eccentric form of communal capitalism present a model for the future?


WED 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k7xg6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdkk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Tuesday]


WED 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmqc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Tuesday]


WED 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k816b)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60ptsmg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4ydgq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 04:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k84yg)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg7wf95)
Trump fires election official who contradicted him

President Trump sacks his top cyber security official for saying there was no evidence of electoral fraud in this month's election.

In Sri Lanka coronavirus cases are surging.

Bitcoin, the world's best-known cryptocurrency, has hit a three-year high.


WED 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k88pl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg7wk19)
President Trump: 'you're fired' to US cyber chief

President Trump sacks a top election official on twitter after he contradicted his claims of voter fraud.

The Czech Republic gradually opens up again following lockdown, but slowly as primary school children go back today.

Belarusian leader Alexander Lukashenko demands the removal of improvised memorials to dead protesters from the capital city Minsk as thousands continue to take to the streets.


WED 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k8dfq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg7wnsf)
Trump defies traditional 'lame duck' role

Donald Trump may be busy contesting the outcome of the elections, but that's not all he's doing in his final months in office: he's also taking more foreign policy decisions such as a further reduction of US troops in Afghanistan and Iraq.

The Covid-19 pandemic: we look at a case here in the UK where middlemen collected almost 30 million dollars for providing personal protective equipment.

BBC special report: Rwandan authorities don't take lightly to dissent at home, but are they now also trying to bring members of the diaspora into line?


WED 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k8j5v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc79)
Judit Varga: How far is Hungary prepared to go in its defiance of the EU?

The EU has long threatened to punish the populist nationalist government in Hungary for a failure to uphold core EU values. So far the threats have been empty, but now there’s a concerted effort to link post-Covid financial aid to compliance with core principles on the rule of law. Stephen Sackur speaks to Hungary’s Justice Minister Judit Varga. How far is Hungary prepared to go in its defiance of Brussels institutions and EU norms?

(Photo: Judit Varga via video link on Hardtalk)


WED 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4ywg7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz8nl)
Your digital legacy

The companies managing your online life after death. Ed Butler speaks to Tom Ainsworth, CEO of Memories, an online memorial service that provides messages from beyond the grave, and to Rikard Steiber, founder of startup GoodTrust, which aims to help people take control of their digital legacies. Pyschologist Dr Elaine Kasket discusses the phenomenon of online death in the age of the pandemic, and why online legacies may be less permanent than we think.

(Photo: A funeral is livestreamed in Austria earlier this year, Credit: Getty Images)


WED 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmsm)
America's WW2 refugee camp

In August 1944 President Franklin D Roosevelt agreed to allow nearly one thousand Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe to come to America. They were allowed entry only as "guests", so as not to breach strict US immigration quotas in place during the whole of WW2. The refugees, who arrived on a troop ship from Italy, were housed in a former military barracks, Fort Ontario, near the city of Oswego in upper state New York. For those who'd recently been imprisoned in Nazi concentration camps in Europe, it was a traumatic experience to find themselves once again behind barbed wire. Mike Lanchin has been hearing the memories of two of the former refugees Elfi Hendell and Doris Schechter.

Photo: A young refugee talking to local American children at Fort Ontario, Oswego, NY, August 1944 (Getty Images)

(Thanks also to USC Shoah Foundation for audio archive)


WED 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k8mxz)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 09:06 The Compass (w3ct1cgn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4z06c)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 09:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cy7)
The five-day election

Philippa Thomas hears from voters across the United States on the agony and ecstasy of waiting for results of the unusually protracted presidential election.

(Photo: Voters wait to cast their ballots in the 2020 US presidential election at the C. Blythe Andrews, Jr. Public Library, Tampa, USA. Credit: Peter Foley/EPA)


WED 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k8rp3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 10:06 The Documentary (w3ct1cq3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


WED 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k8wf7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pvmvc)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4z7pm)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 11:32 Digital Planet (w3csz98x)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Tuesday]


WED 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k905c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdsb)
Skin: the scream that made me a rock star

Skin is the lead singer of Skunk Anansie, the multiplatinum-selling band whose political, in-your-face music stood out from the 1990s UK music scene. Skin had to forge her own path as a black, queer woman in the white male world of rock music, describing how she grew from a painfully shy church girl into a performer famous for her screaming vocals and bold stage antics. The turning point in her life was deciding to confront an aggressive sexual predator who had been stalking her - giving her a 'fearlessness that never left'.
 
Main Image: Skin Credit: Christie Goodwin / Redferns via Getty Images


WED 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmsm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k93xh)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pvwbm)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4zh5w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 13:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cy7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]


WED 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k97nm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z1nn1zf96)
US to almost halve troop numbers in Afghanistan

President Trump has announced that he will cut US troop numbers in Afghanistan from 4,500 to 2,500 by mid-January. We get the reaction of the Afghan government and a British former general with responsibility for Afghanistan.

Also in the programme: thousands of protesters in Thailand call for constitutional changes to reduce the powers of the monarchy and the military-backed ruling party; and a new study suggests dinosaurs were thriving until an asteroid hit the earth 66 million years ago.

(Picture: US soldiers attend a training session for Afghan Army soldiers in Afghanistan in February 2019. Credit: European Pressphoto Agency)


WED 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k9cdr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc79)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv4zqp4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlxmx2m143b)
Ban on new petrol and diesel cars in UK from 2030

New cars powered wholly by petrol and diesel will not be sold in the UK from 2030. Estelle Symonds runs EV Expert, a car dealership that sells second hand electric vehicles, and discusses the market for them as compared to traditional cars. The BBC's Ed Butler reports on efforts to make it easier to deal with people's digital legacies on social media after they die. Plus, we hear about the key role of bloggers when it comes to modern royal fashion, from Elizabeth Holmes, author of HRH: So Many Thoughts on Royal Style.

(Picture: Exhaust pipe emissions. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


WED 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k9h4w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t408fvv6q)
Ethiopia conflict: Government forces advance on Tigray

Ethiopia's forces have advanced into the northern region of Tigray where soldiers loyal to the local political party are fighting the central government. Tigray's leader confirmed the losses but said it was a temporary setback and vowed to defeat the government. We bring you the latest from Ethiopia and explain what the conflict is all about.

Also, we have been talking to Australian rugby league fans, who were among the biggest sports crowd in the world since the pandemic began. Almost 50,000 were in the stadium to watch Queensland play New South Wales. They’ve been telling us about the coronavirus restrictions and being back in a sports crowd.

And every day we invite a health expert on to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer audience questions. Today, we will be joined by Dr Maria Sundaram, infectious disease epidemiologist at ICES Ontario in Toronto.

(Photo: Ethiopians who fled the ongoing fighting in Tigray region, as they wait to be processed for emergency food and logistics support by the World Food Program in Hamdait village on the Sudan-Ethiopia border in eastern Kassala state, Sudan November 17, 2020. Credit: Reuters)


WED 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k9lx0)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t408fvyyv)
Coronavirus conversations: Senegalese business owners

As part of our conversations with people affected by Covid-19, we will spend time hearing from Senegal;, a country that has been widely praised for its handling of the virus, despite only having seven doctors for every 100,000 people. We’ll hear from a doctor and two people trying to run their businesses in through the pandemic.

Also, Ethiopia's forces have advanced into the northern region of Tigray where soldiers loyal to the local political party are fighting the central government. Tigray's leader confirmed the losses but said it was a temporary setback and vowed to defeat the government. We bring you the latest from Ethiopia and explain what the conflict is all about.

And, we are returning to frontline health workers around the world to hear how they have been coping throughout the pandemic. Today we go to Spain, which is going through a second wave of coronavirus, and speak to an emergency doctor in Madrid.

(Photo: A woman wears a protective mask while sitting outside her house, as the global spread of the coronavirus disease continues, in Ouakam neighbourhood of Dakar, Senegal October 23, 2020. Credit: Reuters/Zohra Bensemra)


WED 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k9qn4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdsb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


WED 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmsm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


WED 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k9vd8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pwltd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv506nn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jw4bfmtv9)
2020/11/18 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


WED 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p563k9z4d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 20:06 The Compass (w3ct1cgn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


WED 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv50bds)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 20:32 Health Check (w3cszcct)
Measles outbreak threat due to Covid

Global measles deaths were already at a 23 year high in 2019 after several years of inadequate immunisation levels in a number of countries around the world. The coronavirus pandemic looks set to make matters worse. The World Health Organisation is worried that disruptions to measles vaccination programmes this year in Africa have substantially raised the risk of large outbreaks in many countries. Immunisation coverage needs to be maintained at 95% or more to keep measles suppressed. Too many babies have missed routine measles vaccination at 9 months and planned special immunisation campaigns in areas where the coverage was already too low pre-Covid had to be cancelled. We talk to paediatrician Ifedayo Adetifa at the Kemri Wellcome research programme in Kenya who’s been modelling outbreak scenarios in Kenya of this situation. The risk of large outbreaks of measles in Kenya is now much greater, and likely to be worse in other countries in the region. But mounting vaccination campaigns as soon as possible would reduce the risk to zero.

Sian Griffiths reports from a Canadian school in Quebec which is in the middle of a Covid-19 red zone. The school’s principal decided to move classes outdoors to reduce the infection risk to pupils and staff. Many lessons are happening in three big wedding marquees erected in the school grounds, and the principal plans to keep this going through the Canadian winter.

A new study in BMJ Global Health identifies a widely unrecognised danger to the hundreds of millions of people (mainly women) who have to leave their homes to fetch water for their households. This is physical injury. A survey of more than 6,000 households in 24 countries in Africa, the Middle East, Asia and Latin America found that about 15% of them have been injured while fetching water for the family. The researchers were shocked by this. Injuries include broken limbs, dislocations, lacerations and burns. Northwestern University’s Sera Young says the causes range from falling over while carrying the water, falling into wells, physical assault, animal attacks and road accidents between the home and communal water sources.

Family doctor Ann Robinson is Claudia’s guest this week to talk about measles, the Moderna Covid vaccine and the latest results from trials of polypills.

Presenter: Claudia Hammond
Producer: Andrew Luck-Baker

(Picture: Children outside a field clinic during a vaccination program against measles in Bangui in 2014. Photo credit: Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images.)


WED 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kb2wj)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z1nn208j3)
What's next for US Middle East policy?

The US Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, is in Israel for what’s expected to be his last visit to the country before leaving office. We explore how America's Middle East policy might change under a Biden administration.
Also - Ethiopian forces capture two cities from local forces in the northern region of Tigray. But how concerned is the government in Addis over reports of civilian casualties? And in the week that six million copies of Barack Obama's new book are printed - what makes a good presidential memoir?

(Photo: Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in Jerusalem, 18 November 2020. Credit: EPA/MENAHEM KAHANA)


WED 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kb6mn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79pr936nmh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


WED 22:20 Sports News (w172x3flcf0wylb)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


WED 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv50kx1)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58rn150y1z)
Pfizer releases Covid vaccine safety data

The US pharmaceutical giant Pfizer has released the safety data for its coronavirus vaccine - the last hurdle before regulators meet to approve its use. It's also increased its assessment of the drug's effectiveness to 95% - matching the rival vaccine made by Moderna. According to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) - part of the WHO - vaccinating even one in five people in Latin America and the Caribbean will be extremely expensive.

New cars powered wholly by petrol and diesel will not be sold in the UK from 2030. Estelle Symonds runs EV Expert, a car dealership that sells second hand electric vehicles, and discusses the market for them as compared to traditional cars.

The BBC's Ed Butler reports on efforts to make it easier to deal with people's digital legacies on social media after they die.

Plus, Boeing 737 Max has been cleared to fly again, but is that the end of Boeing's problems?

PHOTO: Reuters


WED 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kbbcs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


WED 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszc79)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


WED 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv50pn5)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


WED 23:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cy7)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:32 today]



THURSDAY 19 NOVEMBER 2020

THU 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kbg3x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 00:06 The Documentary (w3ct1cq3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 03:06 on Sunday]


THU 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kbkw1)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19342x3syy)
Will Covid vaccinations start by the end of the year?

New York City is temporarily closing its schools eight weeks after they reopened, fearing that a second wave of coronavirus has arrived. That announcement came on the day the US department of health said the two coronavirus vaccines developed by Pfizer and Moderna could be available for use within weeks.

Boeing 737 Max has been cleared to fly again, but is that the end of Boeing's problems?

Also in the programme, we hear about plans to ban sales of new cars powered wholly by petrol and diesel from 2030 in the UK.

And, we look at the efforts to make it easier to deal with people's digital legacies on social media after they die.

Plus - the problem with online translations.

We are joined throughout the programme by guests Shuli Ren in Hong Kong and Mitchell Hartman in the US

PHOTO: Getty Images


THU 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kbpm5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pxg19)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv511wk)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 02:32 Assignment (w3csz6m1)
Martinique: The poisoning of paradise

“First we were enslaved. Then we were poisoned.” That’s how many on Martinique see the history of their French Caribbean island that, to tourists, means sun, rum, and palm-fringed beaches. Slavery was abolished in 1848. But today the islanders are victims again – of a toxic pesticide called chlordecone that’s poisoned the soil and water and been linked by scientists to unusually high rates of prostate cancer. For more than 10 years chlordecone was authorised for use in banana plantations – though its harmful effects were already known. Now, more than 90% of Martinicans have traces of it in their blood. The pollution means many can't grow vegetables in their gardens - and fish caught close to the shore are too dangerous to eat. French President Emmanuel Macron has called it an ‘environmental scandal’ and said the state ‘must take responsibility’. But some activists on the island want to raise wider questions about why the pesticide was used for so long – and on an island divided between a black majority and a small white minority, it’s lost on no-one that the banana farmers who used the toxic chemical and still enjoy considerable economic power are, in many cases, descendants of the slave owners who once ran Martinique. Reporting from the island for Assignment, Tim Whewell asks how much has changed there. Is Martinique really an equal part of France? And is there equality between descendants of slaves and the descendants of their masters, even now?

Produced and presented by Tim Whewell
Editor, Bridget Harney

(Image: Sunset on a beach in Martinique. Credit: DeAgostini/Getty Images)


THU 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kbtc9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdsb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Wednesday]


THU 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmsm)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Wednesday]


THU 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kby3f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pxpjk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv519ct)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 04:32 Health Check (w3cszcct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kc1vk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg7zb68)
Australia elite troops 'killed Afghan civilians'

There is "credible evidence" that Australian special forces unlawfully killed 39 people during the Afghan conflict, a long-awaited report has found.

In Ethiopia, concerns mount over civilian casualties as government forces reportedly enter rebel towns in Tigray - we'll talk to a senior UN refugee official.

And another day, another vaccine: the so-called Oxford vaccine is set to release its results amid much fanfare and considerable hope.


THU 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kc5lp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg7zfyd)
Australian military apologises for Afghan deaths

A four-year report finds that Australian elite troops killed 39 civilians in Afghanistan - sometimes in initiation ceremonies - and then planted fake evidence to cover it up.

As the US records more the a quarter of a million deaths from Covid-19, we hear more about the race to finish develop & distribute vaccines.

And with Donald Trump maintaining fraud in the recent US elections we hear from the state of Georgia - which narrowly swung Democrat for the first time in decades - but where Mr Trump's refusal to concede victory is fuelling conspiracy theories among his supporters.


THU 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kc9bt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg7zkpj)
Report finds civilians killed by Australian special forces

Forces chief apologises for 39 killings, emphasising they were premeditated and not in the 'heat of battle'.

There are two Covid vaccines on the way already and today we'll find out more about a 3rd one as the University of Oxford and the pharmaceutical company Astro Zeneca present their findings.

And why scientists are now looking at bacteria in our guts to understand what causes brain debilitating diseases such as Alzheimer's.


THU 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kcf2y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 08:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4d)
What will Donald Trump do next?

After four years in office, Donald Trump is about to become an ex-president.

Charmaine Cozier looks at how the coming months and years might play out for Donald Trump, including a rocky handover to Joe Biden, the potential legal and financial jeopardy that might await him as a citizen, and even the prospect that he might run for president again in 2024.


THU 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv51scb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz7y2)
Can Fintech fuel Africa’s Covid recovery?

2019 was a landmark year for investment into digital financial services, or Fintech, across Africa. Despite the pandemic, the Fintech scene is not only still thriving; it’s poised to play a key role in Africa’s economic recovery. Uzoma Dozie, the head of Nigerian startup Sparkle, says with Covid limiting our ability to handle cash, the cashless revolution in Africa is moving along rapidly. But Viola Llewellyn, president of Ovamba Solutions, which helps finance small businesses across Africa, says some sectors of African banking still lagged behind in digital services provision. Barbara Iyayi of Unicorn Growth Capital says Africa has a “perfect storm” of a young population, prevalent mobile services and a low rate of bank account holding, means Fintech will thrive across African economies but the infrastructure needs to be built up more.

(Image credit: Getty Creative)


THU 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmn3)
Our Bodies, Ourselves

Some have described Our Bodies, Ourselves as “obscene trash” – for others it’s a vital source of information about women’s health and sexuality. First published in 1973, this radical, and sometimes controversial, book has become a best-seller and a global phenomenon. Josephine Casserly talks to one of the authors, Joan Ditzion.


THU 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kcjv2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 09:06 Assignment (w3csz6m1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv51x3g)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 09:32 The Documentary (w3ct1cyv)
Barack Obama talks to David Olusoga

Ahead of the release of his memoirs, the former President talks to David Olusoga


THU 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kcnl6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 10:06 The Forum (w3cszjwc)
First impressions: The printing press

When the fifteenth century German entrepreneur Johannes Gutenberg pioneered the printing press, he made an indelible mark on the history of communication. Here was a way to print pages in high quality and high quantities, using methods more efficient than had ever been seen before.

Rajan Datar and guests explore the story of how the printing press was born, and how it changed our world - from the birth of the modern book to the rise of the information society, and the transformation of fields including scholarship and religion.

Rajan is joined by art historian Hala Auji, publisher Michael Bhaskar, scholar Cristina Dondi and the writer John Man.

[Image: A bas-relief of Johannes Gutenberg checking his work while his assistant turns the press, c.1450. Credit: by Hulton Archive/Getty Images]


THU 10:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5v)
Judit Polgar - the chess champion who defied stereotypes

In 1991, the Hungarian chess prodigy, Judit Polgar, became the youngest Grandmaster ever at the age of 15. She speaks to Robert Nicholson about her unconventional childhood and how her extraordinary career defied expectations for female players. This programme was first broadcast in 2015.

PHOTO: Judit Polgar (EPA)


THU 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kcsbb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pyjrg)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv524lq)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 11:32 Health Check (w3cszcct)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Wednesday]


THU 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kcx2g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 12:06 Outlook (w3cszdbs)
Fire, ice and thunder: a chase on the high seas

The Thunder was the most notorious and elusive poaching ship in the world; for ten years governments had struggled to catch it. Then, in 2014, a crew from the organisation Sea Shepherd - known for its anti-whaling activity - found it illegally hunting Patagonian toothfish in the ice flows of the Antarctic and decided to stop it. They pursued the Thunder for 110 days over 10,000 miles before a dramatic stand-off in the Gulf of Guinea. Captain Peter Hammarstedt, from Sea Shepherd, tells Jo Fidgen about the dramatic chase and eventually watching the Thunder as it burned.

On-board recordings in this piece are from the documentary Ocean Warriors: Chasing the Thunder, courtesy of Brick City TV.

Photo: The Thunder surrounded by icebergs
Credit: Sea Shepherd


THU 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmn3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kd0tl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pys7q)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv52d2z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 13:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqv)
The power of food emojis

Do you give food emojis much thought? If not, perhaps you should. Emily Thomas hears how these tiny digital images can have a big social and economic impact. We reveal who decides which emojis are accepted and how you can propose your very own. Two Venezuelans living in the US explain why their brand new ‘flatbread emoji’ could be one the most significant achievements of their lives, and the emoji artist responsible for everything from the ‘dumpling’ to ‘bubble tea’ tells us why she sees her work as a calling, and how it has made her an unexpected cultural ambassador.

(Picture: selection of food emojis. Credit: Lumen Bigott/Yiying Lu/BBC)

Contributors:

Sebastian Delmont, software developer
Lumen Bigott, graphic designer
Yiying Lu, artist and entrepreneur

If you would like to get in touch with the show, please email thefoodchain@bbc.co.uk


THU 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kd4kq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z1nn22b69)
Pompeo in unprecedented visit to Israeli settlement in West Bank

Mike Pompeo has become the first US Secretary of State to visit a Jewish settlement in the occupied West Bank. We hear from a Palestinian whose family owns land in the settlement Mr Pompeo is visiting.

Also in the programme: The Afghan government has condemned as unforgivable Australia's finding that its troops unlawfully killed civilians and prisoners in Afghanistan; and the Scottish high school students praised for helping discover a new colony of emperor penguins!

(Photo: Mike Pompeo. Credit: EPA)


THU 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kd89v)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 15:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv52ml7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 15:32 World Business Report (w172xlw00mdrf4v)
Container shipping costs rise sharply

As a result of the pandemic, the cost of global shipping has risen sharply. Nate Herman from the American Apparel and Footwear Association represents some of the world's biggest brands in clothing and shoes, and discusses the potential impact on shoppers in the run-up to Christmas. And Peter Wilson, managing director of Cory Brothers, which has been arranging sea shipping for more than 170 years, tells us what's behind the recent price hikes. Also in the programme, the BBC's Laura Heighton-Ginns examines the growth of fake designer goods, or "dupes", which have become so readily available that they have generated a fashion trend of their own, and are being showcased by social media influencers. Plus, as the outcome of this year's Booker prize for fiction is announced, we ask Claire Armitstead, associate editor for culture at The Guardian, how much of an impact it can have on a winner's career.

(Picture: A container ship. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kdd1z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t408fyr3t)
Coronavirus conversations: New York school shutdown

The authorities in New York City have decided to close public schools once again after the city's coronavirus positivity rate rose above a 3% threshold. There's debate over whether it's the right thing to do, so we'll reflect some of the discussion with teachers and parents.

We'll also speak to our expert of the day on the pandemic, Dr Emma Hodcroft, who will answer more of the questions about the virus being sent to us from around the world. The Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine is the latest trial in the news, reportedly showing an "encouraging" immune response in older adults.

And we'll hear how Afghans are responding to the report which found "credible evidence" Australian elite soldiers unlawfully killed at least 39 people during the war in Afghanistan. We'll ask our BBC Afghan reporter how important it is for Afghans to see foreign forces hold their personnel to account.

Picture: School buses at the end of the school day in Brooklyn, New York, on Wednesday after the public school shutdown was announced. (EPA / JUSTIN LANE)


THU 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kdht3)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t408fyvvy)
Coronavirus conversations: The Oxford vaccine

We'll talk coronavirus vaccines with someone involved in the latest vaccine trial in the news. The Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine reportedly shows an "encouraging" immune response in older adults, although it's at an earlier stage than the other potential vaccines we've discussed recently.

All this week, we're catching up with health workers treating Covid-19 patients around the world. Today, we'll speak to a doctor in the Brazilian state of Pará, on the banks of the Amazon river.

We're expecting the outcome from the US state of Georgia of the statewide audit after a manual recount of five million presidential votes. With the help of a reporter there, we'll explain what it shows and reflect on how the state became the focus of the presidential and Senate elections in 2020.

Picture: Elisa Granato was one of the volunteers given the Oxford vaccine (BBC)


THU 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kdmk7)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 18:06 Outlook (w3cszdbs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


THU 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmn3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


THU 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kdr9c)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60pzhqh)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv533kr)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jw4bfqqrd)
2020/11/19 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


THU 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kdw1h)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 20:06 Assignment (w3csz6m1)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


THU 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv5379w)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 20:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1b)
Covid- 19 – Good news on immunity

Tests on patients for up to 8 months following their infection with SARS- CoV-2 suggests an immune response can persist. Alessandro Sette and Daniela Weiskopf at the La Jolla Institute in California are optimistic this could mean vaccines would also confer long lasting immunity.

An analysis of samples from Kenya’s blood banks by Sophie Uyoga at the KEMRI-Wellcome Research Programme reveals far more people in Kenya contracted the virus than was previously know. The figures mean Kenya has similar levels of infection to many European countries.

And a study of mosquitoes by Louis Lambrechts of the Pasteur Institute in Paris reveals why Zika, a virus originating in Africa is much more prevalent in other parts of the world.

We also look at the future of the Nile. Ethiopia is building a massive Dam which will have consequences for Sudan and Egypt who are reliant on the Nile’s waters says hydrologist Hisham Eldardiry from the University of Washington, Seattle.


(Image: Credit: Getty Images)

Presenter: Roland Pease
Producer: Julian Siddle


THU 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kdzsm)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z1nn235f6)
Pompeo makes unprecedented visits to Israeli settlement in West Bank and Golan

Israel's annexation of the Golan has not been recognised by the rest of the international community, and Syria demands the return of the territory. It called Mr Trump's declaration "a blatant attack on its sovereignty".

Also on the programme: In Australia, a long-awaited report into the actions of its military, as part of the international coalition against the Taliban, has said there's credible evidence that elite soldiers were responsible for the unlawful killing of thirty-nine Afghans; following violent protests in the Ugandan capital, and the arrest of opposition presidential candidate Bobi Wine, Newshour speaks to minister Betty Amongi in Kampala; and could sending fewer emails help save the planet?

(Picture: Pompeo visits Israeli-occupied West Bank and Golan Heights Credit: Patrick Semansky/via Reuters)


THU 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kf3jr)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79pr939kjl)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


THU 22:20 Sports News (w172x3flcf0zvhf)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


THU 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv53gt4)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58rn153tz2)
Container shipping costs rise sharply

As a result of the pandemic, the cost of global shipping has risen sharply. We speak to Lori Ann LaRocco, author of Trade War: Containers Don't Lie and Nate Herman from the American Apparel and Footwear Association discusses the potential impact on shoppers in the run-up to Christmas. Also in the programme, the BBC's Laura Heighton-Ginns examines the growth of fake designer goods, or "dupes", which have become so readily available that they have generated a fashion trend of their own, and are being showcased by social media influencers. Plus, as the outcome of this year's Booker prize for fiction is announced, we ask Claire Armitstead, associate editor for culture at The Guardian, how much of an impact it can have on a winner's career.

(Picture: A container ship. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


THU 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kf78w)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


THU 23:06 The Inquiry (w3cszl4d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


THU 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv53lk8)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


THU 23:32 The Food Chain (w3cszjqv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 13:32 today]



FRIDAY 20 NOVEMBER 2020

FRI 00:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kfc10)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 00:06 The Forum (w3cszjwc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:06 on Thursday]


FRI 00:50 Sporting Witness (w3cszh5v)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:50 on Thursday]


FRI 01:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kfgs4)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 01:06 Business Matters (w172x19342x6pw1)
China's Xi Jinping calls for global solidarity

China's President Xi Jinping has used a virtual Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit to call for global solidarity to build trade and defeat the pandemic. We get the latest from the BBC's Karishma Vaswani.

The US has passed the grim figure of a quarter of a million covid-19 deaths, as record case numbers continue to be recorded across the country. We hear from a doctor in New York and, in the southern hemisphere, the governor of South Australia, where a six day lockdown has been announced.

As a result of the pandemic, the cost of global shipping has risen sharply. We speak to Lori Ann LaRocco, author of Trade War: Containers Don't Lie and Nate Herman from the American Apparel and Footwear Association discusses the potential impact on shoppers in the run-up to Christmas.

The BBC's Laura Heighton-Ginns examines the growth of fake designer goods, which have become so readily available that they have generated a fashion trend of their own,. Plus, as the outcome of this year's Booker prize for fiction is announced, we ask Claire Armitstead, associate editor for culture at The Guardian, how much of an impact it can have on a winner's career.

All this and more discussed with our two guests throughout the show: Paddy Hirsch, contributing editor at National Public Radio, in Los Angeles. And Karen Percy, a former senior multi-platform journalist at the ABC, now working freelance, in Melbourne.

Picture:a giant screen showing China's President Xi Jinping's speech at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) virtual forum in Malaysia, outside a shopping mall in Beijing. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 02:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kflj8)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60q0byd)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 02:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv53ysn)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 02:32 World Football (w3cszth0)
Yannick Bolasie, The Gambia and winning in China

The DR Congo and Everton winger Yannick Bolasie talks about the frustration at not getting game time with his club, and the joy of being back playing for his country. Plus, the Gambia coach Tom Saintfiet discusses the chaos that came before their match against Gabon, as unhappy Gabonese players slept on an airport floor the night before the game.

Picture: Yannick Bolasie playing for Sporting CP against Vitria SC in 2019 (Paulo Nascimento / DPI / NurPhoto via Getty Images).


FRI 03:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kfq8d)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 03:06 Outlook (w3cszdbs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 on Thursday]


FRI 03:50 Witness History (w3cszmn3)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 on Thursday]


FRI 04:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kfv0j)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60q0lfn)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 04:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv5468x)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 04:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 05:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kfyrn)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 05:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg8273c)
Biden wins Georgia recount

The President-elect said Mr Trump knew he was not going to win and had shown "incredible irresponsibility".

The EndSars protesters have largely been chased off the streets of Nigeria - our correspondent reports on how the country has been changed.

And BTS are back - and have just released a new album. We'll hear from a woman helping Americans to understand the phenomenon that is K-pop.


FRI 06:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kg2hs)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 06:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg82bvh)
Biden: US is facing "dark winter" over Covid

Health officials have warned Americans not to travel or meet up with others outside their households ahead of the Thanksgiving holidays next week.

Meanwhile, the final election results are out for the US state of Georgia - following a hand recount there - confirming again for Mr Biden.

And Saudi Arabia hosts the G20 for the first time - the annual summit of the world's biggest economies - but it's all being done virtually because of Covid.


FRI 07:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kg67x)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 07:06 Newsday (w172x2wlbg82glm)
Biden: Trump showing "incredible irresponsibility" for not conceding defeat

A hand recount confirms the President-elect's victory in Georgia.

Mexico has become the fourth country in world to reach the grim milestone of a hundred thousand deaths from coronavirus.

And we go to Nigeria for a special report on the state of the country after the #EndSARS protests against police brutality.


FRI 08:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kgb01)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:06 HARDtalk (w3cszby8)
Pawel Jablonski: Why is Poland blocking the EU's budget?

The EU is facing an internal political crisis. Two members, Poland and Hungary, are blocking the passage of a new budget and a post-Covid recovery package, claiming it includes unacceptable conditions. At issue is the EU's ability to tie funds to members' adherence to core EU values, such as the rule of law. Stephen Sackur speaks to Pawel Jablonski, Poland's deputy foreign minister. Can Poland afford to defy Brussels' will?


FRI 08:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv54p8f)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 08:32 Business Daily (w3csz798)
How Africa's economies are withstanding Coronavirus

Many African countries have been praised for waging effective campaigns against coronavirus, and the region has a relatively low case count compared to Europe and the US. African economies have likewise been hit less hard, and Amandla Ooko-Ombaka of McKinsey and Company explains how a mix of a youthful population, hot climate and swift government response helped many of these economies stay resilient. But Lisa Owino, of the Kenyan human rights organisation KELIN, says in some cases government intervention over-stepped and was overly punitive to ordinary people. And Tosin Eniolorunda, founder & Chief Executive of Nigerian financial services company TeamApt says digital finance tools helped people maintain social distancing while conducting business.

(Picture: Kenyans walk past a mural about the Coronavirus in Nairobi. Picture credit: Getty Images)


FRI 08:50 Witness History (w3cszmvw)
When the Egyptian president went to Israel

In 1977, Anwar Sadat became the first Egyptian president to visit Israel and address the Israeli parliament the Knesset. At the time, Egypt was still formally at war with Israel - a country which no Arab nation then recognised. Sadat's visit led to a formal peace treaty between the two countries. Louise Hidalgo spoke to the Egyptian cameraman, Mohamed Gohar who knew Sadat.

PHOTO: Sadat addressing the Knesset (AFP/Getty Images)


FRI 09:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kgfr5)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpn)
Electric cars in the fast lane

The UK government says new petrol and diesel-powered cars will be banned by 2030. Will developments in battery tech deliver electric vehicles for the mass-market? Plus how Kenya is looking to wind energy to bring cleaner power to off-grid communities. And has the pandemic permanently changed how we look at screen-time? Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech reporter Jane Wakefield. Produced by Jat Gill.

(Image: Electric Mini Cooper charging on a central London street, Credit: BBC).


FRI 09:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv54t0k)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 09:32 World Football (w3cszth0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]


FRI 10:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kgkh9)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 10:06 The Real Story (w3cszcnw)
Ethiopia Crisis: High stakes for Africa

The fighting between Ethiopian federal troops and regional forces in Tigray has forced thousands of people to flee to Sudan for safety. The UN has warned of a full-scale humanitarian crisis. Ethiopia's Nobel Peace Prize winning prime minister, Abiy Ahmed, says there will be no let-up in his government's 'law enforcement' mission. His aim is to arrest and put on trial TPLF party politicians who he alleges have put the country's constitution in danger. Ethiopia plays a key role in maintaining security in the Horn of Africa. With a population of more than 110 million, and one of the fastest growing economies on the continent, what happens in Ethiopia will inevitably have a wider regional impact. So how did the TPLF - a group which once dominated Ethiopian politics - end up being accused of destroying national unity? Did PM Ahmed opt for a military confrontation before all avenues for negotiation were explored? And what role should Ethiopia's neighbours play in this conflict? Ritula Shah is joined by a panel of experts.


FRI 11:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kgp7f)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60q1fnk)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 11:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv551ht)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 11:32 Science in Action (w3cszh1b)
[Repeat of broadcast at 20:32 on Thursday]


FRI 12:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kgszk)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 12:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj0)
Explaining Tigray

The crisis in the Tigray region of Ethiopia has continued to intensify, but what are the repercussions for ordinary Tigrayans? Hana Zeratsyon of BBC Tigrinya tells us how the conflict is affecting her friends and family back home. And where did the tensions begin? The BBC's Emmanuel Igunza, who was based in Addis Ababa for many years, explains.

Keeping a precious text alive
La Galigo is an ancient text which tells the creation story of the Bugis people of South Sulawesi in Indonesia, and is described by UNESCO as the most voluminous literary work in the world. Very few people understand the archaic language it's written in. Callistasia Wiyaya of BBC Indonesian has been hearing about efforts to keep La Galigo alive.

It started with a film poster…
A planned film about the life of Sri Lankan cricketing legend Muttiah Muralitharan has led to a huge backlash in south India, causing the lead actor to quit. The BBC’s Nalini Sivathasan explains the controversy around the film.

Learning English to survive: North Korean refugees in South Korea
North Korean refugees in South Korea at least share the same language as their host country. Or do they? BBC Korean’s Julie Yoonnyung Lee has been finding out how poor English skills can damage their chances in a society pervaded by English in education, culture and business.





Image: Ethiopian refugees who fled fighting in Tigray province
Credit: ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP via Getty Images


FRI 12:50 Witness History (w3cszmvw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 13:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kgxqp)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60q1p4t)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 13:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv55902)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 13:32 Heart and Soul (w3ct1cgq)
Converts amongst the conflict in Belarus

Protests against the Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko have carried on for months. 80% of the country calls themselves Orthodox Christian. The church has stood squarely behind their President but not all of the faithful agree with them. Alina Isachenka is from Belarus and speaks to some of the Orthodox worshippers who have converted and become Catholic. The church has become a symbol of resistance and a haven for reformers. Why have these converts stepped away from the official church and how big a decision was it to leave the church that’s been in their blood for generations?

Alina meets the converts and clergy who have switched their allegiance to a church they once saw as an enemy
The Catholic Church has become the conscience of the anti-Lukashenko movement; Alina speaks to the symbolic head of the churches resistance, now exiled in Poland, Archbishop Tadeush Kondrusevich about how Catholic churches have opened their doors, literally in many cases, to Orthodox church goers.

Presenter Alina Isachenka

(Photo: Women form a human chain outside the Catholic Church of Saints Simon and Helena to protest against police violence during opposition rallies against the 2020 presidential election results in Minsk. Credit: Sergei Gapon/AFP/Getty Images)


FRI 14:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kh1gt)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 14:06 Newshour (w172x2z1nn2573d)
Biden: Trump's refusal to accept the election result "totally irresponsible"

The US president-elect Joe Biden has said Donald Trump will go down as one of the most irresponsible presidents in American history. Mr Biden said Mr Trump's refusal to accept defeat in the election sent "a horrible message" about America as a country. The comments from the president- elect came as he was confirmed as victor in Georgia, after ballots were recounted in the state.

As the G20 summit gets underway in Saudi Arabia, we hear two very different perspectives on women's rights in the kingdom.

And the 75th anniversary of the Nuremberg trials.

(Photo: Joe Biden. Credit: Getty Images)


FRI 15:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kh56y)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:06 HARDtalk (w3cszby8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 15:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv55jhb)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 15:32 World Business Report (w172xltc456gq6c)
What next for the Trump brand?

We ask what Donald Trump will do next, and consider the future of the Trump brand. Dan Alexander is a writer with Forbes magazine, and explains how Mr Trump built his business empire. Robert Maguire of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington discusses what his organisation claims are more than 3,500 conflicts of interest for the president since he took office. Nancy Wallace, professor of real estate finance at the Haas Business School in California tells us loans worth more than $480m will come due for Mr Trump in the next four years. And Colm O'Callaghan, former vice-president of Trump International Hotels, suggests a role at the centre of a new television network may be a likely next step for Donald Trump. Also in the programme, as the International Maritime Organisation introduces more stringent targets by 2030 for the carbon footprint of sea freight, Guy Platten, secretary general of the International Chamber of Shipping considers the potential impact of the move. Plus, as haircare brand Garnier unveils a hair shampoo that doesn't come in a plastic bottle, instead working like a bar of soap, Adrien Koskas, global brand president for the firm, explains the thinking behind the launch.

(Picture: Trump International Hotel Las Vegas. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 16:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kh8z2)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 16:06 BBC OS (w172x2t408g1n0x)
Uganda: Bobi Wine released from custody

Ugandan presidential candidate and opposition politician Bobi Wine has been released on bail after being charged with spreading coronavirus. He was arrested at an election rally accused of violating coronavirus prevention guidelines. At least 37 people died in subsequent protests. We speak to young Ugandans who have been taking part in the protests.

Also, we hear a conversation from Japan about the coronavirus and the Olympics. With Covid cases on the rise again, how do people feel about the prospect of the postponed Olympic Games happening there next July?

And every day we invite a health expert on to help us understand the latest news about coronavirus and to answer audience questions. Today, we will be joined by Dr Megan Murray, a professor of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard University

(Photo: Ugandan presidential candidate Robert Kyagulanyi also known as Bobi Wine is seen inside the courtroom in Iganga, eastern Uganda, November 20, 2020. Credit: Reuters/Abubaker Lubowa)


FRI 17:00 BBC News (w172x5p563khdq6)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 17:06 BBC OS (w172x2t408g1rs1)
Coronavirus conversations: Japan and the Olympics

The head of the International Olympics Committee has said he is "very confident" that spectators will be able to attend the Tokyo Olympic Games next year but coronavirus cases are currently on the rise in the country for the third time. We'll hear from three people in Japan about how attitudes towards the virus differ between city and rural areas, and how they feel the prospect of the Olympics happening there next July.

Also, US President Donald Trump has invited senior Republicans from Michigan to meet him in Washington, as he continues legal efforts to challenge his defeat in the presidential election. We’ll speak to reporters in Michigan and Washington DC to explain what Trump's latest move tells us about his changing approach to the election result.

And, we are returning to frontline health workers around the world to hear how they have been coping throughout the pandemic. Today we go to India, which has the second highest number of Covid-19 cases in the world. We'll hear from a doctor who has been working in a hospital in the capital Delhi.

(Photo: Olympic rings with the Japanese national flag at the Japan Olympic Museum in Tokyo, Japan, 29 June 2020. Credit: European Photopress Agency)


FRI 18:00 BBC News (w172x5p563khjgb)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 18:06 The Fifth Floor (w3cszjj0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:06 today]


FRI 18:50 Witness History (w3cszmvw)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:50 today]


FRI 19:00 BBC News (w172x5p563khn6g)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:06 The Newsroom (w172x7bj60q2dml)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 19:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv560gv)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 19:32 Sport Today (w172x3jw4bftmnh)
2020/11/20 GMT

BBC sports correspondents tell the story behind today's top sporting news, with interviews and reports from across the world.


FRI 20:00 BBC News (w172x5p563khryl)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:06 Tech Tent (w3cszhpn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:06 today]


FRI 20:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv5646z)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 20:32 CrowdScience (w3cszv6n)
How does a breeze become a gale?

Every year, Western Afghanistan is hit with a fierce 120-day wind, and listener Hamid wants to know what causes this phenomenon? He’s from the city of Herat, where what starts as a gentle breeze in the morning can pick up to become a dangerous gale just a few hours later, devastating buildings and causing power outages.

The BBC’s Abdullah Elham in Kabul tells us the country has plenty of other ‘friendly’ wind but this one is considered ‘fierce’. CrowdScience talks to Professor Amir Aghakouchak to discover more about the phenomenon, and learns about the pollution problems Herat’s summer storm causes in neighbouring Iran. But it’s not all bad news. Professor Lorraine Remer explains how NASA used satellites to map how wind transport Saharan sand almost half way round the world, fertilising the Amazon rainforest.

Presented by Marnie Chesterton and produced by Marijke Peters for the BBC World Service

[Photo: Tree in wind in desert. Credit: Getty Images]


FRI 21:00 BBC News (w172x5p563khwpq)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 21:06 Newshour (w172x2z1nn262b9)
Interviews, news and analysis of the day’s global events.


FRI 22:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kj0fv)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:06 The Newsroom (w172x79pr93dgfp)
The world's Newsroom brings you global events as they happen


FRI 22:20 Sports News (w172x3flcf12rdj)
BBC Sport brings you all the latest stories and results from around the world.


FRI 22:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv56cq7)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 22:32 World Business Report (w172x58rn156qw5)
What next for the Trump brand?

We ask what Donald Trump will do next, and consider the future of the Trump brand. Dan Alexander is a writer with Forbes magazine, and explains how Mr Trump built his business empire. Robert Maguire of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington discusses what his organisation claims are more than 3,500 conflicts of interest for the president since he took office. Nancy Wallace, professor of real estate finance at the Haas Business School in California tells us loans worth more than $480m will come due for Mr Trump in the next four years. And Colm O'Callaghan, former vice-president of Trump International Hotels, suggests a role at the centre of a new television network may be a likely next step for Donald Trump. Also in the programme, as the International Maritime Organisation introduces more stringent targets by 2030 for the carbon footprint of sea freight, Guy Platten, secretary general of the International Chamber of Shipping considers the potential impact of the move. Plus, as haircare brand Garnier unveils a hair shampoo that doesn't come in a plastic bottle, instead working like a bar of soap, Adrien Koskas, global brand president for the firm, explains the thinking behind the launch.

(Picture: Trump International Hotel Las Vegas. Picture credit: Getty Images.)


FRI 23:00 BBC News (w172x5p563kj45z)
The latest five minute news bulletin from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:06 HARDtalk (w3cszby8)
[Repeat of broadcast at 08:06 today]


FRI 23:30 BBC News Summary (w172x5pzmv56hgc)
The latest two minute news summary from BBC World Service.


FRI 23:32 World Football (w3cszth0)
[Repeat of broadcast at 02:32 today]




LIST OF THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES
(Note: the times link back to the details; the pids link to the BBC page, including iPlayer)

Assignment 02:32 THU (w3csz6m1)

Assignment 09:06 THU (w3csz6m1)

Assignment 20:06 THU (w3csz6m1)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SAT (w172x5pz8kvfq2x)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SAT (w172x5pz8kvg2b9)

BBC News Summary 08:30 SAT (w172x5pz8kvgfkp)

BBC News Summary 09:30 SAT (w172x5pz8kvgk9t)

BBC News Summary 11:30 SAT (w172x5pz8kvgst2)

BBC News Summary 18:30 SAT (w172x5pz8kvhn0z)

BBC News Summary 22:30 SAT (w172x5pz8kvj40h)

BBC News Summary 00:30 SUN (w172x5pz8kvjchr)

BBC News Summary 02:30 SUN (w172x5pz8kvjm00)

BBC News Summary 04:30 SUN (w172x5pz8kvjvh8)

BBC News Summary 05:30 SUN (w172x5pz8kvjz7d)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 SUN (w172x5pz8kvlnp6)

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BBC News Summary 23:30 SUN (w172x5pz8kvm4nq)

BBC News Summary 00:30 MON (w172x5pzmv4r3p0)

BBC News Summary 01:30 MON (w172x5pzmv4r7f4)

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BBC News Summary 04:30 MON (w172x5pzmv4rlnj)

BBC News Summary 08:30 MON (w172x5pzmv4s2n1)

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BBC News Summary 19:30 MON (w172x5pzmv4tdvg)

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BBC News Summary 22:30 MON (w172x5pzmv4ts2v)

BBC News Summary 23:30 MON (w172x5pzmv4twtz)

BBC News Summary 02:30 TUE (w172x5pzmv4v82c)

BBC News Summary 04:30 TUE (w172x5pzmv4vhkm)

BBC News Summary 08:30 TUE (w172x5pzmv4vzk4)

BBC News Summary 09:30 TUE (w172x5pzmv4w398)

BBC News Summary 11:30 TUE (w172x5pzmv4wbsj)

BBC News Summary 13:30 TUE (w172x5pzmv4wl8s)

BBC News Summary 15:30 TUE (w172x5pzmv4wts1)

BBC News Summary 19:30 TUE (w172x5pzmv4x9rk)

BBC News Summary 20:30 TUE (w172x5pzmv4xfhp)

BBC News Summary 22:30 TUE (w172x5pzmv4xnzy)

BBC News Summary 23:30 TUE (w172x5pzmv4xsr2)

BBC News Summary 02:30 WED (w172x5pzmv4y4zg)

BBC News Summary 04:30 WED (w172x5pzmv4ydgq)

BBC News Summary 08:30 WED (w172x5pzmv4ywg7)

BBC News Summary 09:30 WED (w172x5pzmv4z06c)

BBC News Summary 11:30 WED (w172x5pzmv4z7pm)

BBC News Summary 13:30 WED (w172x5pzmv4zh5w)

BBC News Summary 15:30 WED (w172x5pzmv4zqp4)

BBC News Summary 19:30 WED (w172x5pzmv506nn)

BBC News Summary 20:30 WED (w172x5pzmv50bds)

BBC News Summary 22:30 WED (w172x5pzmv50kx1)

BBC News Summary 23:30 WED (w172x5pzmv50pn5)

BBC News Summary 02:30 THU (w172x5pzmv511wk)

BBC News Summary 04:30 THU (w172x5pzmv519ct)

BBC News Summary 08:30 THU (w172x5pzmv51scb)

BBC News Summary 09:30 THU (w172x5pzmv51x3g)

BBC News Summary 11:30 THU (w172x5pzmv524lq)

BBC News Summary 13:30 THU (w172x5pzmv52d2z)

BBC News Summary 15:30 THU (w172x5pzmv52ml7)

BBC News Summary 19:30 THU (w172x5pzmv533kr)

BBC News Summary 20:30 THU (w172x5pzmv5379w)

BBC News Summary 22:30 THU (w172x5pzmv53gt4)

BBC News Summary 23:30 THU (w172x5pzmv53lk8)

BBC News Summary 02:30 FRI (w172x5pzmv53ysn)

BBC News Summary 04:30 FRI (w172x5pzmv5468x)

BBC News Summary 08:30 FRI (w172x5pzmv54p8f)

BBC News Summary 09:30 FRI (w172x5pzmv54t0k)

BBC News Summary 11:30 FRI (w172x5pzmv551ht)

BBC News Summary 13:30 FRI (w172x5pzmv55902)

BBC News Summary 15:30 FRI (w172x5pzmv55jhb)

BBC News Summary 19:30 FRI (w172x5pzmv560gv)

BBC News Summary 20:30 FRI (w172x5pzmv5646z)

BBC News Summary 22:30 FRI (w172x5pzmv56cq7)

BBC News Summary 23:30 FRI (w172x5pzmv56hgc)

BBC News 00:00 SAT (w172x5p4tv7r3b8)

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BBC News 11:00 SAT (w172x5p4tv7sfjp)

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BBC News 18:00 SAT (w172x5p4tv7t8rl)

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BBC News 22:00 SAT (w172x5p4tv7trr3)

BBC News 23:00 SAT (w172x5p4tv7twh7)

BBC News 00:00 SUN (w172x5p4tv7v07c)

BBC News 01:00 SUN (w172x5p4tv7v3zh)

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BBC News 09:00 SUN (w172x5p4tv7w2yj)

BBC News 10:00 SUN (w172x5p4tv7w6pn)

BBC News 11:00 SUN (w172x5p4tv7wbfs)

BBC News 12:00 SUN (w172x5p4tv7wg5x)

BBC News 13:00 SUN (w172x5p4tv7wky1)

BBC News 14:00 SUN (w172x5p4tv7wpp5)

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BBC News 16:00 SUN (w172x5p4tv7wy5f)

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BBC News 21:00 SUN (w172x5p4tv7xjx2)

BBC News 22:00 SUN (w172x5p4tv7xnn6)

BBC News 23:00 SUN (w172x5p4tv7xsdb)

BBC News 00:00 MON (w172x5p563k1rdm)

BBC News 01:00 MON (w172x5p563k1w4r)

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BBC News 06:00 MON (w172x5p563k2gwd)

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BBC News 08:00 MON (w172x5p563k2qcn)

BBC News 09:00 MON (w172x5p563k2v3s)

BBC News 10:00 MON (w172x5p563k2yvx)

BBC News 11:00 MON (w172x5p563k32m1)

BBC News 12:00 MON (w172x5p563k36c5)

BBC News 13:00 MON (w172x5p563k3b39)

BBC News 14:00 MON (w172x5p563k3fvf)

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BBC News 19:00 MON (w172x5p563k41l2)

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BBC News 23:00 MON (w172x5p563k4jkl)

BBC News 00:00 TUE (w172x5p563k4n9q)

BBC News 01:00 TUE (w172x5p563k4s1v)

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BBC News 09:00 TUE (w172x5p563k5r0w)

BBC News 10:00 TUE (w172x5p563k5vs0)

BBC News 11:00 TUE (w172x5p563k5zj4)

BBC News 12:00 TUE (w172x5p563k6388)

BBC News 13:00 TUE (w172x5p563k670d)

BBC News 14:00 TUE (w172x5p563k6brj)

BBC News 15:00 TUE (w172x5p563k6ghn)

BBC News 16:00 TUE (w172x5p563k6l7s)

BBC News 17:00 TUE (w172x5p563k6pzx)

BBC News 18:00 TUE (w172x5p563k6tr1)

BBC News 19:00 TUE (w172x5p563k6yh5)

BBC News 20:00 TUE (w172x5p563k7279)

BBC News 21:00 TUE (w172x5p563k75zf)

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BBC News 23:00 TUE (w172x5p563k7fgp)

BBC News 00:00 WED (w172x5p563k7k6t)

BBC News 01:00 WED (w172x5p563k7nyy)

BBC News 02:00 WED (w172x5p563k7sq2)

BBC News 03:00 WED (w172x5p563k7xg6)

BBC News 04:00 WED (w172x5p563k816b)

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BBC News 06:00 WED (w172x5p563k88pl)

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BBC News 11:00 WED (w172x5p563k8wf7)

BBC News 12:00 WED (w172x5p563k905c)

BBC News 13:00 WED (w172x5p563k93xh)

BBC News 14:00 WED (w172x5p563k97nm)

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BBC News 16:00 WED (w172x5p563k9h4w)

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BBC News 18:00 WED (w172x5p563k9qn4)

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BBC News 21:00 WED (w172x5p563kb2wj)

BBC News 22:00 WED (w172x5p563kb6mn)

BBC News 23:00 WED (w172x5p563kbbcs)

BBC News 00:00 THU (w172x5p563kbg3x)

BBC News 01:00 THU (w172x5p563kbkw1)

BBC News 02:00 THU (w172x5p563kbpm5)

BBC News 03:00 THU (w172x5p563kbtc9)

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BBC News 16:00 THU (w172x5p563kdd1z)

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BBC News 18:00 THU (w172x5p563kdmk7)

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BBC News 00:00 FRI (w172x5p563kfc10)

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BBC News 23:00 FRI (w172x5p563kj45z)

BBC OS Conversations 09:06 SAT (w3ct19yv)

BBC OS Conversations 00:06 MON (w3ct19yv)

BBC OS 16:06 MON (w172x2t408fp1dj)

BBC OS 17:06 MON (w172x2t408fp54n)

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BBC OS 17:06 WED (w172x2t408fvyyv)

BBC OS 16:06 THU (w172x2t408fyr3t)

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BBC OS 16:06 FRI (w172x2t408g1n0x)

BBC OS 17:06 FRI (w172x2t408g1rs1)

Business Daily 08:32 MON (w3csz7k8)

Business Daily 08:32 TUE (w3csz8b9)

Business Daily 08:32 WED (w3csz8nl)

Business Daily 08:32 THU (w3csz7y2)

Business Daily 08:32 FRI (w3csz798)

Business Matters 01:06 SAT (w172x192rtljg59)

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Business Matters 01:06 THU (w172x19342x3syy)

Business Matters 01:06 FRI (w172x19342x6pw1)

Business Weekly 23:06 SAT (w3ct0sph)

CrowdScience 08:32 SUN (w3cszv6m)

CrowdScience 04:32 MON (w3cszv6m)

CrowdScience 11:32 MON (w3cszv6m)

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Digital Planet 20:32 TUE (w3csz98x)

Digital Planet 04:32 WED (w3csz98x)

Digital Planet 11:32 WED (w3csz98x)

Discovery 00:32 MON (w3csz9fd)

Discovery 20:32 MON (w3csz9ff)

Discovery 04:32 TUE (w3csz9ff)

Discovery 11:32 TUE (w3csz9ff)

From Our Own Correspondent 04:06 SUN (w3csz9qf)

From Our Own Correspondent 09:06 SUN (w3csz9qf)

From Our Own Correspondent 23:06 SUN (w3csz9qf)

Girl Taken 09:32 SAT (w3ct0xw9)

Girl Taken 04:32 SUN (w3ct0xw9)

Girl Taken 23:32 SUN (w3ct0xw9)

HARDtalk 08:06 MON (w3cszc2s)

HARDtalk 15:06 MON (w3cszc2s)

HARDtalk 23:06 MON (w3cszc2s)

HARDtalk 08:06 WED (w3cszc79)

HARDtalk 15:06 WED (w3cszc79)

HARDtalk 23:06 WED (w3cszc79)

HARDtalk 08:06 FRI (w3cszby8)

HARDtalk 15:06 FRI (w3cszby8)

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Over to You 09:50 SAT (w3cszf57)

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World Football 02:32 FRI (w3cszth0)

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